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Sample records for advanced electron cyclotron

  1. Investigation of relativistic runaway electrons in electron cyclotron resonance heating discharges on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C. S.; Lee, S. G.

    2014-07-15

    The behavior of relativistic runaway electrons during Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) discharges is investigated in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research device. The effect of the ECRH on the runaway electron population is discussed. Observations on the generation of superthermal electrons during ECRH will be reported, which will be shown to be consistent with existing theory for the development of a superthermal electron avalanche during ECRH [A. Lazaros, Phys. Plasmas 8, 1263 (2001)].

  2. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Ban, G.; Celona, L.; Lunney, D.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O.; Kalvas, T.; and others

    2012-02-15

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  3. Initial high-power testing of the ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) ECH (electron cyclotron heating) system

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a moderate aspect ratio torsatron that will utilize 53.2 GHz 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) to produce nearly current-free target plasmas suitable for subsequent heating by strong neutral beam injection. The initial configuration of the ECH system from the gyrotron to ATF consists of an optical arc detector, three bellows, a waveguide mode analyzer, two TiO/sub 2/ mode absorbers, two 90/sup 0/ miter bends, two waveguide pumpouts, an insulating break, a gate valve, and miscellaneous straight waveguide sections feeding a launcher radiating in the TE/sub 02/ mode. Later, a focusing Vlasov launcher will be added to beam the ECH power to the saddle point in ATF magnetic geometry for optimum power deposition. The ECH system has several unique features; namely, the entire ECH system is evacuated, the ECH system is broadband, forward power is monitored by a newly developed waveguide mode analyzer, phase correcting miter bends will be employed, and the ECH system will be capable of operating short pulse to cw. Initial high-power tests show that the overall system efficiency is 87%. The waveguide mode analyzer shows that the gyrotron mode output consists of 13% TE/sub 01/, 82.6% TE/sub 02/, 2.5% TE/sub 03/, and 1.9% TE/sub 04/. 4 refs.

  4. Advancements in electron cyclotron emission imaging demonstrated by the TEXTOR ECEI diagnostic upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, B.; Kong, X.; Liang, T.; Spear, A.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Pol, M. J. van de; Jaspers, R.; Donne, A. J. H.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2009-09-15

    A new TEXTOR electron cyclotron emission imaging system has been developed and employed, providing a diagnostic with new features and enhanced capabilities when compared to the legacy system it replaces. Optical coupling to the plasma has been completely redesigned, making use of new minilens arrays for reduced optical aberration and providing the new feature of vertical zoom, whereby the vertical coverage is now remotely adjustable on a shot-by-shot basis from 20-35 cm. Other innovations, such as the implementation of stacked quasioptical planar notch filters, allow for the diagnostic to be operated without interruption or degradation in performance during electron cyclotron resonance heating. Successful commissioning of the new diagnostic and a demonstration of the improved capabilities are presented in this paper, along with a discussion of the new technologies employed.

  5. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  6. Advanced Techniques for Neoclassical Tearing Mode Control by Electron Cyclotron Current Drive in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F.

    2008-11-01

    Novel techniques have been developed in DIII-D for (1) control of rapidly rotating neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and (2) control of NTMs that have locked to a residual error field or the resistive wall. Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been successful at suppression of NTMs in present tokamaks, but will face new challenges in ITER where NTMs are expected to be more prone to locking. In order to avoid locking, rotating islands must be controlled at small widths that are expected to be narrower than the ECCD deposition. Under these conditions, modulated ECCD is predicted to stabilize more efficiently than continuous current drive. (1) A new technique developed at DIII-D detects the island using oblique electron cyclotron emission with a line of sight equivalent to that of the ECCD. This removes much of the uncertainty in mapping the island structure from the detector to the current drive location. This method was used both to measure the radial alignment between ECCD and the island, and to synchronize the modulation in phase with the island O-point, successfully stabilizing an NTM with mode numbers m/n=3/2. (2) If islands do grow large enough to lock, locked mode control will be necessary for recovery or avoiding disruption in ITER. A potential difficulty associated with locking is that the mode can lock in a position not necessarily accessible to ECCD. To obviate this problem, magnetic perturbations were used for the first time to unlock and reposition a locked m/n=2/1 mode in order to bring it in view of the gyrotron beam, leading to a significant reduction in island size. Once unlocked, magnetic perturbations were also used to sustain and control the mode rotation, which has the potential for easier ECCD modulation

  7. EC-5 fifth international workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Lohr, J.

    1985-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: electron cyclotron emission measurements; electron cyclotron emission theory; electron cyclotron heating; gyrotron development; and ECH systems and waveguide development. These paper have been indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  8. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  9. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Han, X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-07-15

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104–168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ∼500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented.

  10. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M.; Kogi, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Mase, A.

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  11. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos.

    PubMed

    Rácz, R; Biri, S; Pálinkás, J

    2010-02-01

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  12. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  13. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-06-25

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code"POSINST" was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ~;;(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed.

  14. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2012-12-01

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  15. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2012-12-15

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  16. Imaging Cyclotron Orbits of Electrons in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Sagar; Lee, Gil-Ho; Klales, Anna; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Heller, Eric; Kim, Philip; Westervelt, Robert M

    2016-03-09

    Electrons in graphene can travel for several microns without scattering at low temperatures, and their motion becomes ballistic, following classical trajectories. When a magnetic field B is applied perpendicular to the plane, electrons follow cyclotron orbits. Magnetic focusing occurs when electrons injected from one narrow contact focus onto a second contact located an integer number of cyclotron diameters away. By tuning the magnetic field B and electron density n in the graphene layer, we observe magnetic focusing peaks. We use a cooled scanning gate microscope to image cyclotron trajectories in graphene at 4.2 K. The tip creates a local change in density that casts a shadow by deflecting electrons flowing nearby; an image of flow can be obtained by measuring the transmission between contacts as the tip is raster scanned across the sample. On the first magnetic focusing peak, we image a cyclotron orbit that extends from one contact to the other. In addition, we study the geometry of orbits deflected into the second point contact by the tip.

  17. Currents driven by electron cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the generation of steady-state currents by electron cyclotron waves are explored. A numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation is used to verify the theory of Fisch and Boozer and to extend their results into the nonlinear regime. Relativistic effects on the current generated are discussed. Applications to steady-state tokamak reactors are considered.

  18. Electron cyclotron heating in TMX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    TMX-Upgrade, an improved tandem mirror experiment under construction at LLNL, will use electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) to create thermal barriers and to increase the center cell ion confining potential. Gyrotron oscillators (200 kW, 28 GHz) supply the heating power for the potential confined electron (fundamental heating) and the mirror-confined electrons (harmonic heating) in the thermal barriers. Important issues are temperature limitation and microstability for the hot electrons. Off-midplane heating can control anisotropy-driven microstability. Spacially restricting heating offers the possibility of temperature control by limiting the energy for resonant interaction.

  19. Radiation Sources at Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Frequencies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-28

    KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side it necesear and Identify by block number) Radiation source, electron cyclotron frequency, gyrotron, travelling ...investigation of gyrotron devices operating in cylindrical geometry. Specific topics include an analysis of oscillations in a gyrotron travelling wave...amplifier, the study of the effects of velocity spread and wall resistivity on gain and bandwidth in a gyrotron travell - ing wave amplifier, an

  20. Electron Cyclotron Heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Petty, C.C.

    2005-10-15

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) has proved to be a very flexible system for heating applications in DIII-D. The outstanding characteristics of ECH - controllable heating location, a high degree of localization of the power, ability to heat without introducing particles, and ability to heat only the electron fluid - have been used in a wide variety of experiments to study wave physics and transport, to control magnetohydrodynamic activity, and to improve discharges. These characteristics along with relatively easy coupling to the plasma make ECH a valuable resource for both heating and instability control in burning plasmas.

  1. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L. F.

    2009-04-29

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.

  2. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C M; Furman, M A; Vay, J L; Grote, D P; Ng, J T; Pivi, M F; Wang, L F

    2009-05-05

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l{sub b} << 2{pi}{omega}{sub c}, (l{sub b} = bunch duration, {omega}{sub c} = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor {approx} 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed.

  3. Advanced light ion source extraction system for a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source geometry at Saclay.

    PubMed

    Delferrière, O; Gobin, R; Harrault, F; Nyckees, S; Sauce, Y; Tuske, O

    2012-02-01

    One of the main goal of intense light ion injector projects such as IPHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2, is to produce high current beams while keeping transverse emittance as low as possible. To prevent emittance growth induced in a dual solenoid low energy transfer line, its length has to be minimized. This can be performed with the advanced light ion source extraction system concept that we are developing: a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source based on the use of an additional low energy beam transport (LEBT) short length solenoid close to the extraction aperture to create the resonance in the plasma chamber. The geometry of the source has been considerably modified to allow easy maintenance of each component and to save space in front of the extraction. The source aims to be very flexible and to be able to extract high current ion beams at energy up to 100 kV. A specific experimental setup for this source is under installation on the BETSI test bench, to compare its performances with sources developed up to now in the laboratory, such as SILHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2 ECR sources. This original extraction source concept is presented, as well as electromagnetic simulations with OPERA-2D code. Ion beam extraction in space charge compensation regime with AXCEL, and beam dynamics simulation with SOLMAXP codes show the beam quality improvement at the end of the LEBT.

  4. Advanced light ion source extraction system for a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source geometry at Saclaya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Nyckees, S.; Sauce, Y.; Tuske, O.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main goal of intense light ion injector projects such as IPHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2, is to produce high current beams while keeping transverse emittance as low as possible. To prevent emittance growth induced in a dual solenoid low energy transfer line, its length has to be minimized. This can be performed with the advanced light ion source extraction system concept that we are developing: a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source based on the use of an additional low energy beam transport (LEBT) short length solenoid close to the extraction aperture to create the resonance in the plasma chamber. The geometry of the source has been considerably modified to allow easy maintenance of each component and to save space in front of the extraction. The source aims to be very flexible and to be able to extract high current ion beams at energy up to 100 kV. A specific experimental setup for this source is under installation on the BETSI test bench, to compare its performances with sources developed up to now in the laboratory, such as SILHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2 ECR sources. This original extraction source concept is presented, as well as electromagnetic simulations with OPERA-2D code. Ion beam extraction in space charge compensation regime with AXCEL, and beam dynamics simulation with SOLMAXP codes show the beam quality improvement at the end of the LEBT.

  5. Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Richard; Austin, Max; Phillips, Perry; Rowan, William; Beno, Joseph; Auroua, Abelhamid; Feder, Russell; Patel, Ashish; Hubbard, Amanda; Pandya, Hitesh

    2010-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) will be employed on ITER to measure the radial profile of electron temperature and non thermal features of the electron distribution as well as measurements of ELMs, magnetic islands, high frequency instabilities, and turbulence. There are two quasioptical systems, designed with Gaussian beam analysis. One view is radial, primarily for temperature profile measurement, the other views at a small angle to radial for measuring non-thermal emission. Radiation is conducted to by a long corrugated waveguide to a multichannel Michelson interferometer which provides wide wavelength coverage but limited time response as well as two microwave radiometers which cover the fundamental and second harmonic ECE and provide excellent time response. Measurements will be made in both X and O mode. In-situ calibration is provided by a novel hot calibration source. We discuss spatial resolution and the implications for physics studies.

  6. Two Dimensional Synthetic Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Valeo, Ernest J.; Tobias, Benjamin J.; Kramer, Gerrit J.; Liu, Chang; Tang, William M.

    2016-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) has been widely used as a measurement of the electron temperature profile in magnetically confined plasmas. The ECE Imaging (ECEI) system provides additional vertical resolutions, and is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations. The vertical resolution is typically a few centi-meters which is sometimes comparable to the vertical wave length of the underlying fluctuations. The ray-tracing technique used in most synthetic ECE codes to determine the origin and spatial extent of the ECE radiations is not accurate when the refraction and diffraction due to the fluctuations are important. In this presentation, we introduce a new synthetic ECEI code which solves the wave propagation up to the 2nd order of the WKB approximation, and provides full 2D information of the ECE source. We'll show that when the ECE frequency is near the cutoff, the refraction due to the fluctuations is important. A ``trapping'' of the ECE source by the density fluctuations is identified, and is potentially useful for determining the cross phase between electron temperature and density fluctuations. The new formalism is also used to study the Runaway Electrons contribution to the ECE signal, and provides insights to the measured ECE spectrum on DIII-D. This work has been funded by the US Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. A simple electron cyclotron resonance ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Moran, T. F.; Feeney, R. K.; Thomas, E. W.

    1996-04-01

    A simple, all permanent magnet, 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been developed for the production of stable beams of low charge state ions from gaseous feed materials. The source can produce ˜1 mA of low energy (3 kV) singly charged ion current in the 10-4 Torr pressure range. The source can also be operated in a more efficient low-pressure mode at an order of magnitude lower pressure. In this latter range, for example, the ionization efficiency of Ar is estimated to be 1% with charge states up to Ar8+ present. Operation in the low-pressure mode requires low power input (˜20 W). These features make the source especially suited for use with small accelerator systems for a number of applications including ion implantation, mass spectrometry, and atomic collision experiments where multiply charged ions are desirable. Design details and performance characteristics of the source are presented.

  8. Ionospheric modification at twice the electron cyclotron frequency.

    PubMed

    Djuth, F T; Pedersen, T R; Gerken, E A; Bernhardt, P A; Selcher, C A; Bristow, W A; Kosch, M J

    2005-04-01

    In 2004, a new transmission band was added to the HAARP high-frequency ionospheric modification facility that encompasses the second electron cyclotron harmonic at altitudes between approximately 220 and 330 km. Initial observations indicate that greatly enhanced airglow occurs whenever the transmission frequency approximately matches the second electron cyclotron harmonic at the height of the upper hybrid resonance. This is the reverse of what happens at higher electron cyclotron harmonics. The measured optical emissions confirm the presence of accelerated electrons in the plasma.

  9. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Asner, D. M.; Bradley, R. F.; de Viveiros, L.; ...

    2015-04-20

    Since 1897, we've understood that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. Here, we observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precisemore » electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.« less

  10. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Bradley, R. F.; de Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Fernandes, J. L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, E. C.; Formaggio, J. A.; Furse, D.; Jones, A. M.; Kofron, J. N.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leber, M.; McBride, E. L.; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, P.; Monreal, B.; Oblath, N. S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rybka, G.; Rysewyk, D.; Sternberg, M. G.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Thummler, T.; VanDevender, B. A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-20

    Since 1897, we've understood that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. Here, we observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

  11. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  12. Characterization of electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Outten, C.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Barbour, J.C.; Wampler, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas yield low energy and high ion density plasmas. The characteristics downstream of an ECR hydrogen plasma were investigated as a function of microwave power and magnetic field. A fast-injection Langmuir probe and a carbon resistance probe were used to determine plasma potential (V{sub p}), electron density (N{sub e}), electron temperature (T{sub e}), ion energy (T{sub i}), and ion fluence. Langmuir probe results showed that at 17 cm downstream from the ECR chamber the plasma characteristics are approximately constant across the center 7 cm of the plasma for 50 Watts of absorbed power. These results gave V{sub p} = 30 {plus minus} 5 eV, N{sub e} = 1 {times} 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3}, and T{sub e} = 10--13 eV. In good agreement with the Langmuir probe results, carbon resistance probes have shown that T{sub i} {le} 50 eV. Also, based on hydrogen chemical sputtering of carbon, the hydrogen (ion and energetic neutrals) fluence rate was determined to be 1 {times} 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}-sec. at a pressure of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and for 50 Watts of absorbed power. 19 refs.

  13. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Electron cyclotron emissions from an electron cyclotron heated discharge in ISX-B

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    Observation of the electron cyclotron emissions (ECE) is especially effective when studying the effects of electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Two detectors were built to observe the optically thin third harmonic radiation from ISX B during the recent 28 GHz ECH experiments carried on at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These detectors supplemented existing detectors at the fundamental frequency and at the second harmonic frequency. Observations of the three frequencies during and after the ECH was pulsed into the plasma showed an unexpected rise in their intensity, occurring after the ECH pulse was over. This rise lasted for many tens of milliseconds, well beyond estimates of the electron energy confinement time. The rise in the third harmonic intensity was frequently to an intensity 100 times greater than the pre-ECH intensity. The fundamental frequency and the second harmonic had a much milder change in their intensities. The rises were seen to depend critically on the density of the plasma and the length of the ECH pulse but only weakly on the pre-ECH temperature. A computer code that predicts the ECE from an electron distribution in ISX-B, taking into a account the effect of the plasma's dielectric response to the emissions from a single electron, was developed.

  15. Electron Cyclotron Emissions from AN Electron Cyclotron Heated Discharge in Isx-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Gerald Blaine

    1983-09-01

    Observation of the electron cyclotron emissions (ECE) at both optically thick and optically thin frequencies can be a very useful tool in studying the behavior of the electron distribution. It is especially effective when studying the effects of electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Two detectors were built to observe the optically thin third harmonic radiation from ISX-B during the recent 28 GHz ECH experiments carried on at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These detectors supplemented existing detectors at the fundamental frequency and at the second harmonic frequency. Observations of the three frequencies during and after the ECH was pulsed into the plasma showed an unexpected rise in their intensity, occurring after the ECH pulse was over. This rise lasted for many tens of milliseconds, well beyond estimates of the electron energy confinement time. The rise in the third harmonic intensity was frequently to an intensity 100 times greater than the pre-ECH intensity. The fundamental frequency and the second harmonic had a much milder change in their intensities. The rises were seen to depend critically on the density of the plasma and the length of the ECH pulse but only weakly on the pre-ECH temperature. A computer code which predicts the ECE from an electron distribution in ISX-B, taking into account the effect of the plasma's dielectric response to the emissions from a single electron, is developed. This code is the result of combining a ray tracing technique with the emissions from a single dressed test particle and summing over the electron distribution. The code confirms the sensitivity of the third harmonic emissions to small changes in the electron distribution. A Fokker-Planck code is combined with the emission code to predict the evolution of the ECE from a perturbed electron distribution. The codes clearly show that the rises in the emissions observed by the three detectors can be reasonably explained by consideration of the effect of pitch angle scattering

  16. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Oosterbeek, J. W.; Buerger, A.; Westerhof, E.; Baar, M. R. de; Berg, M. A. van den; Bongers, W. A.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Hennen, B. A.; Kruijt, O. G.; Thoen, J.; Heidinger, R.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Nielsen, S. K.

    2008-09-15

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam. ECE measurements are obtained during high power ECRH operation. This demonstrates the successful operation of the diagnostic and, in particular, a sufficient suppression of the gyrotron component preventing it from interfering with ECE measurements. When integrated into a feedback system for the control of plasma instabilities this line-of-sight ECE diagnostic removes the need to localize the instabilities in absolute coordinates.

  17. Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic instability near Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Singh, K. P.; Singh, O. N.

    2014-08-01

    Jupiter's moon—Ganymede—is the largest satellite in our solar system. Galileo spacecraft made six close flybys to explore Ganymede. More information was acquired about particle population, magnetic field and plasma waves during these encounters. In this paper, our aim is to study the generation of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) emissions in the vicinity of Ganymede using the observed particle data. The calculated ECH wave's growth rates are analyzed in the light of observations of plasma waves along the path of Galileo near Ganymede. Dispersion relation for electrostatic mode is solved to obtain the temporal growth rates. A new electron distribution function, fitted to distribution observed near Ganymede, is used in the calculations. A parametric study is performed to evaluate the effect of loss-cone angle and the ratio of plasma to gyro-frequency on growth rates. It is found that ECH waves growth rates generally decrease as the loss-cone angle is increased. However, the ratio plasma to gyro-frequency has almost no effect on the growth rates. These parameters vary considerably along the Galileo trajectory near Ganymede. This is the first study which relates the occurrence of ECH waves with the particle and magnetic field data in the vicinity of Ganymede. The study of ECH wave growth rate near Ganymede is important for the calculation of pitch angle scattering rates of low-energy electrons and their subsequent precipitation into the thin atmosphere of Ganymede producing ultraviolet emissions. Results of the present study may also be relevant for the upcoming JUNO and JUICE missions to Jupiter.

  18. Alternative optical concept for electron cyclotron emission imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. X.; Milbourne, T.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dominguez, A.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hill, K. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Kung, C.; Pablant, N. A.; Tobias, B.; Kubota, S.; Kasparek, W.; Lu, J.; Park, H.

    2014-11-15

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on tokamak experiments has revolutionized the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and improved our understanding of instabilities, which lead to disruptions. It is therefore desirable to have an ECEI system on the ITER tokamak. However, the large size of optical components in presently used ECEI systems have, up to now, precluded the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER. This paper describes a new optical ECEI concept that employs a single spherical mirror as the only optical component and exploits the astigmatism of such a mirror to produce an image with one-dimensional spatial resolution on the detector. Since this alternative approach would only require a thin slit as the viewing port to the plasma, it would make the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER feasible. The results obtained from proof-of-principle experiments with a 125 GHz microwave system are presented.

  19. The next generation of electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics (invited).

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Domier, C W; Liang, T; Kong, X; Tobias, B; Shen, Z; Luhmann, N C; Park, H; Classen, I G J; van de Pol, M J; Donné, A J H; Jaspers, R

    2008-10-01

    A 128 channel two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of T(e) profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) is undergoing significant changes which promise to revolutionize and extend its capabilities far beyond what has been achieved to date. These include the development of a minilens array configuration with increased sensitivity antennas, a new local oscillator pumping scheme, enhanced electron cyclotron resonance heating shielding, and a highly flexible optical design with vertical zoom capability. Horizontal zoom and spot size (rf bandwidth) capabilities are also being developed with new ECEI electronics. An interface module is under development to remotely control all key features of the new ECEI instrument, many of which can be changed during a plasma discharge for maximum flexibility.

  20. The next generation of electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Domier, C. W.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Tobias, B.; Shen, Z.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Park, H.; Classen, I. G. J.; Pol, M. J. van de; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R.

    2008-10-15

    A 128 channel two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of T{sub e} profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) is undergoing significant changes which promise to revolutionize and extend its capabilities far beyond what has been achieved to date. These include the development of a minilens array configuration with increased sensitivity antennas, a new local oscillator pumping scheme, enhanced electron cyclotron resonance heating shielding, and a highly flexible optical design with vertical zoom capability. Horizontal zoom and spot size (rf bandwidth) capabilities are also being developed with new ECEI electronics. An interface module is under development to remotely control all key features of the new ECEI instrument, many of which can be changed during a plasma discharge for maximum flexibility.

  1. Cyclotron Resonance of Electrons Trapped in a Microwave Cavity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the free-electron cyclotron resonance of electrons trapped in a microwave cavity by a Penning trap is observed. The experiment constitutes an attractive alternative to one of the Gardner-Purcell variety. (Author/GS)

  2. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; England, A.; Ito, Y.; Bretz, N.; McCarthy, M.; Taylor, G.; Doane, J.; Ikezi, H.; Edlington, T.; Tomas, J.

    1999-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic system is installed on the large helical device (LHD). The system includes the following instruments: a heterodyne radiometer, a Michelson spectrometer, and a grating polychromator. A 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide system is fully utilized. Large collection optics and notch filters at the frequency of the LHD electron cyclotron heating (ECH) were developed for this system. In addition to these filters, the rectangular waveguide notch filters, the ECE measurement with the radiometer has been successfully performed during the ECH.

  3. Electron cyclotron heating experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Austin, M.E.; Bernabei, S.

    1998-01-01

    Initial experiments on heating and current drive using second harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak using the new 110 GHz ECH system. Modulation of the ECH power in the frequency range 50 to 300 Hz and detection of the temperature perturbation by ECE diagnostics is used to validate the location of the heating. This technique also determines an upper bound on the width of the deposition profile. Analysis of electron cyclotron current drive indicates that up to 0.17 MA of central current is driven, resulting in a negative loop voltage near the axis.

  4. A Michelson Interferometer for Electron Cyclotron Emission Measurements on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Stefan, Schmuck; Zhao, Hailin; John, Fessey; Paul, Trimble; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Zeying; Zang, Qing; Hu, Liqun

    2016-12-01

    A Michelson interferometer, on loan from EFDA-JET (Culham, United Kingdom) has recently been commissioned on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST, ASIPP, Hefei, China). Following a successful in-situ absolute calibration the instrument is able to measure the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrum, from 80 GHz to 350 GHz in extraordinary mode (X-mode) polarization, with high accuracy. This allows the independent determination of the electron temperature profile from observation of the second harmonic ECE and the possible identification of non-Maxwellian features by comparing higher harmonic emission with numerical simulations. The in-situ calibration results are presented together with the initial measured temperature profiles. These measurements are then discussed and compared with other independent temperature profile measurements. This paper also describes the main hardware features of the diagnostic and the associated commissioning test results. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405211, 11275233), and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106002, 2015GB101000), and the RCUK Energy Programme (No. EP/I501045), partly supported by the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program in the Field of Plasma Physics (NSFC: No. 11261140328)

  5. Electron-cyclotron-heating experiments in tokamaks and stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    England, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of high-frequency microwave radiation to plasma heating near the electron-cyclotron frequency in tokamaks and stellarators. Successful plasma heating by microwave power has been demonstrated in numerous experiments. Predicted future technological developments and current theoretical understanding suggest that a vigorous program in plasma heating will continue to yield promising results.

  6. Higher Harmonic Generation in the Induced Resonance Electron Cyclotron Maser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    direction of the electron beam along the external magnetic field. The index of refraction n = cosm is adjustable by varying the angle between the...exact Lorentz force equations in the vector potential representation over the fast (cyclotron) K5 ’I..--* -- , , ’ , 1,.,. . . ,- ,,.G

  7. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ. Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  8. Parametric decay of an electromagnetic wave near electron cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Y.N.; Leyser, T.B.

    1995-06-01

    A system of equations describing the nonlinear coupling of high frequency electron Bernstein (EB) and upper hybrid (UH) waves near harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency with low frequency lower hybrid (LH) waves in a homogeneous, weakly magnetized, and weakly collisional plasma is derived. The EB and UH modes are described by a single second order equation, taking into account the interaction with low frequency density fluctuations. The ponderomotive force of the high frequency oscillations increases near the cyclotron harmonics due to the resonance with the electron motion. The obtained equations are used to study the parametric decay of an infinite wavelength electromagnetic pump wave into EB or UH waves and LH waves. The threshold electric fields are sufficiently low to be exceeded in high frequency ionospheric modification experiments. However, the instability cannot be excited for pump frequencies near the cyclotron harmonics. For the decay into EB waves, the resulting forbidden frequency range depends on the harmonic number in a power law manner, consistent with observations of stimulated electromagnetic emissions in ionospheric modification experiments. Further, for sufficiently high pump electric fields the instability is also suppressed, when the frequency mismatch around the eigenfrequencies at which the interaction can occur is of the order of the frequency separation between the EB and UH modes near the cyclotron harmonics. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with remote window

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M. )

    1995-03-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma has been used in conjunction with a solid metal sputter target for Cu deposition over 200 mm diameters. The goal is to develop a deposition system and process suitable for filling submicron, high-aspect ratio ULSI features. The system uses a permanent magnet for creation of the magnetic field necessary for ECR, and is significantly more compact than systems equipped with electromagnets. A custom launcher design allows remote microwave injection with the microwave entrance window shielded from the copper flux. When microwaves are introduced at an angle with respect to the plasma, high electron densities can be produced with a plasma frequency significantly greater than the electron cyclotron frequency. Copper deposition rates of 1000 A/min have been achieved.

  10. Electrostatic electron cyclotron instabilities near the upper hybrid layer due to electron ring distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Speirs, D. C.; Daldorff, L. K. S.

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the electrostatic electron cyclotron instability involving Bernstein modes in a magnetized plasma. The presence of a tenuous thermal ring distribution in a Maxwellian plasma decreases the frequency of the upper hybrid branch of the electron Bernstein mode until it merges with the nearest lower branch with a resulting instability. The instability occurs when the upper hybrid frequency is somewhat above the third, fourth, and higher electron cyclotron harmonics, and gives rise to a narrow spectrum of waves around the electron cyclotron harmonic nearest to the upper hybrid frequency. For a tenuous cold ring distribution together with a Maxwellian distribution an instability can take place also near the second electron cyclotron harmonic. Noise-free Vlasov simulations are used to assess the theoretical linear growth-rates and frequency spectra, and to study the nonlinear evolution of the instability. The relevance of the results to laboratory and ionospheric heating experiments is discussed.

  11. First results of an auxiliary electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment in the GDT magnetic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagryansky, P. A.; Kovalenko, Yu. V.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2014-08-01

    The axially symmetric magnetic mirror device gas-dynamic trap (GDT, Budker Institute, Novosibirsk) has recently demonstrated a tangible increase in plasma electron temperature. According to laser scattering, a value of 0.4 keV has been achieved (a twofold increase). In addition to standard machine operation, utilizing a 5 MW neutral beam injection, a newly installed electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system was employed (54.5 GHz, 0.4 MW). The reported progress in electron temperature, along with previous experiments, which demonstrated plasma confinement at beta as high as 60%, is a significant advancement towards an energy efficient fusion neutron source based on GDT physics.

  12. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on the Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, M.E. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A ten-channel grating polychromator was designed, constructed, and installed on the Texas Experimental Tokamak to monitor the second harmonic electron cyclotron emission. Electron temperature profiles were derived from measurements of the optically thick radiation for a variety of plasma confinement experiments. The radial and temporal evolution of T[sub e] has been characterized for electron cyclotron heated discharges with 150 kW of 60 GHz power. Comparisons were made of the heating efficiency of two type of ECH launchers. A focussed launcher was shown to have slightly better heating efficiency than an unfocussed launcher; however, the focussed antenna did not yield significantly higher electron temperatures as expected. A study of the time evolution of the electron temperature indicated that increased sawtooth activity limited the effectiveness of the focussed launcher. A focussing hog-horn antenna was fabricated and installed on the inboard side of the tokamak to measure emission directed towards the high-field side during ECH. Comparison of the radiation temperature profiles from low-field side and high-field side antennas indicates the creation of a nonthermal electron distribution by the heating. The results of the experiment compare favorably with theoretical predictions from a quasi-linear Fokker-Planck code of a 6 keV nonthermal population with a density about 1 percent of the thermal density.

  13. Electron cyclotron emission as a density fluctuation diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A.G.; Phillips, P.E.; Hubbard, A.

    2004-10-01

    A new technique for measuring density fluctuations using a high-resolution heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed. Although ECE radiometry is typically used for electron temperature measurements, the unique viewing geometry of this system's quasioptical antenna has been found to make the detected emission extremely sensitive to refractive effects under certain conditions. This sensitivity gives the diagnostic the ability to measure very low levels of density fluctuations in the core of Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The refractive effects have been modeled using ray-tracing methods, allowing estimates of the density fluctuation magnitude and spatial localization.

  14. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Cao, Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  15. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  16. Nonlinear heating of ions by electron cyclotron frequency waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zestanakis, P. A.; Hizanidis, K.; Ram, A. K.; Kominis, Y.

    2010-11-01

    We study the nonlinear interaction of ions with electron cyclotron (EC) wave packets in a magnetized plasma. Previous studies have shown that such interactions with high frequency electrostatic lower hybrid waves can lead to coherent energization of ions. It requires the frequency bandwidth of the wave packet to be broader than the ion cyclotron frequency [1,2]. For the electromagnetic high frequency EC waves we have developed a more general theory, based on the Lie transform canonical perturbation method [3,4]. We apply the theory to the case of two overlapping EC beams. The wave frequency of each beam is assumed to be frequency modulated with a modulation bandwidth comparable to the ion cyclotron frequency. We present results for both X-mode and O-mode and illustrate the conditions for ion energization. [4pt] [1] D. Benisti, A. K. Ram, and A. Bers, Phys. Plasmas 5, 3224 (1998). [0pt] [2] A. K. Ram, A. Bers, and D. Benisti , J. Geophys. Res. 103, 9431 (1998). [0pt] [3] J.R. Cary and A.N. Kaufman, Phys. Fluids 24, 1238 (1981). [0pt] [4] R.L. Dewar, J. Phys A-Math. Gen 9, 2043 (1976).

  17. Excitation of Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Waves in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojia

    This dissertation investigates the generation mechanism, spatial distribution and characteristics of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves under different plasma sheet conditions, and quantifies the role of these waves in producing the diffuse aurora. THEMIS observations from five magnetotail seasons, along with ray-tracing, and electron diffusion codes have been utilized towards that goal. By modeling the wave growth and quasi-linear pitch-angle diffusion of electrons with realistic parameters for the magnetic field, loss-cone distribution and wave intensity (obtained from observations as a function of magnetotail location), we estimate the loss-cone fill ratio and the contribution of auroral energy flux from wave-induced electron precipitation. We conclude that ECH waves are the dominant driver of electron precipitation in the middle to outer magnetotail.

  18. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Vodopianov, A V; Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Yushkov, G Yu

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 micros and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10(12) cm(-3), required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T(e) approximately = 20 eV.

  19. Nonresonant interactions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves with relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lunjin; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Zhang, Xiao-Jia

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of relativistic electrons traveling through a parallel-propagating, monochromatic electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave in the Earth's dipole field are investigated via test particle simulations. Both resonant and nonresonant responses in electron pitch angle are considered, and the differences between the two are highlighted. Nonresonant electrons, with energies below the minimum resonant energy down to hundreds of keV, are scattered stochastically in pitch angle and can be scattered into the atmospheric loss cone. The nonresonant effect is attributed to the spatial edge associated with EMIC wave packets. A condition for effective nonresonant response is also provided. This effect is excluded from current quasi-linear theory and can be a potentially important loss mechanism of relativistic and subrelativistic electrons in the radiation belts.

  20. Study of ion beam transport from the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source at the Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Sha, S; Yang, Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Lin, S H; Li, X X; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Zhao, H Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Wu, Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2012-02-01

    Ion beam transport from the Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) electron cyclotron resonance ion source was studied at the Institute of Modern Physics during 2010. Particle-in-cell simulations and experimental results have shown that both space charge and magnetic aberrations lead to a larger beam envelope and emittance growth. In the existing SECRAL extraction beam line, it has been shown that raising the solenoid lens magnetic field reduces aberrations in the subsequent dipole and results in lower emittance. Detailed beam emittance measurements are presented in this paper.

  1. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produced large (about 25-cm-diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}-cm{sup -3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonesu, Akira; Hara, Kazufumi; Nishikawa, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma were investigated. High-energy electrons and oxygen radicals were observed in the ECR zone using electric probe and optical emission spectroscopic methods. A biological indicator (BI), Geobacillus stearothermophilus, containing 1 × 106 spores was sterilized in 120 s by exposure to oxygen discharges while maintaining a temperature of approximately 55 °C at the BI installation position. Oxygen radicals and high-energy electrons were found to be the sterilizing species in the ECR region. It was demonstrated that the ECR plasma could be produced in narrow tubes with an inner diameter of 5 mm. Moreover, sterilization tests confirmed that the spores present inside the narrow tube were successfully inactivated by ECR plasma irradiation.

  3. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore » of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  4. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  5. Electron cyclotron maser based on the combination two-wave resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, A. V.

    2012-11-01

    A mechanism of a combination two-wave cyclotron interaction between an electron beam and the forward/backward components of a far-from-cutoff standing wave is analyzed. This regime can be promising for the realization of high-power continuous-wave electron cyclotron masers operating in the THz frequency range.

  6. Dynamic regimes of cyclotron instability in the afterglow mode of minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, D.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the dynamic regimes of cyclotron instabilities in non-equilibrium plasma of a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source operated in pulsed mode. The instability appears in decaying ion source plasma shortly (1-10 ms) after switching off the microwave radiation of the klystron, and manifests itself in the form of powerful pulses of electromagnetic emission associated with precipitation of high-energy electrons along the magnetic field lines. Recently it was shown that this plasma instability causes perturbations of the extracted ion current, which limits the performance of the ion source and generates strong bursts of bremsstrahlung emission. In this article we present time-resolved diagnostics of electromagnetic emission bursts related to cyclotron instability in the decaying plasma. The temporal resolution is sufficient to study the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of the electromagnetic emission at different operating regimes of the ion source. It was found that at different values of magnetic field and heating power the dynamic spectra demonstrate common features: Decreasing frequency from burst to burst and an always falling tone during a single burst of instability. The analysis has shown that the instability is driven by the resonant interaction of hot electrons, distributed between the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) zone and the trap center, with slow extraordinary wave propagation quasi-parallel with respect to the external magnetic field.

  7. Electron cyclotron emission imaging and applications in magnetic fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Benjamin John

    Energy production through the burning of fossil fuels is an unsustainable practice. Exponentially increasing energy consumption and dwindling natural resources ensure that coal and gas fueled power plants will someday be a thing of the past. However, even before fuel reserves are depleted, our planet may well succumb to disastrous side effects, namely the build up of carbon emissions in the environment triggering world-wide climate change and the countless industrial spills of pollutants that continue to this day. Many alternatives are currently being developed, but none has so much promise as fusion nuclear energy, the energy of the sun. The confinement of hot plasma at temperatures in excess of 100 million Kelvin by a carefully arranged magnetic field for the realization of a self-sustaining fusion power plant requires new technologies and improved understanding of fundamental physical phenomena. Imaging of electron cyclotron radiation lends insight into the spatial and temporal behavior of electron temperature fluctuations and instabilities, providing a powerful diagnostic for investigations into basic plasma physics and nuclear fusion reactor operation. This dissertation presents the design and implementation of a new generation of Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics on toroidal magnetic fusion confinement devices, or tokamaks, around the world. The underlying physics of cyclotron radiation in fusion plasmas is reviewed, and a thorough discussion of millimeter wave imaging techniques and heterodyne radiometry in ECEI follows. The imaging of turbulence and fluid flows has evolved over half a millennium since Leonardo da Vinci's first sketches of cascading water, and applications for ECEI in fusion research are broad ranging. Two areas of physical investigation are discussed in this dissertation: the identification of poloidal shearing in Alfven eigenmode structures predicted by hybrid gyrofluid-magnetohydrodynamic (gyrofluid-MHD) modeling, and

  8. Amplitudes of electron cyclotron waves transmitted in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.

    2011-07-01

    During the two-point sounding rocket experiment Observations of Electric-field Distributions in the Ionospheric Plasma-A Unique Strategy-C (OEDIPUS-C, hereinafter OC), Bernstein or electron cyclotron waves (ECWs) were transmitted over magnetic field-aligned emitter-receiver separations of hundreds of meters. Signals were observed at harmonic frequencies mfc of the electron cyclotron frequency fc, where m was 2, 3, and 4, fc ≈ 1.3 MHz, and the electron plasma frequency was less than half of fc. The electric fields at 2fc radiated by the emitting dipoles have been computed from the inhomogeneous Helmholtz wave equation. Using the full hot plasma theory to evaluate the dielectric tensor, a Green's function has been derived, based partly on numerical inversion and facilitated by some simplifications made possible by the given frequency and plasma parameters. Under the assumption of straight-line rays, it is found that the computed absolute voltage levels induced on the receiving dipoles are of the same order of magnitude as the observed levels. The electric field E radiation patterns at 2fc are found to be highly elongated along the direction of the Earth's magnetic induction field B. The component of E perpendicular to B, the radial or ρ component, is much stronger than the other two components in a cylindrical coordinate system. The prediction of strong radial E magnitudes along ray directions very close to B is consistent with the OC observations. These results enlarge our appreciation of distinct characteristics of ECW radiation and propagation that may improve understanding of the role of these electrostatic waves in ionospheric dynamics.

  9. Multi-harmonic electron cyclotron instabilities. [diffuse electron aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Kennel, C. F.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation constitutes an extension of studies conducted by Ashour-Abdalla and Kennel (1975, 1976, 1978) with respect to a basic plasma model of Young et al. (1973). The model involves a combination of a cold Maxwellian background plasma, a hot plasma, and a 'loss cone' type of free energy source. Previous results on the first cyclotron harmonic bands are extended to multiharmonics. The significance of the obtained relations is discussed and tentative conclusions are presented. Given that the spatial growth rates of the convective modes are comparable, and that simultaneous nonconvective instability (NCI) is possible, it is concluded that multiharmonic emissions ought to be a common feature of the magnetospheric electrostatic wave observations. Since the volume of parameter space for which the first harmonic is NCI, and the volume for which the convective first harmonic mode has significant spatial growth rates, exceed those for the higher harmonics, first harmonic waves should be the most commonly observed and the higher harmonics should usually be accompanied by the first harmonic.

  10. Precipitation of Relativistic Electrons by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    We use the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave fields produced in a two dimensional hybrid code simulation (full dynamics particle ions, but inertialess fluid electrons) in dipole geometry in order to investigate the effect of magnetospheric EMIC waves on relativistic electrons. The plane of the simulation includes variation in the L shell direction and along magnetic field lines. Relativistic test particle electrons are inserted into the simulation when the wave fields are near their maximum amplitude. These electrons can be scattered into the loss cone so that they precipitate into the ionosphere. We find the effective pitch angle diffusion coefficient and probability of precipitation using these test particles. The pitch angle diffusion coefficients are largest for relativistic energies greater than 2 MeV, though they may be substantial for lower energies. The probability of precipitation is highest for low energy particles at small initial equatorial pitch angle. For high initial equatorial pitch angles, the probability of precipitation increases greatly with respect to particle energy. Starting from an isotropic pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons with a Gaussian spread in the relativistic momentum, we find only a small drop in the probability of precipitation during 13 s time as the particle energy decreases. But that result depends on the initial pitch angle distribution. Starting with a distribution of particles steeply peaked at 90° initial equatorial pitch angle, the probability of precipitation would be greater for high-energy particles. We will discuss the mechanism of pitch angle scattering.

  11. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Electron cyclotron beam measurement system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kamio, S. Takahashi, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Osakabe, M.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-11-15

    In order to evaluate the electron cyclotron (EC) heating power inside the Large Helical Device vacuum vessel and to investigate the physics of the interaction between the EC beam and the plasma, a direct measurement system for the EC beam transmitted through the plasma column was developed. The system consists of an EC beam target plate, which is made of isotropic graphite and faces against the EC beam through the plasma, and an IR camera for measuring the target plate temperature increase by the transmitted EC beam. This system is applicable to the high magnetic field (up to 2.75 T) and plasma density (up to 0.8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}). This system successfully evaluated the transmitted EC beam profile and the refraction.

  13. A simple electron cyclotron resonance ion source (abstract)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Moran, T. F.; Feeney, R. K.; Thomas, E. W.

    1996-03-01

    A simple, all permanent magnet, 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been developed for the production of stable beams of low charge state ions from gaseous feed materials. The source can produce ˜1 mA of low energy (3 kV) singly charged ion current in the 10-4 Torr pressure range. The source can also be operated in a more efficient low-pressure mode at an order of magnitude lower pressure. In this latter range, for example, the ionization efficiency of Ar is estimated to be 1% with charge states up to Ar8+ present. Operation in the low-pressure mode requires low power input (˜20 W). These features make the source especially suited for use with small accelerator systems for a number of applications including ion implantation, mass spectrometry, and atomic collision experiments where multiply charged ions are desirable. Design details and performance characteristics of the source are presented.

  14. Determination of the Electron Cyclotron Current Drive Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Schuster, D.I.; Makowski, M.A.

    1999-11-01

    Evaluation of the profile of non-inductive current density driven by absorption of electron cyclotron waves (ECCD) using time evolution of the poloidal flux indicated a broader profile than predicted by theory. To determine the nature of this broadening, a 1-1/2 D transport calculation of current density evolution was used to generate the signals which the DIII-D motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic would measure in the event that the current density evolution followed the neoclassical Ohm's law with the theoretical ECCD profile. Comparison with the measured MSE data indicates the experimental data is consistent with the ECCD profile predicted by theory. The simulations yield a lower limit on the magnitude of the ECCD which is at or above the value found in Fokker-Planck calculations of the ECCD including quasilinear and parallel electric field effects.

  15. Electron-cyclotron heating in the Constance 2 mirror experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mauel, Michael E.

    1982-09-01

    Electron cyclotron heating of a highly-ionized plasma in mirror geometry is investigated. The experimental diagnosis of the electron energy distribution and the comparison of the results of this diagnosis with a two dimensional, time-dependent Fokker-Planck simulation are accomplished in four steps. (1) First, the power balance of the heated and unheated Constance 2 plasma is analyzed experimentally. It is concluded that the heated electrons escape the mirror at a rate dominated by a combination of the influx of cool electrons from outside the mirror and the increased loss rate of the ions. (2) The microwave parameters at the resonance zones are then calculated by cold-plasma ray tracing. High N/sub parallel/ waves are launched and for these waves, strong first-pass absorption is predicted. The absorption strength is qualitatively checked in the experiment by surrounding the plasma with non-reflecting liners. (3) A simplified quasilinear theory including the effect of N/sub parallel/ is developed to model the electrons. An analytic expression is derived for the RF-induced pump-out of the magnetically-confined warm electrons. Results of the Fokker-Planck simulations show the development of the electron energy distribution for several plasma conditions and verify the scaling of the analytic expression for RF-induced diffusion into the loss cone. (4) Sample x-ray and endloss data are presented, and the overall comparison between the simulation and experiment is discussed. The x-ray signals indicate that, for greater RF power, the hot electrondensity increases more rapidly than its temperature. The time history of the endloss data, illustrating RF-enhancement, suggests the predicted scaling for warm-electron pump-out. Finally, a comparison between the measured and predicted energy distribution shows that the bulk, warm and hot components of the heated Constance 2 electrons are indeed reproduced by the simulation.

  16. Modeling of Trapped Electron Effects on Electron Cyclotron Current Drive for Recent DIII-D Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Sauter, O.; Harvey, R.W.; Chan, V.S.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.

    1999-08-01

    Owing to its potential capability of generating localized non-inductive current, especially off-axis, Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) is considered a leading candidate for current profile control in achieving Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation. In recent DIII-D proof-of-principle experiments [1], localized off-axis ECCD has been clearly demonstrated for first time. The measured current drive efficiency near the magnetic axis agrees well with predictions of the bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck theory [2,3]. However, the off-axis current drive efficiency was observed to exceed the theoretical results, which predict significant degradation of the current drive efficiency due to trapped electron effects. The theoretical calculations have been based on an assumption that the effective collision frequency is much smaller than the bounce frequency such that the trapped electrons are allowed to complete the banana orbit at all energies. The assumption might be justified in reactor-grade tokamak plasmas, in which the electron temperature is sufficiently high or the velocity of resonant electrons is much larger than the thermal velocity, so that the influence of collisionality on current drive efficiency can be neglected. For off-axis deposition in the present-day experiments, the effect of high density and low temperature is to reduce the current drive efficiency, but the increasing collisionality reduces the trapping of current-carrying electrons, leading to compensating increases in the current drive efficiency. In this work, we use the adjoint function formulation [4] to examine collisionality effects on the current drive efficiency.

  17. Cyclotron-absorption measurement of the runaway-electron distribution in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonkov, A.V.; Suvorov, E.V.; Timofeev, A.V.; Fraiman, A.A.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution function of runaway electrons in a tokamak can be determined in the slightly relativistic region from measurements of the absorption coefficient corresponding to electron cyclotron waves. The plasma should be probed in the vertical direction.

  18. Plume properties measurement of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correyero, Sara; Vialis, Theo; Jarrige, Julien; Packan, Denis

    2016-09-01

    Some emergent technologies for Electric Propulsion, such as the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Accelerator (ECRA), include magnetic nozzles to guide and expand the plasma. The advantages of this concept are well known: wall-plasma contact is avoided, it provides a current-free plume, it can allow to control thrust by modifying the magnetic field geometry, etc. However, their industrial application requires the understanding of the physical mechanisms involved, such as the electron thermodynamics at the plasma plume expansion, which is crucial to determine propulsive performances. This work presents a detailed characterization of the plasma plume axial profile in an ECR plasma thruster developed at ONERA. Langmuir, emissive, Faraday and ion energy probes are used to measure the electric potential space evolution, the current and electron energy distribution function in the plume, from the near field to the far field. The experimental results are compared with a quasi-1D (paraxial) steady-state kinetic model of a quasineutral collisionless magnetized plasma which is able to determine consistently the axial evolution of the electric potential and the electron and ion distribution functions with their associated properties.

  19. Electron-cyclotron maser and solar microwave millisecond spike emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Chun-Sheng; Fu, Qi-Jun

    1986-01-01

    An intense solar microwave millisecond spike emission (SMMSE) event was observed on May 16, 1981 by Zhao and Jin at Beijing Observatory. The peak flux density of the spikes is high to 5 x 100,000 s.f.u. and the corresponding brightness temperature (BT) reaches approx. 10 to the 15th K. In order to explain the observed properties of SMMSE, it is proposed that a beam of electrons with energy of tens KeV injected from the acceleration region downwards into an emerging magnetic arch forms so-called hollow beam distribution and causes electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) instability. The growth rate of second harmonic X-mode is calculated and its change with time is deduced. It is shown that the saturation time of ECM is t sub s approx. equals 0.42 ms and only at last short stage (delta t less than 0.2 t sub s) the growth rate decreases to zero rather rapidly. So a SMMSE with very high BT will be produced if the ratio of number density of nonthermal electrons to that of background electrons, n sub s/n sub e, is larger than 4 x .00001.

  20. Generation of Electron Cyclotron Harmonic waves around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Y.; Kojima, H.; Saito, Y.; Kasahara, Y.; Omura, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Yokota, S.; Nishino, M. N.; Hashimoto, K.; Ono, T.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the electron cyclotron harmonic(ECH) waves has been extensively made in the view point of the magnetospheric physics as well as the microscopic wave-particle interaction. The Japanese lunar satellite Kaguya provides another observation of the ECH waves around the moon. The interaction between the moon and space plasmas results in the generation of the ECH waves. We performed the detailed data analyses using the plasma wave data observed by the Kaguya as well as the linear dispersion analyses. First of all we found the close relation of the ECH wave observation and the magnetic anomaly of the night side of the moon. In order to examine the generation condition of the ECH waves, we consult the Kaguya electron data. The data show that the importance of the coexistence of of electron loss cone velocity distribution and low energy electron beams. The loss cone velocity distribution can be formed by the mirror force at the magnetic anomaly on the surface of the moon. The low energy electron beam can be realized by the acceleration due to the negative potential of the moon surface on the night side. We then assume these two kinds of electron distribution are essential to excite ECH waves. However the loss cone distribution and low energy beam are observed not only in the magnetosphere but also in the wake region, where ECH waves are not observed. This means some parametric dependence of the ECH wave generation even under the coexistence of the electron loss cone distribution and low energy electron beam. In order to make clear the parametric condition of the ECH waves around the moon, we calculate the linear growth rate by solving the kinetic plasma dispersion relation using the realistic plasma parameters of the lobe, plasma sheet and wake regions based on the KAGUYA observation. In the linear dispersion analysis, we assumed hot electrons and cold electrons, and the former have loss cone distribution and the latter has drift velocity which equivalent

  1. Evolution of the axial electron cyclotron maser instability, with applications to solar microwave spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Sprangle, Phillip

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of cyclotron radiation from streaming and gyrating electrons in an external magnetic field is analyzed. The nonlinear dynamics of both the fields and the particles are treated fully relativistically and self-consistently. The model includes a background plasma and electrostatic effects. The analytical and numerical results show that a substantial portion of the beam particle energy can be converted to electromagnetic wave energy at frequencies far above the electron cyclotron frequency. In general, the excited radiation can propagate parallel to the magnetic field and, hence, escape gyrothermal absorption at higher cyclotron harmonics. The high-frequency Doppler-shifted cyclotron instability can have saturation efficiencies far higher than those associated with well-known instabilities of the electron cyclotron maser type. Although the analysis is general, the possibility of using this model to explain the intense radio emission observed from the sun is explored in detail.

  2. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Galli, A.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (Te_periphery). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (Te_periphery). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a˜0.8, f0=144 GHz), an increase of Te in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a˜0.8) is expected by the JETTO code

  3. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.

    2014-02-12

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (T{sub e-periphery}). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (T{sub e-periphery}). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a∼0.8, f{sub 0}=144 GHz), an increase of T{sub e} in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a∼0.8) is

  4. Microwave emission related to cyclotron instabilities in a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, I.; Tarvainen, O.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) have been essential in the research and applications of nuclear physics over the past 40 years. They are extensively used in a wide range of large-scale accelerator facilities for the production of highly charged heavy ion beams of stable and radioactive elements. ECRISs are susceptible to kinetic instabilities due to resonance heating mechanism leading to anisotropic electron velocity distribution function. Instabilities of cyclotron type are a proven cause of frequently observed periodic bursts of ‘hot’ electrons and bremsstrahlung, accompanied with emission of microwave radiation and followed by considerable drop of multiply charged ions current. Detailed studies of the microwave radiation associated with the instabilities have been performed with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen and argon plasmas. It is demonstrated that during the development of cyclotron instability ‘hot’ electrons emit microwaves in sub-microsecond scale bursts at temporally descending frequencies in the 8-15 GHz range with two dominant frequencies of 11.09 and 12.59 GHz regardless of ECRIS settings i.e. magnetic field strength, neutral gas pressure or species and microwave power. The experimental data suggest that the most probable excited plasma wave is a slow extraordinary Z-mode propagating quasi-longitudinally with respect to the external magnetic field.

  5. Acoustic mode driven by fast electrons in TJ-II Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. J.; Ochando, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.

    2016-08-01

    Intense harmonic oscillations in radiation signals (δ I/I∼ 5{%}) are commonly observed during Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating in TJ-II stellarator plasmas at low line-averaged electron density, 0.15 < \\bar{n}e < 0.6 ×1019 \\text{m}-3 . The frequency agrees with acoustic modes. The poloidal modal structure is compatible with Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) but an n \

  6. Applications of Electron Cyclotron Waves in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Cengher, M.; Gorelov, I. A.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.

    2009-11-26

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) have progressed from being the subject of experiments to being a prime tool for carrying out experiments on other topics. ECH has different characteristics than neutral beam heating: ECH heats only the electrons, heats very locally and controllably, does not inject momentum or particles, and may be arranged to drive highly localized currents or to just heat. These differences make ECH useful in a very wide range of experiments.

  7. Rapid Current Ramp-Up by Cyclotron-Driving Electrons beyond Runaway Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, M.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tanaka, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2010-02-12

    The toroidal current has been rapidly ramped-up after the formation of an initial closed flux surface in an electron cyclotron heated discharge in the low aspect ratio torus experiment device. A current carrying fast electron tail is developed well beyond the runaway velocity against the reverse voltage from self-induction, suggesting a forward driving force on the tail by the cyclotron absorption of high N{sub ||} electron Bernstein waves.

  8. SPECE: a code for Electron Cyclotron Emission in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.

    2008-03-12

    The code SPECE has been developed for the analysis of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in a general tokamak equilibrium. The code solves the radiation transport equation along the ray trajectories in a tokamak plasma, in which magnetic equilibrium and plasma profiles are given either analytically or numerically, for a Maxwellian plasma or a non thermal plasma characterized by a distribution function that is the sum of drifting Maxwellian distributions. Ray trajectories are computed making use of the cold dispersion relation, while the absorption and emission coefficients are obtained solving the relevant fully relativistic dispersion relation valid at high electron temperature. The actual antenna pattern is simulated by means of a multi-rays calculation, and the spatial resolution of the ECE measurements is computed by means of an algorithm that takes properly into account the emission along each ray of the beam. Wall effects are introduced in the code by means of a heuristic model. Results of ECE simulations in a standard ITER scenario are presented.

  9. Vertical-viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.; Janz, S.; Ellis, R.; Boyd, D.; Lohr, J.

    1988-08-01

    The vertical-viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic on DIII-D will be used to assess the nonthermal electron distributions resulting from electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive experiments. Electron cyclotron emission along a vertical chord is collected using an ellipsoidal focusing mirror and retroreflector (the latter to minimize wall reflections). The emission is then transported approx.20 m using a quasioptical transport system composed of eight lenses and three mirrors, and detected between the 2nd and the 10th harmonics by a fast-scanning (40-Hz) Michelson interferometer. The entire system has been aligned using a Gaussian beam simulator and absolutely calibrated in situ using a cold liquid-nitrogen bath. Details of the design, installation, and calibration will be discussed.

  10. Quasi-steady, marginally unstable electron cyclotron harmonic wave amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojia; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    2013-06-01

    Electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves have long been considered a potential driver of diffuse aurora in Earth's magnetotail. However, the scarcity of intense ECH emissions in the outer magnetotail suggests that our understanding of the amplification and the relative importance of these waves for electron scattering is lacking. We conduct a comprehensive study of wave growth and quasi-linear diffusion to estimate the amplitude of loss-cone-driven ECH waves once diffusion and growth balance but before convection or losses alter the background hot plasma sheet population. We expect this to be the most common state of the plasma sheet between episodes of fast convection. For any given wave amplitude, we model electron diffusion caused by interaction with ECH waves using a 2-D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. After fitting the resultant electron distributions as a superposition of multicomponent subtracted bi-Maxwellians, we estimate the maximum path-integrated gain using the HOTRAY ray-tracing code. We argue that the wave amplitude during quasi-steady state is the inflection point on a gain-amplitude curve. During quasi-steady state, ECH wave amplitudes can be significant (~1 mV/m) at L ~ 8 but drop to very low values (<~0.1 mV/m) in the outer magnetotail (L ~ 16) and likely fall below the sensitivity of typical instrumentation relatively close to Earth mainly because of the smallness of the loss cone. Our result reinforces the potentially important role of ECH waves in driving diffuse aurora and suggests that careful comparison of theoretical wave amplitude estimates and observations is required for resolving the equatorial scattering mechanism of diffuse auroral precipitation.

  11. Observations of compound sawteeth in ion cyclotron resonant heating plasma using ECE imaging on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Azam; Zhao, Zhenling; Xie, Jinlin; Zhu, Ping; Liu, Wandong; Ti, Ang

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal evolutions of compound sawteeth were directly observed using 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The compound sawtooth consists of partial and full collapses. After partial collapse, the hot core survives as only a small amount of heat disperses outwards, whereas in the following full collapse a large amount of heat is released and the hot core dissipates. The presence of two q = 1 surfaces was not observed. Instead, the compound sawtooth occurs mainly at the beginning of an ion cyclotron resonant frequency heating pulse and during the L-H transition phase, which may be related to heat transport suppression caused by a decrease in electron heat diffusivity.

  12. Heating and Current Drive by Electron Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, R.

    2003-10-01

    The physics model of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) is becoming well validated through systematic comparisons of theory and experiment. Work has shown that ECCD can be highly localized and robustly controlled, leading to applications including stabilization of MHD instabilities like neoclassical tearing modes, control and sustainment of desired profiles of current density and plasma pressure, and studies of localized transport. These physics applications and the study of the basic physics of ECH and ECCD were enabled by the advent of the gyrotron in the 1980s and of the diamond window for megawatt gyrotrons in the 1990s. The experimental work stimulated a broad base of theory based on first principles which is encapsulated in linear ray tracing codes and fully relativistic quasilinear Fokker-Planck codes. Recent experiments use measurements of the local poloidal magnetic field through the motional Stark effect to determine the magnitude and profile of the locally driven current. The subtle balance between wave-induced diffusion and Coulomb relaxation in velocity space provides an understanding of the effects of trapping of current-carrying electrons in the magnetic well, an effect which can be used to advantage. Strong quasilinear effects and radial transport of electrons which may broaden the driven current profile have also been observed under some conditions and appear to be consistent with theory, but in large devices these are usually insignificant. Additional advantages of ECH compared with other rf heating methods are that the antenna can be far removed from the plasma and the power density can be very high. The agreement of theory and experiment, the broad base of established applications, and the technical advantages of ECH support the application of ECH in next-step tokamaks and stellarators.

  13. A fast multichannel Martin-Puplett interferometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Nowak, S.; Fessey, J. A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2011-11-15

    A Martin Puplett interferometer for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements from JET tokamak plasmas was extended to multichannel operation for simultaneous radial and oblique ECE measurements. This paper describes the new optics and the instrument's performance.

  14. Electron cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. V.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Bagryansky, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new plasma startup scenario in the gas dynamic trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target (‘seed plasma’), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and build up the density of plasma to a level suitable for NBI capture. After a short transition of approximately 1 ms the discharge becomes essentially similar to a standard one initiated by the plasma gun. This paper presents the discharge scenario and experimental data on the seed plasma evolution during ECRH, along with the dependencies on incident microwave power, magnetic configuration and pressure of a neutral gas. The characteristics of the consequent high-power NBI discharge are studied and differences from the conventional scenario are discussed. A theoretical model describing the ECR breakdown and the seed plasma accumulation in a large-scale mirror trap is developed on the basis of the GDT experiment.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of diamond-like films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma CVD has been developed at low pressures (0.0001 - 0.01 torr) and at ambient and high substrate temperatures (up to 750 C), to achieve large-area (greater than 4 in. diameter) depositions of diamondlike amorphous carbon (a - C:H) films. The application of a RF bias to the substrate stage, which induces a negative self-bias voltage, is found to play a critical role in determining carbon bonding configurations and in modifying the film morphology. There are two distinct types of ECR-deposited diamondlike films. One type of diamondlike film exhibits a Raman spectrum consisting of broad and overlapping, graphitic D (1360/cm, line width = 280/cm) and G (1590/cm, line width 140/cm) lines, and the other type has a broad Raman peak centered at appoximately 1500/cm. Examination of plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy shows no correlation between the CH-asterisk emission intensity and the deposition rate of diamondklike films.

  16. Electron cyclotron emission spectrometry on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Klimanov, I.; Porte, L.; Alberti, S.; Blanchard, P.; Fasoli, A.; Goodman, T.P.

    2005-09-15

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements are an important component of the diagnostic suite on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) [F. Hoffman et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 36, B277 (1994)]. A recently installed, 24-channel dual-conversion heterodyne radiometer covering the radio frequency range 65-100 GHz and viewing from the low-field side (LFS) of the tokamak greatly enhances the system and, in combination with an existing radiometer viewing from the high-field side (HFS), allows simultaneous measurements of emission from the HFS and LFS. In addition, the new radiometer has multiple lines of sight that can receive the emission perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field as well as with a finite k{sub parallel} (wave vector parallel to magnetic field). Such flexibility allows the LFS radiometer to make standard measurements of thermal emission and nonstandard measurements of nonthermal, anisotropic emission. The toroidal line of sight allows access to overdense plasma via mode converted emission. The enhanced ECE diagnostic is described and examples of measurements made in various configurations are presented.

  17. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  18. Saturation of cyclotron maser instability driven by an electron loss-cone distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    The resonance diffusion of electrons in velocity space caused by the excited EM wave fields is considered to be the dominant saturation process of cyclotron maser instability that is driven by an electron loss-cone distribution. An upper bound of the saturation level is derived analytically. Since the resulting saturation level is low, the resonance diffusion is indeed responsible for the saturation of the cyclotron maser instability.

  19. Data acquisition and processing system of the electron cyclotron emission imaging system of the KSTAR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Kim, J B; Lee, W; Yun, G S; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2010-10-01

    A new innovative electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic system for the Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) produces a large amount of data. The design of the data acquisition and processing system of the ECEI diagnostic system should consider covering the large data production and flow. The system design is based on the layered structure scalable to the future extension to accommodate increasing data demands. Software architecture that allows a web-based monitoring of the operation status, remote experiment, and data analysis is discussed. The operating software will help machine operators and users validate the acquired data promptly, prepare next discharge, and enhance the experiment performance and data analysis in a distributed environment.

  20. Review of highly charged heavy ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plays an important role in the advancement of heavy ion accelerators and other ion beam applications worldwide, thanks to its remarkable ability to produce a great variety of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. Great efforts over the past decade have led to significant ECRIS performance improvements in both the beam intensity and quality. A number of high-performance ECRISs have been built and are in daily operation or are under construction to meet the continuously increasing demand. In addition, comprehension of the detailed and complex physical processes in high-charge-state ECR plasmas has been enhanced experimentally and theoretically. This review covers and discusses the key components, leading-edge developments, and enhanced ECRIS performance in the production of highly charged heavy ion beams.

  1. New compact and efficient local oscillator optic system for the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Y. B.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, J.; Kim, C.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.

    2016-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic on Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research utilizes quasi-optical heterodyne-detection method to measure 2D (vertical and radial) Te fluctuations from two toroidally separated poloidal cross section of the plasma. A cylindrical lens local oscillator (LO) optics with optical path length (OPL) 2-2.5 m has been used in the current ECEI system to couple the LO source to the 24 vertically aligned array of ECE detectors. For efficient and compact LO optics employing the Powell lens is proposed so that the OPL of the LO source is significantly reduced from ˜2.0 m to 0.4 m with new optics. The coupling efficiency of the LO source is expected to be improved especially at the edge channels. Results from the optical simulation together with the laboratory test of the prototype optics will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Modeling of the influences of multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive on NTMs in rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chen; Jinyuan, Liu; Ping, Duan; Guangrui, Liu; Xingyu, Bian

    2017-02-01

    In this work, physical models of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) including bootstrap current and multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive model are applied. Based on the specific physical problems during the suppression of NTMs by driven current, this work compares the efficiency of continuous and modulated driven currents, and simulates the physical processes of multiple modulated driven currents on suppressing rotating magnetic island. It is found that when island rotates along the poloidal direction, the suppression ability of continuous driven current can be massively reduced due to current deposition outside the island separatrix and reverse deposition direction at the X point, which can be avoided by current drive modulation. Multiple current drive has a better suppressing effect than single current drive. This work gives realistic numerical simulations by optimizing the model and parameters based on the experiments, which could provide references for successful suppression of NTMs in future advanced tokamak such as international thermonuclear experimental reactor.

  3. Innovations in optical coupling of the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, T.; Tobias, B.; Kong, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Lee, W.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.

    2010-10-15

    The installation of a new electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is underway, making use of a unique optical port cassette design, which allows placement of refractive elements inside the cryostat region without adverse effects. The result is unprecedented window access for the implementation of a state of the art imaging diagnostic. A dual-array optical design has been developed, capable of simultaneously imaging the high and low field sides of the plasma with independent features of focal plane translation, vertical zoom, and radial channel spacing. The number of translating optics has been minimized by making use of a zoom lens triplet and parabolic plasma facing lens for maximum channel uniformity over a continuous vertical zoom range of 3:1. The simulated performance of this design is presented along with preliminary laboratory characterization data.

  4. Advanced Electronic Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-15

    It AD AObS 062 MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH LEXINGTON LINCOLN LAB F/S 9/S ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY .(U) NOV 78 A J MCLAUGHLIN. A L MCWHORTER...T I T U T E OF T E C H N O L O G Y L I N C O L N L A B O R A T O R Y ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY QUARTERLY TECKNICAL SUMMAR Y REPORT TO THE AIR...Division 8 (Solid State) on the Advanced Electronic Technology Program. Hi

  5. Characteristics of heat flux and electromagnetic electron-cyclotron instabilities driven by solar wind electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-01-01

    In-situ observations reveal the existence of electron velocity distribution function in the solar wind, where the net distribution can be modeled by a combination of core, halo and strahl. These components often possess a relative drift and with respective temperature anisotropies. The relative drift between the core and halo components leads to heat flux (HF) instability, while temperature anisotropies drive electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) instability. These instabilities have been separately studied in the literature, but for the first time, the present study combines both unstable modes in the presence of two free energy sources, namely, excessive parallel pressure and excessive perpendicular temperature. Heat flux instability (which is a left-hand circularly polarized mode) is effectively similar to electron firehose instability, except that the free energy is provided by net relative drift among two component electrons in the background of protons. The heat flux instability is discussed here along with (the right-hand polarized) EMEC instability driven by temperature anisotropy. The unstable heat flux mode is conventionally termed the "whistler" heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. Electromagnetic electron-cyclotron mode, on the other hand, reduces to the proper whistler wave in the absence of free energy source. The present combined analysis clarifies the polarization characteristics of these two modes in an unambiguous manner.

  6. Observation of Ion Cyclotron Heating in a Fast-flowing Plasma for an Advanced Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira; Hatanaka, Motoi; Shibata, Masaki; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Kunihiko; Inutake, Masaaki

    2004-11-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) project in NASA, the combined system of the ion cyclotron heating and the magnetic nozzle is proposed to control a ratio of specific impulse to thrust at constant power. In order to establish the advanced plasma thruster, experiments of an ion heating and plasma acceleration by a magnetic nozzle are performed in a fast-flowing plasma in the HITOP device. A fast-flowing He plasma is produced by Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arcjet (MPDA) operated with an externally-applied magnetic field up to 1kG. RF waves with an ion cyclotron range of frequency (f=20-300kHz) is excited by a helically-wound antenna located downstream of the MPDA. Increases of an ion temperature and plasma stored energy measured by a diamagnetic coil clearly observed during the RF pulse. The heating efficiency is compared for various magnetic field configurations and strengths. There appears no indication of cyclotron resonance in a high density plasma where the ratio of ion cyclotron frequency to ion-ion collision one is below unity, because an ion-ion collisional effect is dominant. When the density becomes low and the ratio of ion cyclotron frequency to ion-ion collision one becomes high, features of ion cyclotron resonance are clearly appeared. The optimum magnetic field strength for the ion heating is slightly lower than that of the cyclotron resonance, which is caused by the Doppler effect due to the fast-flowing plasma. An ion energy distribution function is measured at a magnetic nozzle region by an electrostatic analyzer and increase of the parallel velocity is also observed.

  7. Electron heating and superthermal electron enhancement due to electron cyclotron heating in ISX-B at 28 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, G.B.; Hsuan, H.; England, A.C.

    1983-05-01

    A series of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) experiments was performed with a 28-GHz gyrotron on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Up to 70 kW of microwave power was injected into ISX-B from the high field side. Bulk heating was observed with a central temperature rise of approx. 370 eV from an original temperature of approx. 600 eV, as measured by Thomson scattering. With ECH and under low density conditions, large nonthermal signals were observed on electron cyclotron emission diagnostics at the first, second, and third harmonics. These signals sometimes became quite large after the end of the ECH pulse. The effects observed can be attributed to relatively small changes in the electron distribution function. The temporal behavior of the enhanced emission is tentatively attributed to the pitch angle scattering of superthermal electrons.

  8. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J.R.; Schunk, R.W.

    1985-06-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves. 39 references.

  9. Coherent Cherenkov-Cyclotron Radiation Excited by an Electron Beam in a Metamaterial Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummelt, J. S.; Lu, X.; Xu, H.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    An electron beam passing through a metamaterial structure is predicted to generate reversed Cherenkov radiation, an unusual and potentially very useful property. We present an experimental test of this phenomenon using an intense electron beam passing through a metamaterial loaded waveguide. Power levels of up to 5 MW are observed in backward wave modes at a frequency of 2.40 GHz using a one microsecond pulsed electron beam of 490 keV, 84 A in a 400 G magnetic field. Contrary to expectations, the output power is not generated in the Cherenkov mode. Instead, the presence of the magnetic field, which is required to transport the electron beam, induces a Cherenkov-cyclotron (or anomalous Doppler) instability at a frequency equal to the Cherenkov frequency minus the cyclotron frequency. Nonlinear simulations indicate that the Cherenkov-cyclotron mode should dominate over the Cherenkov instability at a lower magnetic field where the highest output power is obtained.

  10. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves.

  11. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained.

  12. The Influence of Neutral Beam Injection on the Heating and Current Drive with Electron Cyclotron Wave on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pengxiang; Wu, Bin; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Yingying; Wang, Xiaoguang; Xu, Handong; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Hao, Baolong; Yang, Zhen; Zheng, Ting; Hu, Chundong

    2016-11-01

    Both neutral beam injection (NBI) and electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) have been applied on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in the 2015 campaign. In order to achieve more effective heating and current drive, the effects of NBI on the heating and current drive with electron cyclotron wave (ECW) are analyzed utilizing the code TORAY and experimental data in the shot #54411 and #54417. According to the experimental and simulated results, for the heating with ECW, NBI can improve the heating efficiency and move the power deposition place towards the inside of the plasma. On the other hand, for the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), NBI can also improve the efficiency of ECCD and move the place of ECCD inward. These results will be valuable for the center heating, the achievement of fully non-inductive current drive operation and the suppression of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities with ECW on EAST or ITER with many auxiliary heating methods. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB101001 and 2014DFG61950) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405212 and 11175211)

  13. Temperature gradient scale length measurement: A high accuracy application of electron cyclotron emission without calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshmandyar, S.; Yang, Z. J.; Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L.; Hubbard, A. E.; Rice, J. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2016-11-01

    Calibration is a crucial procedure in electron temperature (Te) inference from a typical electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic on tokamaks. Although the calibration provides an important multiplying factor for an individual ECE channel, the parameter ΔTe/Te is independent of any calibration. Since an ECE channel measures the cyclotron emission for a particular flux surface, a non-perturbing change in toroidal magnetic field changes the view of that channel. Hence the calibration-free parameter is a measure of Te gradient. BT-jog technique is presented here which employs the parameter and the raw ECE signals for direct measurement of electron temperature gradient scale length.

  14. Plasma ion dynamics and beam formation in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gambino, N.; Chikin, S.

    2010-02-15

    In electron cyclotron resonance ion sources it has been demonstrated that plasma heating may be improved by means of different microwave to plasma coupling mechanisms, including the ''frequency tuning'' and the ''two frequency heating''. These techniques affect evidently the electron dynamics, but the relationship with the ion dynamics has not been investigated in details up to now. Here we will try to outline these relations: through the study of ion dynamics we may try to understand how to optimize the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources brightness. A simple model of the ion confinement and beam formation will be presented, based on particle-in-cell and single particle simulations.

  15. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated Electron Cyclotron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S.; Conway, G. D.; Classen, I.; Creely, A. J.; Happel, T.; Vanovac, B.; White, A. E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    First measurements of core (r/a < 0.95) turbulent electron temperature fluctuations made on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak using a Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission (CECE) technique are presented. Validation of gyro-kinetic models against measurements of the underlying turbulent micro-structure are essential for developing predictive capabilities for future devices. In tokamak plasmas, turbulent temperature fluctuations are sufficiently broadband ( 0.5 MHz) and low-amplitude ( 1%) that conventional radiometer techniques are fundamentally unable to detect them and a correlation technique is required to further extract the signals. An application of the spectral decorrelation method had been designed and built for AUG. This CECE radiometer shares an optical path with a reflectometer and is sensitive to wavenumbers perpendicular to the magnetic field k⊥ up to 0.76 cm-1 . An upgrade to the focusing mirror will increase this range to k⊥ up to 1.4 cm-1. Measurements in Helium plasmas have been made at three radial locations simultaneously, providing a profile of the temperature fluctuation amplitude in the outer core of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated heated L-mode plasmas. New results and future plans will be presented. This work is supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-SC0006419.

  16. Kinetic instabilities in pulsed operation mode of a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2016-02-15

    The occurrence of kinetic plasma instabilities is studied in pulsed operation mode of a 14 GHz A-electron cyclotron resonance type electron cyclotron resonance ion source. It is shown that the temporal delay between the plasma breakdown and the appearance of the instabilities is on the order of 10-100 ms. The most important parameters affecting the delay are magnetic field strength and neutral gas pressure. It is demonstrated that kinetic instabilities limit the high charge state ion beam production in the unstable operating regime.

  17. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Lin, Y.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.; Calabro, G.; Crombé, K.; Frigione, D.; Giroud, C.; Lennholm, M.; Mantica, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Naulin, V.; Sozzi, C.; Studholme, W.; Tala, T.; Versloot, T.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-07-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost constant angular rotation. The core rotation is stronger in magnitude than observed for scenarios with dominating ion cyclotron absorption. Two scenarios are considered: the inverted mode conversion scenarios and heating at the second harmonic 3He cyclotron resonance in H plasmas. In the latter case, electron absorption of the fast magnetosonic wave by transit time magnetic pumping and electron Landau damping (TTMP/ELD) is the dominating absorption mechanism. Inverted mode conversion is done in (3He)-H plasmas where the mode converted waves are essentially absorbed by electron Landau damping. Similar rotation profiles are seen when heating at the second harmonic cyclotron frequency of 3He and with mode conversion at high concentrations of 3He. The magnitude of the counter-rotation is found to decrease with an increasing plasma current. The correlation of the rotation with the electron temperature is better than with coupled power, indicating that for these types of discharges the dominating mechanism for the rotation is related to indirect effects of electron heat transport, rather than to direct effects of ICRF heating. There is no conclusive evidence that mode conversion in itself affects rotation for these discharges.

  18. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  19. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S. Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  20. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-06-01

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α* of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α* is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  1. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Yun, G S; Lee, J E; Kim, M; Choi, M J; Lee, W; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Sabbagh, S A; Park, Y S; Lee, S G; Bak, J G

    2014-06-01

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α* of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α* is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  2. Electron cyclotron-electron Bernstein wave emission diagnostics for the COMPASS tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zajac, J; Preinhaelter, J; Urban, J; Zacek, F; Sestak, D; Nanobashvili, S

    2010-10-01

    The COMPASS tokamak recently started operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague. A new 16-channel radiometer, operating alternatively in three frequency bands, has been designed and constructed. The system is prepared for detection of normal electron cyclotron emission (O1 or X2) or oblique electron Bernstein wave emission. The end-to-end calibration method includes all components that influence the antenna radiation pattern. A steady recalibration is possible using a noise generator connected to the radiometer input through a fast waveguide PIN-switch. Measurements of the antenna radiation characteristics (2D electric field) were performed in free space as well as in the tokamak chamber, showing the degradation effect of structures on the Gaussian beam shape. First plasma radiation temperature measurements from low-field circular plasmas are available.

  3. Electron cyclotron-electron Bernstein wave emission diagnostics for the COMPASS tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zajac, J.; Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Zacek, F.; Sestak, D.

    2010-10-15

    The COMPASS tokamak recently started operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague. A new 16-channel radiometer, operating alternatively in three frequency bands, has been designed and constructed. The system is prepared for detection of normal electron cyclotron emission (O1 or X2) or oblique electron Bernstein wave emission. The end-to-end calibration method includes all components that influence the antenna radiation pattern. A steady recalibration is possible using a noise generator connected to the radiometer input through a fast waveguide PIN-switch. Measurements of the antenna radiation characteristics (2D electric field) were performed in free space as well as in the tokamak chamber, showing the degradation effect of structures on the Gaussian beam shape. First plasma radiation temperature measurements from low-field circular plasmas are available.

  4. Plans for Electron Bernstein Wave and Electron Cyclotron Heating in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Diem, S. J.; Ellis, R. A.; Fredd, E. H.; Greenough, N. L.; Hosea, J. C.; Bigelow, T. S.; Caughman, J. B.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Ershov, N. M.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Ram, A. K.

    2007-09-28

    A 200 kW, 28 GHz system for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron Bernstein wave heating (EBWH) is being installed on NSTX to assist solenoid-free startup, high harmonic fast wave heated current ramp up, and to support initial EBW coupling and heating studies. This system will provide on-axis second harmonic ECH/EBWH in NSTX. Fundamental on-axis heating may also be possible at 15.3 GHz by operating the gyrotron in a lower order TE01 cavity mode. Sufficient power supply capability will be provided to provide up to 1 MW of gyrotron power for future proof-of-principle EBWH experiments on NSTX. Initial modeling of an NSTX startup discharge with 28 GHz ECH is presented.

  5. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  6. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  7. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Seung Wook

    2016-02-15

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1–10 mm{sup 2}. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  8. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  9. Nonlinear Effects at Tokamak Electron Cyclotron Resonance in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Field.*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V.

    1996-11-01

    Nonlinear interaction of X- and O- modes with drift plasma waves is studied. The drift waves with frequency given by ωD ~ Ωc (ρ_e/r)^2 (ρe electron Larmor radius, Ωe electron cyclotron frequency, r small tokamak radius, where nabla Ω / Ωe ~ 1/R (for large tokamaks R ~ r)), are coupled to driver pump via scattering instability. Nonlocality of the interaction is taken into account. It is shown that nonlinear mechanism of interaction (Brillouin scattering) can be used as a tool for dynamic rf confinement^1 of tokamak plasmas. Particularly, it is possible to achieve longer confinement times due to suppression of drift wave turbulence. Supported by Tesla Laboratories, Inc., La Jolla, CA 92038-2946. ^1M.N. Rosenbluth (Editor-in-Chief). New Ideas in Tokamak Confinement. Research Trends in Physics Series of the La Jolla International School of Physics, The Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, La Jolla, CA (AIP Press, New York, 1994).

  10. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Pan, X M; Yang, Z J; Ma, X D; Zhu, Y L; Luhmann, N C; Domier, C W; Ruan, B W; Zhuang, G

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  11. Status of the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder at ISOLDE, CERN.

    PubMed

    Barton, Charles; Cederkall, Joakim; Delahaye, Pierre; Kester, Oliver; Lamy, Thierry; Marie-Jeanne, Mélanie

    2008-02-01

    We report here on the last progresses made with the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder test bench at ISOLDE. Recently, an experiment was performed to test the trapping of (61)Fe daughter nuclides from the decay of (61)Mn nuclides. Preliminary results are given.

  12. Simulation on the electronic wave packet cyclotron motion in a Weyl semimetal slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Zhu, Mingfeng; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2017-04-01

    We perform a numerical simulation on the time evolution of an electronic wave packet in a Weyl semimetal (WSM) slab driven by a magnetic field. We find that the evolution trajectory of the wave packet depends sensitively on its initial spin state. Only with initial spin state identical to that of the Fermi arc state at the surface it localized, does the wave packet evolution demonstrate the characteristic cyclotron orbit of WSM previously predicted from a semiclassical viewpoint. By analyzing the eigen-expansion of the electronic wave packet, we find the chiral Landau levels (LLs) of the WSM slab, as ingredients of the wave packet, to be responsible for establishing the characteristic WSM cyclotron orbit. In contrast, the nonchiral LLs contribute irregular oscillations to the wave packet evolution, going against the formation of a well-defined cyclotron orbit. In addition, the tilted magnetic field does not affect the motion of the electronic wave packet along the Fermi arcs in the momentum space. It does, however, alter the evolution trajectory of the electronic wave packet in real space and spin space. Finally, the energy disalignment of the Weyl nodes results in a 3D cyclotron orbit in real space.

  13. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-15

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described.

  14. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well.

  15. New Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostic Based Upon the Electron Bernstein Wave

    SciTech Connect

    P.C. Efthimion; J.C. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; G. Taylor

    1999-05-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics to measure temperature. They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition. The standard ECE technique measures the electromagnetic waves emanating from the plasma. Here we propose to measure electron Bernstein waves (EBW) to ascertain the local electron temperature in these plasmas. The optical thickness of EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large k(subscript i). One can reach the blackbody condition with a plasma density approximately equal to 10(superscript 11) cm(superscript -3) and electron temperature approximately equal to 1 eV. This makes it attractive to most plasma devices. One serious issue with using EBW is the wave accessibility. EBW may be accessible by either direct coupling or mode conversion through an extremely narrow layer (approximately 1-2 mm) in low field devices.

  16. Terahertz electron cyclotron maser interactions with an axis-encircling electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G. D.; Kao, S. H.; Chang, P. C.; Chu, K. R.

    2015-04-15

    To generate terahertz radiation via the electron cyclotron maser instability, harmonic interactions are essential in order to reduce the required magnetic field to a practical value. Also, high-order mode operation is required to avoid excessive Ohmic losses. The weaker harmonic interaction and mode competition associated with an over-moded structure present challenging problems to overcome. The axis-encircling electron beam is a well-known recipe for both problems. It strengthens the harmonic interaction, as well as minimizing the competing modes. Here, we examine these advantages through a broad data base obtained for a low-power, step-tunable, gyrotron oscillator. Linear results indicate far more higher-harmonic modes can be excited with an axis-encircling electron beam than with an off-axis electron beam. However, multi-mode, time-dependent simulations reveal an intrinsic tendency for a higher-harmonic mode to switch over to a lower-harmonic mode at a high beam current or upon a rapid current rise. Methods are presented to identify the narrow windows in the parameter space for stable harmonic interactions.

  17. Critical electron pitch angle anisotropy necessary for chorus generation. [Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Simultaneous wave, resonant-particle, and ambient-plasma data from OGO 5 for chorus emissions on August 15, 1968, were found consistent with the theoretical critical pitch-angle-anisotropy condition for whistler-mode instability by Doppler-shifted electron cyclotron resonance. Local generation, as determined by wave normal measurements, occurred only when the pitch-angle anisotropy of resonant electrons required for instability substantially exceeded the critical anisotropy defined by Kennel and Petschek (1966).

  18. Calibration of a 32 channel electron cyclotron emission radiometer on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Z. B. Jiang, M.; Huang, X. L.; Zhong, W. L.; Chen, W.; Che, Y. L.; Liu, Z. T.; Ding, X. T.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2014-02-15

    A novel 32-channel electron cyclotron emission radiometer has been designed and tested for the measurement of electron temperature profiles on the HL-2A tokamak. This system is based on the intermediate frequency filter detection technique, and has the features of wide working frequency range and high spatial resolution. Two relative calibration methods have been investigated: sweeping the toroidal magnetic field and hopping the output frequency of the local oscillator. Preliminary results show that both methods can ensure reasonable profiles.

  19. Measurements of the fast electron bremsstrahlung emission during electron cyclotron resonance heating in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Song, X. Y.; Yuan, G. L.; Chen, W.; Ji, X. Q.; Ding, X. T.; Yang, J. W.; Zhou, J.; Li, X.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.; Liu, Y.

    2010-10-15

    A fast electron bremsstrahlung (FEB) diagnostic technique based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector has been developed recently in the HL-2A tokamak for measurements of the temporal evolution of FEB emission in the energy range of 10-200 keV. With a perpendicular viewing into the plasma on the equatorial plane, the hard x-ray spectra with eight different energy channels are measured. The discrimination of the spectra is implemented by an accurate spectrometry. The system also makes use of fast digitization and software signal processing technology. An ambient environment of neutrons, gammas, and magnetic disturbance requires careful shielding. During electron cyclotron resonance heating, the generation of fast electrons and the oscillations of electron fishbone (e-fishbone) have been found. Using the FEB measurement system, it has been experimentally identified that the mode strongly correlates with the electron cyclotron resonance heating produced fast electrons with 30-70 keV.

  20. The effect of electron holes on cyclotron maser emission driven by horseshoe distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chu, Y. H.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    This Brief Communication presents a quantitative investigation for the effect of electron holes on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) driven by horseshoe distributions. The investigation is based on an integrated distribution function for the horseshoe distributions with electron holes. Results show that the presence of electron holes can significantly enhance the ECM growth rate by 2-3 times in a very narrow waveband. The present study suggests that these electron holes probably are responsible for some fine structures of radiations, such as narrowband events in auroral kilometric radiation and solar microwave spikes.

  1. Optimization of the ITER electron cyclotron equatorial launcher for improved heating and current drive functional capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2014-06-15

    The design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (EC H and CD) system has evolved in the last years both in goals and functionalities by considering an expanded range of applications. A large effort has been devoted to a better integration of the equatorial and the upper launchers, both from the point of view of the performance and of the design impact on the engineering constraints. However, from the analysis of the ECCD performance in two references H-mode scenarios at burn (the inductive H-mode and the advanced non-inductive scenario), it was clear that the EC power deposition was not optimal for steady-state applications in the plasma region around mid radius. An optimization study of the equatorial launcher is presented here aiming at removing this limitation of the EC system capabilities. Changing the steering of the equatorial launcher from toroidal to poloidal ensures EC power deposition out to the normalized toroidal radius ρ ≈ 0.6, and nearly doubles the EC driven current around mid radius, without significant performance degradation in the core plasma region. In addition to the improved performance, the proposed design change is able to relax some engineering design constraints on both launchers.

  2. Modification of argon impurity transport by electron cyclotron heating in KSTAR H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Joohwan; Henderson, S. S.; Kim, Kimin; Seon, C. R.; Song, Inwoo; Lee, H. Y.; Jang, Juhyeok; Park, Jae Sun; Lee, S. G.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, Seung Hun; Hong, Suk-Ho; Choe, Wonho

    2017-03-01

    Experiments with a small amount of Ar gas injection as a trace impurity were conducted in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) H-mode plasma ({{B}\\text{T}}   =  2.8 T, {{I}\\text{P}}   =  0.6 MA, and {{P}\\text{NBI}}   =  4.0 MW). 170 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) at 600 and 800 kW was focused along the mid-plane with a fixed major radial position of R   =  1.66 m. The emissivity of the Ar16+ (3.949 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) and Ar15+ (353.860 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) spectral lines were measured by x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) and a vacuum UV (VUV) spectrometer, respectively. ECH reduces the peak Ar15+ emission and increases the Ar16+ emission, an effect largest with 800 kW. The ADAS-SANCO impurity transport code was used to evaluate the Ar transport coefficients. It was found that the inward convective velocity found in the plasma core without ECH was decreased with ECH, while diffusion remained approximately constant resulting in a less-peaked Ar density profile. Theoretical results from the NEO code suggest that neoclassical transport is not responsible for the change in transport, while the microstability analysis using GKW predicts a dominant ITG mode during both ECH and non-ECH plasmas.

  3. The targeted heating and current drive applications for the ITER electron cyclotron system

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.; Darbos, C.; Gandini, F.; Gassmann, T.; Loarte, A.; Omori, T.; Purohit, D.; Saibene, G.; Gagliardi, M.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Hanson, G.; Poli, E.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-02-15

    A 24 MW Electron Cyclotron (EC) system operating at 170 GHz and 3600 s pulse length is to be installed on ITER. The EC plant shall deliver 20 MW of this power to the plasma for Heating and Current Drive (H and CD) applications. The EC system is designed for plasma initiation, central heating, current drive, current profile tailoring, and Magneto-hydrodynamic control (in particular, sawteeth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode) in the flat-top phase of the plasma. A preliminary design review was performed in 2012, which identified a need for extended application of the EC system to the plasma ramp-up, flattop, and ramp down phases of ITER plasma pulse. The various functionalities are prioritized based on those applications, which can be uniquely addressed with the EC system in contrast to other H and CD systems. An initial attempt has been developed at prioritizing the allocated H and CD applications for the three scenarios envisioned: ELMy H-mode (15 MA), Hybrid (∼12 MA), and Advanced (∼9 MA) scenarios. This leads to the finalization of the design requirements for the EC sub-systems.

  4. Ray Tracing Study of 170GHZ Electron Cyclotron Waves in Kstar Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young-Soon; Joung, M.; Yang, H. L.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H.; Park, H.; Prater, R.; Ellis, R. A.; Hosea, J.

    2011-02-01

    The electron cyclotron heating/current drive (ECH/ECCD) system has become an essential tool for the fusion plasma research in toroidal devices. In Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak, development of high power and multi-frequency ECH/ECCD system is in progress. The frequencies employed in KSTAR are 84 GHz, 110 GHz, and 170 GHz. Multiple frequency sources can easily support the wide range of operating regimes from 1.5 T to 3.5 T in KSTAR tokamak. In particular, the 170 GHz source, that will be adapted to the ITER, corresponds to the second harmonic frequency of the KSTAR operating range from 2.6 T to 3.5 T. This frequency will be mainly used for the control of the local plasma current profile to manipulate the internal MHD instabilities such as the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) critical in high-beta plasma operation. This paper presents simulated ray tracings of the 170 GHz EC waves for a various plasma conditions in KSTAR. The TORAY-GA ray tracing code is used, along with Interactive Data Language (IDL) procedures that create the input files, to study the effect of ECH/ECCD on the plasma equilibrium profiles as a function of the initial density and temperature profiles and of toroidal field.

  5. The design of a correlation electron cyclotron emission system on J-TEXT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z J; Xiao, Y; Ma, X D; Pan, X M; Xiao, J S

    2015-04-01

    To study the anomalous transport, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) was planned to be developed on J-TEXT for electron temperature fluctuation measurement. The spectral decorrelation method was employed for the CECE system. It was developed based on the previous 16-channel electron cyclotron emission system. They shared the optical transmission line and mixer. The CECE part consists of 4 channels. Two fixed frequency narrow band filters were used for two channels and two yttrium iron garnet (YIG) filters for the other two channels. To meet the measuring requirement, some tests have been taken for the YIG filters. The results show good performance of the filters. Gaussian optics is used to produce a good poloidal resolution. Wavenumbers resolved by the CECE diagnostic are k(θ) ≤ 1.5 rad/cm and k(r) ≤ 12 rad/cm. Some preliminary experiment results are also presented in this paper.

  6. The design of a correlation electron cyclotron emission system on J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. J.; Xiao, Y.; Ma, X. D.; Pan, X. M.; Xiao, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    To study the anomalous transport, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) was planned to be developed on J-TEXT for electron temperature fluctuation measurement. The spectral decorrelation method was employed for the CECE system. It was developed based on the previous 16-channel electron cyclotron emission system. They shared the optical transmission line and mixer. The CECE part consists of 4 channels. Two fixed frequency narrow band filters were used for two channels and two yttrium iron garnet (YIG) filters for the other two channels. To meet the measuring requirement, some tests have been taken for the YIG filters. The results show good performance of the filters. Gaussian optics is used to produce a good poloidal resolution. Wavenumbers resolved by the CECE diagnostic are kθ ≤ 1.5 rad/cm and kr ≤ 12 rad/cm. Some preliminary experiment results are also presented in this paper.

  7. Initial characterization of electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the Columbia Non-Neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Kenneth; Volpe, Francesco; Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-10-01

    The Columbia Non-Neutral Torus (CNT) is a stellarator at Columbia University recently modified for the study of quasi-neutral plasmas heated by 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron waves. Using a simple configuration of four circular planar coils, it generates magnetic surfaces with the lowest aspect ratios (1.9-2.7) ever attained by a stellarator. The low magnetic field (0.09 T), combined with the possibility of electron Bernstein wave heating above the cutoff density, could make CNT suitable for research of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability at high beta. Additional plans for future work include novel microwave and magnetic diagnostics, heating with electron cyclotron and helicon waves, and error field studies. Here we present an experimental characterization of the parameters of CNT's first microwave-heated plasmas. We present Langmuir probe measurements of temperature and density profiles, fast camera images, and equilibrium reconstructions computed by the VMEC code.

  8. Investigation of contamination of correlation ECE signals by electron cyclotron heating at DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, M. M.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Sung, C.; Carter, T. A.

    2016-10-01

    Correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) is commonly used at DIII-D to extract localized electron temperature fluctuations from passive emission. Very long coherence length signals (10's of cm in length) have been found to contaminate CECE measurements on some plasma discharges using electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Temperature fluctuations levels are observed to increase by as much as 50% due to this effect. Unabsorbed radiation from ECH is under investigation as a possible cause. A simple 1D code modeling the CECE data is used to investigate and test the effects of long coherence length contamination on the temperature fluctuation calculation. Data analysis methods to mitigate this effect have been designed and show significant promise in correcting the final results. Supported by US DOE DE-FG02-08ER54984 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. The design of a correlation electron cyclotron emission system on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z. J.; Xiao, Y.; Ma, X. D.; Pan, X. M.; Xiao, J. S.

    2015-04-15

    To study the anomalous transport, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) was planned to be developed on J-TEXT for electron temperature fluctuation measurement. The spectral decorrelation method was employed for the CECE system. It was developed based on the previous 16-channel electron cyclotron emission system. They shared the optical transmission line and mixer. The CECE part consists of 4 channels. Two fixed frequency narrow band filters were used for two channels and two yttrium iron garnet (YIG) filters for the other two channels. To meet the measuring requirement, some tests have been taken for the YIG filters. The results show good performance of the filters. Gaussian optics is used to produce a good poloidal resolution. Wavenumbers resolved by the CECE diagnostic are k{sub θ} ≤ 1.5 rad/cm and k{sub r} ≤ 12 rad/cm. Some preliminary experiment results are also presented in this paper.

  10. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive studies during current ramp-up in Tore-Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimini, F. G.; Basiuk, V.; Bourdelle, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Giruzzi, G.; Hoang, G. T.; Lennholm, M.; Sabot, R.; Ségui, J. L.; Thomas, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In a recent series of experiments, electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been successfully used, at a level of 0.75 MW, for current profile tailoring during the current ramp-up in Tore-Supra. The electron cyclotron resonance heating power deposition was varied from on-axis to off-axis and the direction of the driven current from co to counter. In these conditions, the current profile is significantly modified with respect to those typically obtained in pure ohmic scenarios. Central reversed magnetic shear conditions have been achieved with on-axis counter-ECCD, accompanied by high electron temperature gradients, exhibiting internal transport barrier features. This improved electron transport is maintained for some time on the current flat-top when combining ECCD with ion cyclotron resonance heating in a (H)D minority scheme. Integrated interpretative analysis with the CRONOS code confirms that deeply reversed magnetic shear is indeed attained by on-axis counter-ECCD in low density conditions and in combination with a relatively fast controlled current ramp. The high electron temperature gradient is found to be located inside the negative magnetic shear region.

  11. Ionospheric Modification at Twice the Electron Cyclotron Frequency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    height electron density reflected in ionograms obtained at HAARP and backscatter profiles deduced from ionograms recorded during the ex- monitored from... ionograms were care- Finally, we note the similarity between the current work fully refitted to obtain the true-height electron density and studies of

  12. Coherent Cherenkov-Cyclotron Radiation Excited by an Electron Beam in a Metamaterial Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hummelt, J S; Lu, X; Xu, H; Mastovsky, I; Shapiro, M A; Temkin, R J

    2016-12-02

    An electron beam passing through a metamaterial structure is predicted to generate reversed Cherenkov radiation, an unusual and potentially very useful property. We present an experimental test of this phenomenon using an intense electron beam passing through a metamaterial loaded waveguide. Power levels of up to 5 MW are observed in backward wave modes at a frequency of 2.40 GHz using a one microsecond pulsed electron beam of 490 keV, 84 A in a 400 G magnetic field. Contrary to expectations, the output power is not generated in the Cherenkov mode. Instead, the presence of the magnetic field, which is required to transport the electron beam, induces a Cherenkov-cyclotron (or anomalous Doppler) instability at a frequency equal to the Cherenkov frequency minus the cyclotron frequency. Nonlinear simulations indicate that the Cherenkov-cyclotron mode should dominate over the Cherenkov instability at a lower magnetic field where the highest output power is obtained.

  13. Influence of static electron beam`s self-fields on the cyclotron-undulator resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rozanov, N.E.; Golub, Yu.Ya. |

    1995-12-31

    When undulators with a leading magnetic field B are used, the regime of double resonance is possible in which an undulator period is equal to an electron cyclotron wavelength. In the vicinity of this resonance an amplitude of particle oscillations in the undulator strongly depends on a difference between B and a resonant value of the leading magnetic field. Consequently, it is important to investigate a role of self-fields of the electron beam, in particular, due to its influence on the electron cyclotron wavelength. At the paper analytically and by numerical simulation the influence of the static fields of the annular electron beam on its dynamics in the axisymmetrical magnetic undulator with the leading magnetic field in the vicinity of the cyclotron-undulator resonance is investigated. It is shown that the value of the resonant magnetic field is changed with the rise of beam`s current. A shift of the resonant magnetic field may be both to larger values of B and to smaller ones, when different values of beam and waveguide radii, beam energy and undulator period are considered. A width of the resonance (on B - scale) is increased with the beam current.

  14. Observation of electron temperature turbulence with a correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogi, Y.; Higashi, T.; Tamura, N.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kuwahara, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Mase, A.; Takehara, K.; Tokuzawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence measurement is important in the study of plasma confinement. We developed a multi-channel correlation electron cyclotron emission (cECE) radiometer system, using an existing conventional ECE radiometer system (RADH) on a large helical device (LHD) . The signal received by the RADH was split and fed to our cECE system, and then electron temperatures at three separate radial positions were measured by resolving frequency component with three narrow (200 MHz) band-pass filters. Data taken by the cECE system were compared with those taken by the RADH system. Turbulence-like signals below 10 kHz were detected by the cECE measurement using coherence analysis, but were not detected by RADH measurement. We considered this to be due to differences in the radial separation length between the two channels and in the radial measurement depth of each channel. The cECE system was able to detect higher frequency turbulence because its separation length and measurement depth in the radial direction was shorter than the correlation length of the turbulence.

  15. Electron-cyclotron wave scattering by edge density fluctuations in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Tsironis, Christos; Peeters, Arthur G.; Isliker, Heinz; Chatziantonaki, Ioanna; Vlahos, Loukas; Strintzi, Dafni

    2009-11-15

    The effect of edge turbulence on the electron-cyclotron wave propagation in ITER is investigated with emphasis on wave scattering, beam broadening, and its influence on localized heating and current drive. A wave used for electron-cyclotron current drive (ECCD) must cross the edge of the plasma, where density fluctuations can be large enough to bring on wave scattering. The scattering angle due to the density fluctuations is small, but the beam propagates over a distance of several meters up to the resonance layer and even small angle scattering leads to a deviation of several centimeters at the deposition location. Since the localization of ECCD is crucial for the control of neoclassical tearing modes, this issue is of great importance to the ITER design. The wave scattering process is described on the basis of a Fokker-Planck equation, where the diffusion coefficient is calculated analytically as well as computed numerically using a ray tracing code.

  16. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  17. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive for maintaining minimum q in negative central shear discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, T. A.; Kaiser, T. B.; Jong, R. A.; Destro, L. L. Lo; Moller, J.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Dodge, T.

    2003-07-01

    Toroidal plasmas created with negative magnetic shear in the core region offer advantages in terms of MHD stability properties. These plasmas, transiently created in several tokamaks, have exhibited high-performance as measured by normalized stored energy and neutron production rates. A critical issue with extending the duration of these plasmas is the need to maintain the off-axis-peaked current distribution required to support the minimum in the safety factor q at large radii. We present equilibrium and transport simulations that explore the use of electron cyclotron heating and current drive to maintain this negative shear configuration. Using parameters consistent with DIII-D tokamak operation (Strait E et al 1995 Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 4421, Rice B W et al 1996 Nucl. Fusion 36 1271), we find that with sufficiently high injected power, it is possible to achieve steady-state conditions employing well aligned electron cyclotron and bootstrap current drive in fully non-inductively current-driven configurations.

  18. Understanding the bursty electron cyclotron emission during a sawtooth crash in the HT-7 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Erzhong Hu, Liqun; Chen, Kaiyun

    2014-01-15

    Bursts in electron cyclotron emission (ECE) were observed during sawtooth crashes in HT-7 in discharges with ion cyclotron resonance heating injected near the q = 1 rational surface (q is the safety factor). The local ECE measurement indicated that the bursty radiation is only observed on channels near but a little away outward from the q = 1 magnetic surface. In conjunction with the soft x-ray tomography analysis, it was determined that, for the first time, only a compression process survives in the later stage of fast magnetic reconnection but before prompt heat transport. The compression enhanced the electron radiation temperature, the increased amplitude of which agreed well with the estimation according to a kinetic compression theory model [R. J. Hastie and T. C. Hender, Nucl. Fusion 28, 585 (1988)]. This paper presents the experimental evidence that there indeed exists a transient compression phase which results in the bursty ECE radiation during a sawtooth crash.

  19. Cyclotron auto resonance maser and free electron laser devices: a unified point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Palma, E.; Sabia, E.; Dattoli, G.; Licciardi, S.; Spassovsky, I.

    2017-02-01

    We take advantage of previous research in the field of cyclotron auto resonance maser (CARM) and undulator-based free electron laser (U-FEL) sources to establish a common formalism for the relevant description of the underlying physical mechanisms. This strategy is aimed at stressing the deep analogies between the two devices and at providing a practical tool for their study based on the use of well-tested scaling formulae developed independently for the two systems.

  20. Open problems of magnetic island control by electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Lazzaro, E.; Borgogno, D.; Comisso, L.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reviews key aspects of the problem of magnetic islands control by electron cyclotron current drive in fusion devices. On the basis of the ordering of the basic spatial and time scales of the magnetic reconnection physics, we present the established results, highlighting some of the open issues posed by the small-scale structures that typically accompany the nonlinear evolution of the magnetic islands and constrain the effect of the control action.

  1. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R.

    2013-11-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 29+} and 3.0 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 31+} from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  2. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Pardo, R; Scott, R

    2013-11-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 eμA of (202)Hg(29+) and 3.0 eμA of (202)Hg(31+) from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  3. Development of electron cyclotron emission imaging system on Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, D.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Nagayama, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Sugito, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kogi, Y.; Akaki, K.; Mase, A.

    2010-10-15

    A combined system of microwave imaging reflectometry and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging has been developed for the Large Helical Device. This system includes a wide-band two-dimensional horn-antenna mixer array (HMA). The HMA consists of horn antennas, waveguides, mixers, and intermediate frequency circuits. The frequency response of the HMA is between 50 and 110 GHz. The ECE signal is selected using a 95 GHz local oscillator and a 93 GHz high-pass filter.

  4. Electron Cloud Cyclotron Resonances in the Presence of a Short-bunch-length Relativistic Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-09-02

    Computer simulations using the 2D code"POSINST" were used to study the formation of the electron cloud in the wiggler section of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider. In order to simulate an x-y slice of the wiggler (i.e., a slice perpendicular to the beam velocity), each simulation assumed a constant vertical magnetic field. At values of the magnetic field where the cyclotron frequency was an integral multiple of the bunch frequency, and where the field strength was less than approximately 0.6 T, equilibrium average electron densities were up to three times the density found at other neighboring field values. Effects of this resonance between the bunch and cyclotron frequency are expected to be non-negligible when the beam bunch length is much less than the product of the electron cyclotron period and the beam velocity, for a beam moving at v~;;c. Details of the dynamics of the resonance are described.

  5. Millimeter-wave radiometer diagnostics of harmonic electron cyclotron emission in the Levitated Dipole Experiment.

    PubMed

    Woskov, P P; Kesner, J; Garnier, D T; Mauel, M E

    2010-10-01

    A 110/137 GHz radiometer pair with collimated antenna pattern is being used to diagnose optically thin harmonic electron cyclotron emission from hot electrons in LDX. Signal levels of 0.1-1 keV and 110/137 ratios of 2-4 stationary with ECRH power have been observed. The large plasma core magnetic field gradient causes all relevant harmonics to be simultaneously viewed over a angle(k,B) angular range of 0°-90° representing a unique geometry for interpretation of ECE in terms of hot electron temperature and density.

  6. Two-dimensional numerical model of electron cyclotron resonance discharge with pointwise mappings

    SciTech Connect

    Eruhimov, V.; Semenov, V.

    2006-03-15

    We suggest a new approach to numerical modeling of electron distribution function in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The method is based on a pointwise mapping of electron velocity over a single bounce oscillation. We limit our consideration to ECR heating, collisions, ionization, and ambipolar losses from the trap although other processes can be accounted for as well. The method gives a solution close to the brute-force particle-in-cell integration but is incomparably faster. Initial results of experiments are presented.

  7. Electron cyclotron heating of a tokamak reactor at down-shifted frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Mazzucato, E.

    1985-01-01

    The absorption of electron cyclotron waves in a hot and dense tokamak plasma is investigated for the case of the extraordinary mode for outside launching. It is shown that, for electron temperatures T/sub e/ greater than or equal to 5 keV, strong absorption occurs for oblique propagation at frequencies significantly below the electron gyrofrequency at the plasma center. A new density dependence of the wave absorption is found which is more favorable for plasma heating than the familiar n/sub e//sup -1/ scaling.

  8. Millimeter-wave radiometer diagnostics of harmonic electron cyclotron emission in the Levitated Dipole Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, P. P.; Kesner, J.; Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.

    2010-10-15

    A 110/137 GHz radiometer pair with collimated antenna pattern is being used to diagnose optically thin harmonic electron cyclotron emission from hot electrons in LDX. Signal levels of 0.1-1 keV and 110/137 ratios of 2-4 stationary with ECRH power have been observed. The large plasma core magnetic field gradient causes all relevant harmonics to be simultaneously viewed over a <(k,B) angular range of 0 deg. - 90 deg. representing a unique geometry for interpretation of ECE in terms of hot electron temperature and density.

  9. Observation of quasi-periodic frequency sweeping in electron cyclotron emission of nonequilibrium mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, M. E.; Shalashov, A. G.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Chirping frequency patterns have been observed in the electron cyclotron emission from strongly nonequilibrium plasma confined in a table-top mirror magnetic trap. Such patterns are typical for the formation of nonlinear phase-space structures in a proximity of the wave-particle resonances of a kinetically unstable plasma, also known as the “holes and clumps” mechanism. Our data provides the first experimental evidence for the acting of this mechanism in the electron cyclotron frequency domain.

  10. Laboratory study of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Mansfeld, Dmitry; Izotov, Ivan; Gospodchikov, Egor; Shalashov, Alexander; Demekhov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the use of a mirror-confined plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge for modeling of burst processes in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth associated with the implementation of the plasma cyclotron maser. Heating under the electron cyclotron resonance conditions allows to create two component plasma which is typical for the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. One of the most interesting electron cyclotron resonance manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. We investigate several regimes of cyclotron maser which are realized in dense and rarefied plasma, in the presence and absence of a permanent powerful gyrotron microwave radiation as a source of nonequilibrium particles in the plasma. Using the new technique for detection of microwave radiation we studied the dynamical spectrum and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic radiation from the plasma in a wide frequency band covering all types of cyclotron instabilities. Also possible applications for astrophysical plasma are discussed.

  11. Advances in intense beams, beam delivery, targetry, and radiochemistry at advanced cyclotron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Watt, R.; Kovac, B.; Zyuzin, A.; Van Lier, E.; Erdman, K. L.; Gyles, Wm.; Sabaiduc, V.; McQuarrie, S. A.; Wilson, J.; Backhouse, C.; Gelbart, Wm.; Kuo, T.

    2007-08-01

    The increasing demand for radionuclides for PET and SPECT has resulted in ACSI system improvements starting from the cyclotron and proceeding to the Radiochemistry Modules. With more TR30 cyclotrons installed and operating at full capacity, emphasis has been placed on improving the operational components to reduce both the incidence of failure and subsequent maintenance time. A cyclotron system has been developed that meets the needs of a regional radiopharmacy that supplies both positron and single photon emitters that would not otherwise be available. This new system has been named the TR24. In order to deal with some of the challenges of high currents, a method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil during high current irradiation of a water target used to produce F-18. A method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil to reduce unwanted chemical species that interfere with radiopharmaceutical production. Preliminary results for novel radioiodine production technique using the TR19/9 are also discussed.

  12. Conditions for electron-cyclotron maser emission in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosan, D. E.; Zucca, P.; Bloomfield, D. S.; Gallagher, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission ranging from long duration radio bursts associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections to more complex, short duration radio bursts such as solar S bursts, radio spikes and fibre bursts. While plasma emission is thought to be the dominant emission mechanism for most radio bursts, the electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) mechanism may be responsible for more complex, short-duration bursts as well as fine structures associated with long-duration bursts. Aims: We investigate the conditions for ECM in the solar corona by considering the ratio of the electron plasma frequency ωp to the electron-cyclotron frequency Ωe. The ECM is theoretically possible when ωp/ Ωe< 1. Methods: Two-dimensional electron density, magnetic field, plasma frequency, and electron cyclotron frequency maps of the off-limb corona were created using observations from SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO, together with potential field extrapolations of the magnetic field. These maps were then used to calculate ωp/Ωe and Alfvén velocity maps of the off-limb corona. Results: We found that the condition for ECM emission (ωp/ Ωe< 1) is possible at heights <1.07 R⊙ in an active region near the limb; that is, where magnetic field strengths are >40 G and electron densities are >3 × 108 cm-3. In addition, we found comparatively high Alfvén velocities (>0.02c or >6000 km s-1) at heights <1.07 R⊙ within the active region. Conclusions: This demonstrates that the condition for ECM emission is satisfied within areas of the corona containing large magnetic fields, such as the core of a large active region. Therefore, ECM could be a possible emission mechanism for high-frequency radio and microwave bursts.

  13. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Laulainen, J.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2015-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  14. Efficiency enhancement of anomalous-Doppler electron cyclotron masers with tapered magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chao-Ran; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Kong, Ling-Bao E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Liu, Pu-Kun E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Du, Chao-Hai; Jin, Hai-Bo

    2014-02-15

    The efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) is usually low, thus limiting the practical applications. Here, a method of tapered magnetic field is introduced for the efficiency enhancement of the slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the tapered magnetic-field method can enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM significantly. The effect of beam electron velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread reduces the efficiency, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be obtained by the tapered magnetic field method.

  15. Particle simulation of intense electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-10-12

    High-power free-electron lasers make new methods possible for heating plasmas and driving current in toroidal plasmas with electromagnetic waves. We have undertaken particle simulation studies with one and two dimensional, relativistic particle simulation codes of intense pulsed electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive. The particle simulation methods here are conventional: the algorithms are time-centered, second-order-accurate, explicit, leap-frog difference schemes. The use of conventional methods restricts the range of space and time scales to be relatively compact in the problems addressed. Nevertheless, experimentally relevant simulations have been performed. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  17. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  18. Design of a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Oshima National College of Maritime Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Hirabara, N.; Izumihara, T.; Nakamizu, T.; Ohba, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion/plasma source has been designed and will be built at Oshima National College of Maritime Technology by early 2014. We have developed an ion source that allows the control of the plasma parameters over a wide range of electron temperatures for material research. A minimum-B magnetic field composed of axial mirror fields and radial cusp fields was designed using mainly Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. The axial magnetic field can be varied by three solenoid coils. The apparatus has 2.45 GHz magnetron and 2.5–6.0 GHz solid-state microwave sources.

  19. Electron cyclotron maser emission at oblique angles. [decametric radio bursts from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Possible causes of observations of electron cyclotron maser emissions (ECMEs) at oblique angle (about 60 deg) to the magnetic field are investigated. The paper discusses general concepts of ECME in terms of resonant ellipses and considers electron distributions required to produce ECME at oblique angles, as well as the ways in which the most favorable of these distributions may be produced. A mechanism is proposed that might produce an appropriate 'spiraling beam' distribution, with a peak in velocity space at speed v - v(0) and pitch angle alpha = alpha(0) not equal to 0.

  20. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  1. Commissioning of electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument on the DIII-D tokamak and first data

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Yu, L.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Classen, I. G. J; Boom, J. E.; Donne, A. J. H.; Munsat, T.; Nazikian, R.; Van Zeeland, M.; Boivin, R. L.

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic has been commissioned on the DIII-D tokamak. Dual detector arrays provide simultaneous two-dimensional images of T{sub e} fluctuations over radially distinct and reconfigurable regions, each with both vertical and radial zoom capability. A total of 320 (20 verticalx16 radial) channels are available. First data from this diagnostic demonstrate the acquisition of coherent electron temperature fluctuations as low as 0.1% with excellent clarity and spatial resolution. Details of the diagnostic features and capabilities are presented.

  2. Observations of correlated broadband electrostatic noise and electron-cyclotron emissions in the plasma sheet. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, J.L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Baumjohann, W.; Anderson, R.R.

    1991-11-15

    Electric field wave observations in the central plasma sheet of the earth's magnetosphere show the correlated occurrence of broadband electrostatic noise and electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic emissions. A model is proposed in which the broadband emissions are electron acoustic waves generated by an observed low energy electron beam, and the cyclotron emissions are generated by the hot electron loss cone instability. The high degree of correlation between the two emissions is provided in the model by the presence of the cold electron beam population, which allows both of the plasma instabilities to grow.

  3. Analysis of x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.; Sunil Sunny, C.

    2006-03-15

    The analysis of the x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source is carried out. Assuming single-particle motion, the electron acceleration and its final energy are calculated for TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity field and uniform external dc magnetic field. In the calculation, initial coordinates of 40 000 electrons were uniformly selected over the central plane of the cavity using random number generator. The final energy of each electron when it hits the wall is stored and the electron energy distribution is obtained. Using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4A, the geometry of the ECR x-ray source is modeled. The x-ray energy spectrum is calculated for the geometry model and the numerically calculated electron energy distribution. The calculated x-ray spectrum is compared with the experimentally measured x-ray spectrum.

  4. Turbulence and transport during electron cyclotron heating in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, T L; Peebles, W A; DeBoo, J C; Prater, R; Kinsey, J E; deGrassie, J S; Bravenec, R V; Burrell, K H; Lohr, J; Petty, C C; Nguyen, X V; Doyle, E J; Greenfield, C M; Zeng, L; Zeeland, M A; Wang, G; Makowski, M A; Staebler, G M; St. John, H E; Solomon, W M

    2007-06-26

    The response of plasma parameters and broad wavenumber turbulence (1--40 cm{sup -1}, k{rho}{sub s} = 0.1--8) to auxiliary electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is reported on. In these plasmas the electron temperature responds most strongly to the ECH while the electron density and ion temperature are kept approximately constant. Thermal fluxes and diffusivities increase appreciably with ECH for both electron and ion channels. Significant changes to the density fluctuations over the full range of measured wavenumbers are observed. This range of wavenumbers encompasses that typically associated with ion temperature gradient, trapped electron mode, and electron temperature gradient modes. Changes in linear growth rates calculated using a gyrokinetic code show consistency with observed fluctuation increases over the whole range of wavenumbers.

  5. Electron acceleration by Z-mode waves associated with cyclotron maser instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, L. C.; Omura, Y.

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate by a particle simulation that Z-mode waves generated by the cyclotron maser instability can lead to a significant acceleration of energetic electrons. In the particle simulation, the initial electron ring distribution leads to the growth of Z-mode waves, which then accelerate and decelerate the energetic ring electrons. The initial ring distribution evolves into an X-like pattern in momentum space, which can be related to the electron diffusion curves. The peak kinetic energy of accelerated electrons can reach 3 to 6 times the initial kinetic energy. We further show that the acceleration process is related to the 'nonlinear resonant trapping' in phase space, and the test-particle calculations indicate that the maximum electron energy gain {Delta}{epsilon}{sub max} is proportional to B{sub w}{sup 0.57}, where B{sub w} is the wave magnetic field.

  6. Production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using multifrequencies microwaves and active beam profile control on a large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Watanabe, Takeyoshi; Matsui, Yuuki; Hirai, Yoshiaki; Kutsumi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Naoki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of magnets assembly, i.e., comb-shaped magnet which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  7. Calibration of the Electron Cyclotron Diagnostic for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L.; Austin, M. E.; Gentle, K. W.; Huang, H.; Beno, J. H.; Ouroua, A.; Ang, T.; Yang, Z. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electron temperature measurements will be critical to the non-active and deuterium phase of ITER operation and will take on added importance during the alpha heating phase. The ECE diagnostic for these measurements has front end components that must operate reliably during long pulse operation with high neutron and gamma fluxes in spite of limited opportunities for maintenance. Hence, an in-situ emission source is required to calibrate changes in the front end transmission. The calibration unit is a black body emitter (emissivity > 0.75, 100 GHz < f < 1000 GHz) that operates in vacuum at high temperature (700° C) without adversely affecting the vacuum or nearby diagnostics. It was developed at UT-Austin. Long-term field testing at EAST and J-TEXT is underway using variations of the ITER design tailored for the machines. Operation in the field at full temperature verified the basic design and suggested improvements in the heater design. Supported by US-IPO and US DOE grant DE-FG03-97ER54415.

  8. A multi-sample changer coupled to an electron cyclotron resonance source for accelerator mass spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Peters, C; Power, M; Scott, R

    2014-02-01

    A new multi-sample changer has been constructed allowing rapid changes between samples. The sample changer has 20 positions and is capable of moving between samples in 1 min. The sample changer is part of a project using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility to measure neutron capture rates on a wide range of actinides in a reactor environment. This project will require the measurement of a large number of samples previously irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The sample material is introduced into the plasma via laser ablation chosen to limit the dependency of material feed rates upon the source material composition as well as minimize cross-talk between samples.

  9. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  10. The electron-cyclotron maser instability as a source of plasma radiation. [Solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The generation of continuum bursts from the sun at dm and m wavelengths (in particular, type IV bursts) via the electron-cyclotron-maser instability is examined. The maser instability can be driven by an electron distribution with either a loss-cone anisotropy or a peak at large pitch angles. For omega(p)/Omega(e) much greater than 1, the maser emission is produced by electrons interacting through a harmonic (cyclotron) resonance and is electrostatic, being in the upper hybrid mode at frequencies approximately equal to omega(p). Coalescence processes are required to convert the electrostatic waves into transverse radiation which can escape from the source region. Whether the resultant spectrum is nearly a smooth continuum or has a zebra-stripe pattern (both of which occur in type IV bursts) depends on the form of the electron distribution, inhomogeneities in the density and magnetic field, and whether the maser reaches saturation. For at least the case of some type IV dm bursts with fine structure, comparison with observations seems to indicate that the electrons producing the emission are more likely to have a loss-cone distribution, and that the maser instability is not at saturation.

  11. Development of electron cyclotron emission imaging system on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, M.; Shi, Z. B.; Liu, Z. T.; Ding, X. T.; Li, J.; Zhong, W. L.; Chen, W.; Che, Y. L.; Fu, B. Z.; Cui, Z. Y.; Sun, P.; Liu, Y.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Che, S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Hu, X.; Spear, A.

    2013-11-15

    A 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system has been developed for measurement of electron temperature fluctuations in the HL-2A tokamak. It is comprised of a front-end 24 channel heterodyne imaging array with a tunable RF range spanning 75–110 GHz, and a set of back-end ECEI electronics that together generate 24 × 8 = 192 channel images of the 2nd harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron emission from the HL-2A plasma. The simulated performance of the local oscillator (LO) optics and radio frequency (RF) optics is presented, together with the laboratory characterization results. The Gaussian beams from the LO optics are observed to properly cover the entire detector array. The ECE signals from the plasma are mixed with the LO signal in the array box, then delivered to the electronics system by low-loss microwave cables, and finally to the digitizers. The ECEI system can achieve temporal resolutions of ∼μs, and spatial resolutions of 1 cm (radially) and 2 cm (poloidally)

  12. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  13. ARTEMIS-B: A room-temperature test electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University

    SciTech Connect

    Machicoane, G.; Cole, D.; Ottarson, J.; Stetson, J.; Zavodszky, P.

    2006-03-15

    The current scheme for ion-beam injection into the coupled cyclotron accelerator at the NSCL involves the use of two electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The first one is a 6.4 GHz fully superconducting that will be replaced within two years by SUSI, a third generation 18 GHz superconducting ECR ion source. The other source, ARTEMIS, is a room-temperature source based on the AECR-U design and built in collaboration with the University of Jyvaeskylae in 1999. Due to cyclotron operation constraint, very little time can be allowed to ion source development and optics studies of the cyclotron injection beam line. In this context, NSCL has decided to build ARTEMIS-B an exact replica of its room-temperature ECR ion source. The goal of this project is threefold. One is to improve the overall reliability of cyclotron operation through tests and studies of various ion source parameters that could benefit beam stability, tuning reproducibility, and of course overall extracted currents performance. Second is to implement and test modifications or upgrade made to the ion source: extraction geometry, new resistive or rf oven design, dual frequency use, liner, etc. Finally, this test source will be used to study various ion optics schemes such as electrostatic quadrupole doublet or triplet at the source extraction or the use of a correction sextupole and assess their effect on the ion beam through the use of an emittance scanner and imaging viewer that will be incorporated into ARTEMIS-B beam line. This article reviews the design and construction of ARTEMIS-B along with some initial commissioning results.

  14. The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with inclusion of the beam velocity spread

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Ling-Bao; Wang, Hong-Yu; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Jin, Hai-Bo; Du, Chao-Hai

    2013-12-15

    The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) with an initially straight electron beam is developed. The evolution equation of the nonlinear beam electron energy is derived. The numerical studies of the slow-wave ECM efficiency with inclusion of Gaussian beam velocity spread are presented. It is shown that the velocity spread reduces the interaction efficiency. -- Highlights: •The theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers is considered. •The calculation of efficiency under the resonance condition is presented. •The efficiency under Gaussian velocity spreads has been obtained.

  15. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  16. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime. PMID:26525516

  17. Major results of the electron cyclotron heating experiment in the PDX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hsuan, H.; Bol, K.; Bowen, N.; Boyd, D.; Cavallo, A.; Dimits, A.; Doane, J.; Elder, G.; Goldman, M.; Grek, B.

    1984-07-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) experiments on PDX have been carried out with two 60 GHz pulsed gyrotrons each yielding up to approximately 100 kW. The ECH system used two waveguide runs each about 30 meters long. One run included 5 bends and the other, 7 bends. Predetermined waveguide modes were transmitted. The electron cyclotron waves were launched in narrow beams from both the high field and the low field sides of the plasma torus. The major new physics results are: (1) efficient central electron heating for both ohmic and neutral beam heated target plasmas; (2) alteration of MHD behavior using ECH; (3) identification of the trapped electron population with ECH; and (4) signature of velocity-space time evolution during ECH. In the best heating results obtained, Thomson scattering data indicated a central temperature increase from less than or equal to 1.5 keV to greater than or equal to 2.5 keV. This occurred with an average density of about 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and approximately 80 kW outside-launch ordinary-mode heating.

  18. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime.

  19. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Kitaoka, H.

    2014-07-15

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30 eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  20. Physics design of the in-vessel collection optics for the ITER electron cyclotron emission diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Rowan, W L; Houshmandyar, S; Phillips, P E; Austin, M E; Beno, J H; Hubbard, A E; Khodak, A; Ouroua, A; Taylor, G

    2016-11-01

    Measurement of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) is one of the primary diagnostics for electron temperature in ITER. In-vessel, in-vacuum, and quasi-optical antennas capture sufficient ECE to achieve large signal to noise with microsecond temporal resolution and high spatial resolution while maintaining polarization fidelity. Two similar systems are required. One views the plasma radially. The other is an oblique view. Both views can be used to measure the electron temperature, while the oblique is also sensitive to non-thermal distortion in the bulk electron distribution. The in-vacuum optics for both systems are subject to degradation as they have a direct view of the ITER plasma and will not be accessible for cleaning or replacement for extended periods. Blackbody radiation sources are provided for in situ calibration.

  1. Improved system for perpendicular electron-cyclotron emission measurements on TMX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C.J.; Ellis, R.F.; James, R.A.

    1986-03-07

    Perpendicular electron-cyclotron emission (PECE) is used on TMX-U to diagnose thermal-barrier hot electrons (T/sub H/ approx. 100 to 400 keV); yielding the time history of the temperature of these relativistic electrons. We describe an improved quasi-optical viewing system for these measurements that uses high sensitivity superheterodyne receivers at fixed frequencies of 60, 98, 130, and 196 GHz. The improved viewing and transport system consists of an off-axis ellipsoidal mirror that images the plasma onto a V-band conical collection horn, an overmoded circular waveguide (7/8'' diam) that transports the radiation outside the vacuum vessel where the polarization is selected, and a high absorptivity Macor beam dump to prevent internal wall reflections from entering the viewing system. A relativistic code is used to calculate optically thin PECE signals from relativistic electrons for various energy and pitch angle distributions. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Improved system for perpendicular electron-cyclotron emission measurements on TMX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C.J.; Ellis, R.F.; James, R.A.

    1986-08-01

    Perpendicular electron-cyclotron emission (PECE) is used on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) to diagnose thermal-barrier hot electrons (T-italic/sub H-italic/--100--400 keV, yielding the time history of the temperature of these relativistic electrons. We describe an improved quasioptical viewing system for these measurements that uses high-sensitivity superheterodyne receivers at fixed frequencies of 60, 98, 130, and 196 GHz. The improved viewing and transport system consists of an off-axis ellipsoidal mirror that images the plasma onto a V-band conical collection horn, an overmoded circular waveguide ( 7/8 in. diam) that transports the radiation outside the vacuum vessel where the polarization is selected, and a high-absorptivity Macor beam dump to prevent internal wall reflections from entering the viewing system. A relativistic code is used to calculate optically thin PECE signals from relativistic electrons for various energy and pitch angle distributions.

  3. Diffusion coefficients from resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.

    2009-11-15

    Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients have been calculated for resonant interaction with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves using quasilinear diffusion theory. Unlike previous calculations, the parallel group velocity has been included in this study. Further, ECH wave intensity is expressed as a function of wave frequency and wave normal angle with respect to ambient magnetic field. It is found that observed wave electric field amplitudes in Earth's magnetosphere are sufficient to set electrons on strong diffusion in the energy ranges of a few hundred eV. However, the required amplitudes are larger than the observed values for keV electrons and higher by about a factor of 3 compared to past calculations. Required electric field amplitudes are smaller at larger radial distances. It is concluded that ECH waves are responsible for diffuse auroral precipitation of electrons with energies less than about 500 eV.

  4. Physics design of the in-vessel collection optics for the ITER electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, W. L.; Houshmandyar, S.; Phillips, P. E.; Austin, M. E.; Beno, J. H.; Hubbard, A. E.; Khodak, A.; Ouroua, A.; Taylor, G.

    2016-11-01

    Measurement of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) is one of the primary diagnostics for electron temperature in ITER. In-vessel, in-vacuum, and quasi-optical antennas capture sufficient ECE to achieve large signal to noise with microsecond temporal resolution and high spatial resolution while maintaining polarization fidelity. Two similar systems are required. One views the plasma radially. The other is an oblique view. Both views can be used to measure the electron temperature, while the oblique is also sensitive to non-thermal distortion in the bulk electron distribution. The in-vacuum optics for both systems are subject to degradation as they have a direct view of the ITER plasma and will not be accessible for cleaning or replacement for extended periods. Blackbody radiation sources are provided for in situ calibration.

  5. Demonstration of effective control of fast-ion-stabilized sawteeth by electron-cyclotron current drive.

    PubMed

    Lennholm, M; Eriksson, L-G; Turco, F; Bouquey, F; Darbos, C; Dumont, R; Giruzzi, G; Jung, M; Lambert, R; Magne, R; Molina, D; Moreau, P; Rimini, F; Segui, J-L; Song, S; Traisnel, E

    2009-03-20

    In a tokamak plasma, sawtooth oscillations in the central temperature, caused by a magnetohydrodynamic instability, can be partially stabilized by fast ions. The resulting less frequent sawtooth crashes can trigger unwanted magnetohydrodynamic activity. This Letter reports on experiments showing that modest electron-cyclotron current drive power, with the deposition positioned by feedback control of the injection angle, can reliably shorten the sawtooth period in the presence of ions with energies >or=0.5 MeV. Certain surprising elements of the results are evaluated qualitatively in terms of existing theory.

  6. Enhancing the efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with the tapered refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Lingbao; Hou Zhiling; Jing Jian; Jin Haibo; Du Chaohai

    2013-04-15

    The nonlinear analysis of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) based on anomalous Doppler effect in a slab waveguide is presented. A method of tapered refractive index (TRI) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the TRI method can significantly enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM with the frequency ranging from the microwave to terahertz band. The effect of beam velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread suppresses the efficiency significantly, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be introduced by the TRI method.

  7. A 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer on J-TEXT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z J; Phillips, P E; Zhuang, G; Xiao, J S; Huang, H; Rowan, W L; Wang, Z J

    2012-10-01

    To study equilibrium temporal dynamics and the mechanisms of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, a 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed to view the J-TEXT tokamak from the low field side. The ECE radiometer detects second-harmonic extraordinary mode in the frequency band of 94-125 GHz which corresponds to resonances from 1.8 T to 2.2 T. This ECE system consists of an ECE transmission line, a radio frequency unit, and two 8-channel intermediate frequency units. An in situ blackbody calibration source is applied for system calibration by comparison of hot and cold sources in order to provide an absolute temperature measurement.

  8. A 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Xiao, J. S.; Wang, Z. J.; Phillips, P. E.; Huang, H.; Rowan, W. L.

    2012-10-15

    To study equilibrium temporal dynamics and the mechanisms of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, a 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed to view the J-TEXT tokamak from the low field side. The ECE radiometer detects second-harmonic extraordinary mode in the frequency band of 94-125 GHz which corresponds to resonances from 1.8 T to 2.2 T. This ECE system consists of an ECE transmission line, a radio frequency unit, and two 8-channel intermediate frequency units. An in situ blackbody calibration source is applied for system calibration by comparison of hot and cold sources in order to provide an absolute temperature measurement.

  9. Effect of pulse-modulated microwaves on fullerene ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Asaji, T; Uchida, T; Minezaki, H; Oshima, K; Racz, R; Muramatsu, M; Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Kato, Y; Yoshida, Y

    2012-02-01

    Fullerene plasmas generated by pulse-modulated microwaves have been investigated under typical conditions at the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The effect of the pulse modulation is distinct from that of simply structured gases, and then the density of the fullerene plasmas increased as decreasing the duty ratio. The density for a pulse width of 10 μs at the period of 100 μs is 1.34 times higher than that for CW mode. We have studied the responses of fullerene and argon plasmas to pulsed microwaves. After the turnoff of microwave power, fullerene plasmas lasted ∼30 times longer than argon plasmas.

  10. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  11. Rotation drive and momentum transport with electron cyclotron heating in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Sakamoto, Y; Takenaga, H; Ide, S; Oyama, N; Kobayashi, T; Kamada, Y

    2009-08-07

    The role of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) on the toroidal rotation velocity profile has been investigated in the JT-60U tokamak device by separating the effects of the change in momentum transport, the intrinsic rotation by pressure gradient, and the intrinsic rotation by ECRH. It is found that ECRH increases the toroidal momentum diffusivity and the convection velocity. It is also found that ECRH drives the codirection (co) intrinsic rotation inside the EC deposition radius and the counterdirection (ctr) intrinsic rotation outside the EC deposition radius. This ctr rotation starts from the EC deposition radius and propagates to the edge region.

  12. The third generation superconducting 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Taylor, C.; Abbott, S.

    2010-02-15

    VENUS is a third generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, which incorporates a high field superconducting NbTi magnet structure, a 28 GHz gryotron microwave source and a state of the art closed cycle cryosystem. During the decade from initial concept to regular operation, it has demonstrated both the feasibility and the performance levels of this new generation of ECR ion sources and required innovation on magnet construction, plasma chamber design, and beam transport. In this paper, the development, performance, and major innovations are described as well as a look to the potential to construct a fourth generation ECR ion source.

  13. Simulation and beamline experiments for the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Damon S.; Leitner, Daniela; Lyneis, Claude M.; Grote, David P.

    2008-02-15

    The particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to incorporate both two- and three-dimensional sheath extraction models giving WARP the capability of simulating entire ion beam transport systems including the extraction of beams from plasma sources. In this article, we describe a method of producing initial ion distributions for plasma extraction simulations in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources based on experimentally measured sputtering on the source biased disk. Using this initialization method, we present preliminary results for extraction and transport simulations of an oxygen beam and compare them with experimental beam imaging on a quartz viewing plate for the superconducting ECR ion source VENUS.

  14. Bio-Nano ECRIS: An electron cyclotron resonance ion source for new materials production

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Minezaki, H.; Tanaka, K.; Asaji, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    We developed an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for new materials production on nanoscale. Our main target is the endohedral fullerenes, which have potential in medical care, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. In particular, iron-encapsulated fullerene can be applied as a contrast material for magnetic resonance imaging or microwave heat therapy. Thus, our new ECRIS is named the Bio-Nano ECRIS. In this article, the recent progress of the development of the Bio-Nano ECRIS is reported: (i) iron ion beam production using induction heating oven and (ii) optimization of singly charged C{sub 60} ion beam production.

  15. Note: Upgrade of electron cyclotron emission imaging system and preliminary results on HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, M. Shi, Z. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Chen, W.; Liu, Z. T.; Ding, X. T.; Yang, Q. W.; Zhang, B. Y.; Shi, P. W.; Liu, Y.; Fu, B. Z.; Xu, Y.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Yang, Z. C.

    2015-07-15

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging system on the HL-2A tokamak has been upgraded to 24 (poloidally) × 16 (radially) channels based on the previous 24 × 8 array. The measurement region can be flexibly shifted due to the independence of the two local oscillator sources, and the field of view can be adjusted easily by changing the position of the zoom lenses. The temporal resolution is about 2.5 μs and the achievable spatial resolution is 1 cm. After laboratory calibration, it was installed on HL-2A tokamak in 2014, and the local 2D mode structures of MHD activities were obtained for the first time.

  16. Status of the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Toyo University.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Minezaki, H; Ishihara, S; Muramatsu, M; Rácz, R; Asaji, T; Kitagawa, A; Kato, Y; Biri, S; Drentje, A G; Yoshida, Y

    2014-02-01

    In the paper, the material science experiments, carried out recently using the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at Toyo University, are reported. We have investigated several methods to synthesize endohedral C60 using ion-ion and ion-molecule collision reaction in the ECRIS. Because of the simplicity of the configuration, we can install a large choice of additional equipment in the ECRIS. The Bio-Nano ECRIS is suitable not only to test the materials production but also to test technical developments to improve or understand the performance of an ECRIS.

  17. Bio-Nano ECRIS: An electron cyclotron resonance ion source for new materials productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Minezaki, H.; Tanaka, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Asaji, T.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Biri, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2010-02-01

    We developed an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for new materials production on nanoscale. Our main target is the endohedral fullerenes, which have potential in medical care, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. In particular, iron-encapsulated fullerene can be applied as a contrast material for magnetic resonance imaging or microwave heat therapy. Thus, our new ECRIS is named the Bio-Nano ECRIS. In this article, the recent progress of the development of the Bio-Nano ECRIS is reported: (i) iron ion beam production using induction heating oven and (ii) optimization of singly charged C60 ion beam production.

  18. Development of a prototype T-shaped fast switching device for electron cyclotron current drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nagashima, Koji; Honzu, Toshihiko; Saigusa, Mikio; Oda, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2016-09-01

    A T-shaped high-power switching device composed of circular corrugated waveguides with three ports and double dielectric disks made of sapphire was proposed as a fast switching device based on a new principle in electron cyclotron current drive systems. This switching device has the advantages of operating at a fixed frequency and being compact. The design of the prototype switch was obtained by numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The size of these components was optimized for the frequency band of 170 GHz. Low-power tests were carried out in a cross-shaped model.

  19. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  20. Performance of the Argonne National Laboratory electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kolomiets, A.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2011-05-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the Californium rare ion breeder upgrade (CARIBU), a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), has been constructed and commissioned. Charge breeding efficiencies up to 15.6% have been realized for stable beams with a typical breeding time of 10 ms/charge state. The CARIBU system has been undergoing commissioning tests utilizing a 100 mCi {sup 252}Cf fission source. A charge breeding efficiency of 14.8 {+-} 5% has been achieved for the first radioactive beam of {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+}.

  1. Performance of the Argonne National Laboratory electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Kolomiets, A.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2011-05-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the Californium rare ion breeder upgrade (CARIBU), a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), has been constructed and commissioned. Charge breeding efficiencies up to 15.6% have been realized for stable beams with a typical breeding time of 10 ms/charge state. The CARIBU system has been undergoing commissioning tests utilizing a 100 mCi 252Cf fission source. A charge breeding efficiency of 14.8 ± 5% has been achieved for the first radioactive beam of 143Cs27+.

  2. Development of DRAGON electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Xie, D Z; Zhang, X Z; Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Sha, S; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Lin, S H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Guo, X H; Li, X X; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Wu, Q; Zhao, H Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Li, J Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W

    2012-02-01

    A new room temperature electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, DRAGON, is under construction at IMP. DRAGON is designed to operate at microwaves of frequencies of 14.5-18 GHz. Its axial solenoid coils are cooled with evaporative medium to provide an axial magnetic mirror field of 2.5 T at the injection and 1.4 T at the extraction, respectively. In comparison to other conventional room temperature ECR ion sources, DRAGON has so far the largest bore plasma chamber of inner diameter of 126 mm with maximum radial fields of 1.4-1.5 T produced by a non-Halbach permanent sextupole magnet.

  3. Note: Upgrade of electron cyclotron emission imaging system and preliminary results on HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M; Shi, Z B; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Zhong, W L; Chen, W; Liu, Z T; Ding, X T; Yang, Q W; Zhang, B Y; Yang, Z C; Shi, P W; Liu, Y; Fu, B Z; Xu, Y

    2015-07-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging system on the HL-2A tokamak has been upgraded to 24 (poloidally) × 16 (radially) channels based on the previous 24 × 8 array. The measurement region can be flexibly shifted due to the independence of the two local oscillator sources, and the field of view can be adjusted easily by changing the position of the zoom lenses. The temporal resolution is about 2.5 μs and the achievable spatial resolution is 1 cm. After laboratory calibration, it was installed on HL-2A tokamak in 2014, and the local 2D mode structures of MHD activities were obtained for the first time.

  4. A preliminary study of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the RAON injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, I. S.; Kim, Y.; Choi, S. J.; Heo, J. I.; Jin, H. C.; Park, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    We have built and tested an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator of Newness (RAON) injector. Fully superconducting magnets were developed for the ECR ion source. First, an oxygen plasma was ignited, and a preliminary highly-charged oxygen beam was extracted. Next, a 100 μA beam current of oxygen 5+ was extracted when a 1 kW microwave power was injected using a 28 GHz gyrotron. Finally, an off-site test facility was proposed to test the components of the injector by using heavy-ion beams generated by the ECR ion source.

  5. Low-noise heterodyne receiver for electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, Jr., N. C.; Luo, C.; Mamidanna, M.; Phan, T.; Pham, A. -V.; Wang, Y.

    2016-07-25

    The critical component enabling electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) to resolve 2D and 3D electron temperature and density perturbations is the heterodyne imaging array that collects and downconverts radiated emission and/or reflected signals (50-150 GHz) to an intermediate frequency (IF) band (e.g. 0.1-18 GHz) that can be transmitted by a shielded coaxial cable for further filtering and detection. New circuitry has been developed for this task, integrating gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) mounted on a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) substrate. The improved topology significantly increases electromagnetic shielding from out-of-band interference, leads to 10x improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio, and dramatic cost savings through integration. The current design, optimized for reflectometry and edge radiometry on mid-sized tokamaks, has demonstrated >20 dB conversion gain in upper V-band (60-75 GHz). As a result, implementation of the circuit in a multi-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) array will improve the diagnosis of edge-localized modes and fluctuations of the high-confinement, or H-mode, pedestal.

  6. Numerical studies of electron cyclotron wave current drive on HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Song, S. D.; Gao, Q. D.; Zheng, P. W.; Du, D.

    2015-06-15

    The electron cyclotron wave (ECW) current drive (CD) for the HL-2A tokamak is investigated numerically with a new ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck code. The code is benchmarked with other well-tested linear and quasilinear codes and is then used to study the electron cyclotron current drive on the HL-2A tokamak. The wave propagation, power deposition, and driven-current profiles are presented. The effect of electron trapping is also assessed. It is found that quasilinear effects are negligible at the present ECW power levels and that when both waves are injected at an angle of 20° on the plasma equatorial plane, the CD efficiency for the HL-2A saturates at ∼0.029 × 10{sup 20 }A/W/m{sup 2} and ∼0.020 × 10{sup 20 }A/W/m{sup 2} for the 0.5 MW/68 GHz first harmonic ordinary (O1) and 1 MW/140 GHz second harmonic extraordinary (X2) modes, respectively. The effects of the plasma density, temperature, and wave-launching position on the driven current are also investigated analytically and numerically.

  7. Low-noise heterodyne receiver for electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry

    DOE PAGES

    Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, Jr., N. C.; ...

    2016-07-25

    The critical component enabling electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) to resolve 2D and 3D electron temperature and density perturbations is the heterodyne imaging array that collects and downconverts radiated emission and/or reflected signals (50-150 GHz) to an intermediate frequency (IF) band (e.g. 0.1-18 GHz) that can be transmitted by a shielded coaxial cable for further filtering and detection. New circuitry has been developed for this task, integrating gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) mounted on a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) substrate. The improved topology significantly increases electromagnetic shielding from out-of-band interference, leads tomore » 10x improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio, and dramatic cost savings through integration. The current design, optimized for reflectometry and edge radiometry on mid-sized tokamaks, has demonstrated >20 dB conversion gain in upper V-band (60-75 GHz). As a result, implementation of the circuit in a multi-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) array will improve the diagnosis of edge-localized modes and fluctuations of the high-confinement, or H-mode, pedestal.« less

  8. Development of a miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma ion thruster for exospheric micro-propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2015-12-15

    A miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source [(discharge diameter)/(microwave cutoff diameter) < 0.3] has been developed at Kyushu University to be used as an ion thruster in micro-propulsion applications in the exosphere. The discharge source uses both radial and axial magnetostatic field confinement to facilitate electron cyclotron resonance and increase the electron dwell time in the volume, thereby enhancing plasma production efficiency. Performance of the ion thruster is studied at 3 microwave frequencies (1.2 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 2.45 GHz), for low input powers (<15 W) and small xenon mass flow rates (<40 μg/s), by experimentally measuring the extracted ion beam current through a potential difference of ≅1200 V. The discharge geometry is found to operate most efficiently at an input microwave frequency of 1.6 GHz. At this frequency, for an input power of 8 W, and propellant (xenon) mass flow rate of 21 μg/s, 13.7 mA of ion beam current is obtained, equivalent to an calculated thrust of 0.74 mN.

  9. Development of a miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma ion thruster for exospheric micro-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    A miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source [(discharge diameter)/(microwave cutoff diameter) < 0.3] has been developed at Kyushu University to be used as an ion thruster in micro-propulsion applications in the exosphere. The discharge source uses both radial and axial magnetostatic field confinement to facilitate electron cyclotron resonance and increase the electron dwell time in the volume, thereby enhancing plasma production efficiency. Performance of the ion thruster is studied at 3 microwave frequencies (1.2 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 2.45 GHz), for low input powers (<15 W) and small xenon mass flow rates (<40 μg/s), by experimentally measuring the extracted ion beam current through a potential difference of ≅1200 V. The discharge geometry is found to operate most efficiently at an input microwave frequency of 1.6 GHz. At this frequency, for an input power of 8 W, and propellant (xenon) mass flow rate of 21 μg/s, 13.7 mA of ion beam current is obtained, equivalent to an calculated thrust of 0.74 mN.

  10. Low-noise heterodyne receiver for electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Luo, C.; Mamidanna, M.; Phan, T.; Pham, A.-V.; Wang, Y.

    2016-11-01

    The critical component enabling electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) to resolve 2D and 3D electron temperature and density perturbations is the heterodyne imaging array that collects and downconverts radiated emission and/or reflected signals (50-150 GHz) to an intermediate frequency (IF) band (e.g. 0.1-18 GHz) that can be transmitted by a shielded coaxial cable for further filtering and detection. New circuitry has been developed for this task, integrating gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) mounted on a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) substrate. The improved topology significantly increases electromagnetic shielding from out-of-band interference, leads to 10× improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio, and dramatic cost savings through integration. The current design, optimized for reflectometry and edge radiometry on mid-sized tokamaks, has demonstrated >20 dB conversion gain in upper V-band (60-75 GHz). Implementation of the circuit in a multi-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) array will improve the diagnosis of edge-localized modes and fluctuations of the high-confinement, or H-mode, pedestal.

  11. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2011-03-15

    The ion loss distribution in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was investigated to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) charge breeder. The radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions (typical nonvolatile and volatile elements, respectively) were injected into the ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex to breed their charge states. Their respective residual activities on the sidewall of the cylindrical plasma chamber of the source were measured after charge breeding as functions of the azimuthal angle and longitudinal position and two-dimensional distributions of ions lost during charge breeding in the ECRIS were obtained. These distributions had different azimuthal symmetries. The origins of these different azimuthal symmetries are qualitatively discussed by analyzing the differences and similarities in the observed wall-loss patterns. The implications for improving the charge breeding efficiencies of nonvolatile elements in ECR charge breeders are described. The similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  12. ADVANCED ELECTRONIC PACKAGING TECHNIQUES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MICROMINIATURIZATION (ELECTRONICS), *PACKAGED CIRCUITS, CIRCUITS, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, MANUFACTURING, NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING, RESISTANCE (ELECTRICAL), SEMICONDUCTORS, TESTS, THIN FILMS (STORAGE DEVICES), WELDING.

  13. DETAILED MEASUREMENTS OF THE ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE EFFICIENCY ON DIIID

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY, C.C.; PRATER, R.; LOHR, J.; LUCE, T.C.; FOX,W.R.; HARVEY, R.W.; KINSEY, J.E.; LAO, L.L.; MAKOWSKI, M.A.

    2002-05-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments on the DIII-D tokamak are solidifying the physics basis for localized, off-axis current drive, the goal being to validate a predictive model for ECCD. The ECCD profiles are determined from the magnetic field pitch angles measured by motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry. The measured ECCD switches from the co to the counter direction as the toroidal injection angle is varied with a profile width that is in accordance with ray tracing calculations. Tests of electron trapping in low beta plasmas show that the ECCD efficiency decreases rapidly as the deposition is moved off-axis and towards the outboard side of the plasma, but the detrimental effects of electron trapping on the current drive are greatly reduced in high beta plasmas. Overall, the measured ECCD is in good agreement with theoretical calculations using a quasilinear Fokker-Planck code over a wide range of injection angles and plasma parameters.

  14. A theory of electron cyclotron waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.; Freund, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    A generation mechanism for radio waves in the frequency range 150 - 700 kHz observed by ground facilities is suggested in terms of an electromagnetic electron cyclotron instability driven by auroral electrons. The excited waves can propagate downward along the ambient magnetic field lines and are thus observable with ground facilities. The trapped auroral electrons are supposed to play an important role in the generation process, because they give rise to a thermal anisotropy which consequently leads to the instability. The present work is a natural extension of the theory proposed earlier by Wu et al. (1983) which was discussed in a different context but may be used to explain the observed waves originated at low altitudes. This paper presents a possible wave generation mechanism valid in the entire auroral field-line region of interest.

  15. Amplification of radiation near cyclotron frequency due to electron population inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Wu, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Amplification of electromagnetic waves via the cyclotron maser mechanism by a population of weakly relativistic electrons is studied. The effect of a tenuous population of low energy background plasma is included. It is found that both the ordinary and extraordinary modes can be excited by the weakly relativistic electrons with a loss-cone distribution. The growth rate for the extraordinary mode is much higher than that for the ordinary mode. Velocity spread in the energetic electron distribution function may reduce the growth rate by a factor of approximately 10 from that in the monoenergetic case. The maximum growth rate for the fast extraordinary mode (X mode) occurs near the upper hybrid cutoff frequency. Numerical results are obtained and discussed.

  16. Interpretation of the electron cyclotron emission signal from optically marginal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Muhammad Khawar; Yun, Gunsu S.; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.

    2017-02-01

    The interpretation of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal from the optically marginal region of magnetized plasma is presented. The density and the temperature fluctuations associated with the edge localized modes (ELMs) observed in the KSTAR tokamak are estimated by assuming an ELM filamentary structure as a flux tube bulges out like a ballooning mode instability. Synthetic ECE signals from the rotating ELM are calculated based on the measured electron temperature profile and an assumed electron density profile constrained by the measured line-averaged density, yielding an 0.02 relative fluctuation level in agreement with the experimental observations. The measured ECE signal is nearly in phase with the density modulation associated with the rotating ELM. This implies that the ECE signal corresponding to the ELM filaments has a significant contribution from the density fluctuations.

  17. An upgraded 32-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Giruzzi, G.; Goniche, M.; Huysmans, G.; Maget, P.; Ottaviani, M.

    2005-12-15

    A 32-channel, 1 GHz spaced heterodyne radiometer is used on the Tore Supra tokamak to measure electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the ordinary mode (O:E parallel B,k perpendicular B) and 94-126 GHz for the extraordinary mode (X:E perpendicular B,k perpendicular B). The radial resolution is essentially limited by ECE relativistic effects, depending on electron temperature and density, and not by the channels' frequency spacing. The time resolution depends on the acquisition scheme: the system allows for both 1 ms and 10 {mu}s acquisition. For example, this leads to precise electron temperature mapping during MHD activity. First experimental results obtained with this upgraded 32-channel radiometer are presented.

  18. Advanced electron microscopy for advanced materials.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bals, Sara; Van Aert, Sandra; Verbeeck, Jo; Van Dyck, Dirk

    2012-11-08

    The idea of this Review is to introduce newly developed possibilities of advanced electron microscopy to the materials science community. Over the last decade, electron microscopy has evolved into a full analytical tool, able to provide atomic scale information on the position, nature, and even the valency atoms. This information is classically obtained in two dimensions (2D), but can now also be obtained in 3D. We show examples of applications in the field of nanoparticles and interfaces.

  19. Simultaneous propagation of heat waves induced by sawteeth and electron cyclotron heating power modulation in the RTP tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gorini, G.; Mantica, P.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; De Luca, F.; Jacchia, A.; Konings, J.A.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Peters, M. Dipartimento di Fisica, universita degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNP, via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano )

    1993-09-27

    The incremental electron heat diffusivity [chi][sup inc] is determined in Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project plasmas by measurements of simultaneous heat pulses due to (1) the sawtooth instability and (2) modulated electron cyclotron heating. No systematic difference is observed between the two measured [chi][sup inc] values, which are both significantly larger ([chi][sup inc]/[chi][sub [ital e

  20. Theoretical study of electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves in the presence of AC field in Uranian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2015-10-01

    Electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) waves with temperature anisotropy in the magnetosphere of Uranus have been studied in present work. EMEC waves are investigated using method of characteristic solution by kinetic approach, in presence of AC field. In 1986, Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus revealed that magnetosphere of Uranus exhibit non-Maxwellian high-energy tail distribution. So, the dispersion relation, real frequency and growth rate are evaluated using Lorentzian Kappa distribution function. Effect of temperature anisotropy, AC frequency and number density of particles is found. The study is also extended to oblique propagation of EMEC waves in presence and absence of AC field. Through comprehensive mathematical analysis it is found that when EMEC wave propagates parallel to intrinsic magnetic field of Uranus, its growth is more enhanced than in case of oblique propagation. Results are also discussed in context to magnetosphere of Earth and also gives theoretical explanation to existence of high energetic particles observed by Voyager 2 in the magnetosphere of Uranus. The results can present a further insight into the nature of electron-cyclotron instability condition for the whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belts of Uranus or other space plasmas.

  1. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4–5.2 eV and 2 × 10{sup 16}–4.8 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}, respectively.

  2. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn- , particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  3. Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2010-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  4. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, P; Caspi, S; Felice, H; Leitner, D; Lyneis, C M; Prestemon, S; Sabbi, G L; Todd, D S

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb(3)Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb(3)Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb(3)Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb(3)Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb(3)Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell pretensioned with water

  5. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Sun, L. T.; Qian, C.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Feng, Y. C.; Yang, Y.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Ma, B. H.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Ruan, L.; Zhao, H. W.

    2015-04-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months' commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O6+, 1.7 emA of Ar8+, 1.07 emA of Ar9+, and 118 euA of Bi28+. The source has also successfully delivered O5+ and Ar8+ ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  6. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W. Sun, L. T.; Qian, C.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Yang, Y.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Ruan, L.

    2015-04-15

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months’ commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O{sup 6+}, 1.7 emA of Ar{sup 8+}, 1.07 emA of Ar{sup 9+}, and 118 euA of Bi{sup 28+}. The source has also successfully delivered O{sup 5+} and Ar{sup 8+} ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  7. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Sun, L T; Qian, C; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Feng, Y C; Yang, Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Ma, B H; Xiong, B; Guo, S Q; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W

    2015-04-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months' commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O(6+), 1.7 emA of Ar(8+), 1.07 emA of Ar(9+), and 118 euA of Bi(28+). The source has also successfully delivered O(5+) and Ar(8+) ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  8. Electron effective mass enhancement in Ga(AsBi) alloys probed by cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinari, G.; Drachenko, O.; Lewis, R. B.; Tiedje, T.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of Bi incorporation on the conduction band structure of Ga(AsBi) alloys is revealed by a direct estimation of the electron effective mass via cyclotron resonance absorption spectroscopy at THz frequencies in pulsed magnetic fields up to 65 T. A strong enhancement in the electron effective mass with increasing Bi content is reported, with a value of mass ˜40 % higher than that in GaAs for ˜1.7 % of Bi. This experimental evidence unambiguously indicates a Bi-induced perturbation of the host conduction band states and calls for a deep revision of the theoretical models describing dilute bismides currently proposed in the literature, the majority of which neglect or exclude that the incorporation of a small percentage of Bi may affect the conduction band states of the host material.

  9. Sawtooth stabilization by localized electron cyclotron heating in a tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hanada, K.; Tanaka, H.; Iida, M.; Minami, T.; Maekawa, T.; Terumichi, Y.; Tanaka, S. . Dept. of Physics); Ide, S. . Naka Fusion Research Establishment); Nakamura, M. ); Yamada, M.; Manickam, J.; White, R.B. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-11-01

    Sawtooth oscillations (STO) in the ohmically heated WT-3 tokamak are strongly modified or suppressed by localized electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) near the q = 1 surface, where q refers to the safety factor. The effect of ECH is much stronger when it is applied on the high field side (the inner side of the tokamak) as compared to the low field side (outer side). Complete suppression of the STO is achieved for the duration of the ECH when it is applied on the high field side, in a low density plasma, provided the ECH power exceeds a thresholds value. The STO stabilization is attributed to a modification of the current density profile by hot electrons generated by ECH, which reduces the shear in the q = region. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Design of a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Irby, J. H.; Leccacorvi, R.; Vieira, R.; Oi, C. Y.; Peebles, W. A.; Nguyen, X.

    2012-10-15

    A correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic has been installed in Alcator C-Mod. In order to measure electron temperature fluctuations, this diagnostic uses a spectral decorrelation technique. Constraints obtained with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations guided the design of the optical system and receiver. The CECE diagnostic is designed to measure temperature fluctuations which have k{sub {theta}}{<=} 4.8 cm{sup -1} (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s} < 0.5) using a well-focused beam pattern. Because the CECE diagnostic is a dedicated turbulence diagnostic, the optical system is also flexible, which allows for various collimating lenses and antenna to be used. The system overview and the demonstration of its operability as designed are presented in this paper.

  11. Adaptive-array Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostics using data streaming in a Software Defined Radio system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idei, H.; Mishra, K.; Yamamoto, M. K.; Hamasaki, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Onchi, T.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; the QUEST Team

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of the Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) spectrum is one of the most popular electron temperature diagnostics in nuclear fusion plasma research. A 2-dimensional ECE imaging system was developed with an adaptive-array approach. A radio-frequency (RF) heterodyne detection system with Software Defined Radio (SDR) devices and a phased-array receiver antenna was used to measure the phase and amplitude of the ECE wave. The SDR heterodyne system could continuously measure the phase and amplitude with sufficient accuracy and time resolution while the previous digitizer system could only acquire data at specific times. Robust streaming phase measurements for adaptive-arrayed continuous ECE diagnostics were demonstrated using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis with the SDR system. The emission field pattern was reconstructed using adaptive-array analysis. The reconstructed profiles were discussed using profiles calculated from coherent single-frequency radiation from the phase array antenna.

  12. Current drive with combined electron cyclotron wave and high harmonic fast wave in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Wang, J.; Zhang, N.; Zheng, P. W.; Yin, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The current driven by combined electron cyclotron wave (ECW) and high harmonic fast wave is investigated using the GENRAY/CQL3D package. It is shown that no significant synergetic current is found in a range of cases with a combined ECW and fast wave (FW). This result is consistent with a previous study [Harvey et al., in Proceedings of IAEA TCM on Fast Wave Current Drive in Reactor Scale Tokamaks (Synergy and Complimentarily with LHCD and ECRH), Arles, France, IAEA, Vienna, 1991]. However, a positive synergy effect does appear with the FW in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. This positive synergy effect can be explained using a picture of the electron distribution function induced by the ECW and a very high harmonic fast wave (helicon). The dependence of the synergy effect on the radial position of the power deposition, the wave power, the wave frequency, and the parallel refractive index is also analyzed, both numerically and physically.

  13. Design of a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Irby, J. H.; Leccacorvi, R.; Vieira, R.; Oi, C. Y.; Peebles, W. A.; Nguyen, X.

    2012-10-01

    A correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic has been installed in Alcator C-Mod. In order to measure electron temperature fluctuations, this diagnostic uses a spectral decorrelation technique. Constraints obtained with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations guided the design of the optical system and receiver. The CECE diagnostic is designed to measure temperature fluctuations which have kθ ≤ 4.8 cm-1 (kθρs < 0.5) using a well-focused beam pattern. Because the CECE diagnostic is a dedicated turbulence diagnostic, the optical system is also flexible, which allows for various collimating lenses and antenna to be used. The system overview and the demonstration of its operability as designed are presented in this paper.

  14. Electron cyclotron emission radiometer upgrade on the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, E. de la; Sanchez, J.; Tribaldos, V.; Conway, G.; Suttrop, W.; Fessey, J.; Prentice, R.; Gowers, C.; Chareau, J. M.

    2004-10-01

    The capabilities of the Joint European Torus (JET) electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics have recently been extended with an upgrading of the heterodyne radiometer. The number of channels has been doubled to 96 channels, with a frequency separation corresponding to <1 cm for JET magnetic field gradient, and with a frequency response of 1 MHz. This enhancement has increased the radial coverage of the ECE electron temperature measurements in JET to approximately the full plasma column (limited at R>2.6 m for the X-mode due to harmonic overlap) at almost all magnetic field values used at JET (1.7 T

  15. Effects of fundamental and second harmonic electron cyclotron resonances on ECRIS.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Satani, Takashi; Asaji, Toyohisa; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2008-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field of plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of comb-shaped magnet which has opposite polarity to each other, and which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. This magnetic configuration suppresses the loss due to E x B drift, and then plasma confinement is enhanced. The profiles of the electron temperature and density are measured around the ECR zones of the fundamentals and the second harmonics for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves by using Langmuir probe. Their characteristics and effects are clarified under various operating conditions in both of simple multipole and comb-shaped magnetic configurations.

  16. Microwave electron cyclotron electron resonance (ECR) ion source with a large, uniformly distributed, axially symmetric, ECR plasma volume

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1996-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source includes a primary mirror coil disposed coaxially around a vacuum vessel in which a plasma is induced and introducing a solenoidal ECR-producing field throughout the length of the vacuum vessel. Radial plasma confinement is provided by a multi-cusp, multi-polar permanent magnet array disposed azimuthally around the vessel and within the primary mirror coil. Axial confinement is provided either by multi-cusp permanent magnets at the opposite axial ends of the vessel, or by secondary mirror coils disposed on opposite sides of the primary coil.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-02-15

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H{sup −} ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ∼4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H{sup −} ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  18. Electron cyclotron resonance acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies by a microwave field in a mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Karfidov, D. M.; Lukina, N. A.

    2007-06-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the acceleration of electrons by a 2.45-GHz microwave field in an adiabatic mirror trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions, the electric and wave vectors of the wave being orthogonal to the trap axis. At a microwave electric field of {>=}10 V/cm and air pressures of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} Torr (the experiments were also performed with helium and argon), a self-sustained discharge was initiated in which a fraction of plasma electrons were accelerated to energies of 0.3-0.5 MeV. After the onset of instability, the acceleration terminated; the plasma decayed; and the accelerated electrons escaped toward the chamber wall, causing the generation of X-ray emission. Estimates show that electrons can be accelerated to the above energies only in the regime of self-phased interaction with the microwave field, provided that the electrons with a relativistically increased mass penetrate into the region with a higher magnetic field. It is shown that the negative-mass instability also can contribute to electron acceleration. The dynamic friction of the fast electrons by neutral particles in the drift space between the resonance zones does not suppress electron acceleration, so the electrons pass into a runaway regime. Since the air molecules excited by relativistic runaway electrons radiate primarily in the red spectral region, this experiment can be considered as a model of high-altitude atmospheric discharges, known as 'red sprites.'.

  19. Electromagnetic cyclotron-loss-cone instability associated with weakly relativistic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.; Wu, C. S.; Ke, F. J.; Schneider, R. S.; Ziebell, L. F.

    1982-01-01

    The amplification of fast extraordinary mode waves at frequencies very close to the electron cyclotron frequency, due to the presence of a population of energetic electrons with a loss-cone type distribution, is studied. Low-energy background electrons are included in the analysis. Two types of loss-cone distribution functions are considered, and it is found that the maximum growth rates for both distribution functions are of the same order of magnitude. When the thermal effects of the energetic electrons are included in the dispersion equation, the real frequencies of the waves are lower than those obtained by using the cold plasma approximation. This effect tends to enhance the growth rate. An idealized case including a parallel electric field such that the distribution function of the trapped energetic electrons is modified is also considered. It is assumed that the parallel electric field can remove the low-energy background electrons away from the source region of radiation. Both these effects increase the growth rate.

  20. Nonlinear fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons by oblique monochromatic EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Geng; Su, Zhenpeng; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shui

    2017-02-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been considered to be responsible for the rapid loss of radiation belt high-energy electrons. For parallel-propagating EMIC waves, the nonlinear character of cyclotron resonance has been revealed in recent studies. Here we present the first study on the nonlinear fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons by oblique EMIC waves on the basis of test particle simulations. Higher wave obliquity produces stronger nonlinearity of harmonic resonances but weaker nonlinearity of fundamental resonance. Compared to the quasi-linear prediction, these nonlinear resonances yield a more rapid loss of electrons over a wider pitch angle range. In the quasi-linear regime, the ultrarelativistic electrons are lost in the equatorial pitch angle range αeq<75°, nearly independent of wave normal angle ψ. In contrast, the upper pitch angle cutoff of nonlinear losses tends to increase with the wave normal angle increasing, which is about αeq=82° at ψ = 0° and αeq>87.5° at ψ = 20° and 40°. At the resonant pitch angles αeq<75°, the difference between quasi-linear and nonlinear loss timescales tends to decrease with the wave normal angle increasing. At ψ = 0° and 20°, the nonlinear electron loss timescale is 10% shorter than the quasi-linear prediction; at ψ = 40°, the difference in loss timescales is reduced to <5%.

  1. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-15

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (T{sub e}) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity I{sub ECE} ∝ T{sub e} in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat T{sub e} assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (T{sub e,rel}) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  2. A Scaling Law of Plasma Confining Potential Formation with Electron Cyclotron Heating Powers in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, T.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Fukai, T.; Yoshida, M.; Minami, R.; Kiminami, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Imai, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-15

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, the main tandem-mirror operations from 1979 to 2003 are characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. In this paper, the externally controllable parameter scaling including electron cyclotron heating (ECH) powers for potential formation covering over these two representative operational modes is investigated; that is, the construction of 'the central-cell plasma-confining potentials' {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH is studied on the basis of the electron energy-balance equation and Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for investigating the formation physics of plasma confining potentials.It is found that our proposed scaling formulae are in good agreement with the experimental data in the two representative operational modes of the high-potential and hot-ion modes in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.This scaling shows a favorable increase in confining potentials with installing more powerful ECH sources by the use of ECH powers over the present 250 kW. On the basis of the scaling prediction, we also report the design of a newly developed 500 kW gyrotron for an application to investigate the validity of the above described {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH aiming at achieving higher plasma parameters.

  3. Cyclotron resonant scattering feature simulations. I. Thermally averaged cyclotron scattering cross sections, mean free photon-path tables, and electron momentum sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarm, F.-W.; Schönherr, G.; Falkner, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wolff, M. T.; Becker, P. A.; Sokolova-Lapa, E.; Klochkov, D.; Ferrigno, C.; Fürst, F.; Hemphill, P. B.; Marcu-Cheatham, D. M.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Electron cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are observed as absorption-like lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars. A significant fraction of the computing time for Monte Carlo simulations of these quantum mechanical features is spent on the calculation of the mean free path for each individual photon before scattering, since it involves a complex numerical integration over the scattering cross section and the (thermal) velocity distribution of the scattering electrons. Aims: We aim to numerically calculate interpolation tables which can be used in CRSF simulations to sample the mean free path of the scattering photon and the momentum of the scattering electron. The tables also contain all the information required for sampling the scattering electron's final spin. Methods: The tables were calculated using an adaptive Simpson integration scheme. The energy and angle grids were refined until a prescribed accuracy is reached. The tables are used by our simulation code to produce artificial CRSF spectra. The electron momenta sampled during these simulations were analyzed and justified using theoretically determined boundaries. Results: We present a complete set of tables suited for mean free path calculations of Monte Carlo simulations of the cyclotron scattering process for conditions expected in typical X-ray pulsar accretion columns (0.01 ≤ B/Bcrit ≤ 0.12, where Bcrit = 4.413 × 1013 G, and 3 keV ≤ kBT ≤ 15 keV). The sampling of the tables is chosen such that the results have an estimated relative error of at most 1/15 for all points in the grid. The tables are available online (see link in footnote, page 1). The electronic tables described here are available at http://www.sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de/research/cyclo

  4. Excitation of electrostatic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahata, A.; Igami, H.; Kawamori, E.; Kogi, Y.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.

    2014-10-15

    We report the observation of electromagnetic radiation at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency that was considered to be converted from electrostatic waves called electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas. The excitation of EBWs was attributed to the thermalization of electrons accelerated by the reconnection electric field around the X-point. The radiative process discussed here is an acceptable explanation for observed radio waves pulsation associated with major flares.

  5. Development of multichannel intermediate frequency system for electron cyclotron emission radiometer on KSTAR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kogi, Yuichiro; Sakoda, Takuya; Mase, Atsushi; Ito, Naoki; Yokota, Yuya; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Nagayama, Yoshio; Kawahata, Kazuo; Jeong, Seung H.; Kwon, Myeun

    2008-10-15

    Plasma experiments on KSTAR are scheduled to start up this year (2008). We have developed an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer to measure the radial electron temperature profiles in KSTAR experiments. The radiometer system consists, briefly, of two downconversion stages, amplifiers, bandpass filter banks, and video detectors. These components are made commercially or developed in house. The system detects ECE power in the frequency range from 110 to 196 GHz, the detected signal being resolved by means of 48 frequency windows. Before installation of this system on KSTAR, we installed a part of this system on large helical device (LHD) to study the system under similar plasma conditions. In this experiment, the signal amplitude, considered to be proportional to the electron temperature, is measured. The time-dependent traces of the electron temperature measured by this radiometer are in good agreement with those provided by the LHD Michelson spectrometer. The system noise level which limits the minimum measurable temperature (converted to the electron temperature) is about 30 eV.

  6. Radiofrequency and 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance H- volume production ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Peng, S. X.

    2016-10-01

    The volume production of negative hydrogen ions ({{{H}}}-) in plasma ion sources is based on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules (H2), which is a two-step process requiring both, hot electrons for ionization, and vibrational excitation of the H2 and cold electrons for the {{{H}}}- formation through DEA. Traditionally {{{H}}}- ion sources relying on the volume production have been tandem-type arc discharge sources equipped with biased filament cathodes sustaining the plasma by thermionic electron emission and with a magnetic filter separating the main discharge from the {{{H}}}- formation volume. The main motivation to develop ion sources based on radiofrequency (RF) or electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma discharges is to eliminate the apparent limitation of the cathode lifetime. In this paper we summarize the principles of {{{H}}}- volume production dictating the ion source design and highlight the differences between the arc discharge and RF/ECR ion sources from both, physics and technology point-of-view. Furthermore, we introduce the state-of-the-art RF and ECR {{{H}}}- volume production ion sources and review the challenges and future prospects of these yet developing technologies.

  7. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%–70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  8. Electron Cyclotron / Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive Experiments using Phased-array Antenna in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Hasegawa, M.; Yoshida, N.; Watanebe, H.; Tokunaga, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Sakamoto, M.; Ejiri, A.; Takase, Y.; Sakaguchi, M.; Kalinnikova, E.; Ishiguro, M.; Tashima, S.

    2011-12-23

    The phased-array antenna system for Electron Cyclotron/Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive experiments has been developed in the QUEST. The antenna was designed to excite a pure O-mode wave in the oblique injection for the O-X-B mode conversion experiments, and its good performances were confirmed at a low power level. The plasma current (<{approx}15 kA) with an aspect ratio of 1.5 was started up and sustained by only RF injection in the low-density operations. The long pulse discharge of 10 kA was also attained for 37 s. The new density window to sustain the plasma current was observed in the high-density plasmas. The single-null divertor configuration with the high plasma current (<{approx}25 kA) was attained in the 17 s plasma sustainment.

  9. First results of the 2.45 GHz Oshima electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Uchida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.

    2016-02-15

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been constructed at Oshima College with a 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave source and permanent magnets employed as the main components. In addition, a solid-state power amplifier with a frequency range of 2.5–6.0 GHz was installed to study two-frequency plasma heating. Three solenoid coils were set up for adjusting the axial magnetic fields. Argon plasma generation and ion beam production have been conducted during the first year of operation. Ion current densities in the ECR plasma were measured using a biased disk. For 2.45 and 4.65 GHz two-frequency plasma heating, the ion density was approximately 1.5 times higher than that of 2.45 GHz single-frequency heating.

  10. Fabrication of ultrathin Ni-Zn ferrite films using electron cyclotron resonance sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kurisu, Hiroki; Matsuura, Mitsuru; Shimosato, Yoshihiro; Okada, Shigenobu; Oshiro, Kazunori; Fujimori, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Setsuo

    2006-04-15

    Well-crystallized Ni-Zn ferrite (Ni{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) highly oriented ultrathin films were obtained at a substrate temperature of 200 deg. C by a reactive sputtering method utilizing electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma, which is very effective to crystallize oxide or nitride materials without heat treatment. Thin films of Ni-Zn ferrite deposited on a MgO (100) underlayer showed an intense X-ray-diffraction peak of (400) from the Ni-Zn ferrite as compared to similar films deposited directly onto thermally oxidized Si substrates. A 1.5-nm-thick Ni-Zn ferrite film, which corresponds to twice the lattice constant for bulk Ni-Zn ferrite, crystallized on a MgO (100) underlayer.

  11. Status of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbos, Caroline; Albajar, Ferran; Bonicelli, Tullio; Carannante, Giuseppe; Cavinato, Mario; Cismondi, Fabio; Denisov, Grigory; Farina, Daniela; Gagliardi, Mario; Gandini, Franco; Gassmann, Thibault; Goodman, Timothy; Hanson, Gregory; Henderson, Mark A.; Kajiwara, Ken; McElhaney, Karen; Nousiainen, Risto; Oda, Yasuhisa; Omori, Toshimichi; Oustinov, Alexander; Parmar, Darshankumar; Popov, Vladimir L.; Purohit, Dharmesh; Rao, Shambhu Laxmikanth; Rasmussen, David; Rathod, Vipal; Ronden, Dennis M. S.; Saibene, Gabriella; Sakamoto, Keishi; Sartori, Filippo; Scherer, Theo; Singh, Narinder Pal; Strauß, Dirk; Takahashi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive (H&CD) system developed for the ITER is made of 12 sets of high-voltage power supplies feeding 24 gyrotrons connected through 24 transmission lines (TL), to five launchers, four located in upper ports and one at the equatorial level. Nearly all procurements are in-kind, following general ITER philosophy, and will come from Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA. The full system is designed to couple to the plasma 20 MW among the 24 MW generated power, at the frequency of 170 GHz, for various physics applications such as plasma start-up, central H&CD and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity control. The design takes present day technology and extends toward high-power continuous operation, which represents a large step forward as compared to the present state of the art. The ITER EC system will be a stepping stone to future EC systems for DEMO and beyond.

  12. Status report on electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Sekiguchi, M.; Yamada, S.; Jincho, K.; Okada, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Hattori, T.; Biri, S.; Baskaran, R.; Sakata, T.; Sawada, K.; Uno, K.

    2000-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is not only dedicated to cancer therapy, it is also utilized with various ion species for basic experiments of biomedical science, physics, chemistry, etc. Two electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are installed for production of gaseous ions. One of them, the NIRS-ECR, is a 10 GHz ECR ion source, and is mainly operated to produce C4+ ions for daily clinical treatment. This source realizes good reproducibility and reliability and it is easily operated. The other source, the NIRS-HEC, is an 18 GHz ECR ion source that is expected to produce heavier ion species. The output ion currents of the NIRS-ECR and the NIRS-HEC are 430e μA for C4+ and 1.1e mA for Ar8+, respectively.

  13. Roadmap for the design of a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for Spiral2

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Peaucelle, C.

    2012-02-15

    A review of today achieved A/Q = 3 heavy ions beams is proposed. The daily operation A/Q = 3 ion beam intensities expected at Spiral2 are at the limit or above best record 3rd generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) intensities. The necessity to build a new fully superconducting to fulfill these requirements is outlined. A discussion on the volume of the future source is proposed and the minimum value of 12 liters is derived. An analysis of the x-ray absorption superconducting ECRIS is presented based on VENUS experimental data and geometry. This study underlines the necessity to include a complete x-ray study at the time of source conception. The specifications foreseen for the new ECRIS are presented, followed with the roadmap for the design.

  14. Development of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for Synthesis of Endohedral Metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Uchida, T.; Hanajiri, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Kato, Y.

    2008-11-03

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been constructed for synthesis of endohedral metallofullerenes. The main purpose of the ion source is to produce new biological and medical materials. The design is based on ECRIS for production of multicharged ion beams with a traditional minimum-B magnetic field. An 8-10 GHz traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier and a 2.45 GHz magnetron have been applied as microwave sources. Fullerene and metal vapor are introduced with a filament heating micro-oven and an induction heating oven, respectively. In preliminary ion-extraction test, Ar{sup +} is 54 {mu}A. Many broken fullerenes such as C{sub 58} and C{sub 56} are observed in fullerene ion beams.

  15. Refractory rf ovens and sputter probes for electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.; Galata, A.; Kulevoy, T.; Petrenko, S.; Sattin, M.; Facco, A.

    2008-02-15

    Beams from electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) with radio frequency ovens for refractory material (using a Mo coil) were recently demonstrated; results for Ti and V are here discussed, with temperature T{sub s}{>=}2300 K stably maintained and extracted current of about 1000 nA for V{sup 8+} and V{sup 9+}. The status of sputter probes is also reported, and the reason why trapping efficiency may be lower than in the oven case are investigated. The simple tubular probe concept show typical currents of Sn{sup 18+} about 250 nA, for the most abundant isotopes, but an operating pressure of about 300 {mu}Pa may be required. Some preliminary experiments were performed with Penning probes, showing that transmission of Sn or Pr from Penning cathode to ECRIS plasma is limited. Placement of tin onto anticathode and use of collimator between Penning and ECRIS are also discussed.

  16. Optics design for Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging system on J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. D.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhu, Y. L.; Pan, X. M.; Xiao, Y.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.; Xie, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    An electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system is being developed for J-TEXT. It is comprised of two 16-channel antenna arrays that share the same toroidal window for the purpose of observing separate radial regions of the tokamak plasma simultaneously. Two imaging optic units have been designed, which share the same zoom lenses, but have different focus lenses. The setup is flexible and achieves good spatial resolution. In particular, the poloidal zoom factor can achieve 1.17 to 2.20. The desired focal plane can range anywhere from high field side (HFS) edge to low field side (LFS) edge. The effective field curvature adjustment (FCA) lenses have been adopted for the ECEI imaging optic system, which make the image plane flat enough to match the emission layer in order to increase the image quality.

  17. Trap density of GeNx/Ge interface fabricated by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yukio; Otani, Yohei; Toyota, Hiroshi; Ono, Toshiro

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated GeNx/Ge interface properties using Si3N4(7 nm)/GeNx(2 nm)/Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor structures fabricated by the plasma nitridation of Ge substrates using an electron-cyclotron-resonance-generated nitrogen plasma. The interface trap density (Dit) measured by the conductance method is found to be distributed symmetrically in the Ge band gap with a minimum Dit value lower than 3 × 1011 cm-2eV-1 near the midgap. This result may lead to the development of processes for the fabrication of p- and n-Ge Schottky-barrier (SB) source/drain metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors using chemically and thermally robust GeNx dielectrics as interlayers for SB source/drain contacts and high-κ gate dielectrics.

  18. Status of the pulsed magnetic field electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Bleuel, W.; Jöst, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B. H.

    1994-04-01

    Synchrotrons like the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS at GSI need an efficient low duty cycle injector (typical 1-pulse/s and 200-μs pulse length). To improve the peak current, an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been designed using a pulsed magnetic field (PuMa) to force ion extraction. We replaced the hexapole of a 10-GHz Minimafios ECR ion source by a vacuum chamber containing a water-cooled bilayered solenoid coil and a decapole permanent magnetic structure. A pulse line feeds the solenoid with a 250-μs pulse which increases the magnetic field in the minimum B region by 0.3 T. This process opens the magnetic bottle along the beam axis resulting in an extracted ion pulse. First tests of the PuMa ECR configuration in cw and pulsed operation are presented and analyzed.

  19. Investigation of fast particle driven instabilities by 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Lauber, Ph; Curran, D.; Boom, J. E.; Tobias, B. J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; Garcia Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Maraschek, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; da Graça, S.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-12-01

    Detailed measurements of the 2D mode structure of Alfvén instabilities in the current ramp-up phase of neutral beam heated discharges were performed on ASDEX Upgrade, using the electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic. This paper focuses on the observation of reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAEs) and bursting modes that, with the use of the information from ECEI, have been identified as beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs). Both RSAEs with first and second radial harmonic mode structures were observed. Calculations with the linear gyro-kinetic code LIGKA revealed that the ratio of the damping rates and the frequency difference between the first and second harmonic modes strongly depended on the shape of the q-profile. The bursting character of the BAE type modes, which were radially localized to rational q surfaces, was observed to sensitively depend on the plasma parameters, ranging from strongly bursting to almost steady state.

  20. Phase fluctuations of an electron cyclotron: Nondissipative decoherence in a quantum stochastic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouard, S.; Plata, J.

    2002-05-01

    The phase damping induced in the cyclotron mode of a trapped electron by the coupling to the axial fluctuations is studied analytically. This system, described as a nonlinear oscillator stochastically driven in frequency, allows testing the generality of some elements present in the phenomenology of decoherence. In our approach, the reduced density matrix is obtained by performing a statistical average from the propagator for each noise realization. For short times, the decay of the coherences presents a nonexponential form, rooted in the non-Gaussian character of the stochastic driving. For large times, the decay becomes purely exponential, the rate showing a complex dependence on the difference between the Fock indices. As the populations do not change, the asymptotic state corresponds to a nonthermalized statistical mixture.

  1. Nonlinear response of magnetic islands to localized electron cyclotron current injection

    SciTech Connect

    Borgogno, D.; Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Lazzaro, E.

    2014-06-15

    The magnetic island evolution under the action of a current generated externally by electron cyclotron wave beams is studied using a reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics plasma model. The use of a two-dimensional reconnection model shows novel features of the actual nonlinear evolution as compared to the zero-dimensional model of the generalized Rutherford equation. When the radio frequency control is applied to a small magnetic island, the complete annihilation of the island width is followed by a spatial phase shift of the island, referred as “flip” instability. On the other hand, a current-drive injection in a large nonlinear island can be accompanied by the occurrence of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These effects need to be taken into account in designing tearing mode control systems based on radio frequency current-drive.

  2. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-15

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  3. Sawtooth stabilization by localized electron cyclotron heating in the WT-3 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hanada, K.; Maehara, T.; Makino, K.; Kishigami, Y.; Kishino, T.; Minami, T.; Tanaka, H.; Iida, M.; Nakamura, M.; Maekawa, T.; Terumichi, Y.; Tanaka, S. )

    1992-11-01

    The effect on sawtooth oscillations (STO) by localized electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECH) on the WT-3 tokamak ({ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research}, 1988 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 563) is studied. STO are strongly modified or stabilized by ECH near the {ital q}=1 surface, where {ital q} refers to the safety factor. The effect of ECH is much stronger when it is applied on the high-field side as compared to the low-field side. Further, even when ECH is applied outside the {ital q}=1 surface, the amplitude of STO decreases and STO stabilizes. In the very high {ital q}{sub {ital L}} discharge, the excitation of STO can be obtained by applying ECH.

  4. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

    2016-02-15

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  5. Self-consistent simulation of a planar electron-cyclotron-wave-resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Krimke, R.; Urbassek, H.M.

    1997-06-01

    A discharge heated inductively by resonant absorption of electron cyclotron waves discharge is modeled in a planar geometry. The simulation algorithm is based on a kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC/MC) simulation of the plasma properties; the electromagnetic field is calculated macroscopically using the Appleton{endash}Hartree theory for the dielectric tensor. The results are checked against a simplified analytical theory and experimental data by B. Pfeiffer [J. Appl. Phys. {bold 37}, 1624,1628 (1966)] for a 15 mTorr argon discharge. As a result, we show that an inhomogeneous density profile in the discharge strongly affects the electromagnetic fields in the plasma. Power deposition is calculated both in and outside of the resonance. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Production of molecular ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Draganić, I. N.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Vane, C. R.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    An all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is tuned to create a variety of intense molecular ion beams for basic energy research. Based on simultaneous injection of several gases with spectroscopic high purity or enriched isotope content (e.g., H2, D2, N2, O2, or CO) and lower power microwave heating, the ECR ion source produces diatomic molecular ion beams of H2+, D2+, HD+, HO+, DO+, NH+, ND+, and more complex polyatomic molecular ions such as H3+, D3+, HD2+, H2O+, D2O+, H3O+, D3O+, and NHn+, NDn+ with n=2,3,4 and possibly higher. Molecular ion beams have been produced with very high current intensities compared to other molecular beam sources. The recorded molecular ion beam spectra are discussed.

  7. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, A.; Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  8. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, A. Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-15

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  9. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Biri, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  10. Progress towards the development of a realistic electron cyclotron resonance ion source extraction model

    SciTech Connect

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Strohmeier, M. M.

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, an ongoing effort to provide a simulation and design tool for electron cyclotron resonance ion source extraction and low energy beam transport is described and benchmarked against experimental results. Utilizing the particle-in-cell code WARP, a set of scripts has been developed: A semiempirical method of generating initial conditions, a 2D-3D hybrid method of plasma extraction and a simple beam transport deck. Measured emittances and beam profiles of uranium and helium beams are shown and the influence of the sextupole part of the plasma confinement field is investigated. The results are compared to simulations carried out using the methods described above. The results show that the simulation model (with some additional refinements) represents highly charged, well-confined ions well, but that the model is less applicable for less confined, singly charged ions.

  11. Progress in high-temperature oven development for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, J. Higurashi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-15

    We have been developing a high-temperature oven using UO{sub 2} in the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RIKEN since 2013. A total of eleven on-line tests were performed. The longest operation time in a single test was 411 h, and the consumption rate of UO{sub 2} was approximately 2.4 mg/h. In these tests, we experienced several problems: the ejection hole of a crucible was blocked with UO{sub 2} and a crucible was damaged because of the reduction of tungsten strength at high temperature. In order to solve these problems, improvements to the crucible shape were made by simulations using ANSYS.

  12. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomae, R. Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F.; Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-02-15

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  13. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cannat, F. E-mail: felix.cannat@gmail.com; Lafleur, T.; Jarrige, J.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D.; Chabert, P.

    2015-05-15

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  14. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Westerhof, E. Pratt, J.

    2014-10-15

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics is modified as E + v × B = η(J – J{sub EC}). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation faithfully represents the nonlocal character of the EC driven current and its main origin in the Fisch-Boozer effect. The closure relation is validated on both an analytical solution of an approximated Fokker-Planck equation as well as on full bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck code simulations of ECCD inside rotating magnetic islands. The new model contains the model put forward by Giruzzi et al. [Nucl. Fusion 39, 107 (1999)] in one of its limits.

  15. Linear analysis of a rectangular waveguide cyclotron maser with a sheet electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ding; Ding Yaogen; Wang Yong; Ruan Cunjun

    2010-11-15

    A linear theory for a rectangular waveguide cyclotron maser with a sheet electron beam is developed by using the Laplace transformation approach. This theory can be applied to any TE{sub mn} rectangular waveguide mode. The corresponding equations for the TM{sub mn} mode in the rectangular waveguide are also derived as a useful reference. Especially, the effect from the coupling between degenerate modes, which is induced by the nonideal rectangular waveguide walls, on the dispersion relation is considered in order to provide a more accurate model for the real devices. Through numerical calculations, the linear growth rate, launching loss, and spontaneous oscillations (caused by the absolute instability and backward wave oscillation) of this new structure can be analyzed in detail. It is worthwhile to point out that the operation at higher power levels of the rectangular waveguide sheet beam system is possible.

  16. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  17. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Rácz, R; Muramatsu, M; Kato, Y; Kitagawa, A; Biri, S; Yoshida, Y

    2016-02-01

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  18. ORIGIN OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER INDUCED RADIO EMISSIONS AT ULTRACOOL DWARFS: MAGNETOSPHERE-IONOSPHERE COUPLING CURRENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, J. D.; Burleigh, M. R.; Casewell, S. L.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Wynn, G. A.; Clarke, J. T.; West, A. A.

    2012-11-20

    A number of ultracool dwarfs emit circularly polarized radio waves generated by the electron cyclotron maser instability. In the solar system such radio is emitted from regions of strong auroral magnetic-field-aligned currents. We thus apply ideas developed for Jupiter's magnetosphere, being a well-studied rotationally dominated analog in our solar system, to the case of fast-rotating UCDs. We explain the properties of the radio emission from UCDs by showing that it would arise from the electric currents resulting from an angular velocity shear in the fast-rotating magnetic field and plasma, i.e., by an extremely powerful analog of the process that causes Jupiter's auroras. Such a velocity gradient indicates that these bodies interact significantly with their space environment, resulting in intense auroral emissions. These results strongly suggest that auroras occur on bodies outside our solar system.

  19. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Tinschert, K.; Maimone, F.

    2012-02-15

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  20. Assessment of Electron-Cyclotron-Current-Drive-Assisted Operation in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, E.; Fable, E.; Tardini, G.; Zohm, H.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Porte, L.

    2012-09-01

    The achievable efficiency for external current drive through electron-cyclotron (EC) waves in a demonstration tokamak reactor is discussed. Two possible reactor designs, one for steady state and one for pulsed operation, are considered. It is found that for midplane injection the achievable current drive efficiency is limited by secondharmonic absorption at levels consistent with previous studies. Propagation through the second-harmonic region can be reduced by moving the launch position to the high-field side (this can be obtained by injecting the beam from an upper port in the vacuum vessel). In this case, beam tracing calculations deliver values for the EC current drive efficiency approaching those usually reported for neutral beam current drive.

  1. Asymmetric linear efficiency and bunching mechanisms of TM modes for electron cyclotron maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Huang, W. C.; Yao, H. Y.; Hung, C. L.; Chen, W. C.; Su, B. Y.

    2017-02-01

    This study examines the transverse magnetic (TM) waveguide modes, which have long been considered as the unsuitable ones for the operation of the electron cyclotron maser. The beam-wave coupling strength of the TM modes, as expected, is found to be relatively weak as compared with that of the transverse electric (TE) waveguide modes. Unlike TE modes, surprisingly, the linear behavior of the TM modes depends on the sign of the wave number kz. The negative kz has a much stronger linear efficiency than that of the positive kz. The bunching mechanism analysis further exhibits that the azimuthal bunching and axial bunching do not compete but cooperate with each other for the backward-wave operation (negative kz). The current findings are encouraging and imply that TM modes might be advantageous to the gyrotron backward-wave oscillators.

  2. The saturation of the electron-cyclotron maser instability and the interpretation of solar millisecond spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent numeric two-dimensional code of the kinetic wave-particle equations developed to investigate the maser dynamics in the solar context is applied to solar millisecond-spike observations in order to improve the diagnostic capabilities of the theory of the electron-cyclotron maser instablitity. Attention is given to the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field selecting magneto-ionic modes with relatively short saturation lengths and suppressing mechanisms such as collisional deflection, free-free absorption, and gyroresonance absorption. The time scales of maser saturation in respect to time scales of global particle changes in a magnetic loop are covered, relevant observations of solar millisecond spikes are described, and the interpretation in terms of physical parameters deduced from the quasi-linear maser simulations are presented. It is demonstrated that the quasi-linear simulations make it possible to constrain the physical parameters from the observed time scale and frequency.

  3. ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed in the last few years into a reliable source of high charge-state heavy ions. The availability of heavy ions with relatively large charge-to-mass ratios (0.1--0.5) has made it possible to contemplate essentially new classes of heavy-ion linear accelerators. In this talk, I shall review the state-of-the-art in ECR source performance and describe some of the implications this performance level has for heavy-ion linear accelerator design. The present linear accelerator projects using ECR ion sources will be noted and the performance requirements of the ECR source for these projects will be reviewed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Comparison of Fine Structures of Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Emissions in Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labelle, J. W.; Dundek, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries of emissions at four and five times the electron cyclotron frequency in aurora occuring under daylit conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-4 and 2014-5. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events revealed that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at locations where the upper hybrid frequency matches the cyclotron harmonic, which for higher harmonics requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously showed that only rarely, about ten percent of the time, are the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions in exact integer ratio (e.g., 3:2, 4:3, or 5:4 depending on which combination of harmonics is observed). In the remaining approximately ninety percent of the cases, the higher harmonic occurred at a lower ratio than the appropriate integer ratio, as expected if the harmonics are generated independently at their separate matching conditions in the bottomside ionosphere, where the upper hybrid frequency increases with altitude while the gyroharmonics decrease with altitude. (The bottomside is the most likely source of the emissions, since from there the mode converted Z-modes have access to ground-level.) Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at locations where the upper hybrid frequency matches each harmonic, i.e., at a separate source altitude for each harmonic. Generation of higher harmonics through coalescence of lower harmonic waves explains at most a small minority of events.

  5. Electron cyclotron resonant heating: A simpler method for deriving the linear wave equations in a nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D. C.; Cairns, R. A.; Lashmore-Davies, C. N.

    1994-04-01

    In a recent article Cairns et al. [Phys. Fluids B 3, 2953 (1991)] gave a method for the derivation of full wave equations describing propagation through a cyclotron resonance in an inhomogeneous plasma. The simplicity of this method compares favorably with previous derivations, and the damping resulting from the variation in the magnetic field across a Larmor orbit, described by Lashmore-Davies and Dendy [Phys. Fluids B 1, 1565 (1989)], is included. The effect of the relativistic mass shift on the cyclotron frequency, which plays an important role in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies, was not taken into account, however, and the object of the present work is to remedy this omission. It is shown how equations, valid in the weakly relativistic regime, may be obtained in a rather straightforward way. Results obtained by a number of earlier workers are recovered and can be extended.

  6. Excitation of the surface flute waves in electron cyclotron frequency range by internal rotating electron beam in a coaxial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blednov, O.; Girka, I.; Girka, V.; Pavlenko, I.; Sydora, R.

    2014-12-01

    The initial stage of interaction between a gyrating beam of electrons, which move along Larmor orbits in a narrow gap between a cylindrical plasma layer and an internal screen of a metal coaxial waveguide and electromagnetic eigen waves, is studied theoretically. These waves are extraordinary polarized ones; they propagate along the azimuthal angle across an axial external steady magnetic field in the electron cyclotron frequency range. The numerical analysis shows that the excitation process is stable enough in respect to changing plasma waveguide parameters. The wider the plasma layer, the broader the range of plasma waveguide parameters within which effective wave excitation takes place. The main influence on the excitation of these modes is performed by the applied axial magnetic field, namely: its increase leads to an increase of growth rate and a broadening of the range of the waveguide parameters within which wave excitation is effective.

  7. Electron cyclotron maser emission in coronal arches and solar radio type V bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Tan, C. M.

    2013-12-10

    Solar radio type V bursts were classified as a special spectral class based on their moderately long duration, wide bandwidth, and sense of polarization opposite of associated type III bursts. However, type V bursts are also closely related to the preceding type III bursts. They have an approximately equal source height and the same dispersion of position with frequency. Electron cyclotron maser (ECM) instability driven by beam electrons has been used to explain type III bursts in recent years. We propose ECM emission as the physical process of type V solar radio bursts. According to the observed properties of type V and III bursts, we propose that energetic electrons in excited type V continuum are trapped in coronal loops, which are adjacent to the open field lines traced by type III electrons. With the proposed magnetic field configuration and the ECM emission mechanism, the observed properties of type V bursts, such as long duration, wide bandwidth, and opposite sense of polarization can be reasonably explained by our model.

  8. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  9. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER INSTABILITY IN SPACE PLASMAS WITH KAPPA LOSS-CONE DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2012-02-01

    It is well known that non-thermal electrons, often modeled by the kappa distribution, are ubiquitously observed in space. Kappa-type distributions have been widely discussed in various plasma environments. On the other hand, when these non-thermal electrons are trapped by magnetic fields in space they frequently have a loss-cone distribution in velocity space. In this paper, we investigated the growth rates of electron cyclotron maser (ECM) instability in space plasmas by using a kappa loss-cone distribution. Based on the cold plasma assumption and weakly relativistic approximation, the results show that non-thermal electrons with such a distribution can excite ECM emission efficiently. The growth rates of O1 and X2 modes both increase with the kappa spectral index ({kappa}) but the growth rate of X2 mode increases slightly more rapidly than that of O1 mode. The present analysis also shows that the growth rates increase rapidly with the loss-cone index {sigma} for {sigma} < 10 but increase comparatively slowly for larger {sigma} values.

  10. Physics and Engineering Design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, W. L.; Austin, M. E.; Houshmandyar, S.; Phillips, P. E.; Beno, J. H.; Ouroua, A.; Weeks, D. A.; Hubbard, A. E.; Stillerman, J. A.; Feder, R. E.; Khodak, A.; Taylor, G.; Pandya, H. K.; Danani, S.; Kumar, R.

    2015-11-01

    Electron temperature (Te) measurements and consequent electron thermal transport inferences will be critical to the non-active phases of ITER operation and will take on added importance during the alpha heating phase. Here, we describe our design for the diagnostic that will measure spatial and temporal profiles of Te using electron cyclotron emission (ECE). Other measurement capability includes high frequency instabilities (e.g. ELMs, NTMs, and TAEs). Since results from TFTR and JET suggest that Thomson Scattering and ECE differ at high Te due to driven non-Maxwellian distributions, non-thermal features of the ITER electron distribution must be documented. The ITER environment presents other challenges including space limitations, vacuum requirements, and very high-neutron-fluence. Plasma control in ITER will require real-time Te. The diagnosic design that evolved from these sometimes-conflicting needs and requirements will be described component by component with special emphasis on the integration to form a single effective diagnostic system. Supported by PPPL/US-DA via subcontract S013464-C to UT Austin.

  11. Response of multiscale turbulence to electron cyclotron heating in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, T. L.; Peebles, W. A.; Nguyen, X. V.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Wang, G.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; De Grassie, J. S.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Lohr, J.; Petty, C. C.; Greenfield, C. M.; Bravenec, R. V.

    2007-05-15

    Small-scale density turbulence (k{sub perpendicular}{rho}{sub i}{approx}4-10) and electron thermal flux are both observed to increase during electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of a high-temperature tokamak plasma (k{sub perpendicular}) is the turbulent wavenumber and {rho}{sub i} the ion gyroradius). In contrast, large- (k{sub perpendicular}{rho}{sub i}{<=}1) and intermediate-scale (k{sub perpendicular}){rho}{sub i}{approx}1-3) turbulence n-tilde/n levels and ion thermal transport remain effectively constant. This implies that the small-scale turbulence is not a remnant or tail of the ubiquitous, large-scale or intermediate-scale turbulence, and also indicates a potentially important role in determining anomalous electron thermal transport. Radial scans of small-scale turbulence during ECH indicate decreased fluctuations in the deep core compared with increased levels towards the edge. This trend is consistent with linear gyrokinetic growth rate predictions for electron temperature gradient driven instabilities.

  12. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed.

  13. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T. Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K.; Hattori, T.

    2014-02-15

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  14. An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron as metal vapor supply for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weichsel, T. Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Silze, A.

    2014-05-15

    An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron device has been developed. The magnetron is acting as a metal vapor supply for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. FEM simulation of magnetic flux density was used to ensure that there is no critical interaction between both magnetic fields of magnetron and ECR ion source. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy measurements show an increase in electron density by one order of magnitude from 1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}, when the magnetron plasma is exposed to the magnetic mirror field of the ECR ion source. Electron density enhancement is also indicated by magnetron plasma emission photography with a CCD camera. Furthermore, photographs visualize the formation of a localized loss-cone - area, when the magnetron is operated at magnetic mirror field conditions. The inverted cylindrical magnetron supplies a metal atom load rate of R > 1 × 10{sup 18} atoms/s for aluminum, which meets the demand for the production of a milliampere Al{sup +} ion beam.

  15. An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron as metal vapor supply for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Weichsel, T; Hartung, U; Kopte, T; Zschornack, G; Kreller, M; Silze, A

    2014-05-01

    An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron device has been developed. The magnetron is acting as a metal vapor supply for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. FEM simulation of magnetic flux density was used to ensure that there is no critical interaction between both magnetic fields of magnetron and ECR ion source. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy measurements show an increase in electron density by one order of magnitude from 1 × 10(10) cm(-3) to 1 × 10(11) cm(-3), when the magnetron plasma is exposed to the magnetic mirror field of the ECR ion source. Electron density enhancement is also indicated by magnetron plasma emission photography with a CCD camera. Furthermore, photographs visualize the formation of a localized loss-cone - area, when the magnetron is operated at magnetic mirror field conditions. The inverted cylindrical magnetron supplies a metal atom load rate of R > 1 × 10(18) atoms/s for aluminum, which meets the demand for the production of a milliampere Al(+) ion beam.

  16. Electron cyclotron heating at down-shifted frequencies in existing tokamak devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Krivenski, V.

    1985-06-01

    Plasma heating in existing tokamak devices by electron cyclotron waves with frequency (f) significantly smaller than the electron gyrofrequency (f/sub c/) is investigated for the case of Maxwellian plasmas. It is shown that for central electron temperatures larger than 3 keV, strong absorption of extraordinary waves can occur at values of toroidal field for which the condition f = f/sub c/ is not satisfied in the plasma region. The cases of f = 60 GHz and f = 100 GHz are discussed for the PLT and TFTR devices as representative of medium (approx. =30 kG) and high (approx. =50 kG) magnetic field tokamaks, respectively. Numerical calculations with a ray tracing code indicate that most of the rf energy is absorbed in a central plasma region. These results are of practical interest because they significantly simplify the main technical problem of ECH in a tokamak reactor, i.e., the development of high frequency and high power microwave sources.

  17. Electron cyclotron heating and core intrinsic rotation reversal in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Grassie, J. S. de; Boedo, J. A.; Grierson, B. A.

    2015-12-10

    The effect of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) on the intrinsic rotation profile in DIII-D is shown experimentally. Former DIII-D experiments have shown that ECH tends to cause an interior reduction in the normally co-Ip directed intrinsic rotation profile, and this core rotation can be fully reversed to the opposite direction. This effect is due to a turbulent rearrangement of the interior rotation profile. Here, we show results that there is more than one mechanism causing this. We compare two low density L-mode discharges where the only operational difference is the location of the ECH deposition. At low ECH power, comparable to the Ohmic power, the primary change is in the q-profile accompanied by a reversal of the core intrinsic rotation direction for the more off-axis deposition. The change in the shear of the q-profile fits well with a recent theoretical prediction for this rotation reversal. At higher ECH power, the primary change is in the core electron temperature, Te, accompanied by a hollowing of the rotation profile near the magnetic axis. This effect appears to be due to the change in electron collisionality, consistent with another theoretical, gyrokinetic prediction. The variety of phenomena that could allow ECH to modify the intrinsic rotation profile give some expectation that regions of large velocity shear in the interior could be generated, with the possibility of triggering internal transport barriers.

  18. A study on vacuum aspects of electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Taki, G. S.; Mallick, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2008-05-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is special type hot plasma machine where the high temperature electrons co-exist with multiply charge state ions and neutrals. A few years ago 6.4 GHz. ECR ion source (VEC-ECR) was developed indigenously at VECC. This multiply charged ion source is being used continuously to inject heavy ion beams into the cyclotron. Vacuum plays the major role in ECR ion source. The water cooled plasma chamber is made from an oxygen free high conductivity copper billet to meet the suitable surface condition for vacuum purpose. The entire volume of the ion source is pumped by two 900 1/s special type oil diffusion pumps to achieve 5×10-8 Torr. Usually main plasma chamber is pumped by the plasma itself. Moreover a few 1/s additional pumping speed is provided through extraction hole and pumping slot on the extraction electrode. A study has been carried out to understand the role of vacuum on the multiply charged heavy ion production process. Considering the ion production and loss criteria, it is seen that for getting Ar18+ better vacuum is essential for lower frequency operation. So, an ECR ion source can give better charge state current output operating at higher frequency and stronger confining magnetic field under a specific vacuum condition. The low pressure condition is essential to minimize charge exchange loss due to recombination of multiply charged ions with the neutral atoms. A fixed ratio of neutral to electron density must be maintained for optimizing a particular charge state in the steady state condition. As the electron density is proportional to square of the injected microwave frequency (nevpropf2) a particular operating pressure is essential for a specific charge state. From the study, it has been obtained that the production of Ar18+ ions needs a pressure ~ 9.6×10-8 Torr for 6.4 GHz. ECR ion source. It is also obtained that an ECR ion source, works at a particular vacuum level, can give better charge state

  19. Effect of electron-electron interaction on cyclotron resonance in high-mobility InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S. Gavrilenko, V. I.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Orlita, M.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Goiran, M.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.

    2015-03-21

    We report observation of electron-electron (e-e) interaction effect on cyclotron resonance (CR) in InAs/AlSb quantum well heterostructures. High mobility values allow us to observe strongly pronounced triple splitting of CR line at noninteger filling factors of Landau levels ν. At magnetic fields, corresponding to ν > 4, experimental values of CR energies are in good agreement with single-electron calculations on the basis of eight-band k ⋅ p Hamiltonian. In the range of filling factors 3 < ν < 4 pronounced, splitting of CR line, exceeding significantly the difference in single-electron CR energies, is discovered. The strength of the splitting increases when occupation of the partially filled Landau level tends to a half, being in qualitative agreement with previous prediction by MacDonald and Kallin [Phys. Rev. B 40, 5795 (1989)]. We demonstrate that such behaviour of CR modes can be quantitatively described if one takes into account both electron correlations and the mixing between conduction and valence bands in the calculations of matrix elements of e-e interaction.

  20. Effect of Alfvén waves on the growth rate of the electron-cyclotron maser emission

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D. J.

    2014-06-15

    By using the non-relativistic approximation for the calculation of growth rates, but taking account of the weakly relativistic modification for the electron-cyclotron resonance condition, it is shown that the effect of Alfvén waves (AWs) on the electron-cyclotron maser emission leads to the significant increase of the O-mode growth rate, but has little effect on the X-mode growth rate. We propose that this is because the O-mode wave has the field-aligned polarization sense in the same as the field-aligned oscillatory current, which is created by the field-aligned oscillatory motion of the energetic electrons caused via the presence of AWs. It is this field-aligned oscillatory current that contributes a novel growth rate to the O-mode wave but has little effect on the X-mode wave.

  1. Scattering of relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons by obliquely propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzbekov, Bogdan; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Orlova, Ksenia

    2016-10-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are transverse plasma waves that are generated in the Earth magnetosphere by ring current protons with temperature anisotropy in three different bands: below the H+, He+ and O+ ion gyrofrequencies. EMIC events are enhanced during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm when intensifications in the electric field result in enhanced injections of ions and are usually confined to high-density regions just inside the plasmapause or within drainage plumes. EMIC waves are capable of scattering radiation belt electrons and thus provide an important link between the intensification of the electric field, ion populations, and radiation belt electrons. Bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients computed with the assumption of parallel wave propagation are compared to the results of the code that uses the full cold plasma dispersion relation taking into account oblique propagation of waves and higher-order resonances. We study the sensitivity of the scattering rates to a number of included higher-order resonances, wave spectral distribution parameters, wave normal angle distribution parameters, ambient plasma density, and ion composition. Inaccuracies associated with the neglect of higher-order resonances and oblique propagation of waves are compared to potential errors introduced by uncertainties in the model input parameters.

  2. Electron cyclotron emission radiometer upgrade on the J-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z J; Pan, X M; Ma, X D; Ruan, B W; Zhou, R B; Zhang, C

    2016-11-01

    To meet experimental requirements, the J-TEXT electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic is being upgraded. The front end antenna and transmission line have been modified and a new 8-channel W-band detecting unit has been developed. The improved ECE system will extend the frequency range from 94.5-124.5 GHz to 80.5-124.5 GHz. This will enable the system to cover the most plasma in the radius direction for BT = 1.8-2.2 T, and it even can cover almost the whole plasma range ρ = - 0.8-0.9 (minus means the high field side) at BT = 1.8 T. A new auxiliary channel bank with 8 narrow band, tunable yttrium iron garnet filters is planned to add to the ECE system. Due to observations along a major radius, perpendicular to BT, and relatively low electron temperature, Doppler and relativistic broadening are minimal and thus high spatial resolution measurements can be made at variable locations with these tunable channels.

  3. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  4. Silicon carbon alloy thin film depositions using electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon carbon films (a-SiC:H, micro-c-SiC:H) have been deposited using SiH4, CH4 and H2 mixed gas ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasmas. The optical bandgap of a-SiC:H films is not dependent on the hydrogen dilution in the ECR plasma. The deposition rate of a-SiC:H films is found to be strongly dependent on the ECR magnetic field and the hydrogen dilution. The hydrogen dilution effect on the deposition rate indicates that the etching in ECR hydrogen plasmas plays an important role in the deposition of a-SiC:H films. The optical constants n and k of ECR-deposited a-SiC:H films in the wavelength region of 0.4 to 1.0 micron are determined to be 2.03-1.90 and 0.04-0.00, respectively. The microstructures of ECR-deposited micro-c-SiC:H films are shown by X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) to be composed of 1000-A alpha-SiC microcrystallites and amorphous network structures.

  5. Finding evidence for density fluctuation effects on electron cyclotron heating deposition profiles on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Brookman, M. W. Austin, M. E.; Petty, C. C.

    2015-12-10

    Theoretical work, computation, and results from TCV [J. Decker “Effect of density fluctuations on ECCD in ITER and TCV,” EPJ Web of Conf. 32, 01016 (2012)] suggest that density fluctuations in the edge region of a tokamak plasma can cause broadening of the ECH deposition profile. In this paper, a GUI tool is presented which is used for analysis of ECH deposition as a first step towards looking for this broadening, which could explain effects seen in previous DIII-D ECH transport studies [K.W. Gentle “Electron energy transport inferences from modulated electron cyclotron heating in DIII-D,” Phys. Plasmas 13, 012311 (2006)]. By applying an FFT to the T{sub e} measurements from the University of Texas’s 40-channel ECE Radiometer, and using a simplified thermal transport equation, the flux surface extent of ECH deposition is determined. The Fourier method analysis is compared with a Break-In-Slope (BIS) analysis and predictions from the ray-tracing code TORAY. Examination of multiple Fourier harmonics and BIS fitting methods allow an estimation of modulated transport coefficients and thereby the true ECH deposition profile. Correlations between edge fluctuations and ECH deposition in legacy data are also explored as a step towards establishing a link between fluctuations and deposition broadening in DIII-D.

  6. Sawtooth stabilization by electron cyclotron heating at the q =1 surface in the WT-3 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Hanada, K.; Tanaka, H.; Iida, M.; Ide, S.; Minami, T.; Nakamura, M.; Maekawa, T.; Terumichi, Y. ); Yamada, M.; Manickam, J.; White, R.B. )

    1991-08-01

    Sawtooth oscillations (STO) in the Ohmically heated (OH) WT-3 tokamak ({ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} 1988 (IAEA, Vienna, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 563) are strongly modified or suppressed by localized electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) near the {ital q}=1 surface, where {ital q} refers to the safety factor. The effect of ECH is much stronger when it is applied on the high-field side, as compared to the low-field side. Complete suppression of the STO is achieved for the duration of the ECH when it is applied on the high-field side, in a low-density plasma, provided the ECH power exceeds a threshold value. This threshold decreases with the increasing safety factor at the limiter {ital q}{sub {ital L}} and the complete stabilization of STO can be obtained even when ECH is applied on the low-field side in the high-{ital q}{sub {ital L}} region. It is noticeable that these complete stabilizations can be obtained only by the localized ECH with the elliptic antenna. The STO stabilization is attributed to a modification of the current density profile by high-energy electrons generated by ECH, which reduces the shear in the {ital q}=1 region.

  7. Model for the description of ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Spädtke, P

    2010-02-01

    The finite difference method trajectory code KOBRA3-INP has been developed now for 25 years to perform the simulation of ion beam extraction in three dimensions. Meanwhile, the code has been validated for different applications: high current ion beam extraction from plasma sources for ion implantation technology, neutral gas heating in fusion devices, or ion thrusters for space propulsion. One major issue of the development of this code was to improve the flexibility of the applied model for the simulation of different types of particle sources. Fixed emitter sources might be simulated with that code as well as laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), or H(-) sources, which require the simulation of negative ions, negative electrons, and positive charges simultaneously. The model which has been developed for ECRIS has now been used to explore the conditions for the ion beam extraction from a still nonexisting ion source, a so called ARC-ECRIS [P. Suominen and F. Wenander, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A305 (2008)]. It has to be shown whether the plasma generator has similar properties like regular ECRIS. However, the emittance of the extracted beam seems to be much better compared to an ECRIS equipped with a hexapole.

  8. Ion Extraction from a Toroidal Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source: a Numerical Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliri, Claudia; Volpe, Francesco; Gammino, Santo; Mascali, David

    2013-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are magnetic mirror plasmas of microwave-heated electrons and cold multi-charged ions. The ions are extracted from one end of the mirror and injected in accelerators for nuclear and particle physics studies, hadrontherapy, or neutral beam injection in fusion plasmas. ECRIS devices progressed to higher and higher ion currents and charge states by adopting stronger magnetic fields (beneficial for confinement) and proportionally higher ECR frequencies. Further improvements would require the attainment of ``triple products'' comparable with major fusion experiments. For this, we propose a new, toroidal rather than linear, ECRIS geometry, which would at the same time improve confinement and make better use of the magnetic field. Ion extraction is more complicated than from a linear device, but feasible, as our modeling indicates. Possible techniques involve charge-dependent drifts, divertors, specially designed magnetic fields and associated loss-cones, electrostatic and/or magnetic deflectors, or techniques used in accelerators to transfer particles from one storage ring or accelerator to the next. Here we present single-particle tracings assessing and comparing these extraction techniques.

  9. Fluctuations in electron cyclotron resonance plasma in a divergent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Fredriksen, Åshild; Chandra, Sayan

    2016-02-01

    The dependence of fluctuations on electron-neutral collision frequency (νen) and the radial location is investigated in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma in a divergent magnetic field region for a set of magnetic fields. Results indicate that the fluctuations depend strongly on the collision frequency. At lower magnetic fields and νen, the fluctuation levels are small and are observed to peak around 3-5 cm from the central plasma region. Coherent wave modes are found to contribute up to about 30% of the total fluctuation power, and two to three harmonics are present in the power spectra. There are two principal modes present in the discharge: one appears to be a dissipative mode associated with a collisional drift wave instability initiated at a lower pressure (collision frequencies) (˜0.5 mTorr) and is stabilized at a higher pressure (≳3 mTorr). The other mode appears at intermediate pressure (≳1.75 mTorr) and possesses the signature of a flute instability. The fluctuation levels indicate that flute modes are predominant in the discharge at higher pressures ( >1.75 mTorr) and at higher values of the magnetic field (˜540 Gauss).

  10. Finding evidence for density fluctuation effects on electron cyclotron heating deposition profiles on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, M. W.; Austin, M. E.; Petty, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Theoretical work, computation, and results from TCV [J. Decker "Effect of density fluctuations on ECCD in ITER and TCV," EPJ Web of Conf. 32, 01016 (2012)] suggest that density fluctuations in the edge region of a tokamak plasma can cause broadening of the ECH deposition profile. In this paper, a GUI tool is presented which is used for analysis of ECH deposition as a first step towards looking for this broadening, which could explain effects seen in previous DIII-D ECH transport studies [K.W. Gentle "Electron energy transport inferences from modulated electron cyclotron heating in DIII-D," Phys. Plasmas 13, 012311 (2006)]. By applying an FFT to the Te measurements from the University of Texas's 40-channel ECE Radiometer, and using a simplified thermal transport equation, the flux surface extent of ECH deposition is determined. The Fourier method analysis is compared with a Break-In-Slope (BIS) analysis and predictions from the ray-tracing code TORAY. Examination of multiple Fourier harmonics and BIS fitting methods allow an estimation of modulated transport coefficients and thereby the true ECH deposition profile. Correlations between edge fluctuations and ECH deposition in legacy data are also explored as a step towards establishing a link between fluctuations and deposition broadening in DIII-D.

  11. Electron cyclotron emission radiometer upgrade on the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. J.; Pan, X. M.; Ma, X. D.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhou, R. B.; Zhang, C.

    2016-11-01

    To meet experimental requirements, the J-TEXT electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic is being upgraded. The front end antenna and transmission line have been modified and a new 8-channel W-band detecting unit has been developed. The improved ECE system will extend the frequency range from 94.5-124.5 GHz to 80.5-124.5 GHz. This will enable the system to cover the most plasma in the radius direction for BT = 1.8-2.2 T, and it even can cover almost the whole plasma range ρ = - 0.8-0.9 (minus means the high field side) at BT = 1.8 T. A new auxiliary channel bank with 8 narrow band, tunable yttrium iron garnet filters is planned to add to the ECE system. Due to observations along a major radius, perpendicular to BT, and relatively low electron temperature, Doppler and relativistic broadening are minimal and thus high spatial resolution measurements can be made at variable locations with these tunable channels.

  12. Macroscopic quasi-linear theory of electromagnetic electron cyclotron instability associated with core and halo solar wind electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfraz, M.; Saeed, Sundas; Yoon, P. H.; Abbas, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2016-10-01

    Spacecraft observations made near 1 AU show that both core and halo solar wind electrons exhibit temperature anisotropies that appear to be regulated by marginal electromagnetic electron cyclotron instability condition. In the literature, the threshold conditions of this instability, operative for T⊥>T∥, have been expressed as an inverse correlation between the temperature anisotropy, T⊥/T∥, and parallel beta, β∥, but such a relation was deduced on the basis of linear stability analysis combined with empirical fitting. The present paper, on the other hand, employs macroscopic quasi-linear analysis for core-halo two-component model of the solar wind electrons, in order to follow the self-consistent time history of the core and halo temperature development as well as the dynamics of magnetic field perturbation wave energy. In the present analysis, the inverse correlation for core and halo temperature anisotropy and parallel beta naturally emerges from the solutions of self-consistent theory. The present findings indicate that the macroscopic quasi-linear method may be useful for modeling the dynamics of solar wind electrons.

  13. Measurements and analysis of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum obtained in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.; Rodrigues, G.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2008-02-15

    From the ECR plasma, hot electrons leak across the magnetic lines of force and by striking the plasma chamber produce bremsstrahlung x-rays. The wall bremsstrahlung gives information on the confinement status of hot electron. In our studies, experimental measurements are carried out in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for the wall bremsstrahlung x-rays and the results are presented. While optimizing a particular charge state in ECR ion source, experimental parameters are adjusted to get a maximum current. The wall bremsstrahlung components are studied in these cases for understanding the hot electron confinement conditions.

  14. Studies on x-ray and UV emissions in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.

    2008-02-15

    A novel electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source is constructed based on the ECR technique. In this paper, the possibility of using the ECR x-ray source for producing UV rays by optimizing the plasma parameters is explored. X-ray and UV emissions from the ECR x-ray source are carried out for argon, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} plasma. The x-ray spectral and dose measurements are carried with NaI(Tl) based spectrometer and dosimeter, respectively. For UV measurement, a quartz window arrangement is made at the exit port and the UV intensity is measured at 5 cm from the quartz plate using UV meter. The x-ray and UV emissions are carried out for different microwave power levels and gas pressures. The x-ray emission is observed in the pressure range {<=}10{sup -5} Torr, whereas the UV emission is found to be negligible for the gas pressures <10{sup -5} Torr and it starts increasing in the pressure range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -3} Torr. At high-pressure range, collision frequency of electron-atom is large which leads to the higher UV flux. At low pressure, the electron-atom collision frequency is low and hence the electrons reach high energy and by hitting the cavity wall produces higher x-ray flux. By choosing proper experimental conditions and plasma gas species, the same source can be used as either an x-ray source or an UV source.

  15. Electron-cyclotron maser emission - Relative growth and damping rates for different modes and harmonics. [of auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.; Hewitt, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The temporal growth rate and the number of e-folding growths are calculated and compared for the following wave modes due to a loss-cone-driven cyclotron maser: fundamental x, o, and z modes and second harmonic x and o modes. The dominant mode of the maser should be the fastest growing mode for a saturated maser and should be the mode with the greatest number of e-folding growths for an unsaturated maser; this mode is the fundamental x mode) for a plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency ratio of less than about 0.3; it is the z mode (or perhaps the fundamental o mode) for ratios between 0.3 and 1.0, and the z mode (or perhaps the second harmonic x mode) for ratios between 1.0 and 1.3. Two main points are made: the dominance of the z mode over the range of ratios considered and the very weak effect of cyclotron damping. Electron-cyclotron maser emission is seen as responsible for auroral kilometric radiation, decametric radio emission from Jupiter and Saturn, solar microwave spike bursts, and microwave emission from some flare stars.

  16. New method for comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents using an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kishi, Shintaro; Makita, Mika; Nagamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Toda, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a detection technology for vapor forms of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) with an element analysis system using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. After the vapor sample was introduced directly into the ion source, the molecular material was decomposed into elements using electron cyclotron resonance plasma and ionized. The following CWAs and stimulants were examined: diisopropyl fluorophosphonate (DFP), 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (2CEES), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The type of chemical warfare agents, specifically, whether it was a nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, or choking agent, could be determined by measuring the quantities of the monatomic ions or CN(+) using mass spectrometry. It was possible to detect gaseous CWAs that could not be detected by a conventional mass spectrometer. The distribution of electron temperature in the plasma could be closely controlled by adjusting the input power of the microwaves used to generate the electron cyclotron resonance plasma, and the target compounds could be detected as molecular ions or fragment ions, enabling identification of the target agents.

  17. New method for comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents using an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kishi, Shintaro; Makita, Mika; Nagamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Toda, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a detection technology for vapor forms of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) with an element analysis system using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. After the vapor sample was introduced directly into the ion source, the molecular material was decomposed into elements using electron cyclotron resonance plasma and ionized. The following CWAs and stimulants were examined: diisopropyl fluorophosphonate (DFP), 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (2CEES), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The type of chemical warfare agents, specifically, whether it was a nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, or choking agent, could be determined by measuring the quantities of the monatomic ions or CN + using mass spectrometry. It was possible to detect gaseous CWAs that could not be detected by a conventional mass spectrometer. The distribution of electron temperature in the plasma could be closely controlled by adjusting the input power of the microwaves used to generate the electron cyclotron resonance plasma, and the target compounds could be detected as molecular ions or fragment ions, enabling identification of the target agents.

  18. Improved cross-calibration of Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission with ECH on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, M. W.; Austin, M. E.; McLean, A. G.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Hyatt, A. W.; Lohr, J.

    2016-11-01

    Thomson scattering produces ne profiles from measurement of scattered laser beam intensity. Rayleigh scattering provides a first calibration of the relation ne ∝ ITS, which depends on many factors (e.g., laser alignment and power, optics, and measurement systems). On DIII-D, the ne calibration is adjusted against an absolute ne from the density-driven cutoff of the 48 channel 2nd harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron emission system. This method has been used to calibrate Thomson ne from the edge to near the core (r/a > 0.15). Application of core electron cyclotron heating improves the quality of cutoff and depth of its penetration into the core, and also changes underlying MHD activity, minimizing crashes which confound calibration. Less fueling is needed as "ECH pump-out" generates a plasma ready to take up gas. On removal of gyrotron power, cutoff penetrates into the core as channels fall successively and smoothly into cutoff.

  19. A proposal for a novel H ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance heating and surface ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie A; Kurennoy, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    A design for a novel H{sup -} ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE{sub 111} eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H{sup -} ion beam is further 'self-extracted' through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H{sup -} ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  20. A Proposal for a Novel H{sup -} Ion Source Based on Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Heating and Surface Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O.; Kurennoy, S.

    2009-03-12

    A design for a novel H{sup -} ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE{sub 111} eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H{sup -} ion beam is further ''self-extracted'' through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H{sup -} ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  1. Current density distributions and sputter marks in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Boettcher, Stephan; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2013-01-15

    Most electron cyclotron resonance ion sources use hexapolar magnetic fields for the radial confinement of the plasma. The geometry of this magnetic structure is then-induced by charged particles-mapped onto the inner side of the plasma electrode via sputtering and deposition. The resulting structures usually show two different patterns: a sharp triangular one in the central region which in some cases is even sputtered deep into the material (referred to as thin groove or sharp structure), and a blurred but still triangular-like one in the surroundings (referred to as broad halo). Therefore, both patterns seem to have different sources. To investigate their origins we replaced the standard plasma electrode by a custom-built plasma electrode acting as a planar, multi-segment current-detector. For different biased disc voltages, detector positions, and source biases (referred to the detector) we measured the electrical current density distributions in the plane of the plasma electrode. The results show a strong and sharply confined electron population with triangular shape surrounded by less intense and spatially less confined ions. Observed sputter- and deposition marks are related to the analysis of the results. Our measurements suggest that the two different patterns (thin and broad) indeed originate from different particle populations. The thin structures seem to be caused by the hot electron population while the broad marks seem to stem from the medium to highly charged ions. In this paper we present our measurements together with theoretical considerations and substantiate the conclusions drawn above. The validity of these results is also discussed.

  2. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  3. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Mishra, L; Kewlani, H; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10(-3) mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  4. Numerical simulations of gas mixing effect in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Bondarchenko, A.; Efremov, A.; Loginov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions code nam-ecris is used to simulate the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma sustained in a mixture of Kr with O2 , N2 , Ar, Ne, and He. The model assumes that ions are electrostatically confined in the ECR zone by a dip in the plasma potential. A gain in the extracted krypton ion currents is seen for the highest charge states; the gain is maximized when oxygen is used as a mixing gas. The special feature of oxygen is that most of the singly charged oxygen ions are produced after the dissociative ionization of oxygen molecules with a large kinetic energy release of around 5 eV per ion. The increased loss rate of energetic lowly charged ions of the mixing element requires a building up of the retarding potential barrier close to the ECR surface to equilibrate electron and ion losses out of the plasma. In the mixed plasmas, the barrier value is large (˜1 V ) compared to pure Kr plasma (˜0.01 V ), with longer confinement times of krypton ions and with much higher ion temperatures. The temperature of the krypton ions is increased because of extra heating by the energetic oxygen ions and a longer time of ion confinement. In calculations, a drop of the highly charged ion currents of lighter elements is observed when adding small fluxes of krypton into the source. This drop is caused by the accumulation of the krypton ions inside plasma, which decreases the electron and ion confinement times.

  5. A quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser for fusion reactor heating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1990-12-31

    High power microwave and millimeter sources, such as the quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser (QOECM) are important in fusion research as well as in high-energy physics and in other applications. The interaction between the electromagnetic modes of a Fabry-Perot resonator and an electron beam gyrating through a magnetic field has been studied for both the cases of beams parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. The parallel case was theoretically first studied by Kurin for forward and backward wave interaction, and experimentally by Komlev and Kurin. Kreischer and Temkin reviewed the general case of the linear small signal interaction parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. Sprangle, et al discussed the perpendicular case in a self-consistent linear and nonlinear theoretical study using the Gaussian transverse profile of an open resonator with a single longitudinal mode. Experimental verification of the devices operation was first mentioned in work at the Naval Research Laboratory. Theoretical studies using a time-dependent analysis of a large number of longitudinal modes with similar transverse mode profiles have demonstrated that single longitudinal-mode operation can be achieved at equilibrium and that performance can be enhanced by prebunching the electron beam and tapering the magnetic field. The use of output coupling apertures in the mirrors has been studied theoretically in relation to the structure of the modes for both confocal and nonconfocal resonators by Permnoud; use of an open resonator with stepped mirrors has been studied in order to choose a particular longitudinal mode. Studies at the Naval Research Laboratory mirror used configurations that diffraction couple the energy from around the mirror edges, so that the transverse profile inside the resonator can be selective to the fundamental mode.

  6. A quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser for fusion reactor heating

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    High power microwave and millimeter sources, such as the quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser (QOECM) are important in fusion research as well as in high-energy physics and in other applications. The interaction between the electromagnetic modes of a Fabry-Perot resonator and an electron beam gyrating through a magnetic field has been studied for both the cases of beams parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. The parallel case was theoretically first studied by Kurin for forward and backward wave interaction, and experimentally by Komlev and Kurin. Kreischer and Temkin reviewed the general case of the linear small signal interaction parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. Sprangle, et al discussed the perpendicular case in a self-consistent linear and nonlinear theoretical study using the Gaussian transverse profile of an open resonator with a single longitudinal mode. Experimental verification of the devices operation was first mentioned in work at the Naval Research Laboratory. Theoretical studies using a time-dependent analysis of a large number of longitudinal modes with similar transverse mode profiles have demonstrated that single longitudinal-mode operation can be achieved at equilibrium and that performance can be enhanced by prebunching the electron beam and tapering the magnetic field. The use of output coupling apertures in the mirrors has been studied theoretically in relation to the structure of the modes for both confocal and nonconfocal resonators by Permnoud; use of an open resonator with stepped mirrors has been studied in order to choose a particular longitudinal mode. Studies at the Naval Research Laboratory mirror used configurations that diffraction couple the energy from around the mirror edges, so that the transverse profile inside the resonator can be selective to the fundamental mode.

  7. Current density distributions and sputter marks in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Böttcher, Stephan; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Most electron cyclotron resonance ion sources use hexapolar magnetic fields for the radial confinement of the plasma. The geometry of this magnetic structure is then--induced by charged particles--mapped onto the inner side of the plasma electrode via sputtering and deposition. The resulting structures usually show two different patterns: a sharp triangular one in the central region which in some cases is even sputtered deep into the material (referred to as thin groove or sharp structure), and a blurred but still triangular-like one in the surroundings (referred to as broad halo). Therefore, both patterns seem to have different sources. To investigate their origins we replaced the standard plasma electrode by a custom-built plasma electrode acting as a planar, multi-segment current-detector. For different biased disc voltages, detector positions, and source biases (referred to the detector) we measured the electrical current density distributions in the plane of the plasma electrode. The results show a strong and sharply confined electron population with triangular shape surrounded by less intense and spatially less confined ions. Observed sputter- and deposition marks are related to the analysis of the results. Our measurements suggest that the two different patterns (thin and broad) indeed originate from different particle populations. The thin structures seem to be caused by the hot electron population while the broad marks seem to stem from the medium to highly charged ions. In this paper we present our measurements together with theoretical considerations and substantiate the conclusions drawn above. The validity of these results is also discussed.

  8. Electron cyclotron emission reconstruction image and m/n=3/2 mode in HT-7 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li Erzhong; Hu Liqun; Ling Bili; Liu Yong; Ti Ang; Chen Kaiyun; Shen Biao; Gao Xiang

    2010-07-15

    Electron cyclotron emission reconstruction image has been used for flux surface reconstruction. The reconstruction image is based on plasma rigid rotation which is obtained from Mirnov diagnostic. From the reconstructed two-dimensional flux surface, the classical m/n=3/2 mode is visualized, which is of similar spatial structure as neoclassical 3/2 mode observed in some other tokamaks [B. Esposito et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 045006 (2008)].

  9. Evolutions of zonal flows and turbulence in a tokamak edge plasma during electron cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. F.; Liu, A. D.; Lan, T.; Cui, Z. Y.; Yu, D. L.; Yan, L. W.; Zhao, H. L.; Sheng, H. G.; Chen, R.; Xie, J. L.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Ding, W. X.; Sun, X.; Hong, W. Y.; Cheng, J.; Zhao, K. J.; Dong, J. Q.; Duan, X. R.

    2013-12-01

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) and low-frequency zonal flow (LFZF) are both observed through Langmuir probe arrays during electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) on the HL-2A tokamak edge. The radial distributions of the amplitude and peak frequency of GAM in floating potential fluctuations are investigated through rake probe arrays under different ECRH powers. It is observed that the GAM frequency would decrease and the intensity of carbon line emission would increase as the ECRH power exceeds a certain threshold. The analyses suggest that the impurity ions may play an important role in the GAM frequency at the edge region. It is also found that during the ECRH phase besides the mean flow, both GAM and LFZF are strengthened. The total fluctuation power and the fraction of that power associated with zonal flows both increase with the ECRH power, consistent with a predator-prey model. The auto- and cross-bicoherence analyses show the coupling between GAM and its second harmonic during the ECRH phase. Moreover, the results also suggest that the couplings between GAM and the components with multiple GAM frequency are strengthened. These couplings may be important for GAM saturation during the ECRH phase.

  10. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yun; Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-01

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C(5+) ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C(5+) ion beam was got when work gas was CH4 while about 262 eμA of C(5+) ion beam was obtained when work gas was C2H2 gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  11. Use of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for nondestructive testing application

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.

    2006-03-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is being used for generating x rays in the low-energy region (<150 keV). Recently, the source is used for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges. In order to qualify the ECR x-ray source for imaging application, the source should give uniform flux over the area under study. Lead collimation arrangement is made to get uniform flux. The flux profile is measured using a teletector at different distance from the port and uniform field region of 10x10 cm{sup 2} has been marked at 20 cm from the x-ray exit port. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit pack is used for examining the source performance. The required dose for nondestructive testing examination has been estimated using a hospital x-ray machine and it is found to be 0.05 mSv. Our source experimental parameters are tuned and the DAC circuit pack was exposed for nearly 7 min to get the required dose value. The ECR x-ray source operating parameters are argon pressure: 10{sup -5} Torr, microwave power: 350 W, and coil current: 0 A. The effective energy of the x-ray spectrum is nearly 40 keV. The x-ray images obtained from ECR x-ray source and hospital medical radiography machine are compared. It is found that the image obtained from ECR x-ray source is suitable for NDT application.

  12. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-15

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  13. Design Performance of Front Steering-Type Electron Cyclotron Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Imai, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Kasugai, A.; Hayakawa, A.; Mori, S.; Mohri, K.

    2005-01-15

    The performance of a front steering (FS)-type electron cyclotron launcher designed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is evaluated with a thermal, electromagnetic, and nuclear analysis of the components; a mechanical test of a spiral tube for the steering mirror; and a rotational test of bearings. The launcher consists of a front shield and a launcher plug where three movable optic mirrors to steer incident multimegawatt radio-frequency beam power, waveguide components, nuclear shields, and vacuum windows are installed. The windows are located behind a closure plate to isolate the transmission lines from the radioactivated circumstance (vacuum vessel). The waveguide lines of the launcher are doglegged to reduce the direct neutron streaming toward the vacuum windows and other components. The maximum stresses on the critical components such as the steering mirror, its cooling tube, and the front shield are less than their allowable stresses. It was also identified that the stress on the launcher, which yielded from electromagnetic force caused by plasma disruption, was a little larger than the criteria, and a modification of the launcher plug structure was necessary. The nuclear analysis result shows that the neutron shield capability of the launcher satisfies the shield criteria of the ITER. It concludes that the design of the FS launcher is generally suitable for application to the ITER.

  14. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of amorphous silicon alloy films and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shing, Y.H. )

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to develop a state-of-the-art electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The objective was to understand the deposition processes of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, with a best-effort improvement of optoelectronic material properties and best-effort stabilization of solar cell performance. ECR growth parameters were systematically and extensively investigated; materials characterization included constant photocurrent measurement (CPM), junction capacitance, drive-level capacitance profiling (DLCP), optical transmission, light and dark photoconductivity, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Conventional ECR-deposited a-Si:H was compared to a new form, a-Si:(Xe, H), in which xenon gas was added to the ECR plasma. a-Si:(Xe,H) possessed low, stable dark conductivities and high photosensitivites. Light-soaking revealed photodegradation rates about 35% lower than those of comparable radio frequency (rf)-deposited material. ECR-deposited p-type a SiC:H and intrinsic a-Si:H films underwent evaluation as components of p-i-n solar cells with standard rf films for the remaining layers.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of a-Si:H and a-C:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Yang, C. L.; Allevato, C. E.; Pool, F. S.

    1989-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma enhanced CVD. A high deposition rate of 25 A/sec and a light-to-dark conductivity ratio of 500,000 for a-Si:H films have been achieved by the ECR process using a pure silane plasma. ECR microwave plasmas have been analyzed by in situ optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and have shown a strong H-asterisk emission at 434 nm indicating higher chemical reactivity than RF plasmas. The linear correlation between the film deposition rate and the SiH-asterisk emission intensity of ECR silane plasma suggests that SiH-asterisk species are related to the neutral radicals which are responsible for the a-Si:H film deposition. Hard and soft a-C:H films have been deposited by ECR with and without RF bias power, respectively. The RF bias to the substrate is found to play a critical role in determining the film structure and the carbon bonding configuration of ECR deposited a-C:H films. Raman spectra of these films indicate that ECR deposition conditions can be optimized to produce diamond films.

  16. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  17. Effects of electron cyclotron current drive on the evolution of double tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guanglan Dong, Chunying; Duan, Longfang

    2015-09-15

    The effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the double tearing mode (DTM) in slab geometry are investigated by using two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. It is found that, mainly, the double tearing mode is suppressed by the emergence of the secondary island, due to the deposition of driven current on the X-point of magnetic island at one rational surface, which forms a new non-complete symmetric magnetic topology structure (defined as a non-complete symmetric structure, NSS). The effects of driven current with different parameters (magnitude, initial time of deposition, duration time, and location of deposition) on the evolution of DTM are analyzed elaborately. The optimal magnitude or optimal deposition duration of driven current is the one which makes the duration of NSS the longest, which depends on the mutual effect between ECCD and the background plasma. Moreover, driven current introduced at the early Sweet-Parker phase has the best suppression effect; and the optimal moment also exists, depending on the duration of the NSS. Finally, the effects varied by the driven current disposition location are studied. It is verified that the favorable location of driven current is the X-point which is completely different from the result of single tearing mode.

  18. Off-axis electron cyclotron heating and the sandpile paradigm for transport in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, T. K.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Merrifield, J. A.

    2004-02-01

    Previous observations that suggest a substantial role for nondiffusive energy transport in tokamaks subjected to off-axis electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are compared to the output from a sandpile model. The observations considered include local and global aspects of temperature profile evolution in the DIII-D [for example, C. C. Petty and T. C. Luce, Nucl. Fusion 34, 121 (1994)] and RTP (Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project) [for example, M. R. de Baar, M. N. A. Beurskens, G. M. D. Hogeweij, and N. J. Lopes Cardozo, Phys. Plasmas 6, 4645 (1999)] tokamaks. The sandpile model employed is an extension, to incorporate noncentral fueling, of one used previously to address tokamak physics issues [S. C. Chapman, R. O. Dendy, and B. Hnat, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2814 (2001)]. It is found that there are significant points of resemblance between the phenomenology of the noncentrally fueled sandpile and of the tokamaks with off-axis ECH. This suggests that the essential ingredient of the sandpile model, namely avalanching conditioned by a local critical gradient, may be one of the key transport effects generated by the tokamak plasma physics.

  19. Oblique electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves for Kappa distribution with AC field in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2015-08-01

    The dispersion relation for obliquely propagating relativistic electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) waves in collision-less magnetoplasma is obtained. Investigations for EMEC waves in magnetosphere of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus have been done, in presence of perpendicular AC electric field for Kappa distribution function. The relativistic temporal growth rate is calculated using method of characteristic solution. Using the data provided by spacecrafts like Cassini, Voyager 1 and 2, while exploring the magnetosphere of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus, is used to plot graphs showing growth rate being effected by various parameters. Comprehensive parametric analysis have been done at different radial distances of the planets. It is concluded that beside huge difference in magnetospheric configuration, temperature anisotropy remains the main source of energy in case of Jupiter and Uranus. While studying EMEC waves in magnetosphere of Saturn, it is inferred that growth rate attains maximum magnitude when angle of propagation increases. Also, the results and its interpretations explain how the growth of EMEC wave modifies in different magnetospheric conditions.

  20. Progress in producing megawatt gyrotrons for ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) heating

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Tsirulnikov, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Varian is carrying out the development of high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 100--500 GHz for use in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating of magnetically-confined plasma. Initial test vehicles at 140 GHz have utilized TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavities, and have been designed to generate short-pulse (up to 20 ms) power levels of 1 MW and up to 400 kW CW. Recently, short-pulse power levels of 940 kW at 35% efficiency have been obtained and average powers of 200 kW have been achieved at peak powers of 400 kW. Long-pulse testing is currently underway. Initial test have resulted in output levels of 400 kW for pulse durations of 380 ms. Design work on 110 GHz, 500 kW CW gyrotron oscillators has recently been completed and a prototype tube has been assembled and is currently being tested. The design of a 110 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron, using a novel output coupling approach, is nearly complete. Fabrication of the first 1 MW CW experimental tube is in progress.

  1. Status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Jeong, J. H.; Park, S.; Kim, H. J.; Yang, H. L.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Doane, J.

    2011-12-23

    A 170 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH/CD) system on KSTAR is designed to launch total 2.4 MW of power for up to 300 sec into the plasma. At present the first 1 MW ECH/CD system is under installation and commissioning for 2011 KSTAR campaign. The 170 GHz, 1 MW, 300 sec gyrotron and the matching optics unit (MOU) will be provided from JAEA under collaboration between NFRI and JAEA. The transmission line consists of MOU and 70 m long 63.5 mm ID corrugated waveguides with the eight miter bends. The 1 MW, 10 sec launcher is developed based on the existing two-mirror front-end launcher in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Pohang University of Science and Technology, and is installed on the low field side in the KSTAR equatorial plane. The mirror pivot is located at 30 cm below from the equatorial plane. 3.6 MVA power supply system is manufactured and now is under commissioning to meet the triode gun operation of JAEA gyrotron. The power supply consists of 66 kV/55 A cathode power supply, mode-anode system, and 50 kV/160 mA body power supply. In this paper, the current status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW ECH/CD system will be presented as well as the experimental plan utilizing 170 GHz new ECH/CD system.

  2. Design of Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, N.; Bigelow, T.; Rasmussen, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Ramponi, G.; Saibene, G.; Cirant, S.; Denisov, G.; Heidinger, R.; Piosczyk, B.; Henderson, M.; Hogge, J.-P.; Thumm, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Rao, S. L.; Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Temkin, R. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Zohm, H.

    2007-09-28

    Since the end of EDA, the design of the Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH and CD) system has been modified to respond to progress in physics understanding and change of interface conditions. Nominal RF power of 20 MW is shared by four upper launchers or one equatorial launcher RF beams are steered by front steering mirrors providing wide sweeping angle for the RF beam. DC high voltage power supply may be composed of IGBT pulse step modulators because of high frequency modulation and design flexibility to three different types of 170 GHz gyrotrons provided by three parties. The RF power from the 170 GHz gyrotron is transmitted to the launcher by 63.5 mm{phi} corrugated waveguide line and remotely switched by a waveguide switch between the upper launcher and the equatorial launcher. The ECH and CD system has also a start-up sub-system for assist of initial discharge composed of three 127.5 GHz gyrotrons and a dedicated DC high voltage power supply. Three of transmission lines are shared between 170 GHz gyrotron and 127.5 GHz gyrotron so as to inject RF beam for the start-up through the equatorial launcher. R and Ds of components for high power long pulse and mirror steering mechanism have been on-going in the parties to establish a reliable ITER ECH and CD system.

  3. Measurements, modelling and electron cyclotron heating modification of Alfven eigenmode activity in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, Michael; Heidbrink, W.; Nazikian, Raffi; Austin, M. E.; Cheng, C Z; Chu, M. S.; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Holcomb, C T; Hyatt, A. W.; Kramer, G.; Lohr, J.T.; Mckee, G. R.; Petty, C C.; Prater, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Spong, Donald A

    2009-01-01

    Neutral beam injection into reversed magnetic shear DIII-D plasmas produces a variety of Alfvenic activity including toroidicity and ellipticity induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE/EAE, respectively) and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAE) as well as their spatial coupling. These modes are studied during the discharge current ramp phase when incomplete current penetration results in a high central safety factor and strong drive due to multiple higher order resonances. It is found that ideal MHD modelling of eigenmode spectral evolution, coupling and structure are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. It is also found that higher radial envelope harmonic RSAEs are clearly observed and agree with modelling. Some discrepancies with modelling such as that due to up/down eigenmode asymmetries are also pointed out. Concomitant with the Alfvenic activity, fast ion (FIDA) spectroscopy shows large reductions in the central fast ion profile, the degree of which depends on the Alfven eigenmode amplitude. Interestingly, localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) near the mode location stabilizes RSAE activity and results in significantly improved fast ion confinement relative to discharges with ECH deposition on axis. In these discharges, RSAE activity is suppressed when ECH is deposited near the radius of the shear reversal point and enhanced with deposition near the axis. The sensitivity of this effect to deposition power and current drive phasing as well as ECH modulation are presented.

  4. A simulation of X-ray shielding for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-15

    It is generally assumed that large amounts of x-rays are emitted from the ion source of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) instrument. The total amount of x-rays should be strictly limited to avoid the extra heat load to the cryostat of the superconducting ECR ion source, since they are partly absorbed by the cold mass into the cryostat. A simulation of x-ray shielding was carried out to determine the effective thickness of the x-ray shield needed via the use of Geant4. X-ray spectra of the 10 GHz Nanogan ECR ion source were measured as a function of the thickness variation in the x-ray shield. The experimental results were compared with Geant4 results to verify the effectiveness of the x-ray shield. Based on the validity in the case of the 10 GHz ECR ion source, the x-ray shielding results are presented by assuming the spectral temperature of the 28 GHz ECR ion source.

  5. Development of a novel mass spectrometer equipped with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kidera, Masanori; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Mitsubori, Youhei; Goto, Akira; Yano, Yasushige

    2007-01-01

    The ionization efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is generally high, and all elements can be fundamentally ionized by the high-temperature plasma. We focused our attention on the high potentiality of ECRIS as an ion source for mass spectrometers and attempted to customize the mass spectrometer equipped with an ECRIS. Precise measurements were performed by using an ECRIS that was specialized and customized for elemental analysis. By using the charge-state distribution and the isotope ratio, the problem of overlap such as that observed in the spectra of isobars could be solved without any significant improvement in the mass resolution. When the isotope anomaly (or serious mass discrimination effect) was not observed in ECR plasma, the system was found to be very effective for isotope analysis. In this paper, based on the spectrum (ion current as a function of an analyzing magnet current) results of low charged state distributions (2+, 3+, 4+, ...) of noble gases, we discuss the feasibility of an elemental analysis system employing an ECRIS, particularly for isotopic analysis. The high-performance isotopic analysis obtained for ECRIS mass spectrometer in this study suggests that it can be widely applied to several fields of scientific study that require elemental or isotopic analyses with high sensitivity.

  6. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yun; Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-01

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C5+ ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C5+ ion beam was got when work gas was CH4 while about 262 eμA of C5+ ion beam was obtained when work gas was C2H2 gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  7. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  8. Calibration of Thomson scattering systems using electron cyclotron emission cutoff data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhurovich, K.; Mossessian, D.A.; Hughes, J.W.; Hubbard, A.E.; Irby, J.H.; Marmar, E.S.

    2005-05-15

    An alternative method of absolute calibration of Thomson scattering (TS) systems is described. The method is based on the measurements of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) from the plasma. If the plasma density reaches some critical value the emission at some frequencies is cut off and an abrupt loss of signal is registered by the ECE diagnostic. These critical values are calculated from the frequencies of the ECE channels in which cutoffs are observed, using the dispersion relation for the wave propagation. The radial positions of the ECE channels are bound to the measured magnetic field in the tokamak and, therefore, are known. The derived critical density values at certain positions in plasma are used to calculate absolute calibration coefficients for the core TS system. For that data points from the TS diagnostic are interpolated in time and space to these critical density values. This calibration technique is implemented in situ on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak during plasma operation. We use a nine-channel ECE diagnostic to calibrate the eight-channel core TS system. The uncertainty of the TS density calibration is {<=}10%, which is less than that from the gas scattering calibrations. Good agreement exists between TS density profiles and measurements from the visible continuum diagnostic and interferometry. Given the wide availability of ECE diagnostics on most tokamaks and other fusion devices, this technique should be suitable on many other experiments.

  9. Development of gas pulsing system for electron cyclotron resonance ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, S.; Honma, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sugiura, A.

    2008-02-01

    A gas-pulsing system for an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with all permanent magnets (Kei2 source) at NIRS has been developed and tested. The system consists of a small vessel (30ml) to reserve CH4 gas and two fast solenoid valves that are installed at both sides of the vessel. They are connected to each other and to the Kei2 source by using a stainless-steel pipe (4mm inner diameter), where the length of the pipe from the valve to the source is 60cm and the conductance is 1.2l /s. From the results of the test, almost 300eμA for a pulsed C4+12 beam was obtained at a Faraday cup in an extraction-beam channel with a pressure range of 4000Pa in the vessel. At this time, the valve has an open time of 10ms and the delay time between the valve open time and the application of microwave power is 100ms. In experiments, the conversion efficiency for input CH4 molecules to the quantity of extracted C4+12 ions in one beam pulse was found to be around 3% and the ratio of the total amount of the gas requirement was only 10% compared with the case of continuous gas provided in 3.3s of repetition in HIMAC.

  10. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-15

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  11. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  12. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Delahaye, P.; Kutsaev, Sergey; Maunoury, L.

    2012-11-01

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a 252Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species 143Ba27+. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for 23Na7+ and 17.9% for 39K10+ were obtained injecting stable Na+ and K+ beams from a surface ionization source.

  13. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kutsaev, Sergey; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.

    2012-11-15

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a {sup 252}Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for {sup 23}Na{sup 7+} and 17.9% for {sup 39}K{sup 10+} were obtained injecting stable Na{sup +} and K{sup +} beams from a surface ionization source.

  14. High yield neutron generator based on a high-current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Sidorov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Strelkov, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2015-09-07

    In present paper, an approach for high yield compact D-D neutron generator based on a high current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested. Results on dense pulsed deuteron beam production with current up to 500 mA and current density up to 750 mA/cm{sup 2} are demonstrated. Neutron yield from D{sub 2}O and TiD{sub 2} targets was measured in case of its bombardment by pulsed 300 mA D{sup +} beam with 45 keV energy. Neutron yield density at target surface of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} was detected with a system of two {sup 3}He proportional counters. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron yield from a high quality TiD{sub 2} target bombarded by D{sup +} beam demonstrated in present work accelerated to 100 keV could reach 6 × 10{sup 10} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. It is discussed that compact neutron generator with such characteristics could be perspective for a number of applications like boron neutron capture therapy, security systems based on neutron scanning, and neutronography.

  15. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Drentje, A G; Kitagawa, A; Uchida, T; Rácz, R; Biri, S

    2014-02-01

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses. One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions - i.e., radial directions - that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six "side" electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable, off-axis side electrode was applied in technically two versions. The measurements show indeed a decrease of ionic losses but different effectivities as compared to the biased disk.

  16. First results from the new RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Aihara, T; Tamura, M; Uchiyama, A; Okuno, H; Kusaka, K; Kidera, M; Ikezawa, E; Fujimaki, M; Sato, Y; Watanabe, Y; Komiyama, M; Kase, M; Goto, A; Kamigaito, O; Yano, Y

    2010-02-01

    The next generation heavy ion accelerator facility, such as the RIKEN radio isotope (RI) beam factory, requires an intense beam of high charged heavy ions. In the past decade, performance of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources has been dramatically improved with increasing the magnetic field and rf frequency to enhance the density and confinement time of plasma. Furthermore, the effects of the key parameters (magnetic field configuration, gas pressure, etc.) on the ECR plasma have been revealed. Such basic studies give us how to optimize the ion source structure. Based on these studies and modern superconducting (SC) technology, we successfully constructed the new 28 GHz SC-ECRIS, which has a flexible magnetic field configuration to enlarge the ECR zone and to optimize the field gradient at ECR point. Using it, we investigated the effect of ECR zone size, magnetic field configuration, and biased disk on the beam intensity of the highly charged heavy ions with 18 GHz microwaves. In this article, we present the structure of the ion source and first experimental results with 18 GHz microwave in detail.

  17. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Drentje, A. G. Kitagawa, A.; Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.

    2014-02-15

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses. One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions – i.e., radial directions – that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six “side” electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable, off-axis side electrode was applied in technically two versions. The measurements show indeed a decrease of ionic losses but different effectivities as compared to the biased disk.

  18. Status report of the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Loew, T.; Todd, D.S.; Virostek, S.; Tarvainen, O.

    2006-03-15

    The superconducting versatile electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for nuclear science (VENUS) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source designed to produce high-current, high-charge-state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the rare isotope accelerator (RIA) front end, where the goal is to produce intense beams of medium-charge-state ions. Example beams for the RIA accelerator are 15 p {mu}A of Kr{sup 17+}(260 e {mu}A), 12 p {mu}A of Xe{sup 20+} (240 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 20+}), and 8 p {mu}A of U{sup 28+}(230 e {mu}A). To achieve these high currents, VENUS has been optimized for operation at 28 GHz, reaching maximal confinement fields of 4 and 3 T axially and over 2.2 T on the plasma chamber wall radially. After a commissioning phase at 18 GHz, the source started the 28 GHz operation in the summer of 2004. During that ongoing 28 GHz commissioning process, record ion-beam intensities have been extracted. For instance, measured extracted currents for the low to medium charge states were 270 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 27+} and 245 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 29+}, while for the higher charge states 15 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 34+}, 15 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 41+}, and 0.5 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 50+} could be produced. Results from the ongoing 28 GHz commissioning as well as results using double-frequency heating with 18 and 28 GHz for oxygen and xenon are presented. The effect of the minimum B field on the ion source performance has been systematically measured for 18 and 28 GHz. In both cases the performance peaked at a minimum B field of about 80% of the resonance field. In addition, a strong dependence of the x-ray flux and energy on the minimum B field value was found.

  19. Cyclotron Splittings in the Plasmon Resonances of Electronically Doped Semiconductor Nanocrystals Probed by Magnetic Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hartstein, Kimberly H; Schimpf, Alina M; Salvador, Michael; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2017-04-10

    A fundamental understanding of the rich electronic structures of electronically doped semiconductor nanocrystals is vital for assessing the utility of these materials for future applications from solar cells to redox catalysis. Here, we examine the use of magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy to probe the infrared localized surface plasmon resonances of p-Cu2-xSe, n-ZnO, and tin-doped In2O3 (n-ITO) nanocrystals. We demonstrate that the MCD spectra of these nanocrystals can be analyzed by invoking classical cyclotron motions of their excess charge carriers, with experimental MCD signs conveying the carrier types (n or p) and experimental MCD intensities conveying the cyclotron splitting magnitudes. The experimental cyclotron splittings can then be used to quantify carrier effective masses (m*), with results that agree with bulk in most cases. MCD spectroscopy thus offers a unique measure of m* in free-standing colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, raising new opportunities to investigate the influence of various other synthetic or environmental parameters on this fundamentally important electronic property.

  20. Non-linear effects in electron cyclotron current drive applied for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayten, B.; Westerhof, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-07-01

    Due to the smallness of the volumes associated with the flux surfaces around the O-point of a magnetic island, the electron cyclotron power density applied inside the island for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can exceed the threshold for non-linear effects as derived previously by Harvey et al (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 426). We study the non-linear electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency through bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck calculations in the magnetic geometry as created by the islands. The calculations are performed for the parameters of a typical NTM stabilization experiment on ASDEX Upgrade. A particular feature of these experiments is that the rays of the EC wave beam propagate tangential to the flux surfaces in the power deposition region. The calculations show significant non-linear effects on the ECCD efficiency, when the ECCD power is increased from its experimental value of 1 MW to a larger value of 4 MW. The nonlinear effects are largest in the case of locked islands or when the magnetic island rotation period is longer than the collisional time scale. The non-linear effects result in an overall reduction of the current drive efficiency for this case with absorption of the EC power on the low-field side of the electron cyclotron resonance layer. As a consequence of the non-linear effects, also the stabilizing effect of the ECCD on the island is reduced from linear expectations.

  1. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  2. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10(11) cm(-3) and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  3. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  4. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, D. D.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-11-15

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of T{sub e}(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83–130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1–3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6–0.8 cm) resolution T{sub e} measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2–4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83–130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ∼2–4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial T{sub e} measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  5. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, D. D.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. Heterodyning divides this frequency range into three 2-18 GHz intermediate frequency (IF) bands. The frequency spacing of the radiometer’s channels results in a spatial resolution of ~1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. We achieved a higher spatial resolution through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ~2-4 cm radial region. These high resolution channels will be most useful in the low-field side edge region where modest Te values (1-2 keV) result in a minimum of relativistic broadening. Some expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, is presented.

  6. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Truong, D. D.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. Heterodyning divides this frequency range into three 2-18 GHz intermediate frequency (IF) bands. The frequency spacing of the radiometer’s channels results in a spatial resolution of ~1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands andmore » consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. We achieved a higher spatial resolution through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ~2-4 cm radial region. These high resolution channels will be most useful in the low-field side edge region where modest Te values (1-2 keV) result in a minimum of relativistic broadening. Some expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, is presented.« less

  7. Non-linear transport in microwave-irradiated 2D electron systems at the cyclotron resonance subharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Hatke, Anthony; Zudov, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2009-03-01

    We study microwave photoresistivity oscillations in a high mobility two-dimensional electron system subject to strong dc electric fields. We find [1] that near the second subharmonic of the cyclotron resonance the frequency of the resistivity oscillations with dc electric field is twice the frequency of the oscillations at the cyclotron resonance, its harmonics, or in the absence of microwave radiation. This observation is discussed in terms of the microwave-induced sidebands in the density of states and the interplay between different scattering processes in the separated Landau level regime. [1] A. T. Hatke, H.-S. Chiang, M. A. Zudov, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. accepted for publication.

  8. Self-Induced Transparency and Electromagnetic Pulse Compression in a Plasma or an Electron Beam under Cyclotron Resonance Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-12-30

    Based on analogy to the well-known process of the self-induced transparency of an optical pulse propagating through a passive two-level medium we describe similar effects for a microwave pulse interacting with a cold plasma or rectilinear electron beam under cyclotron resonance condition. It is shown that with increasing amplitude and duration of an incident pulse the linear cyclotron absorption is replaced by the self-induced transparency when the pulse propagates without damping. In fact, the initial pulse decomposes to one or several solitons with amplitude and duration defined by its velocity. In a certain parameter range, the single soliton formation is accompanied by significant compression of the initial electromagnetic pulse. We suggest using the effect of self-compression for producing multigigawatt picosecond microwave pulses.

  9. Fokker-Planck modeling of current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, A.; Westerhof, E.; Schueller, F. C.

    2007-05-15

    The current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the resistive time scale is studied with a Fokker-Planck simulation, which includes a model for the magnetic diffusion that determines the parallel electric field evolution. The existence of the synergy between the inductive electric field and EC driven current complicates the process of the current penetration and invalidates the standard method of calculation in which Ohm's law is simply approximated by j-j{sub cd}={sigma}E. Here it is proposed to obtain at every time step a self-consistent approximation to the plasma resistivity from the Fokker-Planck code, which is then used in a concurrent calculation of the magnetic diffusion equation in order to obtain the inductive electric field at the next time step. A series of Fokker-Planck calculations including a self-consistent evolution of the inductive electric field has been performed. Both the ECCD power and the electron density have been varied, thus varying the well known nonlinearity parameter for ECCD P{sub rf}[MW/m{sup -3}]/n{sub e}{sup 2}[10{sup 19} m{sup -3}] [R. W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 62, 426 (1989)]. This parameter turns out also to be a good predictor of the synergetic effects. The results are then compared with the standard method of calculations of the current penetration using a transport code. At low values of the Harvey parameter, the standard method is in quantitative agreement with Fokker-Planck calculations. However, at high values of the Harvey parameter, synergy between ECCD and E{sub parallel} is found. In the case of cocurrent drive, this synergy leads to the generation of large amounts of nonthermal electrons and a concomitant increase of the electrical conductivity and current penetration time. In the case of countercurrent drive, the ECCD efficiency is suppressed by the synergy with E{sub parallel} while only a small amount of nonthermal electrons is produced.

  10. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  11. Fast ion induced shearing of 2D Alfvén eigenmodes measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Tobias, B J; Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Heidbrink, W W; Luhmann, N C; Nazikian, R; Park, H K; Spong, D A; Van Zeeland, M A

    2011-02-18

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  12. Effect of high energy electrons on H- production and destruction in a high current DC negative ion source for cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onai, M.; Etoh, H.; Aoki, Y.; Shibata, T.; Mattei, S.; Fujita, S.; Hatayama, A.; Lettry, J.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a filament driven multi-cusp negative ion source has been developed for proton cyclotrons in medical applications. In this study, numerical modeling of the filament arc-discharge source plasma has been done with kinetic modeling of electrons in the ion source plasmas by the multi-cusp arc-discharge code and zero dimensional rate equations for hydrogen molecules and negative ions. In this paper, main focus is placed on the effects of the arc-discharge power on the electron energy distribution function and the resultant H- production. The modelling results reasonably explains the dependence of the H- extraction current on the arc-discharge power in the experiments.

  13. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfvén Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B. J.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H. K.; Spong, D. A.; van Zeeland, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  14. Spontaneous Formation of Closed-Field Torus Equilibrium via Current Jump Observed in an Electron-Cyclotron-Heated Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshinaga, T.; Uchida, M.; Tanaka, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2006-03-31

    Spontaneous current jump resulting in the formation of closed field equilibrium has been observed in electron-cyclotron-heated toroidal plasmas under steady external fields composed of a toroidal field and a relatively weak vertical field in the low aspect ratio torus experiment device. This bridges the gap between the open field equilibrium maintained by a pressure-driven current in the external field and the closed field equilibrium at a larger current. Experimental results and theoretical analyses suggest a current jump model that is based on the asymmetric electron confinement along the field line appearing upon simultaneous transitions of field topology and equilibrium.

  15. Effect of microwave reflection from the region of electron cyclotron resonance heating in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Sakharov, A. S. Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2013-11-15

    In experiments on electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating of plasma at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency in the L-2M stellarator, the effect of partial reflection of high-power gyrotron radiation from the ECR heating region located in the center of the plasma column was revealed. The reflection coefficient is found to be on the order of 10{sup −3}. The coefficient of reflection of an extraordinary wave from the second-harmonic ECR region is calculated in the one-dimensional full-wave model. The calculated and measured values of the reflection coefficient are found to coincide in order of magnitude.

  16. Effect of high energy electrons on H⁻ production and destruction in a high current DC negative ion source for cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Onai, M; Etoh, H; Aoki, Y; Shibata, T; Mattei, S; Fujita, S; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a filament driven multi-cusp negative ion source has been developed for proton cyclotrons in medical applications. In this study, numerical modeling of the filament arc-discharge source plasma has been done with kinetic modeling of electrons in the ion source plasmas by the multi-cusp arc-discharge code and zero dimensional rate equations for hydrogen molecules and negative ions. In this paper, main focus is placed on the effects of the arc-discharge power on the electron energy distribution function and the resultant H(-) production. The modelling results reasonably explains the dependence of the H(-) extraction current on the arc-discharge power in the experiments.

  17. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, R. Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kawarasaki, R.; Nakazawa, K.; Kato, T.; Sato, F.; Nanzai, H.; Uehara, M.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.

    2014-11-15

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  18. Measurement of effect of electron cyclotron heating in a tandem mirror plasma using a semiconductor detector array and an electrostatic energy analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, R.; Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Uehara, M.; Tsumura, K.; Ebashi, Y.; Kajino, S.; Endo, Y.; Nakashima, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray and end-loss-electron analyses of the electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using a semiconductor detector array and an electrostatic energy analyzer in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The flux and the energy spectrum of the end loss electrons are measured by a multi-grid energy analyzer. Recently, the electron cyclotron heating power modulation experiments have been started in order to generate and control the high heat flux and to make the edge localized mode-like intermittent heat load pattern for the divertor simulation studies by the use of these detectors for electron properties.

  19. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, R.; Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kawarasaki, R.; Nakazawa, K.; Kato, T.; Sato, F.; Nanzai, H.; Uehara, M.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.

    2014-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition, structure, and properties of oxygen incorporated hydrogenated diamondlike amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamopoulos, G.; Godet, C.; Zorba, T.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.; Ballutaud, D.

    2004-11-01

    Oxygen-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were grown by the integrated distributed electron cyclotron resonance plasma technique from a mixture of acetylene and oxygen. It has been found that the increase of the oxygen to acetylene gas ratio results in more oxygen incorporation up to O /(O+C)=0.2 with a decrease in the hydrogen concentration within the film as measured by the nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and a combination of the elastic recoil detection analysis and Rutherford backscattering techniques. The spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range of 1.5-5eV showed a negligible decrease of the E04 optical band gap for increasing the oxygen content. At the same time, the decrease of the refractive index from 2.2 to 2.0 denotes the decrease of the films density, which was independently estimated by NRA. The visible (488nm) Raman spectroscopy showed that the increase of the oxygen content favors the clustering of the six-fold sp2C rings. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy gives evidence of both C-O and C O bonding configurations. No evidence of O-H bonds formation is found. Simultaneously, the chemisorption of CO2 seems to increased with increasing the oxygen to acetylene gas ratio, which is consistent with the lower film density. The previously trends denote the "softening" of the films, which is consistent with the significant decrease (of about 35%) of the compressive stress allowing the growth of thicker but still transparent films.

  1. Comparison of fine structures of electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBelle, J.; Dundek, M.

    2015-10-01

    Recent discoveries of higher harmonic cyclotron emissions in aurora occurring under daylight conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events reveals that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at the matching condition fuh = Nfce, which for higher N requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. This result implies that generation of higher harmonics from lower harmonics via wave-wave processes explains only a minority of events. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously shows that in almost all events the higher harmonic comes from higher altitudes, and only for a small fraction of events is it plausible that the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions are correlated and in exact integer ratio. This observation puts an upper bound of 15-20% on the fraction of emissions which can be explained by wave-wave interactions involving Z mode waves at fce and, combined with consideration of source altitudes, puts an upper bound of 75% on the fraction explained by coalescence of Z mode waves at 2fce. Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at the matching points fuh = Nfce and that the wave-wave interaction mechanisms explain a relatively small fraction of events.

  2. Advanced uncooled infrared system electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Henry W.

    1998-07-01

    Over the past two decades, Raytheon Systems Company (RSC), formerly Texas Instruments Defense Systems & Electronics Group, developed a robust family of products based on a low- cost, hybrid ferroelectric (FE) uncooled focal-plane array (FPA) aimed at meeting the needs for thermal imaging products across both military and commercial markets. Over the years, RSC supplied uncooled infrared (IR) sensors for applications such as in combat vehicles, man-portable weaponry, personnel helmets, and installation security. Also, various commercial IR systems for use in automobiles, boats, law enforcement, hand-held applications, building/site security, and fire fighting have been developed. These products resulted in a high degree of success where cooled IR platforms are too bulky and costly, and other uncooled implementations are less reliable or lack significant cost advantage. Proof of this great success is found in the large price reductions, the unprecedented monthly production rates, and the wide diversity of products and customers realized in recent years. The ever- changing needs of these existing and potential customers continue to fuel the advancement of both the primary technologies and the production capabilities of uncooled IR systems at RSC. This paper will describe a development project intended to further advance the system electronics capabilities of future uncooled IR products.

  3. In-plane and growth direction electron cyclotron effective mass in short period InAs/GaSb semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Suchalkin, S.; Belenky, G.; Svensson, S. P.; Laikhtman, B.; Smirnov, D.; Tung, L. C.; Bandara, S.

    2011-08-15

    In plane and growth direction electron effective mass in short period InAs/GaSb semiconductor superlattices (SL) was measured using cyclotron resonance at different orientations of magnetic field with respect to SL growth direction. It was demonstrated that the electron spectrum near the bottom of the SL subband has 3D character, with the in-plane effective masses ranging from 0.023 m{sub 0} to 0.028 m{sub 0} and growth direction effective masses of 0.03-0.034 m{sub 0} depending on the SL period and growth conditions. The measured effective masses are close to those calculated in the weak coupling limit of the Kronig-Penney model. In this limit the SL electron effective mass is a weighted average of the electron effective masses of corresponding bulk materials. Correlation between the magnitude of cyclotron mobility, amplitude of negative magnetoresistance, and steepness of the long wavelength side of the photoluminescence spectrum indicate that the crystalline structure disorder is a major factor contributing to the momentum relaxation time of the electrons.

  4. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  5. Cyclotron Lines in Accreting Neutron Star Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Jörn; Schönherr, Gabriele; Schmid, Julia; Dauser, Thomas; Kreykenbohm, Ingo

    2009-05-01

    Cyclotron lines are formed through transitions of electrons between discrete Landau levels in the accretion columns of accreting neutron stars with strong (1012 G) magnetic fields. We summarize recent results on the formation of the spectral continuum of such systems, describe recent advances in the modeling of the lines based on a modification of the commonly used Monte Carlo approach, and discuss new results on the dependence of the measured cyclotron line energy from the luminosity of transient neutron star systems. Finally, we show that Simbol-X will be ideally suited to build and improve the observational database of accreting and strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  6. Simulation of slow cyclotron wave growth on a scattered relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, W.R.; Faehl, R.J.

    1981-06-01

    Simulations demonstrating effective growth of slow cyclotron waves on a beam exhibiting a scattered distribution of particle velocities are described. No dramatic changes from the cold beam results for the dispersive properties are observed, but significant modifications of radial eigenmode structure appear.

  7. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the "tokamak" concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of "H-mode" and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the "missing" current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM "seeding" instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a "wild card" may be broadening of the localized ECCD by the presence of

  8. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-10

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the “tokamak” concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of “H-mode” and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the “missing” current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM “seeding” instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a “wild card” may be broadening of the localized

  9. New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    ScienceCinema

    Gabrielse, Gerald [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

  10. Advances in nonlethal electronic weaponry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, James F.

    1998-12-01

    Non-lethal electronic weapons in the form of tasers (a stand-off incapacitation device with a range of about 15 feet) and stun guns (which are not a gun, but a close contact stun device) have been used by law enforcement for over 18 years. The taser has dominated this market, since it does not require the close physical contact (with the resultant injuries) that the stun gun requires. Tasers are effective against even determined assailants where OC or pepper sprays consistently fail. The taser also does not have the close range lethality of low impact munitions. These electronic non-lethal weapons have saved the lives of thousands of suspects and have prevented the injury of thousands of law enforcement officers. Recent advances in laser sight technology have permitted the development of a patented dual laser sight that not only increased accuracy, but have made these weapons even more intimidating, increasing surrender rates. Now increased ranges are feasible and r & d on non-lethal military weapons to replace the anti-personnel landmine has resulted in new, unmanned, non-lethal taser weapons for law enforcement corrections and border patrol perimeter control use.

  11. Electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma deposition of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) deposition of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H thin films using SiH4, CH4, and hydrogen mixed gas plasmas. The ECR deposition conditions were investigated in the pressure region of 0.1 to 100 mtorr, and the film properties were characterized by light and dark conductivity measurements, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, optical transmission, and IR spectroscopy. In addition, the hydrogen dilution effect on ECR-deposited a-SiC:H was investigated.

  12. Emittance study of a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the Rare Isotope Science Project superconducting linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Bum-Sik Hong, In-Seok; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan

    2016-02-15

    A 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is being developed for use as an injector for the superconducting linear accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project. Beam extraction from the ECR ion source has been simulated using the KOBRA3-INP software. The simulation software can calculate charged particle trajectories in three dimensional complex magnetic field structures, which in this case are formed by the arrangement of five superconducting magnets. In this study, the beam emittance is simulated to understand the effects of plasma potential, mass-to-charge ratio, and spatial distribution. The results of these simulations and their comparison to experimental results are presented in this paper.

  13. Effects of electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating-induced internal kink mode on the toroidal rotation in the KSTAR Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Seol, J; Lee, S G; Park, B H; Lee, H H; Terzolo, L; Shaing, K C; You, K I; Yun, G S; Kim, C C; Lee, K D; Ko, W H; Kwak, J G; Kim, W C; Oh, Y K; Kim, J Y; Kim, S S; Ida, K

    2012-11-09

    It is observed that the magnitude of the toroidal rotation speed is reduced by the central electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) regardless of the direction of the toroidal rotation. The magnetohydrodynamics activities generally appear with the rotation change due to ECRH. It is shown that the internal kink mode is induced by the central ECRH and breaks the toroidal symmetry. When the magnetohydrodynamics activities are present, the toroidal plasma viscosity is not negligible. The observed effects of ECRH on the toroidal plasma rotation are explained by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity in this Letter. It is found that the neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque caused by the internal kink mode damps the toroidal rotation.

  14. Emittance study of a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the Rare Isotope Science Project superconducting linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Park, Bum-Sik; Hong, In-Seok; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan

    2016-02-01

    A 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is being developed for use as an injector for the superconducting linear accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project. Beam extraction from the ECR ion source has been simulated using the KOBRA3-INP software. The simulation software can calculate charged particle trajectories in three dimensional complex magnetic field structures, which in this case are formed by the arrangement of five superconducting magnets. In this study, the beam emittance is simulated to understand the effects of plasma potential, mass-to-charge ratio, and spatial distribution. The results of these simulations and their comparison to experimental results are presented in this paper.

  15. Ultracompact/ultralow power electron cyclotron resonance ion source for multipurpose applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sortais, P.; Lamy, T.; Medard, J.; Angot, J.; Latrasse, L.; Thuillier, T.

    2010-02-15

    In order to drastically reduce the power consumption of a microwave ion source, we have studied some specific discharge cavity geometries in order to reduce the operating point below 1 W of microwave power (at 2.45 GHz). We show that it is possible to drive an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with a transmitter technology similar to those used for cellular phones. By the reduction in the size and of the required microwave power, we have developed a new type of ultralow cost ion sources. This microwave discharge system (called COMIC, for COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial) can be used as a source of light, plasma or ions. We will show geometries of conductive cavities where it is possible, in a 20 mm diameter chamber, to reduce the ignition of the plasma below 100 mW and define typical operating points around 5 W. Inside a simple vacuum chamber it is easy to place the source and its extraction system anywhere and fully under vacuum. In that case, current densities from 0.1 to 10 mA/cm{sup 2} (Ar, extraction 4 mm, 1 mAe, 20 kV) have been observed. Preliminary measurements and calculations show the possibility, with a two electrodes system, to extract beams within a low emittance. The first application for these ion sources is the ion injection for charge breeding, surface analyzing system and surface treatment. For this purpose, a very small extraction hole is used (typically 3/10 mm for a 3 {mu}A extracted current with 2 W of HF power). Mass spectrum and emittance measurements will be presented. In these conditions, values down to 1 {pi} mm mrad at 15 kV (1{sigma}) are observed, thus very close to the ones currently observed for a surface ionization source. A major interest of this approach is the possibility to connect together several COMIC devices. We will introduce some new on-going developments such as sources for high voltage implantation platforms, fully quartz radioactive ion source at ISOLDE or large plasma generators for plasma immersion, broad or ribbon

  16. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-15

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi {sup 252}Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10{sup 6} ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for {sup 23}Na{sup 8+}, 15.6% for {sup 84}Kr{sup 17+}, and 13.7% for {sup 85}Rb{sup 19+} with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+} and 14.7% for {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+} accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  17. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci 252Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 106 ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for 23Na8+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 13.7% for 85Rb19+ with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of 143Ba27+ accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  18. Plasma-Sheath Instability in Hall Thrusters Due to Periodic Modulation of the Energy of Secondary Electrons in Cyclotron Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Sydorenko, D.; Smolyakov, A.; Kaganovich, I.; Raitses, Y.

    2008-04-23

    Particle-in-cell simulation of Hall thruster plasmas reveals a plasma-sheath instability manifesting itself as a rearrangement of the plasma sheath near the thruster channel walls accompanied by a sudden change of many discharge parameters. The instability develops when the sheath current as a function of the sheath voltage is in the negative conductivity regime. The major part of the sheath current is produced by beams of secondary electrons counter-streaming between the walls. The negative conductivity is the result of nonlinear dependence of beam-induced secondary electron emission on the plasma potential. The intensity of such emission is defined by the beam energy. The energy of the beam in crossed axial electric and radial magnetic fields is a quasi-periodical function of the phase of cyclotron rotation, which depends on the radial profile of the potential and the thruster channel width. There is a discrete set of stability intervals determined by the final phase of the cyclotron rotation of secondary electrons. As a result, a small variation of the thruster channel width may result in abrupt changes of plasma parameters if the plasma state jumps from one stability interval to another.

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, David Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  20. Characteristics of electron cyclotron harmonic waves observed in an active two-point propagation experiment in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.; Wallis, D. D.

    2008-07-01

    Electrostatic electron cyclotron waves (ECWs), also-called electron Bernstein waves, observed at harmonics nfc of the electron cyclotron frequency fc were transmitted over field-aligned emitter-receiver separations of hundreds of meters in the active rocket experiment OEDIPUS-C. Although the 300-μs rectangular current pulses into the emitting antenna were smoothly maintained during the experiment, the resulting ECW pulses at the receiver exhibited considerable variety in both the time and frequency domains. A full hot-plasma dispersion relation has been applied to ray-tracing investigations to identify the rays that could connect the emitter and receiver in a smoothly varying model of the auroral ionospheric magnetoplasma. Theoretical connecting rays were limited to frequencies extending from 1 to a few kilohertz above 2fc, which was about 2.6 MHz. But the observed pulse spectra extended over a much broader bandwidth, from several kilohertz below nfc to several kilohertz above, for n = 2, 3, and 4. The broadening is interpreted as a consequence of Doppler effect caused by payload motion and backscatter of the ECWs. Field-aligned density irregularities typical of the auroral topside ionosphere or waves nonlinearly induced by the intense near fields of the HEX antenna may act as the scatterers.

  1. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  2. Electron Heating by the Ion Cyclotron Instability in Collisionless Accretion Flows. I. Compression-driven Instabilities and the Electron Heating Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-02-01

    In systems accreting well below the Eddington rate, such as the central black hole in the Milky Way (Sgr A*), the plasma in the innermost regions of the disk is believed to be collisionless and have two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. However, whether a collisionless faster-than-Coulomb energy transfer mechanism exists in two-temperature accretion flows is still an open question. We study the physics of electron heating during the growth of ion velocity-space instabilities by means of multidimensional, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A background large-scale compression—embedded in a novel form of the PIC equations—continuously amplifies the field. This constantly drives a pressure anisotropy P > P ∥ because of the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. We find that, for ion plasma beta values β0i ~ 5-30 appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows (here, β0i is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), mirror modes dominate if the electron-to-proton temperature ratio is T 0e /T 0i >~ 0.2, whereas for T 0e /T 0i <~ 0.2 the ion cyclotron instability triggers the growth of strong Alfvén-like waves, which pitch-angle scatter the ions to maintain marginal stability. We develop an analytical model of electron heating during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability, which we validate with PIC simulations. We find that for cold electrons (β0e <~ 2 me /mi , where β0e is the ratio of electron thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), the electron energy gain is controlled by the magnitude of the E-cross-B velocity induced by the ion cyclotron waves. This term is independent of the initial electron temperature, so it provides a solid energy floor even for electrons starting with extremely low temperatures. On the other hand, the electron energy gain for β0e >~ 2 me /mi —governed by the conservation of the particle magnetic moment in the growing fields of

  3. ELECTRON HEATING BY THE ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION FLOWS. I. COMPRESSION-DRIVEN INSTABILITIES AND THE ELECTRON HEATING MECHANISM

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh E-mail: rnarayan@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-02-20

    In systems accreting well below the Eddington rate, such as the central black hole in the Milky Way (Sgr A*), the plasma in the innermost regions of the disk is believed to be collisionless and have two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. However, whether a collisionless faster-than-Coulomb energy transfer mechanism exists in two-temperature accretion flows is still an open question. We study the physics of electron heating during the growth of ion velocity-space instabilities by means of multidimensional, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A background large-scale compression—embedded in a novel form of the PIC equations—continuously amplifies the field. This constantly drives a pressure anisotropy P > P {sub ∥} because of the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. We find that, for ion plasma beta values β{sub 0i} ∼ 5-30 appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows (here, β{sub 0i} is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), mirror modes dominate if the electron-to-proton temperature ratio is T {sub 0e}/T {sub 0i} ≳ 0.2, whereas for T {sub 0e}/T {sub 0i} ≲ 0.2 the ion cyclotron instability triggers the growth of strong Alfvén-like waves, which pitch-angle scatter the ions to maintain marginal stability. We develop an analytical model of electron heating during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability, which we validate with PIC simulations. We find that for cold electrons (β{sub 0e} ≲ 2 m{sub e} /m{sub i} , where β{sub 0e} is the ratio of electron thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), the electron energy gain is controlled by the magnitude of the E-cross-B velocity induced by the ion cyclotron waves. This term is independent of the initial electron temperature, so it provides a solid energy floor even for electrons starting with extremely low temperatures. On the other hand, the electron energy gain for β{sub 0e} ≳ 2 m{sub e} /m{sub i}

  4. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization.

    PubMed

    Volpe, F; Austin, M E; Campbell, G; Deterly, T

    2012-10-01

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  5. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, F.; Austin, M. E.; Campbell, G.; Deterly, T.

    2012-10-15

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  6. ELECTRON HEATING BY THE ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION FLOWS. II. ELECTRON HEATING EFFICIENCY AS A FUNCTION OF FLOW CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2015-02-20

    In the innermost regions of low-luminosity accretion flows, including Sgr A* at the center of our Galaxy, the frequency of Coulomb collisions is so low that the plasma has two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. This paradigm assumes that Coulomb collisions are the only channel for transferring the ion energy to the electrons. In this work, the second of a series, we assess the efficiency of electron heating by ion velocity-space instabilities in collisionless accretion flows. The instabilities are seeded by the pressure anisotropy induced by magnetic field amplification, coupled to the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we showed in Paper I that if the electron-to-ion temperature ratio is T {sub 0e}/T {sub 0i} ≲ 0.2, the ion cyclotron instability is the dominant mode for ion betas β{sub 0i} ∼ 5-30 (here, β{sub 0i} is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), as appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows. In this work, we employ analytical theory and one-dimensional PIC simulations (with the box aligned with the fastest-growing wave vector of the ion cyclotron mode) to fully characterize how the electron heating efficiency during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability depends on the electron-to-proton temperature ratio, the plasma beta, the Alfvén speed, the amplification rate of the mean field (in units of the ion Larmor frequency), and the proton-to-electron mass ratio. Our findings can be incorporated as a physically grounded subgrid model into global fluid simulations of low-luminosity accretion flows, thus helping to assess the validity of the two-temperature assumption.

  7. 88-Inch Cyclotron newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.

    1987-02-01

    Activities at the 88-Inch Cyclotron are discussed. Increased beam time demand and operation of the ECR source and cyclotron are reported. Experimental facility improvements are reported, including improvements to the High Energy Resolution Array and to the Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer, a new capture beamline, development of a low background counting facility. Other general improvements are reported that relate to the facility computer network and electronics pool. Approved heavy nuclei research is briefly highlighted. Also listed are the beams accelerated by the cyclotron. (LEW)

  8. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  9. EFFECTS OF ALFVEN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-06-10

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfven waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  10. Internal Kink Instability during Off-Axis Electron Cyclotron Current Drive in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K. L.; Chu, M. S.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Prater, R.; Chen, L.; Harvey, R. W.; Austin, M. E.; Johnson, L. C.

    2000-07-31

    Experimental evidence is reported of an internal kink instability driven by a new mechanism: barely trapped suprathermal electrons produced by off-axis electron cyclotron heating on the DIII-D tokamak. It occurs in plasmas with an evolving safety factor profile q(r) when q{sub min} approaches 1. This instability is most active when ECCD is applied on the high field side of the flux surface. It has a bursting behavior with poloidal/toroidal mode number=m/n=1/1 . In positive magnetic shear plasmas, this mode becomes the fishbone instability. This observation can be qualitatively explained by the drift reversal of the barely trapped suprathermal electrons. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Optimized calculation of the synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive and lower hybrid current drive on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Bo-Jiang, Ding; Y, Peysson; J, Decker; Miao-Hui, Li; Xin-Jun, Zhang; Xiao-Jie, Wang; Lei, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The optimized synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with normal parameters of the EAST tokamak are studied by using the C3PO/LUKE code based on the understanding of the synergy mechanisms so as to obtain a higher synergistic current and provide theoretical reference for the synergistic effect in the EAST experiment. The dependences of the synergistic effect on the parameters of two waves (lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW)), including the radial position of the power deposition, the power value of the LH and EC waves, and the parallel refractive indices of the LHW (N∥) are presented and discussed. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011GB102000, 2012GB103000, and 2013GB106001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175206 and 11305211), the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program in the Field of Plasma Physics (Grant No. 11261140328), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. JZ2015HGBZ0472).

  12. First operation and effect of a new tandem-type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yushi; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance plasma for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic field in the first stage consists of all permanent magnets, i.e., cylindrically comb shaped one, and that of the second stage consists of a pair of mirror coil, a supplemental coil and the octupole magnets. Both stage plasmas can be individually operated, and produced ions in which is energy controlled by large bore extractor also can be transported from the first to the second stage. We investigate the basic operation and effects of the tandem type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas in dual plasmas operation as well as each single operation. We describe construction and initial experimental results of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source in future.

  13. First operation and effect of a new tandem-type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance plasma for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic field in the first stage consists of all permanent magnets, i.e., cylindrically comb shaped one, and that of the second stage consists of a pair of mirror coil, a supplemental coil and the octupole magnets. Both stage plasmas can be individually operated, and produced ions in which is energy controlled by large bore extractor also can be transported from the first to the second stage. We investigate the basic operation and effects of the tandem type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas in dual plasmas operation as well as each single operation. We describe construction and initial experimental results of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source in future.

  14. Compact antenna for two-dimensional beam scan in the JT-60U electron cyclotron heating/current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kasugai, A.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Fujii, T.

    2005-11-15

    A compact antenna system was designed and fabricated to enable millimeter-wave beam scanning in the toroidal and poloidal directions of the JT-60U tokamak for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments. The antenna consists of a fast movable flat mirror mounted on the tokamak vacuum vessel and a rotary focusing mirror attached at the end of the waveguide that is supported from outside the vacuum vessel. This separate support concept enables a compact structure inside a shallow port (0.68x0.54x0.2 m) that is shared with a subport for an independent diagnostic system. During a plasma shot, the flat mirror is driven by a servomotor with a 3-m-long drive shaft to reduce the influence of the high magnetic field on the motor. The focusing mirror is rotated by a simple mechanism utilizing a push rod and an air cylinder. The antenna has been operated reliably for 3 years after a small improvement to the rotary drive mechanism. It has made significant contributions to ECH and ECCD experiments, especially the current profile control in JT-60U.

  15. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; LAHAYE,LA; LUCE,TC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

    2003-03-01

    A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. The first suppression of the important and deleterious m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is reported using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to replace the ''missing'' bootstrap current in the island O-point. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak verify the maximum shrinkage of the m=2/n=1 island occurs when the ECCD location coincides with the q = 2 surface. The DIII-D plasma control system is put into search and suppress mode to make small changes in the toroidal field to find and lock onto the optimum position, based on real time measurements of dB{sub {theta}}/dt, for complete m=2/n=1 NTM suppression by ECCD. The requirements on the ECCD for complete island suppression are well modeled by the modified Rutherford equation for the DIII-D plasma conditions.

  16. Numerical analysis of the optimized performance of the electron cyclotron wave system in a HL-2M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing-Chun, Li; Xue-Yu, Gong; Jia-Qi, Dong; Jun, Wang; Lan, Yin

    2016-04-01

    The capabilities of current drive, neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) stabilization, and sawtooth control are analyzed for the electron-cyclotron wave (ECW) system in a HL-2M tokamak. Better performance of the upper launcher is demonstrated in comparison with that of a dropped upper launcher, in terms of J EC/J bs for NTM stabilization and I ECCD/(Δρ tor)2 for sawtooth control. 1-MW ECW power is enough for the 3/2 NTM stabilization, and 1.8-MW ECW power is required to suppress 2/1 NTM in a single null divertor equilibrium with 1.2-MA toroidal current with the upper launcher. Optimization simulation of electron-cyclotron current drive (ECCD) is carried out for three mirrors in an equatorial port, indicating that the middle mirror has a good performance compared with the top and bottom mirrors. The results for balanced co- and counter-ECCD in an equatorial port are also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375085, 11405082, 11505092, 11475083, and 11375053), the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013GB104004, 2013GB111000, 2014GB107000, and 2014GB108002), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China (Grant No. 2015JJ4044).

  17. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  18. A SCENARIO FOR THE FINE STRUCTURES OF SOLAR TYPE IIIb RADIO BURSTS BASED ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-10

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb–III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb–IIIb or III–IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  19. A Scenario for the Fine Structures of Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts Based on Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb-III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  20. Observation of turbulence suppression after electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating switch-off on the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Shi, Z B; Dong, Y B; Sun, H J; Sun, A P; Li, Y G; Xia, Z W; Li, W; Ding, X T; Xiao, W W; Zhou, Y; Zhou, J; Rao, J; Liu, Z T; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R

    2011-07-01

    The formation of a transient internal transport barrier (ITB) is observed after the electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating (ECRH) switch-off in the HL-2A plasmas, characterized by transient increase of central electron temperature. The newly developed correlation reflectometer provided direct measurements showing reduction of turbulence in the region of steepened gradients for the period of ITB formation triggered by the ECRH switch-off. Furthermore, the reduction of core turbulence is correlated in time with the appearance of a low-frequency mode with a spectrally broad poloidal structure that peaks near zero frequency in the core region. These structures have low poloidal mode number, high poloidal correlation, and short radial correlation and are strongly coupled with high-frequency ambient turbulence. Observation indicates that these structures play important roles in the reduction of the core turbulence and in improvements of the core transport after the off-axis ECRH is turned off.

  1. Measure of electron cyclotron emission at multiple angles in high T{sub e} plasmas of JET

    SciTech Connect

    Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Farina, D.; Platania, P.; Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; De La Luna, E.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    The oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic installed at JET allows simultaneous analysis of the ECE spectra along three lines of sight (with toroidal angles of 0 deg., {approx}10 deg., and {approx}20 deg.) and two linear polarizations for each oblique line of sight. The diagnostic is capable of measuring EC emission over the band of 75-800 GHz with 5 ms time resolution and 7.5 GHz spectral resolution, and it is designed to investigate the features of ECE spectra related to electron distribution in the thermal velocity range. Instrumental accuracy was assessed using sources at different temperatures (77-900 K) and with plasma emission. ECE from high temperature plasmas and in the presence of fast ions has been compared to simulations performed with the modeling code SPECE, setting an upper limit to possible discrepancies from thermal emission.

  2. A kinetic cyclotron maser instability associated with a hollow beam of electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Freund, H. P.

    1984-01-01

    A kinetic cyclotron maser instability associated with a hollow-beam distribution function is studied. The instability differs from that discussed for the gyrotron device in two respects: in the present case the momentum dispersion is substantial, and furthermore there exists a low-energy background plasma. On the basis of physical arguments it can be demonstrated that the hollow-beam distribution is far more unstable than the loss cone distribution which has been extensively investigated in recent years. A criterion for maximum growth rate is established on the basis of consideration of the resonance ellipse. The validity of this criterion is supported by the results of numerical calculation.

  3. The Compact Ignition Tokamak and electron cyclotron heating: Description of need; assessment of prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Cohn, D.R.; Woskov, P.P.

    1989-01-01

    The CIT will benefit from auxiliary heating of 10 to 40 MW. The schedules of both the CIT construction project and the operating plan contain adequate time to develop and implement ECH systems based on the gyrotron and the induction free electron laser (IFEL). Each approach has advantages and is the object of R and D at the level of many millions of dollars per year. While the gyrotron is further advanced in terms of power and pulse length achieved, rapid progress is scheduled for the IFEL, including experiments on tokamaks. Plans of CIT, gyrotron, and IFEL make 1992 an appropriate time frame to commit to one or both systems. 12 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  5. Extension of high T{sub e} regime with upgraded electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H. Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Yamada, I.; Nakano, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Seki, R.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Enhancement of the output power per gyrotron has been planned in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Three 77-GHz gyrotrons with an output power of more than 1 MW have been operated. In addition, a high power gyrotron with the frequency of 154 GHz (1 MW/5 s, 0.5 MW/CW) was newly installed in 2012, and the total injection power of Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) reached 4.6 MW. The operational regime of ECRH plasma on the LHD has been extended due to the upgraded ECRH system such as the central electron temperature of 13.5 keV with the line-averaged electron density n{sub e-fir} = 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. The electron thermal confinement clearly improved inside the electron internal transport barrier, and the electron thermal diffusivity reached neoclassical level. The global energy confinement time increased with increase of n{sub e-fir}. The plasma stored energy of 530 kJ with n{sub e-fir} = 3.2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, which is 1.7 times larger than the previous record in the ECRH plasma in the LHD, has been successfully achieved.

  6. Control of plasma profiles and stability through localised Electron Cyclotron Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulov, Oleksiy

    2006-06-01

    The work presented in this thesis addresses several topics from the physics of the magnetically confined plasma inside a tokamak. At the moment, the tokamak is the most successful concept for becoming a future thermonuclear reactor. However, there are plenty of physics and engineering problems to surpass before the prototype can become an economically and environmentally feasible device. The plasma in the tokamak experiences periodic oscillations of the central temperature and density when the safety factor, q, drops below unity on-axis. These oscillations are called the sawtooth instability and are the subject of the first part of this thesis. The sawtooth oscillations are characterised by the relatively slow rise phase, when the central temperature increases, and a following crash phase, when the central temperature drops. The energy, particles and plasma current are redistributed during the sawtooth crash. Obviously, this leads to a confinement degradation and moreover, the sawtooth instability can trigger potentially other more dangerous instabilities, such as a neoclassical tearing mode. The sawtooth period control is realised on the basis of the sawtooth trigger model, derived by Porcelli. The main idea of this model is that the sawtooth crash is triggered when the magnetic shear at the q=1 surface, s1, reaches a critical value which depends on the local plasma parameters. The magnetic shear, s, is a measure for the rate of change in the direction of the field line as a function of the position in the plasma. The sawtooth period can be changed by affecting the evolution of s1. The effects of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the shear evolution are studied with a simple model for the poloidal field evolution. The results of the model are summarised in a form of a criterion for the amount of the non-inductive current drive required for sawtooth period control. The effects of the ECCD have been studied in the TEXTOR tokamak in order to confirm the

  7. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N. Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-15

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with H{sub IPB98}(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  8. Studies of emittance of multiply charged ions extracted from high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source, PKDELIS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G.; Lakshmy, P. S.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2010-02-15

    For the high current injector project at Inter University Accelerator Centre, a high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, PKDELIS, would provide the high charge state ions. The emittance of the ECR ion source is an important parameter to design further beam transport system and to match the acceptances of the downstream radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac accelerators of the high current injector. The emittance of the analyzed beam of PKDELIS ECR source has been measured utilizing the three beam size technique. A slit and two beam profile monitors positioned at fixed distances from each other were used to measure the beam size. The digitized beam profiles have been analyzed to determine the emittance of various multiply charged ions. The variation of emittance with gas mixing, ultrahigh frequency power, and extraction energy are discussed in this presentation.

  9. Note: Studies on x-ray production in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source based on ridged cylindrical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R.

    2012-02-15

    A ridged cylindrical cavity has been designed using MICROWAVE STUDIO programme and it is used in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. The experimental parameters of the source are optimized for maximizing the x-ray output, and an x-ray dose rate of {approx}1000 {mu}Sv/h was observed at 20 cm from the port, for 500 W of microwave power without using any target. With the molybdenum target located at optimum position of the ridged cavity, the dose rate is found to be increased only by 10%. In order to understand the experimental observation, the electric field pattern of the cavity with the target placed at various radial distances is studied. In this note, the experimental and theoretical studies on ECR x-ray source using the ridged cylindrical cavity are presented.

  10. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Toivanen, V. Küchler, D.

    2016-02-15

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  11. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, V; Küchler, D

    2016-02-01

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  12. Improvement of efficiency and temperature control of induction heating vapor source on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, T; Kiriyama, R; Muramatsu, M; Kitagawa, A; Uchida, T; Kurisu, Y; Nozaki, D; Yano, K; Yoshida, Y; Sato, F; Kato, Y; Iida, T

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is used to generate multicharged ions for many kinds of the fields. We have developed an evaporator by using induction heating method that can generate pure vapor from solid state materials in ECRIS. We develop the new matching and protecting circuit by which we can precisely control the temperature of the induction heating evaporator. We can control the temperature within ±15 °C around 1400 °C under the operation pressure about 10(-4) Pa. We are able to use this evaporator for experiment of synthesizing process to need pure vapor under enough low pressure, e.g., experiment of generation of endohedral Fe-fullerene at the ECRIS.

  13. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  14. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  15. Superconducting magnet performance for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung Chul; Ahn, Jung Keun

    2014-02-15

    A superconducting magnet for use in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The superconducting magnet is comprised of three solenoids and a hexapole magnet. According to the design value, the solenoid magnets can generate a mirror field, resulting in axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the injection area and 2.2 T at the extraction region. A radial field strength of 2.1 T can also be achieved by hexapole magnet on the plasma chamber wall. NbTi superconducting wire was used in the winding process following appropriate techniques for magnet structure. The final assembly of the each magnet involved it being vertically inserted into the cryostat to cool down the temperature using liquid helium. The performance of each solenoid and hexapole magnet was separately verified experimentally. The construction of the superconducting coil, the entire magnet assembly for performance testing and experimental results are reported herein.

  16. The effects of gas mixing and plasma electrode position on the emittance of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.

    2004-05-01

    Gas mixing is a commonly used method to improve the intensities and the charge state distribution of ion beams extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). At the same time, the emittance of the ion beam should be as small as possible. In this work we have studied the effect of the gas mixing method on the ion beam quality by measuring the emittance and brightness of different ion beams using helium, oxygen, and argon with several gas feeding ratios. All measurements were performed with the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. At the second stage of the experiments the emittance and the ion beam brightness were studied as a function of the plasma electrode position. The extraction system constructed for this experiment can be moved online.

  17. The preliminary tests of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-SC2.

    PubMed

    Efremov, A; Bekhterev, V; Bogomolov, S; Drobin, V; Loginov, V; Lebedev, A; Yazvitsky, N; Yakovlev, B

    2012-02-01

    A new compact version of the "liquid He-free" superconducting ECR ion source, to be used as an injector of highly charged heavy ions for the MC-400 cyclotron, is designed and built at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in collaboration with the Laboratory of High Energy Physics of JINR. The axial magnetic field of the source is created by the superconducting magnet and the NdFeB hexapole is used for the radial plasma confinement. The microwave frequency of 14 GHz is used for ECR plasma heating. During the first tests, the source shows a good enough performance for the production of medium charge state ions. In this paper, we will present the design parameters and the preliminary results with gaseous ions.

  18. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L. Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, W. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; Cao, Y.; Wu, W.; Yang, T. J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, H. W.; Ma, L. Z.; Xia, J. W.; Lu, W.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Xie, D.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R and D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe{sup 27+}, 236 eμA Xe{sup 30+}, and 64 eμA Xe{sup 35+}. Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi{sup 30+} and 202 eμA U{sup 33+} have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation.

  19. Development of a 2 MW CW Waterload for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence,Ives; Maxwell Mizuhara; George Collins; Jeffrey Neilson; Philipp Borchard

    2012-11-09

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a load capable of continuously dissipating 2 MW of RF power from gyrotrons. The input uses HE11 corrugated waveguide and a rotating launcher to uniformly disperse the power over the lossy surfaces in the load. This builds on experience with a previous load designed to dissipate 1 MW of continuous RF power. The 2 MW load uses more advanced RF dispersion to double the capability in the same size device as the 1 MW load. The new load reduces reflected power from the load to significantly less than 1 %. This eliminates requirements for a preload to capture reflected power. The program updated control electronics that provides all required interlocks for operation and measurement of peak and average power. The program developed two version of the load. The initial version used primarily anodized aluminum to reduce weight and cost. The second version used copper and stainless steel to meet specifications for the ITER reactor currently under construction in France. Tests of the new load at the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency confirmed operation of the load to a power level of 1 MW, which is the highest power currently available for testing the load. Additional tests will be performed at General Atomics in spring 2013. The U.S. ITER organization will test the copper/stainless steel version of the load in December 2012 or early in 2013. Both loads are currently being marketed worldwide.

  20. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Lu, W.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, W. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; Cao, Y.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Wu, W.; Yang, T. J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, H. W.; Ma, L. Z.; Xia, J. W.; Xie, D.

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R&D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe27+, 236 eμA Xe30+, and 64 eμA Xe35+. Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi30+ and 202 eμA U33+ have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation.

  1. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP).

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Lu, W; Feng, Y C; Zhang, W H; Zhang, X Z; Cao, Y; Zhao, Y Y; Wu, W; Yang, T J; Zhao, B; Zhao, H W; Ma, L Z; Xia, J W; Xie, D

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R&D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe(27+), 236 eμA Xe(30+), and 64 eμA Xe(35+). Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi(30+) and 202 eμA U(33+) have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation.

  2. On the application of electron cyclotron emission imaging to the validation of theoretical models of magnetohydrodynamic activitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B. J.; Boivin, R. L.; Boom, J. E.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Donné, A. J. H.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Munsat, T.; Muscatello, C. M.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H. K.; Spong, D. A.; Turnbull, A. D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Yun, G. S.

    2011-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) imaging of electron temperature perturbations provides a powerful constraint for validating theoretical models describing magnetohydrodynamic plasma behavior. In observation of Alfvén wave induced temperature fluctuations, electron cyclotron emission imaging provides unambiguous determination of the 2D eigenmode structure. This has provided support for nonperturbative eigenmode solvers which predict symmetry breaking due to poloidal flows in the fast ion population. It is shown that for Alfvén eigenmodes, and in cases where convective flows or saturated perturbations lead to nonaxisymmetric equilibria, electron plasma displacements oriented parallel to a gradient in mean temperature are well defined. Furthermore, during highly dynamic behavior, such as the sawtooth crash, highly resolved 2D temperature behaviors yield valuable insight. In particular, addressing the role of adiabatic heating on time scales much shorter than the resistive diffusion time through the additional diagnosis of local electron density allows progress to be made toward a comprehensive understanding of fast reconnection in tokamak plasmas.

  3. Effects of suprathermal electrons on the proton temperature anisotropy in space plasmas: Electromagnetic ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, S. M.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Elhanbaly, A.

    2016-06-01

    In collision-poor plasmas from space, e.g., the solar wind and planetary magnetospheres, the kinetic anisotropy of the plasma particles is expected to be regulated by the kinetic instabilities. Driven by an excess of ion (proton) temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field (T_{perp}>T_{allel}), the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) instability is fast enough to constrain the proton anisotropy, but the observations do not conform to the instability thresholds predicted by the standard theory for bi-Maxwellian models of the plasma particles. This paper presents an extended investigation of the EMIC instability in the presence of suprathermal electrons which are ubiquitous in these environments. The analysis is based on the kinetic (Vlasov-Maxwell) theory assuming that both species, protons and electrons, may be anisotropic, and the EMIC unstable solutions are derived numerically providing an accurate description for conditions typically encountered in space plasmas. The effects of suprathermal populations are triggered by the electron anisotropy and the temperature contrast between electrons and protons. For certain conditions the anisotropy thresholds exceed the limits of the proton anisotropy measured in the solar wind considerably restraining the unstable regimes of the EMIC modes.

  4. Multi-field/multi-scale turbulence response to electron cyclotron heating of DIII-D ohmic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Schmitz, L.; Zeng, L.; DeBoo, J. C.; Staebler, G. M.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Leonard, A. W.; VanZeeland, M. A.; Yan, Z.; McKee, G. R.; Solomon, W. M.; White, A. E.

    2011-08-15

    The multi-field/multi-scale core ({rho}{approx} 0.5-0.8) turbulence response to electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of DIII-D Ohmic plasmas is reported for the first time. Long wavelength (low-k) electron temperature (T-tilde{sub e}/T{sub e}) and high-k density turbulence levels (n-tilde{sub e}/n{sub e}) are observed to strongly increase during ECH. In contrast, low-k and intermediate-k n-tilde{sub e}/n{sub e} showed little change, whereas the cross-phase between local low-k electron temperature and density fluctuations ({alpha}{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}}) was significantly modified. The increase in the electron thermal diffusivity determined from power balance is consistent with the increased turbulent transport correlated with the measured increases in low-k T-tilde{sub e}/T{sub e} and high-k n-tilde{sub e}/n{sub e}. Linear stability analysis using the trapped gyro-Landau fluid (TGLF) model indicates an enhanced growth rate for electron modes [e.g., trapped electron mode (TEM)] at low-k consistent with the observed modifications in T-tilde{sub e}/T{sub e} and {alpha}{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}}. TGLF also predicts an increase in high-k electron mode growth rates for normalized wavenumbers k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s} > 7, where electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes exist, which is consistent with the observed increase in high-kn-tilde{sub e}/n{sub e} turbulence.

  5. Electron cyclotron maser emission mode coupling to the z-mode on a longitudinal density gradient in the context of solar type III bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Pechhacker, R.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2012-11-15

    A beam of super-thermal, hot electrons was injected into maxwellian plasma with a density gradient along a magnetic field line. 1.5D particle-in-cell simulations were carried out which established that the EM emission is produced by the perpendicular component of the beam injection momentum. The beam has a positive slope in the distribution function in perpendicular momentum phase space, which is the characteristic feature of a cyclotron maser. The cyclotron maser in the overdense plasma generates emission at the electron cyclotron frequency. The frequencies of generated waves were too low to propagate away from the injection region, hence the wavelet transform shows a pulsating wave generation and decay process. The intensity pulsation frequency is twice the relativistic cyclotron frequency. Eventually, a stable wave packet formed and could mode couple on the density gradient to reach frequencies of the order of the plasma frequency that allowed for propagation. The emitted wave is likely to be a z-mode wave. The total electromagnetic energy generated is of the order of 0.1% of the initial beam kinetic energy. The proposed mechanism is of relevance to solar type III radio bursts, as well as other situations, when the injected electron beam has a non-zero perpendicular momentum, e.g., magnetron.

  6. Advanced Electronics. Curriculum Development. Bulletin 1778.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eppler, Thomas

    This document is a curriculum guide for a 180-hour course in advanced electronics for 11th and 12th grades that has four instructional units. The instructional units are orientation, discrete components, integrated circuits, and electronic systems. The document includes a course flow chart; a two-page section that describes the course, lists…

  7. Temporal and spatial responses of temperature, density and rotation to electron cyclotron heating in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Ide, S.; Takenaga, H.; Honda, M.; Urano, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakata, M.; Miyato, N.; Kamada, Y.

    2013-08-01

    The temporal and spatial responses of electron channels (the electron density, ne, and the electron temperature, Te) and ion channels (the ion temperature, Ti, and the toroidal rotation velocity, Vφ) to central electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been investigated in positive shear H-mode plasmas with a relatively peaked Ti profile and internal transport barrier (ITB) plasmas on JT-60U. Ion temperature decreases with ECH after the increase in the electron temperature in the core region. The time scale of the change in Ti is ≈30-60 ms in H-mode plasmas and almost constant in radius. In ITB plasmas, the time scale is shorter around the ITB foot and becomes longer inside the ITB foot. The experimentally measured causality indicates that the decrease in Ti is consistent with the ion temperature gradient critical gradient reduction. This is also verified through a comparison with linear gyrokinetic stability analyses. The electron heat diffusivity increases with ECH in both H-mode and ITB plasmas, correlating to the increase in the ion heat diffusivity. Electron density with a relatively flat ne profile does not decrease with ECH. On the other hand, the electron density with a peaked ne profile decreases with ECH. The flattening of the ne profile is observed after the increase in the electron temperature in the core region. The time scale of the change in ne is about 200-350 ms. Linear gyrokinetic stability analyses imply that the growth rate of the trapped electron modes, which increase outward particle flux, becomes more pronounced during ECH. The counter intrinsic rotation with ECH is identified on H-mode plasmas with a small torque input (BAL-NBI). The counter intrinsic rotation is generated after the increase in the electron temperature and correlates to the change in the electron temperature with ECH around the EC deposition. The radial region where the counter intrinsic rotation is observed is wider than the radial region where the electron temperature

  8. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  9. Improved beta (local beta >1) and density in electron cyclotron resonance heating on the RT-1 magnetosphere plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.

    2015-05-01

    This study reports the recent progress in improved plasma parameters of the RT-1 device. Increased input power and the optimized polarization of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with an 8.2 GHz klystron produce a significant increase in electron beta, which is evaluated by an equilibrium analysis of the Grad-Shafranov equation. The peak value of the local electron beta βe is found to exceed 1. In the high-beta and high-density regime, the density limit is observed for H, D and He plasmas. The line-averaged density is close to the cutoff density for 8.2 GHz ECRH. When the filling gas pressure is increased, the density limit still exists even in the low-beta region. This result indicates that the density limit is caused by the cutoff density rather than the beta limit. From the analysis of interferometer data, we found that inward diffusion causes a peaked density profile beyond the cutoff density.

  10. Time evolution of endpoint energy of Bremsstrahlung spectra and ion production from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie; Ropponen, Tommi; Jones, Peter; Kalvas, Taneli

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) are used to produce high charge state heavy ion beams for the use of nuclear and materials science, for instance. The most powerful ECR ion sources today are superconducting. One of the problems with superconducting ECR ion sources is the use of high radio frequency (RF) power which results in bremsstrahlung radiation adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. In order to understand the electron heating process and timescales in the ECR plasma, time evolution measurement of ECR bremsstrahlung was carried out. In the measurements JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS was operated in a pulsed mode and bremsstrahlung data from several hundred RF pulses was recorded. Time evolution of ion production was also studied and compared to one of the electron heating theories. To analyze the measurement data at C++ program was developed. Endpoint energies of the bremsstrahlung spectra as a function of axial magnetic field strength, pressure and RF power are presented and ion production timescales obtained from the measurements are compared to bremsstrahlung emission timescales and one of the stochastic heating theories.

  11. Quasioptical design of integrated Doppler backscattering and correlation electron cyclotron emission systems on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, T. L.; Peebles, W. A.; Nguyen, X.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; White, A. E.

    2010-10-15

    The quasioptical design of a new integrated Doppler backscattering (DBS) and correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system is presented. The design provides for simultaneous measurements of intermediate wavenumber density and long wavelength electron temperature turbulence behavior. The Doppler backscattering technique is sensitive to plasma turbulence flow and has been utilized to determine radial electric field, geodesic acoustic modes, zonal flows, and intermediate scale (k{approx}1-6 cm{sup -1}) density turbulence. The correlation ECE system measures a second turbulent field, electron temperature fluctuations, and is sensitive to long poloidal wavelength (k{<=}1.8 cm{sup -1}). The integrated system utilizes a newly installed in-vessel focusing mirror that produces a beam waist diameter of 3.5-5 cm in the plasma depending on the frequency. A single antenna (i.e., monostatic operation) is used for both launch and receive. The DBS wavenumber is selected via an adjustable launch angle and variable probing frequency. Due to the unique system design both positive and negative wavenumbers can be obtained, with a range of low to intermediate wavenumbers possible (approximately -3 to 10 cm{sup -1}). A unique feature of the design is the ability to place the DBS and CECE measurements at the same radial and poloidal locations allowing for cross correlation studies (e.g., measurement of nT cross-phase).

  12. Effect of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating conditions on the low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M. Malakhov, D. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2015-08-15

    Low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator was studied at different modes of plasma confinement. The plasma was heated at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The effect of reflection of gyrotron radiation from the region of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating, as well as of backscattering of gyrotron radiation from fluctuations of the plasma density, on the modulation of the gyrotron power was investigated.

  13. Efficiency enhancement of slow-wave electron-cyclotron maser by a second-order shaping of the magnetic field in the low-gain limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si-Jia; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Wang, Kang; Li, Yong-Ming; Jing, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Based on the anomalous Doppler effect, we put forward a proposal to enhance the conversion efficiency of the slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) under the resonance condition. Compared with previous studies, we add a second-order shaping term in the guild magnetic field. Theoretical analyses and numerical calculations show that it can enhance the conversion efficiency in the low-gain limit. The case of the initial velocity spread of electrons satisfying the Gaussian distribution is also analysed numerically.

  14. Evaluation and optimization of electron capture dissociation efficiency in fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Melinda A; Chalmers, Michael J; Quinn, John P; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G

    2005-07-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) efficiency has typically been lower than for other dissociation techniques. Here we characterize experimental factors that limit ECD and seek to improve its efficiency. Efficiency of precursor to product ion conversion was measured for a range of peptide (approximately 15% efficiency) and protein (approximately 33% efficiency) ions of differing sizes and charge states. Conversion of precursor ions to products depends on electron irradiation period and maximizes at approximately 5-30 ms. The optimal irradiation period scales inversely with charge state. We demonstrate that reflection of electrons through the ICR cell is more efficient and robust than a single pass, because electrons can cool to the optimal energy for capture, which allows for a wide range of initial electron energy. Further, efficient ECD with reflected electrons requires only a short (approximately 500 micros) irradiation period followed by an appropriate delay for cooling and interaction. Reflection of the electron beam results in electrons trapped in or near the ICR cell and thus requires a brief (approximately 50 micros) purge for successful mass spectral acquisition. Further electron irradiation of refractory precursor ions did not result in further dissociation. Possibly the ion cloud and electron beam are misaligned radially, or the electron beam diameter may be smaller than that of the ion cloud such that remaining precursor ions do not overlap with the electron beam. Several ion manipulation techniques and use of a large, movable dispenser cathode reduce the possibility that misalignment of the ion and electron beams limits ECD efficiency.

  15. Enhanced production of runaway electrons during electron cyclotron resonance heating and in the presence of supersonic molecular beam injection in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Yang, J. W.; Song, X. Y.; Yuan, G. L.; Zhou, J.; Yao, L. H.; Feng, B. B.; Li, X.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.; Liu, Y.

    2010-07-15

    In the present paper, it is reported that a large production of runaway electrons has been observed during the flattop phase of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) discharges and in the presence of supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) in the HuanLiuqi-2A (commonly referred to as HL-2A) [Q. W. Yang, Nucl. Fusion 47, S635 (2007)] tokamak. For the set of discharges carried out in the present experiment, the ranges of ECRH power and plasma electron density are 0.8-1.0 MW and (3.0-4.0)x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, respectively. A large number of superthermal electrons are produced through the avalanche effect [A. Lazaros, Phys. Plasmas 8, 1263 (2001)] during ECRH. The loop voltage increase due to SMBI gives rise to a decline in the critical runaway energy, which leads to that many superthermal electrons could be converted into runaway region. Therefore, this phenomenon may come from the synergetic effects of ECRH and SMBI. That is, the superthermal electrons created by ECRH are accelerated into runaway regime via the Dreicer process which is triggered by SMBI. The experimental results are in well agreement with the calculational ones based on the superthermal electron avalanche effect and the Dreicer runaway theory.

  16. Terahertz Dynamics of a Topologically Protected State: Quantum Hall Effect Plateaus near the Cyclotron Resonance of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Stier, A V; Ellis, C T; Kwon, J; Xing, H; Zhang, H; Eason, D; Strasser, G; Morimoto, T; Aoki, H; Zeng, H; McCombe, B D; Cerne, J

    2015-12-11

    We measure the Hall conductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas formed at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction in the terahertz regime close to the cyclotron resonance frequency using highly sensitive Faraday rotation measurements. The sample is electrically gated, allowing the electron density to be changed continuously by more than a factor of 3. We observe clear plateaulike and steplike features in the Faraday rotation angle vs electron density and magnetic field (Landau-level filling factor) even at fields or frequencies very close to cyclotron resonance absorption. These features are the high frequency manifestation of quantum Hall plateaus-a signature of topologically protected edge states. We observe both odd and even filling factor plateaus and explore the temperature dependence of these plateaus. Although dynamical scaling theory begins to break down in the frequency region of our measurements, we find good agreement with theory.

  17. Electron cyclotron waves in the presence of parallel electric fields in the Earthś auroral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Dixit, S. K.; Gwal, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    The electron cyclotron waves that originate at low altitudes (<0.5 RE) and observed by ground facilities have been studied in the presence of a weak parallel electric field in auroral magnetoplasma consisting of trapped energetic auroral electrons and cold background electrons of ionospheric origin. The model distribution for auroral trapped electrons is taken as Maxwellian ring distribution. An expression for the growth rate has been obtained in the presence of parallel electric field assuming that the real frequency in the whistler mode is not affected by the presence of the electric field. The results show that waves grow (or damp) in amplitude for a parallel (or antiparallel) electric field. The influence of the electric field is more pronounced at a shorter wavelength spectrum. An increase in population of energetic electrons increases the growth rate and thus, plays a significant role in the wave excitation process in the auroral regions. Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood (Imperial College, London), J. C. Samson (University of Alberta, Edmonton), L. J. Lanzerotti (AT&T Bell Laboratories), A. Wolfe (New York City Technical College) and to Dr. M. Vellante (University of LÁquila) for helpful discussions. They also thank Dr. A. Meloni (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Roma) who made available geomagnetic field observations from LÁquila Geomagnetic Observatory. This research activity at LÁquila is supported by MURST (40% and 60% contracts) and by GIFCO/CNR. Topical Editor K.-H. Glaßmeier thanks C. Waters and S. Fujita for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to :P. Francia->

  18. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  19. A self-consistent mechanism for electron cyclotron maser emission and its application to type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tang, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Type III solar radio bursts (SRBs) produced by fast electron beams (FEBs) traveling along solar magnetic fields are the best known and the most important kind of SRBs because of their clearest association with FEBs as well as most frequent observations during solar activities. However, the physics of their emitting mechanism has been a controversial issue. Based on the electron cyclotron maser (ECM) instability driven directly by a magnetized FEB, whose physics is fairly well known from the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation, this paper proposes a self-consistent mechanism for type III SRBs, in which the Alfvén wave (AW) produced by the current instability of the beam-return current system associated with the FEB, called the self-generated AW, plays an important and crucial role. Taking into account the return-current effect of the FEB, the growth rate and the saturation intensity of the self-generated AW are estimated. Then the effects of the self-generated AW on the ECM emission via the ECM instability driven by the magnetized FEB are further investigated. The results show that the self-generated AW can significantly influence and change the physical properties of the ECM emission. In particular, this novel ECM emission mechanism can effectively overcome the main difficulties of the conventional ECM emission mechanism in application to type III SRBs and may potentially provide a self-consistent physics scenario for type III SRBs.

  20. A mode converter to generate a Gaussian-like mode for injection into the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C. Benitez, J.; Hodgkinson, A.; Strohmeier, M.; Todd, D.; Plaum, B.; Thuillier, T.

    2014-02-15

    A number of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources use gyrotrons at either 24 or 28 GHz for ECR heating. In these systems, the microwave power is launched into the plasma using the TE{sub 01} circular waveguide mode. This is fundamentally different and may be less efficient than the typical rectangular, linearly polarized TE{sub 10} mode used for launching waves at lower frequencies. To improve the 28 GHz microwave coupling in VENUS, a TE{sub 01}-HE{sub 11} mode conversion system has been built to test launching HE{sub 11} microwave power into the plasma chamber. The HE{sub 11} mode is a quasi-Gaussian, linearly polarized mode, which should couple strongly to the plasma electrons. The mode conversion is done in two steps. First, a 0.66 m long “snake” converts the TE{sub 01} mode to the TE{sub 11} mode. Second, a corrugated circular waveguide excites the HE{sub 11} mode, which is launched directly into the plasma chamber. The design concept draws on the development of similar devices used in tokamaks and stellerators. The first tests of the new coupling system are described below.

  1. A mechanism for the Fine Structures of Solar Radio Bursts Based on the Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Tong, Z.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    A scenario based on the electron cyclotron maser emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission in the present discussion. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro-frequency by ultra low frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of the maser instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation of the observed fine-structure components in the solar type IIIb burst is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of the type IIIb bursts are addressed: 1) what is the physical mechanism that results in the intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of type IIIb bursts, 2) what causes the split pair (or double stria) and the triple stria, 3) why in the events of fundamental-harmonic pair emission there is only IIIb-III, but IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb cases are very rarely observed. The application of the scenario to some other type of solar radio bursts and their fine structures are also discussed.

  2. An antibiotic linked to peptides and proteins is released by electron capture dissociation fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fagerquist, Clifton K; Hudgins, Robert R; Emmett, Mark R; Håkansson, Kristina; Marshall, Alan G

    2003-04-01

    Desfuroylceftiofur (DFC) is a bioactive beta-lactam antibiotic metabolite that has a free thiol group. Previous experiments have shown release of DFC from plasma extracts after addition of a disulfide reducing agent, suggesting that DFC may be bound to plasma and tissue proteins through disulfide bonds. We have reacted DFC with [Arg(8)]-vasopressin (which has one disulfide bond) and bovine insulin (which has three disulfide bonds) and analyzed the reaction products by use of electron capture dissociation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ECD FT-ICR MS), which has previously shown preferential cleavage of disulfide bonds. We observe cleavage of DFC from vasopressin and insulin during ECD, suggesting that DFC is indeed bound to peptides and proteins through disulfide bonds. Specifically, we observed dissociative loss of one, as well as two, DFC species during ECD of [vasopressin + 2(DFC-H) + 2H](2+) from a single electron capture event. Loss of two DFCs could arise from either consecutive or simultaneous loss, but in any case implies a gas phase disulfide exchange step. ECD of [insulin + DFC + 4H](4+) shows preferential dissociative loss of DFC. Combined with HPLC, ECD FT-ICR-MS may be an efficient screening method for detection of drug-biomolecule binding.

  3. Broadband measurement of electron cyclotron emission in TFTR using a quasioptical light collection system and a polarizing Michelson interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, F.J.; Boyd, D.A.; Cutler, R.C.; Diesso, M.; McCarthy, M.P.; Montague, J.; Rocco, R.

    1988-10-01

    For the past four years, a Fourier transform spectrometer diagnostic system, employing a fast-scanning polarizing Michelson interferometer (FMI), has been operating on the TFTR tokamak at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It is used to measure the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrum over the range 2.5--18 cm/sup -1/ (75--540 GHz), with a resolution of 0.123 cm/sup -1/ (3.7 GHz), at a rate of 72 spectra per second. The quasioptical system for collecting the light and transporting it through the interferometer to the detector has been designed using the concepts of both Gaussian and geometrical optics. The commercial FMI was custom made for this project and is the state of the art for this type of specialized instrument. The diagnostic system is described and an error propagation analysis of the absolute calibration process is given. Examples of ECE spectra measured in two polarization directions are given and electron temperature profiles derived from each of them are compared.

  4. Relativistic electron precipitation events driven by electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanov, G. Sibeck, D.; Tel'nikhin, A.; Kronberg, T.

    2014-08-15

    We adopt a canonical approach to describe the stochastic motion of relativistic belt electrons and their scattering into the loss cone by nonlinear EMIC waves. The estimated rate of scattering is sufficient to account for the rate and intensity of bursty electron precipitation. This interaction is shown to result in particle scattering into the loss cone, forming ∼10 s microbursts of precipitating electrons. These dynamics can account for the statistical correlations between processes of energization, pitch angle scattering, and relativistic electron precipitation events, that are manifested on large temporal scales of the order of the diffusion time ∼tens of minutes.

  5. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  6. Electron cyclotron harmonic waves observed by the AMPTE-IRM plasma wave experiment following a lithium release in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeder, J. L.; Koons, H. C.; Holzworth, R. H.; Anderson, R. R.; Bauer, O. H.

    1987-01-01

    An unexpected occurrence following the second lithium release by the AMPTE-IRM spacecraft in the solar wind on September 20, 1984, was the appearance of electron cyclotron harmonic emissions. These emissions began about 50 s after the release and continued for several minutes. Narrow-band emissions polarized perpendicular to the magnetic field with amplitudes of approximately 0.00001 V/m were observed in each of the first five harmonic bands. The diffuse emissions extended from below the lowest measured frequency channel to above the highest narrow-band emission with a maximum below the electron cyclotron frequency. It will be shown that these observations are inconsistent with their generation by several ion beam instabilities.

  7. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Plasma Enchanced Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition Process for Deposition of GaN Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Silie; Chen, Junfang; Li, Yun; Li, Wei; Zhang, Maoping; Hu, Shejun

    2008-02-01

    An investigation was made into the nitrogen-trimethylgallium mixed electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The ECR plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapour deposition technology was adopted to grow GaN film on an α-Al2O3 substrate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the peak of GaN (0002) was at 2θ = 34.48°, being sharper and more intense with the increase in the N2: trimethylgallium(TMG) flow ratio. The results demonstrate that the electron cyclotron resonance-plasma enchanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MOPECVD) technology is evidently advantageous for the deposition of GaN film at a low growth temperature.

  8. Electron cyclotron current drive simulations for finite collisionality plasmas in Wendelstein 7-X using the full linearized collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F.; Marushchenko, Nikolai B.; Turkin, Yuriy

    2016-11-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) efficiency is usually modeled in the collisionless limit. While such models are sufficient for plasmas with rather low collisionality, they might underestimate the current drive in plasmas at low temperatures likely to occur at the initial phase of high density device operation. In this paper, the impact of finite collisionality effects on the wave-induced current drive is studied for a high-mirror configuration of Wendelstein 7-X using a combination of the drift kinetic equation solver NEO-2 and the ray-tracing code TRAVIS for a realistic set of plasma parameter profiles. The generalized Spitzer function, which describes the ECCD efficiency in phase space, is modeled with help of NEO-2, which uses the full linearized Coulomb collision operator, including energy and momentum conservation. Within this approach, the linearized drift kinetic equation is solved by means of the field line integration technique without any simplifications on device geometry. The results of the ray-tracing code TRAVIS using the ECCD efficiency from NEO-2 within the adjoint approach show a significant difference for the driven current when compared to commonly used collisionless models for the ordinary as well as the extraordinary second harmonic mode.

  9. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  10. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  11. Photoconducting ultraviolet detectors based on GaN films grown by electron cyclotron resonance molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, M.; Shah, K.S.; Moustakas, T.D.; Vaudo, R.P.; Singh, R.

    1995-08-01

    We report for the first time, fabrication of photoconducting UV detectors made from GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Semi-instilating GaN films were grown by the method of electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-MBE). Photoconductive devices with interdigitated electrodes were fabricated and their photoconducting properties were investigated. In this paper we report on the performance of the detectors in terms of UV responsivity, gain-quantum efficiency product, spectral response and response time. We have measured responsivity of 125A/W and gain-quantum efficiency product of 600 at 254nm and 25V. The response time was measured to be on the order of 20ns for our detectors, corresponding to a bandwidth of 25Mhz. The spectral response showed a sharp long-wavelength cutoff at 365nm, and remained constant in the 200nm to 365nm range. The response of the detectors to low-energy x-rays was measured and found to be linear for x-rays with energies ranging from 60kVp to 90kVp.

  12. Design and fabrication of circular and rectangular components for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Lang, D.D.; Rubert, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    The electron-cyclotron-resonant heating (ECRH) systems of rectangular waveguides on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) operated with a overall efficiency of 50%, each system using a 28-GHz, 200-kW pulsed gyrotron. We designed and built four circular-waveguide systems with greater efficiency and greater power-handling capabilities to replace the rectangular waveguides. Two of these circular systems, at the 5-kG second-harmonic heating locations, have a total transmission efficiency of >90%. The two systems at the 10-kG fundamental heating locations have a total transmission efficiency of 80%. The difference in efficiency is due to the additional components required to launch the microwaves in the desired orientation and polarization with respect to magnetic-field lines at the 10-kG points. These systems handle the total power available from each gyrotron but do not have the arcing limitation problem of the rectangular waveguide. Each system requires several complex components. The overall physical layout and the design considerations for the rectangular and circular waveguide components are described here.

  13. Spatially resolved charge-state and current-density distributions at the extraction of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we present our measurements of charge-state and current-density distributions performed in very close vicinity (15 mm) of the extraction of our hexapole geometry electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We achieved a relatively high spatial resolution reducing the aperture of our 3D-movable extraction (puller) electrode to a diameter of only 0.5 mm. Thus, we are able to limit the source of the extracted ion beam to a very small region of the plasma electrode's hole (O = 4 mm) and therefore to a very small region of the neutral plasma sheath. The information about the charge-state distribution and the current density in the plane of the plasma electrode at each particular position is conserved in the ion beam. We determined the total current density distribution at a fixed coaxial distance of only 15 mm to the plasma electrode by remotely moving the small-aperture puller electrode which contained a dedicated Faraday cup (FC) across the aperture of the plasma electrode. In a second measurement we removed the FC and recorded m/q-spectra for the different positions using a sector magnet. From our results we can deduce that different ion charge-states can be grouped into bloated triangles of different sizes and same orientation at the extraction with the current density peaking at centre. This confirms observations from other groups based on simulations and emittance measurements. We present our measurements in detail and discuss possible systematic errors.

  14. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, V; Bellodi, G; Dimov, V; Küchler, D; Lombardi, A M; Maintrot, M

    2016-02-01

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  15. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Toivanen, V. Bellodi, G.; Dimov, V.; Küchler, D.; Lombardi, A. M.; Maintrot, M.

    2016-02-15

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  16. Optimization of an electron cyclotron resonance plasma etch process for [ital n][sup +] polysilicon: HBr process chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, G.D.; Blain, M.G. ); Westerfield, P.L.; Trutna, L.S.; Maxwell, K.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Designed experiments were employed to characterize a process for etching phosphorus doped polycrystalline silicon with HBr in a close-coupled electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor configured for 200 mm wafers. A fractional factorial screening experiment was employed to determine the principal input factors and the main etch effects. Linear models of the process responses indicate rf power, O[sub 2] flow rate, and the position of the resonance zone (with respect to the wafer) as the three strongest factors influencing process performance. Response surfaces generated using data from a follow-on response surface methodology experiment predicted an optimum operating region characterized by relatively low rf power, a small O[sub 2] flow, and a resonance zone position close to the wafer. One operating point in this region demonstrated a polysilicon etch rate of 270 nm/min, an etch rate nonuniformity of 2.2% (1 std. dev.), an etch selectivity to oxide greater than 100:1, and anisotropic profiles. Particle test results for the optimized process indicated that careful selection of the O[sub 2] fraction is required to avoid residue deposition and particle formation.

  17. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10(-4)-10(-3) Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron.

  18. Measurements, modelling and electron cyclotron heating modification of Alfvén eigenmode activity in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zeeland, M. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Nazikian, R.; Austin, M. E.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chu, M. S.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Holcomb, C. T.; Hyatt, A. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Lohr, J.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Spong, D. A.

    2009-06-01

    Neutral beam injection into reversed magnetic shear DIII-D plasmas produces a variety of Alfvénic activity including toroidicity and ellipticity induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE/EAE, respectively) and reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAE) as well as their spatial coupling. These modes are studied during the discharge current ramp phase when incomplete current penetration results in a high central safety factor and strong drive due to multiple higher order resonances. It is found that ideal MHD modelling of eigenmode spectral evolution, coupling and structure are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. It is also found that higher radial envelope harmonic RSAEs are clearly observed and agree with modelling. Some discrepancies with modelling such as that due to up/down eigenmode asymmetries are also pointed out. Concomitant with the Alfvénic activity, fast ion (FIDA) spectroscopy shows large reductions in the central fast ion profile, the degree of which depends on the Alfvén eigenmode amplitude. Interestingly, localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) near the mode location stabilizes RSAE activity and results in significantly improved fast ion confinement relative to discharges with ECH deposition on axis. In these discharges, RSAE activity is suppressed when ECH is deposited near the radius of the shear reversal point and enhanced with deposition near the axis. The sensitivity of this effect to deposition power and current drive phasing as well as ECH modulation are presented.

  19. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Cao, R.; Ruan, L.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-02-15

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0–1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  20. Suppression of [ital m]=2 islands by electron cyclotron heating in the Texas Experimental Tokamak: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sing, D.C.; Austin, M.E.; Brower, D.L.; Chen, J.Y.; Gandy, R.F.; Yu, C.X. ); Wang, X.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Schnack, D.D. )

    1993-09-01

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to suppress [ital m]=2 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) [Nucl. Technol. Fusion [bold 1], 479 (1981)]. The location of ECH power deposition is controlled by a movable antenna. The MHD activity is suppressed when the ECH beam is directed close to the [ital q]=2 surface. The experiment is simulated using a three-dimensional resistive MHD code in cylindrical geometry. For fixed plasma current, the saturated [ital m]=2 island width is found to depend on the value of the safety factor at the magnetic axis ([ital q][sub 0]). The simulation suggests that the observed saturated [ital m]=2 island in the pre-ECH plasma, which typically occupies 25% of the minor radius, corresponds to [ital q][sub 0][similar to]1.3. The suppression of the island in the presence of ECH is attributed to current profile modification. In some discharges, the [ital m]=2 activity does not resume even after the ECH pulse is turned off.