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Sample records for advanced electronic devices

  1. Future Opportunities for Advancing Glucose Test Device Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brian R; Young, Teresa L; Joyce, Margaret K; Kennedy, Spencer I; Atashbar, Massood Z

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in the field of printed electronics can be applied to the field of diabetes testing. A brief history and some new developments in printed electronics components applicable to personal test devices, including circuitry, batteries, transmission devices, displays, and sensors, are presented. Low-cost, thin, and lightweight materials containing printed circuits with energy storage or harvest capability and reactive/display centers, made using new printing/imaging technologies, are ideal for incorporation into personal-use medical devices such as glucose test meters. Semicontinuous rotogravure printing, which utilizes flexible substrates and polymeric, metallic, and/or nano “ink” composite materials to effect rapidly produced, lower-cost printed electronics, is showing promise. Continuing research advancing substrate, “ink,” and continuous processing development presents the opportunity for research collaboration with medical device designers. PMID:22027300

  2. Advances in modeling and simulation of vacuum electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Mondelli, A.A.; Levush, B.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1999-05-01

    Recent advances in the modeling and simulation of vacuum electronic devices are reviewed. Design of these devices makes use of a variety of physical models and numerical code types. Progress in the development of these models and codes is outlined and illustrated with specific examples. The state of the art in device simulation is evolving to the point such that devices can be designed on the computer, thereby eliminating many trial and error fabrication and test steps. The role of numerical simulation in the design process can be expected to grow further in the future.

  3. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted. PMID:26403162

  4. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  5. Recent Advances in Flexible and Stretchable Bio-Electronic Devices Integrated with Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Suji; Lee, Hyunjae; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable electronics and optoelectronics configured in soft, water resistant formats uniquely address seminal challenges in biomedicine. Over the past decade, there has been enormous progress in the materials, designs, and manufacturing processes for flexible/stretchable system subcomponents, including transistors, amplifiers, bio-sensors, actuators, light emitting diodes, photodetector arrays, photovoltaics, energy storage elements, and bare die integrated circuits. Nanomaterials prepared using top-down processing approaches and synthesis-based bottom-up methods have helped resolve the intrinsic mechanical mismatch between rigid/planar devices and soft/curvilinear biological structures, thereby enabling a broad range of non-invasive, minimally invasive, and implantable systems to address challenges in biomedicine. Integration of therapeutic functional nanomaterials with soft bioelectronics demonstrates therapeutics in combination with unconventional diagnostics capabilities. Recent advances in soft materials, devices, and integrated systems are reviewes, with representative examples that highlight the utility of soft bioelectronics for advanced medical diagnostics and therapies. PMID:26779680

  6. Advances in molecular electronics: Synthesis and testing of potential molecular electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, David Wilson, Jr.

    New potential molecular electronics devices have been synthesized based on our knowledge of previous systems that have come out of our group. Previous studies and current studies have shown that simple molecular systems demonstrate negative differential resistance (NDR) and memory characteristics. The new systems rely primarily on the redox properties of the compounds to improve upon the solid state properties already observed. Most of these new organic compounds use thiol-based "alligator clips" for attachment to metal surfaces. Some of the compounds, however, contain different "alligator clips," primarily isonitriles, for attachment to metal substrates. It is our hope that these new "alligator clips" will offer lower conductivity barriers (higher current density). Electrochemical tests have been performed in order to evaluate those redox properties and in the hope of using those electrochemical results as a predictive tool to evaluate the usefulness of those compounds. Also, organic structures with polymerizable functionalities have been synthesized in order to cross-link the molecules once they are a part of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). This has been shown to enable the electrochemical growth of polypyrrole from a SAM in a controllable manner.

  7. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing.

    PubMed

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices. PMID:26233395

  8. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  9. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  10. Prospects of application of superconducting electrodynamic structures in electronic devices for their advancement to the terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraev, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Rak, A. O.; Sinitsyn, A. K.; Hramov, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    It is shown that the application of superconducting electrodynamic structures in microwave electronic devices not only improves their characteristics, but also creates premises for implementation of devices like the autophase traveling-wave tube (TWT) and peniotron operating in the millimeter range with their further advancement to the terahertz range, which is impossible for conventional electrodynamic structures with Ohmic losses. Superconducting corrugated waveguides make it possible to suspend limitations imposed on the output power of pulsed relativistic Cherenkov oscillators, which are associated with thermal degradation of the working surface of conventional waveguides with Ohmic losses.

  11. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  12. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  13. Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael S.; Maki, Paul A.; Kolodzey, James

    2007-06-01

    Sb-heterostructure backward diodes for millimeter-wave detection / N. Su ... [et al.]. A Mixed-signal row/Column architecture for very large monolithic mm-wave phased arrays / C. Carta, M. Seo and M. Rodwell. Terahertz emission from electrically pumped silicon germanium itersubband devices / N. Sustersic [et al.]. Terahertz sensing of materials / G. Xuan ... [et al.] -- III. silicon and SiGe devices. Negative bias temperature instability in TiN/HF-Silicate based gate stacks / N. A. Chowdhury, D. Misra and N. Rahim. Power adaptive control of dense configured super-self-aligned back-gate planar transistors / H. Lin ... [et al.]. Non-volatile high speed & low power charge trapping devices / M. K. Kim and S. Tiwari. High performance SiGeC/Si Near-IR electrooptic modulators and photodetectors / M. Schubert and F. Rana -- III. Silicon and SiGe devices. Negative bias temperature instability in TiN/HF-Silicate based gate stacks / N. A. Chowdhury, D. Misra and N. Rahim. Power adaptive control of dense configured super-self-aligned back-gate planar transistors / H. Lin ... [et al.]Non-volatile high speed & low power charge trapping devices / M. K. Kim and S. Tiwari. High performance SiGeC/Si Near-IR electrooptic modulators and photodetectors / M. Schubert and F. Rana -- IV. Nanoelelectronics and ballistic devices. Hybrid nanomaterials for multi-spectral infrared photodetection / A. D. Stiff-Roberts. Ballistic electron acceleration negative-differential-conductivity devices / B. Aslan ... [et al.] -- V. Photoluminescence and photocapacitance. Understanding ultraviolet emitter performance using intensity dependent Time-Resolved photoluminescence / M. Wraback ... [ et al.]. Photocapacitance of selectively doped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures containing deep traps / N. B. Gorev ... [et al.

  14. Electronic security device

    DOEpatents

    Eschbach, Eugene A.; LeBlanc, Edward J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a security device having a control box (12) containing an electronic system (50) and a communications loop (14) over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system (50) and a detection module (72) capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop.

  15. Electronic security device

    DOEpatents

    Eschbach, E.A.; LeBlanc, E.J.; Griffin, J.W.

    1992-03-17

    The present invention relates to a security device having a control box containing an electronic system and a communications loop over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system and a detection module capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop. 11 figs.

  16. Diamond Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175° C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin (˜1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  17. Diamond Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175 deg.n C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin ({approx}1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  18. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  19. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  20. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  1. Biomaterials-Based Organic Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bettinger, Christopher J.; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-01-01

    Organic electronic devices have demonstrated tremendous versatility in a wide range of applications including consumer electronics, photovoltaics, and biotechnology. The traditional interface of organic electronics with biology, biotechnology, and medicine occurs in the general field of sensing biological phenomena. For example, the fabrication of hybrid electronic structures using both organic semiconductors and bioactive molecules has led to enhancements in sensitivity and specificity within biosensing platforms, which in turn has a potentially wide range of clinical applications. However, the interface of biomolecules and organic semiconductors has also recently explored the potential use of natural and synthetic biomaterials as structural components of electronic devices. The fabrication of electronically active systems using biomaterials-based components has the potential to realize a large set of unique devices including environmentally biodegradable systems and bioresorbable temporary medical devices. This article reviews recent advances in the implementation of biomaterials as structural components in organic electronic devices with a focus on potential applications in biotechnology and medicine. PMID:20607127

  2. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (<200 mV/decade). Scale analysis was used to successfully account for disparities observed among a number of sample devices. N-type conduction was found in all NWFETs with

  3. Advanced Modeling of Micromirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Sene, Darren E.; Bright, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    The flexure-beam micromirror device (FBMD) is a phase only piston style spatial light modulator demonstrating properties which can be used for phase adaptive corrective optics. This paper presents a complete study of a square FBMD, from advanced model development through final device testing and model verification. The model relates the electrical and mechanical properties of the device by equating the electrostatic force of a parallel-plate capacitor with the counter-acting spring force of the device's support flexures. The capacitor solution is derived via the Schwartz-Christoffel transformation such that the final solution accounts for non-ideal electric fields. The complete model describes the behavior of any piston-style device, given its design geometry and material properties. It includes operational parameters such as drive frequency and temperature, as well as fringing effects, mirror surface deformations, and cross-talk from neighboring devices. The steps taken to develop this model can be applied to other micromirrors, such as the cantilever and torsion-beam designs, to produce an advanced model for any given device. The micromirror devices studied in this paper were commercially fabricated in a surface micromachining process. A microscope-based laser interferometer is used to test the device in which a beam reflected from the device modulates a fixed reference beam. The mirror displacement is determined from the relative phase which generates a continuous set of data for each selected position on the mirror surface. Plots of this data describe the localized deflection as a function of drive voltage.

  4. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  5. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  6. Silk Fibroin for Flexible Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bowen; Wang, Hong; Leow, Wan Ru; Cai, Yurong; Loh, Xian Jun; Han, Ming-Yong; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Flexible electronic devices are necessary for applications involving unconventional interfaces, such as soft and curved biological systems, in which traditional silicon-based electronics would confront a mechanical mismatch. Biological polymers offer new opportunities for flexible electronic devices by virtue of their biocompatibility, environmental benignity, and sustainability, as well as low cost. As an intriguing and abundant biomaterial, silk offers exquisite mechanical, optical, and electrical properties that are advantageous toward the development of next-generation biocompatible electronic devices. The utilization of silk fibroin is emphasized as both passive and active components in flexible electronic devices. The employment of biocompatible and biosustainable silk materials revolutionizes state-of-the-art electronic devices and systems that currently rely on conventional semiconductor technologies. Advances in silk-based electronic devices would open new avenues for employing biomaterials in the design and integration of high-performance biointegrated electronics for future applications in consumer electronics, computing technologies, and biomedical diagnosis, as well as human-machine interfaces. PMID:26684370

  7. Stretchable and foldable electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark; Choi, Won Mook; Song, Jizhou; Ahn, Jong Hyun; Kim, Dae Hyeong

    2014-12-09

    Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

  8. Stretchable and foldable electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark; Choi, Won Mook; Song, Jizhou; Ahn, Jong Hyun; Kim, Dae Hyeong

    2013-10-08

    Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

  9. Skylab electronic technological advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornback, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes three electronic devices designed for use in the Skylab airlock module: the teleprinter system, the quartz crystal microbalance contamination monitor (QCM), and the speaker. Design considerations, operation, characteristics, and system development are described for these systems, with accompanying diagrams, graphs, and photographs. The teleprinter is a thermal dot printer used to produce hard copy messages by electrically heating print elements in contact with heat-sensitive paper. The QCM was designed to estimate contamination buildup on optical surfaces of the earth resources experiment package. A vibrating quartz crystal is used as a microbalance relating deposited mass to shifts in the crystal's resonant frequency. Audio devices provide communication between crew members and between crew and STDN, and also provide audible alarms, via the caution and warning system, of out-of-limit-conditions.

  10. Electronic measurement correction devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mahns, R.R.

    1984-04-01

    The electronics semi-conductor revolution has touched every industry and home in the nation. The gas industry is no exception. Sophisticated gas measurement instrumentation has been with us for several decades now, but only in the last 10 years or so has it really begun to boom. First marketed were the flow computers dedicated to orifice meter measurement; but with steadily decreasing manufacturing costs, electronic instrumentation is now moving into the area of base volume, pressure and temperature correction previously handled almost solely by mechanical integrating instruments. This paper takes a brief look at some of the features of the newcomers on the market and how they stack up against the old standby mechanical base volume/pressure/temperature correctors.

  11. Polymer electronic devices and materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, William Kent; Baca, Paul Martin; Dirk, Shawn M.; Anderson, G. Ronald; Wheeler, David Roger

    2006-01-01

    Polymer electronic devices and materials have vast potential for future microsystems and could have many advantages over conventional inorganic semiconductor based systems, including ease of manufacturing, cost, weight, flexibility, and the ability to integrate a wide variety of functions on a single platform. Starting materials and substrates are relatively inexpensive and amenable to mass manufacturing methods. This project attempted to plant the seeds for a new core competency in polymer electronics at Sandia National Laboratories. As part of this effort a wide variety of polymer components and devices, ranging from simple resistors to infrared sensitive devices, were fabricated and characterized. Ink jet printing capabilities were established. In addition to promising results on prototype devices the project highlighted the directions where future investments must be made to establish a viable polymer electronics competency.

  12. Ion plated electronic tube device

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.

    1983-10-18

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by ion plating techniques. The process is carried out in an automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  13. Stretchable Hydrogel Electronics and Devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoting; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Zhang, Teng; Parada, German Alberto; Koo, Hyunwoo; Yu, Cunjiang; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2016-06-01

    Stretchable hydrogel electronics and devices are designed by integrating stretchable conductors, functional chips, drug-delivery channels, and reservoirs into stretchable, robust, and biocompatible hydrogel matrices. Novel applications include a smart wound dressing capable of sensing the temperatures of various locations on the skin, delivering different drugs to these locations, and subsequently maintaining sustained release of drugs. PMID:26639322

  14. Advances in nonlethal electronic weaponry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, James F.

    1998-12-01

    Non-lethal electronic weapons in the form of tasers (a stand-off incapacitation device with a range of about 15 feet) and stun guns (which are not a gun, but a close contact stun device) have been used by law enforcement for over 18 years. The taser has dominated this market, since it does not require the close physical contact (with the resultant injuries) that the stun gun requires. Tasers are effective against even determined assailants where OC or pepper sprays consistently fail. The taser also does not have the close range lethality of low impact munitions. These electronic non-lethal weapons have saved the lives of thousands of suspects and have prevented the injury of thousands of law enforcement officers. Recent advances in laser sight technology have permitted the development of a patented dual laser sight that not only increased accuracy, but have made these weapons even more intimidating, increasing surrender rates. Now increased ranges are feasible and r & d on non-lethal military weapons to replace the anti-personnel landmine has resulted in new, unmanned, non-lethal taser weapons for law enforcement corrections and border patrol perimeter control use.

  15. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Pincosy, Philip A.; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600.degree. C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for non-uniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  16. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1983-06-10

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600/sup 0/C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for nonuniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  17. Fullerene Derived Molecular Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Madhu; Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subbash

    1998-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale electronic devices. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal grapheme sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural and electronic properties of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme.

  18. Thermoelectric Devices Advance Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices heat, cool, and generate electricity when a temperature differential is provided between the two module faces. In cooperation with NASA, Chico, California-based United States Thermoelectric Consortium Inc. (USTC) built a gas emissions analyzer (GEA) for combustion research. The GEA precipitated hydrocarbon particles, preventing contamination that would hinder precise rocket fuel analysis. The USTC research and design team uses patent-pending dimple, pin-fin, microchannel and microjet structures to develop and design heat dissipation devices on the mini-scale level, which not only guarantee high performance of products, but also scale device size from 1 centimeter to 10 centimeters. USTC continues to integrate the benefits of TE devices in its current line of thermal management solutions and has found the accessibility of NASA technical research to be a valuable, sustainable resource that has continued to positively influence its product design and manufacturing

  19. Carbon footprint of electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloma, Marcin

    2013-07-01

    Paper assesses the greenhouse gas emissions related to the electronic sectors including information and communication technology and media sectors. While media often presents the carbon emission problem of other industries like petroleum industry, the airlines and automobile sectors, plastics and steel manufacturers, the electronics industry must include the increasing carbon footprints caused from their applications like media and entertainment, computers and cooling devices, complex telecommunications networks, cloud computing and powerful mobile phones. In that sense greenhouse gas emission of electronics should be studied in a life cycle perspective, including regular operational electricity use. Paper presents which product groups or processes are major contributors in emission. From available data and extrapolation of existing information we know that the information and communication technology sector produced 1.3% and media sector 1.7% of global gas emissions within production cycle, using the data from 2007.In the same time global electricity use of that sectors was 3.9% and 3.2% respectively. The results indicate that for both sectors operation leads to more gas emissions than manufacture, although impacts from the manufacture is significant, especially in the supply chain. Media electronics led to more emissions than PCs (manufacture and operation). Examining the role of electronics in climate change, including disposal of its waste, will enable the industry to take internal actions, leading to lowering the impact on the climate change within the sector itself.

  20. Organic materials for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lichang

    Through light absorption and emission as well as charge carrier generation, transport and recombination, pi-conjugated molecules are central to electronic devices including organic field-effect transistors, organic light-emitting diodes, and organic solar cells. This thesis reports on materials development via molecular design, material synthesis and processing, device fabrication and characterization. Major accomplishments are summarized as follows. A series of oligo(fluorene-co-bithiophene)s, OF2Ts, have been synthesized and characterized for an investigation of the effects of oligomer length and pendant aliphatic structure on thermotropic properties, light absorption and emission, and anisotropic field-effect mobilities. Solvent-vapor annealing at room temperature was shown to be capable of orienting OF2Ts into monodomain glassy-nematic films with an orientational order parameter emulating that achieved with conventional thermal annealing on a rubbed polyimide alignment layer. Comprising hole- and electron-transporting moieties with flexible linkages, non-conjugated bipolar compounds have been developed for use as hosts for electrophosphorescence. These materials are characterized by an elevated glass transition temperature, morphological stability against crystallization, LUMO and HOMO levels unaffected by chemical bonding, and triplet energy unconstrained by the electrochemical energy gap. Phosphorescent OLEDs containing solution-processed emitting layers were fabricated with TRZ-3Cz(MP)2, TRZ-1Cz(MP)2 and Cz(MP)2 hosting Ir(mppy)3 for an illustration of how chemical composition and hence charge transport properties affect device performance. Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells comprising an active layer of P3HT:PCBM blend at a 1:1 mass ratio with thickness from 130 to 1200 mn have been fabricated and characterized before and after thermal annealing. Before thermal annealing, both short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency decrease with

  1. Accelerating tomorrow's opto-electronic technologies: a comprehensive introduction to advanced optoelectronic materials and devices in the National Hi-Tech R&D Plan (863-Plan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Chen, Haoming; Ren, Xiaomin; Wang, Zhigong; Qian, Longsheng; Zhang, Rong; Feng, Songlin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ningsheng

    2004-05-01

    The National Hi-Tech R&D Program (the 863-Program) is to enhance China's international competitiveness and improve China's overall capability of R&D in high technology and to bridge the gap between the laboratory and the marketplace. Advanced Optoelectronic Materials and Devices are one of the technology areas strategically important to China's information industry. It has been one of the major priority research fields funded by the 863 Program even since 1987 when the plan was first initiated. From the viewpoint of Priority Expert Group (PEG), this paper will give a comprehensive introduction to advanced optoelectronic materials and devices in the national 863-Program during the current five years period (up to 2005) which includes the main aims and goals and especially the main content of each subject.

  2. 78 FR 1247 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media... United States after importation of certain electronic devices, including wireless communication devices... importation of certain electronic devices, including wireless communication devices, tablet computers,...

  3. Recent Advancements in Functionalized Paper-Based Electronics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Gritsenko, Dmitry; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaonan; Xu, Jie

    2016-08-17

    Building electronic devices on ubiquitous paper substrates has recently drawn extensive attention due to its light weight, low cost, environmental friendliness, and ease of fabrication. Recently, a myriad of advancements have been made to improve the performance of paper electronics for various applications, such as basic electronic components, energy storage devices, generators, antennas, and electronic circuits. This review aims to summarize this progress and discuss different perspectives of paper electronics as well as the remaining challenges yet to be overcome in this field. Other aspects included in this review are the fundamental characteristics of paper, modification of paper with functional materials, and various methods for device fabrication. PMID:27463253

  4. Thermally triggered degradation of transient electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Woo; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Hernandez, Hector Lopez; Kaitz, Joshua A; Wie, Dae Seung; Shin, Jiho; Lee, Olivia P; Sottos, Nancy R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rogers, John A; White, Scott R

    2015-07-01

    Thermally triggered transient electronics using wax-encapsulated acid, which enable rapid device destruction via acidic degradation of the metal electronic components are reported. Using a cyclic poly(phthalaldehyde) (cPPA) substrate affords a more rapid destruction of the device due to acidic depolymerization of cPPA. PMID:25991389

  5. Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications.

    PubMed

    Kuzum, Duygu; Yu, Shimeng; Wong, H-S Philip

    2013-09-27

    In this paper, the recent progress of synaptic electronics is reviewed. The basics of biological synaptic plasticity and learning are described. The material properties and electrical switching characteristics of a variety of synaptic devices are discussed, with a focus on the use of synaptic devices for neuromorphic or brain-inspired computing. Performance metrics desirable for large-scale implementations of synaptic devices are illustrated. A review of recent work on targeted computing applications with synaptic devices is presented. PMID:23999572

  6. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  7. Advances in device and formulation technologies for pulmonary drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chan, John Gar Yan; Wong, Jennifer; Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-08-01

    Inhaled pharmaceuticals are formulated and delivered differently according to the therapeutic indication. However, specific device-formulation coupling is often fickle, and new medications or indications also demand new strategies. The discontinuation of chlorofluorocarbon propellants has seen replacement of older metered dose inhalers with dry powder inhaler formulations. High-dose dry powder inhalers are increasingly seen as an alternative dosage form for nebulised medications. In other cases, new medications have completely bypassed conventional inhalers and been formulated for use with unique inhalers such as the Staccato® device. Among these different devices, integration of software and electronic assistance has become a shared trend. This review covers recent device and formulation advances that are forming the current landscape of inhaled therapeutics. PMID:24728868

  8. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  9. Repetitively pumped electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, L.G.

    1979-07-24

    Disclosed is an apparatus for producing fast, repetitive pulses of controllable length of an electron beam by phased energy storage in a transmission line of length matched to the number of pulses and specific pulse lengths desired. 12 figs.

  10. Advanced Devices for Cryogenic Thermal Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, D.; Stouffer, C.; Garzon, J.; Beres, M.; Gilchrist, A.

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes six advanced cryogenic thermal management devices/subsystems developed by Swales Aerospace for ground/space-based applications of interest to NASA, DoD, and the commercial sector. The devices/subsystems described herein include the following: (a) a differential thermal expansion cryogenic thermal switch (DTE-CTSW) constructed with high purity aluminum end-pieces and an Ultem support rod for the 6 K Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) (b) a quad-redundant DTE-CTSW assembly for the 35 K science instruments (NIRCam, NIRSpec, and FGS) mounted on the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) (c) a cryogenic diode heat pipe (CDHP) thermal switching system using methane as the working fluid for the 100 K CRISM hyperspectral mapping instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and (d) three additional devices/subsystems developed during the AFRL-sponsored CRYOTOOL program, which include a dual DTE-CTSW/dual cryocooler test bed, a miniaturized neon cryogenic loop heat pipe (mini-CLHP), and an across gimbal cryogenic thermal transport system (GCTTS). For the first three devices/subsystems mentioned above, this paper describes key aspects of the development efforts including concept definition, design, fabrication, and testing. For the latter three, this paper provides brief overview descriptions as key details are provided in a related paper.

  11. Device fabrication: Three-dimensional printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jennifer A.; Ahn, Bok Y.

    2015-02-01

    Can three-dimensional printing enable the mass customization of electronic devices? A study that exploits this method to create light-emitting diodes based on 'quantum dots' provides a step towards this goal.

  12. Emerging electronic devices for THz sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, P.; Xie, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Jiang, Z.; Rahman, S.; Xing, H.; Sensale-Rodriguez, B.; Liu, L.

    2014-09-01

    Continuing advances in scaling of conventional semiconductor devices are enabling mainstream electronics to operate in the millimeter-wave through THz regime. At the same time, however, novel devices and device concepts are also emerging to address the key challenges for systems in this frequency range, and may offer performance and functional advantages for future systems. In addition to new devices, advances in integration technology and novel system concepts also promise to provide substantial system-level performance and functionality enhancements. Several emerging devices and device concepts, as well as circuit-level concepts to take advantage of them, are discussed. Based on unconventional semiconductor device structures and operational principles, these devices offer the potential for significantly improved system sensitivity and frequency coverage. When combined in arrays, features such as polarimetric detection and frequency tunability for imaging can be achieved. As examples of emerging devices for millimeter-wave through THz sensing and imaging, heterostructure backward diodes in the InAs/AlSb/GaSb material system and GaN-based plasma-wave high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) will be discussed. Based on interband tunneling, heterostructure backward diodes offer significantly increased sensitivity and extremely low noise for direct detection applications, and have been demonstrated with cutoff frequencies exceeding 8 THz. The plasma-wave HEMT is an emerging device concept that, by leveraging plasma-wave resonances in the two-dimensional electron gas within the channel of the HEMT, offers the prospect for both tunable narrowband detection as well as low-noise amplification at frequencies well into the THz. These emerging devices are both amenable to direct integration within compact planar radiating structures such as annular slot antennas for realization of polarimetric detection and frequency tuning for spectroscopy and imaging.

  13. Sub-electron noise charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Charles E.; Bredthauer, Richard A.; Janesick, James R.; Westphal, James A.; Gunn, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A charge coupled device designed for celestial spectroscopy has achieved readout noise as low as 0.6 electrons rms. A nondestructive output circuit was operated in a special manner to read a single pixel multiple times. Off-chip electronics averaged the multiple values, reducing the random noise by the square root of the number of readouts. Charge capacity was measured to be 500,000 electrons. The device format is 1600 pixels horizontal by 64 pixels vertical. Pixel size is 28 microns square. Two output circuits are located at opposite ends of the 1600 bit CCD register. The device was thinned and operated backside illuminated at -110 degrees C. Output circuit design, layout, and operation are described. Presented data includes the photon transfer curve, noise histograms, and bar-target images down to 3 electrons signal. The test electronics are described, and future improvements are discussed.

  14. Exploiting plasmon-induced hot electrons in molecular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Conklin, David; Nanayakkara, Sanjini; Park, Tae-Hong; Lagadec, Marie F; Stecher, Joshua T; Chen, Xi; Therien, Michael J; Bonnell, Dawn A

    2013-05-28

    Plasmonic nanostructures can induce a number of interesting responses in devices. Here we show that hot electrons can be extracted from plasmonic particles and directed into a molecular electronic device, which represents a new mechanism of transfer from light to electronic transport. To isolate this phenomenon from alternative and sometimes simultaneous mechanisms of plasmon-exciton interactions, we designed a family of hybrid nanostructure devices consisting of Au nanoparticles and optoelectronically functional porphyin molecules that enable precise control of electronic and optical properties. Temperature- and wavelength-dependent transport measurements are analyzed in the context of optical absorption spectra of the molecules, the Au particle arrays, and the devices. Enhanced photocurrent associated with exciton generation in the molecule is distinguished from enhancements due to plasmon interactions. Mechanisms of plasmon-induced current are examined, and it is found that hot electron generation can be distinguished from other possibilities. PMID:23550717

  15. Characterization of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Heffner, R.H.; Hundley, M.F.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our goal has been to extend the Laboratory`s competency in nuclear and advanced materials by characterizing (measuring and interpreting) physical properties of advanced electronic materials and in this process to bridge the gap between materials synthesis and theoretical understanding. Attention has focused on discovering new physics by understanding the ground states of materials in which electronic correlations dominate their properties. Among several accomplishments, we have discovered and interpreted pressure-induced superconductivity in CeRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, boron content in UBe{sub 13-x}B{sub x} and the origin of small gaps in the spin and charge excitation spectra of Ce{sub 3}Bi{sub 4}Pt{sub 3}, and we provided seminal understanding of large magnetoresistive effects in La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3}. This work has established new research directions at LANL and elsewhere, involved numerous collaborators from throughout the world and attracted several postdoctoral fellows.

  16. Image stabilization for SWIR advanced optoelectronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    At long ranges and under low visibility conditions, Advanced Optoelectronic Device provides the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in the Short-wave Infra-red - SWIR (wavelengths between 1,1 ÷2,5 μm), significantly better than in the near wave infrared - NWIR and visible spectral bands [1,2]. The quality of image is nearly independent of the polarization in the incoming light, but it is influenced by the relative movement between the optical system and the observer (the operators' handshake), and the movement towards the support system (land and air vehicles). All these make it difficult to detect objectives observation in real time. This paper presents some systems enhance which the ability of observation and sighting through the optical systems without the use of the stands, tripods or other means. We have to eliminate the effect of "tremors of the hands" and the vibration in order to allow the use of optical devices by operators on the moving vehicles on land, on aircraft, or on boats, and to provide additional comfort for the user to track the moving object through the optical system, without losing the control in the process of detection and tracking. The practical applications of stabilization image process, in SWIR, are the most advanced part of the optical observation systems available worldwide [3,4,5]. This application has a didactic nature, because it ensures understanding by the students about image stabilization and their participation in research.

  17. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2015-05-18

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  18. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  19. Insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Savoy, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the first of the new generation of dedicated synchrotron light sources to be put into operation. Specially designed insertion devices will be required to realize the high brightness photon beams made possible by the low emittance of the electron beam. The complement of insertion devices on the ALS will include undulators with periods as short as 3.9 cm and one or more high field wigglers. The first device to be designed is a 5 m long, 5 cm period, hybrid undulator. The goal of very high brightness and high harmonic output imposes unusually tight tolerances on the magnetic field quality and thus on the mechanical structure. The design process, using a generic structure for all undulators, is described. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Metal microstructures in advanced CMOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gignac, L.M.; Rodbell, K.P.

    1996-12-31

    As advanced semiconductor device features shrink, grain boundaries and interfaces become increasingly more important to the properties of thin metal film. With film thickness decreasing to the range of 10 nm and the corresponding features also decreasing to sub-micrometer sizes, interface and grain boundary properties become dominant. In this regime the details of the surface and grain boundaries dictate the interactions between film layers and the subsequent electrical properties. Therefore it is necessary to accurately characterize these materials on the proper length scale in order to first understand and then to improve the device effectiveness. In this talk we will examine the importance of microstructural characterization of thin metal films used in semiconductor devices and show how microstructure can influence the electrical performance. Specifically, we will review Co and Ti silicides for silicon contact and gate conductor applications, Ti/TiN liner films used for adhesion and diffusion barriers in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten vertical wiring (vias) and Ti/AlCu/Ti-TiN films used as planar interconnect metal lines.

  1. Electron beam sterilisation of heterogeneous medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat, T.; Morisseau, MrD.; Ross, MissA.

    1993-07-01

    Electron beam radiation is used in the sterilisation of medical disposable devices. High energy, 10 MeV, electron beam linear accelerators are in use worldwide for this purpose. The dose distribution achieved in the products treated influences the efficiency of treatment. This paper looks at the dose distribution achieved with such machines and the methods used to define it in heterogeneous products.

  2. Management of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infection

    PubMed Central

    Podoleanu, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Despite improved preventive measures, infection associated with the use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) to treat often life-threatening conditions is rising at an average annual rate of almost 5 %. This rise is being driven by the increasing complexity of CIED technology and by the advancing age and co-morbidities of the patients. Although CIED infection is usually suspected based on local signs at the generator pocket site, diagnosis can be challenging in patients presenting no local manifestations or symptoms. Diagnostic methods include microbiological testing and echocardiography, and may be completed by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan in selected cases. CIED infection requires a multidisciplinary approach in view of hardware extraction, targeted antibiotic therapy and reimplantation on an as-needed basis. Antibiotic prophylaxis targeting staphylococcal flora is recommended but the relation of these infections to medical care exposes patients to multi-resistant bacteria. New preventive measures utilising an antibacterial sleeve look promising. Treatment can be started on an empirical basis using an antistaphylococcal agent but must be continued using targeted antibiotic therapy. Crucial questions remain as to the best prevention strategy, optimal duration and timing of antibiotic therapy, and the most effective reimplantation technique. PMID:26835089

  3. Evaluation of Advanced COTS Passive Devices for Extreme Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dones, Keishla R.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic sensors and circuits are often exposed to extreme temperatures in many of NASA deep space and planetary surface exploration missions. Electronics capable of operation in harsh environments would be beneficial as they simplify overall system design, relax thermal management constraints, and meet operational requirements. For example, cryogenic operation of electronic parts will improve reliability, increase energy density, and extend the operational lifetimes of space-based electronic systems. Similarly, electronic parts that are able to withstand and operate efficiently in high temperature environments will negate the need for thermal control elements and their associated structures, thereby reducing system size and weight, enhancing its reliability, improving its efficiency, and reducing cost. Passive devices play a critical role in the design of almost all electronic circuitry. To address the needs of systems for extreme temperature operation, some of the advanced and most recently introduced commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) passive devices, which included resistors and capacitors, were examined for operation under a wide temperature regime. The types of resistors investigated included high temperature precision film, general purpose metal oxide, and wirewound.

  4. 77 FR 60720 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Commmunication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Commmunication Devices, Portable Music and Data... infringing electronic devices, including wireless communication devices, portable music and data...

  5. Novel Boron Subphthalocyanines for Organic Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrucci, Jeffrey Stephen

    Boron subphthalocyanines (BsubPcs) are a class of organic semiconductor materials that have been identified as having desirable properties for use in photovoltaic devices due to their strong light absorbance and the flexibility to develop tunable chemical derivatives. In particular, a lack of variety in available electron acceptors is an area where BsubPc derivatives can be readily substituted into existing photovoltaic device architectures. There are, however, no metrics to facilitate the rapid screening of different BsubPc derivatives. In this thesis, admittance spectroscopy is used to measure charge carrier mobility of these BsubPc derivatives, and photovoltaic cells are fabricated to evaluate these derivatives' performance in devices. We find that the measured electron carrier mobilities in thin films of BsubPc correlate with the single crystal structural parameters determined by X-ray diffraction. We also find that for BsubPcs, electron mobility measured by admittance spectroscopy is insufficient to predict photovoltaic performance when BsubPcs are used as an electron accepting layer in a device. BsubPc derivatives, however, are discovered as a new class of versatile molecules that can be designed and synthesized for use in photovoltaic devices to harvest singlet fission derived triplet excitons and consequently boost photovoltaic device photocurrent. This thesis also reports vacuum system design and construction to address experimental challenges arising from dealing with low solubility, high molar mass materials and limited amounts of high purity material.

  6. Flexible Organic Electronics in Biology: Materials and Devices.

    PubMed

    Liao, Caizhi; Zhang, Meng; Yao, Mei Yu; Hua, Tao; Li, Li; Yan, Feng

    2015-12-01

    At the convergence of organic electronics and biology, organic bioelectronics attracts great scientific interest. The potential applications of organic semiconductors to reversibly transmit biological signals or stimulate biological tissues inspires many research groups to explore the use of organic electronics in biological systems. Considering the surfaces of movable living tissues being arbitrarily curved at physiological environments, the flexibility of organic bioelectronic devices is of paramount importance in enabling stable and reliable performances by improving the contact and interaction of the devices with biological systems. Significant advances in flexible organic bio-electronics have been achieved in the areas of flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), polymer electrodes, smart textiles, organic electrochemical ion pumps (OEIPs), ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs) and chemiresistors. This review will firstly discuss the materials used in flexible organic bioelectronics, which is followed by an overview on various types of flexible organic bioelectronic devices. The versatility of flexible organic bioelectronics promises a bright future for this emerging area. PMID:25393596

  7. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2011-03-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  8. Treatment of Infected Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Fakhro, Abdulla; Jalalabadi, Faryan; Brown, Rodger H; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    With their rising benefits, cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have witnessed a sharp rise in use over the past 50 years. As indications for use broaden, so too does their widespread employment with its attendant rise of CIED infections. Such large numbers of infections have inspired various algorithms mandating treatment. Early diagnosis of inciting organisms is crucial to tailoring appropriate antibiotic and or antifungal treatment. In addition, surgical debridement and explant of the device have been a longstanding modality of care. More novel therapies focus on salvage of the device by way of serial washouts and instilling drug-eluting antibiotic impregnated beads into the wound. The wound is then serially debrided until clean and closed. This technique is better suited to patients whose device cannot be removed, patients who are poor candidates for cardiac surgery, or patients who have failed conventional prior treatments. PMID:27152097

  9. Electron holography of devices with epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Gribelyuk, M. A. Ontalus, V.; Baumann, F. H.; Zhu, Z.; Holt, J. R.

    2014-11-07

    Applicability of electron holography to deep submicron Si devices with epitaxial layers is limited due to lack of the mean inner potential data and effects of the sample tilt. The mean inner potential V{sub 0} = 12.75 V of the intrinsic epitaxial SiGe was measured by electron holography in devices with Ge content C{sub Ge} = 18%. Nanobeam electron diffraction analysis performed on the same device structure showed that SiGe is strain-free in [220] direction. Our results showed good correlation with simulations of the mean inner potential of the strain-free SiGe using density function theory. A new method is proposed in this paper to correct electron holography data for the overlap of potentials of Si and the epitaxial layer, which is caused by the sample tilt. The method was applied to the analysis of the dopant diffusion in p-Field-effect Transistor devices with the identical gate length L = 30 nm, which had alternative SiGe geometry in the source and drain regions and was subjected to different thermal processing. Results have helped to understand electrical data acquired from the same devices in terms of dopant diffusion.

  10. Towards reproducible, scalable lateral molecular electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkan, Colm; Zhang, Qian

    2014-08-01

    An approach to reproducibly fabricate molecular electronic devices is presented. Lateral nanometer-scale gaps with high yield are formed in Au/Pd nanowires by a combination of electromigration and Joule-heating-induced thermomechanical stress. The resulting nanogap devices are used to measure the electrical properties of small numbers of two different molecular species with different end-groups, namely 1,4-butane dithiol and 1,5-diamino-2-methylpentane. Fluctuations in the current reveal that in the case of the dithiol molecule devices, individual molecules conduct intermittently, with the fluctuations becoming more pronounced at larger biases.

  11. Electronic device aspects of neural network memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambe, J.; Moopenn, A.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The basic issues related to the electronic implementation of the neural network model (NNM) for content addressable memories are examined. A brief introduction to the principles of the NNM is followed by an analysis of the information storage of the neural network in the form of a binary connection matrix and the recall capability of such matrix memories based on a hardware simulation study. In addition, materials and device architecture issues involved in the future realization of such networks in VLSI-compatible ultrahigh-density memories are considered. A possible space application of such devices would be in the area of large-scale information storage without mechanical devices.

  12. Towards reproducible, scalable lateral molecular electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Durkan, Colm Zhang, Qian

    2014-08-25

    An approach to reproducibly fabricate molecular electronic devices is presented. Lateral nanometer-scale gaps with high yield are formed in Au/Pd nanowires by a combination of electromigration and Joule-heating-induced thermomechanical stress. The resulting nanogap devices are used to measure the electrical properties of small numbers of two different molecular species with different end-groups, namely 1,4-butane dithiol and 1,5-diamino-2-methylpentane. Fluctuations in the current reveal that in the case of the dithiol molecule devices, individual molecules conduct intermittently, with the fluctuations becoming more pronounced at larger biases.

  13. Transient (lightning) protection for electronic measurement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Black, L.L.

    1995-12-01

    Electronic measurement devices have become a major part of the oil and gas business today. All of these devices operate on an electrical voltage. Any voltage introduced into the system that is beyond the predetermined tolerance will cause degradation of performance or in some cases failure of the device. The extent of the damage depends upon the dielectric strength of the circuit in question and upon the available energy. As electronic measurement devices are further developed to incorporate more solid state circuitry and operate at lower voltage levels the more susceptible they become to transients. Along with transient protection, the user must also be concerned with intrinsic safety requirements of the device to be protected. The devices and techniques used to protect the equipment from transients do not, in all cases, guarantee the user certification for use in hazardous environments. As a note of reference, some of the techniques listed in this paper as examples would not be allowed in hazardous areas without the addition of other devices to further isolate or clamp the available energy to a safe level. In other words, as the industry moves forward to improve the overall accuracy of the measurement system and adds data availability via communication networks, the transient protection scheme must become more sophisticated.

  14. RCRA toxicity characterization of discarded electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Musson, Stephen E; Vann, Kevin N; Jang, Yong-Chul; Mutha, Sarvesh; Jordan, Aaron; Pearson, Brian; Townsend, Timothy G

    2006-04-15

    The potential for discarded electronic devices to be classified as toxicity characteristic (TC) hazardous waste under provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was examined. The regulatory TCLP method and two modified TCLP methods (in which devices were disassembled and leached in or near entirety) were utilized. Lead was the only element found to leach at concentrations greater than its TC limit (5 mg/L). Thirteen different types of electronic devices were tested using either the standard TCLP or modified versions. Every device type leached lead above 5 mg/L in at least one test and most devices leached lead above the TC limit in a majority of cases. Smaller devices that contained larger amounts of plastic and smaller amounts of ferrous metal (e.g., cellular phones, remote controls) tended to leach lead above the TC limit at a greater frequency than devices with more ferrous metal (e.g., computer CPUs, printers). PMID:16683614

  15. Susceptor heating device for electron beam brazing

    DOEpatents

    Antieau, Susan M.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A brazing device and method are provided which locally apply a controlled amount of heat to a selected area, within a vacuum. The device brazes two components together with a brazing metal. A susceptor plate is placed in thermal contact with one of the components. A serrated pedestal supports the susceptor plate. When the pedestal and susceptor plate are in place, an electron gun irradiates an electron beam at the susceptor plate such that the susceptor plate is sufficiently heated to transfer heat through the one component and melt the brazing metal.

  16. Stretchable polymer-based electronic device

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Wilson, Thomas S.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Benett, William J.; Tovar, Armando R.

    2008-02-26

    A stretchable electronic circuit or electronic device and a polymer-based process to produce a circuit or electronic device containing a stretchable conducting circuit. The stretchable electronic apparatus has a central longitudinal axis and the apparatus is stretchable in a longitudinal direction generally aligned with the central longitudinal axis. The apparatus comprises a stretchable polymer body and at least one circuit line operatively connected to the stretchable polymer body. The circuit line extends in the longitudinal direction and has a longitudinal component that extends in the longitudinal direction and has an offset component that is at an angle to the longitudinal direction. The longitudinal component and the offset component allow the apparatus to stretch in the longitudinal direction while maintaining the integrity of the circuit line.

  17. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-03-19

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  18. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  19. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2012-10-23

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  20. Organic electronic devices via interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qianfei

    This dissertation focuses on interface engineering and its influence on organic electronic devices. A comprehensive review of interface studies in organic electronic devices is presented in Chapter 1. By interface engineering at the cathode contact, an ultra-high efficiency green polymer light emitting diode is demonstrated in Chapter 2. The interface modification turns out to be solution processable by using calcium acetylacetonate, donated by Ca(acac)2. The device structure is Induim Tin Oxide (ITO)/3,4-polyethylenedioxythiophene-polystyrene-sulfonate (PEDOT)/Green polyfluorene/Ca(acac) 2/Al. Based on this structure, we obtained device efficiencies as high as 28 cd/A at 2650 cd/m2, which is about a 3 times improvement over previous devices. The mechanism of this nano-layer has been studied by I-L-V measurements, photovoltaic measurements, XPS/UPS studies, impedance measurements as well as transient EL studies. The interfacial layer plays a crucial role for the efficiency improvement. It is believed to work as a hole blocking layer as well as an electron injection layer. Meanwhile, a systematic study on ITO electrodes is also carried out in Chapter 4. By engineering the interface at ITO electrode, the device lifetime has been improved. In Chapter 5, very bright white emission PLEDs are fabricated based on blue polyfluorene (PF) doped with 1 wt% 6, 8, 15, 17-tetraphyenyl-1.18, 4.5, 9.10, 13.14-tetrabenzoheptacene (TBH). The maximum luminance exceeds 20,000 cd/m2. The maximum luminance efficiency is 3.55 cd/A at 4228 cd/m2 while the maximum power efficiency is 1.6 lm/W at 310 cd/m2. The white color is achieved by an incomplete energy transfer from blue PF to TBH. The devices show super stable CIE coordinates as a function of current density. The interface engineering is also applied to memory devices. In Chapter 6, a novel nonvolatile memory device is fabricated by inserting a buffer layer at the anode contact. Devices with the structure of Cu

  1. Disabling CNT Electronic Devices by Use of Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petkov, Mihail

    2008-01-01

    Bombardment with tightly focused electron beams has been suggested as a means of electrically disabling selected individual carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) in electronic devices. Evidence in support of the suggestion was obtained in an experiment in which a CNT field-effect transistor was disabled (see figure) by focusing a 1-keV electron beam on a CNT that served as the active channel of a field-effect transistor (FET). Such bombardment could be useful in the manufacture of nonvolatile-memory circuits containing CNT FETs. Ultimately, in order to obtain the best electronic performances in CNT FETs and other electronic devices, it will be necessary to fabricate the devices such that each one contains only a single CNT as an active element. At present, this is difficult because there is no way to grow a single CNT at a specific location and with a specific orientation. Instead, the common practice is to build CNTs into electronic devices by relying on spatial distribution to bridge contacts. This practice results in some devices containing no CNTs and some devices containing more than one CNT. Thus, CNT FETs have statistically distributed electronic characteristics (including switching voltages, gains, and mixtures of metallic and semiconducting CNTs). According to the suggestion, by using a 1-keV electron beam (e.g., a beam from a scanning electron microscope), a particular nanotube could be rendered electrically dysfunctional. This procedure could be repeated as many times as necessary on different CNTs in a device until all of the excess CNTs in the device had been disabled, leaving only one CNT as an active element (e.g., as FET channel). The physical mechanism through which a CNT becomes electrically disabled is not yet understood. On one hand, data in the literature show that electron kinetic energy >86 keV is needed to cause displacement damage in a CNT. On the other hand, inasmuch as a 1-keV beam focused on a small spot (typically a few tens of nanometers wide

  2. Plasmonically enhanced hot electron based photovoltaic device.

    PubMed

    Atar, Fatih B; Battal, Enes; Aygun, Levent E; Daglar, Bihter; Bayindir, Mehmet; Okyay, Ali K

    2013-03-25

    Hot electron photovoltaics is emerging as a candidate for low cost and ultra thin solar cells. Plasmonic means can be utilized to significantly boost device efficiency. We separately form the tunneling metal-insulator-metal (MIM) junction for electron collection and the plasmon exciting MIM structure on top of each other, which provides high flexibility in plasmonic design and tunneling MIM design separately. We demonstrate close to one order of magnitude enhancement in the short circuit current at the resonance wavelengths. PMID:23546103

  3. MOF-based electronic and opto-electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Stavila, V; Talin, A A; Allendorf, M D

    2014-08-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of hybrid materials with unique optical and electronic properties arising from rational self-assembly of the organic linkers and metal ions/clusters, yielding myriads of possible structural motifs. The combination of order and chemical tunability, coupled with good environmental stability of MOFs, are prompting many research groups to explore the possibility of incorporating these materials as active components in devices such as solar cells, photodetectors, radiation detectors, and chemical sensors. Although this field is only in its incipiency, many new fundamental insights relevant to integrating MOFs with such devices have already been gained. In this review, we focus our attention on the basic requirements and structural elements needed to fabricate MOF-based devices and summarize the current state of MOF research in the area of electronic, opto-electronic and sensor devices. We summarize various approaches to designing active MOFs, creation of hybrid material systems combining MOFs with other materials, and assembly and integration of MOFs with device hardware. Critical directions of future research are identified, with emphasis on achieving the desired MOF functionality in a device and establishing the structure-property relationships to identify and rationalize the factors that impact device performance. PMID:24802763

  4. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  5. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  6. Dispersion of heavy ion deposited energy in nanometric electronic devices: Experimental measurements and simulation possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raine, M.; Gaillardin, M.; Paillet, P.; Duhamel, O.; Martinez, M.; Bernard, H.

    2015-12-01

    The dispersion of heavy ion deposited energy is explored in nanometric electronic devices. Experimental data are reported, in a large thin SOI diode and in a SOI FinFET device, showing larger distributions of collected charge in the nanometric volume device. Geant4 simulations are then presented, using two different modeling approaches. Both of them seem suitable to evaluate the dispersion of deposited energy induced by heavy ion beams in advanced electronic devices with nanometric dimensions.

  7. 49 CFR 220.303 - General use of electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General use of electronic devices. 220.303 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.303 General use of electronic devices. A railroad operating employee shall not use an electronic device if that use...

  8. 49 CFR 220.305 - Use of personal electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of personal electronic devices. 220.305... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.305 Use of personal electronic devices. A railroad operating employee must have each personal electronic device turned off...

  9. 49 CFR 220.303 - General use of electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General use of electronic devices. 220.303 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.303 General use of electronic devices. A railroad operating employee shall not use an electronic device if that use...

  10. 49 CFR 220.305 - Use of personal electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of personal electronic devices. 220.305... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.305 Use of personal electronic devices. A railroad operating employee must have each personal electronic device turned off...

  11. 49 CFR 220.305 - Use of personal electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of personal electronic devices. 220.305... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.305 Use of personal electronic devices. A railroad operating employee must have each personal electronic device turned off...

  12. 49 CFR 220.303 - General use of electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General use of electronic devices. 220.303 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.303 General use of electronic devices. A railroad operating employee shall not use an electronic device if that use...

  13. 49 CFR 220.303 - General use of electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General use of electronic devices. 220.303 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.303 General use of electronic devices. A railroad operating employee shall not use an electronic device if that use...

  14. 49 CFR 220.305 - Use of personal electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of personal electronic devices. 220.305... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.305 Use of personal electronic devices. A railroad operating employee must have each personal electronic device turned off...

  15. General Electronics Technician: Semiconductor Devices and Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilley, Robert

    These instructional materials include a teacher's guide designed to assist instructors in organizing and presenting an introductory course in general electronics focusing on semiconductor devices and circuits and a student guide. The materials are based on the curriculum-alignment concept of first stating the objectives, developing instructional…

  16. Electronics will transform drug delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Paolo

    2004-03-01

    The drug delivery device sector will be transformed by electronically controlled alternatives that will maximise user safety and medical effectiveness and open the way to the introduction of high-power, next-generation drugs. Current business partnerships will need to change to allow this to happen. PMID:15154333

  17. New materials for electronic and solar devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-21

    The partial contents are: New materials for electronic and solar devices; Applications of the photovoltaic systems; Technological steps in the solar cell production; Examples of the cell processing technology; Economic aspects of the PV panels production; Application of PV systems; Leading PV research centers and companies.

  18. Electronic Devices and Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in electronic devices and systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  19. Animation Based Learning of Electronic Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gero, Aharon; Zoabi, Wishah; Sabag, Nissim

    2014-01-01

    Two-year college teachers face great difficulty when they teach the principle of operation of the bipolar junction transistor--a subject which forms the basis for electronics studies. The difficulty arises from both the complexity of the device and by the lack of adequate scientific background among the students. We, therefore, developed a unique…

  20. The Miniguide: A New Electronic Travel Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jeremy; Black, John

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the Miniguide, a new electronic travel device that assists people in moving about in a range of environments. The Miniguide is held in the palm and is used to scan left to right when walking. It provides vibratory feedback to the hand when it detects an obstacle. (Contains 5 references.) (CR)

  1. Electron transfer kinetics in molecular photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimer, Todd Anthony

    1997-11-01

    Solar energy devices based on the sensitization of nanostructured titanium dioxide semiconductors have proven to be efficient converters of photons into electricity. However, many questions remain concerning the factors which govern conversion efficiency, stability, and photovoltage in these molecular level devices. The energetics and kinetics of electron transfer at the semiconductor/sensitizer interface play a critical role in solar cell photoelectrochemical properties. Through electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques the kinetics of the interfacial electron transfer processes have been measured. The kinetics are in general complex, and various models based on distributions of first order reaction rates or higher order reactions have been used to describe the experimental observations. The unique molecular nature of these devices allows the energy levels involved in electron transfer to be tuned through synthetic modification of the sensitizer. Systematic studies of chemically related sensitizers allow conclusions to be drawn about the factors which govern interfacial electron transfer processes and therefore determine the photoelectrochemical properties of the device. Hopefully, this thesis presents a foundation of knowledge which can successfully direct future development of sensitizers and semiconductors for efficient conversion of light to electricity.

  2. Understanding degradation phenomena in organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. K., Jagdish; Pavankumar, G.; Ramamurthy, Praveen C.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Hegde, Gopalkrishna

    2015-03-01

    This study addresses a unique degradation mechanism in organic electronic devices occurring due to combined effects of electric field and temperature. A simple polymer diode structure consisting of a semiconducting polymer sandwiched between two electrodes (ITO and Al) is considered for degradation studies. It is observed that voltages beyond a certain value lead to fracture of polymer and aluminium films. As characterized, these defects show that the degradation nucleates in the form of a chain-like pattern consisting of alternating polymer fracture sites (hinges) and aluminium rupture sites (links). A mechanism is hypothesized based on experimental observations to explain the phenomenon. This is further validated by an analytical model for stress at degradation sites due to electric field and temperature. The model is used to develop a failure criteria based on device geometry, operating voltage and temperature. Experiments and modelling predict that this mechanism might be unique to soft thin film electronic devices.

  3. Synaptic devices based on purely electronic memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ruobing; Li, Jun; Zhuge, Fei; Zhu, Liqiang; Liang, Lingyan; Zhang, Hongliang; Gao, Junhua; Cao, Hongtao; Fu, Bing; Li, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Memristive devices have been widely employed to emulate biological synaptic behavior. In these cases, the memristive switching generally originates from electrical field induced ion migration or Joule heating induced phase change. In this letter, the Ti/ZnO/Pt structure was found to show memristive switching ascribed to a carrier trapping/detrapping of the trap sites (e.g., oxygen vacancies or zinc interstitials) in ZnO. The carrier trapping/detrapping level can be controllably adjusted by regulating the current compliance level or voltage amplitude. Multi-level conductance states can, therefore, be realized in such memristive device. The spike-timing-dependent plasticity, an important Hebbian learning rule, has been implemented in this type of synaptic device. Compared with filamentary-type memristive devices, purely electronic memristors have potential to reduce their energy consumption and work more stably and reliably, since no structural distortion occurs.

  4. High performance flexible electronics for biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Giovanni A; Munzenrieder, Niko; Zysset, Christoph; Kinkeldei, Thomas; Petti, Luisa; Troster, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Plastic electronics is soft, deformable and lightweight and it is suitable for the realization of devices which can form an intimate interface with the body, be implanted or integrated into textile for wearable and biomedical applications. Here, we present flexible electronics based on amorphous oxide semiconductors (a-IGZO) whose performance can achieve MHz frequency even when bent around hair. We developed an assembly technique to integrate complex electronic functionalities into textile while preserving the softness of the garment. All this and further developments can open up new opportunities in health monitoring, biotechnology and telemedicine. PMID:25570912

  5. Theory of Electron Imaging in Small Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, Eric J.

    2015-05-21

    The research in this program involved theoretical investigations of the transport of charge in graphene and small heterostructure devices. There is an important trend toward imaging electronic systems in real space, with the goal of understanding the specifics of individual samples rather than settling for ensemble and statistical descriptions. For example one of our goals has been the understanding of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) imaging of systems in which the motion of the carriers is restricted to two degrees of freedom, such as in grapheme and the two dimensional electron (and hole) gas (2DEGs and 2DHGs) in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, or when the motion is restricted to one degree of freedom as in nanowires. SPM imaging uses the tip of a movable charged probe to alter the electrons locally, depleting or alternatively increasing the amount of charges in the electron gas just below the tip results in a change to the flow pattern of the charge. The focus of this research was on understanding how the tunable tip affects functional aspects of the device that can be used to understand electronic and transport properties. For instance, scanning over the device while measuring the conductance results in conductance maps, an imaging of the charge transport. This imaging is often semi-direct and requires theory and interpretation to extract all that can be deduced about the underlying physical quantities.

  6. Stretchable inorganic nanomembrane electronics for healthcare devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Son, Donghee; Kim, Jaemin

    2015-05-01

    Flexible or stretchable electronic devices for healthcare technologies have attracted much attention in terms of usefulness to assist doctors in their operating rooms and to monitor patients' physical conditions for a long period of time. Each device to monitor the patients' physiological signals real-time, such as strain, pressure, temperature, and humidity, etc. has been reported recently. However, their limitations are found in acquisition of various physiological signals simultaneously because all the functions are not assembled in one skin-like electronic system. Here, we describe a skin-like, multi-functional healthcare system, which includes single crystalline silicon nanomembrane based sensors, nanoparticle-integrated non-volatile memory modules, electro-resistive thermal actuators, and drug delivery. Smart prosthetics coupled with therapeutic electronic system would provide new approaches to personalized healthcare.

  7. Corrosion of electronic materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Comizzoli, R B; Frankenthal, R P; Milner, P C; Sinclair, J D

    1986-10-17

    Electronic materials and devices corrode in the same ways as automobiles, bridges, and pipelines, but their typically small dimensions make them orders of magnitude more susceptible to corrosion failure. As elsewhere, the corrosion involves interactions with the environment. Under control, these interactions can be put to use, as in the formation of protective and functional oxide films for superconducting devices. Otherwise, they cause damage, as in the electrolytic dissolution of conductors, even gold, in the presence of humidity and ionic contamination from atmospheric particles and gases. Preventing corrosion entails identifying the damaging interactions and excluding species that allow them to occur. PMID:17834532

  8. Advanced devices and systems for radiation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.; Wehe, D.K.; He, Z.; Barrett, C.; Miyamoto, J.

    1996-06-01

    The authors` most recent work continues their long-standing efforts to develop semiconductor detectors based on the collection of only a single type of charge carrier. Their best results are an extension of the principle of coplanar electrodes first described by Paul Luke of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 18 months ago. This technique, described in past progress reports, has the effect of deriving an output signal from detectors that depends only on the motion of carriers close to one surface. Since nearly all of these carriers are of one type (electrons) that are attracted to that electrode, the net effect is to nearly eliminate the influence of hole motion on the properties of the output signal. The result is that the much better mobility of electrons in compound semiconductors materials such as CZT can now be exploited without the concurrent penalty of poor hole collection. They have also developed new techniques in conjunction with the coplanar electrode principle that extends the technique into a new dimension. By proper processing of signals from the opposite electrode (the cathode) from the coplanar surface, they are able to derive a signal that is a good indication of the depth of interaction at which the charge carriers were initially formed. They have been the first group to demonstrate this technique, and examples of separate pulse height spectra recorded at a variety of different depths of interaction are shown in several of the figures that follow. Obtaining depth information is one step in the direction of obtaining volumetric point-of-interaction information from the detector. If one could known the coordinates of each specific interaction, then corrections could be applied to account for the inhomogeneities that currently plague many room-temperature devices.

  9. 75 FR 45696 - Pipeline Safety: Personal Electronic Device Related Distractions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Electronic Devices, 75 FR 9754, May 18, 2010; Limiting the Use of Wireless Communication Devices, 75 FR 16391... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Personal Electronic Device Related... personal electronic devices (PEDs) by individuals performing operations and maintenance activities on...

  10. Nanocoaxes for Optical and Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rizal, Binod; Merlo, Juan M.; Burns, Michael J.; Chiles, Thomas C.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of micro/nanoelectronics technology, including the shrinking of devices and integrated circuit components, has included the miniaturization of linear and coaxial structures to micro/nanoscale dimensions. This reduction in the size of coaxial structures may offer advantages to existing technologies and benefit the exploration and development of new technologies. The reduction in the size of coaxial structures has been realized with various permutations between metals, semiconductors and dielectrics for the core, shield, and annulus. This review will focus on fabrication schemes of arrays of metal – nonmetal – metal nanocoax structures using non-template and template methods, followed by possible applications. The performance and scientific advantages associated with nanocoax-based optical devices including waveguides, negative refractive index materials, light emitting diodes, and photovoltaics are presented. In addition, benefits and challenges that accrue from the application of novel nanocoax structures in energy storage, electronic and sensing devices are summarized. PMID:25279400

  11. Electronic voltage and current transformers testing device.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Chen, Ruimin; Xiao, Yong; Sun, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    A method for testing electronic instrument transformers is described, including electronic voltage and current transformers (EVTs, ECTs) with both analog and digital outputs. A testing device prototype is developed. It is based on digital signal processing of the signals that are measured at the secondary outputs of the tested transformer and the reference transformer when the same excitation signal is fed to their primaries. The test that estimates the performance of the prototype has been carried out at the National Centre for High Voltage Measurement and the prototype is approved for testing transformers with precision class up to 0.2 at the industrial frequency (50 Hz or 60 Hz). The device is suitable for on-site testing due to its high accuracy, simple structure and low-cost hardware. PMID:22368510

  12. Micro- and Nanostructured Materials for Active Devices and Molecular Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Mast, Eric S.; Hall, Michael G.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional single layer barrier coatings are not adequate in preventing degradation of the performance of organic molecular electronic and other active devices. Most advanced devices used in display technology now consist of micro and nanostructured small molecule, polymer and inorganic coatings with thin high reactive group 1A metals. This includes organic electronics such as organic light emitting devices (OLED). The lifetimes of these devices rapidly degrades when they are exposed to atmospheric oxygen and water vapor. Thin film photovoltaics and batteries are also susceptible to degradation by moisture and oxygen. Using in-line coating techniques we apply a composite nanostructured inorganic/polymer thin film barrier that restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels using conventional permeation test equipment. We describe permeation mechanisms for this encapsulation coating and flat panel display and other device applications. Permeation through the multilayer barrier coating is defect and pore limited and can be described by Knudsen diffusion involving a long and tortuous path. Device lifetime is also enhanced by the long lag times required to reach the steady state flux regime. Permeation rates in the range of 10-6 cc,g/m2/d have been achieved and OLED device lifetimes. The structure is robust, yet flexible. The resulting device performance and lifetimes will also be described. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide yielding an engineered nanostructured device for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. This enables, for the first time, thin film encapsulation of emissive organic displays.

  13. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infection in Patients at Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tarakji, Khaldoun G; Ellis, Christopher R; Defaye, Pascal; Kennergren, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection following implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing at a faster rate than that of device implantation. Patients with a CIED infection usually require hospitalisation and complete device and lead removal. A significant proportion die from their infection. Transvenous lead extraction (TLE) is associated with rare but serious complications including major vascular injury or cardiac perforation. Operator experience and advances in lead extraction methods, including laser technology and rotational sheaths, have resulted in procedures having a low risk of complication and mortality. Strategies for preventing CIED infections include intravenous antibiotics and aseptic surgical techniques. An additional method to reduce CIED infection may be the use of antibacterial TYRX™ envelope. Data from non-randomised cohort studies have indicated that antibacterial envelope use can reduce the incidence of CIED infection by more than 80 % in high-risk patients and a randomised clinical trial is ongoing. PMID:27403296

  14. Diversionary device history and revolutionary advancements.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles

    2005-04-01

    Diversionary devices also known as flash bangs or stun grenades were first employed about three decades ago. These devices produce a loud bang accompanied by a brilliant flash of light and are employed to temporarily distract or disorient an adversary by overwhelming their visual and auditory senses in order to gain a tactical advantage. Early devices that where employed had numerous shortcomings. Over time, many of these deficiencies were identified and corrected. This evolutionary process led to today's modern diversionary devices. These present-day conventional diversionary devices have undergone evolutionary changes but operate in the same manner as their predecessors. In order to produce the loud bang and brilliant flash of light, a flash powder mixture, usually a combination of potassium perchlorate and aluminum powder is ignited to produce an explosion. In essence these diversionary devices are small pyrotechnic bombs that produce a high point-source pressure in order to achieve the desired far-field effect. This high point-source pressure can make these devices a hazard to the operator, adversaries and hostages even though they are intended for 'less than lethal' roles. A revolutionary diversionary device has been developed that eliminates this high point-source pressure problem and eliminates the need for the hazardous pyrotechnic flash powder composition. This new diversionary device employs a fuel charge that is expelled and ignited in the atmosphere. This process is similar to a fuel air or thermobaric explosion, except that it is a deflagration, not a detonation, thereby reducing the overpressure hazard. This technology reduces the hazard associated with diversionary devices to all involved with their manufacture, transport and use. An overview of the history of diversionary device development and developments at Sandia National Laboratories will be presented.

  15. Advanced electronic displays and their potential in future transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that electronic displays represent one of the keys to continued integration and improvement of the effectiveness of avionic systems in future transport aircraft. An employment of modern electronic display media and generation has become vital in connection with the increases in modes and functions of modern aircraft. Requirements for electronic systems of future transports are examined, and a description is provided of the tools which are available for cockpit integration, taking into account trends in information processing and presentation, trends in integrated display devices, and trends concerning input/output devices. Developments related to display media, display generation, and I/O devices are considered, giving attention to a comparison of CRT and flat-panel display technology, advanced HUD technology and multifunction controls. Integrated display formats are discussed along with integrated systems and cockpit configurations.

  16. ARED (Advanced-Resistive Exercise Device) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes ARED which is a new hardware exercise device for use on the International Space Station. Astronaut physiological adaptations, muscle parameters, and cardiovascular parameters are also reviewed.

  17. Method for integrating microelectromechanical devices with electronic circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Sniegowski, J.J.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for integrating one or more microelectromechanical (MEM) devices with electronic circuitry. The method comprises the steps of forming each MEM device within a cavity below a device surface of the substrate; encapsulating the MEM device prior to forming electronic circuitry on the substrate; and releasing the MEM device for operation after fabrication of the electronic circuitry. Planarization of the encapsulated MEM device prior to formation of the electronic circuitry allows the use of standard processing steps for fabrication of the electronic circuitry. 13 figs.

  18. Method for integrating microelectromechanical devices with electronic circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Montague, Stephen; Smith, James H.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; McWhorter, Paul J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for integrating one or more microelectromechanical (MEM) devices with electronic circuitry. The method comprises the steps of forming each MEM device within a cavity below a device surface of the substrate; encapsulating the MEM device prior to forming electronic circuitry on the substrate; and releasing the MEM device for operation after fabrication of the electronic circuitry. Planarization of the encapsulated MEM device prior to formation of the electronic circuitry allows the use of standard processing steps for fabrication of the electronic circuitry.

  19. An advanced space rotary power transfer device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, P. E.

    A new electrical signal and rotary power transfer device has recently evolved from ball-bearing and electrical-transfer technologies. This hybrid device, known as a roll ring, has been tested extensively since the late 1970s and has demonstrated important operational advantages in a wide variety of signal and power transfer configurations. A high power version has been developed and evaluated. This paper describes this latter roll ring configuration. The paper also summarizes test results.

  20. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research.

    PubMed

    Muthaiyan Shanmugam, Muniesh; Subhra Santra, Tuhin

    2016-01-01

    The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology. PMID:27490525

  1. Advanced cryocooler electronics for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, D.; Danial, A.; Davis, T.; Godden, J.; Jackson, M.; McCuskey, J.; Valenzuela, P.

    2004-06-01

    Space pulse-tube cryocoolers require electronics to control the cooling temperature and self-induced vibration. Other functions include engineering diagnostics, telemetry and safety protection of the unit against extreme environments and operational anomalies. The electronics must survive the harsh conditions of launch and orbit, and in some cases severe radiation environments for periods exceeding 10 years. A number of our current generation high reliability radiation hardened electronics units have been launched and others are in various stages of assembly or integration on a number of space flight programs. This paper describes the design features and performance of our next generation flight electronics designed for the STSS payloads. The electronics provides temperature control with better than +/-50 mK short-term stability. Self-induced vibration is controlled to low levels on all harmonics up to the 16th. A unique active power filter limits peak-to-peak reflected ripple current on the primary power bus to less than 3% of the average DC current. The 3 kg unit is capable of delivering 180 W continuous to NGST's high-efficiency cryocooler (HEC).

  2. Electronic transport through nanotube contacts and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buia, Calin Ioan

    2003-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes are materials with amazing mechanical and electronic properties, which makes them suitable for building nanoscale electronic devices and circuits. However, their electronic transport properties are not yet fully understood. In this study we aim to investigate the electronic transport through nanotube/nanotube contacts. Our calculations are based on Land auer-Buttiker formalism. The transmission function is computed using a Green's functions technique and a tight-binding hamiltonian. Two types of geometries are considered: parallel contact and concentric contact. Additionally we analyze the behavior of a nanotube Y-junction. We find that out of all the properties of individual nanotubes, chirality and symmetry have the most important effect on the electronic transport. As a rule, armchair/armchair and metallic zigzag/zigzag contacts show the best conduction. This is explained by the perfect in-registry atomic arrangement they can provide. The contact length and the local arrangement of the atoms in the contact area are factors that further influence the conductance. We found that in optimal conditions (i.e. in-registry atomic arrangement), a contact length of ˜10 nm is enough to achieve the same conductance as a perfect nanotube. Beyond that the conductance is modulated by quantum interference effects, due to the formation of a resonant cavity in the contact area. For concentric contacts, the states between which the electron hops when passing from one tube to the other must have compatible rotational symmetries, otherwise, the corresponding conduction channel will be suppressed. This results can be used to predict the electronic transport through various setups, including nanotube bundles and multiwall nanotubes.

  3. Aircrew Training Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features (Phase II-Air Training Command, Military Airlift Command, and Strategic Air Command [and] Phase III-Electronic Warfare Trainers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzella, Donald J.; Hubbard, David C.

    This document consists of an interim report and a final report which describe the second and third phases of a project designed to determine the utility and utilization of sophisticated hardware and software capabilities known as advanced instructional features (AIFs). Used with an aircrew training device (ATD), AIFs permit a simulator instructor…

  4. 46 CFR 130.320 - Electronic position-fixing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic position-fixing device. 130.320 Section 130... CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.320 Electronic position-fixing device. Each vessel must be equipped with an electronic position-fixing device satisfactory...

  5. 14 CFR 125.204 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 125.204... Equipment Requirements § 125.204 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... operation of, any portable electronic device on any U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this...

  6. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for...

  7. 46 CFR 130.320 - Electronic position-fixing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic position-fixing device. 130.320 Section 130... CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.320 Electronic position-fixing device. Each vessel must be equipped with an electronic position-fixing device satisfactory...

  8. 46 CFR 130.320 - Electronic position-fixing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic position-fixing device. 130.320 Section 130... CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.320 Electronic position-fixing device. Each vessel must be equipped with an electronic position-fixing device satisfactory...

  9. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for...

  10. 14 CFR 125.204 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 125.204... Equipment Requirements § 125.204 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... operation of, any portable electronic device on any U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this...

  11. 14 CFR 135.144 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 135.144... Equipment § 135.144 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no... portable electronic device on any of the following U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this...

  12. 14 CFR 121.306 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 121.306... Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate... electronic device on any U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this part. (b) Paragraph (a) of...

  13. 14 CFR 121.306 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 121.306... Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate... electronic device on any U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this part. (b) Paragraph (a) of...

  14. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for...

  15. 14 CFR 135.144 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 135.144... Equipment § 135.144 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no... portable electronic device on any of the following U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this...

  16. 46 CFR 121.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 121.410 Section 121... AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment § 121.410 Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device,...

  17. 14 CFR 121.306 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 121.306... Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate... electronic device on any U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this part. (b) Paragraph (a) of...

  18. 14 CFR 125.204 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 125.204... Equipment Requirements § 125.204 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... operation of, any portable electronic device on any U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this...

  19. 14 CFR 125.204 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 125.204... Equipment Requirements § 125.204 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... operation of, any portable electronic device on any U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this...

  20. 14 CFR 135.144 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 135.144... Equipment § 135.144 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no... portable electronic device on any of the following U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this...

  1. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for...

  2. 14 CFR 121.306 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 121.306... Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate... electronic device on any U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this part. (b) Paragraph (a) of...

  3. 14 CFR 135.144 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 135.144... Equipment § 135.144 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no... portable electronic device on any of the following U.S.-registered civil aircraft operating under this...

  4. 46 CFR 121.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 121.410 Section 121... AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment § 121.410 Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device,...

  5. 46 CFR 130.320 - Electronic position-fixing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic position-fixing device. 130.320 Section 130... CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.320 Electronic position-fixing device. Each vessel must be equipped with an electronic position-fixing device satisfactory...

  6. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for...

  7. 46 CFR 130.320 - Electronic position-fixing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic position-fixing device. 130.320 Section 130... CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.320 Electronic position-fixing device. Each vessel must be equipped with an electronic position-fixing device satisfactory...

  8. 49 CFR 220.305 - Use of personal electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of personal electronic devices. 220.305 Section 220.305 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.305 Use of personal electronic devices. A...

  9. 49 CFR 220.303 - General use of electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General use of electronic devices. 220.303 Section 220.303 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.303 General use of electronic devices. A...

  10. Advanced Electronics. Curriculum Development. Bulletin 1778.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eppler, Thomas

    This document is a curriculum guide for a 180-hour course in advanced electronics for 11th and 12th grades that has four instructional units. The instructional units are orientation, discrete components, integrated circuits, and electronic systems. The document includes a course flow chart; a two-page section that describes the course, lists…

  11. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  12. Programmed electronic advance for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Dogadko, P.

    1987-03-03

    An ignition advance control is described for an internal combustion engine including a crankshaft, a throttle control, and at least one cylinder, the ignition advance control comprising a spark ignition circuit associated with the cylinder and including trigger means operative to cause an ignition spark, means for generating a control pulse associated with the cylinder, latch means for enabling the trigger means in response to generation of the control pulse, means for generating a constant plurality of sequentially occurring electrical reference pulses during each revolution of the crankshaft, means for counting the reference pulses developed during each revolution of the crankshaft, means for firing the enabled trigger means in response to the counting means counting a predetermined number of the reference pulses to cause the ignition spark at a predetermined ignition point in each revolution of the crankshaft, means for sensing the position of the throttle control, and means responsive to the throttle sensing means for varying the predetermined number of reference pulses solely in accordance with the position of the throttle control to vary the predetermined ignition point as appropriate for the position of the throttle control.

  13. Oxide bipolar electronics: materials, devices and circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, Marius; Klüpfel, Fabian; Karsthof, Robert; Schlupp, Peter; Schein, Friedrich-Leonhard; Splith, Daniel; Yang, Chang; Bitter, Sofie; von Wenckstern, Holger

    2016-06-01

    We present the history of, and the latest progress in, the field of bipolar oxide thin film devices. As such we consider primarily pn-junctions in which at least one of the materials is a metal oxide semiconductor. A wide range of n-type and p-type oxides has been explored for the formation of such bipolar diodes. Since most oxide semiconductors are unipolar, challenges and opportunities exist with regard to the formation of heterojunction diodes and band lineups. Recently, various approaches have led to devices with high rectification, namely p-type ZnCo2O4 and NiO on n-type ZnO and amorphous zinc-tin-oxide. Subsequent bipolar devices and applications such as photodetectors, solar cells, junction field-effect transistors and integrated circuits like inverters and ring oscillators are discussed. The tremendous progress shows that bipolar oxide electronics has evolved from the exploration of various materials and heterostructures to the demonstration of functioning integrated circuits. Therefore a viable, facile and high performance technology is ready for further exploitation and performance optimization.

  14. Advanced materials and concepts for energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Shiang Jen

    Over the last decade, technological progress and advances in the miniaturization of electronic devices have increased demands for light-weight, high-efficiency, and carbon-free energy storage devices. These energy storage devices are expected to play important roles in automobiles, the military, power plants, and consumer electronics. Two main types of electrical energy storage systems studied in this research are Li ion batteries and supercapacitors. Several promising solid state electrolytes and supercapacitor electrode materials are investigated in this research. The first section of this dissertation is focused on the novel results on pulsed laser annealing of Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO). LLZO powders with a tetragonal structure were prepared by a sol-gel technique, then a pulsed laser annealing process was employed to convert the tetragonal powders to cubic LLZO without any loss of lithium. The second section of the dissertation reports on how Li5La 3Nb2O12 (LLNO) was successfully synthesized via a novel molten salt synthesis (MSS) method at the relatively low temperature of 900°C. The low sintering temperature prevented the loss of lithium that commonly occurs during synthesis using conventional solid state or wet chemical reactions. The second type of energy storage device studied is supercapacitors. Currently, research on supercapacitors is focused on increasing their energy densities and lowering their overall production costs by finding suitable electrode materials. The third section of this dissertation details how carbonized woods electrodes were used as supercapacitor electrode materials. A high energy density of 45.6 Wh/kg and a high power density of 2000 W/kg were obtained from the supercapacitor made from carbonized wood electrodes. The high performance of the supercapacitor was discovered to originate from the hierarchical porous structures of the carbonized wood. Finally, the fourth section of this dissertation is on the electrochemical effects of

  15. Individual carbon nanotubes for quantum electronic and quantum photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Nan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials since their unique one dimensional geometry leads to remarkable physical properties such as ballistic transport, long mean free path, large direct band gaps, high mechanical tensile strength and strong exciton binding energies, which make them attractive candidates for applications in high-performance nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. CNT-based field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) are considered to be ideally suited for future nanoelectronics. Single CNT-FETs made by depositing metal electrodes on top of individual CNTs with E-beam lithography have achieved great performance but are limited for massive large area integrated circuit fabrication. Therefore, this thesis demonstrates characteristics of CNT-FETs made by registered in-plane growth utilizing tailored nanoscale catalyst patterns and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), resulting in CNT arrays directly bridging source and drain. The demonstrated access to individual CNTs with pronounced semiconducting behavior opens also the possibility to form more advanced nanoelectronic structures such as CNT quantum dots. CNT-based single electron transistors (CNT-SETS) are promising for quantum electronic devices operating with ultra-low power consumption and allow fundamental studies of electron transport. In addition to existing CNT-SETS based on individual CNTs, we have fabricated the first CNT-SETS based on in-plane grown CNTs using the CVD technique. The demonstrated utilization of registered in-plane growth opens possibilities to create novel SET device geometries which are more complex, i.e. laterally ordered and scalable, as required for advanced quantum electronic devices. Blinking and spectral diffusion are hallmarks of nanoscale light emitters and a challenge for creating stable fluorescent biomarkers or efficient nonclassical light sources. The studies of blinking of CNTs are still in the explorative stage. In this thesis, I show the first experimental

  16. Instrumentation for Molecular Electronics Device Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibel, Ashley Ann

    This dissertation describes work on three projects concerning the design and implementation of instrumentation used to study potential organic electronic devices. The first section describes the conducting atomic force microscope (CAFM) in the study of the mechanical and electronic interactions between DNA bases and nucleosides. Previous STM data suggested that an STM tip could recognize single base pairs through an electronic interaction after a functionalized tip made contact with a self assembled monolayer then was retracted. The conducting AFM was employed in order to understand the mechanical interactions of such a system and how they were affecting electrical responses. The results from the conducting AFM showed that the scanning probe system was measuring multiple base-pair interactions, and thus did not have single base resolution. Further, results showed that the conductance between a single base-nucleoside pair is below the detection limit of a potential commercial sequencing device. The second section describes the modifications of a scanning probe microscope in order to study the conductance of single organic molecules under illumination. Modifications to the scanning probe microscope are described as are the control and data analysis software for an experiment testing the single molecule conductance of an organic molecule under illumination. This instrument was then tested using a novel charge-separation molecule, which is being considered for its potential photovoltaic properties. The experiments showed that the instrumentation is capable of detecting differences in conductance upon laser illumination of the molecule on a transparent conductive surface. The third section describes measurements using the illuminated CAFM, as well as the design and construction of an illuminated mercury drop electrode apparatus. Both instruments were tested by attempting to observe photovoltaic behavior in a novel self-organized film of the charge-separation molecules

  17. Electronic load for testing power generating devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E. B.; Stepfer, G.

    1968-01-01

    Instrument tests various electric power generating devices by connecting the devices to the input of the load and comparing their outputs with a reference voltage. The load automatically adjusts until voltage output of the power generating device matches the reference.

  18. Advanced colour processing for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillich, Eugen; Dörksen, Helene; Lohweg, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are going to play an important role in professionally image processing tasks. However, mobile systems were not designed for such applications, especially in terms of image processing requirements like stability and robustness. One major drawback is the automatic white balance, which comes with the devices. It is necessary for many applications, but of no use when applied to shiny surfaces. Such an issue appears when image acquisition takes place in differently coloured illuminations caused by different environments. This results in inhomogeneous appearances of the same subject. In our paper we show a new approach for handling the complex task of generating a low-noise and sharp image without spatial filtering. Our method is based on the fact that we analyze the spectral and saturation distribution of the channels. Furthermore, the RGB space is transformed into a more convenient space, a particular HSI space. We generate the greyscale image by a control procedure that takes into account the colour channels. This leads in an adaptive colour mixing model with reduced noise. The results of the optimized images are used to show how, e. g., image classification benefits from our colour adaptation approach.

  19. 21 CFR 25.34 - Devices and electronic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Devices and electronic products. 25.34 Section 25... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.34 Devices and electronic products. The classes... substitutes. (c) Issuance, amendment, or repeal of a standard for a class II medical device or an...

  20. 21 CFR 25.34 - Devices and electronic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Devices and electronic products. 25.34 Section 25... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.34 Devices and electronic products. The classes... substitutes. (c) Issuance, amendment, or repeal of a standard for a class II medical device or an...

  1. 21 CFR 25.34 - Devices and electronic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Devices and electronic products. 25.34 Section 25... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.34 Devices and electronic products. The classes... substitutes. (c) Issuance, amendment, or repeal of a standard for a class II medical device or an...

  2. 21 CFR 25.34 - Devices and electronic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Devices and electronic products. 25.34 Section 25... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.34 Devices and electronic products. The classes... substitutes. (c) Issuance, amendment, or repeal of a standard for a class II medical device or an...

  3. 21 CFR 25.34 - Devices and electronic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Devices and electronic products. 25.34 Section 25... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.34 Devices and electronic products. The classes... substitutes. (c) Issuance, amendment, or repeal of a standard for a class II medical device or an...

  4. The Jordy Electronic Magnification Device: Opinions, Observations, and Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Barry

    2005-01-01

    The Jordy electronic magnification device is one of a small number of electronic headborne devices designed to provide people with low vision the capability to perform near-range, intermediate-range, and distance viewing tasks. This report seeks to define the benefits of using the Jordy as a low vision device by people who are legally blind. The…

  5. Investigation of relativistic runaway electrons in electron cyclotron resonance heating discharges on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C. S.; Lee, S. G.

    2014-07-15

    The behavior of relativistic runaway electrons during Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) discharges is investigated in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research device. The effect of the ECRH on the runaway electron population is discussed. Observations on the generation of superthermal electrons during ECRH will be reported, which will be shown to be consistent with existing theory for the development of a superthermal electron avalanche during ECRH [A. Lazaros, Phys. Plasmas 8, 1263 (2001)].

  6. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  7. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  8. 14 CFR 91.21 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 91.21 Section... electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate, nor may any operator or pilot in command of an aircraft allow the operation of, any portable electronic...

  9. 14 CFR 91.21 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 91.21 Section... electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate, nor may any operator or pilot in command of an aircraft allow the operation of, any portable electronic...

  10. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic...

  11. 14 CFR 91.21 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 91.21 Section... electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate, nor may any operator or pilot in command of an aircraft allow the operation of, any portable electronic...

  12. 14 CFR 91.21 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 91.21 Section... electronic devices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate, nor may any operator or pilot in command of an aircraft allow the operation of, any portable electronic...

  13. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic...

  14. 77 FR 38829 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic imaging devices by... viewed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov . FOR FURTHER...

  15. Electrical and electronic devices and components: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Components and techniques which may be useful in the electronics industry are described. Topics discussed include transducer technology, printed-circuit technology, solid state devices, MOS transistors, Gunn device, microwave antennas, and position indicators.

  16. Advanced Stress, Strain And Geometrical Analysis In Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Neels, Antonia; Dommann, Alex; Niedermann, Philippe; Farub, Claudiu; Kaenel, Hans von

    2010-11-24

    High stresses and defect densities increases the risk of semiconductor device failure. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. Related to the dramatically smaller volume of semiconductor devices and new bonding techniques on such devices, new methods in testing and qualification are needed. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. In this paper, the applications of advanced High Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD) methods in strain, defect and deformation analysis on semiconductor devices are discussed. HRXRD with Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Maps (RSM's) is used as accurate, non-destructive experimental method to evaluate the crystalline quality, and more precisely for the given samples, the in-situ strain, defects and geometrical parameters such as tilt and bending of device. The combination with advanced FEM simulations gives the possibility to support efficiently semiconductor devices design.

  17. Advanced Electronics Systems 1, Industrial Electronics 3: 9327.03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The 135 clock-hour course for the 12th year consists of outlines for blocks of instruction on transistor applications to basic circuits, principles of single sideband communications, maintenance practices, preparation for FCC licenses, application of circuits to advanced electronic systems, nonsinusoidal wave shapes, multivibrators, and blocking…

  18. Crosslinked polymeric dielectric materials and electronic devices incorporating same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, Tobin J. (Inventor); Facchetti, Antonio (Inventor); Wang, Zhiming (Inventor); Choi, Hyuk-Jin (Inventor); Suh, legal representative, Nae-Jeong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Solution-processable dielectric materials are provided, along with precursor compositions and processes for preparing the same. Composites and electronic devices including the dielectric materials also are provided.

  19. Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P.; Bettinger, C. J.; Irimia-Vladu, M.; Mostert, A. B.; Schwenn, P. E.

    2013-03-01

    Inorganic semiconductors permeate virtually every sphere of modern human existence. Micro-fabricated memory elements, processors, sensors, circuit elements, lasers, displays, detectors, etc are ubiquitous. However, the dawn of the 21st century has brought with it immense new challenges, and indeed opportunities—some of which require a paradigm shift in the way we think about resource use and disposal, which in turn directly impacts our ongoing relationship with inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and gallium arsenide. Furthermore, advances in fields such as nano-medicine and bioelectronics, and the impending revolution of the ‘ubiquitous sensor network’, all require new functional materials which are bio-compatible, cheap, have minimal embedded manufacturing energy plus extremely low power consumption, and are mechanically robust and flexible for integration with tissues, building structures, fabrics and all manner of hosts. In this short review article we summarize current progress in creating materials with such properties. We focus primarily on organic and bio-organic electronic and optoelectronic systems derived from or inspired by nature, and outline the complex charge transport and photo-physics which control their behaviour. We also introduce the concept of electrical devices based upon ion or proton flow (‘ionics and protonics’) and focus particularly on their role as a signal interface with biological systems. Finally, we highlight recent advances in creating working devices, some of which have bio-inspired architectures, and summarize the current issues, challenges and potential solutions. This is a rich new playground for the modern materials physicist.

  20. "Green" electronics: biodegradable and biocompatible materials and devices for sustainable future.

    PubMed

    Irimia-Vladu, Mihai

    2014-01-21

    "Green" electronics represents not only a novel scientific term but also an emerging area of research aimed at identifying compounds of natural origin and establishing economically efficient routes for the production of synthetic materials that have applicability in environmentally safe (biodegradable) and/or biocompatible devices. The ultimate goal of this research is to create paths for the production of human- and environmentally friendly electronics in general and the integration of such electronic circuits with living tissue in particular. Researching into the emerging class of "green" electronics may help fulfill not only the original promise of organic electronics that is to deliver low-cost and energy efficient materials and devices but also achieve unimaginable functionalities for electronics, for example benign integration into life and environment. This Review will highlight recent research advancements in this emerging group of materials and their integration in unconventional organic electronic devices. PMID:24121237

  1. Decontamination of blood soaked electronic devices using ultrasonic technology.

    PubMed

    Dudeck, Kimberly C; Brennan, Tamara C; Embury, Daniel J

    2012-01-10

    With advancements in technology allowing for the miniaturization of consumer electronics, criminal investigations of all types frequently involve the forensic examination of electronic devices, such as cellular telephones, smartphones, and portable flash memory; in some extreme, violent cases, these devices are found covered in blood. Due to the complexity of such devices, standard operating procedures for the complete removal of blood had not previously been established by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police prior to this study. The electronics industry has adopted the use of the ultrasonic cleaner for sanitizing printed circuit boards (PCBs) by removing residues and contaminants. High frequency sound waves created by the machine penetrate and remove dirt and residues; however, early research during the 1950s recorded these sound waves breaking the internal bonds of integrated circuit chips. Experimentation with modern ultrasonic technology was used to determine if internal components were damaged, as well as if ultrasonic cleaning was the most suitable method for the removal of dried and liquid blood from a PCB. Several disinfectant solutions were compared against the 0.5% Triton(®) X-100 detergent solution in the ultrasonic cleaner, including: 10% sodium hypochlorite bleach, 85% isopropyl alcohol, and Conflikt(®) disinfectant spray. The results not only demonstrated that the ultrasonic cleaner did not damage the vital memory chip on the PCB, but also, with the assistance of Conflikt(®), was able to remove all traces of blood as indicated by Hemastix(®) reagent strips. Of five methods experimented with, two cycles of ultrasonic cleaning followed by sanitization with Conflikt(®) proved to be the only procedure capable of removing all traces of blood, as confirmed with both Hemastix(®) reagent strips and the hemochromogen test. PMID:21820828

  2. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  3. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  4. Recent progress on thin-film encapsulation technologies for organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Duan; Yang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Zheng; Tao, Ye; Liu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Among the advanced electronic devices, flexible organic electronic devices with rapid development are the most promising technologies to customers and industries. Organic thin films accommodate low-cost fabrication and can exploit diverse molecules in inexpensive plastic light emitting diodes, plastic solar cells, and even plastic lasers. These properties may ultimately enable organic materials for practical applications in industry. However, the stability of organic electronic devices still remains a big challenge, because of the difficulty in fabricating commercial products with flexibility. These organic materials can be protected using substrates and barriers such as glass and metal; however, this results in a rigid device and does not satisfy the applications demanding flexible devices. Plastic substrates and transparent flexible encapsulation barriers are other possible alternatives; however, these offer little protection to oxygen and water, thus rapidly degrading the devices. Thin-film encapsulation (TFE) technology is most effective in preventing water vapor and oxygen permeation into the flexible devices. Because of these (and other) reasons, there has been an intense interest in developing transparent barrier materials with much lower permeabilities, and their market is expected to reach over 550 million by 2025. In this study, the degradation mechanism of organic electronic devices is reviewed. To increase the stability of devices in air, several TFE technologies were applied to provide efficient barrier performance. In this review, the degradation mechanism of organic electronic devices, permeation rate measurement, traditional encapsulation technologies, and TFE technologies are presented.

  5. Advanced fabrication technologies for nano-electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Weckwerth, M.V.; Baca, W.E.

    1996-03-01

    Three novel fabrication technologies are presented which greatly increase the tools available for the realization of nano-electronic devices. First, a sub-micron area post structure descending from a metallic airbridge allows gating of regions as small as 0.1 {mu}m in diameter. This has enabled the study of such quantum phenomena as coupling of parallel quantum point contacts, and electron focusing around a tunable quantum antidot. We also describe two new techniques for backgating multiquantum well structures with submicron lateral resolution. These techniques enable separate ohmic contacts to individual quantum wells spaced as closely as 100 {Angstrom}, and thus allow the fabrication of novel quantum tunneling devices. The first technique uses regrowth over a patterned ion-implanted substrate. The second involves a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) processing scheme, whereby the original substrate is etched away and the backside then patterned using conventional methods.

  6. Advances in superconducting quantum electronic microcircuit fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, R. K.; Notarys, H. A.; Mercereau, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard microelectronic fabrication techniques have been utilized to produce batch quantities of superconducting quantum electronic devices and circuits. The overall goal is a fabrication technology yielding circuits that are rugged and stable and capable of being fabricated controllably and reproducibly in sizeable quantities. Our progress toward this goal is presented, with primary emphasis on the most recent work, which includes the use of electron-beam lithography and techniques of hybrid microelectronics. Several prototype microcircuits have been successfully fabricated. These microcircuits are formed in a thin-film parent material consisting of layers of superconducting and normal metals, and use proximity-effect structures as the active circuit elements.

  7. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  8. Ultra-high-speed optical and electronic distributed devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.; Wendt, J.R.; Armendariz, M.G.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes work on the development of ultra-high-speed semiconductor optical and electronic devices. High-speed operation is achieved by velocity matching the input stimulus to the output signal along the device`s length. Electronic devices such as field-effect transistors (FET`s), should experience significant speed increases by velocity matching the electrical input and output signals along the device. Likewise, optical devices, which are typically large, can obtain significant bandwidths by velocity matching the light being generated, detected or modulated with the electrical signal on the device`s electrodes. The devices discussed in this report utilize truly distributed electrical design based on slow-wave propagation to achieve velocity matching.

  9. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  10. Advanced superconducting materials for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1980-10-01

    Developments in the fabrication of tunnel junctions using Nb- and V-base transition-metal compounds and alloys are summarized. Particular attention is given to the advances in codeposition of these refractory high-transition-temperature superconductors and the properties of thin films deposited by the dual-electron-beam coevaporation technique. Problems associated with these materials are identified, and prospects for the future are discussed. Of the materials reviewed, Nb3Sn is singled out as one deserving further development.

  11. 14 CFR 91.21 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 91.21 Section 91.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.21 Portable electronic devices. (a) Except as provided...

  12. Electronic spark advance-type ignition system

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, H.

    1986-12-09

    An electronic spark advance-type ignition system is described for an internal combustion engine comprising: an ignition coil; a magnetic pickup for generating a pair of pulse signals with a time interval therebetween substantially corresponding to a maximum advance angle in terms of crankshaft rotation degrees for each rotation of a crankshaft of the engine; signal generating means responsive to the pair of pulse signals for the pickup for generating a pair of comparison signals of different levels within each of the crankshaft rotation degrees of the maximum advance angle and the other crankshaft rotation degrees; and control means for comparing the signal levels of each of the pairs of comparison signals to generate an energization starting position signal and an ignition timing determining ignition position signal for the ignition coil, the signal generating means including means for controlling the waveform of one of the pair of comparison signals so that the ignition position signal is advanced in angle with respect to the energization starting position signal. The energization starting position signal is generated under all conditions prior to the timing of generation of the earlier one of the next pair of pulse signals generated from the pickup. The ignition position signal is generated within the maximum advance angle at a point in time following generation of the earlier one of the next pair of pulse signals by at least a predetermined amount.

  13. Eliminating unwanted electrons in EBIS devices.

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, Ady I

    2016-02-01

    In electron beam ion sources, step-wise ionization to high charge states is accomplished by magnetically confined electron beam. Electron space charge and high voltage electrodes confine the ions. The relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) ion source Debye length meets requirements for instabilities with free source of energy to grow. Electrons stripped from ions provide energy for a variety of microinstabilities to grow. Possible solution is to remove these electrons from the trap to a drift tube biased to higher voltage than the other tubes between the gate and the collector. If needed, a split drift tube for bleeding these electrons to ground is added. PMID:26931979

  14. Eliminating unwanted electrons in EBIS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady I.

    2016-02-01

    In electron beam ion sources, step-wise ionization to high charge states is accomplished by magnetically confined electron beam. Electron space charge and high voltage electrodes confine the ions. The relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) ion source Debye length meets requirements for instabilities with free source of energy to grow. Electrons stripped from ions provide energy for a variety of microinstabilities to grow. Possible solution is to remove these electrons from the trap to a drift tube biased to higher voltage than the other tubes between the gate and the collector. If needed, a split drift tube for bleeding these electrons to ground is added.

  15. Advanced thermal management technologies for defense electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloschock, Kristen P.; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2012-05-01

    Thermal management technology plays a key role in the continuing miniaturization, performance improvements, and higher reliability of electronic systems. For the past decade, and particularly, the past 4 years, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has aggressively pursued the application of micro- and nano-technology to reduce or remove thermal constraints on the performance of defense electronic systems. The DARPA Thermal Management Technologies (TMT) portfolio is comprised of five technical thrust areas: Thermal Ground Plane (TGP), Microtechnologies for Air-Cooled Exchangers (MACE), NanoThermal Interfaces (NTI), Active Cooling Modules (ACM), and Near Junction Thermal Transport (NJTT). An overview of the TMT program will be presented with emphasis on the goals and status of these efforts relative to the current State-of-the-Art. The presentation will close with future challenges and opportunities in the thermal management of defense electronics.

  16. Wide temperature range electronic device with lead attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A electronic device including lead attachment structure which permits operation of the devices over a wide temperature range is reported. The device comprises a core conductor having a thin coating of metal thereon whereby only a limited amount of coating material is available to form an alloy which bonds the core conductor to the device electrode, the electrode composition thus being affected only in the region adjacent to the lead.

  17. Three approaches in infrared imaging of electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, Volodymyr K.

    2003-09-01

    We present further progress in high-resolution time-resolved thermal imaging of electronic and optoelectronic devices. We show that concurrent multi-spectral mapping of light, emissivity, and heat patterns a single device produces may hold the key of the device performance improvement by visualizing current carrier distribution and heat flows. To demonstrate advantage of this approach, thermal heaters, light emitting devices, and Peltier coolers are tested with emphasis laid on uniformity of carrier distribution and thermal control.

  18. Active plasmonic devices via electron spin.

    PubMed

    Baron, C A; Elezzabi, A Y

    2009-04-27

    A class of active terahertz devices that operate via particle plasmon oscillations is introduced for ensembles consisting of ferromagnetic and dielectric micro-particles. By utilizing an interplay between spin-orbit interaction manifesting as anisotropic magnetoresistance and the optical distance between ferromagnetic particles, a multifaceted paradigm for device design is demonstrated. Here, the phase accumulation of terahertz radiation across the device is actively modulated via the application of an external magnetic field. An active plasmonic directional router and an active plasmonic cylindrical lens are theoretically explored using both an empirical approach and finite-difference time-domain calculations. These findings are experimentally supported. PMID:19399088

  19. Applications and Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Baietto, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Electronic-nose devices have received considerable attention in the field of sensor technology during the past twenty years, largely due to the discovery of numerous applications derived from research in diverse fields of applied sciences. Recent applications of electronic nose technologies have come through advances in sensor design, material improvements, software innovations and progress in microcircuitry design and systems integration. The invention of many new e-nose sensor types and arrays, based on different detection principles and mechanisms, is closely correlated with the expansion of new applications. Electronic noses have provided a plethora of benefits to a variety of commercial industries, including the agricultural, biomedical, cosmetics, environmental, food, manufacturing, military, pharmaceutical, regulatory, and various scientific research fields. Advances have improved product attributes, uniformity, and consistency as a result of increases in quality control capabilities afforded by electronic-nose monitoring of all phases of industrial manufacturing processes. This paper is a review of the major electronic-nose technologies, developed since this specialized field was born and became prominent in the mid 1980s, and a summarization of some of the more important and useful applications that have been of greatest benefit to man. PMID:22346690

  20. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  1. Fractal electronic devices: simulation and implementation.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, M S; McCarthy, D N; Scott, S A; Brown, S A; Taylor, R P

    2011-09-01

    Many natural structures have fractal geometries that exhibit useful functional properties. These properties, which exploit the recurrence of patterns at increasingly small scales, are often desirable in applications and, consequently, fractal geometry is increasingly employed in diverse technologies ranging from radio antennae to storm barriers. In this paper, we explore the application of fractal geometry to electrical devices. First, we lay the foundations for the implementation of fractal devices by considering diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) of atomic clusters. Under appropriate growth conditions, atomic clusters of various elements form fractal patterns driven by DLA. We perform a fractal analysis of both simulated and physical devices to determine their spatial scaling properties and demonstrate their potential as fractal circuit elements. Finally, we simulate conduction through idealized and DLA fractal devices and show that their fractal scaling properties generate novel, nonlinear conduction properties in response to depletion by electrostatic gates. PMID:21841218

  2. Fractal electronic devices: simulation and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, M. S.; McCarthy, D. N.; Scott, S. A.; Brown, S. A.; Taylor, R. P.

    2011-09-01

    Many natural structures have fractal geometries that exhibit useful functional properties. These properties, which exploit the recurrence of patterns at increasingly small scales, are often desirable in applications and, consequently, fractal geometry is increasingly employed in diverse technologies ranging from radio antennae to storm barriers. In this paper, we explore the application of fractal geometry to electrical devices. First, we lay the foundations for the implementation of fractal devices by considering diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) of atomic clusters. Under appropriate growth conditions, atomic clusters of various elements form fractal patterns driven by DLA. We perform a fractal analysis of both simulated and physical devices to determine their spatial scaling properties and demonstrate their potential as fractal circuit elements. Finally, we simulate conduction through idealized and DLA fractal devices and show that their fractal scaling properties generate novel, nonlinear conduction properties in response to depletion by electrostatic gates.

  3. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  4. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  5. Advanced electronics for the CTF MEG system.

    PubMed

    McCubbin, J; Vrba, J; Spear, P; McKenzie, D; Willis, R; Loewen, R; Robinson, S E; Fife, A A

    2004-01-01

    Development of the CTF MEG system has been advanced with the introduction of a computer processing cluster between the data acquisition electronics and the host computer. The advent of fast processors, memory, and network interfaces has made this innovation feasible for large data streams at high sampling rates. We have implemented tasks including anti-alias filter, sample rate decimation, higher gradient balancing, crosstalk correction, and optional filters with a cluster consisting of 4 dual Intel Xeon processors operating on up to 275 channel MEG systems at 12 kHz sample rate. The architecture is expandable with additional processors to implement advanced processing tasks which may include e.g., continuous head localization/motion correction, optional display filters, coherence calculations, or real time synthetic channels (via beamformer). We also describe an electronics configuration upgrade to provide operator console access to the peripheral interface features such as analog signal and trigger I/O. This allows remote location of the acoustically noisy electronics cabinet and fitting of the cabinet with doors for improved EMI shielding. Finally, we present the latest performance results available for the CTF 275 channel MEG system including an unshielded SEF (median nerve electrical stimulation) measurement enhanced by application of an adaptive beamformer technique (SAM) which allows recognition of the nominal 20-ms response in the unaveraged signal. PMID:16012695

  6. Remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED).

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Emily P; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2016-08-01

    With increasing indications and access to cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) worldwide, the number of patients needing CIED follow-up continues to rise. In parallel, the technology available for managing these devices has advanced considerably. In this setting, remote monitoring (RM) has emerged as a complement to routine in-office care. Rigorous studies, randomized and otherwise, have demonstrated advantages to patient with CIED management systems, which incorporates RM resulting in authoritative guidelines from relevant professional societies recommending RM for all eligible patients. In addition to clinical benefits, CIED management programs that include RM have been shown to be cost effective and associated with high patient satisfaction. Finally, RM programs hold promise for the future of CIED research in light of the massive data collected through RM databases converging with unprecedented computational capability. This review outlines the available data associated with clinical outcomes in patients managed with RM with an emphasis on randomized trials; the impact of RM on patient satisfaction, cost-effectiveness, and healthcare utilization; and possible future directions for the use of RM in clinical practice and research. PMID:27134007

  7. Ion implantation in compound semiconductors for high-performance electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    Advanced electronic devices based on compound semiconductors often make use of selective area ion implantation doping or isolation. The implantation processing becomes more complex as the device dimensions are reduced and more complex material systems are employed. The authors review several applications of ion implantation to high performance junction field effect transistors (JFETs) and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) that are based on compound semiconductors, including: GaAs, AlGaAs, InGaP, and AlGaSb.

  8. Field mapping with nanometer-scale resolution for the next generation of electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David; de la Peña, Francisco; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Servanton, Germain; Pantel, Roland; Morin, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    In order to improve the performance of today's nanoscaled semiconductor devices, characterization techniques that can provide information about the position and activity of dopant atoms and the strain fields are essential. Here we demonstrate that by using a modern transmission electron microscope it is possible to apply multiple techniques to advanced materials systems in order to provide information about the structure, fields, and composition with nanometer-scale resolution. Off-axis electron holography has been used to map the active dopant potentials in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices with 1 nm resolution. These dopant maps have been compared to electron energy loss spectroscopy maps that show the positions of the dopant atoms. The strain fields in the devices have been measured by both dark field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction. PMID:21972919

  9. Electron-phonon interaction on optical spectra of nanoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.

    2002-01-01

    Information obtained on the solid-state lattice dynamics by electron-phonon interaction between lattice phonons and electrons could open up to learn more about lattice dynamics and to apply it in nanoelectronic devices including software reliability, nano-size capacitors, master clock sources, as well as non-contact temperature probes on nano-electronic and photonicdevices.

  10. Optoelectronic devices utilizing materials having enhanced electronic transitions

    DOEpatents

    Black, Marcie R.

    2011-02-22

    An optoelectronic device that includes a material having enhanced electronic transitions. The electronic transitions are enhanced by mixing electronic states at an interface. The interface may be formed by a nano-well, a nano-dot, or a nano-wire.

  11. Optoelectronic devices utilizing materials having enhanced electronic transitions

    DOEpatents

    Black, Marcie R.

    2013-04-09

    An optoelectronic device that includes a material having enhanced electronic transitions. The electronic transitions are enhanced by mixing electronic states at an interface. The interface may be formed by a nano-well, a nano-dot, or a nano-wire.

  12. Thermal electron-tunneling devices as coolers and amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Su, Shanhe; Zhang, Yanchao; Chen, Jincan; Shih, Tien-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale thermal systems that are associated with a pair of electron reservoirs have been previously studied. In particular, devices that adjust electron tunnels relatively to reservoirs' chemical potentials enjoy the novelty and the potential. Since only two reservoirs and one tunnel exist, however, designers need external aids to complete a cycle, rendering their models non-spontaneous. Here we design thermal conversion devices that are operated among three electron reservoirs connected by energy-filtering tunnels and also referred to as thermal electron-tunneling devices. They are driven by one of electron reservoirs rather than the external power input, and are equivalent to those coupling systems consisting of forward and reverse Carnot cycles with energy selective electron functions. These previously-unreported electronic devices can be used as coolers and thermal amplifiers and may be called as thermal transistors. The electron and energy fluxes of devices are capable of being manipulated in the same or oppsite directions at our disposal. The proposed model can open a new field in the application of nano-devices. PMID:26893109

  13. Thermal electron-tunneling devices as coolers and amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shanhe; Zhang, Yanchao; Chen, Jincan; Shih, Tien-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale thermal systems that are associated with a pair of electron reservoirs have been previously studied. In particular, devices that adjust electron tunnels relatively to reservoirs’ chemical potentials enjoy the novelty and the potential. Since only two reservoirs and one tunnel exist, however, designers need external aids to complete a cycle, rendering their models non-spontaneous. Here we design thermal conversion devices that are operated among three electron reservoirs connected by energy-filtering tunnels and also referred to as thermal electron-tunneling devices. They are driven by one of electron reservoirs rather than the external power input, and are equivalent to those coupling systems consisting of forward and reverse Carnot cycles with energy selective electron functions. These previously-unreported electronic devices can be used as coolers and thermal amplifiers and may be called as thermal transistors. The electron and energy fluxes of devices are capable of being manipulated in the same or oppsite directions at our disposal. The proposed model can open a new field in the application of nano-devices. PMID:26893109

  14. Electron energy loss spectroscopy in advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) with an electron energy loss spectrometer (EELS) yields a powerful tool for the microcharacterization of materials. However, the application of this technique to advanced materials problems can only be fully appreciated when the information obtained using EELS is related to that obtained from other analytical spectroscopies. In this chapter, we briefly discuss the relative performance of X-ray, Auger and Photoelectron Spectroscopies with EELS pointing out the limitations and merits of each. This comparison is followed by examples of the application of EELS to investigations involving high {Tc} superconductors, artificial metallic superlattices, amorphous magnetic materials and the characterization of metallic hydride phases. 14 refs., 22 figs.

  15. Advanced diesel electronic fuel injection and turbocharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, N. J.; Barkhimer, R. L.; Steinmeyer, D. C.; Kelly, J. E.

    1993-12-01

    The program investigated advanced diesel air charging and fuel injection systems to improve specific power, fuel economy, noise, exhaust emissions, and cold startability. The techniques explored included variable fuel injection rate shaping, variable injection timing, full-authority electronic engine control, turbo-compound cooling, regenerative air circulation as a cold start aid, and variable geometry turbocharging. A Servojet electronic fuel injection system was designed and manufactured for the Cummins VTA-903 engine. A special Servojet twin turbocharger exhaust system was also installed. A series of high speed combustion flame photos was taken using the single cylinder optical engine at Michigan Technological University. Various fuel injection rate shapes and nozzle configurations were evaluated. Single-cylinder bench tests were performed to evaluate regenerative inlet air heating techniques as an aid to cold starting. An exhaust-driven axial cooling air fan was manufactured and tested on the VTA-903 engine.

  16. Electronic pictures from charged-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccann, D. H.; Turly, A. P.; White, M.

    1979-01-01

    Imaging system uses charge-coupled devices (CCD's) to generate TV-like pictures with high resolution, sensitivity, and signal-to-noise ratio. It combines detectors for five spectral bands as well as processing and control circuitry all on single silicon chip.

  17. Optical Biosensors: A Revolution Towards Quantum Nanoscale Electronics Device Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Dey, D.; Goswami, T.

    2011-01-01

    The dimension of biomolecules is of few nanometers, so the biomolecular devices ought to be of that range so a better understanding about the performance of the electronic biomolecular devices can be obtained at nanoscale. Development of optical biomolecular device is a new move towards revolution of nano-bioelectronics. Optical biosensor is one of such nano-biomolecular devices that has a potential to pave a new dimension of research and device fabrication in the field of optical and biomedical fields. This paper is a very small report about optical biosensor and its development and importance in various fields. PMID:22131802

  18. Simulation of Ultra-Small Electronic Devices: The Classical-Quantum Transition Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Concern is increasing about how quantum effects will impact electronic device operation as down-scaling continues along the SIA Roadmap through 2010. This document describes part of a new semiconductor device modeling (SDM) program at NAS to investigate these concerns by utilizing advanced NAS and third-party numerical computation software to rapidly implement and investigate electronic device models including quantum effects. This SDM project will investigate quantum effects in devices in the classical-quantum transition region, especially sub-0.1 mm MOSFETs. Specific tasks planned for this project include the use of quantum corrections to the classical drift-diffusion and hydrodynamic models of electron transport, arid the use of nominally quantum models including significant scattering.

  19. Holmium hafnate: An emerging electronic device material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavunny, Shojan P.; Sharma, Yogesh; Kooriyattil, Sudheendran; Dugu, Sita; Katiyar, Rajesh K.; Scott, James F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-03-01

    We report structural, optical, charge transport, and temperature properties as well as the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant of Ho2Hf2O7 (HHO) which make this material desirable as an alternative high-k dielectric for future silicon technology devices. A high dielectric constant of ˜20 and very low dielectric loss of ˜0.1% are temperature and voltage independent at 100 kHz near ambient conditions. The Pt/HHO/Pt capacitor exhibits exceptionally low Schottky emission-based leakage currents. In combination with the large observed bandgap Eg of 5.6 eV, determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, our results reveal fundamental physics and materials science of the HHO metal oxide and its potential application as a high-k dielectric for the next generation of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  20. Programmable synaptic devices for electronic neural nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moopenn, A.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    The architecture, design, and operational characteristics of custom VLSI and thin film synaptic devices are described. The devices include CMOS-based synaptic chips containing 1024 reprogrammable synapses with a 6-bit dynamic range, and nonvolatile, write-once, binary synaptic arrays based on memory switching in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. Their suitability for embodiment of fully parallel and analog neural hardware is discussed. Specifically, a neural network solution to an assignment problem of combinatorial global optimization, implemented in fully parallel hardware using the synaptic chips, is described. The network's ability to provide optimal and near optimal solutions over a time scale of few neuron time constants has been demonstrated and suggests a speedup improvement of several orders of magnitude over conventional search methods.

  1. Holmium hafnate: An emerging electronic device material

    SciTech Connect

    Pavunny, Shojan P. E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Sharma, Yogesh; Kooriyattil, Sudheendran; Dugu, Sita; Katiyar, Rajesh K.; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Scott, James F.

    2015-03-16

    We report structural, optical, charge transport, and temperature properties as well as the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant of Ho{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (HHO) which make this material desirable as an alternative high-k dielectric for future silicon technology devices. A high dielectric constant of ∼20 and very low dielectric loss of ∼0.1% are temperature and voltage independent at 100 kHz near ambient conditions. The Pt/HHO/Pt capacitor exhibits exceptionally low Schottky emission-based leakage currents. In combination with the large observed bandgap E{sub g} of 5.6 eV, determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, our results reveal fundamental physics and materials science of the HHO metal oxide and its potential application as a high-k dielectric for the next generation of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  2. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Report -- 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.; DeVoto, D.; Moreno, G.; Rugh, J.; Waye, S.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the research into advanced liquid cooling, integrated power module cooling, high temperature air cooled power electronics, two-phase cooling for power electronics, and electric motor thermal management by NREL's Power Electronics group in FY13.

  3. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    PubMed

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong. PMID:19734925

  4. Are Electronic Cardiac Devices Still Evolving?

    PubMed Central

    Mabo, P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this paper is to review some important issues occurring during the past year in Implantable devices. Methods First cardiac implantable device was proposed to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart’s natural pacemaker is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. During the last forty years, pacemakers have evolved considerably and become programmable and allow to configure specific patient optimum pacing modes. Various technological aspects (electrodes, connectors, algorithms diagnosis, therapies, …) have been progressed and cardiac implants address several clinical applications: management of arrhythmias, cardioversion / defibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy. Results Observed progress was the miniaturization of device, increased longevity, coupled with efficient pacing functions, multisite pacing modes, leadless pacing and also a better recognition of supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia’s in order to deliver appropriate therapy. Subcutaneous implant, new modes of stimulation (leadless implant or ultrasound lead), quadripolar lead and new sensor or new algorithm for the hemodynamic management are introduced and briefly described. Each times, the main result occurring during the two past years are underlined and repositioned from the history, remaining limitations are also addressed. Conclusion Some important technological improvements were described. Nevertheless, news trends for the future are also considered in a specific session such as the remote follow-up of the patient or the treatment of heart failure by neuromodulation. PMID:25123732

  5. Simulation of electron transport in quantum well devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.; Gullapalli, K. K.; Reddy, V. R.; Neikirk, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Double barrier resonant tunneling diodes (DBRTD) have received much attention as possible terahertz devices. Despite impressive experimental results, the specifics of the device physics (i.e., how the electrons propagate through the structure) are only qualitatively understood. Therefore, better transport models are warranted if this technology is to mature. In this paper, the Lattice Wigner function is used to explain the important transport issues associated with DBRTD device behavior.

  6. Handbook for dose enhancement effects in electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D. M.; Millward, D. G.; Fitzwilson, R. L.; Chadsey, W. L.

    1983-03-01

    The handbook provides tabulation of dose enhancement factors for electronic devices in X-ray and gamma environments. The data is applicable to a wide range of semiconductor devices and selected types of capacitors. The radiation environment includes energy spectra for system design and for radiation test facilities.

  7. Inventory Control. Easily Made Electronic Device for Conductivity Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadek, Frank J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes how to construct an electronic device to be used in conductivity experiments using a 35 millimeter film canister, nine volt battery replacement snaps, a 200-300 ohm resistor, and a light-emitting diode. Provides a diagram and photographs of the device. (TW)

  8. Method for integrating microelectromechanical devices with electronic circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Barron, Carole C.; Fleming, James G.; Montague, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    A method is disclosed for integrating one or more microelectromechanical (MEM) devices with electronic circuitry on a common substrate. The MEM device can be fabricated within a substrate cavity and encapsulated with a sacrificial material. This allows the MEM device to be annealed and the substrate planarized prior to forming electronic circuitry on the substrate using a series of standard processing steps. After fabrication of the electronic circuitry, the electronic circuitry can be protected by a two-ply protection layer of titanium nitride (TiN) and tungsten (W) during an etch release process whereby the MEM device is released for operation by etching away a portion of a sacrificial material (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) that encapsulates the MEM device. The etch release process is preferably performed using a mixture of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and hydrochloric acid (HCI) which reduces the time for releasing the MEM device compared to use of a buffered oxide etchant. After release of the MEM device, the TiN:W protection layer can be removed with a peroxide-based etchant without damaging the electronic circuitry.

  9. Method for integrating microelectromechanical devices with electronic circuitry

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S.

    1999-10-05

    A method is disclosed for integrating one or more microelectromechanical (MEM) devices with electronic circuitry on a common substrate. The MEM device can be fabricated within a substrate cavity and encapsulated with a sacrificial material. This allows the MEM device to be annealed and the substrate planarized prior to forming electronic circuitry on the substrate using a series of standard processing steps. After fabrication of the electronic circuitry, the electronic circuitry can be protected by a two-ply protection layer of titanium nitride (TiN) and tungsten (W) during an etch release process whereby the MEM device is released for operation by etching away a portion of a sacrificial material (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) that encapsulates the MEM device. The etch release process is preferably performed using a mixture of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) which reduces the time for releasing the MEM device compared to use of a buffered oxide etchant. After release of the MEM device, the TiN:W protection layer can be removed with a peroxide-based etchant without damaging the electronic circuitry.

  10. MovAid- a novel device for advanced rehabilitation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant; Verma, Piyush; Gupta, Rakesh; Verma, Bhawna

    2015-08-01

    The present article introduces a new device "MovAid" which helps to measure and monitor rehabilitation. It has two main components- "MovAid device" and the "MovAid Smart Phone Application". The device connects wirelessly to the MovAid smart phone application via Bluetooth. It has electronic sensors to measure three important parameters of the patient- Angle of Joint Bent, Lift from the ground and Orientation of the limb. A mono-axis flex sensor to measure the degree of joint bent and a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope to measure the orientation of the limb and lift from the ground have been used. MovAid system bridges the gap between caretakers and patients, empowering both in ways never thought of before, by providing detailed and accurate data on every move. PMID:26737332

  11. Electron speckle photography: some recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Fu-pen

    2006-09-01

    When the speckle pattern is displaced, the displacement vector can be obtained by performing a correlation comparison between the two patterns, either optically or numerically. The so-called speckle photography technique has become an important metrological, strain analysis and fluid mechanics tool. The resolution of speckle technique depends on the size of the speckles employed. For an optical recording system, it is essentially limited to the wavelength of the light used and is about 0.5μm within the visible spectrum. In 1982 Chiang introduced the electron speckle photography concept whereby sub-micron and nanometer speckles were created via a process of physical vapor deposition and recording was made by an electron microscope, either a SEM or a TEM. As a result the resolution of speckle photography was increased by several orders of magnitude. With the advancement of digital speckle techniques the method is now fully automated. This paper discusses the current state art of this technique, and its application to the determination of differential thermal strains in electronic packaging, shear band formation in the lamellar interfaces of TiAl and prediction of the crack growth, the size effect of MEMS material SU-8, the micro-mechanical properties of artificial tissues, and the mechanical properties of metal oxide nanofibers. Also discussed in the paper are potential applications of this technique to nanotechnology and bio mechanics.

  12. Printed Electronic Devices in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2004-01-01

    The space environment requires robust sensing, control, and automation, whether in support of human spaceflight or of robotic exploration. Spaceflight embodies the known extremes of temperature, radiation, shock, vibration, and static loads, and demands high reliability at the lowest possible mass. Because printed electronic circuits fulfill all these requirements, printed circuit technology and the exploration of space have been closely coupled throughout their short histories. In this presentation, we will explore the space (and space launch) environments as drivers of printed circuit design, a brief history of NASA's use of printed electronic circuits, and we will examine future requirements for such circuits in our continued exploration of space.

  13. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures. PMID:26856789

  14. Electronic 4-wheel drive control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayato, S.; Takanori, S.; Shigeru, H.; Tatsunori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The internal rotation torque generated during operation of a 4-wheel drive vehicle is reduced using a control device whose clutch is attached to one part of the rear-wheel drive shaft. One torque sensor senses the drive torque associated with the rear wheel drive shaft. A second sensor senses the drive torque associated with the front wheel drive shaft. Revolution count sensors sense the revolutions of each drive shaft. By means of a microcomputer, the engagement of the clutch is changed to insure that the ratio of the torque sensors remains constant.

  15. Graphene-oxide-semiconductor planar-type electron emission device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Katsuhisa; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Miyashita, Akira; Nagao, Masayoshi; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Graphene was used as the topmost electrode for a metal-oxide-semiconductor planar-type electron emission device. With several various layers, graphene as a gate electrode on the thin oxide layer was directly deposited by gallium vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The maximum efficiency of the electron emission, defined as the ratio of anode current to cathode current, showed no dependency on electrode thickness in the range from 1.8 nm to 7.0 nm, indicating that electron scattering on the inside of the graphene electrode is practically suppressed. In addition, a high emission current density of 1-100 mA/cm2 was obtained while maintaining a relatively high electron emission efficiency of 0.1%-1.0%. The graphene-oxide-semiconductor planar-type electron emission device has great potential to achieve both high electron emission efficiency and high electron emission current density in practical applications.

  16. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  17. Infected cardiac-implantable electronic devices: prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Gerdes, Jens Christian; Varma, Niraj

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) infection, according to current trends, appears to be an increasing problem. It can be indolent and its diagnosis challenging. Cardiac implantable electronic device infections are potentially lethal, and timely diagnosis and early initiation of correct treatment are of highest importance for patient prognosis. For reducing CIED infections, careful patient selection, preventative measures, and appropriate choice of device are key. The current review presents available data and consensus opinion within the field of CIED infection and identifies important current practice points and aspects for future development. Strategies for reducing CIED infection should be tested in sufficiently powered and well-designed multicentre randomized controlled trials. PMID:25749852

  18. 77 FR 70464 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Telecommunications America, LLC of Richardson, Texas (collectively, ``Samsung''). 76 FR 45860 (Aug. 1, 2011). The... Presidential Memorandum of July 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this period, the subject articles... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and...

  19. 78 FR 16865 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... America, LLC of Richardson, Texas (collectively, ``Samsung''). 76 FR 45860 (Aug. 1, 2011). The complaint... Commission, and on the issues of remedy, the public interest, and bonding. 77 FR 70464. The Commission... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and...

  20. Advanced flexible electronics: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedell, Stephen W.; Shahrjerdi, Davood; Fogel, Keith; Lauro, Paul; Bayram, Can; Hekmatshoar, Bahman; Li, Ning; Ott, John; Sadana, Devendra

    2014-06-01

    Thin, lightweight and flexible electronics are being regarded as an important evolutionary step in the development of novel technological products. Interestingly, this trend has emerged in a wide range of industries; from microelectronics to photovoltaics and even solid state lighting. Historically, most attempts to enable flexibility have focused on the introduction of new material systems that, so far, severely compromise the performance compared to state-of-the-art products. The few approaches that do attempt to render contemporary high-performance materials flexible rely on layer transfer techniques that are complicated, expensive and material-specific. In this paper, we review a method of removing surface layers from brittle substrates called Controlled Spalling Technology that allows one to simple peel material or device layers from their host substrate after they have been fabricated. This allows one to fabricate high-performance electronic products in a manner of their choosing, and make them flexible afterwards. This technique is simple, inexpensive and largely independent of substrate material or size. We demonstrate the power and generality of Controlled Spalling by application to a number of disparate applications including high-performance integrated circuits, high-efficiency photovoltaics and GaN-based solid state lighting.

  1. Electronic systems miniaturization using programmable logic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, E.C.; Bergeson, G.C.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes the steps which were taken to miniaturize a target circuit using Erasable Programmable Logic Devices (EPLDs). The original objective of this project was to explore the miniaturization of a circuit using both Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) and EPLDs to meet the following goals: balance cost and circuit density; reduce fabrication time; improve quality control issues by keeping much of the design in-house; and eliminate security risks by partitioning the design into ASIC and PLD (EPLD) sections. Due to cost considerations, the target circuit was miniaturized using only PLDs. The results of this project indicate that PLDs are capable of realizing fairly dense circuitry, are considerably less expensive than ASICs (by a factor of 500--1000), and are able to eliminate security risks and reduce fabrication time by keeping the design completely in-house.

  2. The Advanced Space Plant Culture Device with Live Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Zhang, Tao; Tong, Guanghui

    The live imaging techniques, including the color and fluorescent imags, are very important and useful for space life science. The advanced space plant culture Device (ASPCD) with live imaging Technique, developed for Chinese Spacecraft, would be introduced in this paper. The ASPCD had two plant experimental chambers. Three cameras (two color cameras and one fluorescent camera) were installed in the two chambers. The fluorescent camera could observe flowering genes, which were labeled by GFP. The lighting, nutrient, temperature controling and water recycling were all independent in each chamber. The ASPCD would beed applied to investigate for the growth and development of the high plant under microgravity conditions on board the Chinese Spacecraft.

  3. 33 CFR 164.41 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 164.41 Section 164.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.41 Electronic...

  4. 33 CFR 164.41 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 164.41 Section 164.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.41 Electronic...

  5. 33 CFR 164.41 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 164.41 Section 164.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.41 Electronic...

  6. 33 CFR 164.41 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 164.41 Section 164.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.41 Electronic...

  7. More Abstracts on Effects of Radiation on Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1987-01-01

    Second volume of bibliography summarizes literature on radiation effects on new electronic devices. Includes those of protons, electrons, neutrons, gamma rays, and cosmic rays at energies up to about 20 GeV. Volume contains 219 abstracts from unclassified sources. Organized into four sections: dose-rate effects, new technology, post-irradiaton effects, and test environments.

  8. Incorporating Ethical Consumption into Electronic Device Acquisition: A Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poggiali, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This essay proposes that librarians practice ethical consumption when purchasing electronic devices. Though librarians have long been engaged with environmentalism and social justice, few have suggested that such issues as e-waste and sweatshop labor should impact our decisions to acquire e-readers, tablets, and other electronics. This article…

  9. Detectors, devices and electronics for optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajer, V.

    2007-06-01

    Objectives: The present course is devoted to engineers, physicists, and techniques which require basic tools for applying in experiments, measurements and research with optical instruments. Content: It is composed of the following topics: photodetectors, semiconductor devices, photomultiplier tubes, Faraday modulators, lock in amplifiers and automatic polarimeters. It begins with the definitions, classification and general characteristics of the photodetectors and its selection criteria for specific applications. There is included a section relative to different types of photodiodes and its differential characteristics, the photomultipliers are described showing its validity and application range. The different characteristics of Faraday cells which are widely employed as optical modulators are analyzed. Lock in amplifiers are shown and its applications in experimental arrangements. Content: It is composed of the following topics: photodetectors, semiconductor devices, photomultiplier tubes, Faraday modulators, lock in amplifiers and automatic polarimeters. It begins with the definitions, classification and general characteristics of the photodetectors and its selection criteria for specific applications. There is included a section relative to different types of photodiodes and its differential characteristics, the photomultipliers are described showing its validity and application range. The different characteristics of Faraday cells which are widely employed as optical modulators are analyzed. Lock in amplifiers are shown and its applications in experimental arrangements. Conclusion: this course could be given as a postgraduate course for Master in Science or Ph. D depending on the number and content of selected topics. It has been applied as an obligatory subject of the Optical Master in Science curriculum in the Superior Technical Institute (José Antonio Echeverría) of Havana, Cuba.

  10. 76 FR 22918 - In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components... States after importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  11. 77 FR 44671 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Receipt of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Receipt of... received a complaint entitled Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof, DN 2904... within the United States after importation of certain wireless consumer electronics devices...

  12. 77 FR 51572 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Institution of Investigation... United States after importation of certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components thereof... importation of certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components thereof that infringe one or...

  13. 78 FR 38361 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... States after importation of certain portable electronic ] communications devices, including mobile phones... importation of certain portable electronic communications devices, including mobile phones and...

  14. 77 FR 27078 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones... electronic devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof. The complaint...

  15. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries. PMID:25387600

  16. Buffer layers and articles for electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan P.; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.; Feenstra, Roeland; Goyal, Amit

    2004-07-20

    Materials for depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured and untextured metallic and metal oxide substrates for use in the manufacture of superconducting and other electronic articles comprise RMnO.sub.3, R.sub.1-x A.sub.x MnO.sub.3, and combinations thereof; wherein R includes an element selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, and A includes an element selected from the group consisting of Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra.

  17. Organic electronic devices with multiple solution-processed layers

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.

    2015-08-04

    A method of fabricating a tandem organic photosensitive device involves depositing a first layer of an organic electron donor type material film by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a first solvent; depositing a first layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the first layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process; depositing a conductive layer over the interim stack by a dry deposition process; depositing a second layer of the organic electron donor type material over the conductive layer by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a second solvent, wherein the organic electron acceptor type material and the conductive layer are insoluble in the second solvent; depositing a second layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the second layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process, resulting in a stack.

  18. Modeling of high-current devices with explosive electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anishchenko, S. V.; Gurinovich, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Based on a detailed analysis of explosive electron emission in high-current electronic devices, we formulate a system of equations that describes the expansion of cathode plasma and the generation of high-current electron beams. The system underlies the numerical algorithm for the hybrid code which enables the simulation of the charged particles’ dynamics in high-current vircators with open resonators. Using the Gabor-Morlet transform, we perform a time-frequency analysis of vircator radiation.

  19. dc-plasma-sprayed electronic-tube device

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.

    1982-01-29

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by dc plasma arc spraying techniques is described. The process is carried out in a single step automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  20. Perioperative Management of Multiple Noncardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan A; Brull, Sorin J

    2015-12-01

    The number of patients with noncardiac implantable electronic devices is increasing, and the absence of perioperative management standards, guidelines, practice parameters, or expert consensus statements presents clinical challenges. A 69-year-old woman presented for latissimus dorsi breast reconstruction. The patient had previously undergone implantation of a spinal cord stimulator, a gastric pacemaker, a sacral nerve stimulator, and an intrathecal morphine pump. After consultation with device manufacturers, the devices with patient programmability were switched off. Bipolar cautery was used intraoperatively. Postoperatively, all devices were interrogated to ensure appropriate functioning before home discharge. Perioperative goals include complete preoperative radiologic documentation of device component location, minimizing electromagnetic interference, and avoiding mechanical damage to implanted device components. PMID:26588030

  1. Advanced Electronic Systems. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Dale R.

    This curriculum for a 1-semester or 1-year course in electronics is designed to take students from basic through advanced electronic systems. It covers several electronic areas, such as digital electronics, communication electronics, industrial process control, instrumentation, programmable controllers, and robotics. The guide contains…

  2. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-04-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  3. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events. PMID:25868677

  4. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices on {110}<100> oriented substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2014-08-05

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices on {110}<100> textured substrates are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  5. [100] or [110] aligned, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2015-03-24

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, [100] or [110] textured, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  6. Recent advances in conjugated polymers for light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  7. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    PubMed Central

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  8. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Subarna Raj

    Research in noble metal nanoparticles has led to exciting progress in a versatile array of applications. For the purpose of better tailoring of nanoparticles activities and understanding the correlation between their structures and properties, control over the composition, shape, size and architecture of bimetallic and multimetallic nanomaterials plays an important role on revealing their new or enhanced functions for potentials application. Advance electron microscopy techniques were used to provide atomic scale insights into the structure-properties of different materials: PtPd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt, AgPd/Pt and AuCu/Pt nanoparticles. The objective of this work is to understand the physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials and describe synthesis, characterization, surface properties and growth mechanism of various bimetallic and multimetallic nanoparticles. The findings have provided us with novel and significant insights into the physical and chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Different synthesis routes allowed us to synthesize bimetallic: Pt-Pd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt and trimetallic: AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt, core-shell and alloyed nanoparticles with monodispersed sizes, controlled shapes and tunable surface properties. For example, we have synthesized the polyhedral PtPd core-shell nanoparticles with octahedral, decahedral, and triangular plates. Decahedral PtPd core-shell structures are novel morphologies for this system. For the first time we fabricated that the Au core and Au3Cu alloyed shell nanoparticles passivated with CuS2 surface layers and characterized by Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of the high-resolution micrographs reveals that these nanoparticles have decahedral structure with shell periodicity, and that each of the particles is composed by Au core and Au3Cu ordered superlattice alloyed shell surrounded by CuS 2 surface layer. Additionally, we have described both experimental and theoretical methods of

  9. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  10. Fiber-based wearable electronics: a review of materials, fabrication, devices, and applications.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Shu, Lin; Li, Qiao; Chen, Song; Wang, Fei; Tao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-08-20

    Fiber-based structures are highly desirable for wearable electronics that are expected to be light-weight, long-lasting, flexible, and conformable. Many fibrous structures have been manufactured by well-established lost-effective textile processing technologies, normally at ambient conditions. The advancement of nanotechnology has made it feasible to build electronic devices directly on the surface or inside of single fibers, which have typical thickness of several to tens microns. However, imparting electronic functions to porous, highly deformable and three-dimensional fiber assemblies and maintaining them during wear represent great challenges from both views of fundamental understanding and practical implementation. This article attempts to critically review the current state-of-arts with respect to materials, fabrication techniques, and structural design of devices as well as applications of the fiber-based wearable electronic products. In addition, this review elaborates the performance requirements of the fiber-based wearable electronic products, especially regarding the correlation among materials, fiber/textile structures and electronic as well as mechanical functionalities of fiber-based electronic devices. Finally, discussions will be presented regarding to limitations of current materials, fabrication techniques, devices concerning manufacturability and performance as well as scientific understanding that must be improved prior to their wide adoption. PMID:24943999

  11. Advanced Power Electronics for LED Drivers: Advanced Technologies for integrated Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: MIT is teaming with Georgia Institute of Technology, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) to create more efficient power circuits for energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through advances in 3 related areas. First, the team is using semiconductors made of high-performing gallium nitride grown on a low-cost silicon base (GaN-on-Si). These GaN-on-Si semiconductors conduct electricity more efficiently than traditional silicon semiconductors. Second, the team is developing new magnetic materials and structures to reduce the size and increase the efficiency of an important LED power component, the inductor. This advancement is important because magnetics are the largest and most expensive part of a circuit. Finally, the team is creating an entirely new circuit design to optimize the performance of the new semiconductors and magnetic devices it is using.

  12. Axial Electron Heat Loss From Mirror Devices Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D

    2004-08-16

    An issue of the axial electron heat loss is of a significant importance for mirror-based fusion devices. This problem has been considered in a number of publications but it is still shrouded in misconceptions. In this paper we revisit it once again. We discuss the following issues: (1) Formation of the electron distribution function in the end tank at large expansion ratios; (2) The secondary emission from the end plates and the ways of suppressing it (if needed); (3) Ionization and charge exchange in the presence of neutrals in the end tanks; (4) Instabilities caused by the peculiar shape of the electron distribution function and their possible impact on the electron heat losses; (5) Electron heat losses in the pulsed mode of operation of mirror devices.

  13. A Novel Device for Intravaginal Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Frank Fuchs, Holger; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Steil, Volker; Ziglio, Francesco; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Postoperative intravaginal brachytherapy for endometrial carcinoma is usually performed with {sup 192}Ir high-dose rate (HDR) afterloading. A potential alternative is treatment with a broadband 50kV X-ray point source, the advantage being its low energy and the consequential steep dose gradient. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a homogeneous cylindrical energy deposition around a newly designed vaginal applicator. Methods and Materials: To create constant isodose layers along the cylindrical plastic vaginal applicator, the source (INTRABEAM system) was moved in steps of 17-19.5 mm outward from the tip of the applicator. Irradiation for a predetermined time was performed at each position. The axial shift was established by a stepping mechanism that was mounted on a table support. The total dose/dose distribution was determined using film dosimetry (Gafchromic EBT) in a 'solid water' phantom. The films were evaluated with Mathematica 5.2 and OmniPro-I'mRT 1.6. The results (dose D0/D5/D10 in 0/5/10 mm tissue depth) were compared with an {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading plan for multiple sampling points around the applicator. Results: Three different dose distributions with lengths of 3.9-7.3 cm were created. The irradiation time based on the delivery of 5/7 Gy to a 5 mm tissue depth was 19/26 min to 27/38 min. D0/D5/D10 was 150%/100%/67% for electronic brachytherapy and 140%/100%/74% for the afterloading technique. The deviation for repeated measurements in the phantom was <7%. Conclusions: It is possible to create a homogeneous cylindrical dose distribution, similar to {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading, through the superimposition of multiple spherical dose distributions by stepping a kilovolt point source.

  14. Testing Electronic Devices for Single-Event Upset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Malone, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Report prepared describes equipment and summarizes both pretest and onsite procedures for testing of digital electronic devices for susceptibility to single-event upset. Term "single-event upset" denotes variety of temporary or permanent bit flips or latchup induced by single particles of ionizing radiation. Vacuum chamber houses device under test while exposed to ion beam. Vacuum chamber and associated equipment must be brought to ion-beam facility for test.

  15. [Implementation of a pretreatment device for an electronic nose].

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan-Yang; Wen, Xiao-Gang; Wan, Mei; Liu, Rui; Chen, Lü-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Ming

    2012-06-01

    A pretreament device was implemented for removing the interference of humidity on the baseline signal response of sensors in an electronic nose, which was used for rapid detection and real-time monitoring of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) pollution in soil. The desiccant material was optimized, and the humidity removal performance and adsorpiton of VCHs was studied. The pretreatment device was evaluated by both the electronic nose and gas chromatography (GC) for its applicability in monitoring the PCE concentration in the desorption gas during the soil ventilation process. The following results were obtained: 1) A desiccant tube with anhydrous calcium chloride followed by a halogenated hydrocarbon separation tube was the best device, with a humidity removal rate of over 99%, and the baseline values of each sensor in the electronic nose were close to that of the control. 2) The desiccant device described above could continuously remove almost all the humidity from air with 75% humidity within 90 min, and the humidity removal rate remained above 95% within 120 min, while little interference was observed on the baseline of each sensor. 3) Little adsorption was observed by the pretreatment device, the relative error being only 3% - 5% between the concentration of VCHs before and after the filtration by the pretreatment device. 4) When applied for monitoring the remediation progress in a soil ventilation process, 99% of humidity was removed within 120 min from air with humidity of over 98%, and the data determined with the electronic nose and GC fitted each other very well, with R2 > 0.99. From the above, the pretreatment device connected with the electronic nose was considered to be applicable for monitoring the soil remediation process. PMID:22946199

  16. Advances in digital video for electronic media.

    PubMed

    McAfooes, J A

    1997-01-01

    From media's early days of film strips and records, to today's multimedia CD-ROMs, nurses have embraced educational tools. Today, the capabilities of these tools have placed a tremendous demand for providing information any time, any where. This has led to increasing digitization of sights and sounds. Once digitized, this information can travel over information highways made up of telephone lines, fiberoptic cables, microwaves and satellites, or it can be stored on magnetic and optical media. Technological advances have made it possible for computer users to create, store and retrieve high quality digital still and moving video and audio for inclusion in electronic media. Methods for digitizing include capturing and converting the information with cameras, scanners and capture boards. Digital video compression/decompression (codec) standards vary in quality. Potential uses of digital video abound including video on demand, videoconferencing, distance learning, telemedicine, on-line education and computer-based training. Examples illustrating the differences in digital video formats will be shown during the presentation. PMID:10175444

  17. Inverted organic photovoltaic device with a new electron transport layer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that there is a new solution-processed electron transport layer, lithium-doped zinc oxide (LZO), with high-performance inverted organic photovoltaic device. The device exhibits a fill factor of 68.58%, an open circuit voltage of 0.86 V, a short-circuit current density of −9.35 cm/mA2 along with 5.49% power conversion efficiency. In addition, we studied the performance of blend ratio dependence on inverted organic photovoltaics. Our device also demonstrates a long stability shelf life over 4 weeks in air. PMID:24674457

  18. Electronic firing systems and methods for firing a device

    DOEpatents

    Frickey, Steven J.; Svoboda, John M.

    2012-04-24

    An electronic firing system comprising a control system, a charging system, an electrical energy storage device, a shock tube firing circuit, a shock tube connector, a blasting cap firing circuit, and a blasting cap connector. The control system controls the charging system, which charges the electrical energy storage device. The control system also controls the shock tube firing circuit and the blasting cap firing circuit. When desired, the control system signals the shock tube firing circuit or blasting cap firing circuit to electrically connect the electrical energy storage device to the shock tube connector or the blasting cap connector respectively.

  19. The Physiologic Effects of Multiple Simultaneous Electronic Control Device Discharges

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Donald M.; Ho, Jeffrey D.; Reardon, Robert F.; Sweeney, James D.; Miner, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Law enforcement and military personnel use electronic control devices to control non-compliant and actively resistive subjects. The TASER® Shockwave is a new electronic control device designed specifically as an area denial device capable of delivering multiple simultaneous discharges. This is the first study to examine the effects of multiple simultaneous device discharges in humans. Methods: Volunteers were exposed to multiple (two to three), simultaneous 5-second discharges from the Shockwave device to the chest, back, chest to abdomen, or thighs. Blood was analyzed before and after discharge for pH, lactate, potassium, creatine kinase (CK), and troponin. Continuous spirometry was performed before, during, and after the discharge. In addition, electrocardiograms (ECGs) before and after discharge were recorded, and echocardiography was used to determine the rhythm during discharge. Results: Small elevations of lactate occurred. Moderate increases in CK at 24 hours occurred and appeared to be related to the number of simultaneous discharges. There was a trend to a decrease in minute ventilation in the volunteers exposed to two simultaneous discharges, but it did not reach statistical significance. ECG changes only reflected an increase in vagal tone, and there was no evidence of capture by echocardiography. Five-second, simultaneous, multiple exposures to the TASER Shockwave device were reasonably tolerated by our human volunteers. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this device may have a reasonable risk/benefit ratio when used to protect an area from a threat. PMID:20411076

  20. Roll-to-roll manufacturing of electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, N. A.; Stolley, T.; Hermanns, U.; Kroemer, U.; Reus, A.; Lopp, A.; Campo, M.; Landgraf, H.

    2012-03-01

    Roll-to-Roll (R2R) production of thin film based electronic devices (e.g. solar cells, activematrix TFT backplanes & touch screens) combine the advantages of the use of inexpensive, lightweight & flexible substrates with high throughput production. Significant cost reduction opportunities can also be found in terms of processing tool capital cost, utilized substrate area and process gas flow when compared with batch processing systems. Nevertheless, material handling, device patterning and yield issues have limited widespread utilization of R2R manufacturing within the electronics industry.

  1. Study on the frequency characteristics of nanogap electron devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ji; Wang, Qilong E-mail: bell@seu.edu.cn; Qi, Zhiyang; Zhai, Yusheng; Zhang, Xiaobing E-mail: bell@seu.edu.cn

    2015-05-28

    Ballistic electron transport in the nanogap devices will make it practical to combine the advantages of solid-state devices and vacuum electron devices including high integration and high frequency characteristics. Although a number of experiments have been exploited on frequency characteristic in nanogap, less modeling or calculations were investigated at such scale yet. In this paper, the concept of mean flight time is proposed in order to theoretically determine the frequency in nanoscale. Traditionally, we have to first determine the frequency response diagram and then deduce the cut-off frequency. This work presents a new method for exploring the frequency characteristics of electron transport in a nanogap structure by calculations and numerical simulations. A double-gate structure was applied in the simulations, and the results suggest that the nanogap structure can perform in the THz range. Additionally, an equivalent circuit model was adopted to demonstrate the validity of this method. Our results provide a model for the intrinsic ballistic transportation of electrons inside the nanogap electron devices.

  2. Porphyrins as Molecular Electronic Components of Functional Devices

    PubMed Central

    Jurow, Matthew; Schuckman, Amanda E.; Batteas, James D.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2010-01-01

    The proposal that molecules can perform electronic functions in devices such as diodes, rectifiers, wires, capacitors, or serve as functional materials for electronic or magnetic memory, has stimulated intense research across physics, chemistry, and engineering for over 35 years. Because biology uses porphyrins and metalloporphyrins as catalysts, small molecule transporters, electrical conduits, and energy transducers in photosynthesis, porphyrins are an obvious class of molecules to investigate for molecular electronic functions. Of the numerous kinds of molecules under investigation for molecular electronics applications, porphyrins and their related macrocycles are of particular interest because they are robust and their electronic properties can be tuned by chelation of a metal ion and substitution on the macrocycle. The other porphyrinoids have equally variable and adjustable photophysical properties, thus photonic applications are potentiated. At least in the near term, realistic architectures for molecular electronics will require self-organization or nanoprinting on surfaces. This review concentrates on self-organized porphyrinoids as components of working electronic devices on electronically active substrates with particular emphasis on the effect of surface, molecular design, molecular orientation and matrix on the detailed electronic properties of single molecules. PMID:20936084

  3. Consistent low-field mobility modeling for advanced MOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojević, Zlatan; Baumgartner, Oskar; Filipović, Lidija; Kosina, Hans; Karner, Markus; Kernstock, Christian; Prause, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we develop several extensions to semi-classical modeling of low-field mobility, which are necessary to treat planar and non-planar channel geometries on equal footing. We advance the state-of-the-art by generalizing the Prange-Nee model for surface roughness scattering to non-planar geometries, providing a fully numerical treatment of Coulomb scattering, and formulating the Kubo-Greenwood mobility model in a consistent, dimension-independent manner. These extensions allow meaningful comparison of planar and non-planar structures alike, and open the door to evaluating emerging device concepts, such as the FinFET or the junction-less transistor, on physical grounds.

  4. Novel electron devices based on the unique properties of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, M. N.

    An account is given of the unique design principles that apply to such electron devices as metal-insulator-metal photodetectors, cascade and virtual-contact FETs, and high-electron-mobility transistors. It is noted that while diamond is a high-power, high-temperature, or extremely HF amplifier, it cannot accomplish all three functions simultaneously. Attention is given to the significance of diamond's heat-dissipation capabilities.

  5. Control system for insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Oleg A.; Den Hartog, Patric; Moog, Elizabeth R.; Smith, Martin L.

    1997-07-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like 'open all IDs' are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed.

  6. Control system for insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, O.A.; Den Hartog, P.; Moog, E.R.; Smith, M.L.

    1997-09-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like ``open all IDs`` are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed.

  7. Control system for insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, O.A.; Den Hartog, P.; Moog, E.R.; Smith, M.L.

    1997-07-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like {open_quotes}open all IDs{close_quotes} are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Towards manufacturing of advanced logic devices by double-patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Chiew-seng; Halle, Scott; Holmes, Steven; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew; van Dommelen, Youri; Jiang, Aiqin; Crouse, Michael; Dunn, Shannon; Hetzer, David; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Cantone, Jason; Huli, Lior; Rodgers, Martin; Martinick, Brian

    2011-04-01

    As reported previously, the IBM Alliance has established a DETO (Double-Expose-Track-Optimized) baseline, in collaboration with ASML, TEL, and CNSE, to evaluate commercially available DETO photoresist system for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. Although EUV lithography is the baseline strategy for <2x nm logic nodes, alternative techniques are still being pursued. The DETO technique produces pitch-split patterns capable of supporting 16 nm and 11 nm node semiconductor devices. We present the long-term monitoring performances of CD uniformity (CDU), overlay, and defectivity of our DETO process. CDU and overlay performances for controlled experiments are also presented. Two alignment schemes in DETO are compared experimentally for their effects on inter-level & intralevel overlays, and space CDU. We also experimented with methods for improving CDU, in which the CD-OptimizerTMand DoseMapperTM were evaluated separately and in tandem. Overlay improvements using the Correction Per Exposure (CPE) and the intra-field High-Order Process Correction (i-HOPC) were compared against the usual linear correction method. The effects of the exposure field size are also compared between a small field and the full field. Included in all the above, we also compare the performances derived from stack-integrated wafers and bare-Si wafers.

  9. Deformable devices with integrated functional nanomaterials for wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Jongsu; Son, Donghee; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-03-01

    As the market and related industry for wearable electronics dramatically expands, there are continuous and strong demands for flexible and stretchable devices to be seamlessly integrated with soft and curvilinear human skin or clothes. However, the mechanical mismatch between the rigid conventional electronics and the soft human body causes many problems. Therefore, various prospective nanomaterials that possess a much lower flexural rigidity than their bulk counterparts have rapidly established themselves as promising electronic materials replacing rigid silicon and/or compound semiconductors in next-generation wearable devices. Many hybrid structures of multiple nanomaterials have been also developed to pursue both high performance and multifunctionality. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art wearable devices based on one- or two-dimensional nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, single-crystal silicon and oxide nanomembranes, organic nanomaterials and their hybrids) in combination with zero-dimensional functional nanomaterials (e.g., metal/oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots). Starting from an introduction of materials strategies, we describe device designs and the roles of individual ones in integrated systems. Detailed application examples of wearable sensors/actuators, memories, energy devices, and displays are also presented.

  10. Ultra-slim flexible glass for roll-to-roll electronic device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Sean; Glaesemann, Scott; Li, Xinghua

    2014-08-01

    As displays and electronics evolve to become lighter, thinner, and more flexible, the choice of substrate continues to be critical to their overall optimization. The substrate directly affects improvements in the designs, materials, fabrication processes, and performance of advanced electronics. With their inherent benefits such as surface quality, optical transmission, hermeticity, and thermal and dimensional stability, glass substrates enable high-quality and long-life devices. As substrate thicknesses are reduced below 200 μm, ultra-slim flexible glass continues to provide these inherent benefits to high-performance flexible electronics such as displays, touch sensors, photovoltaics, and lighting. In addition, the reduction in glass thickness also allows for new device designs and high-throughput, continuous manufacturing enabled by R2R processes. This paper provides an overview of ultra-slim flexible glass substrates and how they enable flexible electronic device optimization. Specific focus is put on flexible glass' mechanical reliability. For this, a combination of substrate design and process optimizations has been demonstrated that enables R2R device fabrication on flexible glass. Demonstrations of R2R flexible glass processes such as vacuum deposition, photolithography, laser patterning, screen printing, slot die coating, and lamination have been made. Compatibility with these key process steps has resulted in the first demonstration of a fully functional flexible glass device fabricated completely using R2R processes.

  11. 46 CFR 121.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 121.410 Section 121.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS VESSEL...

  12. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment §...

  13. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment §...

  14. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment §...

  15. 46 CFR 121.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 121.410 Section 121.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS VESSEL...

  16. 46 CFR 121.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 121.410 Section 121.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS VESSEL...

  17. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  18. 14 CFR 135.144 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 135.144 Section 135.144 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS...

  19. 14 CFR 121.306 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 121.306 Section 121.306 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND...

  20. 14 CFR 125.204 - Portable electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Portable electronic devices. 125.204 Section 125.204 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A...

  1. Travel in Adverse Weather Using Electronic Mobility Guidance Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Leicester W.

    1975-01-01

    After a discussion of the required characteristics of an ideal aid for blind individuals traveling in adverse weather, four electronic mobility guidance devices- the Mowat Sonar Sensor, the Russell E Model Pathsounder, the Bionic C-5 Laser Cane, and the Mark II Binaural Sensory Aid-are described in detail. (Author/SB)

  2. A Web Service and Interface for Remote Electronic Device Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutta, S.; Prakash, S.; Estrada, D.; Pop, E.

    2011-01-01

    A lightweight Web Service and a Web site interface have been developed, which enable remote measurements of electronic devices as a "virtual laboratory" for undergraduate engineering classes. Using standard browsers without additional plugins (such as Internet Explorer, Firefox, or even Safari on an iPhone), remote users can control a Keithley…

  3. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2010-10-12

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  4. Non-equilibrium Green function method: theory and application in simulation of nanometer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Van-Nam

    2014-09-01

    We review fundamental aspects of the non-equilibrium Green function method in the simulation of nanometer electronic devices. The method is implemented into our recently developed computer package OPEDEVS to investigate transport properties of electrons in nano-scale devices and low-dimensional materials. Concretely, we present the definition of the four real-time Green functions, the retarded, advanced, lesser and greater functions. Basic relations among these functions and their equations of motion are also presented in detail as the basis for the performance of analytical and numerical calculations. In particular, we review in detail two recursive algorithms, which are implemented in OPEDEVS to solve the Green functions defined in finite-size opened systems and in the surface layer of semi-infinite homogeneous ones. Operation of the package is then illustrated through the simulation of the transport characteristics of a typical semiconductor device structure, the resonant tunneling diodes.

  5. 77 FR 34063 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... certain electronics devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof...

  6. Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Heller, Christian Maria Anton

    2008-05-06

    A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

  7. Electronic simulation of a multiterminal quantum Hall effect device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosso, A.; Capra, P. P.

    1999-04-01

    A circuit with only resistors and unity gain amplifiers can be proven to be equivalent to the Ricketts and Kemeny electrical model of multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices. By means of the new equivalent circuit, commercial software for electronic circuit analysis can be used to study a QHE measurement system. Moreover, it can be easily implemented, and we were able to build a circuit that simulates the electrical behavior of a QHE device. Particular care was taken in the design to reduce the effect of parasitic capacitances, which act as loads connected to the device terminals. Bootstrap buffers have been adopted to significantly reduce the capacitance of input stage. The small residual loading effect can be calculated and eliminated, allowing simulation of a QHE device with good accuracy.

  8. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and public...

  9. Surface chemical deposition of advanced electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkevig, Cameron

    The focus of this work was to examine the direct plating of Cu on Ru diffusion barriers for use in interconnect technology and the substrate mediated growth of graphene on boron nitride for use in advanced electronic applications. The electrodeposition of Cu on Ru(0001) and polycrystalline substrates (with and without pretreatment in an iodine containing solution) has been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), current--time transient measurements (CTT), in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The EC-AFM data show that at potentials near the OPD/UPD threshold, Cu crystallites exhibit pronounced growth anisotropy, with lateral dimensions greatly exceeding vertical dimensions. XPS measurements confirmed the presence and stability of adsorbed I on the Ru surface following pre-treatment in a KI/H2SO4 solution and following polarization to at least -200 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. CV data of samples pre-reduced in I-containing electrolyte exhibited a narrow Cu deposition peak in the overpotential region and a UPD peak. The kinetics of the electrodeposited Cu films was investigated by CTT measurements and applied to theoretical models of nucleation. The data indicated that a protective I adlayer may be deposited on an airexposed Ru electrode as the oxide surface is electrochemically reduced, and that this layer will inhibit reformation of an oxide during the Cu electroplating process. A novel method for epitaxial graphene growth directly on a dielectric substrate of systematically variable thickness was studied. Mono/multilayers of BN(111) were grown on Ru(0001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), exhibiting a flat (non-nanomesh) R30(✓3x✓3) structure. BN(111) was used as a template for growth of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of C2H4 at 1000 K. Characterization by LEED, Auger, STM/STS and Raman indicate the graphene is in registry with the BN substrate, and exhibits a HOPG-like 0 eV bandgap density

  10. 78 FR 56245 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for... limited exclusion order against certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components thereof... Corporation of Kyoto, Japan; Kyocera Communications, Inc. of San Diego, California; LG Electronics, Inc....

  11. Lithography for enabling advances in integrated circuits and devices.

    PubMed

    Garner, C Michael

    2012-08-28

    Because the transistor was fabricated in volume, lithography has enabled the increase in density of devices and integrated circuits. With the invention of the integrated circuit, lithography enabled the integration of higher densities of field-effect transistors through evolutionary applications of optical lithography. In 1994, the semiconductor industry determined that continuing the increase in density transistors was increasingly difficult and required coordinated development of lithography and process capabilities. It established the US National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors and this was expanded in 1999 to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors to align multiple industries to provide the complex capabilities to continue increasing the density of integrated circuits to nanometre scales. Since the 1960s, lithography has become increasingly complex with the evolution from contact printers, to steppers, pattern reduction technology at i-line, 248 nm and 193 nm wavelengths, which required dramatic improvements of mask-making technology, photolithography printing and alignment capabilities and photoresist capabilities. At the same time, pattern transfer has evolved from wet etching of features, to plasma etch and more complex etching capabilities to fabricate features that are currently 32 nm in high-volume production. To continue increasing the density of devices and interconnects, new pattern transfer technologies will be needed with options for the future including extreme ultraviolet lithography, imprint technology and directed self-assembly. While complementary metal oxide semiconductors will continue to be extended for many years, these advanced pattern transfer technologies may enable development of novel memory and logic technologies based on different physical phenomena in the future to enhance and extend information processing. PMID:22802500

  12. Semi-shunt field emission in electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2014-08-01

    We introduce a concept of semi-shunts representing needle shaped metallic protrusions shorter than the distance between a device electrodes. Due to the lightening rod type of field enhancement, they induce strong electron emission. We consider the corresponding signature effects in photovoltaic applications; they are: low open circuit voltages and exponentially strong random device leakiness. Comparing the proposed theory with our data for CdTe based solar cells, we conclude that stress can stimulate semi-shunts' growth making them shunting failure precursors. In the meantime, controllable semi-shunts can play a positive role mitigating the back field effects in photovoltaics.

  13. Biomolecular electronic devices based on self-organized deoxyguanosine nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Ross; Branca, Emanuela; Cingolani, Roberto; Di Felice, Rosa; Calzolari, Arrigo; Molinari, Elisa; Masiero, Salvatore; Spada, Gianpero; Gottarelli, Giovanni; Garbesi, Anna

    2002-04-01

    We report on a new class of hybrid electronic devices based on a DNA nucleoside (deoxyguanosine lipophilic derivative) whose assembled polymeric ribbons interconnect a submicron metallic gate. The device exhibits large conductivity at room temperature, rectifying behavior and strong current-voltage hysteresis. The transport mechanism through the molecules is investigated by comparing films with different self-assembling morphology. We found that the main transport mechanism is connected to pi-pi interactions between guanosine molecules and to the formation of a strong dipole along ribbons, consistently with the results of our first-principles calculations. PMID:11971799

  14. Evaluation of Miscellaneous and Electronic Device Energy Use in Hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Douglas R.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; Lai, Judy; Brown, Richard E.; Singer, Brett C.

    2012-09-01

    Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about one-thirdof the primary energy used in US buildings, and their energy use is increasing faster than other end-uses. In healthcare facilities, 30percent of the annual electricity was used by MELs in 2008. This paper presents methods and challenges for estimating medical MELs energy consumption along with estimates of energy use in a hospital by combining device-level metered data with inventories and usage information. An important finding is that common, small devices consume large amounts of energy in aggregate and should not be ignored when trying to address hospital energy use.

  15. Neuromimetic Circuits with Synaptic Devices Based on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sieu D.; Shi, Jian; Meroz, Yasmine; Mahadevan, L.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2014-12-01

    Strongly correlated electron systems such as the rare-earth nickelates (R NiO3 , R denotes a rare-earth element) can exhibit synapselike continuous long-term potentiation and depression when gated with ionic liquids; exploiting the extreme sensitivity of coupled charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom to stoichiometry. We present experimental real-time, device-level classical conditioning and unlearning using nickelate-based synaptic devices in an electronic circuit compatible with both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We establish a physical model for the device behavior based on electric-field-driven coupled ionic-electronic diffusion that can be utilized for design of more complex systems. We use the model to simulate a variety of associate and nonassociative learning mechanisms, as well as a feedforward recurrent network for storing memory. Our circuit intuitively parallels biological neural architectures, and it can be readily generalized to other forms of cellular learning and extinction. The simulation of neural function with electronic device analogs may provide insight into biological processes such as decision making, learning, and adaptation, while facilitating advanced parallel information processing in hardware.

  16. Design of advanced ultrasonic transducers for welding devices.

    PubMed

    Parrini, L

    2001-11-01

    A new high frequency ultrasonic transducer has been conceived, designed, prototyped, and tested. In the design phase, an advanced approach was used and established. The method is based on an initial design estimate obtained with finite element method (FEM) simulations. The simulated ultrasonic transducers and resonators are then built and characterized experimentally through laser interferometry and electrical resonance spectra. The comparison of simulation results with experimental data allows the parameters of FEM models to be adjusted and optimized. The achieved FEM simulations exhibit a remarkably high predictive potential and allow full control of the vibration behavior of the transducer. The new transducer is mounted on a wire bonder with a flange whose special geometry was calculated by means of FEM simulations. This flange allows the transducer to be attached on the wire bonder, not only in longitudinal nodes, but also in radial nodes of the ultrasonic field excited in the horn. This leads to a total decoupling of the transducer to the wire bonder, which has not been achieved so far. The new approach to mount ultrasonic transducers on a welding device is of major importance, not only for wire bonding, but also for all high power ultrasound applications and has been patented. PMID:11800125

  17. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhiche, Mike; Dufera, Hiz; Montagna, Deb

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  18. Drafting. Advanced Print Reading--Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document is a workbook for drafting students learning the basics of reading and interpreting electronic drawings and diagrams. The workbook contains eight units covering the following material: basic symbols; circuit symbols; electron tube symbols; winding symbols; semiconductor symbols; miscellaneous symbols; schematic diagrams; and…

  19. Electron guns and collectors developed at INP for electron cooling devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapa, A.N.; Shemyakin, A.V.

    1997-09-01

    Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) has a rich experience in designing electron guns and collectors for electron cooling devices. This paper is a review of the experience of several INP research groups in this field. Some results obtained at INP for systems without a guiding magnetic field are also discussed.

  20. Weak Values from Displacement Currents in Multiterminal Electron Devices.

    PubMed

    Marian, D; Zanghì, N; Oriols, X

    2016-03-18

    Weak values allow the measurement of observables associated with noncommuting operators. Up to now, position-momentum weak values have been mainly developed for (relativistic) photons. In this Letter, a proposal for the measurement of such weak values in typical electronic devices is presented. Inspired by the Ramo-Shockley-Pellegrini theorem that provides a relation between current and electron velocity, it is shown that the displacement current measured in multiterminal configurations can provide either a weak measurement of the momentum or strong measurement of position. This proposal opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied physics with state-of-the-art electronic technology. As an example, a setup for the measurement of the Bohmian velocity of (nonrelativistic) electrons is presented and tested with numerical experiments. PMID:27035291

  1. Weak Values from Displacement Currents in Multiterminal Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, D.; Zanghı, N.; Oriols, X.

    2016-03-01

    Weak values allow the measurement of observables associated with noncommuting operators. Up to now, position-momentum weak values have been mainly developed for (relativistic) photons. In this Letter, a proposal for the measurement of such weak values in typical electronic devices is presented. Inspired by the Ramo-Shockley-Pellegrini theorem that provides a relation between current and electron velocity, it is shown that the displacement current measured in multiterminal configurations can provide either a weak measurement of the momentum or strong measurement of position. This proposal opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied physics with state-of-the-art electronic technology. As an example, a setup for the measurement of the Bohmian velocity of (nonrelativistic) electrons is presented and tested with numerical experiments.

  2. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high–dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second.

  3. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high-dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second. PMID:27124455

  4. Analysis of insertion device magnet measurements for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.M.; Schlueter, R.; Wang, C.

    1993-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), which is currently being commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third generation light source designed to produce XUV radiation of unprecedented brightness. To meet the high brightness goal the storage ring has been designed for very small electron beam emittance and the undulators installed in the ALS are built to a high degree of precision. The allowable magnetic field errors are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed magnetic measurements and adjustments are performed on each undulator to qualify it for installation in the ALS. The first two ALS undulators, IDA and IDB, have been installed. This paper describes the program of measurements, data analysis, and adjustments carried out for these two devices. Calculations of the radiation spectrum, based upon magnetic measurements, are included. Final field integral distributions are also shown. Good field integral uniformity has been achieved using a novel correction scheme, which is also described.

  5. Interface engineering for high performance graphene electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Dae Yool; Yang, Sang Yoon; Park, Hamin; Shin, Woo Cheol; Oh, Joong Gun; Cho, Byung Jin; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2015-06-01

    A decade after the discovery of graphene flakes, exfoliated from graphite, we have now secured large scale and high quality graphene film growth technology via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. With the establishment of mass production of graphene using CVD, practical applications of graphene to electronic devices have gained an enormous amount of attention. However, several issues arise from the interfaces of graphene systems, such as damage/unintentional doping of graphene by the transfer process, the substrate effects on graphene, and poor dielectric formation on graphene due to its inert features, which result in degradation of both electrical performance and reliability in actual devices. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of the recent approaches to resolve these issues by interface engineering of graphene for high performance electronic devices. We deal with each interface that is encountered during the fabrication steps of graphene devices, from the graphene/metal growth substrate to graphene/high-k dielectrics, including the intermediate graphene/target substrate.

  6. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  7. Innovative Field Emitters for High-Voltage Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sominski, G. G.; Sezonov, V. E.; Taradaev, E. P.; Tumareva, T. A.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Kornishin, S. Yu.; Stepanova, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    We describe multitip field emitters with protective coatings, which were developed in Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. The coatings ensure long-term operation of the emitters under high currents and technical vacuum. Innovative multi-layer emitters composed of contacting nanolayers of materials with different work functions are presented as well. The possibility by using the developed emitters in high-voltage electronic devices is demonstrated.

  8. Transvenous Lead Extraction for Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Shea, Julie B

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates the important role that lead extraction plays in the management of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices. Individualized care of the patient is paramount when considering lead management strategies. The critical care nurse must have a comprehensive understanding of the indications, procedural considerations, and preprocedural and postprocedural care for patients undergoing lead extraction procedures, thereby improving patient safety and maximizing patient outcomes. PMID:26484992

  9. The revolution in SiGe: impact on device electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harame, D. L.; Koester, S. J.; Freeman, G.; Cottrel, P.; Rim, K.; Dehlinger, G.; Ahlgren, D.; Dunn, J. S.; Greenberg, D.; Joseph, A.; Anderson, F.; Rieh, J.-S.; Onge, S. A. S. T.; Coolbaugh, D.; Ramachandran, V.; Cressler, J. D.; Subbanna, S.

    2004-03-01

    SiGe is having a major impact in device electronics. The most mature application is the SiGe BiCMOS technology which is in production throughout the world. The areas of most rapid growth are in CMOS where SiGe is being considered for a wide variety of elements including raised S/D, poly-SiGe Gates, in buffer layers to create a tensile strained Si layer, and as the conducting channel in MODFETs.

  10. The molecular electronic device and the biochip computer: present status.

    PubMed

    Haddon, R C; Lamola, A A

    1985-04-01

    The idea that a single molecule might function as a self-contained electronic device has been of interest for some time. However, a fully integrated version--the biochip or the biocomputer, in which both production and assembly of molecular electronic components is achieved through biotechnology-is a relatively new concept that is currently attracting attention both within the scientific community and among the general public. In the present article we draw together some of the approaches being considered for the construction of such devices and delineate the revolutionary nature of the current proposals for molecular electronic devices (MEDs) and biochip computers (BCCs). With the silicon semiconductor conductor industry already in place and in view of the continuing successes of the lithographic process it seems appropriate to ask why the highly speculative MED or BCC has engendered such interest. In some respects the answer is paradigmatic as much as it is real. It is perhaps best stated as the promise of the realm of the molecular. Thus it is envisioned that devices will be constructed by assembly of individual molecular electronic components into arrays, thereby engineering from small upward rather than large downward as do current lithographic techniques. An important corollary of the construction technique is that the functional elements of such an array would be individual molecules rather than macroscopic ensembles. These two aspects of the MED/BCC--assembly of molecular arrays and individually accessible functional molecular units--are truly revolutionary. Both require scientific breakthroughs and the necessary principles, quite apart from the technology, remain essentially unknown. It is concluded that the advent of the MED/BCC still lies well before us. The twin criteria of utilization of individual molecules as functional elements and the assembly of such elements remains as elusive as ever. Biology engineers structures on the molecular scale but

  11. The Molecular Electronic Device and the Biochip Computer: Present Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddon, R. C.; Lamola, A. A.

    1985-04-01

    The idea that a single molecule might function as a self-contained electronic device has been of interest for some time. However, a fully integrated version--the biochip or the biocomputer, in which both production and assembly of molecular electronic components is achieved through biotechnology--is a relatively new concept that is currently attracting attention both within the scientific community and among the general public. In the present article we draw together some of the approaches being considered for the construction of such devices and delineate the revolutionary nature of the current proposals for molecular electronic devices (MEDs) and biochip computers (BCCs). With the silicon semiconductor industry already in place and in view of the continuing successes of the lithographic process it seems appropriate to ask why the highly speculative MED or BCC has engendered such interest. In some respects the answer is paradigmatic as much as it is real. It is perhaps best stated as the promise of the realm of the molecular. Thus it is envisioned that devices will be constructed by assembly of individual molecular electronic components into arrays, thereby engineering from small upward rather than large downward as do current lithographic techniques. An important corollary of the construction technique is that the functional elements of such an array would be individual molecules rather than macroscopic ensembles. These two aspects of the MED/BCC--assembly of molecular arrays and individually accessible functional molecular units--are truly revolutionary. Both require scientific breakthroughs and the necessary principles, quite apart from the technology, remain essentially unknown. It is concluded that the advent of the MED/BCC still lies well before us. The twin criteria of utilization of individual molecules as functional elements and the assembly of such elements remains as elusive as ever. Biology engineers structures on the molecular scale but biomolecules

  12. The molecular electronic device and the biochip computer: present status.

    PubMed Central

    Haddon, R C; Lamola, A A

    1985-01-01

    The idea that a single molecule might function as a self-contained electronic device has been of interest for some time. However, a fully integrated version--the biochip or the biocomputer, in which both production and assembly of molecular electronic components is achieved through biotechnology-is a relatively new concept that is currently attracting attention both within the scientific community and among the general public. In the present article we draw together some of the approaches being considered for the construction of such devices and delineate the revolutionary nature of the current proposals for molecular electronic devices (MEDs) and biochip computers (BCCs). With the silicon semiconductor conductor industry already in place and in view of the continuing successes of the lithographic process it seems appropriate to ask why the highly speculative MED or BCC has engendered such interest. In some respects the answer is paradigmatic as much as it is real. It is perhaps best stated as the promise of the realm of the molecular. Thus it is envisioned that devices will be constructed by assembly of individual molecular electronic components into arrays, thereby engineering from small upward rather than large downward as do current lithographic techniques. An important corollary of the construction technique is that the functional elements of such an array would be individual molecules rather than macroscopic ensembles. These two aspects of the MED/BCC--assembly of molecular arrays and individually accessible functional molecular units--are truly revolutionary. Both require scientific breakthroughs and the necessary principles, quite apart from the technology, remain essentially unknown. It is concluded that the advent of the MED/BCC still lies well before us. The twin criteria of utilization of individual molecules as functional elements and the assembly of such elements remains as elusive as ever. Biology engineers structures on the molecular scale but

  13. Advanced nanoimprint patterning for functional electronics and biochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao

    Nano-fabrication has been widely used for a variety of disciplines, including electronics, material science, nano-optics, and nano-biotechnology. This dissertation focuses on nanoimprint lithography (NIL) based novel nano-patterning techniques for fabricating functional structures, and discusses their applications in advanced electronics and high-sensitivity molecular sensing. In this dissertation, examples of using nano-fabricated structures for promising electronic applications are presented. For instance, 10 nm and 18 nm features are NIL-fabricated for Si/SiGe heterojunction tunneling transistors and graphene nano-ribbon transistors, using shadow evaporation and line-width shrinking techniques, respectively. An ultrafast laser melting based method is applied on flexible plastic substrates to correct defects of nano-features. Nano-texturing of sapphire substrate is developed to improve the light extraction of GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) by 70 %. A novel multi-layer nano-patterned Si-mediated catalyst is discovered to grow straight and uniform Si nanowires with optimized properties in size, location, and crystallization on amorphous SiO2 substrate. Nano-structures are also functionalized into highly sensitive bio-chemical sensors. Plasmonic nano-bar antenna arrays are demonstrated to effectively sense infrared molecules >10 times better than conventional plasmonic sensors. As small as 20 nm wide nano-channel fluidic devices are developed to linearize and detect DNA molecules for potential DNA sequencing. An integrated fluidic system is built to incorporate plasmonic nano-structures for 30X-enhanced fluorescence detection of large DNA molecules.

  14. Modeling of explosive electron emission and electron beam dynamics in high-current devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anishchenko, S. V.; Gurinovich, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    Based on a detailed analysis of explosive electron emission in high-current electronic devices, we formulate a system of equations that describes the expansion of the cathode plasma and the generation of high-current electron beams. The system underlies the numerical algorithm for the hybrid code which enables simulating the charged particles' dynamics in high-current vircators with open resonators. Using the Gabor-Morlet transform, we perform the time-frequency analysis of vircator radiation.

  15. Advances in Defocused-Beam Electron-Probe Microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, P. K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2010-03-01

    Advances in defocused-beam electron-probe microanalysis are presented, with an Excel VBA algorithm which uses a polynomial alpha factor correction algorithm coupled with a catanorm procedure to correct DBA data.

  16. Internet-Based Device-Assisted Remote Monitoring of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pron, G; Ieraci, L; Kaulback, K

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) report was to conduct a systematic review of the available published evidence on the safety, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of Internet-based device-assisted remote monitoring systems (RMSs) for therapeutic cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. The MAS evidence-based review was performed to support public financing decisions. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major cause of fatalities in developed countries. In the United States almost half a million people die of SCD annually, resulting in more deaths than stroke, lung cancer, breast cancer, and AIDS combined. In Canada each year more than 40,000 people die from a cardiovascular related cause; approximately half of these deaths are attributable to SCD. Most cases of SCD occur in the general population typically in those without a known history of heart disease. Most SCDs are caused by cardiac arrhythmia, an abnormal heart rhythm caused by malfunctions of the heart’s electrical system. Up to half of patients with significant heart failure (HF) also have advanced conduction abnormalities. Cardiac arrhythmias are managed by a variety of drugs, ablative procedures, and therapeutic CIEDs. The range of CIEDs includes pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. Bradycardia is the main indication for PMs and individuals at high risk for SCD are often treated by ICDs. Heart failure (HF) is also a significant health problem and is the most frequent cause of hospitalization in those over 65 years of age. Patients with moderate to severe HF may also have cardiac arrhythmias, although the cause may be related more to heart pump or haemodynamic failure. The presence of HF, however

  17. Toward the development of portable miniature intelligent electronic color identification devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolau, Dan V., Jr.; Livingston, Peter; Jahshan, David; Evans, Rob

    2004-03-01

    The identification and differentiation of colours is a relatively problematic task for colour-impaired and partially vision-impaired persons and an impossible one for completely blind. In various contexts, this leads to a loss of independence or an increased risk of harm. The identification of colour using optoelectronic devices, on the other hand, can be done precisely and inexpensively. Additionally, breakthroughs in miniaturising and integrating colour sensors into biological systems may lead to significant advances in electronic implants for alleviating blindness. Here we present a functional handheld device developed for the identification of colour, intended for use by the vision-impaired. We discuss the features and limitations of the device and describe in detail one target application - the identification of different banknote denominations by the blind.

  18. Advances in DC photocathode electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce M. Dunham; P. Heartmann; Reza Kazimi; Hongxiu Liu; B. M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; Charles K. Sinclair

    1998-07-01

    At Jefferson Lab, a DC photoemission gun using GaAs and GaAs-like cathodes provides a source of polarized electrons for the main accelerator. The gun is required to produce high average current with long operational lifetimes and high system throughout. Recent work has shown that careful control of the parameters affecting cathode lifetime lead to dramatic improvements in source operation. These conditions include vacuum and the related effect of ion backbombardment, and precise control of all of the electrons emitted from the cathode. In this paper, the authors will review recent results and discuss implications for future photocathode guns.

  19. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications. PMID:26459443

  20. Calcium chloride electron injection/extraction layers in organic electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Bo E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn; Gao, Zhi; Yang, Hongsheng; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian; Gong, Qihuang E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn

    2014-01-27

    Nontoxic calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) was introduced into organic electronic devices as cathode buffer layer (CBL). The turn-on voltage and maximum luminance of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with 1.5 nm CaCl{sub 2} was 3.5 V and 21 960 cd/m{sup 2}, respectively. OLED with 1.5 nm CaCl{sub 2} possessed comparable electroluminescent characteristics to that of the commonly used LiF. Moreover, the performance of the organic photovoltaic device with 0.5 nm CaCl{sub 2} was comparable to that of the control device with LiF. Therefore, CaCl{sub 2} has the potential to be used as the CBL for organic electronic devices.

  1. Opto-electronic devices with nanoparticles and their assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chieu Van

    Nanotechnology is a fast growing field; engineering matters at the nano-meter scale. A key nanomaterial is nanoparticles (NPs). These sub-wavelength (< 100nm) particles provide tremendous possibilities due to their unique electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. Plethora of NPs with various chemical composition, size and shape has been synthesized. Clever designs of sub-wavelength structures enable observation of unusual properties of materials, and have led to new areas of research such as metamaterials. This dissertation describes two self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles, leading to an ultra-soft thin film and multi-functional single electron device at room temperature. First, the layer-by-layer self-assembly of 10nm Au nanoparticles and polyelectrolytes is shown to behave like a cellular-foam with modulus below 100 kPa. As a result, the composite thin film (˜ 100nm) is 5 orders of magnitude softer than an equally thin typical polymer film. The thin film can be compressed reversibly to 60% strain. The extraordinarily low modulus and high compressibility are advantageous in pressure sensing applications. The unique mechanical properties of the composite film lead to development of an ultra-sensitive tactile imaging device capable of screening for breast cancer. On par with human finger sensitivity, the tactile device can detect a 5mm imbedded object up to 20mm below the surface with low background noise. The second device is based on a one-dimensional (1-D) self-directed self-assembly of Au NPs mediated by dielectric materials. Depending on the coverage density of the Au NPs assembly deposited on the device, electronic emission was observed at ultra-low bias of 40V, leading to low-power plasma generation in air at atmospheric pressure. Light emitted from the plasma is apparent to the naked eyes. Similarly, 1-D self-assembly of Au NPs mediated by iron oxide was fabricated and exhibits ferro-magnetic behavior. The multi-functional 1-D self-assembly of Au

  2. An Electromagnetic Spectrum for Millennial Students: Teaching Light, Color, Energy, and Frequency Using the Electronic Devices of Our Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Maureen Kendrick

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a comparison of student learning outcomes is made in sophomore-level physical science classes using a "traditional" pedagogical approach versus a "modern" approach. Specifically, when students were taught the electromagnetic spectrum using diagrams and examples that incorporate technological advances and electronic devices of our…

  3. Optical sensor array platform based on polymer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetse, Marc M.; Rensing, Peter A.; Sharpe, Ruben B. A.; van Heck, Gert T.; Allard, Bart A. M.; Meulendijks, Nicole N. M. M.; Kruijt, Peter G. M.; Tijdink, Marcel W. W. J.; De Zwart, René M.; Houben, René J.; Enting, Erik; van Veen, Sjaak J. J. F.; Schoo, Herman F. M.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of personal wellbeing and optimizing human performance are areas where sensors have only begun to be used. One of the reasons for this is the specific demands that these application areas put on the underlying technology and system properties. In many cases these sensors will be integrated in clothing, be worn on the skin, or may even be placed inside the body. This implies that flexibility and wearability of the systems is essential for their success. Devices based on polymer semiconductors allow for these demands since they can be fabricated with thin film technology. The use of thin film device technology allows for the fabrication of very thin sensors (e.g. integrated in food product packaging), flexible or bendable sensors in wearables, large area/distributed sensors, and intrinsically low-cost applications in disposable products. With thin film device technology a high level of integration can be achieved with parts that analyze signals, process and store data, and interact over a network. Integration of all these functions will inherently lead to better cost/performance ratios, especially if printing and other standard polymer technology such as high precision moulding is applied for the fabrication. In this paper we present an optical transmission sensor array based on polymer semiconductor devices made by thin film technology. The organic devices, light emitting diodes, photodiodes and selective medium chip, are integrated with classic electronic components. Together they form a versatile sensor platform that allows for the quantitative measurement of 100 channels and communicates wireless with a computer. The emphasis is given to the sensor principle, the design, fabrication technology and integration of the thin film devices.

  4. Critical appraisal of cardiac implantable electronic devices: complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Padeletti, Luigi; Mascioli, Giosuè; Perini, Alessandro Paoletti; Grifoni, Gino; Perrotta, Laura; Marchese, Procolo; Bontempi, Luca; Curnis, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Population aging and broader indications for the implant of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are the main reasons for the continuous increase in the use of pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-P, CRT-D). The growing burden of comorbidities in CIED patients, the greater complexity of the devices, and the increased duration of procedures have led to an augmented risk of infections, which is out of proportion to the increase in implantation rate. CIED infections are an ominous condition, which often implies the necessity of hospitalization and carries an augmented risk of in-hospital death. Their clinical presentation may be either at pocket or at endocardial level, but they can also manifest themselves with lone bacteremia. The management of these infections requires the complete removal of the device and subsequent, specific, antibiotic therapy. CIED failures are monitored by competent public authorities, that require physicians to alert them to any failures, and that suggest the opportune strategies for their management. Although the replacement of all potentially affected devices is often suggested, common practice indicates the replacement of only a minority of devices, as close follow-up of the patients involved may be a safer strategy. Implantation of a PM or an ICD may cause problems in the patients’ psychosocial adaptation and quality of life, and may contribute to the development of affective disorders. Clinicians are usually unaware of the psychosocial impact of implanted PMs and ICDs. The main difference between PM and ICD patients is the latter’s dramatic experience of receiving a shock. Technological improvements and new clinical evidences may help reduce the total burden of shocks. A specific supporting team, providing psychosocial help, may contribute to improving patient quality of life. PMID:22915942

  5. Ultra-thin layer packaging for implantable electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, A.; Aellen, T.; Uhl, S.; Graf, B.; Keppner, H.; Tardy, Y.; Burger, J.

    2013-07-01

    State of the art packaging for long-term implantable electronic devices generally uses reliable metal and glass housings; however, these are limited in the miniaturization potential and cost reduction. This paper focuses on the development of biocompatible hermetic thin-film packaging based on poly-para-xylylene (Parylene-C) and silicon oxide (SiOx) multilayers for smart implantable microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. For the fabrication, a combined Parylene/SiOx single-chamber deposition system was developed. Topological aspects of multilayers were characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Material compositions and layer interfaces were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To evaluate the multilayer corrosion protection, water vapor permeation was investigated using a calcium mirror test. The calcium mirror test shows very low water permeation rates of 2 × 10-3 g m-2 day-1 (23 °C, 45% RH) for a 4.7 µm multilayer, which is equivalent to a 1.9 mm pure Parylene-C coating. According to the packaging standard MIL-STD-883, the helium gas tightness was investigated. These helium permeation measurements predict that a multilayer of 10 µm achieves the hermeticity acceptance criterion required for long-term implantable medical devices.

  6. Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics, Auburn University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, Dan W.; Hopkins, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The union of Auburn University's Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics and the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center to form a Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) is discussed. An area of focus for the CCDS will be the development of silicon carbide electronics technology, in terms of semiconductors and crystal growth. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  7. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-06-20

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  8. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  9. Development of medical electronic devices in the APL space department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Several electronic devices for automatically correcting specific defects in a body's physiologic regulation and allowing approximately normal functioning are described. A self-injurious behavior inhibiting system (SIBIS) is fastened to the arm of a person with chronic self-injurious behavior patterns. An electric shock is delivered into the arm whenever the device senses above-threshold acceleration of the head such as occur with head-bangers. Sounding a buzzer tone with the shock eventually allows transference of the aversive stimulus to the buzzer so shocks are no longer necessary. A programmable implantable medication system features a solenoid pump placed beneath the skin and refueled by hypodermic needle. The pump functions are programmable and can deliver insulin, chemotherapy mixes and/or pain killers according to a preset schedule or on patient demand. Finally, an automatic implantible defibrillator has four electrodes attached directly to the heart for sensing electrical impulses or emitting them in response to cardiac fibrillation.

  10. Cumulative Interference to Aircraft Radios from Multiple Portable Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.

    2005-01-01

    Cumulative interference effects from portable electronic devices (PEDs) located inside a passenger cabin are conservatively estimated for aircraft radio receivers. PEDs' emission powers in an aircraft radio frequency band are first scaled according to their locations' interference path loss (IPL) values, and the results are summed to determine the total interference power. The multiple-equipment-factor (MEF) is determined by normalizing the result against the worst case contribution from a single device. Conservative assumptions were made and MEF calculations were performed for Boeing 737's Localizer, Glide-slope, Traffic Collision Avoidance System, and Very High Frequency Communication radio systems where full-aircraft IPL data were available. The results show MEF for the systems to vary between 10 and 14 dB. The same process was also used on the more popular window/door IPL data, and the comparison show the multiple-equipment-factor results came within one decibel (dB) of each other.

  11. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infection: From an Infection Prevention Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Sangeeta; Rahman, Riaz; Yassin, Mohamed H.

    2015-01-01

    A cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) is indicated for patients with severely reduced ejection fraction or with life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Infection related to a CIED is one of the most feared complications of this life-saving device. The rate of CIED infection has been estimated to be between 2 and 25; though evidence shows that this rate continues to rise with increasing expenditure to the patient as well as healthcare systems. Multiple risk factors have been attributed to the increased rates of CIED infection and host comorbidities as well as procedure related risks. Infection prevention efforts are being developed as defined bundles in numerous hospitals around the country given the increased morbidity and mortality from CIED related infections. This paper aims at reviewing the various infection prevention measures employed at hospitals and also highlights the areas that have relatively less established evidence for efficacy. PMID:26550494

  12. Electronic SSKIN pathway: reducing device-related pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Natalie

    2016-08-11

    This article describes how an interprofessional project in a London NHS Foundation Trust was undertaken to develop an intranet-based medical device-related pressure ulcer prevention and management pathway for clinical staff working across an adult critical care directorate, where life-threatening events require interventions using medical devices. The aim of this project was to improve working policies and processes to define key prevention strategies and provide clinicians with a clear, standardised approach to risk and skin assessment, equipment use, documentation and reporting clinical data using the Trust's CareVue (electronic medical records), Datix (incident reporting and risk-management tool) and eTRACE (online clinical protocol ordering) systems. The process included the development, trial and local implementation of the pathway using collaborative teamwork and the SSKIN care bundle tool. The experience of identifying issues, overcoming challenges, defining best practice and cascading SSKIN awareness training is shared. PMID:27523768

  13. SOIS Support for Onboard Device Virtualisation and the Use of Electronic Data Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowell, Stuart D.; Melvin, Richard; Mendham, Peter; Torelli, Felice; Taylor, Chris

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the motivation for, current status of prototyping, and planned standardisation of SOIS Electronic Data Sheets. This is based upon the recent "Adoption of Electronic Data Sheets for Device Virtualisation for Onboard Devices" TRP project for ESA.

  14. 77 FR 32996 - Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... Microsoft Corporation (``Microsoft'') of Redmond, Washington. 76 FR 22918. The complaint, as amended... COMMISSION Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components Thereof... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  15. Electron-doping of graphene-based devices by hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tingting; Xie, Dan; Wang, Dongxia; Wen, Lang; Wu, Mengqiang

    2014-12-14

    A facile and effective technique to tune the electronic properties of graphene is essential to facilitate the flexibility of graphene-based device performances. Here, the use of hydrazine as a solution-processable and effective n-type dopant for graphene is described. By dropping hydrazine solutions at different concentrations on a graphene surface, the Dirac point of graphene can be remarkably tuned. The transport behavior of graphene can be changed from p-type to n-type accordingly, demonstrating the controllable and adjustable doping effect of the hydrazine solutions. Accompanying the Dirac point shift is an enhanced hysteretic behavior of the graphene conductance, indicating an increasing trap state density induced by the hydrazine adsorbates. The electron-doping of graphene by the hydrazine solutions can be additionally confirmed with graphene/p-type silicon heterojunctions. The decrease of the junction current after the hydrazine treatment demonstrates an increase of the junction barrier between graphene and silicon, which is essentially due to the electron-doping of graphene and the resultant upshift of the Fermi level. Finally, partially doped graphene is realized and its electrical property is studied to demonstrate the potential of the hydrazine solutions to selectively electron-doping graphene for future electronic applications.

  16. Advanced power electronics and electric machinery program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as "FreedomCAR" (derived from "Freedom" and "Cooperative Automotive Research"), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001.

  17. Recent advances in electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Piotr; Kowalski, Karol; Pimienta, Ian S. O.; McGuire, Michael J.

    The recently developed new approach to the many-electron correlation problem in atoms and molecules, termed the method of moments of coupled-cluster (CC) equations (MMCC), is reviewed. The ground-state MMCC formalism and its extension to excited electronic states via the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) approach are discussed. The main principle of all MMCC methods is that of the non-iterative energy corrections which, when added to the ground- and excited-state energies obtained in the standard CC calculations, such as CCSD or EOMCCSD, recover the exact, full configuration interaction (CI) energies. Three types of the MMCC approximations are reviewed in detail: (i) the CI-corrected MMCC methods, which can be applied to ground and excited states; (ii) the renormalized and completely renormalized CC methods for ground states; and (iii) the quasi-variational MMCC approaches for the ground-state problem, including the quadratic MMCC models. It is demonstrated that the MMCC formalism provides a new theoretical framework for designing 'black-box' CC approaches that lead to an excellent description of entire potential energy surfaces of ground- and excited-state molecular systems with an ease of use of the standard single-reference methods. The completely renormalized (CR) CCSD(T) and CCSD(TQ) methods and their quadratic and excited-state MMCC analogues remove the failing of the standard CCSD, CCSD(T), EOMCCSD and similar methods at larger internuclear separations and for states that normally require a genuine multireference description. All theoretical ideas are illustrated by numerical examples involving bond breaking, excited vibrational states, reactive potential energy surfaces and difficult cases of excited electronic states. The description of the existing and well-established variants of the MMCC theory, such as CR-CCSD(T), is augmented by the discussion of future prospects and potentially useful recent developments, including the extension of the black

  18. Stress-induced Effects Caused by 3D IC TSV Packaging in Advanced Semiconductor Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sukharev, V.; Kteyan, A.; Choy, J.-H.; Hovsepyan, H.; Markosian, A.; Zschech, E.; Huebner, R.

    2011-11-10

    Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D through-silicon-via (TSV) based technologies are outlined. The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze a design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by the layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities for 3D IC stacks and a strict ''good die'' requirement make this type of analysis critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon chips stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology is proposed. A calibration technique based on fitting to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is presented. A strategy for generation of a simulation feeding data and respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. For model validation, high-resolution strain measurements in Si channels of the test-chip devices are needed. At the nanoscale, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is the only technique available for sub-10 nm strain measurements so far.

  19. Personal Electronic Devices and Their Interference with Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Elden; Ely, Jay J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A compilation of data on personal electronic devices (PEDs) attributed to having created anomalies with aircraft systems. Charts and tables display 14 years of incidents reported by pilots to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). Affected systems, incident severity, sources of anomaly detection, and the most frequently identified PEDs are some of the more significant data. Several reports contain incidents of aircraft off course when all systems indicated on course and of critical events that occurred during landings and takeoffs. Additionally, PEDs that should receive priority in testing are identified.

  20. An electronic portal imaging device as a physics tool.

    PubMed

    Curtin-Savard, A; Podgorsak, E B

    1997-01-01

    An electronic portal imaging device (EPID) can be used not only to acquire megavoltage patient images but also to measure certain radiation beam parameters of the linear accelerator. EPID images can be used to verify field junctions, center of collimator rotation, or radiation vs. light field coincidence. If the EPID images are calibrated in terms of dose rate, an EPID can be applied to beam penumbra measurement, collimator transmission determination, or compensator verification. Beam parameters measured with EPIDs are in close agreement with those measured with film or ionization chamber, making EPIDs reliable physics tools for quality control of various beam parameters in radiotherapy. PMID:9243462

  1. The use of a portable electronic device in accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Beerten, Koen; Vanhavere, Filip

    2008-01-01

    The use of a portable electronic device in accident dosimetry has been investigated. The thermoluminescence properties of a surface-mount alumina-rich ceramic resonator from a USB flash drive were investigated. The following characteristics were verified: the absence of a zero-dose signal, gamma dose response, dose recycling behaviour, fading and optical bleaching. Finally, this component has been successfully used to determine a simulated accident dose (1 d following the irradiation event). It is concluded that it should be possible to perform rapid and reliable accident dose assessments with such components using conventional thermoluminescence dosimetry equipment. PMID:18703583

  2. Advanced methods for controlling untethered magnetic devices using rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Arthur W., Jr.

    This dissertation presents results documenting advancements on the control of untethered magnetic devices, such as magnetic "microrobots" and magnetically actuated capsule endoscopes, motivated by problems in minimally invasive medicine. This dissertation focuses on applying rotating magnetic fields for magnetic manipulation. The contributions include advancements in the way that helical microswimmers (devices that mimic the propulsion of bacterial flagella) are controlled in the presence of gravitational forces, advancements in ways that groups of untethered magnetic devices can be differentiated and semi-independently controlled, advancements in the way that untethered magnetic device can be controlled with a single rotating permanent magnet, and an improved understanding in the nature of the magnetic force applied to an untethered device by a rotating magnet.

  3. Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: patient education, information and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Gignon, Maxime; Traulle, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) are implanted increasingly frequently. CIEDs are indicated for the treatment of bradycardia, tachycardia and heart failure and therefore improve quality of life and life expectancy. CIED can treat ventricular arrhythmias that would be fatal without immediate care. However, CIEDs raise several patient education, medico-legal, and ethical questions that will be addressed in this article. Information is a patient's right, and necessary for informed consent. When implanting a CIED, the patient must be educated about the need for the device, the function of the device, any restrictions that apply postimplant, and postimplant follow-up methods and schedules. This transfer of information to the patient makes the patient responsible. The occupational physician can determine whether a patient wearing a CIED is able to work. Under current French law, patients are not prohibited from working while wearing a CIED. However, access to certain job categories remains limited, such as jobs involving mechanical stress to the chest, exposure to electromagnetic fields, or jobs requiring permanent vigilance. Pacemakers and defibrillators are medical treatments and are subject to the same ethical and clinical considerations as any other treatment. However, stopping a pacemaker or a defibrillator raises different ethical issues. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator shocks can be considered to be equivalent to resuscitation efforts and can be interpreted as being unreasonable in an end-of-life patient. Pacing is painless and it is unlikely to unnecessarily prolong the life of a patient with a terminal disease. Patients with a CIED should live as normally as possible, but must also be informed about the constraints related to the device and must inform each caregiver about the presence of the device. The forensic and ethical implications must be assessed in relation to current legislation. PMID:23248837

  4. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  5. Electronic heat current rectification in hybrid superconducting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fornieri, Antonio Giazotto, Francesco; Martínez-Pérez, María José

    2015-05-15

    In this work, we review and expand recent theoretical proposals for the realization of electronic thermal diodes based on tunnel-junctions of normal metal and superconducting thin films. Starting from the basic rectifying properties of a single hybrid tunnel junction, we will show how the rectification efficiency can be largely increased by combining multiple junctions in an asymmetric chain of tunnel-coupled islands. We propose three different designs, analyzing their performance and their potential advantages. Besides being relevant from a fundamental physics point of view, this kind of devices might find important technological application as fundamental building blocks in solid-state thermal nanocircuits and in general-purpose cryogenic electronic applications requiring energy management.

  6. Creating standardized electronic data sheets for applications and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. J.; Lanza, D.

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) continues to develop infrastructure to enable the modular construction of satellites using an open network architecture and off-the-shelf avionics for space systems. Recent efforts have included the refinement of an ontology to formalize a standard language for the exchange of data and commands between components, including hardware and software, which is still evolving. AFRL is also focusing effort on creating standard interfaces using electronic data sheets based on this recently defined ontology. This paper will describe the development of standard interfaces that are documented in terms of an electronic datasheet for a specific application. The datasheet will identify the standard interfaces between hardware devices and software applications that are needed for a specific satellite function, in this case, a spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control (GN& C) application for Sun pointing. Finally, the benefits of using standardized interfaces will be discussed.

  7. Electronic heat current rectification in hybrid superconducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornieri, Antonio; Martínez-Pérez, María José; Giazotto, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we review and expand recent theoretical proposals for the realization of electronic thermal diodes based on tunnel-junctions of normal metal and superconducting thin films. Starting from the basic rectifying properties of a single hybrid tunnel junction, we will show how the rectification efficiency can be largely increased by combining multiple junctions in an asymmetric chain of tunnel-coupled islands. We propose three different designs, analyzing their performance and their potential advantages. Besides being relevant from a fundamental physics point of view, this kind of devices might find important technological application as fundamental building blocks in solid-state thermal nanocircuits and in general-purpose cryogenic electronic applications requiring energy management.

  8. Raman and infrared spectroscopy of organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.

    2010-09-01

    We present Raman and infrared studies on the structures of organic semiconductor thin films used for electronic devices. The Raman spectra of crystalline and amorphous states of an organic semiconductor, N,N'-di-1-naphthaleyl-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPD), were measured. These states give rise to slightly different peak positions and widths of each Raman band. Raman images were observed for polycrystalline pentacene films evaporated on a silicon substrate. The structural defects were found in the images of the intensity ratio I1596/I1533, which reflects the orientation of molecules i.e., crystalline domains. Photoinduced infrared absorption from the composite of regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiphene) and C60 was measured by the difference FT-IR method. The observed absorption is attributable to photogenerated carriers. The action spectra of photoinduced infrared absorption are explained by electron transfer from photogenerated excited states on a polymer chain to C60.

  9. 75 FR 38118 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof, and... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices with image... certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated software...

  10. 77 FR 24513 - Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector; Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector, DN 2892; the Commission is... certain electronic devices having a retractable USB connector. The complaint names as respondents...

  11. 77 FR 21584 - Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products Containing Same; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... COMMISSION Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products Containing Same; Institution of... States after importation of certain consumer electronics and display devices and products containing same... electronics and display devices and products containing same that infringe one or more of claims 2, 3, 5,...

  12. 76 FR 72439 - Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products Containing Same; Receipt of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... COMMISSION Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products Containing Same; Receipt of... received a complaint entitled In Re Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products... electronics and display devices and products containing same. The complaint names Research In Motion Ltd....

  13. 49 CFR 220.307 - Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. 220... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.307 Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. (a) General restriction. A railroad operating...

  14. 49 CFR 220.307 - Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. 220... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.307 Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. (a) General restriction. A railroad operating...

  15. 49 CFR 220.307 - Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. 220... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.307 Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. (a) General restriction. A railroad operating...

  16. 49 CFR 220.307 - Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. 220... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.307 Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. (a) General restriction. A railroad operating...

  17. 49 CFR 220.307 - Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. 220... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices § 220.307 Use of railroad-supplied electronic devices. (a) General restriction. A railroad operating...

  18. AN ADVANCED CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR COMPLEX IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Morrison; Jon P. Christophersen; Patrick Bald; John L. Morrison

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. The concern for the availability of critical systems in turn drives the availability of battery systems and thus the need for accurate battery health monitoring has become paramount. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech of the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of an accurate, simple, robust calibration process. This paper discusses the successful realization of this process.

  19. The effects of insertion devices on beam dynamics in the ALS (Advanced Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.; Forest, E.; Nishimura, H.; Zisman, M.S.

    1989-03-01

    Third generation synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), are specifically designed to operate with long undulators that produce very high brightness beams of synchrotron radiation. Including such devices in the storage ring magnet lattice introduced extra linear and nonlinear fields that are intrinsic to the undulator. These fields break the symmetry of the lattice and provide driving forces for nonlinear resonances, thereby perturbing the dynamics of the electron motion, particularly at large amplitudes. The main impact of these perturbations is on the beam lifetime, arising out of a reduction of both the transverse acceptance and the momentum acceptance. In this paper, we present the results of an ongoing study of these effects as they relate to the performance of the ALS. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Polarization Effects in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labram, John; Fabini, Douglas; Perry, Erin; Lehner, Anna; Wang, Hengbin; Glaudell, Anne; Wu, Guang; Evans, Hayden; Buck, David; Cotta, Robert; Echegoyen, Luis; Wudl, Fred; Seshadri, Ram; Chabinyc, Michael

    The immense success of group IV and III-V semiconductors has resulted in disruptive new photovoltaic (PV) cell technologies emerging extremely infrequently. For this reason, the recent progress in Methylammonium Lead Iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells can be viewed as a highly significant historic event. Despite the staggering recent progress made in reported power conversion efficiency (PCE), debate remains intense on the nature of the various instabilities synonymous with these devices. Using various electronic device measurements, we here present a body of experimental evidence consistent with the existence of a mobile ionic species within the MAPbI3 perovskite. Temperature-dependent transistor measurements reveal operating FET devices only below approximately 210K. This is attributed to ionic screening of the (otherwise charge-neutral) semiconductor-dielectric interface. Temperature-dependent pulsed-gate and impedance spectroscopy experiments also reveal behavior consistent with this interpretation. MAPbI3 PV cells were found to possess a PCE which decreases significantly below 210K. Combined, these set of measurements provide an interesting and consistent description of the internal processes at play within the MAPbI3 perovskite structure.

  1. Designing bistable [2]rotaxanes for molecular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Dichtel, William R; Heath, James R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2007-06-15

    The development of molecular electronic components has been accelerated by the promise of increased circuit densities and reduced power consumption. Bistable rotaxanes have been assembled into nanowire crossbar devices, where they may be switched between low- and high-conductivity states, forming the basis for a molecular memory. These memory devices have been scaled to densities of 10(11) bits cm(-2), the 2020 node for memory of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. Investigations of the kinetics and thermodynamics associated with the electromechanical switching processes of several bistable [2]rotaxane derivatives in solution, self-assembled monolayers on gold, polymer electrolyte gels and in molecular switch tunnel junction devices are consistent with a single, universal switching mechanism whose speed is dependent largely on the environment, as well as on the structure of the switching molecule. X-ray reflectometry studies of the bistable rotaxanes assembled into Langmuir monolayers also lend support to an oxidatively driven mechanical switching process. Structural information obtained from Fourier transform reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy of rotaxane monolayers taken before and after evaporation of a Ti top electrode confirmed that the functionality responsible for switching is not affected by the metal deposition process. All the considerable experimental data, taken together with detailed computational work, support the hypothesis that the tunnelling current hysteresis, which forms the basis of memory operation, is a direct result of the electromechanical switching of the bistable rotaxanes. PMID:17430812

  2. Physics and simulation study of nanoscale electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, Saumitra R.

    Silicon based CMOS technology has seen continuous scaling of device dimensions for past three decades. There is a lot of focus on incorporating different high mobility channel materials and new device architectures for post-Si CMOS logic technology, making it a multifaceted problem. In this thesis some of the multiple challenges concerning new CMOS technologies are addressed. High carrier mobility alloyed channel materials like SiGe and InGaAs suffer from scattering due to disorder called, alloy scattering. The current theory of alloy scattering present in literature/text books can be called rudimentary at the best due to lack of a strong theoretical foundation and/or use of fitting parameters to explain experimental measurements. We present a new atomistic approach based on tight-binding parameters to understanding the alloy disorder. Using this approach we are able to provide new insights into the theory of alloy scattering and explain the experimental measurements in bulk SiGe and InGaAs that were till now based on just fitting parameters. With an updated understanding of alloy scattering, hole mobility in SiGe nanowires is calculated using a linearized Boltzmann formalism. Bulk Ge exhibits high hole mobility makeing it ideal for PMOS devices. Nano patterning of Ge/SiGe leads to Ge nanofins with both uniaxial and biaxial strain components, making it a device architecture design problem. Fully atomistic simulations involving molecular dynamics (ReaxFF force field) based relaxation for strain relaxation; tight-binding based bandstructure calculations and a linearized Boltzmann transport model for mobility calculations are performed. Final phonon mobility calculations reveal nearly 3.5 X improvements compared to biaxial strained Ge in Ge nanofins with width reduction. High electron mobility III--V's are projected to be a material of choice for post-Si NMOS. These low electron mass materials suffer from the 'DOS bottleneck' issue. Transistor designs based on using

  3. Glass fragments from portable electronic devices: Implications for forensic examinations.

    PubMed

    Seyfang, Kelsey E; Redman, Kahlee E; Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel S; Kirkbride, K Paul

    2015-12-01

    Personal electronic devices (PEDs) are now widespread in the community. Many such devices have glass display screens that, despite being a relatively strong and specialised material, are vulnerable to breakage. Unlike other glass objects that are usually thrown away when they break, PEDs can still function with a broken or cracked screen and it is not uncommon for their owners to keep using them in this condition. Broken PED screens, therefore, might represent a new and significant source of glass fragments that are present on the clothing and belongings of the general public and individuals suspected of offences involving the breaking of glass. The forensic implications of this new source of glass fragments in the community were investigated. PED glass is easily recognised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis and refractive index measurement and is easily distinguished from domestic and automotive soda-lime glass using these methods; as a consequence there should be no confusion of soda-lime glass fragments and PED glass fragments in forensic glass casework. In cases where the objective is to compare recovered glass fragments to a putative PED source, comparison using refractive index measurement and elemental analysis achieves good discrimination between sources. PMID:26587905

  4. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.

    2011-09-27

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics device design projects to scale up the current Ocean Power Technology PowerBuoy from 150kW to 500kW.

  5. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  6. Home Monitoring for Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices: Benefits to Patients and to Their Follow-up Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Robin A; Davenport, Elizabeth E

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances in the management of patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) have expanded clinicians' ability to remotely monitor patients with CIEDs. Remote monitoring, in addition to periodic in-person device evaluation, provides many advantages to patients and clinicians. Aside from the therapeutic and diagnostic benefits of pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, cardiac resynchronization therapy devices, and implantable loop recorders, improvement in clinical outcomes, clinical efficiencies, and patient experience can be realized with the adoption of remote CIED monitoring. These advantages create significant value to both patients and CIED follow-up centers. PMID:26484995

  7. HeartWare left ventricular assist device for the treatment of advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Jasmin S; Rojas, Sebastian V; Avsar, Murat; Bara, Christoph; Ismail, Issam; Haverich, Axel; Schmitto, Jan D

    2016-01-01

    The importance of mechanical circulatory support in the therapy of advanced heart failure is steadily growing. The rapid developments in the field of mechanical support are characterized by continuous miniaturization and enhanced performance of the assist devices, providing increased pump durability and prolonged patient survival. The HeartWare left ventricular assist device system (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, MA, USA) is a mechanical ventricular assist device with over 8000 implantations worldwide. Compared with other available assist devices it is smaller in size and used in a broad range of patients. The possibility of minimally invasive procedures is one of the major benefits of the device - allowing implants and explants, as well as exchanges of the device with reduced surgical impact. We present here a review of the existing literature on the treatment of advanced heart failure using the HeartWare left ventricular assist device system. PMID:26597386

  8. Observation of molecular level behavior in molecular electronic junction device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitani, Masato

    In this dissertation, I utilize AFM based scanning probe measurement and surface enhanced Raman scattering based vibrational spectroscopic analysis to directly characterize topographic, electronic, and chemical properties of molecules confined in the local area of M3 junction to elucidate the molecular level behavior of molecular junction electronic devices. In the introduction, the characterization of molecular electronic devices with different types of metal-molecule-metal (M3) structures based upon self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is reviewed. A background of the characterization methods I use in this dissertation, conducting probe atomic force microscopy (cp-AFM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), is provided in chapter 1. Several attempts are performed to create the ideal top metal contacts on SAMs by metal vapor phase deposition in order to prevent the metal penetration inducing critical defects of the molecular electronic devices. The scanning probe microscopy (SPM), such as cp-AFM, contact mode (c-) AFM and non-contact mode (nc-) AFM, in ultra high vacuum conditions are utilized to study the process of the metal-SAM interface construction in terms of the correlation between the morphological and electrical properties including the metal nucleation and filament generation as a function of the functionalization of long-chain alkane thiolate SAMs on Au. In chapter 2, the nascent condensation process of vapor phase Al deposition on inert and reactive SAMs are studied by SPM. The results of top deposition, penetration, and filament generation of deposited Al are discussed and compared to the results previously observed by spectroscopic measurements. Cp-AFM was shown to provide new insights into Al filament formation which has not been observed by conventional spectroscopic analysis. Additionally, the electronic characteristics of individual Al filaments are measured. Chapter 3 reveals SPM characterization of Au deposition onto --COOH terminated SAMs

  9. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  10. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  11. Predictive atomistic simulations of electronic properties of realistic nanoscale devices: A multiscale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Ravi Pramod Kumar

    Scaling of CMOS towards its ultimate limits, where quantum effects and atomistic variability due to fabrication, along with recent emphasis on heterogeneous integration of non-digital devices for increasing the functional diversification presents us with fundamentally new challenges. A comprehensive understanding of design and operation of these nanoscale transistors, and other electronic devices like RF-MEMS, requires an insight into their electronic and mechanical properties that are strongly influenced by underlying atomic structure. Hence, continuum descriptions of materials and use of empirical models at these scales become questionable. This increase in complexity of electronic devices necessitates an understanding at a more fundamental level to accurately predict the performance and reliability of these devices. The objective of this thesis is to outline the application of multiscale predictive modeling methods, ranging from atoms to devices, for addressing these challenges. This capability is demonstrated using two examples: characterization of (i) dielectric charging in RF-MEMS, and (ii) transport properties of Ge-nanofins. For characterizing the dielectric charging phenomenon, a continuum dielectric charging model, augmented by first principles informed trap distributions, is used to predict current transient measurements across a broad range of voltages and temperatures. These simulations demonstrate using ab initio informed model not only reduces the empiricism (number of adjustable parameters) in the model but also leads to a more accurate model over a broad range of operating conditions, and enable the precise determination of additional material parameters. These atomistic calculations also provide detailed information about the nature of charge traps and their trapping mechanisms that are not accessible experimentally; such information could prove invaluable in defect engineering. The second problem addresses the effect of the in-homogeneous strain

  12. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guangtong

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  13. Materials, structures, and devices for high-speed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollam, John A.; Snyder, Paul G.

    1992-12-01

    Advances in materials, devices, and instrumentation made under this grant began with ex-situ null ellipsometric measurements of simple dielectric films on bulk substrates. Today highly automated and rapid spectroscopic ellipsometers are used for ex-situ characterization of very complex multilayer epitaxial structures. Even more impressive is the in-situ capability, not only for characterization but also for the actual control of the growth and etching of epitaxial layers. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has expanded from the research lab to become an integral part of the production of materials and structures for state of the art high speed devices. Along the way, it has contributed much to our understanding of the growth characteristics and material properties. The following areas of research are summarized: Si3N4 on GaAs, null ellipsometry; diamondlike carbon films; variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) development; GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures; Ta-Cu diffusion barrier films on GaAs; GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices and multiple quantum wells; superconductivity; in situ elevated temperature measurements of III-V's; optical constants of thermodynamically stable InGaAs; doping dependence of optical constants of GaAs; in situ ellipsometric studies of III-V epitaxial growth; photothermal spectroscopy; microellipsometry; and Si passivation and Si/SiGe strained-layer superlattices.

  14. Materials, structures, and devices for high-speed electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, John A.; Snyder, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in materials, devices, and instrumentation made under this grant began with ex-situ null ellipsometric measurements of simple dielectric films on bulk substrates. Today highly automated and rapid spectroscopic ellipsometers are used for ex-situ characterization of very complex multilayer epitaxial structures. Even more impressive is the in-situ capability, not only for characterization but also for the actual control of the growth and etching of epitaxial layers. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has expanded from the research lab to become an integral part of the production of materials and structures for state of the art high speed devices. Along the way, it has contributed much to our understanding of the growth characteristics and material properties. The following areas of research are summarized: Si3N4 on GaAs, null ellipsometry; diamondlike carbon films; variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) development; GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures; Ta-Cu diffusion barrier films on GaAs; GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices and multiple quantum wells; superconductivity; in situ elevated temperature measurements of III-V's; optical constants of thermodynamically stable InGaAs; doping dependence of optical constants of GaAs; in situ ellipsometric studies of III-V epitaxial growth; photothermal spectroscopy; microellipsometry; and Si passivation and Si/SiGe strained-layer superlattices.

  15. Devices in the management of advanced, chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, William T.; Smith, Sakima A.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a global phenomenon, and the overall incidence and prevalence of the condition are steadily increasing. Medical therapies have proven efficacious, but only a small number of pharmacological options are in development. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy, cardiac resynchronization therapy has been shown to improve symptoms, reduce hospitalizations, promote reverse remodelling, and decrease mortality. However, challenges remain in identifying the ideal recipients for this therapy. The field of mechanical circulatory support has seen immense growth since the early 2000s, and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have transitioned over the past decade from large, pulsatile devices to smaller, more-compact, continuous-flow devices. Infections and haematological issues are still important areas that need to be addressed. Whereas LVADs were once approved only for ‘bridge to transplantation’, these devices are now used as destination therapy for critically ill patients with HF, allowing these individuals to return to the community. A host of novel strategies, including cardiac contractility modulation, implantable haemodynamic-monitoring devices, and phrenic and vagus nerve stimulation, are under investigation and might have an impact on the future care of patients with chronic HF. PMID:23229137

  16. Methods for synchronizing a countdown routine of a timer key and electronic device

    DOEpatents

    Condit, Reston A.; Daniels, Michael A.; Clemens, Gregory P.; Tomberlin, Eric S.; Johnson, Joel A.

    2015-06-02

    A timer key relating to monitoring a countdown time of a countdown routine of an electronic device is disclosed. The timer key comprises a processor configured to respond to a countdown time associated with operation of the electronic device, a display operably coupled with the processor, and a housing configured to house at least the processor. The housing has an associated structure configured to engage with the electronic device to share the countdown time between the electronic device and the timer key. The processor is configured to begin a countdown routine based at least in part on the countdown time, wherein the countdown routine is at least substantially synchronized with a countdown routine of the electronic device when the timer key is removed from the electronic device. A system and method for synchronizing countdown routines of a timer key and an electronic device are also disclosed.

  17. Recent progress in printed 2/3D electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Andreas; Patter, Paul; Popovic, Karl; Blümel, Alexander; Sax, Stefan; Lenz, Martin; Glushko, Oleksandr; Cordill, Megan J.; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    New, energy-saving, efficient and cost-effective processing technologies such as 2D and 3D inkjet printing (IJP) for the production and integration of intelligent components will be opening up very interesting possibilities for industrial applications of molecular materials in the near future. Beyond the use of home and office based printers, "inkjet printing technology" allows for the additive structured deposition of photonic and electronic materials on a wide variety of substrates such as textiles, plastics, wood, stone, tiles or cardboard. Great interest also exists in applying IJP in industrial manufacturing such as the manufacturing of PCBs, of solar cells, printed organic electronics and medical products. In all these cases inkjet printing is a flexible (digital), additive, selective and cost-efficient material deposition method. Due to these advantages, there is the prospect that currently used standard patterning processes can be replaced through this innovative material deposition technique. A main issue in this research area is the formulation of novel functional inks or the adaptation of commercially available inks for specific industrial applications and/or processes. In this contribution we report on the design, realization and characterization of novel active and passive inkjet printed electronic devices including circuitry and sensors based on metal nanoparticle ink formulations and the heterogeneous integration into 2/3D printed demonstrators. The main emphasis of this paper will be on how to convert scientific inkjet knowledge into industrially relevant processes and applications.

  18. Advances in dental local anesthesia techniques and devices: An update

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh K.; Newaskar, Vilas; Chandra, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Although local anesthesia remains the backbone of pain control in dentistry, researches are going to seek new and better means of managing the pain. Most of the researches are focused on improvement in the area of anesthetic agents, delivery devices and technique involved. Newer technologies have been developed that can assist the dentist in providing enhanced pain relief with reduced injection pain and fewer adverse effects. This overview will enlighten the practicing dentists regarding newer devices and methods of rendering pain control comparing these with the earlier used ones on the basis of research and clinical studies available. PMID:24163548

  19. Electroluminescent devices formed using semiconductor nanocrystals as an electron transport media and method of making such electroluminescent devices

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Colvin, Vickie

    1996-01-01

    An electroluminescent device is described, as well as a method of making same, wherein the device is characterized by a semiconductor nanocrystal electron transport layer capable of emitting visible light in response to a voltage applied to the device. The wavelength of the light emitted by the device may be changed by changing either the size or the type of semiconductor nanocrystals used in forming the electron transport layer. In a preferred embodiment the device is further characterized by the capability of emitting visible light of varying wavelengths in response to changes in the voltage applied to the device. The device comprises a hole processing structure capable of injecting and transporting holes, and usually comprising a hole injecting layer and a hole transporting layer; an electron transport layer in contact with the hole processing structure and comprising one or more layers of semiconductor nanocrystals; and an electron injecting layer in contact with the electron transport layer for injecting electrons into the electron transport layer. The capability of emitting visible light of various wavelengths is principally based on the variations in voltage applied thereto, but the type of semiconductor nanocrystals used and the size of the semiconductor nanocrystals in the layers of semiconductor nanometer crystals may also play a role in color change, in combination with the change in voltage.

  20. 78 FR 4418 - Electronic Submission Process for Requesting Export Certificates From the Center for Devices and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Submission Process for Requesting Export... availability of an electronic submission process for requesting export certificates for products regulated by FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH). The electronic process will help fulfill...

  1. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Toth, Gabor G; Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  2. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  3. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  4. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  5. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  6. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zebda, A.; Cosnier, S.; Alcaraz, J.-P.; Holzinger, M.; Le Goff, A.; Gondran, C.; Boucher, F.; Giroud, F.; Gorgy, K.; Lamraoui, H.; Cinquin, P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm−2 and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL−1. We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  7. Why We Need Postmortem Analysis of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Mauf, Sabrina; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Laberke, Patrick J; Thali, Michael J; Bartsch, Christine

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is increasing. However, postmortem analysis of CIEDs is not performed routinely. Fourteen consecutive CIEDs were analyzed. The indication for and date of implantation, technical data, CIED reprogramming, heart rhythm disturbances, patient demographics and medical consultations were investigated. Death during the first year after implantation was seen in 54%, whereof 71% consulted a physician within 10 days before death. The time of death was attributed to a particular day in 29%. There was a relationship between CIEDs and cause/manner of death in 50%. Although limited by a small sample size, this study advocates the routine postmortem CIED analysis for forensic and clinical purposes in selected cases. Patients with CIEDs seem to show an increased risk of death during the first year after implantation. The analysis of CIEDs can be helpful in evaluating the time/cause/manner of death. PMID:27364278

  8. Single glucose biofuel cells implanted in rats power electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zebda, A; Cosnier, S; Alcaraz, J-P; Holzinger, M; Le Goff, A; Gondran, C; Boucher, F; Giroud, F; Gorgy, K; Lamraoui, H; Cinquin, P

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm(-2) and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL(-1). We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  9. Use and safety of conducted electronic devices: what is known?

    PubMed

    Nugent, K; Cevik, C

    2013-06-01

    Conductive electronic devices (CED), such as Taser and stun guns, are sold worldwide for use by security services, although they have also been used for self-defence and even for torture. CED are promoted as non-lethal weapons which can potentially save lives. However, there are multiple reports of deaths temporally associated with CED use. These weapons have definite physiological effects in normal volunteers, especially when accompanied by exertion. Medical examiners often report that deaths followed physical encounters which included the use of CED were due to natural causes, excited delirium and/or drug intoxication. These cases present complex situations in which multiple factors potentially contribute to the death, including electric shocks which cause neuromuscular incapacitation, severe pain and anxiety. Public health officials, physicians and hospital personnel need to be aware that individuals controlled with CED are at increased risk of death. We need better recording of incidents worldwide to understand the extent and outcomes of CED use. PMID:24975188

  10. [Electronic portal image device dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy].

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Daisaku; Nakada, Ryosei; Ienaga, Akinori; Yomoda, Akane; Inoue, Makoto; Ichida, Takao; Hosono, Masako

    2013-01-01

    Recently electronic portal image devices (EPIDs) have been widely used for quality assurance and dose verification. However there are no reports describing EPID dosimetry for Elekta volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). We have investigated EPID dosimetry during VMAT delivery using a commercial software EPIDose with an Elekta Synergy linac. Dose rate dependence and the linac system sag during gantry rotation were measured. Gamma indices were calculated between measured doses using an EPID and calculation made by a treatment planning system for prostate VMAT test plans. The results were also compared to gamma indices using films and a two-dimensional detector array, MapCHECK2. The pass rates of the gamma analysis with a criterion of 3% and 2 mm for the three methods were over 96% with good consistency. Our results have showed that EPID dosimetry is feasible for Elekta VMAT. PMID:23358333

  11. Electron cyclotron beam measurement system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kamio, S. Takahashi, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Osakabe, M.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-11-15

    In order to evaluate the electron cyclotron (EC) heating power inside the Large Helical Device vacuum vessel and to investigate the physics of the interaction between the EC beam and the plasma, a direct measurement system for the EC beam transmitted through the plasma column was developed. The system consists of an EC beam target plate, which is made of isotropic graphite and faces against the EC beam through the plasma, and an IR camera for measuring the target plate temperature increase by the transmitted EC beam. This system is applicable to the high magnetic field (up to 2.75 T) and plasma density (up to 0.8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}). This system successfully evaluated the transmitted EC beam profile and the refraction.

  12. Electron-hole asymmetry in two-terminal graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannes, W.-R.; Jonson, M.; Titov, M.

    2011-07-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe asymmetric gate-voltage dependence of conductance and noise in two-terminal ballistic graphene devices. The model is analyzed independently within the self-consistent Hartree and Thomas-Fermi approximations. Our results justify the prominent role of metal contacts in recent experiments with suspended graphene flakes. The contact-induced electrostatic potentials in graphene demonstrate a power-law decay, with the exponent varying from -1 to -0.5. Within our model we explain electron-hole asymmetry and strong Fabri-Perot oscillations of the conductance and noise with positive doping, which were observed in many experiments with submicrometer samples. Limitations of the Thomas-Fermi approximation in a vicinity of the Dirac point are discussed.

  13. Electron Transport Simulations of 4-Terminal Crossed Graphene Nanoribbons Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandimarte, Pedro; Papior, Nick R.; Engelund, Mads; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Frederiksen, Thomas; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel

    Recently, it has been reported theoretically a current switching mechanism by voltage control in a system made by two perpendicular 14-armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). In order to investigate the possibilities of using crossed GNRs as ON/OFF devices, we have studied their electronic and transport properties as function structural parameters determining the crossing. Our calculations were performed with TranSIESTA code, which has been recently generalized to consider N >= 1 arbitrarily distributed electrodes at finite bias. We find that the transmission along each individual GNR and among them strongly depends on the stacking. For a 60° rotation angle, the lattice matching in the crossing region provokes a strong scattering effect that translates into an increased interlayer transmission. FP7 FET-ICT PAMS-project (European Commission, contract 610446), MINECO (Grant MAT2013-46593-C6-2-P) and Basque Dep. de Educación, UPV/EHU (Grant IT-756-13).

  14. Dosimetric review of cardiac implantable electronic device patients receiving radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Joann I; Makkar, Akash; Fox, Colleen J; Hayman, James A; Horwood, Laura; Pelosi, Frank; Moran, Jean M

    2015-01-01

    A formal communication process was established and evaluated for the management of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) receiving radiation therapy (RT). Methods to estimate dose to the CIED were evaluated for their appropriateness in the management of these patients. A retrospective, institutional review board (IRB) approved study of 69 patients with CIEDs treated with RT between 2005 and 2011 was performed. The treatment sites, techniques, and the estimated doses to the CIEDs were analyzed and compared to estimates from published peripheral dose (PD) data and three treatment planning systems(TPSs) - UMPlan, Eclipse's AAA and Acuros algorithms. When measurements were indicated, radiation doses to the CIEDs ranged from 0.01-5.06 Gy. Total peripheral dose estimates based on publications differed from TLD measurements by an average of 0.94 Gy (0.05-4.49 Gy) and 0.51 Gy (0-2.74 Gy) for CIEDs within 2.5 cm and between 2.5 and 10 cm of the treatment field edge, respectively. Total peripheral dose estimates based on three TPSs differed from measurements by an average of 0.69 Gy (0.02-3.72 Gy) for CIEDs within 2.5 cm of the field edge. Of the 69 patients evaluated in this study, only two with defibrillators experienced a partial reset of their device during treatment. Based on this study, few CIED-related events were observed during RT. The only noted correlation with treatment parameters for these two events was beam energy, as both patients were treated with high-energy photon beams (16 MV). Differences in estimated and measured CIED doses were observed when using published PD data and TPS calculations. As such, we continue to follow conservative guidelines and measure CIED doses when the device is within 10 cm of the field or the estimated dose is greater than 2 Gy for pacemakers or 1 Gy for defibrillators. PMID:25679176

  15. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  16. Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, H. W.; Graves, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is described. Tunnel junctions were fabricated, the tunneling spectra of several molecules absorbed on the surface of aluminum oxide measured, and mode assignments made for several of the prominent peaks in spectra using results obtained from optical…

  17. The evolution of the cardiac implantable electronic device connector.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Helland, John R; Fischer, Avi

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) play a vital role in the management of cardiac rhythm disturbances. The devices are comprised of two primary components: a generator and lead joined by a connector. Original pacemaker lead connectors were created de novo at the time of implantation or replacement and were very unreliable. With the development of new lead designs, creation of a standard connector configuration, the IS-1 connector became mandatory. Similar connector development also occurred with the advent of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), resulting in creation of the high voltage standard: the DF-1 connector. Differing from a pacemaker lead, the ICD lead connector requires one IS-1 connector and one or two DF-1 connectors, resulting in a large cumbersome lead connector and generator header block. Recently, a revolutionary quad pole single plug connector standard has been approved for market release. These are the single-pin DF4 and IS4 lead connectors that carry low- and high-voltage poles or all low-voltage poles, respectively. These connectors, together with new labeling guidelines, have simplified operative procedures and reduced errors, when mating lead connectors into the generator's connector block. PMID:23808816

  18. Physical characteristics of a commercial electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Althof, V G; de Boer, J C; Huizenga, H; Stroom, J C; Visser, A G; Swanenburg, B N

    1996-11-01

    An electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for use in radiotherapy with high energy photons has been under development since 1985 and has been in clinical use since 1988. The x-ray detector consists of a metal plate/fluorescent screen combination, which is monitored by a charge-coupled device (CDD)-camera. This paper discusses the physical quantities governing image quality. A model which describes the signal and noise propagation through the detector is presented. The predicted contrasts and signal-to-noise ratios are found to be in agreement with measurements based on the EPID images. Based on this agreement the visibility of low contrast structures in clinical images has been calculated with the model. Sufficient visibility of relevant structures (4-10 mm water-equivalent thickness) has been obtained down to a delivered dose of 4 cGy at dose maximum. It is found that the described system is not limited by quantum noise but by camera read-out noise. In addition we predict that with a new type of CCD sensor the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by a factor of 5 at small doses, enabling high quality imaging, for most relevant clinical situations, with a patient dose smaller than 4 cGy. The latter system would be quantum noise limited. PMID:8947896

  19. Applications of Direct Detection Device in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Li, Shengdong; Leblanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Bouwer, James C.; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2008-01-01

    A prototype Direct Detection Device (DDD) camera system has shown great promise in improving both the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio for electron microscopy at 120–400 keV beam energies (Xuong, et al., 2007. Methods in Cell Biology, 79, 721–739). Without the need for a resolution-limiting scintillation screen as in the charge coupled device (CCD), the DDD camera can outperform CCD based systems in terms of spatial resolution, due to its small pixel size (5 μm). In this paper, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the DDD prototype is measured and compared with the specifications of commercial scientific CCD camera systems. Combining the fast speed of the DDD with image mosaic techniques, fast wide-area imaging is now possible. In this paper, the first large area mosaic image and the first tomography dataset from the DDD camera are presented, along with an image processing algorithm to correct the specimen drift utilizing the fast readout of the DDD system. PMID:18054249

  20. {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100>, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100> oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  1. Advanced investigation of two-phase charge-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosonocky, W. F.; Carnes, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of experimental two phase, charge-coupled shift registers constructed using polysilicon gates overlapped by aluminum gates was studied. Shift registers with 64, 128, and 500 stages were built and operated. Devices were operated at the maximum clock frequency of 20 MHz. Loss per transfer of less than .0001 was demonstrated for fat zero operation. The effect upon transfer efficiency of various structural and materials parameters was investigated including substrate orientation, resistivity, and conductivity type; channel width and channel length; and method of channel confinement. Operation of the devices with and without fat zero was studied as well as operation in the complete charge transfer mode and the bias charge, or bucket brigade mode.

  2. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarino, L. L.; Di Palma, E.; Anania, M. P.; Artioli, M.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Giannessi, L.; Mostacci, A.; Musumeci, P.; Petralia, A.; Petrillo, V.; Pompili, R.; Rau, J. V.; Rossi, A. R.; Sabia, E.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2014-11-01

    We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL) device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line "simulation" of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  3. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  4. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  5. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  6. The development of silicon carbide-based power electronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Richard H.; Perkins, John F.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989 Westinghouse created an internally funded initiative to develop silicon carbide materials and device technology for a variety of potential commercial and military applications. Westinghouse saw silicon carbide as having the potential for dual use. For space applications, size and weight reductions could be achieved, together with increased reliability. Terrestrially, uses in harsh-temperature environments would be enabled. Theoretically, the physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide were highly promising for high-power, high-temperature, radiation-hardened electronics. However, bulk material with the requisite electronic qualities was not available, and the methods needed to produce a silicon carbide wafer—to fabricate high-quality devices—and to transition these technologies into a commercial product were considered to be a high-risk investment. It was recognized that through a collaborative effort, the CCDS could provide scientific expertise in several areas, thus reducing this risk. These included modeling of structures, electrical contacts, dielectrics, and epitaxial growth. This collaboration has been very successful, with developed technologies being transferred to Westinghouse.

  7. Electron Transport Materials: Synthesis, Properties and Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cosimbescu, Lelia; Wang, Liang; Helm, Monte L.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2012-06-01

    We report the design, synthesis and characterization, thermal and photophysical properties of two silane based electron transport materials, dibenzo[b,d]thiophen-2-yltriphenylsilane (Si{phi}87) and (dibenzo[b,d]thiophen-2-yl)diphenylsilane (Si{phi}88) and their performance in blue organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The utility of these materials in blue OLEDs with iridium (III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C']picolinate (Firpic) as the phosphorescent emitter was demonstrated. Using the silane Si{phi}87 as the electron transport material (ETm) an EQE of 18.2% was obtained, with a power efficiency of 24.3 lm/W (5.8V at 1mA/cm{sup 2}), in a heterostructure. When Si{phi}88 is used, the EQE is 18.5% with a power efficiency of 26.0 lm/W (5.5V at 1mA/cm{sup 2}).

  8. 76 FR 45860 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Music and Data Processing Devices, and Tablet Computers; Notice of Institution of Investigation... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, and tablet computers by reason of... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, and tablet computers that infringe one...

  9. Chalcogenide based materials and devices for flexible electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-Villasenor, Ana Lizeth

    The scaling of large-area electronics for applications in flat-panel displays, digital X-ray images, and flexible electronics is pushing the technological and cost limits of conventional materials and device processing. Chemical bath deposited chalcogenide films are attractive for thin film transistors (TFTs) for large area electronics given its simple fabrication, low temperature and compatibility with most substrates. In this dissertation, we describe the development of a high performance chalcogenide based TFTs using chemical bath deposition (CBD) methods. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and lead sulfide (PbS) are used as the TFT channel layer. The influence of several CBD parameters is studied. CBD pH and CdS film thickness have a profound influence on the TFT electrical characteristics. These parameters impact film cluster size and impurity concentration. With the optimized CdS deposition conditions TFTs with excellent electrical properties are demonstrated. With a novel photolithography approach demonstrated here, TFTs with mobilities as high as 18 cm2 /V s, Ion/Ioff of 109 and V T shift of less than 0.1 eV were fabricated. To achieve these TFTs characteristics, a variety of contact materials, gate dielectrics, annealing conditions and device structures were studied. The factors affecting VT instability for CdS based TFTs are also presented and correlated to electrode materials, gate dielectrics, and post-annealing. In summary, TFT instability is correlated to traps and impurities at the dielectric/semiconductor and/or in the semiconductor film. In addition, this dissertation demonstrates CdS TFTs integration in hybrid complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. In particular, logic gates and ferroelectric random access (FRAM) memory cells are demonstrated. Finally, CdS based TFTs on flexible and transparent substrates with excellent stability and mobility of 10-18 cm2/V-s, threshold voltage of 1.6-4.8 V, and Ion/Ioff ratios of 107 are demonstrated. This

  10. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  11. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  12. Recent advances in spintronics for emerging memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seung H.

    2008-09-01

    The emerging field of spintronics has the potential to bring game-changing opportunities to nanoelectronic technologies far beyond its traditional contribution to mass storage applications such as hard disk drives. The value proposition is timely since the dominant semiconductor industry is in pursuit of “More-than-Moore” to extend the technology roadmap or to create functional diversifications through enhanced system platforms. This article overviews a promising spintronic device in conjunction with recent breakthroughs in tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-transfer-torque magnetization switching.

  13. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, K D; Seo, D C; Nam, Y U; Choi, M C

    2010-10-01

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 °C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5×10(-8) Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations. PMID:21033972

  14. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Choi, M. C.

    2010-10-15

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 deg. C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5x10{sup -8} Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  15. 78 FR 6834 - Certain Cases for Portable Electronic Devices; Institution of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... COMMISSION Certain Cases for Portable Electronic Devices; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... portable electronic devices by reason of infringement of U.S. Patent No. 8,204,561 (``the '561 patent....usitc.gov . The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic...

  16. 77 FR 14422 - Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt... Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain consumer electronics...

  17. River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials (River DREAM)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Daniel P.

    2013-07-03

    The purpose of this project is to develop a generator called a Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED). It uses a galloping prism to convert water flow into linear motion. This motion is converted into electricity via a dielectric elastomer generator (DEG). The galloping mechanism and the DEG are combined to create a system to effectively generate electricity. This project has three research objectives: 1. Oscillator development and design a. Characterize galloping behavior, evaluate control surface shape change on oscillator performance and demonstrate shape change with water flow change. 2. Dielectric Energy Generator (DEG) characterization and modeling a. Characterize and model the performance of the DEG based on oscillator design 3. Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED) system modeling and integration a. Create numerical models for construction of a system performance model and define operating capabilities for this approach Accomplishing these three objectives will result in the creation of a model that can be used to fully define the operating parameters and performance capabilities of a generator based on the GHEED design. This information will be used in the next phase of product development, the creation of an integrated laboratory scale generator to confirm model predictions.

  18. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-06

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as {approx} 16 We/kg and {approx} 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is {approx} 640 m2 and {approx} 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is {approx} 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is {approx} 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  19. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as ˜ 16 We/kg and ˜ 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is ˜ 640 m2 and ˜ 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is ˜ 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is ˜ 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  20. Image readout device with electronically variable spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, H. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An invention relating to the use of a standing acoustic wave charge storage device as an image readout device is described. A frequency f sub 1 was applied to the storage transfer device to create a traveling electric field in the device in one direction along a straight line. A second frequency f sub 2 was applied to the charge transfer device to create a traveling electric field opposite to the first traveling electric field. A standing wave was created. When an image was focused on the charge transfer device, light was stored in the wells of the standing wave. When the frequency f sub 2 is removed from the device, the standing wave tends to break up and the charges stored move to an electrode connected to an output terminal and to a utilization device where the received charges represent the image on the surface of the charge transfer device along a projection of said straight line.

  1. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  2. Extreme service packaging for silicon carbide electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinel, Maxime Jean-Francois

    Electronic devices based on silicon carbide (SiC) represent a good choice for a variety of new high temperature, high power electronic applications. Moreover, SiC ceramics have great potentials for use in harsh environments. Nevertheless, many technical challenges still need to be addressed, including high temperature stability. Results obtained on several levels in the development of a SiC-based package are presented. The sealing of ceramic packages is generally accomplished using specialty glasses. Several commercial glasses were tested in view of their application as glass sealants. The reactions between SiC and certain oxides present in the glasses were responsible for the formation of CO gas. Selection criteria were developed based on thermodynamic calculations. This approach provides valuable information in tailoring suitable glasses. The oxidation of SiC in air results in the formation of silica that does not prove to be protective above about 1800 K because of interfacial reactions with its SiC substrate. The oxidation of both single crystal and polycrystalline SiC, between 973 and 2053 K, resulted in the formation of quartz, cristobalite or tridymite, which are the stable crystalline polymorphs of silica at ambient pressure. The polymorphs were pure SiO2, and contamination of the oxide scales from the oxidizing environment did not occur. The only variable affecting the occurrence of a specific polymorph was the oxidation temperature. Cristobalite was formed at temperatures ≥ 1673 K, tridymite between 1073 and 1573 K, while quartz formed at 973 K. Cristobalite was observed to grow in a spherulitic fashion from amorphous silica. This was not the case for tridymite and quartz, which appeared to grow as oriented crystalline films. The presence of a thin layer of silicon oxycarbide was detected at the SiC/SiO 2 interface. Formation of reliable and homogeneous interconnects can be a critical issue for demanding applications. The approach that was undertaken to

  3. Advanced materials development for multi-junction monolithic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, L.R.; Reno, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    We report results in three areas of research relevant to the fabrication of monolithic multi-junction photovoltaic devices. (1) The use of compliant intervening layers grown between highly mismatched materials, GaAs and GaP (same lattice constant as Si), is shown to increase the structural quality of the GaAs overgrowth. (2) The use of digital alloys applied to the MBE growth of GaAs{sub x}Sb{sub l-x} (a candidate material for a two junction solar cell) provides increased control of the alloy composition without degrading the optical properties. (3) A nitrogen plasma discharge is shown to be an excellent p-type doping source for CdTe and ZnTe, both of which are candidate materials for a two junction solar cell.

  4. Molecular self-assembly approaches for supramolecular electronic and organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Hin-Lap

    Molecular self-assembly represents an efficient bottom-up strategy to generate structurally well-defined aggregates of semiconducting pi-conjugated materials. The capability of tuning the chemical structures, intermolecular interactions and nanostructures through molecular engineering and novel materials processing renders it possible to tailor a large number of unprecedented properties such as charge transport, energy transfer and light harvesting. This approach does not only benefit traditional electronic devices based on bulk materials, but also generate a new research area so called "supramolecular electronics" in which electronic devices are built up with individual supramolecular nanostructures with size in the sub-hundred nanometers range. My work combined molecular self-assembly together with several novel materials processing techniques to control the nucleation and growth of organic semiconducting nanostructures from different type of pi-conjugated materials. By tailoring the interactions between the molecules using hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stacking, semiconducting nanoplatelets and nanowires with tunable sizes can be fabricated in solution. These supramolecular nanostructures were further patterned and aligned on solid substrates through printing and chemical templating methods. The capability to control the different hierarchies of organization on surface provides an important platform to study their structural-induced electronic properties. In addition to using molecular self-assembly to create different organic nanostructures, functional self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by spontaneous chemisorption on surfaces was used to tune the interfacial property in organic solar cells. Devices showed dramatically improved performance when appropriate SAMs were applied to optimize the contact property for efficiency charge collection.

  5. System and method for interfacing large-area electronics with integrated circuit devices

    DOEpatents

    Verma, Naveen; Glisic, Branko; Sturm, James; Wagner, Sigurd

    2016-07-12

    A system and method for interfacing large-area electronics with integrated circuit devices is provided. The system may be implemented in an electronic device including a large area electronic (LAE) device disposed on a substrate. An integrated circuit IC is disposed on the substrate. A non-contact interface is disposed on the substrate and coupled between the LAE device and the IC. The non-contact interface is configured to provide at least one of a data acquisition path or control path between the LAE device and the IC.

  6. Detecting and locating electronic devices using their unintended electromagnetic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagner, Colin Blake

    Electronically-initiated explosives can have unintended electromagnetic emissions which propagate through walls and sealed containers. These emissions, if properly characterized, enable the prompt and accurate detection of explosive threats. The following dissertation develops and evaluates techniques for detecting and locating common electronic initiators. The unintended emissions of radio receivers and microcontrollers are analyzed. These emissions are low-power radio signals that result from the device's normal operation. In the first section, it is demonstrated that arbitrary signals can be injected into a radio receiver's unintended emissions using a relatively weak stimulation signal. This effect is called stimulated emissions. The performance of stimulated emissions is compared to passive detection techniques. The novel technique offers a 5 to 10 dB sensitivity improvement over passive methods for detecting radio receivers. The second section develops a radar-like technique for accurately locating radio receivers. The radar utilizes the stimulated emissions technique with wideband signals. A radar-like system is designed and implemented in hardware. Its accuracy tested in a noisy, multipath-rich, indoor environment. The proposed radar can locate superheterodyne radio receivers with a root mean square position error less than 5 meters when the SNR is 15 dB or above. In the third section, an analytic model is developed for the unintended emissions of microcontrollers. It is demonstrated that these emissions consist of a periodic train of impulses. Measurements of an 8051 microcontroller validate this model. The model is used to evaluate the noise performance of several existing algorithms. Results indicate that the pitch estimation techniques have a 4 dB sensitivity improvement over epoch folding algorithms.

  7. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  8. Controllable chemical vapor deposition growth of few layer graphene for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dacheng; Wu, Bin; Guo, Yunlong; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-01-15

    used patterned CVD FLGs as the bottom electrodes in pentacene FETs. The strong π-π interactions between graphene and pentacene produced an excellent interface with low contact resistance and a reduced injection barrier, which dramatically enhances the device performance. We also fabricated reversible nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches and a logic gate using the FLG ribbons produced using our template CVD method. In summary, CVD provides a controllable means to produce graphene samples with both large area and high quality. We developed several modified CVD methods to produce FLG samples with controlled shape, location, edge, layer, dopant, and growth substrate. As a result, we can modulate the properties of FLGs, which provides materials that could be used in FETs, OFETs, and NEM devices. Despite remarkable advances in this field, further exploration is required to produce consistent, homogeneous graphene samples with single layer, single crystal, and large area for graphene-based electronics. PMID:22809220

  9. Architectural development of an advanced EVA Electronic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    An advanced electronic system for future EVA missions (including zero gravity, the lunar surface, and the surface of Mars) is under research and development within the Advanced Life Support Division at NASA Ames Research Center. As a first step in the development, an optimum system architecture has been derived from an analysis of the projected requirements for these missions. The open, modular architecture centers around a distributed multiprocessing concept where the major subsystems independently process their own I/O functions and communicate over a common bus. Supervision and coordination of the subsystems is handled by an embedded real-time operating system kernel employing multitasking software techniques. A discussion of how the architecture most efficiently meets the electronic system functional requirements, maximizes flexibility for future development and mission applications, and enhances the reliability and serviceability of the system in these remote, hostile environments is included.

  10. Endoscopic Electrosurgery in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lee, Yoon Bum; Hwang, Seawon; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Yong-Seog; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) undergoing endoscopic electrosurgery (EE) are at a risk of electromagnetic interference (EMI). We aimed to analyze the effects of EE in CIED patients. Methods: Patients with CIED who underwent EE procedures such as snare polypectomy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) were retrospectively analyzed. Postprocedural symptoms as well as demographic and outpatient follow-up data were reviewed through medical records. Electrical data, including preprocedural and postprocedural arrhythmia records, were reviewed through pacemaker interrogation, 24-hour Holter monitoring, or electrocardiogram. Results: Fifty-nine procedures in 49 patients were analyzed. Fifty procedures were performed in 43 patients with a pacemaker, and nine were performed in six patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. There were one gastric and 44 colon snare polypectomies, five gastric and one colon ESDs, and eight ERCPs with EST. Fifty-five cases of electrical follow-up were noted, with two postprocedural changes not caused by EE. Thirty-one pacemaker interrogations had procedure recordings, with two cases of asymptomatic tachycardia. All patients were asymptomatic with no adverse events. Conclusions: Our study reports no adverse events from EE in patients with CIED, suggesting that this procedure is safe. However, because of the possibility of EMI, recommendations on EE should be followed. PMID:26867552

  11. Surgical management of infected cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Umar A R; Harling, Leanne; Ashrafian, Hutan; Athanasiou, Christina; Tsipas, Pantelis; Kokotsakis, John; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-01-15

    The growing use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) has led to infections requiring intervention. These are traditionally managed using a percutaneous transvenous approach to fully extract the culpable leads. Indications for such strategies are well-established and range from simple traction to the use of powered extraction tools including laser sheaths. Where such attempts fail, or if there are further complications, then there may be need for a cardiothoracic surgical approach. Limited evidence is currently available on the merits of individual strategies, and these are mainly drawn from case reports or series. Most utilise cardiopulmonary bypass, cardioplegic arrest and entry within the right atrium to allow direct visualisation of any vegetation and safely explant all CIED components whilst avoiding perforation, valvular and paravalvular damage. In this review, we describe a number of these and the unique challenges faced by surgeons when attempting to extract CIED. It is clear that future work should concentrate on creating clear consensus and guidelines on indications, risks and measures of efficacy outcomes for various surgical techniques. PMID:26590887

  12. Effect of symmetry on electronic properties of nano devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lamba, Vijay Kr Anju,; Aditi; Garg, O. P.

    2015-06-24

    Nano devices are a promising candidate for new technology nowadays. Great effort has been devoted recently to understand the charge transport at the interfaces in nano junctions and the role of the symmetry in the transport properties of molecular junctions. However, these studies have been largely based on the analysis of the low-bias conductance, which does not allow elucidating the exact influence of the symmetry in both the electronic structure and transport characteristics of the interfaces. In this work we present a theoretical study of the transport properties, and how conductance changes with symmetry. Herein, we investigate a di-thiol benzene (DTB) single-molecule system in which sulphur group from the molecule are anchored to two facing gold electrodes. We have performed first principles calculations of the transport properties of these molecules using a combination of density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green’s function techniques. Our computational results show that for the asymmetric models, the onset of the larger current occurs at current and conductance in the negative bias regime than that in the positive bias regime, and with ΔL increasing the conductance peak shifts towards the lower negative bias so that the I(G)-V curves behave more asymmetric. Further with variation of electrode surface we found that coupling constant for coned shaped electrode is less as compared to 2X2, and 3X3 atom electrodes, so there will be lower potential barrier for canonical electrode in comparison to that of others.

  13. Spray cooling characteristics of nanofluids for electronic power devices.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Leu, Hsin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a single spray for electronic power devices using deionized (DI) water and pure silver (Ag) particles as well as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) particles, respectively, is studied herein. The tests are performed with a flat horizontal heated surface using a nozzle diameter of 0.5 mm with a definite nozzle-to-target surface distance of 25 mm. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction and mass flow rate of the liquid on the surface heat flux, including critical heat flux (CHF), are explored. Both steady state and transient data are collected for the two-phase heat transfer coefficient, boiling curve/ cooling history, and the corresponding CHF. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 274 W/cm(2) with the corresponding CHF enhancement ratio of 2.4 for the Ag/water nanofluids present at a volume fraction of 0.0075% with a low mass flux of 11.9 × 10(-4) kg/cm(2)s. PMID:25852429

  14. Spray cooling characteristics of nanofluids for electronic power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Leu, Hsin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a single spray for electronic power devices using deionized (DI) water and pure silver (Ag) particles as well as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) particles, respectively, is studied herein. The tests are performed with a flat horizontal heated surface using a nozzle diameter of 0.5 mm with a definite nozzle-to-target surface distance of 25 mm. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction and mass flow rate of the liquid on the surface heat flux, including critical heat flux (CHF), are explored. Both steady state and transient data are collected for the two-phase heat transfer coefficient, boiling curve/ cooling history, and the corresponding CHF. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 274 W/cm2 with the corresponding CHF enhancement ratio of 2.4 for the Ag/water nanofluids present at a volume fraction of 0.0075% with a low mass flux of 11.9 × 10-4 kg/cm2s.

  15. Emergency Dosimetry Using Ceramic Components in Personal Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroukla, E. C.; Bailiff, I. K.; Terry, I.

    2014-02-01

    The rapid assessment of radiation dose to members of the public exposed to significant levels of ionizing radiation during a radiological incident presents a significant difficulty in the absence of planned radiation monitoring. However, within most personal electronic devices components such as resistors with alumina substrates can be found that have potentially suitable properties as solid state dosimeters using luminescence measurement techniques. The suitability of several types of ceramic-based components (e.g., resonators, inductors and resistors) has been previously examined using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques to establish their basic characteristics for the retrospective determination of absorbed dose. In this paper, we present results obtained with aluminum oxide surface mount resistors extracted from mobile phones that further extend this work. Very encouraging results have been obtained related to the measurement of luminescence sensitivity, dose response, reusability, limit of detection, signal reproducibility and known-dose recovery. However, the alumina exhibits a rapid loss of the latent luminescence signal with time following irradiation attributed to athermal (or anomalous) fading. The issues related to obtaining a reliable correction protocol for this loss and the detailed examinations required of the fading behavior are discussed.

  16. Effect of symmetry on electronic properties of nano devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamba, Vijay Kr; Garg, O. P.; Anju, Aditi

    2015-06-01

    Nano devices are a promising candidate for new technology nowadays. Great effort has been devoted recently to understand the charge transport at the interfaces in nano junctions and the role of the symmetry in the transport properties of molecular junctions. However, these studies have been largely based on the analysis of the low-bias conductance, which does not allow elucidating the exact influence of the symmetry in both the electronic structure and transport characteristics of the interfaces. In this work we present a theoretical study of the transport properties, and how conductance changes with symmetry. Herein, we investigate a di-thiol benzene (DTB) single-molecule system in which sulphur group from the molecule are anchored to two facing gold electrodes. We have performed first principles calculations of the transport properties of these molecules using a combination of density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function techniques. Our computational results show that for the asymmetric models, the onset of the larger current occurs at current and conductance in the negative bias regime than that in the positive bias regime, and with ΔL increasing the conductance peak shifts towards the lower negative bias so that the I(G)-V curves behave more asymmetric. Further with variation of electrode surface we found that coupling constant for coned shaped electrode is less as compared to 2X2, and 3X3 atom electrodes, so there will be lower potential barrier for canonical electrode in comparison to that of others.

  17. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.

    2012-01-03

    This invention provides thin film devices that have been processed on their front- and backside. The devices include an active layer that is sufficiently thin to be mechanically flexible. Examples of the devices include back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  18. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  19. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  20. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  1. Graphene Electronic Device Based Biosensors and Chemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan

    Two-dimensional layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, are emerging as an exciting material system for a new generation of atomically thin electronic devices. With their ultrahigh surface to volume ratio and excellent electrical properties, 2D-layered materials hold the promise for the construction of a generation of chemical and biological sensors with unprecedented sensitivity. In my PhD thesis, I mainly focus on graphene based electronic biosensors and chemical sensors. In the first part of my thesis, I demonstrated the fabrication of graphene nanomesh (GNM), which is a graphene thin film with a periodic array of holes punctuated in it. The periodic holes introduce long periphery active edges that provide a high density of functional groups (e.g. carboxylic groups) to allow for covalent grafting of specific receptor molecules for chemical and biosensor applications. After covalently functionalizing the GNM with glucose oxidase, I managed to make a novel electronic sensor which can detect glucose as well as pH change. In the following part of my thesis I demonstrate the fabrication of graphene-hemin conjugate for nitric oxide detection. The non-covalent functionalization through pi-pi stacking interaction allows reliable immobilization of hemin molecules on graphene without damaging the graphene lattice to ensure the highly sensitive and specific detection of nitric oxide. The graphene-hemin nitric oxide sensor is capable of real-time monitoring of nitric oxide concentrations, which is of central importance for probing the diverse roles of nitric oxide in neurotransmission, cardiovascular systems, and immune responses. Our studies demonstrate that the graphene-hemin sensors can respond rapidly to nitric oxide in physiological environments with sub-nanomolar sensitivity. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that the graphene-hemin sensors can be used for the detection of nitric oxide released from macrophage cells and endothelial cells, demonstrating their

  2. Novel transparent electrodes allow sustainable production of electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Constant, Kristen

    2010-12-27

    A novel technique for fabricating inexpensive, transparent electrodes from common metals has been developed by engineers and scientists at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. They exhibit very high transparency and are very good electrical conductors. This is a combination of properties that is difficult to achieve with common materials. The most frequently used transparent electrode in today's high-technology devices (such as LCD screens) is indium tin oxide (ITO). While ITO performs well in these applications, the supply of indium is very limited. In addition, it is rapidly decreasing as consumer demand for flat-panel electronics is skyrocketing. According to a 2004 US Geological Survey report, as little as 14 years exploitation of known indium reserves remains. In addition to increasing prices, the dwindling supply of indium suggests its use is not sustainable for future generations of electronics enthusiasts. Solar cells represent another application where transparent electrodes are used. To make solar-energy collection economically feasible, all parts of solar photovoltaics must be made more efficient and cost-effective. Our novel transparent electrodes have the potential to do both. In addition, there is much interest in developing more efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly lighting. Incandescent light bulbs are very inefficient, because most of their energy consumption is wasted as heat. Fluorescent lighting is much more efficient but still uses mercury, an environmental toxin. An attractive alternative is offered by LEDs, which have very high efficiencies and long lifetimes, and do not contain mercury. If made bright enough, LED use for general lighting could provide a viable alternative. We have fabricated electrodes from more commonly available materials, using a technique that is cost effective and environmentally friendly. Most of today's electronic devices are made in specialized facilities equipped with low

  3. Molecular-based electronically switchable tunnel junction devices.

    PubMed

    Collier, C P; Jeppesen, J O; Luo, Y; Perkins, J; Wong, E W; Heath, J R; Stoddart, J F

    2001-12-19

    Solid-state tunnel junction devices were fabricated from Langmuir Blodgett molecular monolayers of a bistable [2]catenane, a bistable [2]pseudorotaxane, and a single-station [2]rotaxane. All devices exhibited a (noncapacitive) hysteretic current-voltage response that switched the device between high- and low-conductivity states, although control devices exhibited no such response. Correlations between the structure and solution-phase dynamics of the molecular and supramolecular systems, the crystallographic domain structure of the monolayer film, and the room-temperature device performance characteristics are reported. PMID:11741428

  4. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong; Xiao, Y.; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  5. Advanced Simulation of Electron Heat Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Xiao, Y.; Holod, I.; Zhang, W. L.; Deng, Wenjun; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.; Kamath, Chandrika; Wichmann, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  6. 76 FR 67200 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Devices and Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Electron... of use limited to electron paramagnetic resonance devices and systems for oximetry. DATES:...

  7. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  8. Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices in Dental, Oral, and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices as life-prolonging and life-saving devices has evolved from a treatment of last resort to a first-line therapy for an increasing number of patients. As these devices become more and more popular in the general population, dental providers utilizing instruments and medications should be aware of dental equipment and medications that may affect these devices and understand the management of patients with these devices. This review article will discuss the various types and indications for pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, common drugs and instruments affecting these devices, and management of patients with these devices implanted for cardiac dysrhythmias. PMID:27269668

  9. Current state-of-the-art of device therapy for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lawrence S.; Shekar, Prem S.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of past and current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support. PMID:25559828

  10. Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

  11. Applications of Electronic Devices in the Sixth Form Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Described are two experiments using electronic circuits designed for the activities. The first experiment is Ruchardt's experiment and the second demonstrates the distribution of velocity of electrons. (RH)

  12. Use of Personal Electronic Devices by Nurse Anesthetists and the Effects on Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Snoots, Lauren R; Wands, Brenda A

    2016-04-01

    Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) provide high-quality patient care to ensure patient safety. Strict vigilance and prompt response is required of the CRNA to make critical decisions. Distractions during anesthesia delivery may threaten patient safety. Personal electronic devices (PEDs) have become an integral tool used by 90% of adults. Adaptation of PEDs has permitted their integration into current anesthesia practice. Although technologic advancements have improved accessibility to resources and communication, they also serve as a source of distraction. Inappropriate PED use while administering anesthesia remains grossly underreported and understudied related to its impact on patient safety. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the critical need for further research in order to analyze safety risk, appropriately guide CRNA education, and properly develop and enforce media policies within organizations. Currently, PED use by the CRNA exists in ethically blurred boundaries, with potentially major patient safety and legal consequences. PMID:27311152

  13. Atomic and electronic structure of interfaces in materials systems for future semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, Sergei

    Because of the intrinsic limits of the Si/SiO2 based industry, there is a great trend towards the monolithic integration of new materials into already well developed silicon technology. Having lasted for several decades now, downscaling reaches the limit, in which a critical device dimension approaches the size of one atom. At this level of the miniaturization, it is not the bulk material, but the interface between the two materials that what controls the properties of the resulting optoelectronic device. Thus, the characterization of precise atomic arrangements at different interfaces and the influence of these arrangements on the optoelectronic properties of interfaces is required. Therefore, in this study, a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques and density functional theory calculations was used as a research tool for the characterization of interfaces. The STEM instruments used for the study were equipped with prototypes of spherical aberration correctors, enabling to achieve the highest resolution currently available both in space and energy. The combination of experimental and theoretical methods was applied to study interfaces between Si/GaAs, Si/Ge, Ge/SiO2, Si/HfO2 and Si/Al2O3. As the result of the present research, a new dislocation configuration at the Si/GaAs interface was reported for the first time. The influence of this dislocation structure on the electrical properties of the Si/GaAs interface was analyzed. Also, the transition from Si to GaAs and from Si to Ge at corresponding interfaces was described with atomic precision. For the first time, the interface between Ge and SiO2 was shown to have "ideal" characteristics (chemical abruptness and sharpness). This indicates the potential, both for a more successful use of Ge in high-speed devices and for advances in interface engineering to enhance performance in electronic devices. The features of Si/HfO2 and Si/Al2O3 interfaces, namely the distribution and

  14. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:22464092

  15. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Ancona, Mario G.; Yu, Zhi-Ping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction to the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion or quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  16. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Ancona, Mario G.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Yu, Zhiping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction ot the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  17. A Cs2LiYCl6:Ce-based advanced radiation monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Dallmann, N.; Baginski, M. J.; Best, D. J.; Smith, M. B.; Graham, S. A.; Dathy, C.; Frank, J. M.; McClish, M.

    2015-06-01

    Cs2LiYCl6:Ce3+ (CLYC) scintillator has gained recent interest because of its ability to perform simultaneous gamma spectroscopy and thermal neutron detection. Discrimination between the two incident particle types owes to the fundamentally unique emission waveforms, a consequence of the interaction and subsequent scintillation mechanisms within the crystal. Due to this dual-mode detector capability, CLYC was selected for the development of an Advanced Radiation Monitoring Device (ARMD), a compact handheld instrument for radioisotope identification and localization. ARMD consists of four 1 in.-right cylindrical CLYC crystals, custom readout electronics including a suitable multi-window application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), battery pack, proprietary software, and Android-based tablet for high-level analysis and display. We herein describe the motivation of the work and engineering design of the unit, and we explain the software embedded in the core module and for radioisotope analysis. We report an operational range of tens of keV to 8.5 MeV with approximately 5.3% gamma energy resolution at 662 keV, thermal neutron detection efficiency of 10%, battery lifetime of up to 10 h, manageable rates of 20 kHz; further, we describe in greater detail time to identify specific gamma source setups.

  18. Growth and Electronic Structure of Heusler Compounds for Use in Electron Spin Based Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sahil Jaykumar

    Spintronic devices, where information is carried by the quantum spin state of the electron instead of purely its charge, have gained considerable interest for their use in future computing technologies. For optimal performance, a pure spin current, where all electrons have aligned spins, must be generated and transmitted across many interfaces and through many types of materials. While conventional spin sources have historically been elemental ferromagnets, like Fe or Co, these materials pro duce only partially spin polarized currents. To increase the spin polarization of the current, materials like half-metallic ferromagnets, where there is a gap in the minority spin density of states around the Fermi level, or topological insulators, where the current transport is dominated by spin-locked surface states, show promise. A class of materials called Heusler compounds, with electronic structures that range from normal metals, to half metallic ferromagnets, semiconductors, superconductors and even topological insulators, interfaces well with existing device technologies, and through the use of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) high quality heterostructures and films can be grown. This dissertation examines the electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces of both topological insulator (PtLuSb-- and PtLuBi--) and half-metallic ferromagnet (Co2MnSi-- and Co2FeSi--) III-V semiconductor heterostructures. PtLuSb and PtLuBi growth by MBE was demonstrated on Alx In1--xSb (001) ternaries. PtLuSb (001) surfaces were observed to reconstruct with either (1x3) or c(2x2) unit cells depending on Sb overpressure and substrate temperature. viii The electronic structure of these films was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and photoemission spectroscopy. STS measurements as well as angle resolved photoemission spectropscopy (ARPES) suggest that PtLuSb has a zero-gap or semimetallic band structure. Additionally, the observation of linearly dispersing surface

  19. Use of portable electronic devices in a hospital setting and their potential for bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Rao, Amitha; Reyes-Sacin, Carlos; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Szpunar, Susan; Riederer, Kathleen; Kaye, Keith; Fishbain, Joel T; Levine, Diane

    2015-03-01

    Portable electronic devices are increasingly being used in the hospital setting. As with other fomites, these devices represent a potential reservoir for the transmission of pathogens. We conducted a convenience sampling of devices in 2 large medical centers to identify bacterial colonization rates and potential risk factors. PMID:25557772

  20. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

  1. Ionic current devices-Recent progress in the merging of electronic, microfluidic, and biomimetic structures.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyung-Jun; Velev, Orlin D

    2013-01-01

    We review the recent progress in the emerging area of devices and circuits operating on the basis of ionic currents. These devices operate at the intersection of electrochemistry, electronics, and microfluidics, and their potential applications are inspired by essential biological processes such as neural transmission. Ionic current rectification has been demonstrated in diode-like devices containing electrolyte solutions, hydrogel, or hydrated nanofilms. More complex functions have been realized in ionic current based transistors, solar cells, and switching memory devices. Microfluidic channels and networks-an intrinsic component of the ionic devices-could play the role of wires and circuits in conventional electronics. PMID:24404020

  2. 78 FR 22899 - Certain Electronic Devices Having Placeshifting or Display Replication Functionality and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices Having Placeshifting or Display Replication Functionality and Products... the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices having placeshifting... Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure, 19 CFR 210.10 (2012). Scope of Investigation: Having...

  3. 49 CFR 220.315 - Operational tests and inspections; further restrictions on use of electronic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operational tests and inspections; further restrictions on use of electronic devices. 220.315 Section 220.315 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Electronic Devices §...

  4. Activating Students' Interest and Participation in Lectures and Practical Courses Using Their Electronic Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijtmans, Maikel; van Rens, Lisette; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E.

    2014-01-01

    Interactive teaching with larger groups of students can be a challenge, but the use of mobile electronic devices by students (smartphones, tablets, laptops) can be used to improve classroom interaction. We have examined several types of tasks that can be electronically enacted in classes and practical courses using these devices: multiple choice…

  5. 75 FR 4583 - In the Matter of: Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of: Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and... electronic devices, including mobile phones, portable music players, and computers, by reason of infringement... mobile phones, portable music players, or computers that infringe one or more of claims 1-12 of...

  6. 77 FR 31039 - Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector; Institution of Investigation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector; Institution of Investigation... electronic devices having a retractable USB connector by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S... retractable USB connector that infringe one or more of claims 1-4, 7, and 8 of the `210 patent and claims...

  7. 77 FR 31876 - Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products Containing Same Determination Not...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... Properties Holdings, Inc. of New Rochelle, New York (``GPH''). 77 FR 21584 (April 10, 2012). The complaint... COMMISSION Certain Consumer Electronics and Display Devices and Products Containing Same Determination Not To... importation of certain consumer electronics and display devices and products containing the same by reason...

  8. 78 FR 34132 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... published a notice (78 FR 12892, May 31, 2013) of receipt of complaint entitled Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission...

  9. Evaluation of advanced cooling therapy's esophageal cooling device for core temperature control.

    PubMed

    Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Managing core temperature is critical to patient outcomes in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Previous devices designed to perform temperature management required a trade-off between invasiveness and temperature modulation efficiency. The Esophageal Cooling Device, made by Advanced Cooling Therapy (Chicago, IL), was developed to optimize warming and cooling efficiency through an easy and low risk procedure that leverages heat transfer through convection and conduction. Clinical data from cardiac arrest, fever, and critical burn patients indicate that the Esophageal Cooling Device performs very well both in terms of temperature modulation (cooling rates of approximately 1.3°C/hour, warming of up to 0.5°C/hour) and maintaining temperature stability (variation around goal temperature ± 0.3°C). Physicians have reported that device performance is comparable to the performance of intravascular temperature management techniques and superior to the performance of surface devices, while avoiding the downsides associated with both. PMID:27043177

  10. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Travis; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Kang, Byoung Sam; Wang, Hung-Ta; Chang, Chih-Yang; Lin, Jenshan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO2 and C2H4 using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application. PMID:22408548

  11. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies Developed for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Baietto, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The research and development of new electronic-nose applications in the biomedical field has accelerated at a phenomenal rate over the past 25 years. Many innovative e-nose technologies have provided solutions and applications to a wide variety of complex biomedical and healthcare problems. The purposes of this review are to present a comprehensive analysis of past and recent biomedical research findings and developments of electronic-nose sensor technologies, and to identify current and future potential e-nose applications that will continue to advance the effectiveness and efficiency of biomedical treatments and healthcare services for many years. An abundance of electronic-nose applications has been developed for a variety of healthcare sectors including diagnostics, immunology, pathology, patient recovery, pharmacology, physical therapy, physiology, preventative medicine, remote healthcare, and wound and graft healing. Specific biomedical e-nose applications range from uses in biochemical testing, blood-compatibility evaluations, disease diagnoses, and drug delivery to monitoring of metabolic levels, organ dysfunctions, and patient conditions through telemedicine. This paper summarizes the major electronic-nose technologies developed for healthcare and biomedical applications since the late 1980s when electronic aroma detection technologies were first recognized to be potentially useful in providing effective solutions to problems in the healthcare industry. PMID:22346620

  12. Materials issues for advanced electronic and optoelectronic connectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J.; Wen, S.

    1990-09-01

    Trends of increased speed, density and power of electronic devices and circuitry translate to a need for connector substrate materials with improved form-ability and mechanical stability. Many contact surface requirements will continue to be met by precious metals for low contact force and tin in moderate contact force connectors. However, the demands for lower insertion forces, increased wear resistance, higher operating temperatures and improved corrosion resistance will challenge materials experts and connector designers to develop and utilize cost-effective replacements for tin and gold in electronic connectors. The stability and compatibility requirements of optoelectronic connectors provide challenges over a wide range of materials with the added dimension of accommodating essential optical characteristics.

  13. 76 FR 12144 - Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... COMMISSION Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading March 2, 2011. It appears to the... securities of Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the... of investors require a suspension of trading in Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc. Therefore, it...

  14. Advanced photovoltaic system simulator to demonstrate the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.; DeBlasio, R.; O'Sullivan, G.A.; Tomko, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes a photovoltaic system simulator for characterizing and evaluating the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays as well as for simulating the operation of advanced conceptual photovoltaic systems. The system simulator is capable of extrapolating the performance from a single laboratory cell, or of a module to power levels up to 10 kW. The major subsystems comprising the system simulator are (1) Solar Array Simulator, (2) Power Conditioning Unit, (3) Load Controller and Resistive Load Unit, (4) Data Acquisition and Control Unit, and (5) Cell Test Bed.

  15. Aircrew Training Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features (Phase IV--Summary Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzella, Donald J.; And Others

    Modern aircrew training devices (ATDs) are equipped with sophisticated hardware and software capabilities, known as advanced instructional features (AIFs), that permit a simulator instructor to prepare briefings, manage training, vary task difficulty/fidelity, monitor performance, and provide feedback for flight simulation training missions. The…

  16. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices and End-of-Life Care: An Australian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Alhammad, Nasser J; O'Donnell, Mark; O'Donnell, David; Mariani, Justin A; Gould, Paul A; McGavigan, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic devices (pacemakers and defibrillators) are increasingly common in modern cardiology practice, and health professionals from a variety of specialties will encounter patients with such devices on a frequent basis. This article will focus on the subset of patients who may request, or be appropriate for, device deactivation and discuss the issues surrounding end-of-life decisions, along with the ethical and legal implications of device deactivation. PMID:27320854

  17. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL has lased at 4.7 and 5.2 {mu}m with a 1-cm period wiggler and a high-brightness electron beam at 16.8 and 15.8 MeV, respectively. The measured electron beam normalized emittance is 1.7 {pi}{center_dot}mm{center_dot}mrad at a peak current of 100 A, corresponding to a beam brightness greater than 2 {times} 10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2}rad{sup 2}. Initial results indicate that the AFEL small signal gain is {approximately}8% at 0.3 nC (30 A peak). The maximum output energy is 7 mJ over a 2-{mu}s macropulse. The AFEL performance can be significantly enhanced by improvements in the rf and drive laser stability.

  18. Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Advanced Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling

    2015-01-01

    Novel approach enables high-speed special-purpose processors Advanced reconfigurable and reprogrammable communication systems will require sub-130-nanometer electronics. Legacy single event upset (SEU) radiation-tolerant circuits are ineffective at speeds greater than 125 megahertz. In Phase I of this project, ICs, LLC, demonstrated new base-level logic circuits that provide SEU immunity for sub-130-nanometer high-speed circuits. In Phase II, the company developed an innovative self-restoring logic (SRL) circuit and a system approach that provides high-speed, SEU-tolerant solutions that are effective for sub-130-nanometer electronics scalable to at least 22-nanometer processes. The SRL system can be used in the design of NASA's next-generation special-purpose processors, especially reconfigurable communication processors.

  19. EDITORIAL: Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of 'Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics'— NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix— were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (10

  20. An electronic device to record consensual reflex in human pupil.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, H M; Costa, R M; Camilo, E N R; Gang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Examination of the pupil offers an objective evaluation of visual function as well as the vegetative pathways to the eye. This work proposes the development of an effective method and a portable device to test the consensual pupillary reflex. The first results demonstrate the success of a new device construction and methodology to record the consensual reflex with different stimulus, in a situation of complete blockage of light. PMID:26262208