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Sample records for advanced fabrication techniques

  1. Advanced fabrication techniques for cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved design for regeneratively cooled engine structures was identified. This design uses photochemically machined (PCM) coolant passages. It permits the braze joint to be placed in a relatively cool area, remote from the critical hot face sheet. The geometry of the passages at the face sheet also minimizes stress concentration and, therefore, enhances the low cycle fatigue performance. The two most promising alloys identified for this application are Inconel 617 and Nickel 201. Inconel 617 was selected because it has excellent creep rupture properties, while Nickel 201 was selected because of its predicted good performance under low cycle fatigue loading. The fabrication of the PCM coolant passages in both Inconel 617 and Nickel 201 was successfully developed. During fabrication of Inconel 617, undesirable characteristics were observed in the braze joints. A development program to resolve this condition was undertaken and led to definition of an isothermal solidification process for joining Inconel 617 panels. This process produced joints which approach parent metal strength and homogeneity.

  2. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high-quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  3. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  4. Advanced Fibre Bragg Grating and Microfibre Bragg Grating Fabrication Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kit Man

    Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) have become a very important technology for communication systems and fibre optic sensing. Typically, FBGs are less than 10-mm long and are fabricated using fused silica uniform phase masks which become more expensive for longer length or non-uniform pitch. Generally, interference UV laser beams are employed to make long or complex FBGs, and this technique introduces critical precision and control issues. In this work, we demonstrate an advanced FBG fabrication system that enables the writing of long and complex gratings in optical fibres with virtually any apodisation profile, local phase and Bragg wavelength using a novel optical design in which the incident angles of two UV beams onto an optical fibre can be adjusted simultaneously by moving just one optical component, instead of two optics employed in earlier configurations, to vary the grating pitch. The key advantage of the grating fabrication system is that complex gratings can be fabricated by controlling the linear movements of two translation stages. In addition to the study of advanced grating fabrication technique, we also focus on the inscription of FBGs written in optical fibres with a cladding diameter of several ten's of microns. Fabrication of microfibres was investigated using a sophisticated tapering method. We also proposed a simple but practical technique to filter out the higher order modes reflected from the FBG written in microfibres via a linear taper region while the fundamental mode re-couples to the core. By using this technique, reflection from the microfibre Bragg grating (MFBG) can be effectively single mode, simplifying the demultiplexing and demodulation processes. MFBG exhibits high sensitivity to contact force and an MFBG-based force sensor was also constructed and tested to investigate their suitability for use as an invasive surgery device. Performance of the contact force sensor packaged in a conforming elastomer material compares favourably to one

  5. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  6. Advanced Manufacturing Techniques Demonstrated for Fabricating Developmental Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Engineering Development Division has been working in support of innovative gas turbine engine systems under development by Glenn's Combustion Branch. These one-of-a-kind components require operation under extreme conditions. High-temperature ceramics were chosen for fabrication was because of the hostile operating environment. During the designing process, it became apparent that traditional machining techniques would not be adequate to produce the small, intricate features for the conceptual design, which was to be produced by stacking over a dozen thin layers with many small features that would then be aligned and bonded together into a one-piece unit. Instead of using traditional machining, we produced computer models in Pro/ENGINEER (Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC), Needham, MA) to the specifications of the research engineer. The computer models were exported in stereolithography standard (STL) format and used to produce full-size rapid prototype polymer models. These semi-opaque plastic models were used for visualization and design verification. The computer models also were exported in International Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) format and sent to Glenn's Thermal/Fluids Design & Analysis Branch and Applied Structural Mechanics Branch for profiling heat transfer and mechanical strength analysis.

  7. Fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials using sol-gel processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. T.; Chu, Jay; Zheng, Haixing

    1995-01-01

    Advanced materials play an important role in electrochemical energy devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrochemical capacitors. They are being used as both electrodes and electrolytes. Sol-gel processing is a versatile solution technique used in fabrication of ceramic materials with tailored stoichiometry, microstructure, and properties. The application of sol-gel processing in the fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials will be presented. The potentials of sol-gel derived materials for electrochemical energy applications will be discussed along with some examples of successful applications. Sol-gel derived metal oxide electrode materials such as V2O5 cathodes have been demonstrated in solid-slate thin film batteries; solid electrolytes materials such as beta-alumina for advanced secondary batteries had been prepared by the sol-gel technique long time ago; and high surface area transition metal compounds for capacitive energy storage applications can also be synthesized with this method.

  8. Extrusion based rapid prototyping technique: an advanced platform for tissue engineering scaffold fabrication.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M Enamul; Chuan, Y Leng; Pashby, Ian

    2012-02-01

    Advances in scaffold design and fabrication technology have brought the tissue engineering field stepping into a new era. Conventional techniques used to develop scaffolds inherit limitations, such as lack of control over the pore morphology and architecture as well as reproducibility. Rapid prototyping (RP) technology, a layer-by-layer additive approach offers a unique opportunity to build complex 3D architectures overcoming those limitations that could ultimately be tailored to cater for patient-specific applications. Using RP methods, researchers have been able to customize scaffolds to mimic the biomechanical properties (in terms of structural integrity, strength, and microenvironment) of the organ or tissue to be repaired/replaced quite closely. This article provides intensive description on various extrusion based scaffold fabrication techniques and review their potential utility for TE applications. The extrusion-based technique extrudes the molten polymer as a thin filament through a nozzle onto a platform layer-by-layer and thus building 3D scaffold. The technique allows full control over pore architecture and dimension in the x- and y- planes. However, the pore height in z-direction is predetermined by the extruding nozzle diameter rather than the technique itself. This review attempts to assess the current state and future prospects of this technology.

  9. Advanced Materials and Fabrication Techniques for the Orion Attitude Control Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Holmes, Richard; O'Dell, John; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy

    2013-01-01

    Rhenium, with its high melting temperature, excellent elevated temperature properties, and lack of a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), is ideally suited for the hot gas components of the ACM (Attitude Control Motor), and other high-temperature applications. However, the high cost of rhenium makes fabricating these components using conventional fabrication techniques prohibitive. Therefore, near-net-shape forming techniques were investigated for producing cost-effective rhenium and rhenium alloy components for the ACM and other propulsion applications. During this investigation, electrochemical forming (EL-Form ) techniques were evaluated for producing the hot gas components. The investigation focused on demonstrating that EL-Form processing techniques could be used to produce the ACM flow distributor. Once the EL-Form processing techniques were established, a representative rhenium flow distributor was fabricated, and samples were harvested for material properties testing at both room and elevated temperatures. As a lower cost and lighter weight alternative to an all-rhenium component, rhenium- coated graphite and carbon-carbon were also evaluated. The rhenium-coated components were thermal-cycle tested to verify that they could withstand the expected thermal loads during service. High-temperature electroforming is based on electrochemical deposition of compact layers of metals onto a mandrel of the desired shape. Mandrels used for electro-deposition of near-net shaped parts are generally fabricated from high-density graphite. The graphite mandrel is easily machined and does not react with the molten electrolyte. For near-net shape components, the inner surface of the electroformed part replicates the polished graphite mandrel. During processing, the mandrel itself becomes the cathode, and scrap or refined refractory metal is the anode. Refractory metal atoms from the anode material are ionized in the molten electrolytic solution, and are deposited

  10. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures. Final report, October 1975-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, O.A.; Arefian, V.V.; Warren, H.A.; Vuigner, A.A.; Pohlman, M.J.

    1985-11-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  11. Micropen direct-write technique for fabrication of advanced electroceramic and optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingjing

    Direct-write technologies, a subset of the rapid prototyping, have been applied for many applications including electronics, photonics and biomedical engineering. Among them, Micropen(TM) is a promising technique, providing precision deposition of materials with various viscosities, on-line design changes and writing on nonplanar substrates. The objective of this project was to directly write two- and three-dimensional novel structures by Micropen(TM) for potential optical and transducer applications. First, to gain a basic understanding of Micropen(TM) operation, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) solutions were developed as a model system. The effects of solution rheological properties on deposition conditions were investigated. Secondly, PMMA/SiO2 hybrids were developed using sol-gel process. The effects of organic/inorganic ratios on thermal stability, microstructure and optical properties were studied. The solution with 80 wt% PMMA loading was chosen to deposit lines for optical applications. Another application was the direct-write of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thick films (6-70 mum) for MEMS or high frequency medical imaging applications. Pastes consisting of 15-30 vol% ceramic loading in a sol-gel solution were prepared for the deposition of films on various substrates. The PZT sol was used as a binder as well as to achieve low temperature heat treatment of the films. Using the 15 vol% paste with a 250-mum pen tip, a four-layer film was deposited on a silicon substrate. This 16-mum film with 1 cm 2 area had K of 870, tandelta of 4.1%, Pr of 12.2 muC/cm 2 and Ec of 27 kV/cm. Furthermore, Micropen(TM) was utilized for the direct-write of ceramic skeletal structures to develop PZT ceramic/polymer composites with 2-2 connectivity for medical ultrasound transducers. Ceramic/binder based pastes were developed as writing materials. The 35 vol% paste exhibited shear thinning with a viscosity of 45 Pa˙s at lower shear rate and 3 Pa˙s at higher shear rate. Using a

  12. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  13. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed. PMID:27119268

  14. Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Precisely Controlled Micro and Nano Scale Environments for Complex Tissue Regeneration and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Benjamin

    As modern medicine advances, it is still very challenging to cure joint defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The current clinical standard for catastrophic or late stage joint degradation is a total joint implant, where the damaged joint is completely excised and replaced with a metallic or artificial joint. However, these procedures still only lasts for 10-15 years, and there are hosts of recovery complications which can occur. Thus, these studies have sought to employ advanced biomaterials and scaffold fabricated techniques to effectively regrow joint tissue, instead of merely replacing it with artificial materials. We can hypothesize here that the inclusion of biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials with highly functional electrospun and 3D printed scaffold can improve physical characteristics (mechanical strength, surface interactions and nanotexture) enhance cellular growth and direct stem cell differentiation for bone, cartilage and vascular growth as well as cancer metastasis modeling. Nanomaterial inclusion and controlled 3D printed features effectively increased nano surface roughness, Young's Modulus and provided effective flow paths for simulated arterial blood. All of the approaches explored proved highly effective for increasing cell growth, as a result of increasing micro-complexity and nanomaterial incorporation. Additionally, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, cell to cell interaction and vascular formation were enhanced. Finally, growth-factor(gf)-loaded polymer nanospheres greatly improved vascular cell behavior, and provided a highly bioactive scaffold for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture and bone formation. In conclusion, electrospinning and 3D printing when combined effectively with biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanomaterials, collagen, nHA, polymer

  15. 3D printed electromagnetic transmission and electronic structures fabricated on a single platform using advanced process integration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffenbaugh, Paul Issac

    3D printing has garnered immense attention from many fields including in-office rapid prototyping of mechanical parts, outer-space satellite replication, garage functional firearm manufacture, and NASA rocket engine component fabrication. 3D printing allows increased design flexibility in the fabrication of electronics, microwave circuits and wireless antennas and has reached a level of maturity which allows functional parts to be printed. Much more work is necessary in order to perfect the processes of 3D printed electronics especially in the area of automation. Chapter 1 shows several finished prototypes of 3D printed electronics as well as newly developed techniques in fabrication. Little is known about the RF and microwave properties and applications of the standard materials which have been developed for 3D printing. Measurement of a wide variety of materials over a broad spectrum of frequencies up to 10 GHz using a variety of well-established measurement methods is performed throughout chapter 2. Several types of high frequency RF transmission lines are fabricated and valuable model-matched data is gathered and provided in chapter 3 for future designers' use. Of particular note is a fully 3D printed stripline which was automatically fabricated in one process on one machine. Some core advantages of 3D printing RF/microwave components include rapid manufacturing of complex, dimensionally sensitive circuits (such as antennas and filters which are often iteratively tuned) and the ability to create new devices that cannot be made using standard fabrication techniques. Chapter 4 describes an exemplary fully 3D printed curved inverted-F antenna.

  16. Nozzle fabrication technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A block of electrically conductive material which is to be formed into a body with internal and/or external surfaces that approximate hyperboloids of one sheet is placed so that its axis is set at a predetermined skew angle with relation to a traveling EDM electrode wire. The electrode wire is then moved into cutting proximity of the body wire. Thereafter, by revolving the body about its own axis, the external and/or internal surfaces of the body will be cut into an approximate hyperbolic surface of revolution depending upon whether the body is positioned with the cutting wire outside of the body or in a previously formed longitudinal passage in the body. As an alternative technique, elongated channels can also be cut into the wall of the body by successively orienting the body to a selected number of angular positions, with the electrode wire being either outside of the body or in a previously formed passage in the body. At each of these angular positions, the electrode wire is moved orthogonally with respect to the axis of the wire, while both the body axis skew angle and the rotational position about that axis is controlled by cutting a channel or groove in the body to relieve stresses in the body material or to convey a coolant fluid.

  17. Nozzle fabrication technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A block of electrically-conductive material which is to be formed into a body with internal and/or external surfaces that approximate hyperboloids of one sheet is placed so that its axis is set at a predetermined skew angle with relation to a travelling EDM electrode wire and the electrode wire is then moved into cutting proximity of the body. Thereafter, by revolving the body about its own axis, the external and/or internal surfaces of the body will be cut into an approximate hyperbolic surface of revolution depending upon whether the body is positioned with the cutting wire outside of the body or in a previously-formed longitudinal passage in the body. As an alternative technique, elongated channels can also be cut into the walls of the body by successively orienting the body to a selected number of angular positions with the electrode wire being either outside of the body or in a previously-formed passage in the body. At each of these angular positions, the electrode wire is moved orthogonally with respect to the axis of the wire while both the body axis skew angle and the rotational position about that axis are controlled for cutting a channel or groove in the body as required to relieve stresses in the material of the body or to convey a coolant fluid.

  18. Advanced Fabrication Technique and Thermal Performance Prediction of U-Mo/Zr-alloy Dispersion Fuel Pin for High Burnup PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwardi

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, a novel class of zirconium alloys having the melting temperature of 990-1160 K has been developed. Based on novel zirconium matrix alloys, high uranium content fuel pin with U-9Mo has been developed according to capillary impregnation technique. The pin shows it is thermal conductivity ranging from 18 to 22 w/m/K that is comparably higher than UO2 pellet pin. The paper presents the met-met fabrication and thermal performance analysis of the fuel in typical PWR. The fabrication consists of mixing UO2 powder or granules and a novel Zr-alloy powder having low melting point, filling the mixture in a cladding tube that one of its end has been plugged, heating the pin to above melting temperature of Zr-alloy for an hour, natural cooling and heat treating at 300 K for 1/2 hr. The thermal analysis takes into account the pore and temperature distribution and high burn up effect to pellet conductivity. The thermal diffusivity ratio of novel to conventional fuel has been used as correction factor for the novel fuel conductivity. The results show a significant lowering pellet temperature along the radius until 1000 K at the hottest position. The analysis underestimates since the gap conductivity has been treated as decreased by 2% fission gas released that is not real since the use of lower temperature, and also decreasing thermal conductivity by porosity formation will much lower. The analysis shows that the novel fuel has very good thermal properties which able to pass the barrier of 65 MWD/kg-U, the limit to day commercial fuel. The burn-up extension means fewer fresh fuel is needed to produce electricity, preserve natural uranium resource, easier fuel handling operational per energy produced

  19. Advancements in electrode design and laser techniques for fabricating micro-electrode arrays as part of a retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Dodds, C W D; Schuettler, M; Guenther, T; Lovell, N H; Suaning, G J

    2011-01-01

    Retinal micro-electrode arrays (MEAs) for a visual prosthesis were fabricated by laser structuring of platinum (Pt) foil and liquid silicone rubber. A new design was created using a folding technique to create a multi-layered array from a single Pt sheet. This method allowed a reduction in both the electrode pitch, and the overall width of the array, while maintaining coplanar connection points for more stable interconnections to other components of the system. The design also included a section which could be rolled to create a cylindrical segment in order to minimise the size of the exit in the sclera after implantation. A picosecond mode-locked 532 nm laser system was investigated as a replacement for the nanosecond Q-switched 1064 nm laser currently in use. Trials showed that the ps system could produce high quality electrode tracks with a minimum pitch of 30 μm, less than 40% the pitch achievable with the ns laser. A method was investigated for the cutting of Pt foils without damaging the underlying silicone by laser machining to a depth just below the thickness of the foil. Initial samples showed promise with full penetration of the foil only occurring at cross points of the laser paths. The ps laser was also used to create roughened surfaces, in order to increase the electrochemical surface area of the electrodes. Surfaces were imaged using a scanning electron microscope, and compared to surfaces roughened with the ns laser. The ps laser was seen to offer a reduction in feature size, as well as an increase in control over the appearance of the electrode surface. PMID:22254389

  20. A standardized block fabrication technique

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, R.; Noriega, B.; Sanders, R. )

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of delivered dose is a primary goal in every radiation therapy department. Improved imaging techniques now enable the radiation therapist to define more precisely the area of interest, which helps the sparing of normal surrounding tissue. Tray-mounted customized blocks are routinely used to define this treatment portal accurately and reproducibly. However, the level of accuracy is dependent on the block fabrication technique and the skill of the block cutter. We at Moffitt Cancer Center have standardized our system in a way that minimizes some of the human errors, while keeping the procedure fast and accurate. This system uses a tray template that simulates our blocking trays. The function of this tray is to position the styrofoam (and therefore the cerrobend block) on the tray in such a way as to insure proper alignment with the treatment machine. We also feel this improves upon some common designs using random holes or hole patterns, which may interfere with the treatment area. This system is not overly sophisticated and can be easily implemented in most radiation therapy departments.

  1. Advanced optic fabrication using ultrafast laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Advanced fabrication and finishing techniques are desired for freeform optics and integrated photonics. Methods including grinding, polishing and magnetorheological finishing used for final figuring and polishing of such optics are time consuming, expensive, and may be unsuitable for complex surface features while common photonics fabrication techniques often limit devices to planar geometries. Laser processing has been investigated as an alternative method for optic forming, surface polishing, structure writing, and welding, as direct tuning of laser parameters and flexible beam delivery are advantageous for complex freeform or photonics elements and material-specific processing. Continuous wave and pulsed laser radiation down to the nanosecond regime have been implemented to achieve nanoscale surface finishes through localized material melting, but the temporal extent of the laser-material interaction often results in the formation of a sub-surface heat affected zone. The temporal brevity of ultrafast laser radiation can allow for the direct vaporization of rough surface asperities with minimal melting, offering the potential for smooth, final surface quality with negligible heat affected material. High intensities achieved in focused ultrafast laser radiation can easily induce phase changes in the bulk of materials for processing applications. We have experimentally tested the effectiveness of ultrafast laser radiation as an alternative laser source for surface processing of monocrystalline silicon. Simulation of material heating associated with ultrafast laser-material interaction has been performed and used to investigate optimized processing parameters including repetition rate. The parameter optimization process and results of experimental processing will be presented.

  2. Advances in superconducting quantum electronic microcircuit fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, R. K.; Notarys, H. A.; Mercereau, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard microelectronic fabrication techniques have been utilized to produce batch quantities of superconducting quantum electronic devices and circuits. The overall goal is a fabrication technology yielding circuits that are rugged and stable and capable of being fabricated controllably and reproducibly in sizeable quantities. Our progress toward this goal is presented, with primary emphasis on the most recent work, which includes the use of electron-beam lithography and techniques of hybrid microelectronics. Several prototype microcircuits have been successfully fabricated. These microcircuits are formed in a thin-film parent material consisting of layers of superconducting and normal metals, and use proximity-effect structures as the active circuit elements.

  3. Advanced Communication Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, Robert A.

    This document contains the proceedings of the workshop Advanced Communication Processing Techniques, held May 14 to 17, 1989, near Ruidoso, New Mexico. Sponsored by the Army Research Office (under Contract DAAL03-89-G-0016) and organized by the Communication Sciences Institute of the University of Southern California, the workshop had as its objective to determine those applications of intelligent/adaptive communication signal processing that have been realized and to define areas of future research. We at the Communication Sciences Institute believe that there are two emerging areas which deserve considerably more study in the near future: (1) Modulation characterization, i.e., the automation of modulation format recognition so that a receiver can reliably demodulate a signal without using a priori information concerning the signal's structure, and (2) the incorporation of adaptive coding into communication links and networks. (Encoders and decoders which can operate with a wide variety of codes exist, but the way to utilize and control them in links and networks is an issue). To support these two new interest areas, one must have both a knowledge of (3) the kinds of channels and environments in which the systems must operate, and of (4) the latest adaptive equalization techniques which might be employed in these efforts.

  4. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  5. A photolithographic fabrication technique for magnetohydrodynamic micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuenstner, Stephen; Baylor, Martha-Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) devices use perpendicular electric and magnetic fields to exert a Lorentz body force on a conducting fluid. Miniaturized MHD devices have been used to create pumps, stirrers, heat exchangers, and microfluidic networks. Compared to mechanical micropumps, MHD micropumps are appealing because they require no moving parts, which simplifies fabrication, and because they are amenable to electronic control. This abstract reports the fabrication and testing of a centimeter-scale MHD pump using a thiol-ene/methacrylate-based photopolymer and mask-based photolithographic technique. Pumps like this one could simplify the fabrication of sophisticated optofluidic devices, including liquid-core, liquid cladding (L2) waveguides, which are usually created with PDMS using stamps, or etched into silicon wafers. The photolithographic technique demonstrated here requires only one masking step to create fluid channels with complex geometries.

  6. Smile design and advanced provisional fabrication.

    PubMed

    Malone, Mike

    2008-05-01

    Cosmetic reconstruction is much more predictable when superb provisionals are used as a blueprint for the final restoration. This article provides details for a technique that can be used to fabricate indirect multilayered composite provisional restorations for porcelain veneers and complex full-arch cases.

  7. Advanced trans-tibial socket fabrication using selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bill; Bosker, Gordon W; Crawford, Richard H; Faustini, Mario C; Neptune, Richard R; Walden, Gail; Gitter, Andrew J

    2007-03-01

    There have been a variety of efforts demonstrating the use of solid freeform fabrication (SFF) for prosthetic socket fabrication though there has been little effort in leveraging the strengths of the technology. SFF encompasses a class of technologies that can create three dimensional objects directly from a geometric database without specific tooling or human intervention. A real strength of SFF is that cost of fabrication is related to the volume of the part, not the part's complexity. For prosthetic socket fabrication this means that a sophisticated socket can be fabricated at essentially the same cost as a simple socket. Adding new features to a socket design becomes a function of software. The work at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) and University of Texas at Austin (UTA) has concentrated on developing advanced sockets that incorporate structural features to increase comfort as well as built in fixtures to accommodate industry standard hardware. Selective laser sintering (SLS) was chosen as the SFF technology to use for socket fabrication as it was capable of fabricating sockets using materials appropriate for prosthetics. This paper details the development of SLS prosthetic socket fabrication techniques at UTHSCSA/UTA over a six-year period.

  8. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  9. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.

  10. Advanced fabrication technologies for nano-electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Weckwerth, M.V.; Baca, W.E.

    1996-03-01

    Three novel fabrication technologies are presented which greatly increase the tools available for the realization of nano-electronic devices. First, a sub-micron area post structure descending from a metallic airbridge allows gating of regions as small as 0.1 {mu}m in diameter. This has enabled the study of such quantum phenomena as coupling of parallel quantum point contacts, and electron focusing around a tunable quantum antidot. We also describe two new techniques for backgating multiquantum well structures with submicron lateral resolution. These techniques enable separate ohmic contacts to individual quantum wells spaced as closely as 100 {Angstrom}, and thus allow the fabrication of novel quantum tunneling devices. The first technique uses regrowth over a patterned ion-implanted substrate. The second involves a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) processing scheme, whereby the original substrate is etched away and the backside then patterned using conventional methods.

  11. Advanced qualification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.

    1993-12-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML ``builds in`` the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structured-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ``process capability`` is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co{sup 60} gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883D, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SSC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe`s Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  12. Advanced qualification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winokur, P. S.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Meisenheimer, T. L.; Fleetwood, D. M.

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML 'builds in' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structured-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish 'process capability' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co-60 gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883D, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SSC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  13. Advanced qualification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Fleetwood, D.M. )

    1994-06-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML ''builds in'' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structure-to-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ''process capability'' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-kev x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ''process capability'' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co[sup 60] gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SCC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  14. Advanced qualification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winokur, P. S.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Meisenheimer, T. L.; Fleetwood, D. M.

    1994-06-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML 'builds in' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structure-to-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish 'process capability' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co-60 gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SCC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  15. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  16. Fabrication of advanced design (grooved) cermet anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windisch, C. F., Jr.; Huettig, F. R.

    1993-05-01

    Attempts were made to fabricate full-size anodes with advanced, or grooved, design using isostatic pressing, slip casting injection molding. Of the three approaches, isostatic pressing produced an anode with dimensions nearest to the target specifications, without serious macroscopic flaws. This approach is considered the most promising for making advanced anodes for aluminum smelting. However, significant work still remains to optimize the physical properties and microstructure of the anode, both of which were significantly different from that of previous anodes. Injection molding and slip casting yielded anode materials with serious deficiencies, including cracks and holes. Injection molding gave cermet material with the best intrinsic microstructure, i.e., the microstructure of the material between macroscopic flaws was very similar to that of anodes previously made at PNL. The reason for the similarity may have to do with amount of residual binder in the material prior to sintering.

  17. Fabrication of advanced design (grooved) cermet anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Huettig, F.R.

    1993-05-01

    Attempts were made to fabricate full-size anodes with advanced, or grooved, design using isostatic pressing, slip casting injection molding. Of the three approaches, isostatic pressing produced an anode with dimensions nearest to the target specifications, without serious macroscopic flaws. This approach is considered the most promising for making advanced anodes for aluminum smelting. However, significant work still remains to optimize the physical properties and microstructure of the anode, both of which were significantly different from that of previous anodes. Injection molding and slip casting yielded anode materials with serious deficiencies, including cracks and holes. Injection molding gave cermet material with the best intrinsic microstructure, i.e., the microstructure of the material between macroscopic flaws was very similar to that of anodes previously made at PNL. Reason for the similarity may have to do with amount of residual binder in the material prior to sintering.

  18. Techniques in Advanced Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ager, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    For ease of presentation, advanced grammar teaching techniques are briefly considered under the headings of structuralism (belief in the effectiveness of presenting grammar rules) and contextualism (belief in the maximum use by students of what they know in the target language). The structuralist's problem of establishing a syllabus is discussed…

  19. Strength and flexibility properties of advanced ceramic fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Tran, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of four advanced ceramic fabrics are measured at a temperature range of 23 C to 1200 C. The fabrics evaluated are silica, high-and low-boria content aluminoborosilicate, and silicon carbide. Properties studied include fabric break strengths from room temperature to 1200 C, and bending durability after temperature conditioning at 1200 C and 1400 C. The interaction of the fabric and ceramic insulation is also studied for shrinkage, appearance, bend resistance, and fabric-to-insulation bonding. Based on these tests, the low-boria content aluminoborosilicate fabric retains more strength and fabric durability than the other fabrics studied at high temperature.

  20. Advances in wound debridement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nazarko, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Dead and devitalised tissue interferes with the process of wound healing. Debridement is a natural process that occurs in all wounds and is crucial to healing; it reduces the bacterial burden in a wound and promotes effective inflammatory responses that encourage the formation of healthy granulation tissue (Wolcott et al, 2009). Wound care should be part of holistic patient care. Recent advances in debridement techniques include: biosurgery, hydrosurgery, mechanical debridement, and ultrasound. Biosurgery and mechanical debridement can be practiced by nonspecialist nurses and can be provided in a patient's home, thus increasing the patient's access to debridement therapy and accelerating wound healing.

  1. Laser-assisted advanced assembly for MEMS fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Yuriy Andreev

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently fabricated using methods originally designed for manufacturing semiconductor devices, using minimum if any assembly at all. The inherited limitations of this approach narrow the materials that can be employed and reduce the design complexity, imposing limitations on MEMS functionality. The proposed Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly (LA3) method solves these problems by first fabricating components followed by assembly of a MEMS device. Components are micro-machined using a laser or by photolithography followed by wet/dry etching out of any material available in a thin sheet form. A wide range of materials can be utilized, including biocompatible metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, semiconductors, and materials with special properties such as memory shape alloys, thermoelectric, ferromagnetic, piezoelectric, and more. The approach proposed allows enhancing the structural and mechanical properties of the starting materials through heat treatment, tribological coatings, surface modifications, bio-functionalization, and more, a limited, even unavailable possibility with existing methods. Components are transferred to the substrate for assembly using the thermo-mechanical Selective Laser Assisted Die Transfer (tmSLADT) mechanism for microchips assembly, already demonstrated by our team. Therefore, the mechanical and electronic part of the MEMS can be fabricated using the same equipment/method. The viability of the Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly technique for MEMS is demonstrated by fabricating magnetic switches for embedding in a conductive carbon-fiber metamaterial for use in an Electromagnetic-Responsive Mobile Cyber-Physical System (E-RMCPS), which is expected to improve the wireless communication system efficiency within a battery-powered device.

  2. Electromagnetic levitation coil fabrication technique for MSFC containerless processing facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Theiss, J.; Curreri, P. A.; Abbaschian, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is described for more reproducible fabrication of electromagnetic levitation coils. A split mandrel was developed upon which the coil is wound. After fabrication the mandrel can be disassembled to remove it from the coil. Previously, a full day was required to fabricate a levitation coil and the success rate for a functional coil was only 50 percent. About eight coils may be completed in one day using the technique developed and 95 percent of them are good levitation coils.

  3. Microfluidic sensing: state of the art fabrication and detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Gu, Min

    2011-08-01

    Here we introduce the existing fabrication techniques, detection methods, and related techniques for microfluidic sensing, with an emphasis on the detection techniques. A general survey and comparison of the fabrication techniques were given, including prototyping (hot embossing, inject molding, and soft lithography) and direct fabrication (laser micromachining, photolithography, lithography, and x-ray lithography) techniques. This is followed by an in-depth look at detection techniques: optical, electrochemical, mass spectrometry, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based sensing approaches and related techniques. In the end, we highlight several of the most important issues for future work on microfluidic sensing. This article aims at providing a tutorial review with both introductory materials and inspiring information on microfluidic fabrication and sensing for nonspecialists.

  4. Inverse lithography technique for advanced CMOS nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaret, Alexandre; Tritchkov, Alexander; Entradas, Jorge; Yesilada, Emek

    2013-04-01

    Resolution Enhancement Techniques have continuously improved over the last decade, driven by the ever growing constraints of lithography process. Despite the large number of RET applied, some hotspot configurations remain challenging for advanced nodes due to aggressive design rules. Inverse Lithography Technique (ILT) is evaluated here as a substitute to the dense OPC baseline. Indeed ILT has been known for several years for its near-to-ideal mask quality, while also being potentially more time consuming in terms of OPC run and mask processing. We chose to evaluate Mentor Graphics' ILT engine "pxOPCTM" on both lines and via hotspot configurations. These hotspots were extracted from real 28nm test cases where the dense OPC solution is not satisfactory. For both layer types, the reference OPC consists of a dense OPC engine coupled to rule-based and/or model-based assist generation method. The same CM1 model is used for the reference and the ILT OPC. ILT quality improvement is presented through Optical Rule Check (ORC) results with various adequate detectors. Several mask manufacturing rule constraints (MRC) are considered for the ILT solution and their impact on process ability is checked after mask processing. A hybrid OPC approach allowing localized ILT usage is presented in order to optimize both quality and runtime. A real mask is prepared and fabricated with this method. Finally, results analyzed on silicon are presented to compare localized ILT to reference dense OPC.

  5. Advanced techniques of laser telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, S.; Gilardini, A.

    The relationships which govern a laser telemeter; noise sources; and measurement accuracy with pulsed and sinusoidal intensity modulation techniques are discussed. Developments in telemetry instrumention and optical detection are considered. Meteorological interferometers, geodimeters, and military telemeters are described. Propagation attenuation and signal to noise ratios are treated. It is shown that accuracy depends on the product of measurement time and received power. The frequency scanning technique of CW and long pulse telemetry; multifrequency techniques; pulse compression; and vernier technique are outlined.

  6. Composite material fabrication techniques. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B J; Paulauskas, F L; Miller, J; Parzych, W

    1996-09-30

    This report describes a low cost method of fabricating components for mockups and training simulators used in the transportation industry. This technology was developed jointly by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Metters Industries, Incorporated (MI) as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) ORNL94-0288 sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Economic Impace and Diversity Minority Business Technology Transfer Consortium. The technology involves fabricating component replicas from fiberglass/epoxy composites using a resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The original components are used as masters to fabricate the molds. The molding process yields parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still providing adequate strength and stiffness for use in training simulators. This technology permits MI to overcome an acute shortage in surplus military hardware available to them for use in manufacturing training simulators. In addition, the cost of the molded fiberglass components is expected to be less than that of procuring the original components from the military.

  7. Splitting advancement genioplasty: a new genioplasty technique.

    PubMed

    Celik, M; Tuncer, S; Büyükçayir, I

    1999-08-01

    A new genioplasty technique has been described and performed on 16 patients since 1995. The technique has been developed to avoid some undesired results of the current osseous genioplasty techniques and to achieve a more natural appearance in advancement genioplasty. According to the authors' technique, a rectangular part of the outer table of the mentum is split away from the mandible, and is advanced and fixated to the mandible. This technique can be used for advancement cases but not for reduction genioplasty. This technique was performed on 16 patients with only minor complications, including one case of wound dehiscence, one hematoma, and one case of osteomyelitis, which was managed with systemic antibiotic therapy. Aesthetic results were found to be satisfactory according to an evaluation by the authors. When the results were evaluated using pre- and postoperative photos, lip position and projection of the mentum were found to be natural in shape appearance. During the late postoperative period, the new bone formation between the advanced segment and the mandible was demonstrated radiographically. Advantages of the technique include having more contact surfaces for bony healing, a natural position of the lower lip, more natural projection of the mentum, tridimensional movement of the mentum, and improvement in the soft tissue of the neck. The disadvantages of the technique are the potential risk of infection due to dead space from the advancement, manipulation problems during surgery, and possible mental nerve injury. Splitting advancement genioplasty was found to be a useful technique for advancement genioplasty. Splitting advancement genioplasty is a more physiological osteotomy technique than most of osseous genioplasty techniques. PMID:10454320

  8. Advanced Spectroscopy Technique for Biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan

    This chapter presents an overview of the applications of optical spectroscopy in biomedicine. We focus on the optical design aspects of advanced biomedical spectroscopy systems, Raman spectroscopy system in particular. Detailed components and system integration are provided. As examples, two real-time in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems, one for skin cancer detection and the other for endoscopic lung cancer detection, and an in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy system for skin assessment are presented. The applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer diagnosis of the skin, lung, colon, oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, breast, and cervix are summarized.

  9. Improved fabrication techniques for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, A. E.; Kreysa, E.; Mcbride, S. E.; Richards, P. L.; Haller, E. E.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques are described for producing improved infrared bolometers from doped germanium. Ion implantation and sputter metalization have been used to make ohmic electrical contacts to Ge:Ga chips. This method results in a high yield of small monolithic bolometers with very little low-frequency noise. When one of these chips is used as the thermometric element of a composite bolometer, it must be bonded to a dielectric substrate. The thermal resistance of the conventional epoxy bond has been measured and found to be undesirably large. A procedure for soldering the chip to a metalized portion of the substrate is described which reduced this resistance. The contribution of the metal film absorber to the heat capacity of a composite bolometer has been measured. The heat capacity of a NiCr absorber at 1.3 K can dominate the bolometer performance. A Bi absorber has significantly lower heat capacity. A low temperature blackbody calibrator has been built to measure the optical responsivity of bolometers. A composite bolometer system with a throughput of approx. 0.1 sr sq cm was constructed using the new techniques. In negligible background it has an optical NEP of 3.6 10((exp -15) W/sq root of Hz at 1.0 K with a time constant of 20 ms. The noise in this bolometer is white above 2.5 Hz and is somewhat below the value predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium theory. It is in agreement with calculations based on a recent nonequilibrium theory.

  10. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  11. Advanced techniques in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Monson, J R

    1993-01-01

    Almost every abdominal organ is now amenable to laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic appendicectomy is a routine procedure which also permits identification of other conditions initially confused with an inflamed appendix. However, assessment of appendiceal inflammation is more difficult. Almost all colonic procedures can be performed laparoscopically, at least partly, though resection for colonic cancer is still controversial. For simple patch repair of perforated duodenal ulcers laparoscopy is ideal, and inguinal groin hernia can be repaired satisfactorily with a patch of synthetic mesh. Many upper abdominal procedures, however, still take more time than the open operations. These techniques reduce postoperative pain and the incidence of wound infections and allow a much earlier return to normal activity compared with open surgery. They have also brought new disciplines: surgeons must learn different hand-eye coordination, meticulous haemostasis is needed to maintain picture quality, and delivery of specimens may be problematic. The widespread introduction of laparoscopic techniques has emphasised the need for adequate training (operations that were straight-forward open procedures may require considerable laparoscopic expertise) and has raised questions about trainee surgeons acquiring adequate experience of open procedures. Images FIG 9 p1347-a p1347-b p1349-a p1350-a p1350-b PMID:8257893

  12. ADVANCED ELECTROSTATIC STIMULATION OF FABRIC FILTRATION: PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the performance and economics of advanced electrostatic stimulation of fabric filtration (AESFF), in which a high-voltage electrode is placed coaxially inside a filter bag to establish an electric field between the electrode and the bag surface. The electric f...

  13. Advanced beaded and tubular structural panels. Volume 2: Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrove, M. D.; Northrop, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to exploit the efficiency of curved elements in the design of lightweight structural panels under combined loads of axial compression, inplane shear, and bending. A summary of the total program (analysis, fabrication and test) is presented in document NASA CR-2514. Detailed descriptions of the analysis effort and of the panel tests are contained in supplementary documents NASA CR-132460 and NASA-CR-132515 respectively. Data are also given on the development of economical fabrication techniques to minimize the effects of fabrication limitations on optimum panel designs.

  14. Improved fabrication techniques for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, A. E.; Mcbride, S. E.; Richards, P. L.; Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.

    1983-01-01

    Ion implantation and sputter metallization are used to produce ohmic electrical contacts to Ge:Ga chips. The method is shown to give a high yield of small monolithic bolometers with very little low-frequency noise. It is noted that when one of the chips is used as the thermometric element of a composite bolometer it must be bonded to a dielectric substrate. The thermal resistance of the conventional epoxy bond is measured and found to be undesirably large. A procedure for soldering the chip to a metallized portion of the substrate in such a way as to reduce this resistance is outlined. An evaluation is made of the contribution of the metal film absorber to the heat capacity of a composite bolometer. It is found that the heat capacity of a NiCr absorber at 1.3 K can dominate the bolometer performance. A Bi absorber possesses significantly lower heat capacity. A low-temperature blackbody calibrator is built to measure the optical responsivity of bolometers. A composite bolometer system with a throughput of approximately 0.1 sr sq cm is constructed using the new techniques. The noise in this bolometer is white above 2.5 Hz and is slightly below the value predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium theory.

  15. Advanced prosthetic techniques for below knee amputations.

    PubMed

    Staats, T B

    1985-02-01

    Recent advances in the evaluation of the amputation stump, the materials that are available for prosthetic application, techniques of improving socket fit, and prosthetic finishings promise to dramatically improve amputee function. Precision casting techniques for providing optimal fit of the amputation stump using materials such as alginate are described. The advantages of transparent check sockets for fitting the complicated amputation stump are described. Advances in research that promise to provide more functional prosthetic feet and faster and more reliable socket molding are the use of CAD-CAM (computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing) and the use of gait analysis techniques to aid in the alignment of the prosthesis after socket fitting. Finishing techniques to provide a more natural appearing prosthesis are described. These advances will gradually spread to the entire prosthetic profession.

  16. Advanced sialoendoscopy techniques, rare findings, and complications.

    PubMed

    Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-12-01

    This article presents and discusses advanced minimally invasive sialoendoscopy and combined methods: endoscopy, endoscopic-assisted techniques, and external-lithotripsy combined procedures. It also presents rare situations and complications encountered during sialoendoscopic procedures. Sialoendoscopy is a relatively novel technique, which adds significant new dimensions to the surgeon's armamentarium for management of inflammatory salivary gland diseases. Because of the rapid development in minimally invasive surgical techniques, surgeons are capable of more facilely treating complicated inflammatory and obstructive conditions of the salivary glands.

  17. Development of a Fluid Structures Interaction Test Technique for Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.; Heineck, James T.; Schairer, Edward T.; Mosher, Robert N.; Garbeff, Theodore Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Application of fluid structures interaction (FSI) computational techniques to configurations of interest to the entry, descent and landing (EDL) community is limited by two factors - limited characterization of the material properties for fabrics of interest and insufficient experimental data to validate the FSI codes. Recently ILC Dover Inc. performed standard tests to characterize the static stress-strain response of four candidate fabrics for use in EDL applications. The objective of the tests described here is to address the need for a FSI dataset for CFD validation purposes. To reach this objective, the structural response of fabrics was measured in a very simple aerodynamic environment with well controlled boundary conditions. Two test series were undertaken. The first series covered a range of tunnel conditions and the second focused on conditions that resulted in fabric panel buckling.

  18. Development and fabrication of an advanced liquid cooling garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    A tube/fin concept liquid cooling garment head cooler was developed, fabricated and delivered to NASA-ARC. The head cooler was fabricated from polyurethane film which sandwiches the transport fluid tubing and a thermally conductive fin material. The head cooler garment is sewn to form a skull cap and covered with a comfort liner. In addition, two Neonate heating garments were fabricated and supplied to NASA for further finishing and use in medical tests. The resulting garment is flexible, elastic and conforms to the head comfortably. Tests on a tube/fin element of identical construction as the head cooler demonstrated good thermal effectiveness. Use of commercially available materials and development of relatively simple fabrication techniques give the potential for a low garment cost.

  19. Rapid Fabrication Techniques for Liquid Rocket Channel Wall Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The functions of a regeneratively-cooled nozzle are to (1) expand combustion gases to increase exhaust gas velocity while, (2) maintaining adequate wall temperatures to prevent structural failure, and (3) transfer heat from the hot gases to the coolant fluid to promote injector performance and stability. Regeneratively-cooled nozzles are grouped into two categories: tube-wall nozzles and channel wall nozzles. A channel wall nozzle is designed with an internal liner containing a series of integral coolant channels that are closed out with an external jacket. Manifolds are attached at each end of the nozzle to distribute coolant to and away from the channels. A variety of manufacturing techniques have been explored for channel wall nozzles, including state of the art laser-welded closeouts and pressure-assisted braze closeouts. This paper discusses techniques that NASA MSFC is evaluating for rapid fabrication of channel wall nozzles that address liner fabrication, slotting techniques and liner closeout techniques. Techniques being evaluated for liner fabrication include large-scale additive manufacturing of freeform-deposition structures to create the liner blanks. Abrasive water jet milling is being evaluated for cutting the complex coolant channel geometries. Techniques being considered for rapid closeout of the slotted liners include freeform deposition, explosive bonding and Cold Spray. Each of these techniques, development work and results are discussed in further detail in this paper.

  20. Design and fabrication of advanced EUV diffractive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Salmassi, Farhad; Anderson, Erik H.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2003-11-16

    As extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography approaches commercial reality, the development of EUV-compatible diffractive structures becomes increasingly important. Such devices are relevant to many aspects of EUV technology including interferometry, illumination, and spectral filtering. Moreover, the current scarcity of high power EUV sources makes the optical efficiency of these diffractive structures a paramount concern. This fact has led to a strong interest in phase-enhanced diffractive structures. Here we describe recent advancements made in the fabrication of such devices.

  1. Electrohydrodynamics: A facile technique to fabricate drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Liao, I-Chien; Adler, Andrew; Leong, Kam W.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning and electrospraying are facile electrohydrodynamic fabrication methods that can generate drug delivery systems (DDS) through a one-step process. The nano-structured fiber and particle morphologies produced by these techniques offer tunable release kinetics applicable to diverse biomedical applications. Coaxial-electrospinning/electrospraying, a relatively new technique of fabricating core-shell fibers/particles have added to the versatility of these DDS by affording a near zero-order drug release kinetics, dampening of burst release, and applicability to a wider range of bioactive agents. Controllable electrospinning/spraying of fibers and particles and subsequent drug release from these chiefly polymeric vehicles depends on well-defined solution and process parameters. The additional drug delivery capability from electrospun fibers can further enhance the material’s functionality in tissue engineering applications. This review discusses the state-of-the-art of using electrohydrodynamic technique to generate nano-fiber/particles as drug delivery devices. PMID:19651167

  2. Hybrid mesh generation using advancing reduction technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presents an extension of the application of the advancing reduction technique to the hybrid mesh generation. The proposed algorithm is based on a pre-generated rectangle mesh (RM) with a certain orientation. The intersection points between the two sets of perpendicular mesh lines in RM an...

  3. Development and fabrication of an advanced liquid cooling garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leith, J. R.; Hixon, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The elastomeric film fin/tube concept which was developed is a composite of polyurethane film, fine expanded silver mesh, a serpentine pattern polyurethane transport tubing and an integral comfort liner, all bonded via adhesive application and vacuum-bagged for final cure. As demonstrated by thermal analysis, the composite garment material is capable of removing a 293 watt (1000 BTU/hr) metabolic load through a head and torso cooling area of .46 sq m (5 sq ft) with tube spacing of slightly under one inch. A total of 60 test elements, each .15m x .15m (6 in. x 6 in.) were fabricated in support of the liquid cooling garment concept development. In parallel with the fabrication of these elements a continuing series of laboratory tests to support the fabrication techniques was carried out. The elements and supporting tests are described.

  4. Development of Core Cladding Fabrication Techniques for Phase I Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Reid, Robert S.; Ring, Peter J.; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Phase I fission propulsion systems focus on safety, timely development, and affordability. Prototype and flight units can be tested at full thrust, using resistance heaters to closely simulate heat from a fission reaction. In Phase I ground testing, one goal is to establish a reliable and affordable manufacturing technique for fabricating a flight-like core. A refractory metal (Mo) has been suggested for the core substrate, primarily due to the existence of a significant database for Mo/LJ02 fuel. The core can be fabricated by bundling Mo tubes with a bonding system that meets preliminary test goals. These criteria include materials compatibility, ability to maintain thermal and structural integrity during 10,000 hours of operation, and fabrication with existing facilities. This paper describes an effort to investigate several fabrication techniques in a cost-effective manner. First, inexpensive materials were tested at low temperatures to determine the relative effectiveness of such techniques as welding, brazing, plating, and vacuum plasma spraying (VPSing). Promising techniques were chosen for further evaluation, including thermal and structural studies, using ceramic tubing at intermediate temperatures. The most desirable technique will be tested on actual Mo tubing at anticipated operating temperatures. This work is being performed by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Advanced Methods & Materials (AMM), Inc.

  5. Development of core cladding fabrication techniques for phase I fission propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Reid, Robert S.; Ring, Peter J.

    2001-02-01

    Phase I fission propulsion systems focus on safety, timely development, and affordability. Prototype and flight units can be tested at full thrust, using resistance heaters to closely simulate heat from a fission reaction. In Phase I ground testing, one goal is to establish a reliable and affordable manufacturing technique for fabricating a flight-like core. A refractory metal (Mo) has been suggested for the core substrate, primarily due to the existence of a significant database for Mo/UO2 fuel. The core can be fabricated by bundling Mo tubes with a bonding system that meets preliminary test goals. These criteria include materials compatibility, ability to maintain thermal and structural integrity during 10,000 hours of operation, and fabrication with existing facilities. This paper describes an effort to investigate several fabrication techniques in a cost-effective manner. First, inexpensive materials were tested at low temperatures to determine the relative effectiveness of such techniques as welding, brazing, plating, and vacuum plasma spraying (VPSing). Promising techniques were chosen for further evaluation, including thermal and structural studies, using ceramic tubing at intermediate temperatures. The most desirable technique will be tested on actual Mo tubing at anticipated operating temperatures. This work is being performed by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Advanced Methods & Materials (AMM), Inc. .

  6. Recent Developments in Microsystems Fabricated by the Liga-Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, J.; Bade, K.; El-Kholi, A.; Hein, H.; Mohr, J.

    1995-01-01

    As an example of microsystems fabricated by the LIGA-technique (x-ray lithography, electroplating and molding), three systems are described and characterized: a triaxial acceleration sensor system, a micro-optical switch, and a microsystem for the analysis of pollutants. The fabrication technologies are reviewed with respect to the key components of the three systems: an acceleration sensor, and electrostatic actuator, and a spectrometer made by the LIGA-technique. Aa micro-pump and micro-valve made by using micromachined tools for molding and optical fiber imaging are made possible by combining LIGA and anisotropic etching of silicon in a batch process. These examples show that the combination of technologies and components is the key to complex microsystems. The design of such microsystems will be facilitated is standardized interfaces are available.

  7. Techniques of fabrication of provisional restoration: an overview.

    PubMed

    Regish, K M; Sharma, Deeksha; Prithviraj, D R

    2011-01-01

    A properly fabricated provisional restoration is important in achieving a successful indirect restoration. The importance of provisional restorations as an integral part of fixed prosthodontic treatment is evident from the abundance of the literature pertaining to their importance regarding margin fidelity, function, occlusion, and esthetics. There are a variety of techniques available to suit the individual needs of the clinician and of the clinical situation, from a single unit to a complete-arch provisional fixed prostheses.

  8. Techniques of Fabrication of Provisional Restoration: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Regish, K. M.; Sharma, Deeksha; Prithviraj, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    A properly fabricated provisional restoration is important in achieving a successful indirect restoration. The importance of provisional restorations as an integral part of fixed prosthodontic treatment is evident from the abundance of the literature pertaining to their importance regarding margin fidelity, function, occlusion, and esthetics. There are a variety of techniques available to suit the individual needs of the clinician and of the clinical situation, from a single unit to a complete-arch provisional fixed prostheses. PMID:22013441

  9. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilkoy, F.; Flauraud, V.; Rüegg, M.; Kim, B. J.; Brugger, J.

    2016-02-01

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au.

  10. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Yesilkoy, F; Flauraud, V; Rüegg, M; Kim, B J; Brugger, J

    2016-03-01

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au. PMID:26884085

  11. Advancements in Binder Systems for Solid Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Paper will present recent developments in advanced material binder systems for solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technologies. The advantage of SFF is the capability to custom fabricate complex geometries directly from computer aided design data in layer- by-layer fashion, eliminated the need for traditional fixturing and tooling. Binders allow for the low temperature processing of 'green' structural materials, either metal, ceramic or composite, in traditional rapid prototyping machines. The greatest obstacle comes when green parts must then go through a sintering or burnout process to remove the binders and fully densify the parent material, without damaging or distorting the original part geometry. Critical issues and up-to-date assessments will be delivered on various material systems.

  12. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  13. Structural design and fabrication techniques of composite unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Daniel Stephen

    Popularity of unmanned aerial vehicles has grown substantially in recent years both in the private sector, as well as for government functions. This growth can be attributed largely to the increased performance of the technology that controls these vehicles, as well as decreasing cost and size of this technology. What is sometimes forgotten though, is that the research and advancement of the airframes themselves are equally as important as what is done with them. With current computer-aided design programs, the limits of design optimization can be pushed further than ever before, resulting in lighter and faster airframes that can achieve longer endurances, higher altitudes, and more complex missions. However, realization of a paper design is still limited by the physical restrictions of the real world and the structural constraints associated with it. The purpose of this paper is to not only step through current design and manufacturing processes of composite UAVs at Oklahoma State University, but to also focus on composite spars, utilizing and relating both calculated and empirical data. Most of the experience gained for this thesis was from the Cessna Longitude project. The Longitude is a 1/8 scale, flying demonstrator Oklahoma State University constructed for Cessna. For the project, Cessna required dynamic flight data for their design process in order to make their 2017 release date. Oklahoma State University was privileged enough to assist Cessna with the mission of supporting the validation of design of their largest business jet to date. This paper will detail the steps of the fabrication process used in construction of the Longitude, as well as several other projects, beginning with structural design, machining, molding, skin layup, and ending with final assembly. Also, attention will be paid specifically towards spar design and testing in effort to ease the design phase. This document is intended to act not only as a further development of current

  14. Investigation of electroforming techniques. [fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Copper and nickel electroforming was examined for the purpose of establishing the necessary processes and procedures for repeatable, successful fabrication of the outer structures of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The selection of electrolytes for copper and nickel deposition is described. The development studies performed to refine and complete the processes necessary for successful chamber shell fabrication and the testing employed to verify the applicability of the processes and procedures to small scale hardware are described. Specifications were developed to afford a guideline for the electroforming of high quality outer shells on regeneratively cooled thrust chamber liners. Test results indicated repeatable mechanical properties could be produced in copper deposits from the copper sulfate electrolyte with periodic current reversal and in nickel deposits from the sulfamate solution. Use of inert, removable channel fillers and the conductivizing of such is described. Techniques (verified by test) which produce high integrity bonds to copper and copper alloy liners are discussed.

  15. FY-87 packing fabrication techniques (commercial waste form) results

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, E.V.; Gates, T.E.; Cabbage, K.S.; Eklund, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    This report covers the investigation of fabrication techniques associated with the development of suitable materials and methods to provide a prefabricated packing for waste packages for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). The principal functions of the packing are to minimize container corrosion during the 300 to 1000 years following repository closure and provide long-term control of the release of radionuclides from the waste package. The investigative work, discussed in this report, was specifically conceived to develop the design criteria for production of full-scale prototypical packing rings. The investigative work included the preparation of procedures, the preparation of fabrication materials, physical properties, and the determination of the engineering properties. The principal activities were the preparation of the materials and the determination of the physical properties. 21 refs., 20 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Fabrication and application of advanced functional materials from lignincellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Sixiao

    This dissertation explored the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into advanced functional materials and their potential applications. Lignocellulosic biomass represents an as-of-yet underutilized renewable source for not only biofuel production but also functional materials fabrication. This renewable source is a great alternative for fossil fuel based chemicals, which could be one of the solutions to energy crisis. In this work, it was demonstrated a variety of advanced materials including functional carbons, metal and silica nanoparticles could be derived from lignocellulosic biomass. Chapter 1 provided overall reviewed of the lignin structures, productions and its utilizations as plastics, absorbents and carbons, as well as the preparation of nano-structured silver, silica and silicon carbide/nitride from biomass. Chapter 2, 3 and 4 discussed the fabrication of highly porous carbons from isolated lignin, and their applications as electric supercapacitors for energy storage. In chapter 2, ultrafine porous carbon fibers were prepared via electrospinning followed by simultaneous carbonization and activation. Chapter 3 covered the fabrication of supercapacitor based on the porous carbon fibers and the investigation of their electrochemical performances. In chapter 4, porous carbon particulates with layered carbon nano plates structures were produced by simple oven-drying followed by simultaneous carbonization and activation. The effects of heat processing parameters on the resulting carbon structures and their electrochemical properties were discussed in details. Chapter 5 and 6 addressed the preparation of silver nanoparticles using lignin. Chapter 5 reported the synthesis, underlying kinetics and mechanism of monodispersed silver nanospheres with diameter less than 25 nm in aqueous solutions using lignin as dual reducing and capping agents. Chapter 6 covered the preparation of silver nanoparticles on electrospun celluloses ultrafine fibers using lignin as both

  17. Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques in Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final technical report for grant number NAG-1-02101. The title of this grant was "Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques In Aerospace Systems". The principal investigator on this grant was Dr. John C. Knight of the Computer Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4740. This report summarizes activities under the grant during the period 7/01/2002 to 9/30/2004. This report is organized as follows. In section 2, the technical background of the grant is summarized. Section 3 lists accomplishments and section 4 lists students funded under the grant. In section 5, we present a list of presentations given at various academic and research institutions about the research conducted. Finally, a list of publications generated under this grant is included in section 6.

  18. Fabrication of SERS Substrate by Multilayered Nanosphere Deposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Chit Yaw; Dinish, U. S.; Praveen, Thoniyot; Koh, Zhen Yu; Kho, Khiang Wei; Malini, Olivo

    2010-08-06

    Metal film over nanosphere (MFON) has been employed as a reproducible and predictable SERS-active device in biosensing applications. In addition to its economic fabrication process, such substrate can be further processed to a prism-structure with increased SERS enhancement and wider Plasmon tunability. In this work, we investigate an alternative coating method to deposit a larger area of well-ordered PS beads with different sizes (oe = 100nm and 400 nm) onto a glass. The result suggests that the proposed well-coating technique can be suitably used to form closely-packed PS beads with diameter less than 100 nm for developing MFON substrates.

  19. Fabrication of Advanced Thermoelectric Materials by Hierarchical Nanovoid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A novel method to prepare an advanced thermoelectric material has hierarchical structures embedded with nanometer-sized voids which are key to enhancement of the thermoelectric performance. Solution-based thin film deposition technique enables preparation of stable film of thermoelectric material and void generator (voigen). A subsequent thermal process creates hierarchical nanovoid structure inside the thermoelectric material. Potential application areas of this advanced thermoelectric material with nanovoid structure are commercial applications (electronics cooling), medical and scientific applications (biological analysis device, medical imaging systems), telecommunications, and defense and military applications (night vision equipments).

  20. Advanced decision aiding techniques applicable to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruchten, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    RADC has had an intensive program to show the feasibility of applying advanced technology to Air Force decision aiding situations. Some aspects of the program, such as Satellite Autonomy, are directly applicable to space systems. For example, RADC has shown the feasibility of decision aids that combine the advantages of laser disks and computer generated graphics; decision aids that interface object-oriented programs with expert systems; decision aids that solve path optimization problems; etc. Some of the key techniques that could be used in space applications are reviewed. Current applications are reviewed along with their advantages and disadvantages, and examples are given of possible space applications. The emphasis is to share RADC experience in decision aiding techniques.

  1. Advanced Microstructured Semiconductor Neutron Detectors: Design, Fabrication, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, Steven Lawrence

    The microstructured semiconductor neutron detector (MSND) was investigated and previous designs were improved and optimized. In the present work, fabrication techniques have been refined and improved to produce three-dimensional microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors with reduced leakage current, reduced capacitance, highly anisotropic deep etched trenches, and increased signal-to-noise ratios. As a result of these improvements, new MSND detection systems function with better gamma-ray discrimination and are easier to fabricate than previous designs. In addition to the microstructured diode fabrication improvement, a superior batch processing backfill-method for 6LiF neutron reactive material, resulting in a nearly-solid backfill, was developed. This method incorporates a LiF nano-sizing process and a centrifugal batch process for backfilling the nanoparticle LiF material. To better transition the MSND detector to commercialization, the fabrication process was studied and enhanced to better facilitate low cost and batch process MSND production. The research and development of the MSND technology described in this work includes fabrication of variant microstructured diode designs, which have been simulated through MSND physics models to predict performance and neutron detection efficiency, and testing the operational performance of these designs in regards to neutron detection efficiency, gamma-ray rejection, and silicon fabrication methodology. The highest thermal-neutron detection efficiency reported to date for a solid-state semiconductor detector is presented in this work. MSNDs show excellent neutron to gamma-ray (n/γ) rejection ratios, which are on the order of 106, without significant loss in thermal-neutron detection efficiency. Individually, the MSND is intrinsically highly sensitive to thermal neutrons, but not extrinsically sensitive because of their small size. To improve upon this, individual MSNDs were tiled together into a 6x6-element array

  2. Advanced AE Techniques in Composite Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been successfully used to evaluate damage mechanisms in laboratory testing of composite coupons. An example is presented in which the initiation of transverse matrix cracking was monitored. In these tests, broad band, high fidelity acoustic sensors were used to detect signals which were then digitized and stored for analysis. Analysis techniques were based on plate mode wave propagation characteristics. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. This technique also allows much more precise source location than conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. To apply Modal AE concepts to the interpretation of AE on larger composite specimens or structures, the effects of modal wave propagation over larger distances and through structural complexities must be well characterized and understood. To demonstrate these effects, measurements of the far field, peak amplitude attenuation of the extensional and flexural plate mode components of broad band simulated AE signals in large composite panels are discussed. These measurements demonstrated that the flexural mode attenuation is dominated by dispersion effects. Thus, it is significantly affected by the thickness of the composite plate. Furthermore, the flexural mode attenuation can be significantly larger than that of the extensional mode even though its peak amplitude consists of much lower frequency components.

  3. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Markl, M; Schnell, S; Wu, C; Bollache, E; Jarvis, K; Barker, A J; Robinson, J D; Rigsby, C K

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented. PMID:26944696

  4. Novel immobilization techniques in the fabrication of efficient electrochemical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, Shridhara; Marx, Kenneth A.; Samuelson, Lynne A.; Kumar, Jayant; Tripathy, Sukant K.; Kaplan, David L.

    1996-02-01

    The development of enzyme electrodes plays a major role in the performance of an electrochemical biosensor. In this paper, we describe two generic methods for efficient immobilization of enzymes or biomolecules at the electrode surface. These methods are based on physical entrapment of the enzymes during biochemical polymerization of phenols and electrochemical copolymerization of aromatic diamines with enzymes that are covalently coupled to the monomer. Both of these techniques have proven to be chemically mild and provide efficient polymer matrices for the fabrication of enzyme electrodes. Enzymes including horseradish peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase and glucose oxidase have been immobilized in these polymeric matrices and used for electrochemical as well as colorimetric detection of various substrates. Response times of the order of 5 - 10 seconds and sensitivities of the order of mM have been achieved with these electrodes. The use of these immobilization techniques towards the development of microelectrode arrays for multianalyte sensors is also discussed.

  5. A hybrid sequential deposition fabrication technique for micro fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Kevin G.; Czyzewska, Eva K.; Vanderhoek, Tom P. K.; Fan, Lilian L. Y.; Abel, Keith A.; Wu, Q. M. Jonathan; Parameswaran, M. Ash

    2005-10-01

    Micro fuel cell systems have elicited significant interest due to their promise for instantly rechargeable, longer duration and portable power. Most micro fuel cell systems are either built as miniaturized plate-and-frame or silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Plate-and-frame systems are difficult to fabricate smaller than 20 cm3. Existing micro fuel cell designs cannot meet the cost, scale and power requirements of some portable power markets. Traditional MEMS scaling advantages do not apply to fuel cells because the minimum area for the fuel cell is fixed by the catalyst area required for a given power output, and minimum volume set by mass transport limitations. We have developed a new hybrid technique that borrows from both micro and macro machining techniques to create fuel cells in the 1-20 cm3 range, suitable for cell phones, PDAs and smaller devices.

  6. Advanced Bode Plot Techniques for Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, D. A.; Schulze, G. W.

    The Bode plot, displayed as either impedance or admittance versus frequency, is the most basic test used by ultrasonic transducer designers. With simplicity and ease-of-use, Bode plots are ideal for baseline comparisons such as spacing of parasitic modes or impedance, but quite often the subtleties that manifest as poor process control are hard to interpret or are nonexistence. In-process testing of transducers is time consuming for quantifying statistical aberrations, and assessments made indirectly via the workpiece are difficult. This research investigates the use of advanced Bode plot techniques to compare ultrasonic transducers with known "good" and known "bad" process performance, with the goal of a-priori process assessment. These advanced techniques expand from the basic constant voltage versus frequency sweep to include constant current and constant velocity interrogated locally on transducer or tool; they also include up and down directional frequency sweeps to quantify hysteresis effects like jumping and dropping phenomena. The investigation focuses solely on the common PZT8 piezoelectric material used with welding transducers for semiconductor wire bonding. Several metrics are investigated such as impedance, displacement/current gain, velocity/current gain, displacement/voltage gain and velocity/voltage gain. The experimental and theoretical research methods include Bode plots, admittance loops, laser vibrometry and coupled-field finite element analysis.

  7. Application of solution deposition techniques to coated conductor fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan

    2000-12-01

    Coated conductors offer a viable alternative to the BSCCO PIT tapes. However, at the current juncture, results are being reported for conductors with buffer layers and superconductor layers processed using conventional thin film deposition which are vacuum based. Also these conductors are fabricated using four or five buffer layers between the superconductor and the metal substrate. These aspects of the fabrication route drive the cost of the process to prohibitively high values. This work is directed at the development of fabrication routes for cube textured nickel substrates, and metallorganic decomposition (MOD) routes for buffer layers and Y123 layers using simple solution based techniques which can be readily scaled. Studies of cube texturing of nickel using rolling and recrystallization showed that it is possible to produce textured nickel substrates with a FWHM of 8--10°. The substrate quality of the nickel is determined by the purity of the cube texture and the cleanliness of the surface. Processing of oriented buffer layers of barium zirconate and strontium titanate using simple metal organic decomposition routes have been studied. These processes, which use precursor solutions made by dissolution of simple acetates in common solvents like acetic acid and methanol, produce highly oriented buffer layers even when processed in a partially reducing atmosphere. Therefore, these MOD routes for buffer layer processing are compatible with nickel substrates and produce buffer layers oriented as sharply as the underlying nickel substrate. Y123 processing using fluorinated precursors, as in the TFA process, effectively circumvents the BaCO3 problem associated with most MOD routes for Y123 processing. This route, under optimized process conditions, yields Y123 films with Jc of the order of 106 A/cm2 on single crystal substrates. Studies of the compatibility of the TFA process with the MOD buffer layers showed that current density of the order of 106 A/cm 2 can be

  8. Micro cycloid-gear system fabricated by multiexposure LIGA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Toru; Chung, Song-Jo; Hein, Herbert; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Mohr, Juergen

    1999-09-01

    In this paper, a prototype of 2 mm-diameter micro-cycloid gear system fabricated by the multi-exposure LIGA technique is presented. The entire gear system consists of a casing and three vertically stacked disks and gears. Each part is composed of three different levels. The first level, 40 micrometers high, was fabricated by UV-lithography, and the second as well as the third level, 195 micrometers and 250 micrometers high respectively, were processed by aligned deep X-ray lithography (DXL). The alignment error between two DXL- processed layers was measured, and the results have turned out to be within +/- 5 micrometers range. As a result of the height control process by the mechanical surface machining, the deviation of structural height has been maintained within +/- 3 micrometers range for the UV-lithography-processed structures, and +/- 10 micrometers for the DXL-processed structures. Further the tests of gear assembly were implemented with 125 micrometers -diameter glass fiber, by using a die-bonding machine with vacuum gripper under stereo- microscope. Finally the dynamic tests of the gear system were successfully conducted with the mechanical torque input by an electrical motor. A proper rotational speed reduction was observed in the operational input range of 3 to 1500 rpm with the designed gear ratio of 18.

  9. Fabrication of a Bronze Age Sword using Ancient Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiro, David; Webler, Bryan

    2016-09-01

    A khopesh was cast and forged for the TMS 2016 Bladesmithing Symposium. The khopesh was the first sword style, originating during the Bronze Age in the Near East. The manufacturing process used in this study closely followed Bronze Age techniques to determine the plausibility of open mold casting coupled with cold work and annealing cycles. Forging and annealing cycles substantially increased blade strength and diminished intergranular δ-phase inclusions. While a functional blade was not completed due to casting defects, the process gives valuable insight into the effort required to fabricate a khopesh during the Bronze Age. Forging and annealing cycles following casting were necessary to produce the mechanical properties desired in a sword.

  10. Fabricating protein immunoassay arrays on nitrocellulose using dip-pen lithography techniques.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Eleanore Jane; Hernandez-Santana, Aaron; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2011-07-21

    Advancements in lithography methods for printing biomolecules on surfaces are proving to be potentially beneficial for disease screening and biological research. Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is a versatile micro and nanofabrication technique that has the ability to produce functional biomolecule arrays. The greatest advantage, with respect to the printing mechanism, is that DPN adheres to the sensitive mild conditions required for biomolecules such as proteins. We have developed an optimised, high-throughput printing technique for fabricating protein arrays using DPN. This study highlights the fabrication of a prostate specific antigen (PSA) immunoassay detectable by fluorescence. Spot sizes are typically no larger than 8 μm in diameter and limits of detection for PSA are comparable with a commercially available ELISA kit. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of the array surface gives great insight into how the nitrocellulose substrate functions to retain protein integrity. This is the first report of protein arrays being printed on nitrocellulose using the DPN technique and the smallest feature size yet to be achieved on this type of surface. This method offers a significant advance in the ability to produce dense protein arrays on nitrocellulose which are suitable for disease screening using standard fluorescence detection. PMID:21647488

  11. Advances in nanodiagnostic techniques for microbial agents.

    PubMed

    Syed, Muhammad Ali

    2014-01-15

    Infectious diseases account for millions of sufferings and deaths in both developing as well as developed countries with a substantial economic loss. Massive increase in world population and international travel has facilitated their spread from one part of the world to other areas, making them one of the most significant global health risks. Furthermore, detection of bioterrorism agents in water, food and environmental samples as well traveler's baggage is a great challenge of the time for security purpose. Prevention strategies against infectious agents demand rapid and accurate detection and identification of the causative agents with highest sensitivity which should be equally available in different parts of the globe. Similarly, rapid and early diagnosis of infectious diseases has always been indispensable for their prompt cure and management, which has stimulated scientists to develop highly sophisticated techniques over centuries and the efforts continue unabated. Conventional diagnostic techniques are time consuming, tedious, expensive, less sensitive, and unsuitable for field situations. Nanodiagnostic assays have been promising for early, sensitive, point-of-care and cost-effective detection of microbial agents. There has been an explosive research in this area of science in last two decades yielding highly fascinating results. This review highlights some of the advancements made in the field of nanotechnology based assays for microbial detection since 2005 along with providing the basic understanding. PMID:24012709

  12. Advanced techniques in current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

    1992-03-01

    In general, both ac and dc motors can be characterized as weakly nonlinear systems, in which both linear and nonlinear effects occur simultaneously. Fortunately, the nonlinearities are generally well behaved and understood and an be handled via several standard mathematical techniques already well developed in the systems modeling area; examples are piecewise linear approximations and Volterra series representations. Field measurements of numerous motors and motor-driven systems confirm the rather complex nature of motor current spectra and illustrate both linear and nonlinear effects (including line harmonics and modulation components). Although previous current signature analysis (CSA) work at Oak Ridge and other sites has principally focused on the modulation mechanisms and detection methods (AM, PM, and FM), more recent studies have been conducted on linear spectral components (those appearing in the electric current at their actual frequencies and not as modulation sidebands). For example, large axial-flow compressors ({approximately}3300 hp) in the US gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants exhibit running-speed ({approximately}20 Hz) and high-frequency vibrational information (>1 kHz) in their motor current spectra. Several signal-processing techniques developed to facilitate analysis of these components, including specialized filtering schemes, are presented. Finally, concepts for the designs of advanced digitally based CSA units are offered, which should serve to foster the development of much more computationally capable ``smart`` CSA instrumentation in the next several years. 3 refs.

  13. Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minyard, Glen E.; Lambarski, Timothy J.

    1997-02-01

    The Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems contract is a Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) cost-shared contract under Phase 4A1 for Product Driven Systems and Component Technologies. Phase 4A1 has the goals to improve the cost-effectiveness and manufacturing efficiency of PV end-products, optimize manufacturing and packaging methods, and generally improve balance-of-system performance, integration and manufacturing. This contract has the specific goal to reduce the installed PV system life cycle costs to the customer with the ultimate goal of increasing PV system marketability and customer acceptance. The specific objectives of the project are to develop certified, standardized, modular, pre-engineered products lines of our main stand-alone systems, the Modular Autonomous PV Power Supply (MAPPS) and PV-Generator Hybrid System (Photogenset). To date, we have designed a 200 W MAPPS and a 1 kW Photogenset and are in the process of having the MAPPS certified by Underwriters Laboratories (UL Listed) and approved for hazardous locations by Factory Mutual (FM). We have also developed a manufacturing plan for product line expansion for the MAPPS. The Photogenset will be fabricated in February 1997 and will also be UL Listed. Functionality testing will be performed at NREL and Sandia with the intentions of providing verification of performance and reliability and of developing test-based performance specifications. In addition to an expansion on the goals, objectives and status of the project, specific accomplishments and benefits are also presented in this paper.

  14. Advanced composites: Fabrication processes for selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note is based on present state of the art for epoxy and polyimide matrix composite fabrication technology. Boron/epoxy and polyimide and graphite/epoxy and polyimide structural parts can be successfully fabricated. Fabrication cycles for polyimide matrix composites have been shortened to near epoxy cycle times. Nondestructive testing has proven useful in detecting defects and anomalies in composite structure elements. Fabrication methods and tooling materials are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of different tooling materials. Types of honeycomb core, material costs and fabrication methods are shown in table form for comparison. Fabrication limits based on tooling size, pressure capabilities and various machining operations are also discussed.

  15. A Comparison of Fabrication Techniques for Hollow Retroreflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Alix; Merkowitz, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide usage of hollow retroreflectors, there is limited literature involving their fabrication techniques and only two documented construction methods could be found. One consists of an adjustable fixture that allows for the independent alignment of each mirror, while the other consists of a modified solid retroreflector that is used as a mandrel. Although both methods were shown to produce hollow retroreflectors with arcsecond dihedral angle errors, a comparison and analysis of each method could not be found which makes it difficult to ascertain which method would be better suited to use for precision-aligned retroreflectors. Although epoxy bonding is generally the preferred method to adhere the three mirrors, a relatively new method known as hydroxide-catalysis bonding (HCB) presents several potential advantages over epoxy bonding. HCB has been used to bond several optical components for space-based missions, but has never been applied for construction of hollow retroreflectors. In this paper we examine the benefits and limitations of each bonding fixture as well as present results and analysis of hollow retroreflectors made using both epoxy and HCB techniques.

  16. Characterization of a Viking Blade Fabricated by Traditional Forging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Traylor, R.; Austin, J.; Pringle, J.; Bickel, J.; Connick, R.; Connick, W.; Hosemann, P.

    2016-09-01

    A team of students from the University of California, Berkeley, participated in a blade-smithing competition hosted by the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society at the TMS 2015 144th annual meeting and exhibition. Motivated by ancient forging methods, the UC Berkeley team chose to fabricate our blade from historical smithing techniques utilizing naturally-occurring deposits of iron ore. This approach resulted in receiving the "Best Example of a Traditional Blade Process/Ore Smelting Technique" award for our blade named "Berkelium." First, iron-enriched sand was collected from local beaches. Magnetite (Fe3O4) was then extracted from the sand and smelted into individual high- and low-carbon steel ingots. Layers of high- and low-carbon steels were forge-welded together, predominantly by hand, to form a composite material. Optical microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness mechanical testing were conducted at different stages throughout the blade-making process to evaluate the microstructure and hardness evolution during formation. It was found that the pre-heat-treated blade microstructure was composed of ferrite and pearlite, and contained many nonmetallic inclusions. A final heat treatment was performed, which caused the average hardness of the blade edge to increase by more than a factor of two, indicating a martensitic transformation.

  17. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M.

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  18. Design, fabrication, and calibration of curved integral coils for measuring transfer function, uniformity, and effective length of LBL ALS (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Advanced Light Source) Booster Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Nelson, D.; Marks, S.; Gee, B.; Wong, W.; Meneghetti, J.

    1989-03-01

    A matched pair of curved integral coils has been designed, fabricated and calibrated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for measuring Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole Magnets. Distinctive fabrication and calibration techniques are described. The use of multifilar magnet wire in fabrication integral search coils is described. Procedures used and results of AC and DC measurements of transfer function, effective length and uniformity of the prototype booster dipole magnet are presented in companion papers. 8 refs.

  19. Advanced digital modulation: Communication techniques and monolithic GaAs technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. G.; Oliver, J. D., Jr.; Kot, R. C.; Richards, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Communications theory and practice are merged with state-of-the-art technology in IC fabrication, especially monolithic GaAs technology, to examine the general feasibility of a number of advanced technology digital transmission systems. Satellite-channel models with (1) superior throughput, perhaps 2 Gbps; (2) attractive weight and cost; and (3) high RF power and spectrum efficiency are discussed. Transmission techniques possessing reasonably simple architectures capable of monolithic fabrication at high speeds were surveyed. This included a review of amplitude/phase shift keying (APSK) techniques and the continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) methods, of which MSK represents the simplest case.

  20. Thermocapillary Technique for Shaping and Fabricating Optical Ribbon Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Kevin; Troian, Sandra

    The demand for ever increasing bandwidth and higher speed communication has ushered the next generation optoelectronic integrated circuits which directly incorporate polymer optical waveguide devices. Polymer melts are very versatile materials which have been successfully cast into planar single- and multimode waveguides using techniques such as embossing, photolithography and direct laser writing. In this talk, we describe a novel thermocapillary patterning method for fabricating waveguides in which the free surface of an ultrathin molten polymer film is exposed to a spatially inhomogeneous temperature field via thermal conduction from a nearby cooled mask pattern held in close proximity. The ensuring surface temperature distribution is purposely designed to pool liquid selectively into ribbon shapes suitable for optical waveguiding, but with rounded and not rectangular cross sectional areas due to capillary forces. The solidified waveguide patterns which result from this non-contact one step procedure exhibit ultrasmooth interfaces suitable for demanding optoelectronic applications. To complement these studies, we have also conducted finite element simulations for quantifying the influence of non-rectangular cross-sectional shapes on mode propagation and losses. Kf gratefully acknowledges support from a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  1. Fabrication of a microreactor by proton beam writing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huszank, R.; Szilasi, S. Z.; Vad, K.; Rajta, I.

    2009-06-01

    Microreactors are innovative and promising tools in technology nowadays because of their advantages compared to the conventional-scale reactors. These advantages include vast improvements in surface to volume ratio, energy efficiency, reaction speed and yield and increased control of reaction conditions, to name a few examples. The high resolution capability of the micromachining technique utilizing accelerated ion beams in the fabrication technology of microreactors has not yet been taken advantage of. In this work we present the design of a prototype micro-electrochemical cell of 1.5 μL volume (2.5 × 2.5 × 0.240 mm) created with a 3 MeV proton microbeam. The cell can be separated into two half-cells with a suitable membrane applicable to galvanic or fuel cells as well. We deposited gold electrodes on both of the half-cells. The operability of the device was demonstrated by electric current flow between the two electrodes in this micro-electrochemical cell containing a simple electrolyte solution. We used a polycapillary film to separate the two half-cells, hindering the mixing of the anolyte and catholyte solutions. As a result of the minimal mixing caused by the polycapillary film, this cell design can be suitable for electro-synthesis. Due to the high resolution of proton beam writing, it is planned to reduce the dimensions of this kind of microreactor.

  2. Advances in procedural techniques--antegrade.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William; Spratt, James C

    2014-05-01

    There have been many technological advances in antegrade CTO PCI, but perhaps most importantly has been the evolution of the "hybrid' approach where ideally there exists a seamless interplay of antegrade wiring, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde approaches as dictated by procedural factors. Antegrade wire escalation with intimal tracking remains the preferred initial strategy in short CTOs without proximal cap ambiguity. More complex CTOs, however, usually require either a retrograde or an antegrade dissection re-entry approach, or both. Antegrade dissection re-entry is well suited to long occlusions where there is a healthy distal vessel and limited "interventional" collaterals. Early use of a dissection re-entry strategy will increase success rates, reduce complications, and minimise radiation exposure, contrast use as well as procedural times. Antegrade dissection can be achieved with a knuckle wire technique or the CrossBoss catheter whilst re-entry will be achieved in the most reproducible and reliable fashion by the Stingray balloon/wire. It should be avoided where there is potential for loss of large side branches. It remains to be seen whether use of newer dissection re-entry strategies will be associated with lower restenosis rates compared with the more uncontrolled subintimal tracking strategies such as STAR and whether stent insertion in the subintimal space is associated with higher rates of late stent malapposition and stent thrombosis. It is to be hoped that the algorithms, which have been developed to guide CTO operators, allow for a better transfer of knowledge and skills to increase uptake and acceptance of CTO PCI as a whole. PMID:24694104

  3. Improved ceramic slip casting technique. [application to aircraft model fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A primary concern in modern fluid dynamics research is the experimental verification of computational aerothermodynamic codes. This research requires high precision and detail in the test model employed. Ceramic materials are used for these models because of their low heat conductivity and their survivability at high temperatures. To fabricate such models, slip casting techniques were developed to provide net-form, precision casting capability for high-purity ceramic materials in aqueous solutions. In previous slip casting techniques, block, or flask molds made of plaster-of-paris were used to draw liquid from the slip material. Upon setting, parts were removed from the flask mold and cured in a kiln at high temperatures. Casting detail was usually limited with this technique -- detailed parts were frequently damaged upon separation from the flask mold, as the molded parts are extremely delicate in the uncured state, and the flask mold is inflexible. Ceramic surfaces were also marred by 'parting lines' caused by mold separation. This adversely affected the aerodynamic surface quality of the model as well. (Parting lines are invariably necessary on or near the leading edges of wings, nosetips, and fins for mold separation. These areas are also critical for flow boundary layer control.) Parting agents used in the casting process also affected surface quality. These agents eventually soaked into the mold, the model, or flaked off when releasing the case model. Different materials were tried, such as oils, paraffin, and even an algae. The algae released best, but some of it remained on the model and imparted an uneven texture and discoloration on the model surface when cured. According to the present invention, a wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell

  4. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  5. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  6. Recent advances in high-performance window fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, James B.; Boland, Richard; Gowac, Edward; Stupik, Paul; Tricard, Marc

    2013-06-01

    The continuous drive towards higher performance intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) and high-energy laser (HEL) systems has translated into new requirements for high-performance windows. In these applications a wide range of materials needs to be considered, ranging from amorphous glass (such as fused silica), polycrystalline materials (such as CleartranTM) or hard ceramics (such as AlON, spinel and sapphire). A wide range of sizes (up to and including meter class optics) and geometries are also considered for these applications (high aspect ratio plano surfaces remain prevalent, of course, but "free-form" shapes are also being envisioned and implemented routinely, including conformal windows). As is always the case, increasingly tighter specifications, driven by lower wavelength IR systems as well as visible and/or multispectral systems, require continually more sophisticated metrology techniques to verify and validate. Development of manufacturing processes needed to yield pristine optical surfaces capable of operating at higher laser fluences and/or for highly brittle ceramics capable of withstanding a wide range of temperature, operating pressure and stress are also considered. New high-durability thin film coatings capable of withstanding increasingly harsher environments have been developed for these applications. In a defense environment where cost pressures continue to require less expensive manufacturing processes, several advances are discussed. This paper will present a wide range of examples dealing with these materials, geometries, specifications, metrology and thin film coating developments.

  7. Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Roger; Helms, Richard; Bilbro, Jim; Brown, Norman; Eng, Sverre; Hinman, Steve; Hull-Allen, Greg; Jacobs, Stephen; Keim, Robert; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-08-01

    What aspects of optical fabrication technology need to be developed so as to facilitate existing planned missions, or enable new ones? Throughout the submillimeter to UV wavelengths, the common goal is to push technology to the limits to make the largest possible apertures that are diffraction limited. At any one wavelength, the accuracy of the surface must be better than lambda/30 (rms error). The wavelength range is huge, covering four orders of magnitude from 1 mm to 100 nm. At the longer wavelengths, diffraction limited surfaces can be shaped with relatively crude techniques. The challenge in their fabrication is to make as large as possible a reflector, given the weight and volume constraints of the launch vehicle. The limited cargo diameter of the shuttle has led in the past to emphasis on deployable or erectable concepts such as the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), which was studied by NASA for a submillimeter astrophysics mission. Replication techniques that can be used to produce light, low-cost reflecting panels are of great interest for this class of mission. At shorter wavelengths, in the optical and ultraviolet, optical fabrication will tax to the limit the most refined polishing methods. Methods of mechanical and thermal stabilization of the substrate will be severely stressed. In the thermal infrared, the need for large aperture is tempered by the even stronger need to control the telescope's thermal emission by cooled or cryogenic operation. Thus, the SIRTF mirror at 1 meter is not large and does not require unusually high accuracy, but the fabrication process must produce a mirror that is the right shape at a temperature of 4 K. Future large cooled mirrors will present more severe problems, especially if they must also be accurate enough to work at optical wavelengths. At the very shortest wavelengths accessible to reflecting optics, in the x-ray domain, the very low count fluxes of high energy photons place a premium on the collecting area. It is

  8. Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Roger; Helms, Richard; Bilbro, Jim; Brown, Norman; Eng, Sverre; Hinman, Steve; Hull-Allen, Greg; Jacobs, Stephen; Keim, Robert; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    What aspects of optical fabrication technology need to be developed so as to facilitate existing planned missions, or enable new ones? Throughout the submillimeter to UV wavelengths, the common goal is to push technology to the limits to make the largest possible apertures that are diffraction limited. At any one wavelength, the accuracy of the surface must be better than lambda/30 (rms error). The wavelength range is huge, covering four orders of magnitude from 1 mm to 100 nm. At the longer wavelengths, diffraction limited surfaces can be shaped with relatively crude techniques. The challenge in their fabrication is to make as large as possible a reflector, given the weight and volume constraints of the launch vehicle. The limited cargo diameter of the shuttle has led in the past to emphasis on deployable or erectable concepts such as the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), which was studied by NASA for a submillimeter astrophysics mission. Replication techniques that can be used to produce light, low-cost reflecting panels are of great interest for this class of mission. At shorter wavelengths, in the optical and ultraviolet, optical fabrication will tax to the limit the most refined polishing methods. Methods of mechanical and thermal stabilization of the substrate will be severely stressed. In the thermal infrared, the need for large aperture is tempered by the even stronger need to control the telescope's thermal emission by cooled or cryogenic operation. Thus, the SIRTF mirror at 1 meter is not large and does not require unusually high accuracy, but the fabrication process must produce a mirror that is the right shape at a temperature of 4 K. Future large cooled mirrors will present more severe problems, especially if they must also be accurate enough to work at optical wavelengths. At the very shortest wavelengths accessible to reflecting optics, in the x-ray domain, the very low count fluxes of high energy photons place a premium on the collecting area. It is

  9. Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

  10. Achieving miniature sensor systems via advanced packaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartup, David C.; Bobier, Kevin; Demmin, Jeffrey

    2005-05-01

    Demands for miniaturized networked sensors that can be deployed in large quantities dictate that the packages be small and cost effective. In order to accomplish these objectives, system developers generally apply advanced packaging techniques to proven systems. A partnership of Nova Engineering and Tessera begins with a baseline of Nova's Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) technology and utilizes Tessera's three-dimensional (3D) Chip-Scale Packaging (CSP), Multi-Chip Packaging (MCP), and System-in-Package (SIP) innovations to enable novel methods for fabricating compact, vertically integrated sensors utilizing digital, RF, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. These technologies, applied to a variety of sensors and integrated radio architectures, enable diverse multi-modal sensing networks with wireless communication capabilities. Sensors including imaging, accelerometers, acoustical, inertial measurement units, and gas and pressure sensors can be utilized. The greatest challenge to high density, multi-modal sensor networks is the ability to test each component prior to integration, commonly called Known Good Die (KGD) testing. In addition, the mix of multi-sourcing and high technology magnifies the challenge of testing at the die level. Utilizing Tessera proprietary CSP, MCP, and SIP interconnection methods enables fully testable, low profile stacking to create multi-modal sensor radios with high yield.

  11. Dynamic Compression of Aluminum Foam Processed by a Freeform Fabrication Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannemann, Kathryn A.; Lankford, James; Nicholls, Arthur E.; Vaidyanathan, Ranji; Green, Catherine

    2004-07-01

    The compressive deformation behavior of a new type of aluminum foam was assessed under static and dynamic loading conditions. The aluminum foam investigated was processed by Advanced Ceramics Research using an extrusion freeform fabrication technique. The foam contained approximately 50 to 60 % porosity. The dynamic compression response was evaluated in air using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system with aluminum bars, and strain rates ranging from 600 s-1 to 2000 s-1. Compression tests were also conducted at lower strain rates (10-3 s-1 to 4 s-1) to determine the extent of strain rate strengthening. The low strain rate tests were performed with a servo-controlled hydraulic test machine. The results were analyzed as a function of foam density, structure, and process conditions.

  12. Wire electric-discharge machining and other fabrication techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Wire electric discharge machining and extrude honing were used to fabricate a two dimensional wing for cryogenic wind tunnel testing. Electric-discharge cutting is done with a moving wire electrode. The cut track is controlled by means of a punched-tape program and the cutting feed is regulated according to the progress of the work. Electric-discharge machining involves no contact with the work piece, and no mechanical force is exerted. Extrude hone is a process for honing finish-machined surfaces by the extrusion of an abrasive material (silly putty), which is forced through a restrictive fixture. The fabrication steps are described and production times are given.

  13. Dynamic shadow mask technique for device fabrication in UHV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Stefan

    2006-08-01

    Clean structures are fabricated in ultrahigh vacuum conditions by evaporation through a shadow mask, avoiding contamination by resist, chemicals or exposure to air. Moving the shadow mask with nanometer precision during the growth of the structures gives additional freedom in determining the lateral shape and the thickness profile. Different materials can easily be combined and chosen from a large range of metals, semiconductors or insulators. In-situ treated surfaces or, conversely, ex-situ pre-fabricated samples can be used as substrates.

  14. Multidirectional mobilities: Advanced measurement techniques and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, Lars Holger

    Today high noise-and-vibration comfort has become a quality sign of products in sectors such as the automotive industry, aircraft, components, households and manufacturing. Consequently, already in the design phase of products, tools are required to predict the final vibration and noise levels. These tools have to be applicable over a wide frequency range with sufficient accuracy. During recent decades a variety of tools have been developed such as transfer path analysis (TPA), input force estimation, substructuring, coupling by frequency response functions (FRF) and hybrid modelling. While these methods have a well-developed theoretical basis, their application combined with experimental data often suffers from a lack of information concerning rotational DOFs. In order to measure response in all 6 DOFs (including rotation), a sensor has been developed, whose special features are discussed in the thesis. This transducer simplifies the response measurements, although in practice the excitation of moments appears to be more difficult. Several excitation techniques have been developed to enable measurement of multidirectional mobilities. For rapid and simple measurement of the loaded mobility matrix, a MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) technique is used. The technique has been tested and validated on several structures of different complexity. A second technique for measuring the loaded 6-by-6 mobility matrix has been developed. This technique employs a model of the excitation set-up, and with this model the mobility matrix is determined from sequential measurements. Measurements on ``real'' structures show that both techniques give results of similar quality, and both are recommended for practical use. As a further step, a technique for measuring the unloaded mobilities is presented. It employs the measured loaded mobility matrix in order to calculate compensation forces and moments, which are later applied in order to compensate for the loading of the

  15. Advanced fabrication technology for high speed aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Hoffman, E. K.; Bird, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the development of the weld-brazing process for fabricating Ti-6Al-4V skin-stiffened panels, a brazing process for fabricating Bsc/Al titanium honeycomb core panels, and the enhanced diffusion bonding (EDB) process for fabricating Ti-14Al-21Nb titanium aluminide structural elements are presented. Data presented include the shear strengths of full-scale weldbrazed Ti-6Al-4V skin stiffened and Bsc/Al titanium honeycomb core sandwich panels designed to meet the requirements of an upper wing panel on the NASA YF-12. These results verified that the materials, fabrication processes, and structural concepts were qualified for Mach 3 flight. Shear strengths of each of the panel concepts following flight service evaluation are also reported. Comparisons made with the cost and weight of the original wing panel indicated that the weldbrazed titanium panels resulted in a 15-20 percent cost savings and the brazed Bsc/Al panel showed a 30 percent weight savings. It was also shown that the strengths of the EDB joints were sufficient to develop stresses in the Ti-14Al-21Nb face sheets of the sandwich structure which were above the yield strength of the material.

  16. Advances in laparoscopic urologic surgery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M.; Humphreys, Mitchell R.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades witnessed the inception and exponential implementation of key technological advancements in laparoscopic urology. While some of these technologies thrived and became part of daily practice, others are still hindered by major challenges. This review was conducted through a comprehensive literature search in order to highlight some of the most promising technologies in laparoscopic visualization, augmented reality, and insufflation. Additionally, this review will provide an update regarding the current status of single-site and natural orifice surgery in urology. PMID:27134743

  17. Advances in laparoscopic urologic surgery techniques.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M; Humphreys, Mitchell R

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades witnessed the inception and exponential implementation of key technological advancements in laparoscopic urology. While some of these technologies thrived and became part of daily practice, others are still hindered by major challenges. This review was conducted through a comprehensive literature search in order to highlight some of the most promising technologies in laparoscopic visualization, augmented reality, and insufflation. Additionally, this review will provide an update regarding the current status of single-site and natural orifice surgery in urology. PMID:27134743

  18. Retention of denture bases fabricated by three different processing techniques – An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Chalapathi Kumar, V. H.; Surapaneni, Hemchand; Ravikiran, V.; Chandra, B. Sarat; Balusu, Srilatha; Reddy, V. Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Distortion due to Polymerization shrinkage compromises the retention. To evaluate the amount of retention of denture bases fabricated by conventional, anchorized, and injection molding polymerization techniques. Materials and Methods: Ten completely edentulous patients were selected, impressions were made, and master cast obtained was duplicated to fabricate denture bases by three polymerization techniques. Loop was attached to the finished denture bases to estimate the force required to dislodge them by retention apparatus. Readings were subjected to nonparametric Friedman two-way analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni correction methods and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Denture bases fabricated by injection molding (3740 g), anchorized techniques (2913 g) recorded greater retention values than conventional technique (2468 g). Significant difference was seen between these techniques. Conclusions: Denture bases obtained by injection molding polymerization technique exhibited maximum retention, followed by anchorized technique, and least retention was seen in conventional molding technique. PMID:27382542

  19. Epoxy nanodielectrics fabricated with in situ and ex situ techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report fabrication and characterisation of a nanocomposite system composed of a commercial resin and extremely small (several nanometres in diameter) titanium dioxide particles. Nanoparticles were synthesised in situ with particle nucleation occurring inside the resin matrix. In this nanodielectric fabrication method, the nanoparticle precursor was mixed to the resin solution, and the nanoparticles were in situ precipitated. Note that no high shear mixing equipment was needed to improve particle dispersion - nanoparticles were distributed in the polymer matrix uniformly since particle nucleation occurs uniformly throughout the matrix. The properties of in situ nanodielectrics are compared to the unfilled resin and an ex situ nanocomposite. We anticipate that the presented in situ nanocomposite would be employed in high-temperature superconductivity applications. In additions, the improvement shown in the dielectric breakdown indicates that conventional high-voltage components and systems can be reduced in size with novel nanodielectrics.

  20. Fabrication of thermoplastics chips through lamination based techniques.

    PubMed

    Miserere, Sandrine; Mottet, Guillaume; Taniga, Velan; Descroix, Stephanie; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Malaquin, Laurent

    2012-04-24

    In this work, we propose a novel strategy for the fabrication of flexible thermoplastic microdevices entirely based on lamination processes. The same low-cost laminator apparatus can be used from master fabrication to microchannel sealing. This process is appropriate for rapid prototyping at laboratory scale, but it can also be easily upscaled to industrial manufacturing. For demonstration, we used here Cycloolefin Copolymer (COC), a thermoplastic polymer that is extensively used for microfluidic applications. COC is a thermoplastic polymer with good chemical resistance to common chemicals used in microfluidics such as acids, bases and most polar solvents. Its optical quality and mechanical resistance make this material suitable for a large range of applications in chemistry or biology. As an example, the electrokinetic separation of pollutants is proposed in the present study.

  1. Fabrication of a wettability-gradient surface on copper by screen-printing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ding-Jun; Leu, Tzong-Shyng

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a screen-printing technique is utilized to fabricate a wettability-gradient surface on a copper substrate. The pattern definitions on the copper surface were freely fabricated to define the regions with different wettabilities, for which the printing definition technique was developed as an alternative to the existing costly photolithography techniques. This fabrication process using screen printing in tandem with chemical modification methods can easily realize an excellent wettability-gradient surface with superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity. Surface analyses were performed to characterize conditions in some fabrication steps. A water droplet movement sequence is provided to clearly demonstrate the droplet-driving effectiveness of the fabricated gradient surface. The droplet-driving efficiency offers a promising solution for condensation heat transfer applications in the foreseeable future.

  2. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    PubMed

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines.

  3. Advanced optical imaging techniques for neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy.

  4. Advanced Optical Imaging Techniques for Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1 mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy. PMID:23831260

  5. Advanced ultrasonic techniques for local tumor hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Lele, P P

    1989-05-01

    Scanned, intensity-modulated, focused ultrasound (SIMFU) presently is the modality of choice for localized, controlled heating of deep as well as superficial tumors noninvasively. With the present SIMFU system, it was possible to heat 88 per cent of deep tumors up to 12 cm in depth and 15 cm in diameter, to 43 degrees C in 3 to 4 minutes. The infiltrative tumor margins could be heated to the desired therapeutic temperature. The temperature outside the treatment field fell off sharply. Excellent objective responses were obtained without local or systemic toxicity. Multiinstitutional clinical trials of local hyperthermia by this promising technique are clearly warranted.

  6. Air pollution monitoring by advanced spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Hodgeson, J A; McClenny, W A; Hanst, P L

    1973-10-19

    The monitoring requirements related to air pollution are many and varied. The molecules of concern differ greatly in their chemical and physical properties, in the nature of their environment, and in their concentration ranges. Furthermore, the application may have specific requirements such as rapid response time, ultrasensitivity, multipollutant capability, or capability for remote measurements. For these reasons, no single spectroscopic technique appears to offer a panacea for all monitoring needs. Instead we have attempted to demonstrate in the above discussion that, regardless of the difficulty and complexity of the monitoring problems, spectroscopy offers many tools by which such problems may be solved.

  7. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  8. Advanced automated char image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Wu; Edward Lester; Michael Cloke

    2006-05-15

    Char morphology is an important characteristic when attempting to understand coal behavior and coal burnout. In this study, an augmented algorithm has been proposed to identify char types using image analysis. On the basis of a series of image processing steps, a char image is singled out from the whole image, which then allows the important major features of the char particle to be measured, including size, porosity, and wall thickness. The techniques for automated char image analysis have been tested against char images taken from ICCP Char Atlas as well as actual char particles derived from pyrolyzed char samples. Thirty different chars were prepared in a drop tube furnace operating at 1300{sup o}C, 1% oxygen, and 100 ms from 15 different world coals sieved into two size fractions (53-75 and 106-125 {mu}m). The results from this automated technique are comparable with those from manual analysis, and the additional detail from the automated sytem has potential use in applications such as combustion modeling systems. Obtaining highly detailed char information with automated methods has traditionally been hampered by the difficulty of automatic recognition of individual char particles. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rama Shankar

    2013-06-01

    Successful mapping of the draft human genome in 2001 and more recent mapping of the human microbiome genome in 2012 have relied heavily on the parallel processing of the second generation/Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) DNA machines at a cost of several millions dollars and long computer processing times. These have been mainly biochemical approaches. Here a system analysis approach is used to review these techniques by identifying the requirements, specifications, test methods, error estimates, repeatability, reliability and trends in the cost reduction. The first generation, NGS and the Third Generation Single Molecule Real Time (SMART) detection sequencing methods are reviewed. Based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) data, the achieved cost reduction of 1.5 times per yr. from Sep. 2001 to July 2007; 7 times per yr., from Oct. 2007 to Apr. 2010; and 2.5 times per yr. from July 2010 to Jan 2012 are discussed.

  10. Single intrinsic Josephson junction with double-sided fabrication technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, L. X.; Torstensson, M.; Yurgens, A.; Winkler, D.; Lin, C. T.; Liang, B.

    2006-05-01

    We make stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) embedded in the bulk of very thin (d⩽100nm) Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x single crystals. By precisely controlling the etching depth during the double-sided fabrication process, the stacks can be reproducibly tailor-made to be of any microscopic height (0-9nm

  11. A Simplified Technique for Fabrication of Orbital Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, G.K.; Mohapatra, Abhilash; Seth, Jyotsna; Vashisht, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Eye is a vital organ not only for vision, but also an important component of facial expression, and over-all personality of a person. Loss of eye, apart from leading to impaired vision has a crippling effect on the psychology of the patient. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of such cases includes fabrication of prosthesis by acrylic resin, silicone and implants. However, not all patients are willing to use implants for maxillofacial rehabilitation. Therefore, a custom made orbital prosthesis serves as an affordable and satisfactory alternative. PMID:25121068

  12. Optimization of segmented alignment marks for advanced semiconductor fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Lu, Zhijian G.; Williams, Gary; Zach, Franz X.; Liegl, Bernhard

    2001-08-01

    The continued downscaling of semiconductor fabrication ground rule has imposed increasingly tighter overlay tolerances, which becomes very challenging at the 100 nm lithographic node. Such tight tolerances will require very high performance in alignment. Past experiences indicate that good alignment depends largely on alignment signal quality, which, however, can be strongly affected by chip design and various fabrication processes. Under some extreme circumstances, they can even be reduced to the non- usable limit. Therefore, a systematic understanding of alignment marks and a method to predict alignment performance based on mark design are necessary. Motivated by this, we have performed a detailed study of bright field segmented alignment marks that are used in current state-of- the-art fabrication processes. We find that alignment marks at different lithographic levels can be organized into four basic categories: trench mark, metal mark, damascene mark, and combo mark. The basic principles of these four types of marks turn out to be so similar that they can be characterized within the theoretical framework of a simple model based on optical gratings. An analytic expression has been developed for such model and it has been tested using computer simulation with the rigorous time-domain finite- difference (TD-FD) algorithm TEMPEST. Consistent results have been obtained; indicating that mark signal can be significantly improved through the optimization of mark lateral dimensions, such as segment pitch and segment width. We have also compared simulation studies against experimental data for alignment marks at one typical lithographic level and a good agreement is found.

  13. Preparation, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Advanced Polymeric and Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis titles are given below: physical and mechanical behavior of amorphous poly(arylene ether-co-imidasole)s and poly(arylene ether-co-imidasole) modification epoxies; the requirements of patentability as applied to the chemical arts; fabrication of thermoplastic polymer composite ribbon; blend of reactive diluents with phenylethynyl-terminated arylene ether oligomers; the synthesis, characterization, and application of ether-containing polyimides; the synthesis of reflective and electrically conductive polyimide films via an in-situ self-metalization procedure using silver (I) complexes; the thermal cure of phenylethynyl terminated polyimides and selected model compounds; and the synthesis, characterization, and molecular modeling of cyclic arylene ether oligomers.

  14. Flexible Fabrics with High Thermal Conductivity for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kesterson, Matt; Connel, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Southward, Robin E.; Working, Dennis; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effort and accomplishments for developing flexible fabrics with high thermal conductivity (FFHTC) for spacesuits to improve thermal performance, lower weight and reduce complexity. Commercial and additional space exploration applications that require substantial performance enhancements in removal and transport of heat away from equipment as well as from the human body can benefit from this technology. Improvements in thermal conductivity were achieved through the use of modified polymers containing thermally conductive additives. The objective of the FFHTC effort is to significantly improve the thermal conductivity of the liquid cooled ventilation garment by improving the thermal conductivity of the subcomponents (i.e., fabric and plastic tubes). This paper presents the initial system modeling studies, including a detailed liquid cooling garment model incorporated into the Wissler human thermal regulatory model, to quantify the necessary improvements in thermal conductivity and garment geometries needed to affect system performance. In addition, preliminary results of thermal conductivity improvements of the polymer components of the liquid cooled ventilation garment are presented. By improving thermal garment performance, major technology drivers will be addressed for lightweight, high thermal conductivity, flexible materials for spacesuits that are strategic technical challenges of the Exploration

  15. Development of a Direct Fabrication Technique for Full-Shell X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Kolodziejczak, J. K.; Griffith, C.; Roche, J.; Smith, W. S.; Kester, T.; Atkins, C.; Arnold, W.; Ramsey, B.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrophysical missions will require fabrication technology capable of producing high angular resolution x-ray optics. A full-shell direct fabrication approach using modern robotic polishing machines has the potential for producing high resolution, light-weight and affordable x-ray mirrors that can be nested to produce large collecting area. This approach to mirror fabrication, based on the use of the metal substrates coated with nickel phosphorous alloy, is being pursued at MSFC. The design of the polishing fixtures for the direct fabrication, the surface figure metrology techniques used and the results of the polishing experiments are presented.

  16. Laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation: a simplified dome advancement technique.

    PubMed

    Lima, Guilherme C; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Link, Richard E; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2005-12-01

    Laparoscopic Boari flap reimplantation has been used to treat long distal ureteral strictures. This technique requires extensive bladder mobilization and complex intracorporeal suturing. This demonstrates a novel laparoscopic bladder dome advancement approach for ureteral reimplantation. This technique obviates the need for bladder pedicle dissection and simplifies the required suturing.

  17. Evaluation of Advanced Retrieval Techniques in an Experimental Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses subject searching problems in online library catalogs; explains advanced information retrieval (IR) techniques; and describes experiments conducted on a test collection database, CHESHIRE (California Hybrid Extended SMART for Hypertext and Information Retrieval Experimentation), which was created to evaluate IR techniques in online…

  18. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  19. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  20. Deformation grating fabrication technique based on the solvent-assisted microcontact molding.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xianglu; Xie, Huimin; Wang, Huaixi

    2014-10-20

    A deformation grating fabrication technique based on solvent-assisted microcontact molding (SAMIM) is reported in this paper. The fabrication process can be divided into three steps: imprinting a grating on a medium polymer substrate (MPS) by SAMIM, coating a thin metal film on the MPS, and transferring the film to the measured surface. In order to increase the stiffness of the elastic mold without decreasing its conformal contact formation ability, a re-useable, glass-embedded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold is used. In addition, a characterization method based on the Fourier transform and phase analysis is proposed to check the quality of the fabricated grating. Verified by experiment, the proposed fabrication technique can fabricate a high-frequency large-area grating on different specimens, which can be a qualified deformation sensor for the moiré method. PMID:25402792

  1. Direct technique for the fabrication of a visible light-curing resin provisional restoration.

    PubMed

    Passon, C; Goldfogel, M

    1990-09-01

    A properly fabricated provisional restoration will, among other things, provide acceptable esthetics. Although many materials have been used for provisional restorations, when esthetics is of primary concern, the choice is limited to tooth-colored resin materials. Recently, a tooth-colored, light-activated urethane dimethacrylate resin has been developed. This material has been reported to be useful for many prosthetic applications, including the indirect fabrication of provisional restorations. This paper presents a technique for the direct fabrication of single-unit provisional restorations using this material. The physical properties of this resin and the advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also discussed.

  2. A novel technique for the direct fabrication of fixed interim restorations.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Kotsakis, Georgios; Pallis, Konstantinos; Walter, Michael Horst

    2013-03-01

    This article describes an alternative technique for the fabrication of interim restorations. A thermoplastic, vacuum-formed template and translucent vinyl polysiloxane material are combined in the waxed diagnostic cast to fabricate a matrix in which the interim material can be placed. With this matrix, a variety of materials, such as dual-polymerized or light-polymerized resins, can be used in a predictable way. The major advantage of this technique is that it allows for the fabrication of accurate restorations with excellent reproduction of surface anatomy and for alterations of the tooth shape with light-polymerized materials. PMID:23522370

  3. Advances in LIGA-Based Post-Mold Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, T.R.

    1998-10-21

    The establishment of a process to allow planarization of deep x-ray lithography based microfabncated metal components via diamond lapping has enabled examination of three additional microfabrication issues. The areas of improvement that are discussed include materials, microassembly and packaging, and multilevel fabrication. New materials work has centered on magnetic materials including precision micromagnets and surface treatments of electrodeposited materials. Assembly and packaging has been aided by deep silicon etch processing and the use of conventional precision milling equipment combined with press-tit assembly. Diffhsion bonding is shown to be a particularly important approach to achieving multilevel metal mechanisms and furthermore shows promise for achieving batch assembled and packaged high aspect-ratio metal micromechanics,

  4. Advances in fabrication of Ag-clad Bi-2223 superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.

    1998-09-04

    Powder-in-tube (PIT) processing was used to fabricate multifilamentary Ag-clad Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (Bi-2223) superconductors for various electric power applications. Enhancements in the transport current properties of long lengths of multifilament tapes were achieved by increasing the packing density of the precursor powder, improving the mechanical deformation, and adjusting the cooling rate. The dependence of the critical current density on magnetic field and temperature for the optimally processed tapes was measured. J{sub c} was greater than 10{sup 4} (A/cm{sup 2}) at 20 K for magnetic field up to 3 T and parallel to the c-axis which is of interest for use in refrigerator coded magnets. An attempt was made to combine the good alignment of Bi-2223 grains in Ag-sheathed superconducting tapes to obtain high J{sub c} values at high temperature and low field, and good intrinsic pinning of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}d} (Y-123) thin film to maintain high J{sub c} values in high fields. A new composite multifilament tape was fabricated such that the central part contained Bi-2223 filaments, with the primary function of conducting the transport current. The central Bi-2223 filaments were surrounded by Y-123 thin film to shield the applied magnetic field and protect the Bi-2223 filaments. The J{sub c} values of the composite tape were better than those of an uncoated tape. In the case of 77 K applications, an I{sub c} of about 60 A was obtained in a 150 m long tape and zero applied magnetic field. In-situ strain characteristics of the mono- and multifilament tapes were conducted.

  5. Structures And Fabrication Techniques For Solid State Electrochemical Devices

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2005-12-27

    Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one embodiment the invention provides techniques for co-firing of device substrate (often an electrode) with an electrolyte or membrane layer to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another embodiment, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe, Cu and Ag, or alloys thereof.

  6. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2006-10-10

    Low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures provide solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one aspect the invention provides techniques for co-firing of device substrate (often an electrode) with an electrolyte or membrane layer to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another aspect, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe and Cu, or alloys thereof.

  7. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-08-12

    Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one embodiment the invention provides techniques for co-firing of device substrate (often an electrode) with an electrolyte or membrane layer to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another embodiment, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe, Cu and Ag, or alloys thereof.

  8. Artificial submicron or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and electron microscope speckle photography

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhanwei; Xie Huimin; Fang Daining; Dai Fulong; Wang Weining; Fang Yan

    2007-03-15

    In this article, a novel artificial submicro- or nanometer speckle fabricating technique is proposed by taking advantage of submicro or nanometer particles. In the technique, submicron or nanometer particles were adhered to an object surface by using ultrasonic dispersing technique. The particles on the object surface can be regarded as submicro or nanometer speckle by using a scanning electronic microscope at a special magnification. In addition, an electron microscope speckle photography (EMSP) method is developed to measure in-plane submicron or nanometer deformation of the object coated with the artificial submicro or nanometer speckles. The principle of artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and the EMSP method are discussed in detail in this article. Some typical applications of this method are offered. The experimental results verified that the artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and EMSP method is feasible.

  9. MICRO-SEISMOMETERS VIA ADVANCED MESO-SCALE FABRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Caesar A; Onaran, Guclu; Avenson, Brad; Hall, Neal

    2014-11-07

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) seek revolutionary sensing innovations for the monitoring of nuclear detonations. Performance specifications are to be consistent with those obtainable by only an elite few products available today, but with orders of magnitude reduction in size, weight, power, and cost. The proposed commercial innovation calls upon several technologies including the combination of meso-scale fabrication and assembly, photonics-based displacement / motion detection methods, and the use of digital control electronics . Early Phase II development has demonstrated verified and repeatable sub 2ng noise floor from 3Hz to 100Hz, compact integration of 3-axis prototypes, and robust deployment exercises. Ongoing developments are focusing on low frequency challenges, low power consumption, ultra-miniature size, and low cross axis sensitivity. We are also addressing the rigorous set of specifications required for repeatable and reliable long-term explosion monitoring, including thermal stability, reduced recovery time from mass re-centering and large mechanical shocks, sensitivity stability, and transportability. Successful implementation will result in small, hand-held demonstration units with the ability to address national security needs of the DOE/NNSA. Additional applications envisioned include military/defense, scientific instrumentation, oil and gas exploration, inertial navigation, and civil infrastructure monitoring.

  10. Advances in gamma titanium aluminides and their manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides display attractive properties for high temperature applications. For over a decade in the 1990s, the attractive properties of titanium aluminides were outweighed by difficulties encountered in processing and machining at room temperature. But advances in manufacturing technologies, deeper understanding of titanium aluminides microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and advances in micro-alloying, has led to the production of gamma titanium aluminide sheets. An in-depth review of key advances in gamma titanium aluminides is presented, including microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and alloy development. Traditional manufacturing techniques such as ingot metallurgy and investment casting are reviewed and advances via powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques are discussed. Finally, manufacturing challenges facing gamma titanium aluminides, as well as avenues to overcome them, are discussed.

  11. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  12. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  13. Advanced regenerative-cooling techniques for future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.; Shoji, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A review of regenerative-cooling techniques applicable to advanced planned engine designs for space booster and orbit transportation systems has developed the status of the key elements of this cooling mode. This work is presented in terms of gas side, coolant side, wall conduction heat transfer, and chamber life fatigue margin considerations. Described are preliminary heat transfer and trade analyses performed using developed techniques combining channel wall construction with advanced, high-strength, high-thermal-conductivity materials (NARloy-Z or Zr-Cu alloys) in high heat flux regions, combined with lightweight steel tubular nozzle wall construction. Advanced cooling techniques such as oxygen cooling and dual-mode hydrocarbon/hydrogen fuel operation and their limitations are indicated for the regenerative cooling approach.

  14. Recent advances in bioprinting techniques: approaches, applications and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Li, Jipeng; Chen, Mingjiao; Fan, Xianqun; Zhou, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting technology shows potential in tissue engineering for the fabrication of scaffolds, cells, tissues and organs reproducibly and with high accuracy. Bioprinting technologies are mainly divided into three categories, inkjet-based bioprinting, pressure-assisted bioprinting and laser-assisted bioprinting, based on their underlying printing principles. These various printing technologies have their advantages and limitations. Bioprinting utilizes biomaterials, cells or cell factors as a "bioink" to fabricate prospective tissue structures. Biomaterial parameters such as biocompatibility, cell viability and the cellular microenvironment strongly influence the printed product. Various printing technologies have been investigated, and great progress has been made in printing various types of tissue, including vasculature, heart, bone, cartilage, skin and liver. This review introduces basic principles and key aspects of some frequently used printing technologies. We focus on recent advances in three-dimensional printing applications, current challenges and future directions. PMID:27645770

  15. Bi-maxillary advancement surgery: Technique, indications and results.

    PubMed

    Olivi, Pierre; Garcia, Claude

    2014-06-01

    Esthetic analysis of the face in some patients presenting a dental Class II can reveal the need for maxillo-mandibular advancement surgery. In these cases, mandibular advancement alone would provide a result which was satisfactory from the occlusal viewpoint but esthetically displeasing. Using bi-maxillary advancement, the impact of nasal volume is reduced and the nasolabial relationship is corrected. The sub-mandibular length is increased, thus creating a better-defined cervico-mental angle. This treatment technique involving a prior mandibular procedure has the advantage of restoring patients' dental occlusion while optimizing their facial esthetics.

  16. Fabrication of a microlens array in BK7 through laser ablation and thermal treatment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, M.; Nieto, D.; Flores-Arias, M. T.

    2015-04-01

    We propose a laser-based method for fabricating microlens on borosilicate glass substrates. The technique is composed by a laser direct-write technique using a Nd : YVO4 for fabricating the microlens arrays and a post thermal treatment with a CO2 laser for improving its morphological and optical properties. The proposed technique will allow us to obtain microlenses with a broad range of diameters (50μm-500μm) and focal lengths (1mm-5mm). By combining laser direct-write and the thermal treatment assisted by a CO2 laser, we are able to obtain good quality elements.

  17. Biomedical microfluidic devices by using low-cost fabrication techniques: A review.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Vera; Catarino, Susana O; Lima, Rui; Minas, Graça

    2016-07-26

    One of the most popular methods to fabricate biomedical microfluidic devices is by using a soft-lithography technique. However, the fabrication of the moulds to produce microfluidic devices, such as SU-8 moulds, usually requires a cleanroom environment that can be quite costly. Therefore, many efforts have been made to develop low-cost alternatives for the fabrication of microstructures, avoiding the use of cleanroom facilities. Recently, low-cost techniques without cleanroom facilities that feature aspect ratios more than 20, for fabricating those SU-8 moulds have been gaining popularity among biomedical research community. In those techniques, Ultraviolet (UV) exposure equipment, commonly used in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) industry, replaces the more expensive and less available Mask Aligner that has been used in the last 15 years for SU-8 patterning. Alternatively, non-lithographic low-cost techniques, due to their ability for large-scale production, have increased the interest of the industrial and research community to develop simple, rapid and low-cost microfluidic structures. These alternative techniques include Print and Peel methods (PAP), laserjet, solid ink, cutting plotters or micromilling, that use equipment available in almost all laboratories and offices. An example is the xurography technique that uses a cutting plotter machine and adhesive vinyl films to generate the master moulds to fabricate microfluidic channels. In this review, we present a selection of the most recent lithographic and non-lithographic low-cost techniques to fabricate microfluidic structures, focused on the features and limitations of each technique. Only microfabrication methods that do not require the use of cleanrooms are considered. Additionally, potential applications of these microfluidic devices in biomedical engineering are presented with some illustrative examples. PMID:26671220

  18. Biomedical microfluidic devices by using low-cost fabrication techniques: A review.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Vera; Catarino, Susana O; Lima, Rui; Minas, Graça

    2016-07-26

    One of the most popular methods to fabricate biomedical microfluidic devices is by using a soft-lithography technique. However, the fabrication of the moulds to produce microfluidic devices, such as SU-8 moulds, usually requires a cleanroom environment that can be quite costly. Therefore, many efforts have been made to develop low-cost alternatives for the fabrication of microstructures, avoiding the use of cleanroom facilities. Recently, low-cost techniques without cleanroom facilities that feature aspect ratios more than 20, for fabricating those SU-8 moulds have been gaining popularity among biomedical research community. In those techniques, Ultraviolet (UV) exposure equipment, commonly used in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) industry, replaces the more expensive and less available Mask Aligner that has been used in the last 15 years for SU-8 patterning. Alternatively, non-lithographic low-cost techniques, due to their ability for large-scale production, have increased the interest of the industrial and research community to develop simple, rapid and low-cost microfluidic structures. These alternative techniques include Print and Peel methods (PAP), laserjet, solid ink, cutting plotters or micromilling, that use equipment available in almost all laboratories and offices. An example is the xurography technique that uses a cutting plotter machine and adhesive vinyl films to generate the master moulds to fabricate microfluidic channels. In this review, we present a selection of the most recent lithographic and non-lithographic low-cost techniques to fabricate microfluidic structures, focused on the features and limitations of each technique. Only microfabrication methods that do not require the use of cleanrooms are considered. Additionally, potential applications of these microfluidic devices in biomedical engineering are presented with some illustrative examples.

  19. Weldability aspects in the design and fabrication of aluminium structures subjected to fatigue loads. Part 2: Weldability of aluminium alloys using advanced MIG and TIG techniques. Effect of the weld bead geometrical factors on the fatigue behavior of the welded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevasmaa, Pekka; Peltonen, Jorma; Kuitunen, Risto; Rahka, Klaus

    1993-05-01

    The project explored experimentally the weldability of high-strength aluminum alloys and suitable welding techniques. Part 2 of the report will examine welding procedures suitable for high-strength 5xxx (AlMg) and 6xxx (AlSiMg) series aluminum alloys using advanced MIG and TIG techniques and evaluate the weldability of these alloys, as well as the importance of the shape of the weld bead for fatigue strength of the welded joint.

  20. An Alternative Technique for Fabrication of Frameworks in an Immediate Loading Implant Fixed Mandibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Paleari, André Gustavo; Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Vasconcelos, Juliano Alencar; Nunes Reis, José Maurício dos Santos; Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira; Tavares da Silva, Regina Helena Barbosa; Quishida, Cristiane Campos Costa

    2015-01-01

    The oral rehabilitation of edentulous patients with immediate loading has become a safe procedure with high predictability. The success is related to immediate fabrication of a passive fit framework to attach the implants. Based on these considerations, this case report shows an alternative technique for mandibular rehabilitation using implants immediately loaded, where the framework was fabricated using cylinders with internal reinforcement and precast pieces, electrowelding, and conventional welding providing esthetics and function to the patient in a short period of time. PMID:25628899

  1. Development of low-cost test techniques for advancing film cooling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soechting, F. O.; Landis, K. K.; Dobrowolski, R.

    1987-06-01

    A program for studying advanced film hole geometries that will provide improved film effectiveness levels relative to those reported in the literature is described. A planar wind tunnel was used to conduct flow visualization studies on different film hole shapes, followed by film effectiveness measurements. The most promising geometries were then tested in a two-dimensional cascade to define the film effectiveness distributions, while duplicating a turbine airfoil curvature, Mach number, and acceleration characteristics. The test techniques are assessed and typical results are presented. It was shown that smoke flow visualization is an excellent low-cost technique for observing film coolant-to-mainstream characteristics and that reusable liquid crystal sheets provide an accurate low-cost technique for measuring near-hole film effectiveness contours. Cascade airfoils constructed using specially developed precision fabrication techniques provided high-quality film effectiveness data.

  2. Paper-based microfluidics: fabrication technique and dynamics of capillary-driven surface flow.

    PubMed

    Songok, Joel; Tuominen, Mikko; Teisala, Hannu; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki; Kuusipalo, Jurkka; Toivakka, Martti

    2014-11-26

    Paper-based devices provide an alternative technology for simple, low-cost, portable, and disposable diagnostic tools for many applications, including clinical diagnosis, food quality control, and environmental monitoring. In this study we report a two-step fabrication process for creating two-dimensional microfluidic channels to move liquids on a hydrophobized paper surface. A highly hydrophobic surface was created on paper by TiO2 nanoparticle coating using a high-speed, roll-to-roll liquid flame spray technique. The hydrophilic pattern was then generated by UV irradiation through a photomask utilizing the photocatalytic property of TiO2. The flow dynamics of five model liquids with differing surface tensions 48-72 mN·m(-1) and viscosities 1-15 mN·m(-2) was studied. The results show that the liquid front (l) in a channel advances in time (t) according to the power law l=Zt0.5 (Z is an empirical constant which depend on the liquid properties and channel dimensions). The flow dynamics of the liquids with low viscosity show a dependence on the channel width and the droplet volume, while the flow of liquids with high viscosity is mainly controlled by the viscous forces. PMID:25336235

  3. Paper-based microfluidics: fabrication technique and dynamics of capillary-driven surface flow.

    PubMed

    Songok, Joel; Tuominen, Mikko; Teisala, Hannu; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki; Kuusipalo, Jurkka; Toivakka, Martti

    2014-11-26

    Paper-based devices provide an alternative technology for simple, low-cost, portable, and disposable diagnostic tools for many applications, including clinical diagnosis, food quality control, and environmental monitoring. In this study we report a two-step fabrication process for creating two-dimensional microfluidic channels to move liquids on a hydrophobized paper surface. A highly hydrophobic surface was created on paper by TiO2 nanoparticle coating using a high-speed, roll-to-roll liquid flame spray technique. The hydrophilic pattern was then generated by UV irradiation through a photomask utilizing the photocatalytic property of TiO2. The flow dynamics of five model liquids with differing surface tensions 48-72 mN·m(-1) and viscosities 1-15 mN·m(-2) was studied. The results show that the liquid front (l) in a channel advances in time (t) according to the power law l=Zt0.5 (Z is an empirical constant which depend on the liquid properties and channel dimensions). The flow dynamics of the liquids with low viscosity show a dependence on the channel width and the droplet volume, while the flow of liquids with high viscosity is mainly controlled by the viscous forces.

  4. Anodic fabrication of advanced titania nanotubes photocatalysts for photoelectrocatalysis decolorization of Orange G dye.

    PubMed

    Juang, Yaju; Liu, Yijin; Nurhayati, Ervin; Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Huang, Chihpin; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2016-02-01

    Titania nanotubes (TNTs) were fabricated on Ti mesh substrates by the anodizing technique. The effects of preparation variables, such as anodizing voltage, time and calcination temperature on the textural characteristics and photocatalytic activity of TNTs were investigated. The surface morphology, crystalline phase, and chemical composition were analyzed using field emission-scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The photo-electrochemical properties of TNTs were examined by voltammetry. The TNTs were tested as a photoanode for advanced oxidation processes, such as photocatalytic, electrocatalytic, and photoelectrocatalytic decolorization of Orange G dye. The well-arranged TNTs electrode prepared in this work showed a high photocurrent density of 101 µA cm(-2) at an optimum length-to-diameter aspect ratio of 31.2. In dye decolorization tests, the electrochemical photocatalytic system using TNTs as the photoanode achieved total decolorization and 64% mineralization under extended reaction time. These results show that TNTs prepared by this method is greatly stable in prolonged use and suitable as a photoanode in the photocatalytic/photoelectrocatalytic treatments of dye wastewater.

  5. Advanced Marketing Core Curriculum. Test Items and Assessment Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.; And Others

    This document contains duties and tasks, multiple-choice test items, and other assessment techniques for Missouri's advanced marketing core curriculum. The core curriculum begins with a list of 13 suggested textbook resources. Next, nine duties with their associated tasks are given. Under each task appears one or more citations to appropriate…

  6. Fundamentals and advances in the development of remote welding fabrication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agapakis, J. E.; Masubuchi, K.; Von Alt, C.

    1986-01-01

    Operational and man-machine issues for welding underwater, in outer space, and at other remote sites are investigated, and recent process developments are described. Probable remote welding missions are classified, and the essential characteristics of fundamental remote welding tasks are analyzed. Various possible operational modes for remote welding fabrication are identified, and appropriate roles for humans and machines are suggested. Human operator performance in remote welding fabrication tasks is discussed, and recent advances in the development of remote welding systems are described, including packaged welding systems, stud welding systems, remotely operated welding systems, and vision-aided remote robotic welding and autonomous welding systems.

  7. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria.

  8. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria. PMID:27300591

  9. Fabrication and nondestructive examination development for advanced components and materials for the SP-100 space reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Peter J.; Dobrzynski, Walter J.

    1993-01-01

    Significant progress has now been made in the development of fabrication and Nondestructive Examination techniques for the SP-100 Space Reactor. All major fabrication challenges have been faced and overcome. Methods are in place for the fabrication and inspection of composite fuel cladding, the reactor honeycomb core, cold forging of the core support nozzle course, and electron beam welding of the auxiliary cooling loop system. Specifications and procedures have been developed and proven on actual hardware for electron beam welding, gas tungsten arc welding, heat treatment, solvent cleaning, chemical cleaning, ultrasonic inspection, helium leak testing, dye penetrant and microfocus rod anode radiography. Signicant work remains to be done but no problems have been identified which would prevent fabrication of the high temperature SP-100 Space Reactor.

  10. Innovative sputtering techniques for CIS and CdTe submodule fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.M.; Misra, M.S.; Lanning, B. . Astronautics Group)

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work done during Phase 1 of the subject subcontract. The subcontract was designed to study innovative deposition techniques, such as the rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering system and electrodeposition for large-area, low-cost copper indium diselenide (CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) devices. A key issue for photovoltaics (PV) in terrestrial and future space applications is producibility, particularly for applications using a large quantity of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV, such as CIS and CdTe, are production volume, cost, and minimization of waste. Both rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag[trademark]) sputtering and electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials, and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mae facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput reduced health and safety risks, and, ultimately, lower fabrication cost. Electrodeposited films appear to be adherent and comparable with low-cost fabrication techniques. Phase I involved the initial film and device fabrication using the two techniques mentioned herein. Devices were tested by both internal facilities, as well as NREL and ISET.

  11. Innovative sputtering techniques for CIS and CdTe submodule fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. M.; Misra, M. S.; Lanning, B.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work done during Phase 1 of the subject subcontract. The subcontract was designed to study innovative deposition techniques, such as the rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering system and electrodeposition for large-area, low-cost copper indium diselenide (CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) devices. A key issue for photovoltaics (PV) in terrestrial and future space applications is producibility, particularly for applications using a large quantity of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV, such as CIS and CdTe, are production volume, cost, and minimization of waste. Both rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag(trademark)) sputtering and electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials, and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mag facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput reduced health and safety risks, and, ultimately, lower fabrication cost. Electrodeposited films appear to be adherent and comparable with low-cost fabrication techniques. Phase 1 involved the initial film and device fabrication using the two techniques mentioned herein. Devices were tested by both internal facilities, as well as NREL and ISET.

  12. High frequency PMN-PT single crystal focusing transducer fabricated by a mechanical dimpling technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Lam, K H; Zhou, D; Cheng, W F; Dai, J Y; Luo, H S; Chan, H L W

    2013-02-01

    High frequency (∼30MHz and ∼80MHz) focusing ultrasound transducers were fabricated using a PMN-0.28PT single crystal by a mechanical dimpling technique. The dimpled single crystal was used as an active element for the focusing transducer. Compared with a plane transducer, the focusing transducer fabricated with a dimpled active element exhibits much broader bandwidth and higher sensitivity. Besides, a high quality image can be obtained by the 30MHz focusing transducer, in which the -6dB axial and lateral resolution is 27μm and 139μm, respectively. These results prove that the dimpling technique is capable to fabricate the high frequency focusing transducers with excellent performance for imaging applications. PMID:22944074

  13. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  14. A new fabrication technique for back-to-back varactor diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. Peter; Choudhury, Debabani; Martin, Suzanne; Frerking, Margaret A.; Liu, John K.; Grunthaner, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    A new varactor diode process has been developed in which much of the processing is done from the back of an extremely thin semiconductor wafer laminated to a low-dielectric substrate. Back-to-back BNN diodes were fabricated with this technique; excellent DC and low-frequency capacitance measurements were obtained. Advantages of the new technique relative to other techniques include greatly reduced frontside wafer damage from exposure to process chemicals, improved capability to integrate devices (e.g. for antenna patterns, transmission lines, or wafer-scale grids), and higher line yield. BNN diodes fabricated with this technique exhibit approximately the expected capacitance-voltage characteristics while showing leakage currents under 10 mA at voltages three times that needed to deplete the varactor. This leakage is many orders of magnitude better than comparable Schottky diodes.

  15. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  16. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-06-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis.

  17. An Advanced Time Averaging Modelling Technique for Power Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuloski, Goce

    For stable and efficient performance of power converters, a good mathematical model is needed. This thesis presents a new modelling technique for DC/DC and DC/AC Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) converters. The new model is more accurate than the existing modelling techniques such as State Space Averaging (SSA) and Discrete Time Modelling. Unlike the SSA model, the new modelling technique, the Advanced Time Averaging Model (ATAM) includes the averaging dynamics of the converter's output. In addition to offering enhanced model accuracy, application of linearization techniques to the ATAM enables the use of conventional linear control design tools. A controller design application demonstrates that a controller designed based on the ATAM outperforms one designed using the ubiquitous SSA model. Unlike the SSA model, ATAM for DC/AC augments the system's dynamics with the dynamics needed for subcycle fundamental contribution (SFC) calculation. This allows for controller design that is based on an exact model.

  18. Advanced Morphological and Functional Magnetic Resonance Techniques in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Agnifili, Luca; Mattei, Peter A.; Caulo, Massimo; Fasanella, Vincenzo; Navarra, Riccardo; Mastropasqua, Leonardo; Marchini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease that is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Recent data documented that glaucoma is not limited to the retinal ganglion cells but that it also extends to the posterior visual pathway. The diagnosis is based on the presence of signs of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and consistent functional visual field alterations. Unfortunately these functional alterations often become evident when a significant amount of the nerve fibers that compose the optic nerve has been irreversibly lost. Advanced morphological and functional magnetic resonance (MR) techniques (morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, arterial spin labeling, and functional connectivity) may provide a means for observing modifications induced by this fiber loss, within the optic nerve and the visual cortex, in an earlier stage. The aim of this systematic review was to determine if the use of these advanced MR techniques could offer the possibility of diagnosing glaucoma at an earlier stage than that currently possible. PMID:26167474

  19. Application of Optical Measurement Techniques During Fabrication and Testing of Liquid Rocket Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a series of optical measurement techniques that were developed for use during large-scale fabrication and testing of nozzle components. A thorough understanding of hardware throughout the fabrication cycle and hotfire testing is critical to meet component design intent. Regeneratively cooled nozzles and associated tooling require tight control of tolerances during the fabrication process to ensure optimal performance. Additionally, changes in geometry during testing can affect performance of the nozzle and mating components. Structured light scanning and digital image correlation techniques were used to collect data during the fabrication and test of nozzles, in addition to other engine components. This data was used to analyze deformations data during machining, heat treatment, assembly and testing operations. A series of feasibility experiments were conducted for these techniques that led to use on full scale nozzles during the J-2X upper stage engine program in addition to other engine development programs. This paper discusses the methods and results of these measurement techniques throughout the nozzle life cycle and application to other components.

  20. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recent advances in the fabrication and adhesion testing of biomimetic dry adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameoto, D.; Menon, C.

    2010-10-01

    In the past two years, there have been a large number of publications on the topic of biomimetic dry adhesives from modeling, fabrication and testing perspectives. We review and compare the most recent advances in fabrication and testing of these materials. While there is increased convergence and consensus as to what makes a good dry adhesive, the fabrication of these materials is still challenging, particularly for anisotropic or hierarchal designs. Although qualitative comparisons between different adhesive designs can be made, quantifying the exact performance and rating each design is significantly hampered by the lack of standardized testing methods. Manufacturing dry adhesives, which can reliably adhere to rough surfaces, show directional and self-cleaning behavior and are relatively simple to manufacture, is still very challenging—great strides by multiple research groups have however made these goals appear achievable within the next few years.

  2. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    SciTech Connect

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.; Strum, G.

    2012-08-15

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  3. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method.

    PubMed

    Hurvitz, G; Ehrlich, Y; Strum, G; Shpilman, Z; Levy, I; Fraenkel, M

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  4. Phase-shifted distributed feedback laser with linearly chirped grating fabricated by reconstruction equivalent chirp technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianyan; Lu, Linlin; Li, Simin; Guo, Renjia; Shi, Yuechun; Chen, Xiangfei

    2014-09-01

    The phase-shifted distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor laser with linearly chirped grating based on reconstruction equivalent chirp (REC) technique is theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The asymmetric property of the lasing spectrum is analyzed according to the normalized threshold gain, and the different spectra from each facet of the laser are compared. Due to the low cost and fabrication flexibility, REC technique provides a promising way for the future practical applications of DFB lasers with chirped gratings.

  5. Three-dimensional hybrid grid generation using advancing front techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Noack, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional hybrid grid generation technique has been developed, based on ideas of advancing fronts for both structured and unstructured grids. In this approach, structured grids are first generate independently around individual components of the geometry. Fronts are initialized on these structure grids, and advanced outward so that new cells are extracted directly from the structured grids. Employing typical advancing front techniques, cells are rejected if they intersect the existing front or fail other criteria When no more viable structured cells exist further cells are advanced in an unstructured manner to close off the overall domain, resulting in a grid of 'hybrid' form. There are two primary advantages to the hybrid formulation. First, generating blocks with limited regard to topology eliminates the bottleneck encountered when a multiple block system is used to fully encapsulate a domain. Individual blocks may be generated free of external constraints, which will significantly reduce the generation time. Secondly, grid points near the body (presumably with high aspect ratio) will still maintain a structured (non-triangular or tetrahedral) character, thereby maximizing grid quality and solution accuracy near the surface.

  6. Development of processing techniques for advanced thermal protection materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.

    1994-01-01

    The effort, which was focused on the research and development of advanced materials for use in Thermal Protection Systems (TPS), has involved chemical and physical testing of refractory ceramic tiles, fabrics, threads and fibers. This testing has included determination of the optical properties, thermal shock resistance, high temperature dimensional stability, and tolerance to environmental stresses. Materials have also been tested in the Arc Jet 2 x 9 Turbulent Duct Facility (TDF), the 1 atmosphere Radiant Heat Cycler, and the Mini-Wind Tunnel Facility (MWTF). A significant part of the effort hitherto has gone towards modifying and upgrading the test facilities so that meaningful tests can be carried out. Another important effort during this period has been the creation of a materials database. Computer systems administration and support have also been provided. These are described in greater detail below.

  7. Recent advances in high-temperature superconductor wire fabrication and applications development

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1992-08-01

    In this paper, recent advances in fabrication of HTS wires are summarized, and detailed discussion is provided for developments in near- and intermediate-term applications. Near-term applications, using presently obtainable current densities, include: liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, cryostat current leads, and magnetic bearings. Intermediate-term applications, using current densities expected to be available in the near future include fault-current limiters and short transmission lines. 25 refs.

  8. Recent advances in high-temperature superconductor wire fabrication and applications development

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, recent advances in fabrication of HTS wires are summarized, and detailed discussion is provided for developments in near- and intermediate-term applications. Near-term applications, using presently obtainable current densities, include: liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, cryostat current leads, and magnetic bearings. Intermediate-term applications, using current densities expected to be available in the near future include fault-current limiters and short transmission lines. 25 refs.

  9. Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol-gel and rf-sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Alombert-Goget, G.; Armellini, C.; Berneschi, S.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Boulard, B.; Brenci, M.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Duverger-Arfuso, C.; Féron, P.; Gonçalves, R. R.; Jestin, Y.; Minati, L.; Moser, E.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Rao, D. N.; Retoux, R.; Righini, G. C.; Speranza, G.

    2009-05-01

    The realization of photonic structures operating at visible and near infrared frequencies is a highly attractive scientific and technological challenge. Since optical fiber innovation, a huge of activity has been performed leading to interesting results, such as optical waveguides and planar lightwave circuits, microphotonic devices, optical microcavities, nanowires, plasmonic structures, and photonic crystals. These systems have opened new possibilities in the field of both basic and applied physics, in a large area covering Information Communication Technologies, Health and Biology, Structural Engineering, and Environment Monitoring Systems. Several materials and techniques are employed to successfully fabricate photonic structures. Concerning materials, Er3+-activated silica-based glasses still play an important role, although recently interesting results have been published about fluoride glass-ceramic waveguides. As far as regards the fabrication methods sol-gel route and rf sputtering have proved to be versatile and reliable techniques. In this article we will present a review of some Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol gel route and rf sputtering deposition. In the discussion on the sol-gel approach we focus our attention on the silica-hafnia binary system presenting an overview concerning fabrication protocols and structural, optical and spectroscopic assessment of SiO2-HfO2 waveguides activated by Er3+ ions. In order to put in evidence the reliability and versatility of the sol-gel route for photonics applications four different confined structures are briefly presented: amorphous waveguides, coated microspheres, monolithic waveguide laser, and core-shell nanospheres. As examples of rf sputtering technique, we will discuss Er3+-activated silica-hafnia and silica-germania waveguides, the latter system allowing fabrication of integrated optics structures by UV photo-imprinting. Finally, two examples of photonic crystal structures, one

  10. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  11. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  12. Fabrication of enzyme-degradable and size-controlled protein nanowires using single particle nano-fabrication technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omichi, Masaaki; Asano, Atsushi; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Takano, Katsuyoshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Saeki, Akinori; Sakamaki, Daisuke; Onoda, Akira; Hayashi, Takashi; Seki, Shu

    2014-04-01

    Protein nanowires exhibiting specific biological activities hold promise for interacting with living cells and controlling and predicting biological responses such as apoptosis, endocytosis and cell adhesion. Here we report the result of the interaction of a single high-energy charged particle with protein molecules, giving size-controlled protein nanowires with an ultra-high aspect ratio of over 1,000. Degradation of the human serum albumin nanowires was examined using trypsin. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires bound avidin, demonstrating the high affinity of the nanowires. Human serum albumin-avidin hybrid nanowires were also fabricated from a solid state mixture and exhibited good mechanical strength in phosphate-buffered saline. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires can be transformed into nanowires exhibiting a biological function such as avidin-biotinyl interactions and peroxidase activity. The present technique is a versatile platform for functionalizing the surface of any protein molecule with an extremely large surface area.

  13. Fabrication of enzyme-degradable and size-controlled protein nanowires using single particle nano-fabrication technique.

    PubMed

    Omichi, Masaaki; Asano, Atsushi; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Takano, Katsuyoshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Saeki, Akinori; Sakamaki, Daisuke; Onoda, Akira; Hayashi, Takashi; Seki, Shu

    2014-04-28

    Protein nanowires exhibiting specific biological activities hold promise for interacting with living cells and controlling and predicting biological responses such as apoptosis, endocytosis and cell adhesion. Here we report the result of the interaction of a single high-energy charged particle with protein molecules, giving size-controlled protein nanowires with an ultra-high aspect ratio of over 1,000. Degradation of the human serum albumin nanowires was examined using trypsin. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires bound avidin, demonstrating the high affinity of the nanowires. Human serum albumin-avidin hybrid nanowires were also fabricated from a solid state mixture and exhibited good mechanical strength in phosphate-buffered saline. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires can be transformed into nanowires exhibiting a biological function such as avidin-biotinyl interactions and peroxidase activity. The present technique is a versatile platform for functionalizing the surface of any protein molecule with an extremely large surface area.

  14. High T(sub c) superconductors fabricated by plasma aerosol mist deposition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. W.; Vuong, K. D.; Leone, A.; Shen, C. Q.; Williams, J.; Coy, M.

    1995-01-01

    We report new results on high T(sub c) superconductors fabricated by a plasma aerosol mist deposition technique, in atmospheric environment. Materials fabricated are YBaCuO, BiPbSrCaCuO, BaCaCuO precursor films for TlBaCaCuO, and other buffers such as YSZ. Depending on processing conditions, sizes of crystallites and/or particles are between dozens of nano-meters and several micrometers. Superconductive properties and other material characteristics can also be tailored.

  15. Instantly AgNPs deposition through facile solventless technique for poly-functional cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Emam, Hossam E; Saleh, N H; Nagy, Khaled S; Zahran, M K

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, functional clothes are employed for human body protection in addition to be fashionable clothes. Hence functionalization of clothes increases the attention of scientists and business. In the current study, poly-functional cotton fabric was carried out by instantly deposition of AgNPs using two solventless techniques namely; sorption and padding. Sorption technique was exhibited extremely high efficiency than padding one by ca. 10 times. By using the same concentrations of AgNO3, Ag content was ranged 69.3-6094.8 mg/kg and 33.8-609.3 mg/kg for sorption and padding, respectively. After AgNPs deposition, fabrics color was turned to gray-reddish yellow. By applying 5912.3 mgAg/kg fabric, bacterial reduction and UPF value were reached 99% and 12.59. Bacterial reduction and UPF were lessened to 90% and 10.19 after 20 washings. These findings proved that the direct AgNPs deposition into cotton using solventless/sorption technique is applicable in manufacturing of antibacterial/UV resistant fabrics with acquired decorative color. PMID:26708429

  16. A net-shape fabrication process of alumina micro-components using a soft lithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhigang; Wei, Xueyong; Jiang, Kyle

    2007-02-01

    Microceramic components have outstanding properties, such as high temperature resistant, biocompatible, chemically stable and high hardness properties, and could be used in a wide range of applications. However, the fabrication of precision micro-components has long been a barrier and limited their applications. This paper presents a soft lithography technique to fabricate near net-shape alumina micro-components. The process uses elastomer polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) to replace traditional solid moulds and leaves the green patterns intact after demoulding. The whole soft lithography technique involves the following steps: (i) fabricating high aspect ratio SU-8 moulds using UV photolithography, (ii) producing PDMS soft moulds from SU-8 masters, (iii) making aqueous high solids loading alumina suspension, (iv) filling patterned PDMS mould with the aqueous alumina suspension and (v) demoulding and sintering. The rheological properties (zeta potential and viscosity) of aqueous alumina suspensions have been characterized in relation to the varying pH values and concentration of dispersant (D-3005). The optimal parameters of alumina suspension for mould filling have been achieved at a pH value = 11; concentration of dispersant = 0.05 g ml-1; amount of binder = 0.75%; highest solid loading = 70 wt%. After pressurized mould filling, complete, dense and free-standing micro-components have been achieved by using a 70 wt% alumina suspension and an optimum fabrication technique, while the overall linear shrinkage is found to be about 22%.

  17. The origins of bioethics: advances in resuscitations techniques.

    PubMed

    Niebroj, L

    2008-12-01

    During the last years there has been an increasing interest in meta-bioethical issues. This turn in the research focus is regarded as a sign of the maturation of bioethics as a distinct area of an academic inquiry. The role of historic-philosophical reflection is often emphasized. It should be noted that there is a rather common agreement that the future of bioethics lies in the critical reflection on its past, in particular, on the very origins of this discipline. Sharing Caplan's opinion, advances in medicine technologies, especially the introduction of respirators and artificial heart machines, is considered as one of the main issues that started bioethics. Using methods of historical as well as meta-ethical research, this article aims at describing the role of advances in resuscitation techniques in the emergence of bioethics and at exploring how bioethical reflection has been shaped by technological developments. A brief historical analysis permits to say that there is a close bond between the emergence of bioethics and the introduction of sophisticated resuscitation technologies into medical practice. The meta-ethical reflection reveals that advances in resuscitation techniques not only initiated bioethics in the second half of the 20(th) century but influenced its evolution by (i) posing a question of justice in health care, (ii) altering commonly accepted ontological notions of human corporeality, and (iii) reconsidering the very purpose of medicine.

  18. Indications and general techniques for lasers in advanced operative laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, J H

    1991-09-01

    Lasers are but one of the several energy delivery systems used by the operative laparoscopist in the performance of advanced operative laparoscopy. Safety is a key factor in the selection of a laser because the tissue damage produced by this instrument is absolutely predictable. The surgeon must be totally familiar with the chosen wavelength and its tissue reaction if this safety factor is to be realized. Other instruments complement the use of lasers in advanced operative laparoscopy, and without thorough knowledge of all available techniques and instruments, the operative laparoscopist will not achieve the full potential of this specialty. It is beyond the scope of this issue on gynecologic laser surgery to present all of the useful nonlaser techniques. Suffice it to say that we often use laser, loop ligature, sutures, hemoclips, bipolar electricity, hydrodissection, and endocoagulation during the course of a day in the operating room and sometimes during one case. As enthusiasm for advanced operative laparoscopy grows and endoscopic capability increases, more complicated and prolonged surgical feats are reported. Radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy have been performed by the laparoscopic route, and endoscopic management of ovarian tumors also has been reported. At this moment, these must be viewed as "show and tell" procedures unsupported by statistics to demonstrate any advantage (or disadvantage) when compared with conventional surgical methods. The time required of advanced operative laparoscopy for any given procedure is certainly an important factor. Prolonged operative and anesthesia time certainly can negate the supposed benefit of small incisions and minimally invasive surgery. What goes on inside the abdomen is certainly the most important part of advanced operative laparoscopy. Good surgeons must recognize their own limitations and the limitations of available technology. The operative laparoscopist must know when to quit and institute a

  19. Hollow polymer microneedle array fabricated by photolithography process combined with micromolding technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Po-Chun; Wester, Brock A; Rajaraman, Swaminathan; Paik, Seung-Joon; Kim, Seong-Hyok; Allen, Mark G

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery through microneedles is a minimally invasive procedure causing little or no pain, and is a potentially attractive alternative to intramuscular and subdermal drug delivery methods. This paper demonstrates the fabrication of a hollow microneedle array using a polymer-based process combining UV photolithography and replica molding techniques. The key characteristic of the proposed fabrication process is to define a hollow lumen for microfluidic access via photopatterning, allowing a batch process as well as high throughput. A hollow SU-8 microneedle array, consisting of 825mum tall and 400 mum wide microneedles with 15-25 mum tip diameters and 120 mum diameter hollow lumens was designed, fabricated and characterized. PMID:19964192

  20. Application of Anisotropic Conductive Film to Fabrication of Molybdenum Field Emitter Arrays Using Transfer Mold Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eou Sik; Ahn, Min Hyung; Kwon, Sang Jik

    2008-08-01

    In the fabrication of molybdenum field emitter arrays (Mo FEA) by the transfer mold technique, anisotropic conductive film (ACF) was applied to the bond between the inverted mold structure and the transferred glass substrate. Without any electrical treatment of electrostatic bonding, the inverted mold was successfully bonded to an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate under optimized thermal and pressure conditions. No additional conductive layers were used in the bonding process, and the bonded ACF was not chemically affected in the wet-etch process of the silicon inverted mold structure. The fabricated Mo FEA was structurally and electrically investigated and an anode current of 10 nA per emitter was obtained at a gate bias of 94 V. The results demonstrate the possibility of selective conduction in the fabrication of transfer mold FEA using ACF bonding.

  1. Characterization of CdTe Nanoparticles Fabricated by Pulsed Electron Deposition Technique at Different Ablation Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, E.; Aga, R. Jr.; Steigerwald, A.; Ueda, A.; Pan, Z.; Collins, W. E.; Mu, R.

    2008-03-13

    Telluride (CdTe) is a front-runner photovoltaic (PV) material because it has already attained efficiencies above 16%. The fabrication of CdTe nanoparticles has aroused considerable interest because of their potential application as active layer in organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells. They can also be used for sensitisation of wide band gap semiconductors. In this work, we explore pulsed electron beam deposition (PED) technique to fabricate CdTe nanoparticles. Two ablation parameters, namely background gas pressure and electron energy were varied to investigate their effects on the nanoparticle formation. AFM and optical transmission measurements indicate that we have fabricated CdTe nanocrystalline films exhibiting quantum confinement effect. These films contain scattered nanoparticles with diameters varying from 40 nm to 500 nm, which contribute to the optical absorption near the bulk bandgap energy. However, increasing the background pressure to 19 mTorr improves the nanocrystalline film uniformity.

  2. Advanced aeroservoelastic stabilization techniques for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Samuel Y.; Cheng, Peter Y.; Myers, Thomas T.; Klyde, David H.; Magdaleno, Raymond E.; Mcruer, Duane T.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced high performance vehicles, including Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) hypersonic flight vehicles, that are statically unstable, require higher bandwidth flight control systems to compensate for the instability resulting in interactions between the flight control system, the engine/propulsion dynamics, and the low frequency structural modes. Military specifications, such as MIL-F-9490D and MIL-F-87242, tend to limit treatment of structural modes to conventional gain stabilization techniques. The conventional gain stabilization techniques, however, introduce low frequency effective time delays which can be troublesome from a flying qualities standpoint. These time delays can be alleviated by appropriate blending of gain and phase stabilization techniques (referred to as Hybrid Phase Stabilization or HPS) for the low frequency structural modes. The potential of using HPS for compensating structural mode interaction was previously explored. It was shown that effective time delay was significantly reduced with the use of HPS; however, the HPS design was seen to have greater residual response than a conventional gain stablized design. Additional work performed to advance and refine the HPS design procedure, to further develop residual response metrics as a basis for alternative structural stability specifications, and to develop strategies for validating HPS design and specification concepts in manned simulation is presented. Stabilization design sensitivity to structural uncertainties and aircraft-centered requirements are also assessed.

  3. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  4. Computational Electromagnetic Modeling of Optical Responses in Plasmonically Enhanced Nanoscale Devices Fabricated with Nanomasking Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Eric; Debu, Desalegn; Saylor, Cameron; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    This work computationally explores plasmonic nanoscale devices fabricated with a recently developed nanomasking technique that is based on the self-aligned process. Computational electromagnetic modeling has determined enhancement factors and the plasmonic and optical properties of these structures. The nanomasking technique is a new process that is employed to overcome the resolution limits of traditional electron beam lithography and can also be used to increase resolution in photolithography fabrication as well. This technique can consistently produce accurate features with nanostructures and gaps smaller than 10 nm. These smaller dimensions can allow for increased and more localized plasmonically enhanced electric fields. These unique metal devices encompass tunable, enhanced plasmonic and optical properties that can be useful in a wide range of applications. Finite element methods are used to approximate the electromagnetic responses, giving the ability to alter the designs and dimensions in order to optimize the enhancement. Ultimately, we will fabricate devices and characterize the plasmonic properties with optical techniques, including dark-field spectroscopy, to confirm the properties with the goal of generating more efficient devices.

  5. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints is reported. The program consists of two concurrent tasks: (1) design and test of specific built up attachments; and (2) evaluation of standard advanced bonded joint concepts. A data base for the design and analysis of advanced composite joints for use at elevated temperatures (561K (550 deg F)) to design concepts for specific joining applications, and the fundamental parameters controlling the static strength characteristics of such joints are evaluated. Data for design and build GR/PI of lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Results for compression and interlaminar shear strengths of Celion 6000/PMR-15 laminates are given. Static discriminator test results for type 3 and type 4 bonded and bolted joints and final joint designs for TASK 1.4 scale up fabrication and testing are presented.

  6. An Advanced Electrospinning Method of Fabricating Nanofibrous Patterned Architectures with Controlled Deposition and Desired Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasel, Sheikh Md

    We introduce a versatile advanced method of electrospinning for fabricating various kinds of nanofibrous patterns along with desired alignment, controlled amount of deposition and locally variable density into the architectures. In this method, we employed multiple electrodes whose potentials have been altered in milliseconds with the help of microprocessor based control system. Therefore, key success of this method was that the electrical field as well as charge carrying fibers could be switched shortly from one electrode's location to another, as a result, electrospun fibers could be deposited on the designated areas with desired alignment. A wide range of nanofibrous patterned architectures were constructed using proper arrangement of multiple electrodes. By controlling the concurrent activation time of two adjacent electrodes, we demonstrated that amount of fibers going into the pattern can be adjusted and desired alignment in electrospun fibers can be obtained. We also revealed that the deposition density of electrospun fibers in different areas of patterned architectures can be varied. We showed that by controlling the deposition time between two adjacent electrodes, a number of functionally graded patterns can be generated with uniaxial alignment. We also demonstrated that this handy method was capable of producing random, aligned, and multidirectional nanofibrous mats by engaging a number of electrodes and switching them in desired patterns. A comprehensive study using finite element method was carried out to understand the effects of electrical field. Simulation results revealed that electrical field strength alters shortly based on electrode control switch patterns. Nanofibrous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds and its composite reinforced with wollastonite and wood flour were fabricated using rotating drum electrospinning technique. Morphological, mechanical, and thermal, properties were characterized on PVA/wollastonite and PVA/wood flour nanocomposites

  7. Silicon and germanium crystallization techniques for advanced device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaocheng

    Three-dimensional architectures are believed to be one of the possible approaches to reduce interconnect delay in integrated circuits. Metal-induced crystallization (MIC) can produce reasonably high-quality Si crystals with low-temperature processing, enabling the monolithic integration of multilevel devices and circuits. A two-step MIC process was developed to make single-crystal Si pillars on insulator by forming a single-grain NiSi2 template in the first step and crystallizing the amorphous Si by NiSi2-mediated solid-phase epitaxy (SPE) in the second step. A transmission electron microscopy study clearly showed the quality improvement over the traditional MIC process. Another crystallization technique developed is rapid melt growth (RMG) for the fabrication of Ge crystals and Ge-on-insulator (GeOI) substrates. Ge is an important semiconductor with high carrier mobility and excellent optoelectronic properties. GeOI substrates are particularly desired to achieve high device performances and to solve the process problems traditionally associated with bulk Ge wafers. High-quality Ge crystals and GeOI structures were grown on Si substrates using the novel rapid melt growth technique that integrates the key elements in Czochralski growth---seeding, melting, epitaxy and defect necking. Growth velocity and nucleation rate were calculated to determine the RMG process window. Self-aligned microcrucibles were created to hold the Ge liquid during the RMG annealing. Material characterization showed a very low defect density in the RMG GeOI structures. The Ge films are relaxed, with their orientations controlled by the Si substrates. P-channel MOSFETs and p-i-n photodetectors were fabricated with the GeOI substrates. The device properties are comparable to those obtained with bulk Ge wafers, indicating that the RMG GeOI substrates are well suited for device fabrication. A new theory, growth-induced barrier lowering (GIBL), is proposed to understand the defect generation in

  8. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  9. Fabrication of Porous Copper with Directional Pores by Continuous Casting Technique Through Thermal Decomposition of Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Takuya; Tsunemi, Akihiro; Nakajima, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Lotus-type porous copper with aligned long cylindrical pores was fabricated by continuous casting technique through thermal decomposition method (TDM) in an argon atmosphere of 0.1 MPa. A pellet of titanium hydride was supplied into molten copper with adjusting the time interval to maintain the constant concentration of hydrogen to be dissolved in the melt, when the transfer velocity of the unidirectional solidification is changed. Long lotus-type porous copper slabs were fabricated with constant solidification velocity. The effect of the transfer velocity on the porosity and pore size was investigated. The average pore diameter was independent of the transfer velocity, but the porosity is slightly dependent on the velocity. It is apparent that the continuous casting technique can be applicable for production of lotus metals through TDM.

  10. Recent advances in UHV techniques for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Rao

    1995-01-01

    The ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) requirements for storage rings and accelerators, and the development of the science and technology of UHV for particle accelerators and magnetic fusion devices have been recently reviewed by N.B. Mistry and H.F. Dylla respectively. In this paper, the latest developments in the advancement of UHV techniques for the vacuum integrity of Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and for successfully dealing with the synchrotron radiation related beam line vacuum problem encountered in the design of the SSC are reviewed: the review includes developments in extreme sensitivity He leak detection technique based on the dynamic adsorption and desorption of He, operation of ionization gauges at Lhe temperatures, metal sponges for the effective cryopumping of H{sup 2} and He to pressures better than 10{sup -14} torr, and low cost and high He sensitivity RGA's. The details of a new extreme sensitivity He leak detector system are also discussed here.

  11. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  12. A modified technique for fabricating a mirror image wax pattern for an auricular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Gajdhar, Shaiq; Gajdhar, Sajda Khan; Salakalakonda, Srikanth Reddy; Vasthare, Abubakkar

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a technique for fabricating a wax pattern for an auricular prosthesis by tracing the shape of a sliced cast of the contralateral ear at an interval of 1-mm and transferring the shape of each 1-mm slice to a similar dimension modeling wax sheet. In this way, slices of modeling wax are obtained, which can be reversed and placed over the previous slice to produce a mirror image wax pattern of the contralateral ear. PMID:25277032

  13. Design and fabrication of brazed Rene 41 honeycomb sandwich structural panels for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Swegle, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The design and fabrication of two large brazed Rene 41 honeycomb panels, the establishment of a test plan, the design and fabrication of a test fixture to subject the panels to cyclic thermal gradients and mechanical loads equivalent to those imposed on an advanced space transportation vehicle during its boost and entry trajectories are discussed. The panels will be supported at four points, creating three spans. The outer spans are 45.7 cm (18 in.) and the center span 76.2 cm (30 in). Specimen width is 30.5 cm (12 in.). The panels were primarily designed by boost conditions simulated by subjecting the panels to liquid nitrogen, 77K (-320 F) on one side and 455K (360 F) on the other side and by mechanically imposing loads representing vehicle fuel pressure loads. Entry conditions were simulated by radiant heating to 1034K (1400 F). The test program subjected the panels to 500 boost thermal conditions. Results are presented.

  14. Advanced ACTPol Multichroic Polarimeter Array Fabrication Process for 150 mm Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, S. M.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Datta, R.; Gallardo, P. A.; Henderson, S. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Nati, F.; Niemack, M. D.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schmitt, B. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is a third-generation cosmic microwave background receiver to be deployed in 2016 on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). Spanning five frequency bands from 25 to 280 GHz and having just over 5600 transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers, this receiver will exhibit increased sensitivity and mapping speed compared to previously fielded ACT instruments. This paper presents the fabrication processes developed by NIST to scale to large arrays of feedhorn-coupled multichroic AlMn-based TES polarimeters on 150-mm diameter wafers. In addition to describing the streamlined fabrication process which enables high yields of densely packed detectors across larger wafers, we report the details of process improvements for sensor (AlMn) and insulator (SiN_x) materials and microwave structures, and the resulting performance improvements.

  15. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  16. Advanced bronchoscopic techniques in diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Bojan; Stojsic, Vladimir; Sarcev, Tatjana; Stojanovic, Goran; Carapic, Vladimir; Perin, Branislav; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Kesisis, Georgios; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-09-01

    The role of advanced brochoscopic diagnostic techniques in detection and staging of lung cancer has steeply increased in recent years. Bronchoscopic imaging techniques became widely available and easy to use. Technical improvement led to merging in technologies making autofluorescence or narrow band imaging incorporated into one bronchoscope. New tools, such as autofluorescence imagining (AFI), narrow band imaging (NBI) or fuji intelligent chromo endoscopy (FICE), found their place in respiratory endoscopy suites. Development of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) improved minimally invasive mediastinal staging and diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions. Linear EBUS proven to be complementary to mediastinoscopy. This technique is now available in almost all high volume centers performing bronchoscopy. Radial EBUS with mini-probes and guiding sheaths provides accurate diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions. Combining EBUS guided procedures with rapid on site cytology (ROSE) increases diagnostic yield even more. Electromagnetic navigation technology (EMN) is also widely used for diagnosis of peripheral lesions. Future development will certainly lead to new improvements in technology and creation of new sophisticated tools for research in respiratory endoscopy. Broncho-microscopy, alveoloscopy, optical coherence tomography are some of the new research techniques emerging for rapid technological development.

  17. Analytical and experimental evaluation of techniques for the fabrication of thermoplastic hologram storage devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on recording information on thermoplastic are given. A description was given of a typical fabrication configuration, the recording sequence, and the samples which were examined. There are basically three configurations which can be used for the recording of information on thermoplastic. The most popular technique uses corona which furnishes free charge. The necessary energy for deformation is derived from a charge layer atop the thermoplastic. The other two techniques simply use a dc potential in place of the corona for deformation energy.

  18. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  19. Fabrication of a flat V3+/Fe3+ redox microbattery from gold compact disk using drilling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantezadeh, Mehri; Rashid-Nadimi, Sahar

    2016-02-01

    Here a simple design which could be developed for flat redox microbattery array with tunable output power is introduced. The fabrication of a V3+/Fe3+ redox microbattery using the gold compact disk (CD) as the electrode material and employing drilling technique to fabricate band electrodes is reported. The as-fabricated V3+/Fe3+ redox microbattery shows very attractive performance such as rechargeability, very high power and current density, low cost and simplicity of fabrication. Also microbattery arrays could be stacked very easily to achieve proper voltage, current and output power. Polarization and power curves and charge-discharge cycles are obtained to characterize as-fabricated microbatteries.

  20. Fabrication and assembly of a superconducting undulator for the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Hasse, Quentin; Fuerst, J. D.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Doose, C.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Skiadopoulos, D.

    2014-01-29

    A prototype superconducting undulator magnet (SCU0) has been built at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and has successfully completed both cryogenic performance and magnetic measurement test programs. The SCU0 closed loop, zero-boil-off cryogenic system incorporates high temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads, cryocoolers, a LHe reservoir supplying dual magnetic cores, and an integrated cooled beam chamber. This system presented numerous challenges in the design, fabrication, and assembly of the device. Aspects of this R and D relating to both the cryogenic and overall assembly of the device are presented here. The SCU0 magnet has been installed in the APS storage ring.

  1. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now.

  2. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now. PMID:27095912

  3. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now. PMID:27095912

  4. Communication methods and production techniques in fixed prosthesis fabrication: a UK based survey. Part 2: Production techniques

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J.; Nesbit, M.; Saberi, S.; Petridis, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to identify the communication methods and production techniques used by dentists and dental technicians for the fabrication of fixed prostheses within the UK from the dental technicians' perspective. This second paper reports on the production techniques utilised. Materials and methods Seven hundred and eighty-two online questionnaires were distributed to the Dental Laboratories Association membership and included a broad range of topics, such as demographics, impression disinfection and suitability, and various production techniques. Settings were managed in order to ensure anonymity of respondents. Statistical analysis was undertaken to test the influence of various demographic variables such as the source of information, the location, and the size of the dental laboratory. Results The number of completed responses totalled 248 (32% response rate). Ninety percent of the respondents were based in England and the majority of dental laboratories were categorised as small sized (working with up to 25 dentists). Concerns were raised regarding inadequate disinfection protocols between dentists and dental laboratories and the poor quality of master impressions. Full arch plastic trays were the most popular impression tray used by dentists in the fabrication of crowns (61%) and bridgework (68%). The majority (89%) of jaw registration records were considered inaccurate. Forty-four percent of dental laboratories preferred using semi-adjustable articulators. Axial and occlusal under-preparation of abutment teeth was reported as an issue in about 25% of cases. Base metal alloy was the most (52%) commonly used alloy material. Metal-ceramic crowns were the most popular choice for anterior (69%) and posterior (70%) cases. The various factors considered did not have any statistically significant effect on the answers provided. The only notable exception was the fact that more methods of communicating the size and shape of crowns were utilised for

  5. Novel fabrication techniques for low-mass composite structures in silicon particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Neal; Silber, Joseph; Anderssen, Eric; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gilchriese, Murdock; Johnson, Thomas; Cepeda, Mario

    2013-12-01

    The structural design of silicon-based particle detectors is governed by competing demands of reducing mass while maximizing stability and accuracy. These demands can only be met by fiber reinforced composite laminates (CFRP). As detecting sensors and electronics become lower mass, the motivation to reduce structure as a proportion of overall mass pushes modern detector structures to the lower limits of composite ply thickness, while demanding maximum stiffness. However, classical approaches to composite laminate design require symmetric laminates and flat structures, in order to minimize warping during fabrication. This constraint of symmetry in laminate design, and a “flat plate” approach to fabrication, results in more massive structures. This study presents an approach to fabricating stable and accurate, geometrically complex composite structures by bonding warped, asymmetric, but ultra-thin component laminates together in an accurate tool, achieving final overall precision normally associated with planar structures. This technique has been used to fabricate a prototype “I-beam” that supports two layers of detecting elements, while being up to 20 times stiffer and up to 30% lower mass than comparable, independent planar structures (typically known as “staves”).

  6. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

  7. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth. PMID:26202477

  8. Surface properties and corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy fabricated with selective laser melting technique.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xian-zhen; Chen, Jie; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study the corrosion behavior and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy which was fabricated with selective laser melting (SLM) technique. For this purpose, specimens were fabricated using different techniques, such as SLM system and casting methods. Surface hardness testing, microstructure observation, surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test were carried out to evaluate the corrosion properties and surface properties of the specimens. We found that microstructure of SLM specimens was more homogeneous than that of cast specimens. The mean surface hardness values of SLM and cast specimens were 458.3 and 384.8, respectively; SLM specimens showed higher values than cast ones in hardness. Both specimens exhibited no differences in their electrochemical corrosion properties in the artificial saliva through potentiodynamic curves and EIS, and no significant difference via XPS. Therefore, we concluded that within the scope of this study, SLM-fabricated restorations revealed good surface properties, such as proper hardness, homogeneous microstructure, and also showed sufficient corrosion resistance which could meet the needs of dental clinics.

  9. Semiconductor fabrication techniques for producing an ultra-flat reflective slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervelde, Thomas E.; Cabral, Michael J.; Wilson, John; Skrutskie, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The most difficult aspects in manufacturing a reflective slit substrate are achieving a precisely fabricated slit surrounded by an optically flat surface. A commonly used technique is to polish a metal substrate that has a slit cut by electric discharge machine (EDM) methods. This process can produce 'optically flat' surfaces; however, the EDM can produce a slit with edge roughness on the order of 10 microns and a RMS field roughness of ~1 micron. Here, we present a departure from these traditional methods and employ the advantages inherent in integrated circuit fabrication. By starting with a silicon wafer, we begin with a nearly atomically flat surface. In addition, the fabrication tools and methodologies employed are traditionally used for high precision applications: this allows for the placement and definition of the slit with high accuracy. If greater accuracy in slit definition is required, additional tools, such as a focused ion beam, are used to define the slit edge down to tens of nanometers. The deposition of gold, after that of a suitable bonding layer, in an ultra-high vacuum chamber creates a final surface without the need of polishing. Typical results yield a surface RMS-roughness of approximately 2nm. Most of the techniques and tools required for this process are commonly available at research universities and the cost to manufacture said mirrors is a small fraction of the purchase price of the traditional ones.

  10. Fabrication of dielectrophoretic microfluidic chips using a facile screen-printing technique for microparticle trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Wei Hong; Li, Zedong; Hu, Jie; Adib Kadri, Nahrizul; Xu, Feng; Li, Fei; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-10-01

    Trapping of microparticles finds wide applications in numerous fields. Microfluidic chips based on a dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique hold several advantages for trapping microparticles, such as fast result processing, a small amount of sample required, high spatial resolution, and high accuracy of target selection. There is an unmet need to develop DEP microfluidic chips on different substrates for different applications in a low cost, facile, and rapid way. This study develops a new facile method based on a screen-printing technique for fabrication of electrodes of DEP chips on three types of substrates (i.e. polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), poly(ethylene terephthalate) and A4 paper). The fabricated PMMA-based DEP microfluidic chip was selected as an example and successfully used to trap and align polystyrene microparticles in a suspension and cardiac fibroblasts in a cell culture solution. The developed electrode fabrication method is compatible with different kinds of DEP substrates, which could expand the future application field of DEP microfluidic chips, including new forms of point-of care diagnostics and trapping circulating tumor cells.

  11. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-07-23

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth.

  12. Surface properties and corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy fabricated with selective laser melting technique.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xian-zhen; Chen, Jie; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study the corrosion behavior and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy which was fabricated with selective laser melting (SLM) technique. For this purpose, specimens were fabricated using different techniques, such as SLM system and casting methods. Surface hardness testing, microstructure observation, surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test were carried out to evaluate the corrosion properties and surface properties of the specimens. We found that microstructure of SLM specimens was more homogeneous than that of cast specimens. The mean surface hardness values of SLM and cast specimens were 458.3 and 384.8, respectively; SLM specimens showed higher values than cast ones in hardness. Both specimens exhibited no differences in their electrochemical corrosion properties in the artificial saliva through potentiodynamic curves and EIS, and no significant difference via XPS. Therefore, we concluded that within the scope of this study, SLM-fabricated restorations revealed good surface properties, such as proper hardness, homogeneous microstructure, and also showed sufficient corrosion resistance which could meet the needs of dental clinics. PMID:23553145

  13. Focused ion beam techniques for fabricating geometrically-complex components and devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Adams, David Price; Hodges, V. Carter; Vasile, Michael J.

    2004-03-01

    We have researched several new focused ion beam (FIB) micro-fabrication techniques that offer control of feature shape and the ability to accurately define features onto nonplanar substrates. These FIB-based processes are considered useful for prototyping, reverse engineering, and small-lot manufacturing. Ion beam-based techniques have been developed for defining features in miniature, nonplanar substrates. We demonstrate helices in cylindrical substrates having diameters from 100 {micro}m to 3 mm. Ion beam lathe processes sputter-define 10-{micro}m wide features in cylindrical substrates and tubes. For larger substrates, we combine focused ion beam milling with ultra-precision lathe turning techniques to accurately define 25-100 {micro}m features over many meters of path length. In several cases, we combine the feature defining capability of focused ion beam bombardment with additive techniques such as evaporation, sputter deposition and electroplating in order to build geometrically-complex, functionally-simple devices. Damascene methods that fabricate bound, metal microcoils have been developed for cylindrical substrates. Effects of focused ion milling on surface morphology are also highlighted in a study of ion-milled diamond.

  14. A review of the hybrid techniques for the fabrication of hard magnetic microactuators based on bonded magnetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallapa, M.; Yeow, J. T. W.

    2015-02-01

    Polymer composites based on permanent magnetic bonded powders exhibit immense potential for applications in microactuators and sensors with magnetic performances comparable to their fully dense counterparts. While fabrication and integration of magnetic devices based on bonded magnetic powders is challenging via conventional deposition and electrochemical growth techniques, hybrid fabrication offers a promising alternative. This paper presents the evolution of permanent magnetic materials into bonded magnetic powders, the magnetic performance figures of merit of permanent magnetic materials significant for the design and manufacture of polymer based sensors and actuators. A review of the hybrid fabrication techniques such as replica molding, squeegee coating, spin casting etc are reported. Critical factors affecting the fabrication of polymer magnetic composites such as filler particle size and effect of magnetic field during fabrication are discussed. Prior art based on polymer magnetic composites for the fabrication of hard magnetic films and hard magnetic actuators are presented.

  15. Fatigue Life of Titanium Alloys Fabricated by Additive Layer Manufacturing Techniques for Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Mason, Robert L.; Okabe, Toru

    2013-02-01

    Additive layer deposition techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM) have been utilized to fabricate rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) contents. The layer-by-layer deposition techniques resulted in plates that have different surface finishes which can impact significantly on the fatigue life by providing potential sites for fatigue cracks to initiate. The fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys fabricated by EBM and LBM deposition techniques was investigated by three-point testing of rectangular beams of as-fabricated and electro-discharge machined surfaces under stress-controlled conditions at 10 Hz until complete fracture. Fatigue life tests were also performed on rolled plates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI, regular Ti-6Al-4V, and CP Ti as controls. Fatigue surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy to identify the crack initiation site in the various types of specimen surfaces. The fatigue life data were analyzed statistically using both analysis of variance techniques and the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis method with the Gehan-Breslow test. The results indicate that the LBM Ti-6Al-4V ELI material exhibits a longer fatigue life than the EBM counterpart and CP Ti, but a shorter fatigue life compared to rolled Ti-6Al-4V ELI. The difference in the fatigue life behavior may be largely attributed to the presence of rough surface features that act as fatigue crack initiation sites in the EBM material.

  16. Quantitative characterization of X-ray lenses from two fabrication techniques with grating interferometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, Frieder J; Detlefs, Carsten; Schröter, Tobias J; Kunka, Danays; Last, Arndt; Mohr, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Refractive X-ray lenses are in use at a large number of synchrotron experiments. Several materials and fabrication techniques are available for their production, each having their own strengths and drawbacks. We present a grating interferometer for the quantitative analysis of single refractive X-ray lenses and employ it for the study of a beryllium point focus lens and a polymer line focus lens, highlighting the differences in the outcome of the fabrication methods. The residuals of a line fit to the phase gradient are used to quantify local lens defects, while shape aberrations are quantified by the decomposition of the retrieved wavefront phase profile into either Zernike or Legendre polynomials, depending on the focus and aperture shape. While the polymer lens shows better material homogeneity, the beryllium lens shows higher shape accuracy. PMID:27137533

  17. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  18. Curved grating fabrication techniques for concentric-circle grating, surface-emitting semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Rebecca H.; King, Oliver; Wicks, Gary W.; Hall, Dennis G.; Anderson, Erik H.; Rooks, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and operational characteristics of a novel, surface-emitting semiconductor laser that makes use of a concentric-circle grating to both define its resonant cavity and to provide surface emission. A properly fabricated circular grating causes the laser to operate in radially inward- and outward-going circular waves in the waveguide, thus, introducing the circular symmetry needed for the laser to emit a beam with a circular cross-section. The basic circular-grating-resonator concept can be implemented in any materials system; an AlGaAs/GaAs graded-index, separate confinement heterostructure (GRINSCH), single-quantum-well (SQW) semiconductor laser, grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), was used for the experiments discussed here. Each concentric-circle grating was fabricated on the surface of the AlGaAs/GaAs semiconductor laser. The circular pattern was first defined by electron-beam (e-beam) lithography in a layer of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and subsequently etched into the semiconductor surface using chemically-assisted (chlorine) ion-beam etching (CAIBE). We consider issues that affect the fabrication and quality of the gratings. These issues include grating design requirements, data representation of the grating pattern, and e-beam scan method. We provide examples of how these techniques can be implemented and their impact on the resulting laser performance. A comparison is made of the results obtained using two fundamentally different electron-beam writing systems. Circular gratings with period lambda = 0.25 microns and overall diameters ranging from 80 microns to 500 microns were fabricated. We also report our successful demonstration of an optically pumped, concentric-circle grating, semiconductor laser that emits a beam with a far-field divergence angle that is less than one degree. The emission spectrum is quite narrow (less than 0.1 nm) and is centered at wavelength lambda = 0.8175 microns.

  19. Techniques for developing approximate optimal advanced launch system guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Timothy S.; Speyer, Jason L.

    1991-01-01

    An extension to the authors' previous technique used to develop a real-time guidance scheme for the Advanced Launch System is presented. The approach is to construct an optimal guidance law based upon an asymptotic expansion associated with small physical parameters, epsilon. The trajectory of a rocket modeled as a point mass is considered with the flight restricted to an equatorial plane while reaching an orbital altitude at orbital injection speeds. The dynamics of this problem can be separated into primary effects due to thrust and gravitational forces, and perturbation effects which include the aerodynamic forces and the remaining inertial forces. An analytic solution to the reduced-order problem represented by the primary dynamics is possible. The Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman or dynamic programming equation is expanded in an asymptotic series where the zeroth-order term (epsilon = 0) can be obtained in closed form.

  20. Neurocysticercosis: evaluation with advanced magnetic resonance techniques and atypical forms.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Lázaro Luís Faria; Ferreira, Rafael Martins; da Rocha, Antônio José; Ferreira, Nelson Paes Diniz Fortes

    2005-04-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common helminthic infection of the central nervous system, but its diagnosis remains difficult. The purpose of this article is to perform a critical analysis of the literature and show our experience in the evaluation of NCC. We discuss the advanced MR technique applications such as diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging, spectroscopy, cisternography with FLAIR, and supplemental O2 and 3D-CISS. The typical manifestations of NCC are described; emphasis is given to the unusual presentations. The atypical forms of neurocysticercosis were divided into: intraventricular, subarachnoid, spinal, orbital, and intraparenchymatous. Special attention was also given to reactivation of previously calcified lesions and neurocysticercosis associated with mesial temporal sclerosis.

  1. COAL AND CHAR STUDIES BY ADVANCED EMR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson; Mark J. Nilges; Boris M. Odintsov; Alex I. Smirnov

    2001-04-30

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have been used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During the span of this grant, progress was made on construction and applications to coals and chars of two high frequency EMR systems particularly appropriate for such studies--48 GHz and 95 GHz electron magnetic resonance spectrometer, on new low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments to examine the interaction between water and the surfaces of suspended char particulates in slurries, and on a variety of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to measure characteristics of the water directly in contact with the surfaces and pore spaces of carbonaceous particulates.

  2. Fabrication of advanced particles and particle-based materials assisted by droplet-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Tao; Wang, Juan; Han, Jun-Jie

    2011-07-01

    Recent advances in the fabrication of complex particles and particle-based materials assisted by droplet-based microfluidics are reviewed. Monodisperse particles with expected internal structures, morphologies, and sizes in the range of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers have received a good deal of attention in recent years. Due to the capability of generating monodisperse emulsions and of executing precise control and operations on the suspended droplets inside the microchannels, droplet-based microfluidic devices have become powerful tools for fabricating complex particles with desired properties. Emulsions and multiple-emulsions generated in the microfluidic devices can be composed of a variety of materials including aqueous solutions, gels, polymers and solutions containing functional nanoparticles. They are ideal microreactors or fine templates for synthesizing advanced particles, such as polymer particles, microcapsules, nanocrystals, and photonic crystal clusters or beads by further chemical or physical operations. These particles are promising materials that may be applicable for many fields, such as photonic materials, drug delivery systems, and bio-analysis. From simple to complex, from spherical to nonspherical, from polymerization and reaction crystallization to self-assembly, this review aims to help readers be aware of the many aspects of this field.

  3. Multiple advanced surgical techniques to treat acquired seminal duct obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong-Tao; Yuan, Qian; Liu, Yu; Liu, Zeng-Qin; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Xiao, Ke-Feng; Yang, Jiang-Gen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of multiple advanced surgical treatments (i.e. microsurgery, laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic surgery) for acquired obstructive azoospermia. We analyzed the surgical outcomes of 51 patients with suspected acquired obstructive azoospermia consecutively who enrolled at our center between January 2009 and May 2013. Modified vasoepididymostomy, laparoscopically assisted vasovasostomy and transurethral incision of the ejaculatory duct with holmium laser were chosen and performed based on the different obstruction sites. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 22 months (range: 9 months to 52 months). Semen analyses were initiated at four postoperative weeks, followed by trimonthly (months 3, 6, 9 and 12) semen analyses, until no sperm was found at 12 months or until pregnancy was achieved. Patency was defined as >10,000 sperm ml−1 of semen. The obstruction sites, postoperative patency and natural pregnancy rate were recorded. Of 51 patients, 47 underwent bilateral or unilateral surgical reconstruction; the other four patients were unable to be treated with surgical reconstruction because of pelvic vas or intratesticular tubules obstruction. The reconstruction rate was 92.2% (47/51), and the patency rate and natural pregnancy rate were 89.4% (42/47) and 38.1% (16/42), respectively. No severe complications were observed. Using multiple advanced surgical techniques, more extensive range of seminal duct obstruction was accessible and correctable; thus, a favorable patency and pregnancy rate can be achieved. PMID:25337841

  4. Advances in the Rising Bubble Technique for discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgersom, Koen; Luxemburg, Willem; Willemsen, Geert; Bussmann, Luuk

    2014-05-01

    Already in the 19th century, d'Auria described a discharge measurement technique that applies floats to find the depth-integrated velocity (d'Auria, 1882). The basis of this technique was that the horizontal distance that the float travels on its way to the surface is the image of the integrated velocity profile over depth. Viol and Semenov (1964) improved this method by using air bubbles as floats, but still distances were measured manually until Sargent (1981) introduced a technique that could derive the distances from two photographs simultaneously taken from each side of the river bank. Recently, modern image processing techniques proved to further improve the applicability of the method (Hilgersom and Luxemburg, 2012). In the 2012 article, controlling and determining the rising velocity of an air bubble still appeared a major challenge for the application of this method. Ever since, laboratory experiments with different nozzle and tube sizes lead to advances in our self-made equipment enabling us to produce individual air bubbles with a more constant rising velocity. Also, we introduced an underwater camera to on-site determine the rising velocity, which is dependent on the water temperature and contamination, and therefore is site-specific. Camera measurements of the rising velocity proved successful in a laboratory and field setting, although some improvements to the setup are necessary to capture the air bubbles also at depths where little daylight penetrates. References D'Auria, L.: Velocity of streams; A new method to determine correctly the mean velocity of any perpendicular in rivers and canals, (The) American Engineers, 3, 1882. Hilgersom, K.P. and Luxemburg, W.M.J.: Technical Note: How image processing facilitates the rising bubble technique for discharge measurement, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(2), 345-356, 2012. Sargent, D.: Development of a viable method of stream flow measurement using the integrating float technique, Proceedings of

  5. Fabrication of deterministic nanostructure assemblies with sub-nanometer spacing using a nanoimprinting transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Barcelo, Steven J; Kim, Ansoon; Wu, Wei; Li, Zhiyong

    2012-07-24

    Deterministic patterning or assembly of nanoparticles often requires complex processes that are not easily incorporated into system architectures of arbitrary design. We have developed a technique to fabricate deterministic nanoparticle assemblies using simple and inexpensive nanoimprinting equipment and procedures. First, a metal film is evaporated onto flexible polymer pillars made by nanoimprinting. The resulting metal caps on top of the pillars can be pulled into assemblies of arbitrary design by collapsing the pillars in a well-controlled manner. The nanoparticle assemblies are then transferred from the pillars onto a new substrate via nanoimprinting with the aid of either cold welding or chemical bonding. Using this technique, a variety of patterned nanoparticle assemblies of Au and Ag with a critical dimension less than 2 nm were fabricated and transferred to silicon-, glass-, and metal-coated substrates. Separating the nanostructure assembly from the final architecture removes significant design constraints from devices incorporating nanoparticle assemblies. The application of this process as a technique for generating surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates is presented.

  6. A technique for fabricating patterns for removable partial denture frameworks using digitized casts and electronic surveying.

    PubMed

    Williams, R J; Bibb, Richard; Rafik, Tahseen

    2004-01-01

    Although computer-aided design and manufacture techniques have shown some promising applications in the fabrication of crowns, inlays, and maxillofacial and oral surgery, the field of removable prosthodontics has not embraced these technologies so far. This article describes the development and investigation of computer-aided techniques that may eventually enable prosthodontic procedures such as surveying and the production of sacrificial patterns to be performed digitally. A 3-dimensional computer model of a conventional cast from a patient was obtained using an optical surface capture device (a scanner). The shape of a number of components of a removable partial denture framework was modeled on the 3-dimensional scan electronically, using computer-aided design software. A physical plastic shape of the components was produced using a Rapid Prototyping machine and used as a sacrificial pattern. Techniques to allow digital cast surveying before the production of sacrificial patterns were also developed. The results show that digital dental surveying and machine-produced sacrificial patterns can be accomplished. This article forms a basis for further developments leading to a fully integrated approach to the computer-aided design and fabrication of removable partial denture frameworks.

  7. An Innovative and Simple Technique of Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya; Mysore, Ashwin; Da Costa, Godwin Clovis

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of severely atrophic ridges has always been an ordeal for the clinician due to decreased support, stability and retention. Because of severe resorption the restorative space between maxillary and mandibular residual ridges is increased. Rehabilitation in such cases may result in increased height and weight of the prosthesis further compromising its retention and stability. This in turn overloads the underlying hard and soft tissues exacerbating ridge resorption so, in order to break this vicious cycle, the weight of the prosthesis needs to be reduced which can be achieved by making hollow prosthesis. This article describes a novel technique of fabricating a hollow maxillary complete denture. PMID:27656580

  8. An Innovative and Simple Technique of Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Qanungo, Anchal; Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya; Mysore, Ashwin; Da Costa, Godwin Clovis

    2016-08-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of severely atrophic ridges has always been an ordeal for the clinician due to decreased support, stability and retention. Because of severe resorption the restorative space between maxillary and mandibular residual ridges is increased. Rehabilitation in such cases may result in increased height and weight of the prosthesis further compromising its retention and stability. This in turn overloads the underlying hard and soft tissues exacerbating ridge resorption so, in order to break this vicious cycle, the weight of the prosthesis needs to be reduced which can be achieved by making hollow prosthesis. This article describes a novel technique of fabricating a hollow maxillary complete denture. PMID:27656580

  9. Fabrication of Polymeric Coatings with Controlled Microtopographies Using an Electrospraying Technique

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiongyu; Mather, Jason P.; Yang, Pine; Boden, Mark; Mather, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Surface topography of medical implants provides an important biophysical cue on guiding cellular functions at the cell-implant interface. However, few techniques are available to produce polymeric coatings with controlled microtopographies onto surgical implants, especially onto implant devices of small dimension and with complex structures such as drug-eluting stents. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to develop a new strategy to fabricate polymeric coatings using an electrospraying technique based on the uniqueness of this technique in that it can be used to produce a mist of charged droplets with a precise control of their shape and dimension. We hypothesized that this technique would allow facile manipulation of coating morphology by controlling the shape and dimension of electrosprayed droplets. More specifically, we employed the electrospraying technique to coat a layer of biodegradable polyurethane with tailored microtopographies onto commercial coronary stents. The topography of such stent coatings was modulated by controlling the ratio of round to stretched droplets or the ratio of round to crumped droplets under high electric field before deposition. The shape of electrosprayed droplets was governed by the stability of these charged droplets right after ejection or during their flight in the air. Using the electrospraying technique, we achieved conformal polymeric coatings with tailored microtopographies onto conductive surgical implants. The approach offers potential for controlling the surface topography of surgical implant devices to modulate their integration with surrounding tissues. PMID:26090663

  10. Innovative deposition techniques for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. H.; Lanning, B. R.; Misra, M. S.

    1992-12-01

    A key issue for photovoltaics (PV), both in terrestrial and future space applications, is producibility, particularly for applications utilizing a large volume of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics, such as copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) and cadmium-telluride (CdTe), are production volume, which translates directly related to cost, and minimization of waste. Both the rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-MagTM) and pulsed electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-MagTM facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput, reduced health and safety risks, and ultimately lower fabrication cost. For pulsed electrodeposition, the films appear to be more tightly adherent and deposited at an enhanced rate when compared to conventional DC electrodeposition. This paper addresses Martin Marietta's investigation into innovative sputtering techniques and pulsed electrodeposition with a near-term goal of 930 cm2 (1 ft2) monolithically-integrated CIS and CdTe submodules.

  11. Innovative deposition techniques for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.H.; Lanning, B.R.; Misra, M.S. )

    1992-12-01

    A key issue for photovoltaics (PV), both in terrestrial and future space applications, is [ital producibility], particularly for applications utilizing a large volume of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics, such as copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) and cadmium-telluride (CdTe), are production volume, which translates directly related to cost, and minimization of waste. Both the rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag[sup TM]) and pulsed electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mag[sup TM] facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput, reduced health and safety risks, and ultimately lower fabrication cost. For pulsed electrodeposition, the films appear to be more tightly adherent and deposited at an enhanced rate when compared to conventional DC electrodeposition. This paper addresses Martin Marietta's investigation into innovative sputtering techniques and pulsed electrodeposition with a near-term goal of 930 cm[sup 2] (1 ft[sup 2]) monolithically-integrated CIS and CdTe submodules.

  12. Characterization of fabricated three dimensional scaffolds of bioceramic-polymer composite via microstereolithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Marina; Covington, James A.; Bolarinwa, Aminat

    2014-02-01

    Microstereolithography is a method used for rapid prototyping of polymeric and ceramic components. This technique converts a computer-aided design (CAD) to a three dimensional (3D) model, and enables layer per layer fabrication curing a liquid resin with UV-light or laser source. The aim of this project was to formulate photocurable polymer reinforced with synthesized calcium pyrophosphate (CPP), and to fabricate a 3D scaffolds with optimum mechanical properties for specific tissue engineering applications. The photocurable ceramic suspension was prepared with acrylate polyester, multifunctional acrylate monomer with the addition of 50-70wt% of CPP, photoinitiators and photoinhibitors. The 3D structure of disc (5 mm height × 4 mm diameter) was successfully fabricated using Envisiontec Perfactory3® . They were then sintered at high temperature for polymer removal, to obtain a ceramic of the desired porosity. The density increased to more than 35% and the dimensional shrinkage after sintering were 33%. The discs were then subjected compressive measurement, biodegradation and bioactivity test. Morphology and CPP content of the sintered polymer was investigated with SEM and XRD, respectively. The addition of CPP coupled with high temperature sintering, had a significant effect on the compressive strength exhibited by the bioceramic. The values are in the range of cancellous bone (2-4 MPa). In biodegradation and bioactivity test, the synthesized CPP induced the formation of apatite layer and its nucleation onto the composite surface.

  13. Advances in fabrication of mono- and multifilament Ag-CLAD BSCCO superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Iyer, A.N.; Jammy, R.; Haldar, P.; Hoehn, J.G. Jr.; Suenaga, M.

    1995-07-01

    Fabricating long lengths of robust and high-quality conductors is imperative for various applications of high-{Tc} superconductors. Long lengths of mono- and multifilament Ag-clad Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-0 conductors have been fabricated by the powder-in-tube technique. High values for critical current density (J{sub c}) have been achieved in both short- and long-length conductors. J{sub c} values up to 12,000 A/cm{sup 2} have been achieved in an 850-m-long multifilament conductor. Pancake-shaped coils and test magnets fabricated from long-length conductors were characterized at various temperatures and applied magnetic fields. A magnet containing 770 m of high-{Tc} conductor generated a record high field of {approx} 1 T at 4.2 K in a background field of {approx} 20 T. In-situ tensile and bending characteristics of both mono- and multifilament conductors have also been studied. Multifilament conductors exhibited better axial strain tolerance ({var_epsilon} {approx} 1%) than that of monofilament conductor ({var_epsilon} {approx} 0.2%), while retaining 90% of their initial critical current. An analysis of the results is presented, along with effects of parameters such as thickness, superconductor/Ag ratio, and microstructural details.

  14. Fabrication of advanced organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings for biomedical applications by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xin

    Novel electrodeposition strategies have been developed for the fabrication of thick adherent zirconia ceramic and composite coatings for biomedical applications. The new method is based on the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of polyelectrolyte additives combined with the cathodic precipitation of zirconia. The method enables the room-temperature electrosynthesis of crystalline zirconia nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. Adherent crack-free coatings up to several microns thick were obtained. The deposits were studied by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Obtained results pave the way for electrodeposition of other ceramic-polymer composites. Novel advanced nanocomposite coatings based on bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HA) have been developed for the surface modification of orthopaedic and dental implant metals. HA nanopartic1es prepared by a chemical precipitation method were used for the fabrication of novel HA-chitosan nanocomposite coatings. The use of chitosan enables room-temperature fabrication of the composite coatings. The problems related to the sintering of HA can be avoided. A new electrodeposition strategy, based on the EPD of HA nanoparticles and electrochemical deposition of chitosan macromolecules, has been developed. The method enabled the formation of dense, adherent and uniform coatings of various thicknesses in the range of up to 60 mum. Bioactive composite coatings containing 40.9-89.8 wt% HA were obtained. The deposit composition and microstructure can be tailored by varying the chitosan and HA concentrations in the deposition bath. A mathematical model describing the formation of the HA-chitosan composite deposit has been developed. X-ray studies revealed preferred orientation of HA nanoparticles in the nanocomposites. Obtained coatings provide corrosion protection of the substrates and can be utilized for the fabrication of

  15. Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) Method for Fabricating Stiffened Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, Mary Cecilia; Hehir, Austin R.; Ivanco, Marie L.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2016-01-01

    This cost-benefit analysis assesses the benefits of the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) manufacturing process for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. These preliminary, rough order-of-magnitude results report a 46 to 58 percent reduction in production costs and a 7-percent reduction in weight over the conventional metallic manufacturing technique used in this study for comparison. Production cost savings of 35 to 58 percent were reported over the composite manufacturing technique used in this study for comparison; however, the ANNST concept was heavier. In this study, the predicted return on investment of equipment required for the ANNST method was ten cryogenic tank barrels when compared with conventional metallic manufacturing. The ANNST method was compared with the conventional multi-piece metallic construction and composite processes for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. A case study compared these three alternatives for manufacturing a cylinder of specified geometry, with particular focus placed on production costs and process complexity, with cost analyses performed by the analogy and parametric methods. Furthermore, a scalability study was conducted for three tank diameters to assess the highest potential payoff of the ANNST process for manufacture of large-diameter cryogenic tanks. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was subsequently used with a group of selected subject matter experts to assess the value of the various benefits achieved by the ANNST method for potential stakeholders. The AHP study results revealed that decreased final cylinder mass and quality assurance were the most valued benefits of cylinder manufacturing methods, therefore emphasizing the relevance of the benefits achieved with the ANNST process for future projects.

  16. Technique for the efficient and reproducible fabrication of electromagnetic levitation coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Curreri, P. A.; Theiss, J.; Abbaschian, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    A technique has been developed for fabricating electromagnetic induction coils in a reproducible manner. The process utilizes a split mandrel that can be disassembled to remove the mandrel from the coil. The technique has increased coil production rates by a factor of 8 over the freehand winding method. The success rate for producing a functional levitation coil has been increased from 50 percent to 95 percent. The levitation coil designed during this work has successfully levitated and melted a variety of alloys including Cu, Ag, Ag-Ni, Cu-Fe, Fe-C, and Nb-Ge. W was also levitated but not melted at temperatures as high as 2700 C. The highest sample melt temperature achieved was 2400 C for the Nb-Ge samples.

  17. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. As a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.

  18. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. Asmore » a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.« less

  19. A novel fabrication technique to minimize poly(dimethylsiloxane)-microchannels deformation under high-pressure operation.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Hojjat; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Casals-Terré, Jasmina; López, Roberto Castilla

    2013-12-01

    PDMS is one of the most common materials used for the flow delivery in the microfluidics chips, since it is clear, inert, nontoxic, and nonflammable. Its inexpensiveness, straightforward fabrication, and biological compatibility have made it a favorite material in the exploratory stages of the bio-microfluidic devices. If small footprint assays want to be performed while keeping the throughput, high pressure-rated channels should be used, but PDMS flexibility causes an important issue since it can generate a large variation of microchannel geometry. In this work, a novel fabrication technique based on the prevention of PDMS deformation is developed. A photo-sensible thiolene resin (Norland Optical Adhesive 63, NOA 63) is used to create a rigid coating layer over the stiff PDMS micropillar array, which significantly reduces the pressure-induced shape changes. This method uses the exact same soft lithography manufacturing equipment. The verification of the presented technique was investigated experimentally and numerically and the manufactured samples showed a deformation 70% lower than PDMS conventional samples. PMID:24114728

  20. Porous titanium scaffolds fabricated using a rapid prototyping and powder metallurgy technique.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Garrett E; Pandit, Abhay S; Apatsidis, Dimitrios P

    2008-09-01

    One of the main issues in orthopaedic implant design is the fabrication of scaffolds that closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the surrounding bone. This research reports on a multi-stage rapid prototyping technique that was successfully developed to produce porous titanium scaffolds with fully interconnected pore networks and reproducible porosity and pore size. The scaffolds' porous characteristics were governed by a sacrificial wax template, fabricated using a commercial 3D-printer. Powder metallurgy processes were employed to generate the titanium scaffolds by filling around the wax template with titanium slurry. In the attempt to optimise the powder metallurgy technique, variations in slurry concentration, compaction pressure and sintering temperature were investigated. By altering the wax design template, pore sizes ranging from 200 to 400 microm were achieved. Scaffolds with porosities of 66.8 +/- 3.6% revealed compression strengths of 104.4+/-22.5 MPa in the axial direction and 23.5 +/- 9.6 MPa in the transverse direction demonstrating their anisotropic nature. Scaffold topography was characterised using scanning electron microscopy and microcomputed tomography. Three-dimensional reconstruction enabled the main architectural parameters such as pore size, interconnecting porosity, level of anisotropy and level of structural disorder to be determined. The titanium scaffolds were compared to their intended designs, as governed by their sacrificial wax templates. Although discrepancies in architectural parameters existed between the intended and the actual scaffolds, overall the results indicate that the porous titanium scaffolds have the properties to be potentially employed in orthopaedic applications.

  1. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  2. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  3. Fabrication of a highly sensitive penicillin sensor based on charge transfer techniques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ro; Rahman, M M; Sawada, Kazuaki; Ishida, Makoto

    2009-03-15

    A highly sensitive penicillin biosensor based on a charge-transfer technique (CTTPS) has been fabricated and demonstrated in this paper. CTTPS comprised a charge accumulation technique for penicilloic acid and H(+) ions perception system. With the proposed CTTPS, it is possible to amplify the sensing signals without external amplifier by using the charge accumulation cycles. The fabricated CTTPS exhibits excellent performance for penicillin detection and exhibit a high-sensitivity (47.852 mV/mM), high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), large span (1445 mV), wide linear range (0-25 mM), fast response time (<3s), and very good reproducibility. A very lower detection limit of about 0.01 mM was observed from the proposed sensor. Under optimum conditions, the proposed CTTPS outstripped the performance of the widely used ISFET penicillin sensor and exhibited almost eight times greater sensitivity as compared to ISFET (6.56 mV/mM). The sensor system is implemented for the measurement of the penicillin concentration in penicillin fermentation broth. PMID:18977651

  4. A new method of fabricating a blend scaffold using an indirect three-dimensional printing technique.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Hyungseok; Hong, Jung Min; Park, Jeong Hun; Shim, Jung Hee; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Due to its simplicity and effectiveness, the physical blending of polymers is considered to be a practical strategy for developing a versatile scaffold having desirable mechanical and biochemical properties. In the present work, an indirect three-dimensional (i3D) printing technique was proposed to fabricate a 3D free-form scaffold using a blend of immiscible materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin. The i3D printing technique includes 3D printing of a mold and a sacrificial molding process. PCL/chloroform and gelatin/water were physically mixed to prepare the blend solution, which was subsequently injected into the cavity of a 3D printed mold. After solvent removal and gelatin cross-linking, the mold was dissolved to obtain a PCL-gelatin (PG) scaffold, with a specific 3D structure. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that PCL masses and gelatin fibers in the PG scaffold homogenously coexisted without chemical bonding. Compression tests confirmed that gelatin incorporation into the PCL enhanced its mechanical flexibility and softness, to the point of being suitable for soft-tissue engineering, as opposed to pure PCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells, cultured on a PG scaffold, exhibited enhanced in vitro chondrogenic differentiation and tissue formation, compared with those on a PCL scaffold. The i3D printing technique can be used to blend a variety of materials, facilitating 3D scaffold fabrication for specific tissue regeneration. Furthermore, this convenient and versatile technique may lead to wider application of 3D printing in tissue engineering. PMID:26525821

  5. A new method of fabricating a blend scaffold using an indirect three-dimensional printing technique.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Hyungseok; Hong, Jung Min; Park, Jeong Hun; Shim, Jung Hee; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-03

    Due to its simplicity and effectiveness, the physical blending of polymers is considered to be a practical strategy for developing a versatile scaffold having desirable mechanical and biochemical properties. In the present work, an indirect three-dimensional (i3D) printing technique was proposed to fabricate a 3D free-form scaffold using a blend of immiscible materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin. The i3D printing technique includes 3D printing of a mold and a sacrificial molding process. PCL/chloroform and gelatin/water were physically mixed to prepare the blend solution, which was subsequently injected into the cavity of a 3D printed mold. After solvent removal and gelatin cross-linking, the mold was dissolved to obtain a PCL-gelatin (PG) scaffold, with a specific 3D structure. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that PCL masses and gelatin fibers in the PG scaffold homogenously coexisted without chemical bonding. Compression tests confirmed that gelatin incorporation into the PCL enhanced its mechanical flexibility and softness, to the point of being suitable for soft-tissue engineering, as opposed to pure PCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells, cultured on a PG scaffold, exhibited enhanced in vitro chondrogenic differentiation and tissue formation, compared with those on a PCL scaffold. The i3D printing technique can be used to blend a variety of materials, facilitating 3D scaffold fabrication for specific tissue regeneration. Furthermore, this convenient and versatile technique may lead to wider application of 3D printing in tissue engineering.

  6. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  7. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    PubMed

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted. PMID:27483933

  8. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    PubMed

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted.

  9. Fabrication of advanced oxide fuels containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, Shuhei; Osaka, Masahiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Ishi, Yohei; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya

    2007-07-01

    R and D of advanced fuel containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors is described related to the composite fuel with MgO matrix. Fabrication tests of MgO composite fuels containing Am were done by a practical process that could be adapted to the presently used commercial manufacturing technology. Am-containing MgO composite fuels having good characteristics, i.e., having no defects, a high density, a homogeneous dispersion of host phase, were obtained. As related technology, burn-up characteristics of a fast reactor core loaded with the present MgO composite fuel were also analyzed, mainly in terms of core criticality. Furthermore, phase relations of MA oxide which was assumed to be contained in MgO matrix fuel were experimentally investigated. (authors)

  10. Design, fabrication, and certification of advanced modular PV power systems. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lambarski, T.; Minyard, G.

    1998-10-01

    Solar Electric Specialties Company (SES) has completed a two and a half year effort under the auspices of the US Department of Energy (DOE) PVMaT (Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology) project. Under Phase 4A1 of the project for Product Driven System and Component Technology, the SES contract ``Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems`` had the goal to reduce installed system life cycle costs through development of certified (Underwriters Laboratories or other listing) and standardized prototype products for two of the product lines, MAPPS{trademark} (Modular Autonomous PV Power Supply) and Photogensets{trademark}. MAPPS are small DC systems consisting of Photovoltaic modules, batteries and a charge controller and producing up to about a thousand watt-hours per day. Photogensets are stand-alone AC systems incorporating a generator as backup for the PV in addition to a DC-AC inverter and battery charger. The program tasks for the two-year contract consisted of designing and fabricating prototypes of both a MAPPS and a Photogenset to meet agency listing requirements using modular concepts that would support development of families of products, submitting the prototypes for listing, and performing functionality testing at Sandia and NREL. Both prototypes were candidates for UL (Underwriters Laboratories) listing. The MAPPS was also a candidate for FM (Factory Mutual) approval for hazardous (incendiary gases) locations.

  11. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  12. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  13. Removing baseline flame's spectrum by using advanced recovering spectrum techniques.

    PubMed

    Arias, Luis; Sbarbaro, Daniel; Torres, Sergio

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a novel automated algorithm to estimate and remove the continuous baseline from measured flame spectra is proposed. The algorithm estimates the continuous background based on previous information obtained from a learning database of continuous flame spectra. Then, the discontinuous flame emission is calculated by subtracting the estimated continuous baseline from the measured spectrum. The key issue subtending the learning database is that the continuous flame emissions are predominant in the sooty regions, in absence of discontinuous radiation. The proposed algorithm was tested using natural gas and bio-oil flames spectra at different combustion conditions, and the goodness-of-fit coefficient (GFC) quality metric was used to quantify the performance in the estimation process. Additionally, the commonly used first derivative method (FDM) for baseline removing was applied to the same testing spectra in order to compare and to evaluate the proposed technique. The achieved results show that the proposed method is a very attractive tool for designing advanced combustion monitoring strategies of discontinuous emissions. PMID:22945158

  14. Development of advanced strain diagnostic techniques for reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Miller, Timothy J.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Urrea, David Anthony,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    The following research is operated as a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The long-term goals of the program include sophisticated diagnostics of advanced fuels testing for nuclear reactors for the Department of Energy (DOE) Gen IV program, with the future capability to provide real-time measurement of strain in fuel rod cladding during operation in situ at any research or power reactor in the United States. By quantifying the stress and strain in fuel rods, it is possible to significantly improve fuel rod design, and consequently, to improve the performance and lifetime of the cladding. During the past year of this program, two sets of experiments were performed: small-scale tests to ensure reliability of the gages, and reactor pulse experiments involving the most viable samples in the Annulated Core Research Reactor (ACRR), located onsite at Sandia. Strain measurement techniques that can provide useful data in the extreme environment of a nuclear reactor core are needed to characterize nuclear fuel rods. This report documents the progression of solutions to this issue that were explored for feasibility in FY12 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  15. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  16. PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    S. T. Khericha

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

  17. Fabrication and physical testing of graphite composite panels utilizing woven graphite fabric with current and advanced state-of-the-art resin systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C. S.

    1979-01-01

    Three weaves were evaluated; a balanced plain weave, a balanced 8-harness satin weave, and a semiunidirectional crowfoot satin weave. The current state-of-the-art resin system selected was Fiberite's 934 Epoxy; the advanced resin systems evaluated were Phenolic, Phenolic/Novolac, Benzyl and Bismaleimide. The panels were fabricated for testing on NASA/Ames Research Center's Composites Modification Program. Room temperature mechanical tests only were performed by Hitco; the results are presented.

  18. Hybrid inverse lithography techniques for advanced hierarchical memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guangming; Hooker, Kevin; Irby, Dave; Zhang, Yunqiang; Ward, Brian; Cecil, Tom; Hall, Brett; Lee, Mindy; Kim, Dave; Lucas, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Traditional segment-based model-based OPC methods have been the mainstream mask layout optimization techniques in volume production for memory and embedded memory devices for many device generations. These techniques have been continually optimized over time to meet the ever increasing difficulties of memory and memory periphery patterning. There are a range of difficult issues for patterning embedded memories successfully. These difficulties include the need for a very high level of symmetry and consistency (both within memory cells themselves and between cells) due to circuit effects such as noise margin requirements in SRAMs. Memory cells and access structures consume a large percentage of area in embedded devices so there is a very high return from shrinking the cell area as much as possible. This aggressive scaling leads to very difficult resolution, 2D CD control and process window requirements. Additionally, the range of interactions between mask synthesis corrections of neighboring areas can extend well beyond the size of the memory cell, making it difficult to fully take advantage of the inherent designed cell hierarchy in mask pattern optimization. This is especially true for non-traditional (i.e., less dependent on geometric rule) OPC/RET methods such as inverse lithography techniques (ILT) which inherently have more model-based decisions in their optimizations. New inverse methods such as model-based SRAF placement and ILT are, however, well known to have considerable benefits in finding flexible mask pattern solutions to improve process window, improve 2D CD control, and improve resolution in ultra-dense memory patterns. They also are known to reduce recipe complexity and provide native MRC compliant mask pattern solutions. Unfortunately, ILT is also known to be several times slower than traditional OPC methods due to the increased computational lithographic optimizations it performs. In this paper, we describe and present results for a methodology to

  19. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  20. Spectral characterization of porous dielectric subwavelength THz fibers fabricated using a microstructured molding technique.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Alexandre; Mazhorova, Anna; Désévédavy, Frédéric; Rozé, Mathieu; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-06-21

    We report two novel fabrication techniques, as well as THz spectral transmission and propagation loss measurements of subwavelength plastic wires with highly porous (up to 86%) and non-porous transverse geometries. The two fabrication techniques we describe are based on the microstructured molding approach. In one technique the mold is made completely from silica by stacking and fusing silica capillaries to the bottom of a silica ampoule. The melted material is then poured into the silica mold to cast the microstructured preform. Another approach uses a microstructured mold made of a sacrificial plastic which is co-drawn with a cast preform. Material from the sacrificial mold is then dissolved after fi ber drawing. We also describe a novel THz-TDS setup with an easily adjustable optical path length, designed to perform cutback measurements using THz fibers of up to 50 cm in length. We fi nd that while both porous and non-porous subwavelength fibers of the same outside diameter have low propagation losses (alpha

  1. Hydrothermal fabrication of selectively doped organic assisted advanced ZnO nanomaterial for solar driven photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Namratha, K; Byrappa, K; Byrappa, S; Venkateswarlu, P; Rajasekhar, D; Deepthi, B K

    2015-08-01

    Hydrothermal fabrication of selectively doped (Ag(+)+Pd(3+)) advanced ZnO nanomaterial has been carried out under mild pressure temperature conditions (autogeneous; 150°C). Gluconic acid has been used as a surface modifier to effectively control the particle size and morphology of these ZnO nanoparticles. The experimental parameters were tuned to achieve optimum conditions for the synthesis of selectively doped ZnO nanomaterials with an experimental duration of 4 hr. These selectively doped ZnO nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The solar driven photocatalytic studies have been carried out for organic dyes, i.e., Procion MX-5B dye, Cibacron Brilliant Yellow dye, Indigo Carmine dye, separately and all three mixed, by using gluconic acid modified selectively doped advanced ZnO nanomaterial. The influence of catalyst, its concentration and initial dye concentration resulted in the photocatalytic efficiency of 89% under daylight.

  2. Analysis of Translucency Parameter of Glass-Ceramics Fabricated by Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ledić, Karla; Majnarić, Igor; Milardović, Slađana; Ortolan; Špalj, Stipe; Štefančić, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse translucency parameter (TP values) of glass-ceramics fabricated by different techniques and investigate the effect of the corrosive medium on TP values. Materials and methods Three specimens of each type of IPS e.max ceramics (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) were made in three colours (A2, C2 and B3) by three fabrication techniques (layering – e.max Ceram Dentin; heat-pressing – e.max Press; CAD/CAM – e.max CAD). Specimens were made in the form of plates (10 mm x 12 mm x 0.8 mm). CIE L*a*b* values were measured by a spectrophotometer (X-Rite DTP 20 Pulse, Neu Isenburg, Germany) before and after exposure to 4% acetic acid at 80 °C for 16 hours (ISO 6872) to calculate translucency parameter (TP values). Statistical data were analysed using the IBM SPSS 22 software. Results IPS e.max Ceram Dentin had significantly the lowest TP values, and IPS e.max Press the highest TP values of all colours (A2, C2, B3), both prior and after exposure to acid (p<0.001). The difference in TP values among colours was evident in the IPS e.max Ceram Dentin material, both before and after exposure to acid with a great effect size (p<0.001; η2 = 0.702 and 0.741), and in the IPS e.max Press material (p<0.001, effect size 0.547 and 0.576). CAD/CAD specimens showed uniform TP values between three colours. Further, exposure to a corrosive medium did not result in a statistically significant change of TP values in any of the materials tested. Conclusions Different types of glass-ceramics showed significant difference in TP values both with respect to the fabrication technique and colour. Exposure to a corrosive medium did not result in a statistically significant change of TP values. PMID:27688383

  3. Analysis of Translucency Parameter of Glass-Ceramics Fabricated by Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ledić, Karla; Majnarić, Igor; Milardović, Slađana; Ortolan; Špalj, Stipe; Štefančić, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse translucency parameter (TP values) of glass-ceramics fabricated by different techniques and investigate the effect of the corrosive medium on TP values. Materials and methods Three specimens of each type of IPS e.max ceramics (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) were made in three colours (A2, C2 and B3) by three fabrication techniques (layering – e.max Ceram Dentin; heat-pressing – e.max Press; CAD/CAM – e.max CAD). Specimens were made in the form of plates (10 mm x 12 mm x 0.8 mm). CIE L*a*b* values were measured by a spectrophotometer (X-Rite DTP 20 Pulse, Neu Isenburg, Germany) before and after exposure to 4% acetic acid at 80 °C for 16 hours (ISO 6872) to calculate translucency parameter (TP values). Statistical data were analysed using the IBM SPSS 22 software. Results IPS e.max Ceram Dentin had significantly the lowest TP values, and IPS e.max Press the highest TP values of all colours (A2, C2, B3), both prior and after exposure to acid (p<0.001). The difference in TP values among colours was evident in the IPS e.max Ceram Dentin material, both before and after exposure to acid with a great effect size (p<0.001; η2 = 0.702 and 0.741), and in the IPS e.max Press material (p<0.001, effect size 0.547 and 0.576). CAD/CAD specimens showed uniform TP values between three colours. Further, exposure to a corrosive medium did not result in a statistically significant change of TP values in any of the materials tested. Conclusions Different types of glass-ceramics showed significant difference in TP values both with respect to the fabrication technique and colour. Exposure to a corrosive medium did not result in a statistically significant change of TP values.

  4. New fabrication techniques for ring-array transducers for real-time 3D intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Lieu, Victor; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-10-01

    We have previously described miniature 2D array transducers integrated into a Cook Medical, Inc. vena cava filter deployment device. While functional, the fabrication technique was very labor intensive and did not lend itself well to efficient fabrication of large numbers of devices. We developed two new fabrication methods that we believe can be used to efficiently manufacture these types of devices in greater than prototype numbers. One transducer consisted of 55 elements operating near 5 MHz. The interelement spacing is 0.20 mm. It was constructed on a flat piece of copper-clad polyimide and then wrapped around an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical, Inc. inferior vena cava (IVC) filter deployment device. We used a braided wiring technology from Tyco Electronics Corp. to connect the elements to our real-time 3D ultrasound scanner. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 20% centered at 4.7 MHz and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was --82 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -37.0 dB. The second method consisted of a 46-cm long single layer flex circuit from MicroConnex that terminates in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable. This transducer had 70 elements at 0.157 mm interelement spacing operating at 4.8 MHz. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 29% and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was -83 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -33.0 dB. PMID:20458877

  5. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  6. Advanced Techniques for Simulating the Behavior of Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothier, M.; Bailey, M.

    2009-12-01

    research is to simulate the look and behavior of sand, this work will go beyond simple particle collision. In particular, we can continue to use our parallel algorithms not only on single particles but on particle “clumps” that consist of multiple combined particles. Since sand is typically not spherical in nature, these particle “clumps” help to simulate the coarse nature of sand. In a simulation environment, multiple combined particles could be used to simulate the polygonal and granular nature of sand grains. Thus, a diversity of sand particles can be generated. The interaction between these particles can then be parallelized using GPU hardware. As such, this research will investigate different graphics and physics techniques and determine the tradeoffs in performance and visual quality for sand simulation. An enhanced sand model through the use of high performance computing and GPUs has great potential to impact research for both earth and space scientists. Interaction with JPL has provided an opportunity for us to refine our simulation techniques that can ultimately be used for their vehicle simulator. As an added benefit of this work, advancements in simulating sand can also benefit scientists here on earth, especially in regard to understanding landslides and debris flows.

  7. Recent advances in fabrication of high-T{sub c} superconductors for electric power applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.

    1998-03-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports an applied superconductivity program entitled ''Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems.'' Activities within this program contribute to development of the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology needed for industry to proceed with the commercial development of electric power applications such as motors, generators, transformers, transmission cables, and current limiters. Research is conducted in three categories: wire development, systems technology development, and Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). Wire development activities are devoted to improving the critical current density (J{sub c}) of short-length HTS wires, whereas systems technology development focuses on fabrication of long-length wires, coils, and on magnets. The SPI activities are aimed at development of prototype products. Significant progress has been made in the development of (HTSs) for various applications: some applications have already made significant strides in the marketplace, while others are still in the developmental stages. For successful electric power applications, it is very important that the HTS be fabricated into long-length conductors that exhibit desired superconducting and mechanical properties. Several parameters of the PIT technique must be carefully controlled to obtain the desired properties. Long lengths of Bi-2223 tapes with respectable superconducting properties have been fabricated by a carefully designed thermomechanical treatment process. A 1-MVA capacity fault current limiter, a 286-hp motor, and 630-kVA transformers, and a 50-m-long conductor, all using HTSs, have already been demonstrated. While the use of HTS devices in the electric utility area has clear advantages, impediments to successful commercialization remain. Issues such as AC losses, conductor cost, and reliable superconducting joints must be addressed. The cost of HTS conductors are still quite high, and significant R and D

  8. A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Khericha

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

  9. Elastomeric PDMS Planoconvex Lenses Fabricated by a Confined Sessile Drop Technique.

    PubMed

    Ekgasit, S; Kaewmanee, N; Jangtawee, P; Thammacharoen, C; Donphoongpri, M

    2016-08-10

    The ubiquity of high quality smartphones at affordable prices not only accelerated the social penetration in the global population but also promoted nontraditional usage of smartphones as point-of-care medical diagnostic devices, sensors, and portable digital microscopes. This paper reveals a simple, rapid, cost-effective, and template-free technique for mass-scale production of an elastomeric PDMS (ePDMS) planoconvex lens capable of converting a smartphone into a portable digital microscope. By taking advantage of the resistance to spreading of liquid by a sharp edge, highly stable spherical cap of viscous liquid PDMS (lPDMS) on a smooth PMMA circular disk was fabricated. The axisymmetric spreading of lPDMS under the gravitational force and interfacial tension force enable the formation of spherical cap with a certain radius of curvature. A thermal treatment at 80 °C for 30 min cured the spherical cap lPDMS into a bubble-free ePDMS planoconvex lens. Lenses with focal lengths of 55.2-3.4 mm could be reproducibly fabricated by adjusting the volume of dispensed lPDMSs and diameter of PMMA disks. High-resolution panoramic microscope images without a distortion of small cylindrical object could be constructed on-the-fly using the imbedded smartphone app. Applications of the smartphone digital microscope equipped with an ePDMS planoconvex lens for imaging of micro printings, gun shot residues, cylindrical objects, and bullet toolmarks were explored. PMID:27419266

  10. Processing Techniques Developed to Fabricate Lanthanum Titanate Piezoceramic Material for High-Temperature Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic materials are potential candidates for use as actuators and sensors in intelligent gas turbine engines. For piezoceramics to be applied in gas turbine engines, they will have to be able to function in temperatures ranging from 1000 to 2500 F. However, the maximum use temperature for state-of-the-art piezoceramic materials is on the order of 300 to 400 F. Research activities have been initiated to develop high-temperature piezoceramic materials for gas turbine engine applications. Lanthanum titanate has been shown to have high-temperature piezoelectric properties with Curie temperatures of T(sub c) = 1500 C and use temperatures greater than 1000 C. However, the fabrication of lanthanum titanate poses serious challenges because of the very high sintering temperatures required for densification. Two different techniques have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to fabricate dense lanthanum titanate piezoceramic material. In one approach, lower sintering temperatures were achieved by adding yttrium oxide to commercially available lanthanum titanate powder. Addition of only 0.1 mol% yttrium oxide lowered the sintering temperature by as much as 300 C, to just 1100 C, and dense lanthanum titanate was produced by pressure-assisted sintering. The second approach utilized the same commercially available powders but used an innovative sintering approach called differential sintering, which did not require any additive.

  11. Hemoglobin protein hollow shells fabricated through covalent layer-by-layer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Li; He Qiang; Cui Yue; Wang Kewei; Li Junbai . E-mail: jbli@iccas.ac.cn

    2007-03-09

    Hemoglobin (Hb) protein microcapsules held together by cross-linker, glutaraldehyde (GA), were successfully fabricated by covalent layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The Schiff base reaction occurred on the colloid templates between the aldehyde groups of GA and free amino sites of Hb results in the formation of GA/Hb microcapsules after the removal of the templates. The structure of obtained monodisperse protein microcapsule was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The UV-Vis spectra measurements demonstrate the existence of Hb in the assembled capsules. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and potential-controlled amperometric measurements (I-t curve) confirm that hemoglobin microcapsules after fabrication remain their heme electroactivity. Moreover, direct electron transfer process from protein to electrode surface was performed to detect the heme electrochemistry without using any mediator or promoter. The experiments of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) by CLSM demonstrate that the hemoglobin protein microcapsules have an improved permeability comparing to the conventional polyelectrolyte microcapsules.

  12. Fabrication of two dimensional polyethylene terephthalate nanofluidic chip using hot embossing and thermal bonding technique

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhifu; Zou, Helin; Chen, Li; Xu, Shenbo

    2014-01-01

    We present in this paper a method for obtaining a low cost and high replication precision 2D (two dimensional) nanofluidic chip with a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) sheet, which uses hot embossing and a thermal bonding technique. The hot embossing process parameters were optimized by both experiments and the finite element method to improve the replication precision of the 2D nanochannels. With the optimized process parameters, 174.67 ± 4.51 nm wide and 179.00 ± 4.00 nm deep nanochannels were successfully replicated into the PET sheet with high replication precision of 98.4%. O2 plasma treatment was carried out before the bonding process to decrease the dimension loss and improve the bonding strength of the 2D nanofluidic chip. The bonding parameters were optimized by bonding rate of the nanofluidic chip. The experiment results show that the bonding strength of the 2D PET nanofluidic chip is 0.664 MPa, and the total dimension loss of 2D nanochannels is 4.34 ± 7.03 nm and 18.33 ± 9.52 nm, in width and depth, respectively. The fluorescence images demonstrate that there is no blocking or leakage over the entire micro- and nanochannels. With this fabrication technology, low cost polymer nanochannels can be fabricated, which allows for commercial manufacturing of nano-components. PMID:25553203

  13. Fabrication of carbon nanotube AFM probes using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kang, Won-Seok; Choi, Bung-Sam; Choi, Sung-Wook; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-tipped atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have shown a significant potential for obtaining high-resolution imaging of nanostructure and biological materials. In this paper, we report a simple method to fabricate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanoprobes for AFM using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Thiophenyl-modified SWNTs (SWNT-SHs) through amidation of SWNTs in chloroform allowed to be spread and form a stable Langmuir monolayer at the water/air interface. A simple two-step transfer process was used: (1) dipping conventional AFM probes into the Langmuir monolayer and (2) lifting the probes from the water surface. This results in the attachment of SWNTs onto the tips of AFM nanoprobes. We found that the SWNTs assembled on the nanoprobes were well-oriented and robust enough to maintain their shape and direction even after successive scans. AFM measurements of a nano-porous alumina substrate and deoxyribonucleic acid using SWNT-modified nanoprobes revealed that the curvature diameter of the nanoprobes was less than 3 nm and a fine resolution was obtained than that from conventional AFM probes. We also demonstrate that the LB method is a scalable process capable of simultaneously fabricating a large number of SWNT-modified nanoprobes.

  14. A technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns in conjunction with implant surgery.

    PubMed

    McRory, M Eric; Cagna, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an intraoral technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns immediately after surgical implant placement in extraction sites. The technique may be used with any implant system that provides a provisional abutment or an open-tray impression coping that can be modified for use as a provisional abutment. PMID:24461941

  15. Improved fabrication of melt electrospun tissue engineering scaffolds using direct writing and advanced electric field control.

    PubMed

    Ristovski, Nikola; Bock, Nathalie; Liao, Sam; Powell, Sean K; Ren, Jiongyu; Kirby, Giles T S; Blackwood, Keith A; Woodruff, Maria A

    2015-03-25

    Direct writing melt electrospinning is an additive manufacturing technique capable of the layer-by-layer fabrication of highly ordered 3d tissue engineering scaffolds from micron-diameter fibers. The utility of these scaffolds, however, is limited by the maximum achievable height of controlled fiber deposition, beyond which the structure becomes increasingly disordered. A source of this disorder is charge build-up on the deposited polymer producing unwanted coulombic forces. In this study, the authors introduce a novel melt electrospinning platform with dual voltage power supplies to reduce undesirable charge effects and improve fiber deposition control. The authors produced and characterized several 90° cross-hatched fiber scaffolds using a range of needle/collector plate voltages. Fiber thickness was found to be sensitive only to overall potential and invariant to specific tip/collector voltage. The authors also produced ordered scaffolds up to 200 layers thick (fiber spacing 1 mm and diameter 40 μm) and characterized structure in terms of three distinct zones: ordered, semiordered, and disordered. Our in vitro analysis indicates successful cell attachment and distribution throughout the scaffolds, with little evidence of cell death after seven days. This study demonstrates the importance of electrostatic control for reducing destabilizing polymer charge effects and enabling the fabrication of morphologically suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  16. Biomimetic Collagen–Hydroxyapatite Composite Fabricated via a Novel Perfusion-Flow Mineralization Technique

    PubMed Central

    Antebi, Ben; Cheng, Xingguo; Harris, Jeffrey N.; Gower, Laurie B.; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Prevalent three-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering are mineralized collagen–hydroxyapatite (Col/HA) composites. Conventional mineralization techniques are either to coat collagen scaffold surfaces with minerals or to simply mix collagen and mineral nanoparticles together. These conventional in vitro collagen mineralization methods are different from the in vivo bone formation process and often result in scaffolds that are not suitable for bone tissue engineering. In this study, a unique perfusion-flow (i.e., dynamic) in conjunction with a previously described polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) method was used to fabricate a porous Col/HA composite. The dynamic flow emulated the physiological extracellular fluid flow containing the mineralization ions, while the PILP method facilitated the deposition of the HA crystals within the collagen fibrils (i.e., intrafibrillar mineralization). By utilizing a dynamic PILP technique to mimic the in vivo bone formation process, the resultant Col/HA composite has a similar structure and compositions like human trabecular bone. A comparison of the dynamic and static mineralization methods revealed that the novel dynamic technique facilitates more efficient and homogenous mineral deposition throughout the Col/HA composite. The dynamic intrafibrillar mineralization method generated stiff Col/HA composites with excellent surface property for cell attachment and growth. The human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the Col/HA composites quickly remodeled the scaffolds and resulted in constructs with an extensive cell-derived extracellular matrix network. PMID:23157544

  17. Biomimetic collagen-hydroxyapatite composite fabricated via a novel perfusion-flow mineralization technique.

    PubMed

    Antebi, Ben; Cheng, Xingguo; Harris, Jeffrey N; Gower, Laurie B; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Ling, Jian

    2013-07-01

    Prevalent three-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering are mineralized collagen-hydroxyapatite (Col/HA) composites. Conventional mineralization techniques are either to coat collagen scaffold surfaces with minerals or to simply mix collagen and mineral nanoparticles together. These conventional in vitro collagen mineralization methods are different from the in vivo bone formation process and often result in scaffolds that are not suitable for bone tissue engineering. In this study, a unique perfusion-flow (i.e., dynamic) in conjunction with a previously described polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) method was used to fabricate a porous Col/HA composite. The dynamic flow emulated the physiological extracellular fluid flow containing the mineralization ions, while the PILP method facilitated the deposition of the HA crystals within the collagen fibrils (i.e., intrafibrillar mineralization). By utilizing a dynamic PILP technique to mimic the in vivo bone formation process, the resultant Col/HA composite has a similar structure and compositions like human trabecular bone. A comparison of the dynamic and static mineralization methods revealed that the novel dynamic technique facilitates more efficient and homogenous mineral deposition throughout the Col/HA composite. The dynamic intrafibrillar mineralization method generated stiff Col/HA composites with excellent surface property for cell attachment and growth. The human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the Col/HA composites quickly remodeled the scaffolds and resulted in constructs with an extensive cell-derived extracellular matrix network.

  18. Bonding techniques for the fabrication of internally cooled x-ray monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Smolenski, K.W.; Conolly, C.; Doing, P.; Kiang, B.; Shen, Q.

    1996-12-31

    At CHESS, 2,500 W total are absorbed by the first crystal of the double bounce monochromators located on the A2 and F2 wiggler beamlines. In order to dissipate this absorbed power and deliver the highest X-ray flux to an end station, the authors have explored the technique of internally cooling the silicon first crystals with water channels. This technique brings with it the need for reliable mechanical joints between the silicon diffracting surface and a glass or silicon water manifold. The joint must have structural strength to resist the internal water pressure and the cyclic heat load, be vacuum leak tight for operation in UHV, and not act as a source of residual strain in the crystal lattice of the diffracting surface. The authors have explored four bonding techniques which have been tested for their suitability to monochromator fabrication: direct silicon to silicon bonding, anodic glass to silicon bonding, a variety of ceramic and die attach adhesives (alumina, zirconia, silica/silver) and metallic diffusion bonding/brazing. In this paper, they characterize each method with respect to the requirements of structural integrity (bond tensile strength), residual strain (minimal effect on diffraction quality) and vacuum compatibility.

  19. Application of nanoimprinting technique for fabrication of trifocal diffractive lens with sine-like radial profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Doskolovich, Leonid L.; Bezus, Evgeni A.; Drew, Tom; Zhou, Kaiming; Sawalha, Kameel; Swadener, Greg; Wolffsohn, James S. W.

    2015-02-01

    The fabrication of submicron-height sine-like relief of a trifocal diffractive zone plate using a nanoimprinting technique is studied. The zone plate is intended for use in combined trifocal diffractive-refractive lenses and provides the possibility to form trifocal intraocular lenses with predetermined light intensity distribution between foci. The optical properties of the designed zone plate having the optical powers 3 D, 0, -3 D in the three main diffraction orders are theoretically and experimentally investigated. The results of the theoretical investigations are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The effects of the pupil size (lens diameter) as well as the wavelength-dependent behavior of the zone plate are also discussed.

  20. Surface energy control techniques for photomask fabrication and their characterizations with scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2008-05-01

    Most of photomask issues such as pattern collapse, HAZE, and cleaning damage relate to behavior of mask surfaces. Therefore it is coming to be important to control surface energy in photomask processes. Especially adhesion analysis in micro region is strongly desired to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. Quantitative measurements of adhesive forces of resists on photomask blanks were realized with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques. Then surface energy on photomask blanks was able to be controlled by modification with some silanization reagents. In addition, adhesive forces of resists on surfaces modified with some silanes were able to be also controlled. The SPM method is proved to be effective for measuring adhesive energy of micro patterns on photomask blanks.

  1. Two-step fabrication technique of gold tips for use in point-contact spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Narasiwodeyar, S.; Dwyer, M.; Liu, M.; Park, W. K. Greene, L. H.

    2015-03-15

    For a successful point-contact spectroscopy (PCS) measurement, metallic tips of proper shape and smoothness are essential to ensure the ballistic nature of a point-contact junction. Until recently, the fabrication of Au tips suitable for use in point-contact spectroscopy has remained more of an art involving a trial and error method rather than an automated scientific process. To address these issues, we have developed a technique with which one can prepare high quality Au tips reproducibly and systematically. It involves an electronic control of the driving voltages used for an electrochemical etching of a gold wire in a HCl-glycerol mixture or a HCl solution. We find that a stopping current, below which the circuit is set to shut off, is a single very important parameter to produce an Au tip of desired shape. We present detailed descriptions for a two-step etching process for Au tips and also test results from PCS measurements using them.

  2. Crystallization behavior of MgB2 films fabricated on copper cathodes via electrochemical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huazhe; Sun, Xiaguang; Yu, Xiaoming; Qi, Yang

    2012-11-01

    An electrochemical technique was devised and settled to prepare MgB2 films on copper cathodes in MgCl2-Mg(BO2)2-NaCl-KCl molten salts. X-ray diffraction and scanning probe microscopy were adopted to investigate the phase composition and elements distribution of sample. R-T curve of film was monitored through standard four-probe method. Transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis were chosen to investigate the crystallization behavior and morphology of the films at different electrolytic temperatures. The results indicated that MgB2 films were successfully fabricated on the copper cathodes, and the optimal electrolytic temperature was 601 °C. It was presumed that the non-conducting MgO impurities hindered continuous growth of MgB2 grain, which may result in dendritic growth of MgB2 grain.

  3. Stretchable photo sensor based on graphene/perylene composite utilizing electrohydrodynamic fabrication technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Shawkat; Bae, Jinho; Lee, Chong Hyun

    2015-07-01

    We propose a stretchable photo sensor fabricated on uniform ridged polydimethylsiloxane PDMS substrate through electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) technique. An active layer, perylene/graphene composite thin film (67nm) is sandwiched between top and bottom ITO electrodes. The electrical conductivity of the perylene is enhanced by blending with graphene. The photo sensor changes the terminal resistance from 108MΩ to 87MΩ against light intensity of 0~400lux, respectively. To verify a stretchability, the proposed photo sensor under mechanical strain of 25% is normally worked, and it is stretchable up to 50% strain, maximally. A mechanical bendability test is carried out by folding the device for 1000 endurance cycles, while there is no change in the electrical behavior.

  4. New fabrication technique for highly sensitive qPlus sensor with well-defined spring constant.

    PubMed

    Labidi, Hatem; Kupsta, Martin; Huff, Taleana; Salomons, Mark; Vick, Douglas; Taucer, Marco; Pitters, Jason; Wolkow, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    A new technique for the fabrication of highly sensitive qPlus sensor for atomic force microscopy (AFM) is described. The focused ion beam was used to cut then weld onto a bare quartz tuning fork a sharp micro-tip from an electrochemically etched tungsten wire. The resulting qPlus sensor exhibits high resonance frequency and quality factor allowing increased force gradient sensitivity. Its spring constant can be determined precisely which allows accurate quantitative AFM measurements. The sensor is shown to be very stable and could undergo usual UHV tip cleaning including e-beam and field evaporation as well as in situ STM tip treatment. Preliminary results with STM and AFM atomic resolution imaging at 4.5 K of the silicon Si(111)-7×7 surface are presented.

  5. Nanosphere lithography based technique for fabrication of large area well ordered metal particle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelo, Steven J.; Lam, Si-Ty; Gibson, Gary A.; Sheng, Xia; Henze, Dick

    2012-03-01

    Nanosphere lithography is an effective technique for high throughput fabrication of well-ordered patterns, but expanding the method to large area coverage of nanoparticles less than 300 nm in diameter while maintaining good order has proven challenging. Here we demonstrate a nanosphere lithography based technique for fabricating large area, wellordered arrays of hemispherical metal particles which pushes the limits of these size constraints. First, large area monolayers of polystyrene (PS) nanospheres are assembled at an air-water interface and then transferred to a submerged substrate. The submerged substrate is supported at a 10° angle so that the water draining speed can be used to control the transfer rate, which is essential for hydrophobic substrates such as the polymer-coated glass used in our work. A double liftoff procedure was used to transfer the PS pattern to a silver particle array on an arbitrary substrate, achieving tunable control over the final metal particle diameter and spacing in the range of 50-150 nm and 100-200 nm, respectively. Additional control over particle shape and diameter can be obtained by modifying the substrate surface energy. For example, depositing silver on ITO-coated glass rather than a more hydrophilic clean glass substrate leads to a more hemispherical particle shape and a diameter reduction of 20%. Peak wavelength-selective reflection greater than 70% and total extinction greater than 90% were measured. The intensity, position and bandwidth of the main plasmon resonance of the arrays were shown to have minimal angle dependence up to at least 30° off normal.

  6. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  7. Electrochemical Evaluation of Lead Base Composite Anodes Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbasi, Maryam; Keshavarz Alamdari, Eskandar

    2015-04-01

    Accumulative roll bonding is used for the first time in lead systems to fabricate advanced lead base composite anodes. For this purpose, Ag as the most common and effective additive, Co as the best metallic immiscible substitution for Ag, and MnO2 as the ceramic and electrocatalytic agent have been used as additives to produce anodes. The accumulative roll bonding processed sheets have been fabricated under determined conditions. The electrochemical properties of the prepared samples are investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, Polarization tests, electrowinning tests, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results indicate that the ARB-processed composite lead sheets can be perfectly used as novel developed anodes. The advantages include 5.51 times increase of current density, in the Pb-pct0.5Ag 9-pass sample compared to pure lead anode, decreased charge transfer resistance from 56.31 (Ω cm2) in pure lead anode to 17.5 (Ω cm2) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (72 pct lower), and decreased oxygen evolution potential from 1.95 (V/SHE) in pure lead anode to 1.77 (V/SHE) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (0.18 (V/SHE) lower). Electrowinning tests results reveal Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass showed best anodic performance withsignificant lower compared corrosion rate (75 pct), product and electrolyte contamination, slime formation, energy consumption and higher Zn deposit and energy conservation (to 294 kWh/t-Zn). Finest Zn deposit morphology (effective reduced grain size corresponding to smoothness and compaction) has been supplied by Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass sample resulted from enhanced growth rate of Zn in lack of Pb contaminations that could act as suitable nucleation sites.

  8. Thermal Skin fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques applicable to Thermal Skin structures were investigated, including: (1) chemical machining; (2) braze bonding; (3) diffusion bonding; and (4) electron beam welding. Materials investigated were nickel and nickel alloys. Sample Thermal Skin panels were manufactured using the advanced fabrication techniques studied and were structurally tested. Results of the program included: (1) development of improved chemical machining processes for nickel and several nickel alloys; (2) identification of design geometry limits; (3) identification of diffusion bonding requirements; (4) development of a unique diffusion bonding tool; (5) identification of electron beam welding limits; and (6) identification of structural properties of Thermal Skin material.

  9. Recent advances in biosensor techniques for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K R

    2006-05-24

    Biosensors for environmental applications continue to show advances and improvements in areas such as sensitivity, selectivity and simplicity. In addition to detecting and measuring specific compounds or compound classes such as pesticides, hazardous industrial chemicals, toxic metals, and pathogenic bacteria, biosensors and bioanalytical assays have been designed to measure biological effects such as cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, biological oxygen demand, pathogenic bacteria, and endocrine disruption effects. This article is intended to discuss recent advances in the area of biosensors for environmental applications.

  10. Quantification of Changes in Mulberry Silk Fabrics due to Different Laundering: Using WAXS Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswara, P.; Nivedita, S.; Somashekar, R.

    2011-07-01

    Loom finished mulberry silk fabrics (Taffeta) were machine laundered and hand laundered several times. X-ray diffractograms of pure and laundered fabrics were used to calculate microstructural parameters like average crystallite size (D) and lattice strain (Vegr) employing Williamson-Hall plot. Microstructural parameters were compared with measured mechanical properties like breaking load, tenacity, and elongation of warp yarns unraveled from fabrics. Surface morphology and texture of silk fabrics changed upon washing is evident from SEM images.

  11. Automatic fabrication of 3-dimensional tissues using cell sheet manipulator technique.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Wada, Masanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-03-01

    Automated manufacturing is a key for tissue-engineered therapeutic products to become common-place and economical. Here, we developed an automatic cell sheet stacking apparatus to fabricate 3-dimensional tissue-engineered constructs exploiting our cell sheet manipulator technique, where cell sheets harvested from temperature-responsive culture dishes are stacked into a multilayered cell sheet. By optimizing the stacking conditions and cell seeding conditions, the apparatus was eventually capable of reproducibly making five-layer human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) sheets with a thickness of approximately 70-80 μm within 100 min. Histological sections and confocal topographies of the five-layer HSMM sheets revealed a stratified structure with no delamination. In cell counts using trypsinization, the live cell numbers in one-, three- and five-layer HSMM sheets were equivalent to the seeded cell numbers at 1 h after the stacking processes; however, after subsequent 5-day static cultures, the live cell numbers of the five-layered HSMM sheets decreased slightly, while one- and three-layer HSMM sheets maintained their live cell numbers. This suggests that there are thickness limitations in maintaining tissues in a static culture. We concluded that by combining our cell sheet manipulator technique and industrial robot technology we can create a secure, cost-effective manufacturing system able to produce tissue-engineered products from cell sheets. PMID:24370007

  12. Fabrication of nanostructure by physical vapor deposition with glancing angle deposition technique and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horprathum, M.; Eiamchai, P.; Kaewkhao, J.; Chananonnawathorn, C.; Patthanasettakul, V.; Limwichean, S.; Nuntawong, N.; Chindaudom, P.

    2014-09-01

    A nanostructural thin film is one of the highly exploiting research areas particularly in applications in sensor, photocatalytic, and solar-cell technologies. In the past two decades, the integration of glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) technique to physical vapor deposition (PVD) process has gained significant attention for well-controlled multidimensional nanomorphologies because of fast, simple, cost-effective, and mass-production capability. The performance and functional properties of the coated thin films generally depend upon their nanostructural compositions, i.e., large aspect ratio, controllable porosity, and shape. Such structural platforms make the fabricated thin films very practical for several realistic applications. We therefore present morphological and nanostructural properties of various deposited materials, which included metals, i.e., silver (Ag), and oxide compounds, i.e., tungsten oxide (WO3), titanium dioxide (TiO2), and indium tin oxide (ITO). Different PVD techniques based on DC magnetron sputtering and electron-beam evaporation, both with the integrated GLAD component, were discussed. We further explore engineered nanostructures which enable controls of optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. These improvements led to several practical applications in surface-enhanced Raman, smart windows, gas sensors, self-cleaning materials and transparent conductive oxides (TCO).

  13. Applications of Semiconductor Fabrication Methods to Nanomedicine: A Review of Recent Inventions and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, Achanta; Gimi, Barjor; Hu, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We live in a world of convergence where scientific techniques from a variety of seemingly disparate fields are being applied cohesively to the study and solution of biomedical problems. For instance, the semiconductor processing field has been primarily developed to cater to the needs of the ever decreasing transistor size and cost while increasing functionality of electronic circuits. In recent years, pioneers in this field have equipped themselves with a powerful understanding of how the same techniques can be applied in the biomedical field to develop new and efficient systems for the diagnosis, analysis and treatment of various conditions in the human body. In this paper, we review the major inventions and experimental methods which have been developed for nano/micro fluidic channels, nanoparticles fabricated by top-down methods, and in-vivo nanoporous microcages for effective drug delivery. This paper focuses on the information contained in patents as well as the corresponding technical publications. The goal of the paper is to help emerging scientists understand and improvise over these inventions. PMID:24312161

  14. Lithographic techniques and surface chemistries for the fabrication of PEG-passivated protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Balaji; Castelino, Kenneth; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a new technique to fabricate patterns of functional molecules surrounded by a coating of the inert poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on glass slides for applications in protein microarray technology. The chief advantages of this technique are that it is based entirely on standard lithography processes, makes use of glass slides employing surface chemistries that are standard in the microarray community, and has the potential to massively scale up the density of microarray spots. It is shown that proteins and antibodies can be made to self-assemble on the functional patterns in a microarray format, with the PEG coating acting as an effective passivating agent to prevent non-specific protein adsorption. Various standard surface chemistries such as aldehyde, epoxy and amine are explored for the functional layer, and it is conclusively demonstrated that only an amine-terminated surface satisfies all the process constraints imposed by the lithography process sequence. The effectiveness of this microarray technology is demonstrated by patterning fluorescent streptavidin and a fluorescent secondary antibody using the well-known and highly specific interaction between biotin and streptavidin. PMID:16457998

  15. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Jiang, Wenxue; Sun, Yufu; Li, Hui

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young's modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:27404126

  16. Creating tissues from textiles: scalable nonwoven manufacturing techniques for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tuin, S A; Pourdeyhimi, B; Loboa, E G

    2016-02-23

    Electrospun nonwovens have been used extensively for tissue engineering applications due to their inherent similarities with respect to fibre size and morphology to that of native extracellular matrix (ECM). However, fabrication of large scaffold constructs is time consuming, may require harsh organic solvents, and often results in mechanical properties inferior to the tissue being treated. In order to translate nonwoven based tissue engineering scaffold strategies to clinical use, a high throughput, repeatable, scalable, and economic manufacturing process is needed. We suggest that nonwoven industry standard high throughput manufacturing techniques (meltblowing, spunbond, and carding) can meet this need. In this study, meltblown, spunbond and carded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nonwovens were evaluated as tissue engineering scaffolds using human adipose derived stem cells (hASC) and compared to electrospun nonwovens. Scaffolds were seeded with hASC and viability, proliferation, and differentiation were evaluated over the course of 3 weeks. We found that nonwovens manufactured via these industry standard, commercially relevant manufacturing techniques were capable of supporting hASC attachment, proliferation, and both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hASC, making them promising candidates for commercialization and translation of nonwoven scaffold based tissue engineering strategies.

  17. Fabrication of uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds using a gas-in-liquid templating technique.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takayuki; Aokawa, Ryuta; Shigemitsu, Takamasa; Kawakami, Koei; Yoshida, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Design of porous scaffolds in tissue engineering field was challenging. Uniform immobilization of cells in the scaffolds with high porosity was essential for homogeneous tissue formation. The present study was aimed at fabricating uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds with porosity >74% using the gas-in-liquid foam templating technique. To this end, we used gelatin, microbial transglutaminase and argon gas as a scaffold material, cross-linker of the protein and porogen of scaffold, respectively. We confirmed that a porosity of >74% could be achieved by increasing the gas volume delivered to a gelatin solution. Pore size in the scaffold could be controlled by stirring speed, stirring time and the pore size of the filter through which the gas passed. The foaming technique enabled us to uniformly immobilize a human hepatoblastoma cell line in scaffold. Engraftment efficiency of the cell line entrapped within the scaffold in nude mice was higher than that of cells in free-form. These results showed that the uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds were promising for tissue engineering.

  18. Creating tissues from textiles: scalable nonwoven manufacturing techniques for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tuin, S A; Pourdeyhimi, B; Loboa, E G

    2016-02-01

    Electrospun nonwovens have been used extensively for tissue engineering applications due to their inherent similarities with respect to fibre size and morphology to that of native extracellular matrix (ECM). However, fabrication of large scaffold constructs is time consuming, may require harsh organic solvents, and often results in mechanical properties inferior to the tissue being treated. In order to translate nonwoven based tissue engineering scaffold strategies to clinical use, a high throughput, repeatable, scalable, and economic manufacturing process is needed. We suggest that nonwoven industry standard high throughput manufacturing techniques (meltblowing, spunbond, and carding) can meet this need. In this study, meltblown, spunbond and carded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nonwovens were evaluated as tissue engineering scaffolds using human adipose derived stem cells (hASC) and compared to electrospun nonwovens. Scaffolds were seeded with hASC and viability, proliferation, and differentiation were evaluated over the course of 3 weeks. We found that nonwovens manufactured via these industry standard, commercially relevant manufacturing techniques were capable of supporting hASC attachment, proliferation, and both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hASC, making them promising candidates for commercialization and translation of nonwoven scaffold based tissue engineering strategies. PMID:26908485

  19. Fabrication of nanostructure by physical vapor deposition with glancing angle deposition technique and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horprathum, M. Eiamchai, P. Patthanasettakul, V.; Limwichean, S.; Nuntawong, N.; Chindaudom, P.; Kaewkhao, J.; Chananonnawathorn, C.

    2014-09-25

    A nanostructural thin film is one of the highly exploiting research areas particularly in applications in sensor, photocatalytic, and solar-cell technologies. In the past two decades, the integration of glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) technique to physical vapor deposition (PVD) process has gained significant attention for well-controlled multidimensional nanomorphologies because of fast, simple, cost-effective, and mass-production capability. The performance and functional properties of the coated thin films generally depend upon their nanostructural compositions, i.e., large aspect ratio, controllable porosity, and shape. Such structural platforms make the fabricated thin films very practical for several realistic applications. We therefore present morphological and nanostructural properties of various deposited materials, which included metals, i.e., silver (Ag), and oxide compounds, i.e., tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}), titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), and indium tin oxide (ITO). Different PVD techniques based on DC magnetron sputtering and electron-beam evaporation, both with the integrated GLAD component, were discussed. We further explore engineered nanostructures which enable controls of optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. These improvements led to several practical applications in surface-enhanced Raman, smart windows, gas sensors, self-cleaning materials and transparent conductive oxides (TCO)

  20. Automatic fabrication of 3-dimensional tissues using cell sheet manipulator technique.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Wada, Masanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-03-01

    Automated manufacturing is a key for tissue-engineered therapeutic products to become common-place and economical. Here, we developed an automatic cell sheet stacking apparatus to fabricate 3-dimensional tissue-engineered constructs exploiting our cell sheet manipulator technique, where cell sheets harvested from temperature-responsive culture dishes are stacked into a multilayered cell sheet. By optimizing the stacking conditions and cell seeding conditions, the apparatus was eventually capable of reproducibly making five-layer human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) sheets with a thickness of approximately 70-80 μm within 100 min. Histological sections and confocal topographies of the five-layer HSMM sheets revealed a stratified structure with no delamination. In cell counts using trypsinization, the live cell numbers in one-, three- and five-layer HSMM sheets were equivalent to the seeded cell numbers at 1 h after the stacking processes; however, after subsequent 5-day static cultures, the live cell numbers of the five-layered HSMM sheets decreased slightly, while one- and three-layer HSMM sheets maintained their live cell numbers. This suggests that there are thickness limitations in maintaining tissues in a static culture. We concluded that by combining our cell sheet manipulator technique and industrial robot technology we can create a secure, cost-effective manufacturing system able to produce tissue-engineered products from cell sheets.

  1. Simple technique for the fabrication of a penta prism with high accuracy right angle deviation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Pavan Kumar, Y

    2007-09-10

    What we believe to be a new technique for the fabrication of a penta prism (PP) with high accuracy right angle deviation of the incident beam is presented. We derive simple formulas relating to the error in right angle deviation with the errors in 45 degrees (beta) and 90 degrees (delta) angles of a PP, and we determine error in right angle deviation from the angle ((error in right angle deviation)r) between the plane wavefronts reflected from the right angled surfaces (external Fresnel reflection on the entrance surface and internal Fresnel reflection on the exit surface) of a PP and the angular error (delta) between the same surfaces. The error in right angle deviation is determined from the measurement of (error in right angle deviation)r using an autocollimator and a Fizeau interferometer, and error in right angle deviation is corrected to a high order of accuracy during the final stage of polishing one of the slanted surfaces of the PP. A new technique to determine the magnitude and direction of the small values of (error in right angle deviation)r is proposed and verified. The result for a PP is presented.

  2. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Jiang, Wenxue; Sun, Yufu; Li, Hui

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young's modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering.

  3. Solid Dispersion Matrix Tablet Comprising Indomethacin-PEG-HPMC Fabricated with Fusion and Mold Technique.

    PubMed

    Mesnukul, A; Yodkhum, K; Phaechamud, T

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to fabricate the polyethylene glycol matrix tablet by mold technique. Indomethacin and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose were used as model drug and polymer, respectively, in PEG matrix system. The physical and drug release characteristics of developed matrix tablet were studied. This inert carrier system comprising 7:3 polyethylene glycol 4000: polyethylene glycol 400 could effectively enhance the solubility of indomethacin and an addition of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose could sustain the drug release. Scanning electron microscope photomicrograph indicated the drug diffusion outward through the porous network of this developed matrix tablet into the dissolution fluid. Least square fitting the experimental dissolution data to the mathematical expressions (power law, first-order, Higuchi's and zero-order) indicated the drug release kinetics primarily as Fickian diffusion. Both the enhancement of drug dissolution and the prolongation of the drug release could be achieved for aqueous insoluble drug such as, indomethacin, by using polyethylene glycol-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose matrix system prepared with melting and mold technique. PMID:20502547

  4. Advanced engineering tools for design and fabrication of a custom nasal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Inês; Leal, Nuno; Silva, Pedro; da Costa Ferreira, A.; Neto, Rui J.; Lino, F. Jorge; Reis, Ana

    2012-09-01

    Unexpected external defects resulting from neoplasms, burns, congenital malformations, trauma or other diseases, particularly when involving partial or total loss of an external organ, can be emotionally devastating. These defects can be restored with prosthesis, obtained by different techniques, materials and methods. The increase of patient numbers and cost constraints lead to the need of exploring new techniques that can increase efficiency. The main goal of this project was to develop a full engineering-based manufacturing process to obtain soft-tissue prosthesis that could provide faster and less expensive options in the manufacturing of customized prosthesis, and at the same time being able to reproduce the highest degree of details, with the maximum comfort for the patient. Design/methodology/approach - This case report describes treatment using silicone prosthesis with an anatomic retention for an 80-years-old woman with a rhinectomy. The proposed methodology integrates non-contact structured light scanning, CT and reverse engineering with CAD/CAM and additive manufacturing technology. Findings - The proposed protocol showed encouraging results since reveals being a better solution for fabricating custom-made facial prostheses for asymmetrical organs than conventional approaches. The process allows the attainment of prosthesis with the minimum contact and discomfort for the patient, disclosing excellent results in terms of aesthetic, prosthesis retention and in terms of time and resources consumed.

  5. Fabrication of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Optics: A Deterministic, Precision Engineering Approach to Optical Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The mirror assembly of the AXAF observatory consists of four concentric, confocal, Wolter type 1 telescopes. Each telescope includes two conical grazing incidence mirrors, a paraboloid followed by a hyperboloid. Fabrication of these state-or-the-art optics is now complete, with predicted performance that surpasses the goals of the program. The fabrication of these optics, whose size and requirements exceed those of any previous x-ray mirrors, presented a challenging task requiring the use of precision engineering in many different forms. Virtually all of the equipment used for this effort required precision engineering. Accurate metrology required deterministic support of the mirrors in order to model the gravity distortions which will not be present on orbit. The primary axial instrument, known as the Precision Metrology Station (PMS), was a unique scanning Fizeau interferometer. After metrology was complete, the optics were placed in specially designed Glass Support Fixtures (GSF's) for installation on the Automated Cylindrical Grinder/Polishers (ACG/P's). The GSF's were custom molded for each mirror element to match the shape of the outer surface to minimize distortions of the inner surface. The final performance of the telescope is expected to far exceed the original goals and expectations of the program.

  6. Development of Hot Pressing as a Low Cost Processing Technique for Fuel Cell Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V

    2003-01-14

    Dependable, plentiful, and economical energy has been the driving force for financial, industrial, and political growth in the US since the mid 19th century. For a country whose progress is so deeply rooted in abundant energy and whose current political agenda involves stabilizing world fossil fuel prices, the development of a reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly power generating source seems compulsory. The maturing of high technology fuel cells may be the panacea the country will find indispensable to free itself from foreign dependence. Fuel cells offer an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions. Fuel cells have few moving parts and run almost silently. Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly to electrical energy. Unlike batteries, which store a finite amount of energy, fuel cells will generate electricity continuously, as long as fuel and oxidant are available to the electrodes. Additionally, fuel cells offer clean, efficient, and reliable power and they can be operated using a variety of fuels. Hence, the fuel cell is an extremely promising technology. Over the course of this research, the fundamental knowledge related to ceramic processing, sintering, and hot pressing to successfully hot press a single operational SOFC in one step has been developed. Ceramic powder processing for each of the components of an SOFC has bene tailored towards this goal. Processing parameter for the electrolyte and cathode have been studied and developed until they converted. Several anode fabrication techniques have been developed. Additionally, a novel anode structured has been developed and refined. These individual processes have been cultivated until a single cell SOFC has been fabricated in one step.

  7. Fabrication of ultra-fine grained aluminium tubes by RTES technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadeh, H. Abrinia, K.

    2015-04-15

    Recently, repetitive tube expansion and shrinking have been exploited as a means for producing ultra-fine grained and nano-crystalline microstructures for magnesium alloy tubes. This method includes two different half-cycles and was based on pressing a tubular part through an angular channel die with two shear zones. Since the aluminium alloys are the most widely used materials in industries, in this study, repetitive tube expansion and shrinking as a new severe plastic deformation technique was applied to commercially pure aluminium for fabricating ultra-fine grained aluminium tubes for the first time and the ability of this process in significant grain refinement is determined even after single cycle. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to evaluate the microstructure of the repetitive tube expansion and shrinking processed materials and the examinations showed ultra-fine grains with the average grain size of 320 nm after one cycle of repetitive tube expansion and shrinking. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength increased notably by the factor of 2.17 and 1.27 respectively, after one cycle of repetitive tube expansion and shrinking, whereas the elongation to failure as well as the uniform elongation decreased. Furthermore, micro-hardness distribution through the part's section proposed the hardness increasing to ~ 55 HV from the initial value of ~ 28 HV after one cycle of repetitive tube expansion and shrinking. - Highlights: • RTES was introduced for fabricating the UFGed AA1050 tubes for the first time. • Nano-grained AA1050 tube was obtained by RTES process. • Grain size of ~ 320 nm was obtained after two half-cycles of RTES process. • Yield and ultimate strength increased by the factor of 2.17 and 1.27 respectively. • The microhardness increased to ~ 55 HV from the initial value of ~ 28 HV.

  8. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    NARloy-Z alloy (Cu-3 percent, Ag-0.5 percent, Zr) is a state of the art alloy currently used for fabricating rocket engine combustion chamber liners. Research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State – Applied Research Laboratory has shown that thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z can be increased significantly by adding diamonds to form a composite (NARloy-Z-D). NARloy-Z-D is also lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes make this advanced composite material an ideal candidate for fabricating combustion chamber liner for an advanced rocket engine. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. This paper describes the process development for fabricating a subscale high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D combustion chamber liner using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). The FAST process uses a mixture of NARloy-Z and diamond powders which is sintered under pressure at elevated temperatures. Several challenges were encountered, i.e., segregation of diamonds, machining the super hard NARloy-Z-D composite, net shape fabrication and nondestructive examination. The paper describes how these challenges were addressed. Diamonds coated with copper (CuD) appear to give the best results. A near net shape subscale combustion chamber liner is being fabricated by diffusion bonding cylindrical rings of NARloy-Z-CuD using the FAST process.

  9. A technique for indirect fabrication of an implant-supported, screw-retained, fixed provisional restoration in the esthetic zone.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Ercoli, Carlo

    2009-12-01

    This article describes an alternative technique for the fabrication of an implant-supported, screw-retained, fixed provisional restoration in the esthetic zone. After an implant-level impression is made with a polyether impression material, the provisional restoration is fabricated indirectly. This technique is easy, saves time, and has economic advantages, while maintaining color stability and esthetic properties for the provisional restoration. It may be contraindicated for severely misaligned implants that require extensive reduction of the implant temporary abutments and denture teeth laminates.

  10. An Alternate Vista in Rehabilitation of Cranial Defects: Combining Digital and Manual Techniques to Fabricate a Hybrid Cranioplast.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harsimran; Nanda, Aditi; Koli, Dheeraj; Verma, Mahesh; Singh, Hukum; Bishnoi, Ishu; Pathak, Pooja; Gupta, Ankur

    2015-06-01

    The desired features of a cranioplast include providing an acceptable contour, continuity with the remaining skull (marginal adaptation), improvising the aesthetic outcome, providing a strengthened prosthesis to avoid fracture in case of repeat trauma, and protecting the remaining neurological structures. Combining digital and manual techniques to fabricate a hybrid polymethylmethacrylate cranioplast during the rehabilitation of a pediatric patient with cranial defect has been described. Utilization of digital techniques (rapid prototyping to obtain skull analog) and manual (hand) sculpting of the prosthesis strengthened with glass fiber enabled the authors to fabricate a hybrid cranioplast. Satisfactory outcome was achieved.

  11. Advanced Millimeter-Wave Security Portal Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-04-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This paper details a number of techniques developed over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, as well as high frequency high bandwidth techniques. Implementation of some of these methods will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems.

  12. Development of nano-fabrication technique utilizing self-organizational behavior of point defects induced by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Noriko; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2006-04-01

    The present authors proposed a novel nano-fabrication technique that is able to arrange the fine cells orderly, based on their finding in GaSb implanted at a low temperature. In this article, first the experimental results that anomalous cellular structure was formed in GaSb by ion implantation is introduced and the self-organizational formation mechanism of the structure is described. Next a nano-fabrication technique that utilizes focused ion beam is described. This technique consists of two procedures, i.e. the formation process of the voids array and the development of the initial array to ordered cellular structure. Finally, the nano-fabrication is actually performed by this technique and their results are reported. Fabrication succeeded in structures where the dot (cell) interval was 100 nm or larger. The minimum ion dose for initial voids which develops to the ordered cellular structure is evaluated. It is also shown that the substrate temperature during implantation is an essential parameter for this technique.

  13. Microfluidic-based photocatalytic microreactor for environmental application: a review of fabrication substrates and techniques, and operating parameters.

    PubMed

    Das, Susmita; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Photochemical technology with microfluidics is emerging as a new platform in environmental science. Microfluidic technology has various advantages, like better mixing and a shorter diffusion distance for the reactants and products; and uniform distribution of light on the photocatalyst. Depending on the material type and related applications, several fabrication techniques have been adopted by various researchers. Microreactors have been prepared by various techniques, such as lithography, etching, mechanical microcutting technology, etc. Lithography can be classified into photolithography, soft lithography and X-ray lithography techniques whereas the etching process is divided into wet etching (chemical etching) and dry etching (plasma etching) techniques. Several substrates, like polymers, such as polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS), polymethyle-methacrylate (PMMA), hydrogel, etc.; metals, such as stainless steel, titanium foil, etc.; glass, such as silica capillary, glass slide, etc.; and ceramics have been used for microchannel fabrication. During degradation in a microreactor, the degradation efficiency is affected by few important parameters such as flow rate, initial concentration of the target compound, microreactor dimensions, light intensity, photocatalyst structure and catalyst support. The present paper discusses and critically reviews fabrication techniques and substrates used for microchannel fabrication and critical operating parameters for organics, especially dye degradation in the microreactor. The kinetics of degradation has also been discussed. PMID:27193741

  14. Influence of fabrication technique on the fiber pushout behavior in a sapphire-reinforced NiAl matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asthana, R.; Tewari, S. N.; Bowman, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    Directional solidification (DS) of “powder-cloth” (PC) processed sapphire-NiAl composites was carried out to examine the influence of fabrication technique on the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength, measured using a fiber-pushout technique. The DS process replaced the fine, equiaxed NiAl grain structure of the PC composites with an oriented grain structure comprised of large columnar NiAl grains aligned parallel to the fiber axis, with fibers either completely engulfed within the NiAl grains or anchored at one to three grain boundaries. The load-displacement behavior during the pushout test exhibited an initial “pseudoelastic” response, followed by an “inelastic” response, and finally a “frictional” sliding response. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and the fracture behavior during fiber pushout were investigated using an interrupted pushout test and fractography, as functions of specimen thickness (240 to 730 μm) and fabrication technique. The composites fabricated using the PC and the DS techniques had different matrix and interface structures and appreciably different interfacial shear strengths. In the DS composites, where the fiber-matrix interfaces were identical for all the fibers, the interfacial debond shear stresses were larger for the fibers embedded completely within the NiAl grains and smaller for the fibers anchored at a few grain boundaries. The matrix grain boundaries coincident on sapphire fibers were observed to be the preferred sites for crack formation and propagation. While the frictional sliding stress appeared to be independent of the fabrication technique, the interfacial debond shear stresses were larger for the DS composites compared to the PC composites. The study highlights the potential of the DS technique to grow single-crystal NiAl matrix composites reinforced with sapphire fibers, with fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength appreciably greater than that attainable by the current solid

  15. Novel Engineering and Fabrication Techniques Tested in Low-Noise- Research Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Cameron C.

    2003-01-01

    A major source of fan noise in commercial turbofan engines is the interaction of the wake from the fan blades with the stationary vanes (stators) directly behind them. The Trailing Edge Blowing (TEB) project team at the NASA Glenn Research Center designed and fabricated new fan blades to study the effects of fan trailing edge blowing as a potential noise-reduction concept. The intent is to fill the rotor wake by supplying air to the rotor blade trailing edge at the proper conditions to minimize the wake deficit, and thus generate less noise. The TEB hardware is designed for the Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) test rig in Glenn's Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory. For this test, the air is fed from an external supply through the shaft of the rig. It is distributed to the base of each blade through an impeller, where it is forced into a plenum at the core of each blade. In actual engine configuration, air would most likely be bled from the compressor, but only at times when noise is an issue, such as takeoffs and landings. Glenn researchers designed and manufactured the blades in-house, using new techniques and concepts. The skins, which were designed for maximum strength in the directions of highest stress, were molded from multiple layers of carbon fiber. Considerable use was made of rapid prototyping techniques, such as laser sintering. The core was sintered from a lightweight polymer, and the retainer was CNC-machined (computer numerical control machined) from aluminum. All the components were joined with a cold-cure aerospace adhesive. These techniques and processes reduced the overall cost and allowed the new concept to be studied much sooner than would be possible using traditional fabrication methods. Since this test rig did not support the use of blade-monitoring techniques such as strain gauges, extensive bench testing was required to qualify the design. The blades were examined using a variety of methods including holography, pull tests (cyclic and

  16. Recent advances in microscopic techniques for visualizing leukocytes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rohit; Tikoo, Shweta; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes are inherently motile and interactive cells. Recent advances in intravital microscopy approaches have enabled a new vista of their behavior within intact tissues in real time. This brief review summarizes the developments enabling the tracking of immune responses in vivo. PMID:27239292

  17. Bricklaying Curriculum: Advanced Bricklaying Techniques. Instructional Materials. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turcotte, Raymond J.; Hendrix, Laborn J.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist bricklaying instructors in providing performance-based instruction in advanced bricklaying. Included in the first section of the guide are units on customized or architectural masonry units; glass block; sills, lintels, and copings; and control (expansion) joints. The next two units deal with cut,…

  18. Advanced NDE techniques for quantitative characterization of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center and their applications that have resulted in quantitative assessment of material properties based on thermal and ultrasonic measurements are reviewed. Specific applications include ultrasonic determination of bolt tension, ultrasonic and thermal characterization of bonded layered structures, characterization of composite materials, and disbonds in aircraft skins.

  19. Backscattered Electron Microscopy as an Advanced Technique in Petrography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsley, David Henry; Manley, Curtis Robert

    1989-01-01

    Three uses of this method with sandstone, desert varnish, and granite weathering are described. Background information on this technique is provided. Advantages of this type of microscopy are stressed. (CW)

  20. High-Quality Large-Magnification Polymer Lens from Needle Moving Technique and Thermal Assisted Moldless Fabrication Process

    PubMed Central

    Pongsoon, Prasit; Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Chaitavon, Kosom; Porntheeraphat, Supanit; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Koanantakool, Thaweesak

    2016-01-01

    The need of mobile microscope is escalating as well as the demand of high quality optical components in low price. We report here a novel needle moving technique to fabricate milli-size lens together with thermal assist moldless method. Our proposed protocol is able to create a high tensile strength structure of the lens and its base which is beneficial for exploiting in convertinga smart phone to be a digital microscope. We observe that no bubble trapped in a lens when this technique is performed which can overcome a challenge problem found in a typical dropping technique. We demonstrate the symmetry, smoothness and micron-scale resolution of the fabricated structure. This proposed technique is promising to serve as high quality control mass production without any expensive equipment required. PMID:26765524

  1. Fabrication of YSZ buffer layer by single source MOCVD technique for YBCO coated conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Sun, Jong-Won; Kim, Ho-Jin; Lee, Dong-Wook; Jung, Choong-Hwan; Park, Soon-Dong; Kim, Chan-Joong

    2003-10-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers were deposited by a metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique using a single liquid source for the application of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) coated conductor. Y:Zr mole ratio was 0.2:0.8, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) was used as a solvent. The (1 0 0) single crystal MgO substrate was used for searching the deposition conditions. Bi-axially oriented CeO 2 and NiO films were fabricated on {1 0 0} <0 0 1> textured Ni substrate by the same method and used as templates. At a constant working pressure of 10 Torr, the deposition temperatures (660-800 °C) and oxygen flow rates (100-500 sccm) were changed to find the optimum deposition condition. The best (1 0 0) oriented YSZ film on MgO was obtained at 740 °C and O 2 flow rate of 300 sccm. For a YSZ buffer layer with this deposition condition on a CeO 2/Ni template, full width half maximum values of the in-plane ( ϕ-scan) and out-of-plane ( ω-scan) alignments were 10.6° and 9.8°, respectively. The SEM image of YSZ film on CeO 2/Ni showed surface morphologies without microcracks. The film deposition rate was about 100 nm/min.

  2. Charged Nanoparticle Translocation through solid state nanopores fabricated using different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandivada, Santoshi; Li, Jiali; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-03-01

    Solid-state nanopores are widely used for detection of biomolecules and small particles by measuring the pore resistance change when the molecules or particles are electrophoretically driven through. In this work, we use well-characterized spherical nanoparticles and long chain double-stranded DNA molecules to study the interactions of these nanoparticles and voltage biased solid-state nanopores. Charged nanoparticles of ~ 30nm or smaller are used to study the volume and charge dependence of their translocation dynamics in solid-state nanopores made from silicon nitride. Nanopores fabricated using two different techniques are used in this study: one is to use noble gas ion beams to sculpt ~ 100 nm pores milled by focused ion beam; another is to use e-beam lithography to first write a micrometer size pattern, then to thin the patterned region, and finally drill a nanopore in the thinned micrometer region by a high energy electron beam in a TEM. The 3D geometry of both types of nanopores are measured using HR-TEM . Furthermore, COMSOL is used to model the experimental results. These studies will improve our understanding of solid-state nanopore as a sensor for charged nanoparticle detection.

  3. Polyaniline-based organic memristive device fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhina, Svetlana; Sorokin, Vladimir; Erokhin, Victor

    2015-09-01

    Memristors and memristive devices represent a splendid area of research due to the unique possibilities for the realization of new types of computer hardware elements and mimicking several essential properties of the nervous system of living beings. The organic memristive device was developed as an electronic single-device analogue of the synapse, suitable for the realization of circuits allowing Hebbian type of learning. This work is dedicated to the realization of the active channel of organic memristive devices by polyelectrolyte self-assembling (layer-by-layer technique). Stable and reproducible electrical characteristics of the device were obtained when the thickness of the active channel was more than seven bilayers. The device revealed rectifying behaviour and the presence of hysteresis—important properties for the realization of neuromorphic systems with synapse-like properties of the individual elements. Compared to previously reported results on organic memristive devices fabricated using other methods, the present device does not require any additional doping that is usually performed through acid treatment. Such a behaviour is extremely important for the cases in which biological systems (nervous cells, slime mould, etc.) must be interfaced with the system of organic memristive devices, since acid treatment can kill living beings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Characterization and analysis of surface notches on Ti-alloy plates fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-12-01

    Rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) were fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition techniques that included electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM). The surface conditions of these plates were characterized using x-ray micro-computed tomography. The depth and radius of surface notch-like features on the LBM and EBM plates were measured from sectional images of individual virtual slices of the rectangular plates. The stress concentration factors of individual surface notches were computed and analyzed statistically to determine the appropriate distributions for the notch depth, notch radius, and stress concentration factor. These results were correlated with the fatigue life of the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys from an earlier investigation. A surface notch analysis was performed to assess the debit in the fatigue strength due to the surface notches. The assessment revealed that the fatigue lives of the additively manufactured plates with rough surface topographies and notch-like features are dominated by the fatigue crack growth of large cracks for both the LBM and EBM materials. The fatigue strength reduction due to the surface notches can be as large as 60%-75%. It is concluded that for better fatigue performance, the surface notches on EBM and LBM materials need to be removed by machining and the surface roughness be improved to a surface finish of about 1 μm.

  5. Validity of content-based techniques to distinguish true and fabricated statements: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oberlader, Verena A; Naefgen, Christoph; Koppehele-Gossel, Judith; Quinten, Laura; Banse, Rainer; Schmidt, Alexander F

    2016-08-01

    Within the scope of judicial decisions, approaches to distinguish between true and fabricated statements have been of particular importance since ancient times. Although methods focusing on "prototypical" deceptive behavior (e.g., psychophysiological phenomena, nonverbal cues) have largely been rejected with regard to validity, content-based techniques constitute a promising approach and are well established within the applied forensic context. The basic idea of this approach is that experience-based and nonexperience-based statements differ in their content-related quality. In order to test the validity of the most prominent content-based techniques, criteria-based content analysis (CBCA) and reality monitoring (RM), we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis on English- and German-language studies. Based on a variety of decision criteria, 56 studies were included revealing an overall effect size of g = 1.03 (95% confidence interval [0.78, 1.27], Q = 420.06, p < .001, I2 = 92.48%, N = 3,429). There was no significant difference in the effectiveness of CBCA and RM. Additionally, we investigated a number of moderator variables, such as characteristics of participants, statements, and judgment procedures, as well as general study characteristics. Results showed that the application of all CBCA criteria outperformed any incomplete CBCA criteria set. Furthermore, statement classification based on discriminant functions revealed higher discrimination rates than decisions based on sum scores. Finally, unpublished studies showed higher effect sizes than studies published in peer-reviewed journals. All results are discussed in terms of their significance for future research (e.g., developing standardized decision rules) and practical application (e.g., user training, applying complete criteria set). (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27149290

  6. Nacre-like materials using a simple doctor blading technique: Fabrication, testing and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mirkhalaf, M; Barthelat, F

    2016-03-01

    The remarkable mechanical performance of biological materials such as bone, nacre, and spider silk stems from their staggered microstructure in which stiff and strong reinforcements are elongated in the direction of loading, separated by softer interfaces, and shifted relative to each other. This structure results in useful combinations of modulus, strength and toughness and therefore is increasingly mimicked in bio-inspired engineering composites. Here, we report the use of a simple and versatile technique based on doctor-blading to fabricate staggered composites of microscopic alumina tablets with high alignment in a chitosan matrix. Tensile tests on these nacre-like materials show that the modulus and strength of the composite films are enhanced by the incorporation of ceramic tablets, but only up to 15vol% after which all properties degrade. This phenomenon, also reported in the past for most of nacre-like materials, composed of micro/nano tablets, obtained from different techniques, has been limiting our ability to produce large volumes of high-performance nacre-like materials. Examination of the structure of the films revealed that at lower tablet concentrations the tablets are well-aligned and well dispersed thorough the volume of the film. At 15vol% and beyond, we observed tablet misalignment and clustering. In order to investigate the impact of these imperfections on material performance we developed large scale finite element models representative of the structure of the composite films. These models show that the mechanical performance significantly degrades with tablet misalignment, and especially at high tablet concentrations. The simulations along with the SEM images therefore quantitatively explain the experimental trends, e.g. the degradation of mechanical properties at high tablet contents. PMID:26655459

  7. Validity of content-based techniques to distinguish true and fabricated statements: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oberlader, Verena A; Naefgen, Christoph; Koppehele-Gossel, Judith; Quinten, Laura; Banse, Rainer; Schmidt, Alexander F

    2016-08-01

    Within the scope of judicial decisions, approaches to distinguish between true and fabricated statements have been of particular importance since ancient times. Although methods focusing on "prototypical" deceptive behavior (e.g., psychophysiological phenomena, nonverbal cues) have largely been rejected with regard to validity, content-based techniques constitute a promising approach and are well established within the applied forensic context. The basic idea of this approach is that experience-based and nonexperience-based statements differ in their content-related quality. In order to test the validity of the most prominent content-based techniques, criteria-based content analysis (CBCA) and reality monitoring (RM), we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis on English- and German-language studies. Based on a variety of decision criteria, 56 studies were included revealing an overall effect size of g = 1.03 (95% confidence interval [0.78, 1.27], Q = 420.06, p < .001, I2 = 92.48%, N = 3,429). There was no significant difference in the effectiveness of CBCA and RM. Additionally, we investigated a number of moderator variables, such as characteristics of participants, statements, and judgment procedures, as well as general study characteristics. Results showed that the application of all CBCA criteria outperformed any incomplete CBCA criteria set. Furthermore, statement classification based on discriminant functions revealed higher discrimination rates than decisions based on sum scores. Finally, unpublished studies showed higher effect sizes than studies published in peer-reviewed journals. All results are discussed in terms of their significance for future research (e.g., developing standardized decision rules) and practical application (e.g., user training, applying complete criteria set). (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Electroextraction and electromembrane extraction: Advances in hyphenation to analytical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Oedit, Amar; Ramautar, Rawi; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Electroextraction (EE) and electromembrane extraction (EME) are sample preparation techniques that both require an electric field that is applied over a liquid‐liquid system, which enables the migration of charged analytes. Furthermore, both techniques are often used to pre‐concentrate analytes prior to analysis. In this review an overview is provided of the body of literature spanning April 2012–November 2015 concerning EE and EME, focused on hyphenation to analytical techniques. First, the theoretical aspects of concentration enhancement in EE and EME are discussed to explain extraction recovery and enrichment factor. Next, overviews are provided of the techniques based on their hyphenation to LC, GC, CE, and direct detection. These overviews cover the compounds and matrices, experimental aspects (i.e. donor volume, acceptor volume, extraction time, extraction voltage, and separation time) and the analytical aspects (i.e. limit of detection, enrichment factor, and extraction recovery). Techniques that were either hyphenated online to analytical techniques or show high potential with respect to online hyphenation are highlighted. Finally, the potential future directions of EE and EME are discussed. PMID:26864699

  9. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  10. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique

    PubMed Central

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections. PMID:24991524

  11. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  12. Design and Fabrication of Edge Filter Using Absorbed ZnS Single Layer Prepared by Flash Evaporation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habubi, Nadir F.; Mishjil, Khudheir A.; Rashid, Hayfa G.; Mansour, H. L.

    Long-wave pass edge filter of high transmittance and wide bandpass have been designed and fabricated using on a single weakly absorbed ZnS thin film material of thickness of about 300 nm which was prepared by using the flash evaporation technique. The design was based on characteristic matrix theory, taking into account the effect of dispersion phenomena for all spectral wavelength.

  13. Comparison of obturator prosthesis fabricated using different techniques and its effect on the management of a hemipalatomaxillectomy patient

    PubMed Central

    Badadare, Mokshada M; Patil, Sanjayagouda B; Bhat, Sudhakara; Tambe, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic tumours involving the maxilla or mandible are usually treated with surgical resection. To prevent recurrence, extensive surgical intervention might be carried out leaving the patient with anatomical defects. However, rehabilitation of such patients with an obturator can improve function, facial form and social acceptance. In this case, we have evaluated the different designs and techniques of fabrication of an obturator prosthesis used for the rehabilitation of a hemipalatomaxillectomy patient. A 40-year-old man presented with a loose fitting obturator prosthesis. He had undergone hemipalatomaxillectomy for the treatment of an ameloblastoma 2 years earlier and had been using an obturator prosthesis since then. Hollow-bulb obturator prostheses were fabricated using two different methods, the lost salt and open lid techniques. The obturator prosthesis fabricated with the lost salt technique weighed less than the patient's old obturator. But the obturator fabricated using the open lid technique did not only considerably reduce the weight of the prosthesis but also improved health, function, aesthetics, phonetics and quality of life in this hemipalatomaxillectomy patient. PMID:25188927

  14. Design & fabrication of two seated aircraft with an advanced rotating leading edge wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Ahmari, Saeed Abdullah Saeed

    The title of this thesis is "Design & Fabrication of two Seated Aircraft with an Advanced Rotating Leading Edge Wing", this gives almost a good description of the work has been done. In this research, the moving surface boundary-layer control (MSBC) concept was investigated and implemented. An experimental model was constructed and tested in wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics using the leading edge moving surface of modified semi-symmetric airfoil NACA1214. The moving surface is provided by a high speed rotating cylinder, which replaces the leading edge of the airfoil. The angle of attack, the cylinder surfaces velocity ratio Uc/U, and the flap deflection angle effects on the lift and drag coefficients and the stall angle of attack were investigated. This new technology was applied to a 2-seat light-sport aircraft that is designed and built in the Aerospace Engineering Department at KFUPM. The project team is led by the aerospace department chairman Dr. Ahmed Z. AL-Garni and Dr. Wael G. Abdelrahman and includes graduate and under graduate student. The wing was modified to include a rotating cylinder along the leading edge of the flap portion. This produced very promising results such as the increase of the maximum lift coefficient at Uc/U=3 by 82% when flaps up and 111% when flaps down at 40° and stall was delayed by 8degrees in both cases. The laboratory results also showed that the effective range of the leading-edge rotating cylinder is at low angles of attack which reduce the need for higher angles of attack for STOL aircraft.

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A; Barker, Alan M; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Albright, Austin P; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years [1]. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  16. Patient satisfaction with complete dentures fabricated using two neutral zone techniques: a within-subject cross-over pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Komal; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra; Verma, Mahesh

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have compared complete dentures fabricated using conventional and neutral zone (NZ) techniques. However, studies comparing patient satisfaction with complete dentures fabricated using swallowing and phonetic NZ techniques are lacking in literature. To compare patient satisfaction with the complete dentures fabricated using the two NZ techniques. To compare the bucco-lingual dimensions of the NZ records obtained with these techniques. Ten completely edentulous subjects dissatisfied with their existing mandibular complete dentures participated in the study. Five subjects first received the swallowing neutral zone (SNZ) dentures and five the phonetic neutral zone (PNZ) dentures. Tissue conditioner was used as the recording material in both the techniques. After having worn the prosthesis for a minimum of 2 months, subjects responded to a questionnaire that measured their perceptions of various factors associated with the prosthesis. The prostheses were then changed and the procedures repeated. Student t test and non-parametric Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. Level of statistical significance was set p < 0.05. There was no statistical significant difference in patient satisfaction with the SNZ and PNZ complete dentures for all the variables assessed. Statistical significant difference was observed for majority of the variables when the two NZ dentures were compared with patients' old dentures. The difference in the mean dimensions of the two NZ records was also found to be statistically insignificant except in the maxillary left premolar region. The study indicated that patient satisfaction with the complete dentures fabricated using SNZ technique did not significantly differ from that of the PNZ technique. Data gathered at the final appointment showed that SNZ dentures were preferred by the patients with regards to esthetics, stability, comfort and ability to chew. For ability to speak, mixed preferences were found.

  17. Brain development in preterm infants assessed using advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David

    2014-03-01

    Infants who are born preterm have a high incidence of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral abnormalities, which may be associated with impaired brain development. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches, such as diffusion MRI (d-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), provide objective and reproducible measures of brain development. Indices derived from d-MRI can be used to provide quantitative measures of preterm brain injury. Although fMRI of the neonatal brain is currently a research tool, future studies combining d-MRI and fMRI have the potential to assess the structural and functional properties of the developing brain and its response to injury.

  18. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  19. Transcranial Doppler: Techniques and advanced applications: Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind K.; Bathala, Lokesh; Batra, Amit; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only diagnostic tool that can provide continuous information about cerebral hemodynamics in real time and over extended periods. In the previous paper (Part 1), we have already presented the basic ultrasound physics pertaining to TCD, insonation methods, and various flow patterns. This article describes various advanced applications of TCD such as detection of right-to-left shunt, emboli monitoring, vasomotor reactivity (VMR), monitoring of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), monitoring of intracranial pressure, its role in stoke prevention in sickle cell disease, and as a supplementary test for confirmation of brain death. PMID:27011639

  20. In Situ Techniques for Monitoring Electrochromism: An Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saricayir, Hakan; Uce, Musa; Koca, Atif

    2010-01-01

    This experiment employs current technology to enhance and extend existing lab content. The basic principles of spectroscopic and electroanalytical techniques and their use in determining material properties are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, there are limited examples of laboratory experiments with in…

  1. Advances in reduction techniques for tire contact problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    Some recent developments in reduction techniques, as applied to predicting the tire contact response and evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the different response quantities, are reviewed. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the contact response to variations in the geometric and material parameters of the tire. The tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in geometric and material parameters, transverse shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities included. The contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The elemental arrays are obtained by using a modified two-field, mixed variational principle. For the application of reduction techniques, the tire finite element model is partitioned into two regions. The first region consists of the nodes that are likely to come in contact with the pavement, and the second region includes all the remaining nodes. The reduction technique is used to significantly reduce the degrees of freedom in the second region. The effectiveness of the computational procedure is demonstrated by a numerical example of the frictionless contact response of the space shuttle nose-gear tire, inflated and pressed against a rigid flat surface. Also, the research topics which have high potential for enhancing the effectiveness of reduction techniques are outlined.

  2. Benefits of advanced software techniques for mission planning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasquet, A.; Parrod, Y.; Desaintvincent, A.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern spacecraft, and the stringent requirement for maximizing their mission return, call for a new generation of Mission Planning Systems (MPS). In this paper, we discuss the requirements for the Space Mission Planning and the benefits which can be expected from Artificial Intelligence techniques through examples of applications developed by Matra Marconi Space.

  3. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-03-31

    The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

  4. Single Molecule Techniques for Advanced in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hollars, C W; Stubbs, L; Carlson, K; Lu, X; Wehri, E

    2003-02-03

    One of the most significant achievements of modern science is completion of the human genome sequence, completed in the year 2000. Despite this monumental accomplishment, researchers have only begun to understand the relationships between this three-billion-nucleotide genetic code and the regulation and control of gene and protein expression within each of the millions of different types of highly specialized cells. Several methodologies have been developed for the analysis of gene and protein expression in situ, yet despite these advancements, the pace of such analyses is extremely limited. Because information regarding the precise timing and location of gene expression is a crucial component in the discovery of new pharmacological agents for the treatment of disease, there is an enormous incentive to develop technologies that accelerate the analytical process. Here we report on the use of plasmon resonant particles as advanced probes for in situ hybridization. These probes are used for the detection of low levels of gene-probe response and demonstrate a detection method that enables precise, simultaneous localization within a cell of the points of expression of multiple genes or proteins in a single sample.

  5. Micro-beam and pulsed laser beam techniques for the micro-fabrication of diamond surface and bulk structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, S.; Bellini, M.; Bosia, F.; Calusi, S.; Corsi, C.; Czelusniak, C.; Gelli, N.; Giuntini, L.; Gorelli, F.; Lagomarsino, S.; Mandò, P. A.; Massi, M.; Olivero, P.; Parrini, G.; Santoro, M.; Sordini, A.; Sytchkova, A.; Taccetti, F.; Vannoni, M.

    2015-04-01

    Micro-fabrication in diamond is applicable in a wide set of emerging technologies, exploiting the exceptional characteristics of diamond for application in bio-physics, photonics and radiation detection. Micro ion-beam irradiation and pulsed laser irradiation are complementary techniques, which permit the implementation of complex geometries, by modification and functionalization of surface and/or bulk material, modifying the optical, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the material. In this article we summarize the work done in Florence (Italy), concerning ion beam and pulsed laser beam micro-fabrication in diamond.

  6. Fabrication of dual-pore scaffolds using SLUP (salt leaching using powder) and WNM (wire-network molding) techniques.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Sang; Hong, Myoung Wha; Kim, So-Youn; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Young Yul; Cho, Young-Sam

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a novel technique was proposed to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds combining both SLUP (salt leaching using powder) and WNM (wire-network molding) techniques. This technique has several advantages: solvent-free, no limit on the use of thermoplastic polymers as a raw material, and easiness of fabricating scaffolds with dual-scale pores that are interconnected randomized small pores. To fabricate dual-pore scaffolds, PCL and NaCl powders were mixed at a certain ratio. Subsequently, needles were inserted into a designed mold, and the mixture was filled into the mold thereafter. Subsequently, after the mold was pressurized, the mold was heated to melt the PCL powders. The PCL/NaCl structure and needles were separated from the mold. The structure was sonicated to leach-out the NaCl particles and was dried. Consequently, the remaining PCL structure became the dual-pore scaffold. To compare the characteristics of dual-pore scaffolds, control scaffolds, which are 3D plotter and SLUP scaffolds were fabricated. PMID:25491863

  7. Fabrication of Metal Oxide Thin Films Using the Langmuir-Blodgett Deposition Technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David John

    The Langmuir Blodgett (LB) deposition of metal arachidates was investigated as a technique for fabrication of metal oxides with emphasis placed on the lanthanide arachidates. Traditionally, these materials are difficult to deposit via the LB process, due to the rigidity of the floating monolayer. Studies on yttrium arachidate have shown that the quality of deposition of these materials is highly dependent on the concentration of the metal salt and the pH of the subphase. Yttrium arachidate was thus deposited at 10^{-5} M YCl_3 over a pH range of 4.0 to 6.9. Uniform multilayer films were produced with films at the higher pH's showing 100% yttrium arachidate. A pK_{rm a} value of 4.9 +/- 0.2 was obtained under these conditions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data indicate that the metal is being incorporated into the arachidic acid predominantly as Y(OH) ^{2+}. A saturation areal density of (2.0 +/- 0.1) times 10^{14} Y/cm ^2 was measured for one layer of yttrium arachidate. Ellipsometric measurements were performed on films of yttrium arachidate to study order-disorder transitions. Upon heating the films were observed to undergo two transitions at 65^circC and 100 ^circC. At room temperature, the as -deposited films were found to be anisotropic with indices of refraction of N_{rm x} = 1.503 +/- 0.005 and N _{rm z} = 1.554 +/- 0.005 and a monolayer spacing of 2.73 +/- 0.03 nm. Above 100^ circC the films were isotropic with N = 1.440 +/- 0.005 and a thickness of 3.13 +/- 0.03 nm per original layer. The films showed no desorption below 100^circ C. In contrast to films of cadium arachidate, the yttrium arachidate films were observed to undergo supercooling by 35^circC. This may point to a lack of nucleation sites in the yttrium arachidate films explaining why they maintain areal integrity at high temperature while cadmium arachidate films do not. The decomposition of LB films was

  8. Developments and advances concerning the hyperpolarisation technique SABRE.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Ryan E

    2015-10-01

    To overcome the inherent sensitivity issue in NMR and MRI, hyperpolarisation techniques are used. Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) is a hyperpolarisation technique that utilises parahydrogen, a molecule that possesses a nuclear singlet state, as the source of polarisation. A metal complex is required to break the singlet order of parahydrogen and, by doing so, facilitates polarisation transfer to analyte molecules ligated to the same complex through the J-coupled network that exists. The increased signal intensities that the analyte molecules possess as a result of this process have led to investigations whereby their potential as MRI contrast agents has been probed and to understand the fundamental processes underpinning the polarisation transfer mechanism. As well as discussing literature relevant to both of these areas, the chemical structure of the complex, the physical constraints of the polarisation transfer process and the successes of implementing SABRE at low and high magnetic fields are discussed. PMID:26264565

  9. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique.

    PubMed

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun

    2016-01-01

    Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (T g) of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and -31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully. PMID:27366064

  10. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique

    PubMed Central

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun

    2016-01-01

    Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (Tg) of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and −31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully. PMID:27366064

  11. Fabricating sub-collimating grids for an x-ray solar imaging spectrometer using LIGA techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brennen, R.A.; Hecht, M.H.; Wiberg, D.V.

    1997-04-01

    The HESSI mission proposes to perform high resolution imaging and spectroscopy observations in the soft X-ray, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray regimes, with finer angular resolution (nearly 2 arcseconds) and finer energy resolution (approximately 1 keV) than has been previously possible. This combination of imaging and spectroscopy is achieved with a set of Rotating Modulation Collimators placed in front of an array of cooled germanium and silicon detectors. A set of 12 bi-grid collimators, each of which consists of a pair of identically pitched, widely-separated grids, is used to provide the imaging. Each grid consists of a planar array of equally-spaced, parallel, X-ray opaque slats separated by X-ray transparent slits. If the slits of each grid are parallel to each other and the pitch is identical for the two grids, then the transmission through the grid pair depends on the direction of incidence of the incoming X-rays. For slits and slats of equal width, the transmission varies between zero and 50% depending on whether the shadows of the slats in the top grid fall on the slits or slats of the lower grid. A complete transmission cycle from zero to 50% and back to zero corresponds to a change in source direction that is given by p/L, where L is the separation between the grids. The authors describe a deep etch lithography technique developed to fabricate the grids which have pitches below 100 {micro}m. They use a free standing sheet of PMMA as a base for the process, and use the ALS facility to perform the exposures of the PMMA.

  12. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique.

    PubMed

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun

    2016-01-01

    Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (T g) of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and -31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully.

  13. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiation effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.

  14. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiationmore » effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.« less

  15. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  16. Advanced techniques for constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Balaraman, Gouthaman S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-04-30

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle, and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high-frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this article, we have designed a new framework for (1) initializing velocities for nonindependent CICMD coordinates, (2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, (3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto, and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and (4) cancelling out the "flying ice cube effect" that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this article, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse-graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided "freezing and thawing" of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during molecular dynamics simulations and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements, we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion.

  17. Double-Step Image Superimposition Technique for Fabricating a Drilling Guide to Access the Abutment Screw in Implant Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hang-Nga; Kim, Kyung-Rok; Lee, Du-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Limited retrievability is a major disadvantage of cement-retained implant restorations. Despite great progress in locating the abutment screw within crowns, the existing techniques are based on prior data or prefabricated devices and require significant work. This study introduces a new procedure for fabricating a guide template to drill a screw access hole using a double-step superimposition technique that incorporates intraoral optical scanning, cone beam computed tomography, and dental design software. The double-step superimposition technique with computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing technology can enhance the convenience and accuracy of drilling the screw-access hole. PMID:27479352

  18. Containerless Processing: Fabrication of Advanced Functional Materials from Undercooled Oxide Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. S. Vijaya; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-07-01

    Materials science in Microgravity condition is one of newly established cutting edge science field. After the effort of space development and space utilization, microgravity of space environment has been considered as one of novel tools for materials science because it assures containerless levitation. Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the technologically important materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt. Recently, rare-earth ferrites and manganites have attracted great interest towards their wide applications in the field of electronic industry. Among these new hexagonal phases with a space group of P6 _{3}cm are technologically important materials because of multiferroic characteristics, i.e., the coexistence of ferroelectricity and magnetism in one compound. In the present study, containerless solidification of the R-Fe-O, and R-Mn-O melts were carried out to fabricate multiferroics under the controlled Po _{2}. Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the new materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt because it provides large undercooling prior to nucleation. In order to undercool the melt deeply below the melting temperature under a precisely controlled oxygen partial pressure, an aerodynamic levitator (ADL) combined with ZrO _{2} oxygen sensor was designed. A spherical RFeO _{3} and RMnO _{3} sample was levitated by an ADL and completely melted by a CO _{2} laser in an atmosphere with predetermined Po _{2}.The surface temperature of the levitated droplet was monitored by a two-color pyrometer. Then, the droplet was cooled by turning off the CO _{2} laser. The XRD results of the rapidly solidified LuFeO _{3} and LuMnO _{3} samples at Po _{2} of 1x10 ^{5} Pa confirms the existence of the hexagonal metastable LuFeO _{3} phase. On the other hand, orthorhombic RFeO _{3} (R=Yb, Er, Y and Dy)and hexagonal RMnO _{3} (R=Ho-Lu)phases were identified. The cross-sectioned scanning

  19. Fabrication of Silicon-on-Nothing Structure by Substrate Engineering Using the Empty-Space-in-Silicon Formation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tsutomu; Mizushima, Ichiro; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Takenaka, Keiichi; Shimonishi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Hisataka; Hatano, Masayuki; Sugihara, Kazuyoshi; Tsunashima, Yoshitaka

    2004-01-01

    A practical method for the fabrication of a silicon on nothing (SON) structure with the desired size and shape has been developed by using the empty-space-in-silicon (ESS) formation technique. It was found that the SON structure could be precisely controlled by the initial shape and layout of the trenches. The size of ESS is determined by the size of the initial trench. The desired shapes of ESS, such as spherical, pipe-shaped and plate-shaped, can be fabricated by changing the arrangement of the initial trenches. The fabricated SON region over ESS has excellent crystallinity adoptable for ultra-large-scale integrated circuit (ULSI) applications. The SON structure would be a promising substrate structure for various manufacturing technologies, such as the micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS), photonic crystals and waveguides.

  20. Fabrication of high sensitivity 3D nanoSQUIDs based on a focused ion beam sculpting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Lacquaniti, Vincenzo; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a nanofabrication process, based on a focused ion beam (FIB) nanosculpting technique, for high sensitivity three-dimensional nanoscale superconducting quantum interference devices (nanoSQUIDs) is reported. The crucial steps of the fabrication process are described, as are some peculiar features of the superconductor-normal metal-insulator-superconductor (SNIS) Josephson junctions, which may useful for applications in cryocooler systems. This fabrication procedure is employed to fabricate sandwich nanojunctions and high sensitivity nanoSQUIDs. Specifically, the superconductive nanosensors have a rectangular loop of 1 × 0.2-0.4 μm2 interrupted by two square Nb/Al-AlO x /Nb SNIS Josephson junctions with side lengths of 0.3 μm. The characterization of a typical nanoSQUID has been carried out and a spectral density of magnetic flux noise as low as 0.8 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 has been measured.

  1. Fabrication of high sensitivity 3D nanoSQUIDs based on a focused ion beam sculpting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Lacquaniti, Vincenzo; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a nanofabrication process, based on a focused ion beam (FIB) nanosculpting technique, for high sensitivity three-dimensional nanoscale superconducting quantum interference devices (nanoSQUIDs) is reported. The crucial steps of the fabrication process are described, as are some peculiar features of the superconductor–normal metal–insulator–superconductor (SNIS) Josephson junctions, which may useful for applications in cryocooler systems. This fabrication procedure is employed to fabricate sandwich nanojunctions and high sensitivity nanoSQUIDs. Specifically, the superconductive nanosensors have a rectangular loop of 1 × 0.2–0.4 μm2 interrupted by two square Nb/Al–AlO x /Nb SNIS Josephson junctions with side lengths of 0.3 μm. The characterization of a typical nanoSQUID has been carried out and a spectral density of magnetic flux noise as low as 0.8 μΦ0 Hz–1/2 has been measured.

  2. Advances in dental veneers: materials, applications, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Lovadino, José Roberto; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Laminate veneers are a conservative treatment of unaesthetic anterior teeth. The continued development of dental ceramics offers clinicians many options for creating highly aesthetic and functional porcelain veneers. This evolution of materials, ceramics, and adhesive systems permits improvement of the aesthetic of the smile and the self-esteem of the patient. Clinicians should understand the latest ceramic materials in order to be able to recommend them and their applications and techniques, and to ensure the success of the clinical case. The current literature was reviewed to search for the most important parameters determining the long-term success, correct application, and clinical limitations of porcelain veneers.

  3. Advances in dental veneers: materials, applications, and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Lovadino, José Roberto; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Laminate veneers are a conservative treatment of unaesthetic anterior teeth. The continued development of dental ceramics offers clinicians many options for creating highly aesthetic and functional porcelain veneers. This evolution of materials, ceramics, and adhesive systems permits improvement of the aesthetic of the smile and the self-esteem of the patient. Clinicians should understand the latest ceramic materials in order to be able to recommend them and their applications and techniques, and to ensure the success of the clinical case. The current literature was reviewed to search for the most important parameters determining the long-term success, correct application, and clinical limitations of porcelain veneers. PMID:23674920

  4. The emerging role of advanced neuroimaging techniques for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Nowosielski, Martha; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases are an increasingly encountered and frightening manifestation of systemic cancer. More effective therapeutic strategies for the primary tumor are resulting in longer patient survival on the one hand while on the other, better brain tumor detection has resulted from increased availability and development of more precise brain imaging methods. This review focuses on the emerging role of functional neuroimaging techniques; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as positron emission tomography (PET), in establishing diagnosis, for monitoring treatment response with an emphasis on new targeted as well as immunomodulatory therapies and for predicting prognosis in patients with brain metastases.

  5. Advances in parameter estimation techniques applied to flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maben, Egbert; Zimmerman, David C.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, various parameter estimation techniques are investigated in the context of structural system identification utilizing distributed parameter models and 'measured' time-domain data. Distributed parameter models are formulated using the PDEMOD software developed by Taylor. Enhancements made to PDEMOD for this work include the following: (1) a Wittrick-Williams based root solving algorithm; (2) a time simulation capability; and (3) various parameter estimation algorithms. The parameter estimations schemes will be contrasted using the NASA Mini-Mast as the focus structure.

  6. Advanced techniques in reliability model representation and solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The current tendency of flight control system designs is towards increased integration of applications and increased distribution of computational elements. The reliability analysis of such systems is difficult because subsystem interactions are increasingly interdependent. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have been working for several years to extend the capability of Markov modeling techniques to address these problems. This effort has been focused in the areas of increased model abstraction and increased computational capability. The reliability model generator (RMG) is a software tool that uses as input a graphical object-oriented block diagram of the system. RMG uses a failure-effects algorithm to produce the reliability model from the graphical description. The ASSURE software tool is a parallel processing program that uses the semi-Markov unreliability range evaluator (SURE) solution technique and the abstract semi-Markov specification interface to the SURE tool (ASSIST) modeling language. A failure modes-effects simulation is used by ASSURE. These tools were used to analyze a significant portion of a complex flight control system. The successful combination of the power of graphical representation, automated model generation, and parallel computation leads to the conclusion that distributed fault-tolerant system architectures can now be analyzed.

  7. Advanced terahertz techniques for quality control and counterfeit detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports our invented methods for detection of counterfeit electronic. These versatile techniques are also handy in quality control applications. Terahertz pulsed laser systems are capable of giving the material characteristics and thus make it possible to distinguish between the materials used in authentic components and their counterfeit clones. Components with material defects can also be distinguished in section in this manner. In this work different refractive indices and absorption coefficients were observed for counterfeit components compared to their authentic counterparts. Existence of unexpected ingredient materials was detected in counterfeit components by Fourier Transform analysis of the transmitted terahertz pulse. Thicknesses of different layers are obtainable by analyzing the reflected terahertz pulse. Existence of unexpected layers is also detectable in this manner. Recycled, sanded and blacktopped counterfeit electronic components were detected as a result of these analyses. Counterfeit ICs with die dislocations were detected by depicting the terahertz raster scanning data in a coordinate plane which gives terahertz images. In the same manner, raster scanning of the reflected pulse gives terahertz images of the surfaces of the components which were used to investigate contaminant materials and sanded points on the surfaces. The results of the later technique, reveals the recycled counterfeit components.

  8. Advanced microscopy techniques resolving complex precipitates in steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikaly, W.; Soto, R.; Bano, X.; Issartel, C.; Rigaut, G.; Charaï, A.

    1999-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy as well as analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques such as high resolution, electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) and elemental mapping via a Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF) have been used to study complex precipitation in commercial dual phase steels microalloyed with titanium. Titanium nitrides, titanium carbosulfides, titanium carbonitrides and titanium carbides were characterized in this study. Both carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were used as sample preparation techniques. On both the microscopic and nanometric scales, it was found that a large amount of precipitation occurred heterogeneously on already existing inclusions/precipitates. CaS inclusions (1 to 2 μm), already present in liquid steel, acted as nucleation sites for TiN precipitating upon the steel's solidification. In addition, TiC nucleated on existing smaller TiN (around 30 to 50 nm). Despite the complexity of such alloys, the statistical analysis conducted on the non-equilibrium samples were found to be in rather good agreement with the theoretical equilibrium calculations. Heterogeneous precipitation must have played a role in bringing these results closer together.

  9. Comparison of three advanced chromatographic techniques for cannabis identification.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D; Albessard, F; Bigot, M C; Moulin, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of chromatography technology, with the increasing availability of easier-to-use mass spectrometers combined with gas chromatography (GC), the use of diode-array or programmable variable-wavelength ultraviolet absorption detectors in conjunction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the availability of scanners capable of reading thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates in the ultraviolet and visible regions, has made for easier, quicker and more positive identification of cannabis samples that standard analytical laboratories are occasionally required to undertake in the effort to combat drug addiction. At laboratories that do not possess the technique of GC combined with mass spectrometry, which provides an irrefutable identification, the following procedure involving HPLC or TLC techniques may be used: identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to each of the three main cannabis constituents-cannabidiol (CBD), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabinol (CBN)-by comparison with published data in conjunction with a specific absorption spectrum for each of those constituents obtained between 200 and 300 nm. The collection of the fractions corresponding to the three major cannabinoids at the HPLC system outlet and the cross-checking of their identity in the GC process with flame ionization detection can further corroborate the identification and minimize possible errors due to interference.

  10. Recent Advances in Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurement Techniques and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone

    2006-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced instrument concepts and technologies for future spaceborne atmospheric radars, with an over-arching objective of making such instruments more capable in supporting future science needs and more cost effective. Two such examples are the Second-Generation Precipitation Radar (PR-2) and the Nexrad-In-Space (NIS). PR-2 is a 14/35-GHz dual-frequency rain radar with a deployable 5-meter, wide-swath scanned membrane antenna, a dual-polarized/dual-frequency receiver, and a realtime digital signal processor. It is intended for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) operations to provide greatly enhanced rainfall profile retrieval accuracy while consuming only a fraction of the mass of the current TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). NIS is designed to be a 35-GHz Geostationary Earth Orbiting (GEO) radar for providing hourly monitoring of the life cycle of hurricanes and tropical storms. It uses a 35-m, spherical, lightweight membrane antenna and Doppler processing to acquire 3-dimensional information on the intensity and vertical motion of hurricane rainfall.

  11. Coal and Coal Constituent Studies by Advanced EMR Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Alex I. Smirnov; Mark J. Nilges; R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson

    1998-03-31

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. We have achieved substantial progress on upgrading the high field (HF) EMR (W-band, 95 GHz) spectrometers that are especially advantageous for such studies. Particularly, we have built a new second W-band instrument (Mark II) in addition to our Mark I. Briefly, Mark II features: (i) an Oxford custom-built 7 T superconducting magnet which is scannable from 0 to 7 T at up to 0.5 T/min; (ii) water-cooled coaxial solenoid with up to ±550 G scan under digital (15 bits resolution) computer control; (iii) custom-engineered precision feed-back circuit, which is used to drive this solenoid, is based on an Ultrastab 860R sensor that has linearity better than 5 ppm and resolution of 0.05 ppm; (iv) an Oxford CF 1200 cryostat for variable temperature studies from 1.8 to 340 K. During this grant period we have completed several key upgrades of both Mark I and II, particularly microwave bridge, W-band probehead, and computer interfaces. We utilize these improved instruments for HF EMR studies of spin-spin interaction and existence of different paramagnetic species in carbonaceous solids.

  12. Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Cancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lovitt, Carrie J.; Shelper, Todd B.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2014-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are an integral part of drug discovery practices. However, modeling the complexity of cancer utilizing these cell lines on standard plastic substrata, does not accurately represent the tumor microenvironment. Research into developing advanced tumor cell culture models in a three-dimensional (3D) architecture that more prescisely characterizes the disease state have been undertaken by a number of laboratories around the world. These 3D cell culture models are particularly beneficial for investigating mechanistic processes and drug resistance in tumor cells. In addition, a range of molecular mechanisms deconstructed by studying cancer cells in 3D models suggest that tumor cells cultured in two-dimensional monolayer conditions do not respond to cancer therapeutics/compounds in a similar manner. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of utilizing 3D cell culture models in drug discovery programs; however, it is evident that further research is required for the development of more complex models that incorporate the majority of the cellular and physical properties of a tumor. PMID:24887773

  13. Advanced coding techniques for few mode transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Okonkwo, Chigo; van Uden, Roy; Chen, Haoshuo; de Waardt, Huug; Koonen, Ton

    2015-01-26

    We experimentally verify the advantage of employing advanced coding schemes such as space-time coding and 4 dimensional modulation formats to enhance the transmission performance of a 3-mode transmission system. The performance gain of space-time block codes for extending the optical signal-to-noise ratio tolerance in multiple-input multiple-output optical coherent spatial division multiplexing transmission systems with respect to single-mode transmission performance are evaluated. By exploiting the spatial diversity that few-mode-fibers offer, with respect to single mode fiber back-to-back performance, significant OSNR gains of 3.2, 4.1, 4.9, and 6.8 dB at the hard-decision forward error correcting limit are demonstrated for DP-QPSK 8, 16 and 32 QAM, respectively. Furthermore, by employing 4D constellations, 6 × 28Gbaud 128 set partitioned quadrature amplitude modulation is shown to outperform conventional 8 QAM transmission performance, whilst carrying an additional 0.5 bit/symbol.

  14. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-01-31

    The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, fabrication and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive Gas Generator. Focus during this past report period has been to continue completion the Gas Generator design, completing the brazing and bonding experiments to determine the best method and materials necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continuing to making preparations for fabricating and testing this Gas Generator and commencing with the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware. Designs have been completed sufficiently such that Long Lead Items [LLI] have been ordered and upon arrival will be readied for the fabrication process. The keys to this design are the platelet construction of the injectors that precisely measures/meters the flow of the propellants and water all throughout the steam generating process and the CES patented gas generating cycle. The Igniter Assembly injector platelets fabrication process has been completed and bonded to the Igniter Assembly and final machined. The Igniter Assembly is in final assembly and is being readied for testing in the October 2001 time frame. Test Plan dated August 2001, was revised and finalized, replacing Test Plan dated May 2001.

  15. Advancement in conductive cotton fabrics through in situ polymerization of polypyrrole-nanocellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Hebeish, A; Farag, S; Sharaf, S; Shaheen, Th I

    2016-10-20

    Current research was undertaking with a view to innovate a new approach for development of conductive - coated textile materials through coating cotton fabrics with nanocellulose/polypyrrole composites. The study was designed in order to have a clear understanding of the role of nanocellulose as well as modified composite thereof under investigation. It is anticipated that incorporation of nanocellulose in the pyrrole/cotton fabrics/FeCl3/H2O system would form an integral part of the composites with mechanical, electrical or both properties. Three different nanocellulosic substrates are involved in the oxidation polymerization reaction of polypyrrole (Ppy) in presence of cotton fabrics. Polymerization was subsequently carried out by admixing at various ratios of FeCl3 and pyrrole viz. Ppy1, Ppy2 and pp3. The conductive, mechanical and thermal properties of cotton fabrics coated independently with different nanocellulose/polypyrrole were investigated. FTIR, TGA, XRD, SEM and EDX were also used for further characterization. Results signify that, the conductivity of cotton fabrics increases exponentially with increasing the dose of pyrrole and oxidant irrespective of nanocellulose substrate used. While, the mechanical properties of cotton fabrics are not significantly affected by the oxidant treatment. PMID:27474547

  16. Development of fabrication techniques for NR150B2-S5X graphite/polyimide high temperature composites. [applicable to space shuttle orbiter aft body flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheck, W. G.; Smith, C. W.; Harrison, E.

    1979-01-01

    Fabrication techniques for NR-150B2-S5X graphite/polyimide composites are described. The development of fabrication, tooling, and quality assurance techniques used for the composites is discussed. Processing information and preliminary mechanical property data are presented along with long term aging data.

  17. Advanced Process Monitoring Techniques for Safeguarding Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peper, Shane M.

    2010-11-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of weapons-grade nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. For large throughput nuclear facilities, it is difficult to satisfy the IAEA safeguards accountancy goal for detection of abrupt diversion. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MC&A) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource-intensive destructive assay (DA). Leveraging new on-line non destructive assay (NDA) process monitoring techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide an additional measure to nuclear material accountancy which would potentially result in a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for safeguards verification at such facilities. By monitoring process control measurements (e.g. flowrates, temperatures, or concentrations of reagents, products or wastes), abnormal plant operations can be detected. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies, including both the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor and a spectroscopy-based monitoring system, to potentially reduce the time and resource burden associated with current techniques. The MIP Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and multivariate analysis to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. The spectroscopic monitor continuously measures chemical compositions of the process streams including actinide metal ions (U, Pu, Np), selected fission products, and major cold flowsheet chemicals using UV-Vis, Near IR and Raman spectroscopy. This paper will provide an overview of our methods and report our on-going efforts to develop and demonstrate the technologies.

  18. A novel hybrid patterning technique for micro and nanochannel fabrication by integrating hot embossing and inverse UV photolithography.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhifu; Cheng, E; Zou, Helin

    2014-05-01

    Nanofluidic devices with micro and nanostructures are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present fabrication methods suffer from a low pattern transfer quality during the simultaneous embossing of the microscale and nanoscale patterns into a thermoplastic polymer due to insufficient polymer flow. In this work, a novel hybrid patterning technique, integrating hot embossing and inverse ultraviolet (UV) photolithography, is developed to fabricate micro and nanochannels with a high replication precision of the SU-8 layer. The influence of embossing temperature and time on the replication precision was investigated. The effect of UV lithography parameters on the micro and nanochannel pattern was analyzed. To improve the SU-8 bonding strength, the influence of the O2 plasma treatment parameters on the water contact angles of the exposed and unexposed SU-8 layer were studied. A complete SU-8 nanofluidic chip with 130 nm wide and 150 nm deep nanochannels was successfully fabricated with a replication precision of 99.5%. Compared with most of the current processing methods, this fabrication technique has great potential due to its low cost and high pattern transfer quality of the SU-8 micro and nanochannels.

  19. A novel 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique for linear nanochannels over a 4 inch diameter substrate

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhifu; Qi, Liping; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A novel low-cost 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique was developed based on Cu inclined-deposition and Ar+ (argon ion) etching. With this technique, sub-100 nm 2D (two dimensional) nano-channels can be etched economically over the whole area of a 4 inch n-type <100> silicon wafer. The fabricating process consists of only 4 steps, UV (Ultraviolet) lithography, inclined Cu deposition, Ar+ sputter etching, and photoresist & Cu removing. During this nano-mold fabrication process, we investigated the influence of the deposition angle on the width of the nano-channels and the effect of Ar+ etching time on their depth. Post-etching measurements showed the accuracy of the nanochannels over the whole area: the variation in width is 10%, in depth it is 11%. However, post-etching measurements also showed the accuracy of the nanochannels between chips: the variation in width is 2%, in depth it is 5%. With this newly developed technology, low-cost and large scale 2D nano-molds can be fabricated, which allows commercial manufacturing of nano-components over large areas. PMID:26752559

  20. A novel 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique for linear nanochannels over a 4 inch diameter substrate.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhifu; Qi, Liping; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-11

    A novel low-cost 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique was developed based on Cu inclined-deposition and Ar(+) (argon ion) etching. With this technique, sub-100 nm 2D (two dimensional) nano-channels can be etched economically over the whole area of a 4 inch n-type <100> silicon wafer. The fabricating process consists of only 4 steps, UV (Ultraviolet) lithography, inclined Cu deposition, Ar(+) sputter etching, and photoresist &Cu removing. During this nano-mold fabrication process, we investigated the influence of the deposition angle on the width of the nano-channels and the effect of Ar(+) etching time on their depth. Post-etching measurements showed the accuracy of the nanochannels over the whole area: the variation in width is 10%, in depth it is 11%. However, post-etching measurements also showed the accuracy of the nanochannels between chips: the variation in width is 2%, in depth it is 5%. With this newly developed technology, low-cost and large scale 2D nano-molds can be fabricated, which allows commercial manufacturing of nano-components over large areas.

  1. Comparative study on structural and optical properties of CdS films fabricated by three different low-cost techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, K.; Philominathan, P.

    2009-03-01

    Highly crystalline and transparent cadmium sulphide films were fabricated at relatively low temperature by employing an inexpensive, simplified spray technique using perfume atomizer (generally used for cosmetics). The structural, surface morphological and optical properties of the films were studied and compared with that prepared by conventional spray pyrolysis using air as carrier gas and chemical bath deposition. The films deposited by the simplified spray have preferred orientation along (1 0 1) plane. The lattice parameters were calculated as a = 4.138 Å and c = 6.718 Å which are well agreed with that obtained from the other two techniques and also with the standard data. The optical transmittance in the visible range and the optical band gap were found as 85% and 2.43 eV, respectively. The structural and optical properties of the films fabricated by the simplified spray are found to be desirable for opto-electronic applications.

  2. Fabrication of nanoporous arrays from photosensitive organic-inorganic hybrid materials by using an UV soft nanoimprint technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehua; Que, Wenxiu; Hu, Jiaxing; Chen, Jin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Weiguo

    2013-02-01

    A honeycomb-like regular nanoporous pattern built in the photosensitive organic-inorganic hybrid film was fabricated by an UV soft nanoimprint technique. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft mold was firstly replicated from an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template obtained by using a two-step anodization method. Scanning electron microscopy images show that the AAO template has a regular honeycomb-like nanoporous structure, while the PDMS soft mold has a relief structure of nanopillar arrays. Photosensitive TiO2-contained organic-inorganic hybrid films, which were prepared by combining a low temperature sol-gel process with a spin-coating technique, were used as the imprinted layer. Thus, a honeycomb-like regular nanoporous pattern built in the hybrid film can be easily obtained by imprinting the PDMS soft mold into the photosensitive hybrid film under an UV-irradiation. The as-fabricated organic-inorganic regular nonporous arrays have potential applications in two-dimensional photonic crystal.

  3. Modified technique to fabricate a hollow light-weight facial prosthesis for lateral midfacial defect: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Large oro-facial defects result from cancer treatment consequences in serious functional as well as cosmetic deformities. Acceptable cosmetic results usually can be obtained with a facial prosthesis. However, retention of a large facial prosthesis can be challenging because of its size and weight. This article describes prosthetic rehabilitation of a 57-year-old man having a right lateral mid-facial defect with intraoral-extraoral combination prosthesis. A modified technique to fabricate a hollow substructure in heat-polymerizing polymethyl-methacrylate to support silicone facial prosthesis was illustrated. The resultant facial prosthesis was structurally durable and light in weight facilitating the retention with magnets satisfactorily. This technique is advantageous as there is no need to fabricate the whole prosthesis again in case of damage of the silicone layer because the outer silicone layer can be removed and re-packed on the substructure if the gypsum-mold is preserved. PMID:21165271

  4. Simulation of an advanced techniques of ion propulsion Rocket system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    2016-07-01

    The ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of Deuterium,Argon gas and Hexagonal shape Magneto hydrodynamic(MHD) techniques because of the stimulation indirectly generated the power from ionization chamber,design of thrust range is 1.2 N with 40 KW of electric power and high efficiency.The proposed work is the study of MHD power generation through ionization level of Deuterium gas and combination of two gaseous ions(Deuterium gas ions + Argon gas ions) at acceleration stage.IPR consists of three parts 1.Hexagonal shape MHD based power generator through ionization chamber 2.ion accelerator 3.Exhaust of Nozzle.Initially the required energy around 1312 KJ/mol is carrying out the purpose of deuterium gas which is changed to ionization level.The ionized Deuterium gas comes out from RF ionization chamber to nozzle through MHD generator with enhanced velocity then after voltage is generated across the two pairs of electrode in MHD.it will produce thrust value with the help of mixing of Deuterium ion and Argon ion at acceleration position.The simulation of the IPR system has been carried out by MATLAB.By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results,if reaches that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with 40KW power for simulating the IPR system.

  5. Advances in Current Rating Techniques for Flexible Printed Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Twist Capsule Assemblies are power transfer devices commonly used in spacecraft mechanisms that require electrical signals to be passed across a rotating interface. Flexible printed circuits (flex tapes, see Figure 2) are used to carry the electrical signals in these devices. Determining the current rating for a given trace (conductor) size can be challenging. Because of the thermal conditions present in this environment the most appropriate approach is to assume that the only means by which heat is removed from the trace is thru the conductor itself, so that when the flex tape is long the temperature rise in the trace can be extreme. While this technique represents a worst-case thermal situation that yields conservative current ratings, this conservatism may lead to overly cautious designs when not all traces are used at their full rated capacity. A better understanding of how individual traces behave when they are not all in use is the goal of this research. In the testing done in support of this paper, a representative flex tape used for a flight Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) application was tested by energizing individual traces (conductors in the tape) in a vacuum chamber and the temperatures of the tape measured using both fine-gauge thermocouples and infrared thermographic imaging. We find that traditional derating schemes used for bundles of wires do not apply for the configuration tested. We also determine that single active traces located in the center of a flex tape operate at lower temperatures than those on the outside edges.

  6. Recent advances in techniques for tsetse-fly control*

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, K. J. R.

    1967-01-01

    With the advent of modern persistent insecticides, it has become possible to utilize some of the knowledge that has accumulated on the ecology and bionomics of Glossina and to devise more effective techniques for the control and eventual extermination of these species. The present article, based on experience of the tsetse fly problem in Northern Nigeria, points out that the disadvantages of control techniques—heavy expenditure of money and manpower and undue damage to the biosystem—can now largely be overcome by basing the application of insecticides on knowledge of the habits of the particular species of Glossina in a particular environment. Two factors are essential to the success of a control project: the proper selection of sites for spraying (the concept of restricted application) and the degree of persistence of the insecticide used. Reinfestation from within or outside the project area must also be taken into account. These and other aspects are discussed in relation to experience gained from a successful extermination project carried out in the Sudan vegetation zone and from present control activities in the Northern Guinea vegetation zone. PMID:5301739

  7. Advanced pattern-matching techniques for autonomous acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendra, P. M.; Westover, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    The key objective of this effort is the development of pattern-matching algorithms which can impart autonomous acquisition capability to precision-guided munitions such as Copperhead and Hellfire. Autonomous acquisition through pattern matching holds the promise of eliminating laser designation and enhancing fire power by multiple target prioritization. The pattern-matching approach being developed under this program is based on a symbolic pattern-matching framework, which is suited for the autonomous acquisition scenario. It is based on matching a symbolic representation derived from the two images, and it can accommodate the stringent pattern-matchine criteria established by the scenario: enormous differences in the scene perspective, aspect and range between the two sensors, differences in sensor characteristics and illumination, and scene changes such as target motion and obscuration from one view point ot the other. This report contains a description of an efficient branch-and-bound technique for symbolic pattern matching. Also presented are the results of applying a simulation of the algorithm to pairs of FLIR images of military vehicles in cluttered environments as well as pairs of images from different sensors (FLIR and silicon TV). The computational requirements are analyzed toward real-time implementation, and avenues of future work are recommended.

  8. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  9. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2000-08-28

    This project targets the development of (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling non-conventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and well index (for use in simulation models), including the effects of wellbore flow; and (3) accurate approaches to account for heterogeneity in the near-well region.

  10. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss "small-group apprenticeships (SGAs)" as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments…

  11. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    Discusses small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method for introducing cell culture techniques to high school participants. Teaches cell culture practices and introduces advance imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Clarifies and illuminates the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships. (Author/KHR)

  12. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.; Stebbins, J. P.; Smith, A. W.; Pullen, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method for the prediction of propellant-material compatibility for periods of time up to ten years is presented. Advanced sensitive measurement techniques used in the prediction method are described. These include: neutron activation analysis, radioactive tracer technique, and atomic absorption spectroscopy with a graphite tube furnace sampler. The results of laboratory tests performed to verify the prediction method are presented.

  13. Endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer: Standard techniques and recent advances in ESD

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-known endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer. ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precision of histologic diagnosis and can also reduce the recurrence rate. However, the drawback of ESD is its technical difficulty, and, consequently, it is associated with a high rate of complications, the need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. Various advances in the devices and techniques used for ESD have contributed to overcoming these drawbacks. PMID:24914364

  14. Controlled fabrication of advanced functional structures on the nanoscale by means of electron beam-induced processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Foucher, Johann; Penzkofer, Christian; Irmer, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    The controlled deposition of materials by means of electron beam induced processing (EBIP) is a well-established patterning method, which allows for the fabrication of nanostructures with high spatial resolution in a highly precise and flexible manner. Applications range from the production of ultrathin coatings and nanoscaled conductivity probes to super sharp atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips, to name but a few. The latter are typically deposited at the very end of silicon or silicon-nitride tips, which are fabricated with MEMS technologies. EBIP therefore provides the unique ability to converge MEMS to NEMS in a highly controllable way, and thus represents an encouraging opportunity to refine or even develop further MEMS-based features with advanced functionality and applicability. In this paper, we will present and discuss exemplary application solutions, where we successfully applied EBIP to overcome dimensional and/or functional limitations. We therefore show the fabrication stability and accuracy of "T-like-shaped" AFM tips made from high density, diamond-like carbon (HDC/DLC) for the investigation of undercut structures on the base of CDR30-EBD tips. Such aggressive CD-AFM tip dimensions are mandatory to fulfill ITRS requirements for the inspection of sub-28nm nodes, but are unattainable with state-of-art Si-based MEMS technologies today. In addition to that, we demonstrate the ability of EBIP to realize field enhancement in sensor applications and the fabrication of cold field emitters (CFE). For example: applying the EBIP approach allows for the production of CFEs, which are characterized by considerably enhanced imaging resolution compared to standard thermal field emitters and stable operation properties at room temperature without the need for periodic cathode flashing - unlike typical CFEs. Based on these examples, we outline the strong capabilities of the EBIP approach to further downscale functional structures in order to meet future demands in the

  15. Fabrication of Ultrasensitive Field-Effect Transistor DNA Biosensors by a Directional Transfer Technique Based on CVD-Grown Graphene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Huang, Le; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Zhongyue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-08-12

    Most graphene field-effect transistor (G-FET) biosensors are fabricated through a routine process, in which graphene is transferred onto a Si/SiO2 substrate and then devices are subsequently produced by micromanufacture processes. However, such a fabrication approach can introduce contamination onto the graphene surface during the lithographic process, resulting in interference for the subsequent biosensing. In this work, we have developed a novel directional transfer technique to fabricate G-FET biosensors based on chemical-vapor-deposition- (CVD-) grown single-layer graphene (SLG) and applied this biosensor for the sensitive detection of DNA. A FET device with six individual array sensors was first fabricated, and SLG obtained by the CVD-growth method was transferred onto the sensor surface in a directional manner. Afterward, peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was covalently immobilized on the graphene surface, and DNA detection was realized by applying specific target DNA to the PNA-functionalized G-FET biosensor. The developed G-FET biosensor was able to detect target DNA at concentrations as low as 10 fM, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than those reported in a previous work. In addition, the biosensor was capable of distinguishing the complementary DNA from one-base-mismatched DNA and noncomplementary DNA. The directional transfer technique for the fabrication of G-FET biosensors is simple, and the as-constructed G-FET DNA biosensor shows ultrasensitivity and high specificity, indicating its potential application in disease diagnostics as a point-of-care tool.

  16. Fabrication of Ultrasensitive Field-Effect Transistor DNA Biosensors by a Directional Transfer Technique Based on CVD-Grown Graphene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Huang, Le; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Zhongyue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-08-12

    Most graphene field-effect transistor (G-FET) biosensors are fabricated through a routine process, in which graphene is transferred onto a Si/SiO2 substrate and then devices are subsequently produced by micromanufacture processes. However, such a fabrication approach can introduce contamination onto the graphene surface during the lithographic process, resulting in interference for the subsequent biosensing. In this work, we have developed a novel directional transfer technique to fabricate G-FET biosensors based on chemical-vapor-deposition- (CVD-) grown single-layer graphene (SLG) and applied this biosensor for the sensitive detection of DNA. A FET device with six individual array sensors was first fabricated, and SLG obtained by the CVD-growth method was transferred onto the sensor surface in a directional manner. Afterward, peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was covalently immobilized on the graphene surface, and DNA detection was realized by applying specific target DNA to the PNA-functionalized G-FET biosensor. The developed G-FET biosensor was able to detect target DNA at concentrations as low as 10 fM, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than those reported in a previous work. In addition, the biosensor was capable of distinguishing the complementary DNA from one-base-mismatched DNA and noncomplementary DNA. The directional transfer technique for the fabrication of G-FET biosensors is simple, and the as-constructed G-FET DNA biosensor shows ultrasensitivity and high specificity, indicating its potential application in disease diagnostics as a point-of-care tool. PMID:26203889

  17. Fabrication of a metal-ceramic crown to fit an existing partial removable dental prosthesis using ceramic pressed to metal technique: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    Fabricating a crown to retrofit an existing abutment tooth for a partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) is one of the most time-consuming and labor-intensive clinical procedures. In particular, when the patient is concerned with esthetic aspects of restoration, the task of fabricating becomes more daunting. Many techniques for the fabrication of all-metallic or metal-ceramic crowns have been discussed in the literature. This article was aimed to describe a simple fabrication method in which a retrofitting crown was fabricated for a precise fit using a ceramic-pressed-to-metal system. PMID:25006389

  18. [Our experience with the treatment of high perianal fistulas with the mucosal flap advancement technique].

    PubMed

    Marino, Giuseppe; Greco, Ettore; Gasparrini, Marcello; Romanzi, Aldo; Ottaviani, Maurizio; Nasi, Stefano; Pasquini, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the treatment of high transphincteric anal fistulas with the mucosal flap advancement technique. This technique, though by no means easy to perform, allows fistulas to be treated in a single surgical session in comparison to the technique in which setone is used or to the less well known transposition techniques, given the same long-term results in terms of continence and recurrence rate. After a brief overview of the problem, from the points of view of both aetiopathogenesis and classification, the principal surgical treatment techniques are described, presenting the results and complications observed in the authors' own case series. PMID:15038659

  19. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. During the first two quarters of the project, the thrust of the work directed towards characterizing the various coal combustion residues and FGD residue, i.e., scrubber sludge. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and transmission-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), FBC fly ash (ADK unit l-6), FBC fly ash (S.I. coal), FBC spent bed ash (ADM, unit l-6), bottom ash, and scrubber sludge (CWLP) residues to characterize their geometrical shapes, mineral phases, and thermal stability. Our spectroscopic results indicate that the scrubber sludge is mainly composed of a gypsum-like phase whose lattice structure is different from the lattice structure of conventional gypsum, and sludge does not contain hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3}.0.5H{sub 2}O) phase. Our attempts to fabricate brake frictional shoes, in the form of 1.25 inch disks, from PCC fly ash, FBC spent bed ash, scrubber sludge, coal char, iron particles, and coal tar were successful. Based on the experience gained and microscopic analyses, we have now upscaled our procedures to fabricate 2.5 inch diameter disk,- from coal combustion residues. This has been achieved. The SEM and Young`s modulus analyses of brake composites fabricated at 400 psi < Pressure < 2200 psi suggest pressure has a strong influence on the particle packing and the filling of interstices in our composites. Also, these results along with mechanical behavior of the fabricated disks lead us to believe that the combination of surface altered PCC fly ash and scrubber sludge particles, together ed ash particles are ideal for our composite materials.

  20. Progress and recent advances in fabrication and utilization of hypoxanthine biosensors for meat and fish quality assessment: a review.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Abdulazeez T; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2012-10-15

    This review provides an update on the research conducted on the fabrication and utilization of hypoxanthine (Hx) biosensors published over the past four decades. In particular, the review focuses on progress made in the development and use of Hx biosensors for the assessment of fish and meat quality which has dominated research in this area. The various fish and meat freshness indexes that have been proposed over this period are highlighted. Furthermore, recent developments and future advances in the use of screen-printed electrodes and nanomaterials for achieving improved performances for the reliable determination of Hx in fish and meat are discussed.

  1. Fabrication of microlens array on silicon surface using electrochemical wet stamping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Lei-Jie; Zhou, Hang; Zhu, Li-Min

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on the fabrication of microlens array (MLA) on silicon surface by taking advantage of a novel micromachining approach, the electrochemical we stamping (E-WETS). The E-WETS allows the direct imprinting of MLA on an agarose stamp into the substrate through a selective anodic dissolution process. The pre-patterned agarose stamp can direct and supply the solution preferentially on the contact area between the agarose stamp and the substrate, to which the electrochemical reaction is confined. The anodic potential vs. saturated calomel electrode is optimized and 1.5 V is chosen as the optimum value for the electrochemical polishing of p-Si. A refractive MLA on a PMMA mold is successfully transferred onto the p-Si surface. The machining deviations of the fabricated MLA from those on the mold are 0.44% in diameter and 2.1% in height respectively, and the machining rate in HF is around 1.1 μm/h. The surface roughness of the fabricated MLA is less than 12 nm owing to the electrochemical polishing process. The results demonstrate that E-WETS is a promising approach to fabricate MLA on p-Si surface with high accuracy and efficiency.

  2. Consolidation and fabrication techniques for vanadium-20 w/o titanium /TV-20/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, W. R.; Karasek, F. J.; Kramer, W. C.; Mayfield, R. M.; Mc Gowan, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Tests of the mechanical properties, fuel compatibility, sodium corrosion and irradiation behavior were made for vanadium and vanadium alloy. Improved methods for consolidation and fabrication of bar, rod, sheet, and high-quality, small diameter, thin-wall tubing of vanadium-20 without titanium are reported.

  3. Novel fabrication technique of hybrid structure lens array for 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junsik; Kim, Junoh; Kim, Cheoljoong; Shin, Dooseub; Koo, Gyohyun; Won, Yong Hyub

    2016-03-01

    Tunable liquid lens arrays can produce three dimensional images by using electrowetting principle that alters surface tensions by applying voltage. This method has advantages of fast response time and low power consumption. However, it is challenging to fabricate a high fill factor liquid lens array and operate three dimensional images which demand high diopter. This study describes a hybrid structure lens array which has not only a liquid lens array but a solid lens array. A concave-shape lens array is unavoidable when using only the liquid lens array and some voltages are needed to make the lens flat. By placing the solid lens array on the liquid lens array, initial diopter can be positive. To fabricate the hybrid structure lens array, a conventional lithographic process in semiconductor manufacturing is needed. A negative photoresist SU-8 was used as chamber master molds. PDMS and UV adhesive replica molding are done sequentially. Two immiscible liquids, DI water and dodecane, are injected in the fabricated chamber, followed by sealing. The fabricated structure has a 20 by 20 pattern of cylindrical shaped circle array and the aperture size of each lens is 1mm. The thickness of the overall hybrid structure is about 2.8mm. Hybrid structure lens array has many advantages. Solid lens array has almost 100% fill factor and allow high efficiency. Diopter can be increased by more than 200 and negative diopter can be shifted to the positive region. This experiment showed several properties of the hybrid structure and demonstrated its superiority.

  4. Fabrication of silk fibroin film using centrifugal casting technique for corneal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Chae; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Ok Joo; Kim, Jung-Ho; Ju, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jung Min; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Su Hyeon; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    Films prepared from silk fibroin have shown potential as biomaterials in tissue engineering applications for the eye. Here, we present a novel process for fabrication of silk fibroin films for corneal application. In this work, fabrication of silk fibroin films was simply achieved by centrifugal force. In contrast to the conventional dry casting method, we carried out the new process in a centrifuge with a rotating speed of 4000 rpm, where centrifugal force was imposed on an aluminum tube containing silk fibroin solution. In the present study, we also compared the surface roughness, mechanical properties, transparency, and cell proliferation between centrifugal and dry casting method. In terms of surface morphology, films fabricated by the centrifugal casting have less surface roughness than those by the dry casting. For elasticity and transparency, silk fibroin films obtained from the centrifugal casting had favorable results compared with those prepared by dry casting. Furthermore, primary human corneal keratocytes grew better in films prepared by the centrifugal casting. Therefore, our results suggest that this new fabrication process for silk fibroin films offers important potential benefits for corneal tissue regeneration.

  5. Low cost batch fabrication of microdevices using ultraviolet light-emitting diode photolithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Neam Heng; Swamy, Varghese; Ramakrishnan, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state technology has enabled the use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in lithography systems due to their low cost, low power requirement, and higher efficiency relative to the traditional mercury lamp. Uniform irradiance distribution is essential for photolithography to ensure the critical dimension (CD) of the feature fabricated. However, light illuminated from arrays of LEDs can have nonuniform irradiance distribution, which can be a problem when using LED arrays as a source to batch-fabricate multiple devices on a large wafer piece. In this study, the irradiance distribution of an UV LED array was analyzed, and the separation distance between light source and mask optimized to obtain maximum irradiance uniformity without the use of a complex lens. Further, employing a diffuser glass enhanced the fabrication process and the CD loss was minimized to an average of 300 nm. To assess the performance of the proposed technology, batch fabrication of surface acoustic wave devices on lithium niobate substrate was carried out, and all the devices exhibited identical insertion loss of -18 dB at a resonance frequency of 39.33 MHz. The proposed low-cost UV lithography setup can be adapted in academic laboratories for research and teaching on microdevices.

  6. Fabrication of Hybrid Nanostructures via Nanoscale Laser-Induced Reshaping for Advanced Light Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zuev, Dmitry A; Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Milichko, Valentin A; Starikov, Sergey V; Morozov, Ivan A; Shishkin, Ivan I; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-04-01

    Ordered hybrid nanostructures for nanophotonics applications are fabricated by a novel approach via femtosecond laser melting of asymmetric metal-dielectric (Au/Si) nanoparticles created by lithographical methods. The approach allows selective reshaping of the metal components of the hybrid nanoparticles without affecting the dielectric ones and is applied for tuning of the scattering properties of the hybrid nanostructures in the visible range.

  7. Development of a Batch Fabrication Process for Chemical Nanosensors: Recent Advancements at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin M.

    2014-01-01

    A major objective in aerospace sensor development is to produce sensors that are small in size, easy to batch fabricate and low in cost, and have low power consumption. Chemical sensors involving nanostructured materials can provide these characteristics as well as the potential for the development of sensor systems with unique properties and improved performance. However, the fabrication and processing of nanostructures for sensor applications currently is limited by the ability to control their location on the sensor platform, which in turn hinders the progress for batch fabrication. This presentation will discuss the following: the development of a novel room temperature methane (CH4) sensor fabricated using porous tin oxide (SnO2) nanorods as the sensing material, the advantages of using nanomaterials in sensor designs, the challenges encountered with the integration of nanostructures into microsensordevices, and the different methods that have been attempted to address these challenges. An approach for the mass production of sensors with nanostructures using a method developed by our group at the NASA Glenn Research Center to control the alignment of nanostructures onto a sensor platform will also be described.

  8. Polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated with an advanced electrohydrodynamic direct-printing method for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seung Hyun; Lee, Hyeong Jin; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2011-12-12

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) direct writing has been used in diverse microelectromechanical systems and various supplemental methods for biotechnology and electronics. In this work, we expanded the use of EHD-induced direct writing to fabricate 3D biomedical scaffolds designed as porous structures for bone tissue engineering. To prepare the scaffolds, we modified a grounded target used in conventional EHD direct printing using a poly(ethylene oxide) solution bath, elastically cushioning the plotted struts to prevent crumbling. The fabricated scaffolds were assessed for not only physical properties including surface roughness and water uptake ability but also biological capabilities by culturing osteoblast-like cells (MG63) for the EHD-plotted polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold. The EHD-scaffolds showed significantly roughened surface and enhanced water-absorption ability (400% increase) compared with the pure rapid-prototyped PCL. The results of cell viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization analyses showed significantly enhanced biological properties of the scaffold (20 times the cell viability and 6 times the mineralization) compared with the scaffolds fabricated using RP technology. Because of the results, the modified EHD direct-writing process can be a promising method for fabricating 3D biomedical scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  9. Periodically tapered photonic crystal fibre based strain sensor fabricated by a CO2 laser technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Gerald; Bo, Lin; Guan, Chunying; Semenova, Yuliya; Wang, Pengfei

    2014-05-01

    A focused CO2 laser beam has been previously used to successfully fabricate both symmetric and asymmetric long period fiber gratings which have been used for a variety of sensing applications. However fabrication by a CO2 laser beam demands a time consuming laser scanning process which increases the difficulty and cost of fabrication. In this paper a fibre sensor based on a fibre heterostructure with a simple configuration consisting of a series of periodical tapers in a photonic crystal fibre (PCF) sandwiched between two singlemode fibres is proposed and investigated experimentally. The tapers are periodically fabricated along the PCF section using a CO2 laser beam. The proposed fibre heterostructure can be used for strain sensing by measuring the wavelength blueshift of the multimode interference dip of the transmission spectrum as a function of strain. An average stain sensitivity of -68.4 pm/μ ɛ has been experimentally achieved over a microstrain range from 0 to 100 μ ɛ. Assuming in practice that the sensor is interrrogated with a ratiometric power measurement system, then the strain resolution is estimated to be better than 1.18×10-2 microstrain. The mechanisms for refractive index modulation periodically tapered PCF under tensile strain measurements are complex but may be regarded as a combination of stress-relaxation and refractive index perturbations over the length of the tapered PCF induced by strain and by tapering. The proposed fibre strain sensor has the advantage of low temperature sensitivity (average 8.4 pm/°C) and an experimental demonstration of this reduced sensitivity is also presented. The proposed strain sensor benefits from simplicity of fabrication and achieves a competitive sensitivity compared with other existing fibre-optic sensors.

  10. Density measurement of yarn dyed woven fabrics based on dual-side scanning and the FFT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Xin, Binjie; Wu, Xiangji

    2014-11-01

    The yarn density measurement, as part of fabric analysis, is very important for the textile manufacturing process and is traditionally based on single-side analysis. In this paper, a new method, suitable for yarn dyed woven fabrics, is developed, based on dual-side scanning and the fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique for yarn density measurement, instead of one-side image analysis. Firstly, the dual-side scanning method based on the Radon transform (RT) is used for the image registration of both side images of the woven fabric; a lab-used imaging system is established to capture the images of each side. Secondly, the merged image from the dual-side fabric images can be generated using three self-developed image fusion methods. Thirdly, the yarn density can be measured based on the merged image using FFT and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) processing. The effects of yarn color and weave pattern on the density measurement have been investigated for the optimization of the proposed method. Our experimental results show that the proposed method works better than the conventional analysis method in terms of both the accuracy and robustness.

  11. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  12. Fabrication techniques for microfluidic paper-based analytical devices and their applications for biological testing: A review.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yanyan; Si, Jin; Li, Zhiyang

    2016-03-15

    Paper is increasingly recognized as a user-friendly and ubiquitous substrate for construction of microfluidic devices. Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) provide an alternative technology for development of affordable, portable, disposable and low-cost diagnostic tools for improving point of care testing (POCT) and disease screening in the developing world, especially in those countries with no- or low-infrastructure and limited trained medical and health professionals. We in this review present fabrication techniques for microfluidic devices and their respective applications for biological detection as reported to date. These include: (i) fabrication techniques: examples of devices fabricated by using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) methods; (ii) detection application: biochemical, immunological and molecular detection by incorporating efficient detection methods such as, colorimetric detection, electrochemical detection, fluorescence detection, chemiluminescence (CL) detection, electrochemiluninescence (ECL) detection, photoelectrochemi (PEC) detection and so on. In addition, main advantages, disadvantages and future trends for the devices are also discussed in this review.

  13. Fabrication of controllable form submicrometer structures on positive photoresist by one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Quang Cong; Do, Minh Thanh; Journet, Bernard; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a very simple and low-cost method based on one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique to fabricate arbitrary two-dimensional (2D) polymeric submicrometer structures with controllable form. In this technique, a continuous-wave green laser beam (532 nm) with very weak power is tightly focused into a positive photoresist (S1805) by a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens (OL), depolymerizing the polymer in a local submicrometer region. The focusing spot is then moved in a controllable trajectory by a 3D piezo translation stage, resulting in desired structures. The low absorption effect of the photoresist at the excitation wavelength allows obtaining structures with submicrometer size and great depth. In particular, by controlling the exposure dose, e.g. the scanning speed, and the scanning configuration, the structures have been created in positive (cylindrical material in air) or negative (air holes) form. The 2D square structures with periods in between 0.6 μm and 1 μm and with a feature size of about 150 nm have been demonstrated with an OL of NA = 0.9 (air-immersion). The fabricated results are well consistent with those obtained numerically by using a vectorial diffraction theory for high NA OLs. This investigation should be very useful for fabrication of photonic and plasmonic templates.

  14. Microporous Poly(L-Lactic Acid) Membranes Fabricated by Polyethylene Glycol Solvent-Cast/Particulate Leaching Technique

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, Shivaram; Chang, Wenji V.; Nakamura, Tamako; Samant, Deedar M.; Thomas, Padmaja B.; Trousdale, Melvin D.; Mircheff, Austin K.; Schechter, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    With the eventual goal of developing a tissue-engineered tear secretory system, we found that primary lacrimal gland acinar cells grown on solid poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) supports expressed the best histiotypic morphology. However, to be able to perform vectorial transport functions, epithelia must be supported by a permeable substratum. In the present study, we describe the use of a solvent-cast/particulate leaching technique to fabricate microporous PLLA membranes (mpPLLAm) from PLLA/polyethylene glycol blends. Scanning electron microscopy revealed pores on both the air-cured (∼4 μm) and glass-cured sides (<2 μm) of the mpPLLAm. Diffusion studies were performed with mpPLLAm fabricated from 57.1% PLLA/42.9% polyethylene glycol blends to confirm the presence of channelized pores. The data reveal that glucose, L-tryptophan, and dextran (a high molecular weight glucose polymer) readily permeate mpPLLAm. Diffusion of the immunoglobulin G through the mpPLLAm decreased with time, suggesting the possible adsorption and occlusion of the pores. Cells cultured on the mpPLLAm (57.1/42.9 wt%) grew to subconfluent monolayers but retained histiotypic morphological and physiological characteristics of lacrimal acinar cells in vivo. Our results suggest that mpPLLAm fabricated using this technique may be useful as a scaffold for a bioartificial lacrimal gland device. PMID:19260769

  15. Advances in high-resolution imaging – techniques for three-dimensional imaging of cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Lidke, Diane S.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to determine how cellular organization is coupled to function. To achieve this goal, a better understanding of organelle composition and structure is needed. Although visualization of cellular organelles using fluorescence or electron microscopy (EM) has become a common tool for the cell biologist, recent advances are providing a clearer picture of the cell than ever before. In particular, advanced light-microscopy techniques are achieving resolutions below the diffraction limit and EM tomography provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of cellular structures. The ability to perform both fluorescence and electron microscopy on the same sample (correlative light and electron microscopy, CLEM) makes it possible to identify where a fluorescently labeled protein is located with respect to organelle structures visualized by EM. Here, we review the current state of the art in 3D biological imaging techniques with a focus on recent advances in electron microscopy and fluorescence super-resolution techniques. PMID:22685332

  16. Fabrication Of Atomic-scale Gold Junctions By Electrochemical Plating Technique Using A Common Medical Disinfectant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeno, Akinori; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2005-06-01

    Iodine tincture, a medical liquid familiar as a disinfectant, was introduced as an etching/deposition electrolyte for the fabrication of nanometer-separated gold electrodes. In the gold dissolved iodine tincture, the gold electrodes were grown or eroded slowly in atomic scale, enough to form quantum point contacts. The resistance evolution during the electrochemical deposition showed plateaus at integer multiples of the resistance quantum, (2e2/h)-1, at the room temperature. The iodine tincture is a commercially available common material, which makes the fabrication process to be the simple and cost effective. Moreover, in contrast to the conventional electrochemical approaches, this method is free from highly toxic cyanide compounds or extraordinary strong acid. We expect this method to be a useful interface between single-molecular-scale structures and macroscopic opto-electronic devices.

  17. High aspect ratio spiral microcoils fabricated by a silicon lost molding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y. G.; Ono, T.; Esashi, M.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, a silicon lost molding process is described for fabricating high aspect ratio microcoils with high Q factors. Deep reactive ion etching, electroplating and XeF2 silicon etching are utilized in this process. Microcoils with an aspect ratio of 16 and inner diameters from 80 µm to 200 µm are fabricated. The electrical characteristics are measured using a network analyzer and a two-terminal radio frequency probe. For a microcoil with an inner diameter of 130 µm, three windings and an outer diameter of 240 µm, the quality factor is 85 at a frequency of 1.6 GHz. The proximity effect and parasitic capacitance are found to be the key issues for limiting the maximum Q factor of the microcoil at high frequencies. The high Q values of the microcoils make them attractive for high resolution micro-MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) applications.

  18. Fabrication of Electrospun Polymer Fibers with Nonspherical Cross-Sections Using a Nanopressing Technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiun-Tai; Kao, Yi-Huei; Kuo, Tyng-Yow; Liu, Chih-Ting; Chiu, Yu-Jing; Chu, Chien-Wei; Chi, Mu-Huan; Tsai, Chia-Chan

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of electrospun polymer fibers is demonstrated with anisotropic cross-sections by applying a simple pressing method. Electrospun polystyrene or poly(methyl methacrylate) fibers are pressed by flat or patterned substrates while the samples are annealed at elevated temperatures. The shapes and morphologies of the pressed polymer fibers are controlled by the experimental conditions such as the pressing force, the pressing temperature, the pressing time, and the surface pattern of the substrate. At the same pressing force, the shape changes of the polymer fibers can be controlled by the pressing time. For shorter pressing times, the deformation process is dominated by the effect of pressing and fibers with barrel-shaped cross-sections can be generated. For longer pressing times, the effect of wetting becomes more important and fibers with dumbbell-shaped cross-sections can be obtained. Hierarchical polymer fibers with nanorods are fabricated by pressing the fibers with porous anodic aluminum oxide templates. PMID:26574243

  19. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 2: Advanced techniques. The linear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is presented for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the linear satellite channel. The underlying principle used is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum-likelihood decision rule. The application of the performance prediction tools, e.g., channel cutoff rate and bit error probability transfer function bounds to these modulation/demodulation techniques.

  20. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-03-24

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA.

  1. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA. PMID:27023546

  2. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA. PMID:27023546

  3. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    E.W. Baxter

    2002-06-30

    The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, completion of the hardware and ancillary hardware fabrication and commence the Test Preparations for the testing of the non-polluting unique power turbine driven Gas Generator. Focus during this report period has been on completing the Gas Generator fabrication of hardware and ancillary hardware, and completion of unit closeout brazing and bonding. Because of unacceptable delays encountered in a previously competitively selected test site, CES initiated a re-competition of our testing program and selected an alternate test site. Following that selection, CES used all available resources to make preparations for testing the 10 Mw Gas Generator at the new testing site facilities of NTS at Saugus, CA.

  4. LIGA fabrication of mm-wave accelerating cavity structures at the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Bajikar, S.; Kang, Y.W.

    1997-08-01

    Recent microfabrication technologies based on the LIGA (German acronym for Lithographe, Galvanoformung, und Abformung) process have been applied to build high-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric planar structures suitable for high-frequency rf cavity structures. The cavity structures would be used as parts of linear accelerators, microwave undulators, and mm-wave amplifiers. The microfabrication process includes manufacture of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist x-rays through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Prototypes of a 32-cell, 108-GHz constant-impedance cavity and a 66-cell, 94-GHz constant-gradient cavity were fabricated with the synchrotron radiation sources at APS and NSLS. This paper will present an overview of the new technology and details of the mm-wave cavity fabrication.

  5. An investigation of density measurement method for yarn-dyed woven fabrics based on dual-side fusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Xin, Binjie

    2016-08-01

    Yarn density is always considered as the fundamental structural parameter used for the quality evaluation of woven fabrics. The conventional yarn density measurement method is based on one-side analysis. In this paper, a novel density measurement method is developed for yarn-dyed woven fabrics based on a dual-side fusion technique. Firstly, a lab-used dual-side imaging system is established to acquire both face-side and back-side images of woven fabric and the affine transform is used for the alignment and fusion of the dual-side images. Then, the color images of the woven fabrics are transferred from the RGB to the CIE-Lab color space, and the intensity information of the image extracted from the L component is used for texture fusion and analysis. Subsequently, three image fusion methods are developed and utilized to merge the dual-side images: the weighted average method, wavelet transform method and Laplacian pyramid blending method. The fusion efficacy of each method is evaluated by three evaluation indicators and the best of them is selected to do the reconstruction of the complete fabric texture. Finally, the yarn density of the fused image is measured based on the fast Fourier transform, and the yarn alignment image could be reconstructed using the inverse fast Fourier transform. Our experimental results show that the accuracy of density measurement by using the proposed method is close to 99.44% compared with the traditional method and the robustness of this new proposed method is better than that of conventional analysis methods.

  6. Techniques for fabrication and construction of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tingli; Li, Yuhui; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds have widespread applications in biomedical tissue engineering because of their nanoscaled architecture, eg, nanofibers and nanopores, similar to the native extracellular matrix. In the conventional “top-down” approach, cells are seeded onto a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold, in which cells are expected to populate in the scaffold and create their own extracellular matrix. The top-down approach based on these scaffolds has successfully engineered thin tissues, including skin, bladder, and cartilage in vitro. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate complex and functional tissues (eg, liver and kidney) due to the lack of vascularization systems and limited diffusion properties of these large biomimetic scaffolds. The emerging “bottom-up” method may hold great potential to address these challenges, and focuses on fabricating microscale tissue building blocks with a specific microarchitecture and assembling these units to engineer larger tissue constructs from the bottom up. In this review, state-of-the-art methods for fabrication of three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds are presented, and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. The bottom-up methods used to assemble microscale building blocks (eg, microscale hydrogels) for tissue engineering are also reviewed. Finally, perspectives on future development of the bottom-up approach for tissue engineering are addressed. PMID:23345979

  7. Optimization of pyrethroid and repellent on fabrics against Stegomyia albopicta (=Aedes albopictus) using a microencapsulation technique.

    PubMed

    Yao, T-T; Wang, L-K; Cheng, J-L; Hu, Y-Z; Zhao, J-H; Zhu, G-N

    2015-03-01

    A new approach employing a combination of pyrethroid and repellent is proposed to improve the protective efficacy of conventional pyrethroid-treated fabrics against mosquito vectors. In this context, the insecticidal and repellent efficacies of commonly used pyrethroids and repellents were evaluated by cone tests and arm-in-cage tests against Stegomyia albopicta (=Aedes albopictus) (Diptera: Culicidae). At concentrations of LD50 (estimated for pyrethroid) or ED50 (estimated for repellent), respectively, the knock-down effects of the pyrethroids or repellents were further compared. The results obtained indicated that deltamethrin and DEET were relatively more effective and thus these were selected for further study. Synergistic interaction was observed between deltamethrin and DEET at the ratios of 5 : 1, 2 : 1, 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 (but not 1 : 5). An optimal mixing ratio of 7 : 5 was then microencapsulated and adhered to fabrics using a fixing agent. Fabrics impregnated by microencapsulated mixtures gained extended washing durability compared with those treated with a conventional dipping method. Results indicated that this approach represents a promising method for the future impregnation of bednet, curtain and combat uniform materials. PMID:25429906

  8. Techniques for fabrication and construction of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tingli; Li, Yuhui; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds have widespread applications in biomedical tissue engineering because of their nanoscaled architecture, eg, nanofibers and nanopores, similar to the native extracellular matrix. In the conventional "top-down" approach, cells are seeded onto a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold, in which cells are expected to populate in the scaffold and create their own extracellular matrix. The top-down approach based on these scaffolds has successfully engineered thin tissues, including skin, bladder, and cartilage in vitro. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate complex and functional tissues (eg, liver and kidney) due to the lack of vascularization systems and limited diffusion properties of these large biomimetic scaffolds. The emerging "bottom-up" method may hold great potential to address these challenges, and focuses on fabricating microscale tissue building blocks with a specific microarchitecture and assembling these units to engineer larger tissue constructs from the bottom up. In this review, state-of-the-art methods for fabrication of three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds are presented, and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. The bottom-up methods used to assemble microscale building blocks (eg, microscale hydrogels) for tissue engineering are also reviewed. Finally, perspectives on future development of the bottom-up approach for tissue engineering are addressed.

  9. Apparatus and method for fabricating a microbattery

    DOEpatents

    Shul, Randy J.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Christenson, Todd R.; Zipperian, Thomas E.; Ingersoll, David

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for fabricating a microbattery that uses silicon as the structural component, packaging component, and semiconductor to reduce the weight, size, and cost of thin film battery technology is described. When combined with advanced semiconductor packaging techniques, such a silicon-based microbattery enables the fabrication of autonomous, highly functional, integrated microsystems having broad applicability.

  10. Fabrication of Hybrid Nanostructures via Nanoscale Laser-Induced Reshaping for Advanced Light Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zuev, Dmitry A; Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Milichko, Valentin A; Starikov, Sergey V; Morozov, Ivan A; Shishkin, Ivan I; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-04-01

    Ordered hybrid nanostructures for nanophotonics applications are fabricated by a novel approach via femtosecond laser melting of asymmetric metal-dielectric (Au/Si) nanoparticles created by lithographical methods. The approach allows selective reshaping of the metal components of the hybrid nanoparticles without affecting the dielectric ones and is applied for tuning of the scattering properties of the hybrid nanostructures in the visible range. PMID:26901635

  11. POC-Scale Testing of an Advanced Fine Coal Dewatering Equipment/Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Karekh, B K; Tao, D; Groppo, J G

    1998-08-28

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 mm) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy's program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 45 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 - March 31, 1998.

  12. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 3: Advanced techniques. The nonlinear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the nonlinear satellite channel is presented. The underlying principle used throughout is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum likelihood decision rule and aproximations to it. The bit error probability transfer function bounds developed in great detail in Part 4 is applied to these modulation/demodulation techniques. The effects of the various degrees of receiver mismatch are considered both theoretically and by numerous illustrative examples.

  13. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  14. Methods of Fabricating a Layer of Metallic Glass-Based Material Using Immersion and Pouring Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement layers of metallic glass-based materials. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a layer of metallic glass includes: applying a coating layer of liquid phase metallic glass to an object, the coating layer being applied in a sufficient quantity such that the surface tension of the liquid phase metallic glass causes the coating layer to have a smooth surface; where the metallic glass has a critical cooling rate less than 1000 K/s; and cooling the coating layer of liquid phase metallic glass to form a layer of solid phase metallic glass.

  15. Fabrication of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-aluminum matrix composite by powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, N. A.; Kozlov, D. V.; Golovanov, V. N.; Klimov, E. S.; Grebchuk, E. E.; Efimov, M. S.; Kostishko, B. B.

    We report on fabrication of an aluminum matrix composite containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced by MOCVD method and functionalized via acid treatment by a H2SO4/HNO3 mixture. Specimens were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) of the aluminum powder with different amounts of functionalized MWCNTs (FMWCNTs) in the range of 0.1-1 wt.%. We studied the effect of FMWCNTs amount on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites. It is shown that functionalization allows homogeneous dispersing of the MWCNTs in Al powder. The maximal increase in micro-hardness and tensile strength is registered at 0.1 wt.%.

  16. FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Baxter; Roger E. Anderson; Stephen E. Doyle

    2003-06-01

    In September 2000 the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) contracted with Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) of Sacramento, California to design, fabricate, and test a 20 MW{sub t} (10 MW{sub e}) gas generator. Program goals were to demonstrate a non-polluting gas generator at temperatures up to 3000 F at 1500 psi, and to demonstrate resulting drive gas composition, comprising steam and carbon dioxide substantially free of pollutants. Following hardware design and fabrication, testing, originally planned to begin in the summer of 2001, was delayed by unavailability of the contracted test facility. CES designed, fabricated, and tested the proposed gas generator as originally agreed. The CES process for producing near-zero-emissions power from fossil fuels is based on the near-stoichiometric combustion of a clean gaseous fuel with oxygen in the presence of recycled water, to produce a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine drive fluid comprising steam and carbon dioxide. Tests demonstrated igniter operation over the prescribed ranges of pressure and mixture ratios. Ignition was repeatable and reliable through more than 100 ignitions. Injector design ''A'' was operated successfully at both low power ({approx}20% of rated power) and at rated power ({approx}20 MW{sub t}) in more than 95 tests. The uncooled gas generator configuration (no diluent injectors or cooldown chambers installed) produced drive gases at temperatures approaching 3000 F and at pressures greater than 1550 psia. The fully cooled gas generator configuration, with cooldown chambers and injector ''A'', operated consistently at pressures from 1100 to 1540 psia and produced high pressure, steam-rich turbine drive gases at temperatures ranging from {approx}3000 to as low as 600 F. This report includes description of the intended next steps in the gas generator technology demonstration and traces the anticipated pathway to commercialization for the gas generator technology

  17. Innovative fabrication processing of advanced composite materials concepts for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassapoglou, Christos; Dinicola, Al J.; Chou, Jack C.

    1992-01-01

    The autoclave based THERM-X(sub R) process was evaluated by cocuring complex curved panels with frames and stiffeners. The process was shown to result in composite parts of high quality with good compaction at sharp radius regions and corners of intersecting parts. The structural properties of the postbuckled panels fabricated were found to be equivalent to those of conventionally tooled hand laid-up parts. Significant savings in bagging time over conventional tooling were documented. Structural details such as cocured shear ties and embedded stiffener flanges in the skin were found to suppress failure modes such as failure at corners of intersecting members and skin stiffeners separation.

  18. Nanorods of Co/Pd multilayers fabricated by glancing angle deposition for advanced media

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hao; Gupta, Subhadra; Natarajarathinam, Anusha

    2013-05-28

    Perpendicular anisotropy magnetic nanorods composed of Co/Pd multilayers have been successfully fabricated by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) in a planetary sputtering system. Co and Pd layer thickness, ratio, and bilayer number were optimized for both normal and GLAD depositions. Scanning electron micrographs estimated the nanorods to be about 12 nm in diameter. M-H loops showed that the coercivity for the GLAD nanorods increased from 1.3 kOe for the normally deposited continuous films to 2.9 kOe for the GLAD nanorod array, a 123% increase.

  19. Electron Beam Lithography Double Step Exposure Technique for Fabrication of Mushroom-Like Profile in Bilayer Resist System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornelia, Indykiewicz; Bogdan, Paszkiewicz; Tomasz, Szymański; Regina, Paszkiewicz

    2015-01-01

    The Hi/Lo bilayer resist system exposure in e-beam lithography (EBL) process, intended for mushroom-like profile fabrication, was studied. Different exposure parameters and theirs influence on the resist layers were simulated in CASINO software and the obtained results were compared with the experimental data. The AFM technique was used for the estimation of the e-beam penetration depth in the resist stack. Performed numerical and experimental results allow us to establish the useful ranges of the exposure parameters.

  20. Fabrication of IrSi(3)/p-Si Schottky diodes by a molecular beam epitaxy technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Iannelli, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    IrSi(3)/p-Si Schottky diodes have been fabricated by a molecular beam epitaxy technique at 630 C. Good surface morphology was observed for IrSi(3) layers grown at temperatures below 680 C, and an increasing tendency to form islands is observed in samples grown at higher temperatures. Good diode current-voltage characteristics were observed and Schottky barrier heights of 0.14-0.18 eV were determined by activation energy analysis and spectral response measurement.

  1. Fabrication of cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion targets using target free-fall technique. Report No. 2-82

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Murphy, M.J.

    1982-04-01

    Techniques for fabricating cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets (i.e., spherical shells containing a uniform layer of DT ice) are investigated using target free-fall concept. Detection and characterization of the moving targets are effected by optoelectronic means, of which the principal is an RF ac-interferometer. This interferometer system demonstrates, for the first time, the speed capabilities of the phase-modulation ac-interferometry. New techiques developed for handling, holding, launching, and transporting targets are also described. Results obtained at both room and cryogenic temperatures are presented.

  2. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-04-28

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application.

  3. Next generation bioelectronics: Advances in fabrication coupled with clever chemistries enable the effective integration of biomaterials and organic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molino, Paul J.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2015-01-01

    Organic bioelectronics is making an enormous impact in the field of tissue engineering, providing not just biocompatible, but biofunctional conducting material platforms. For their true potential to be reached, it is critical to integrate organic conductors with other biopolymers in a targeted manner, allowing the development of devices and scaffold architectures capable of delivering a number of physical, chemical, and electrical stimuli. Herein, we provide an overview of the methods currently being employed to tailor organic conductors for bioapplications, with a focus on the development of fabrication techniques vital to the development of the next generation of intelligent bionic devices.

  4. Fabrication of a bunch of sub-30-nm nanofibers inside microchannels using photopolymerization via a long exposure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Hu; Lim, Tae Woo; Yang, Dong-Yol; Cho, Nam Chul; Lee, Kwang-Sup

    2006-10-01

    Experimental studies on the fabrication of sub-30-nm nanofibers using two-photon initiated photopolymerization (TPP) have been carried out. To generate nanofibers at the interior region of microstructures, a photopolymerization method involving a long laser-exposure technique (LET) is proposed. A multitude of nanofibers with a notably high resolution (about 22nm) in TPP were produced using the LET. Furthermore, it is also demonstrated that thin interconnecting networks were created regularly in a weakly polymerized region existing around the boundary of a densely polymerized voxel, allowing for the creation of various embossing patterns. By controlling the distance between adjacent voxels or lines, a selective generation of nanofibers in a local area is possible, which leads to the fabrication of high-functional filters and mixers. Embossing patterns and microchannels including nanofibers inside were fabricated by the LET so as to demonstrate the practical feasibility of this approach. These sub-30-nm nanofibers may find meaningful applications such as biofilters, mixers, and photon emitters in diverse research fields.

  5. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  6. Advanced process with magnetically enhanced RIE for phase-shifting mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Satoshi; Kusunose, Haruhiko; Hanazaki, Minoru; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Watakabe, Yaichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Isao, Akihiko; Tokoro, Yasuo

    1993-08-01

    Phase-shifting needs the critical dimension (CD) accuracy to be less than 0.05 micrometers for the metal and shifter pattern on a phase-shifting mask. Thus we have investigated a new etching process using magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE). A magnetic field was provided by two pairs of solenoid coils outside the chamber. By using this MERIE system, the etching characteristics of chromium (Cr) and spin on glass (SOG) were evaluated. A Cl2 and O2 gas mixture was used for Cr etching. The etching selectivity had a maximum when the concentration of O2 was 20%. The etching selectivity increased with an increase in the magnetic field and gas pressure as well as with a decrease in the rf power. High etching selectivity and anisotropic etching features were obtained when the magnetic field was 100 G, the gas pressure 10 - 30 Pa, and the rf power density 0.18 - 0.22 W/cm2. Phase-shifting masks fabricated with this system show a CD accuracy of better than 0.05 micrometers , so 64 MB DRAM phase-shifting masks can be successfully fabricated with this MERIE system.

  7. Softform for facial rejuvenation: historical review, operative techniques, and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Miller, P J; Levine, J; Ahn, M S; Maas, C S; Constantinides, M

    2000-01-01

    The deep nasolabial fold and other facial furrows and wrinkles have challenged the facial plastic surgeon. A variety of techniques have been used in the past to correct these troublesome defects. Advances in the last five years in new materials and design have created a subcutaneous implant that has excellent properties. This article reviews the development and use of Softform facial implant.

  8. Traditional Materials and Techniques Used as Instructional Devices in an Advanced Business Spanish Conversation Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivieso, Jorge

    Spanish language training at the Thunderbird Graduate School of International Management is discussed, focusing on the instructional materials and classroom techniques used in advanced Spanish conversation classes. While traditional materials (dialogues, dictation, literature, mass media, video- and audiotapes) and learning activities (recitation,…

  9. Recognizing and Managing Complexity: Teaching Advanced Programming Concepts and Techniques Using the Zebra Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, John; Zhang, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Teaching advanced programming can be a challenge, especially when the students are pursuing different majors with diverse analytical and problem-solving capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficacy of using a particular problem as a vehicle for imparting a broad set of programming concepts and problem-solving techniques. We…

  10. Real-time application of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques for research aircraft simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Visual aids are valuable assets to engineers for design, demonstration, and evaluation. Discussed here are a variety of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques used to enhance the displays of test aircraft dynamics. The new software's capabilities are examined and possible future uses are considered.

  11. Tooth preparation and fabrication of porcelain veneers using a double-layer technique.

    PubMed

    Chpindel, P; Cristou, M

    1994-09-01

    This article discusses proper tooth preparation when using the double-layered porcelain technique for constructing porcelain veneers designed to produce strength and translucency. Indications for this technique include color correction, restoration of lost tooth structure or improper tooth size, and overall smile design. A new indication--misalignment--has been added. The objective of this article is to review tooth preparation and double-layered laboratory techniques using hydrothermal ceramics in combination. Four cases are used to illustrate the procedure, concentrating on the correction of misaligned teeth.

  12. Prototype Development of Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press (ROHUP) to Fabricate Advanced Tc-99 Bearing Ceramic Waste Forms - 13381

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Ariana J.; Delgado, Luc R.; Werbick, Brett M.; Hartmann, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this senior student project is to design and build a prototype construction of a machine that simultaneously provides the proper pressure and temperature parameters to sinter ceramic powders in-situ to create pellets of rather high densities of above 90% (theoretical). This ROHUP (Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press) device is designed specifically to fabricate advanced ceramic Tc-99 bearing waste forms and therefore radiological barriers have been included in the system. The HUP features electronic control and feedback systems to set and monitor pressure, load, and temperature parameters. This device operates wirelessly via portable computer using Bluetooth{sup R} technology. The HUP device is designed to fit in a standard atmosphere controlled glove box to further allow sintering under inert conditions (e.g. under Ar, He, N{sub 2}). This will further allow utilizing this HUP for other potential applications, including radioactive samples, novel ceramic waste forms, advanced oxide fuels, air-sensitive samples, metallic systems, advanced powder metallurgy, diffusion experiments and more. (authors)

  13. Fabric space radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Krotiuk, W.J.; Webb, B.J.; Prater, J.T.; Bates, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Future Air Force space missions will require thermal radiators that both survive in the hostile space environment and stow away for minimal bulk during launch. Advances in all aspects of radiator design, construction, and analysis will be necessary to enable such future missions. Currently, the best means for obtaining high strength along with flexibility is through structures known as fabrics. The development of new materials and bonding techniques has extended the application range of fabrics into areas traditionally dominated by monolithic and/or metallic structures. Given that even current spacecraft heat rejection considerations tend to dominate spacecraft design and mass, the larger and more complex designs of the future face daunting challenges in thermal control. Ceramic fabrics bonded to ultra-thin metal liners (foils) have the potential of achieving radiator performance levels heretofore unattainable, and of readily matching the advances made in other branches of spacecraft design. The research effort documented here indicates that both pumped loops and heat pipes constructed in ceramic fabrics stand to benefit in multiple ways. Flexibility and low mass are the main advantages exhibited by fabric radiators over conventional metal ones. We feel that fabric radiators have intrinsic merits not possessed by any other radiator design and need to be researched further. 26 refs., 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. Fabrication techniques and properties of multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Suenaga, M; Sampson, W B; Luhman, T S

    1980-01-01

    Various processing techniques for multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn and V/sub 3/Ga are reviewed. The critical current of commercially produced Nb/sub 3/Sn wires manufactured by both the bronze and external diffusion techniques are compared. Critical currents for in situ and powder processed Nb/sub 3/Sn are also included. New developments which promise improvements in J/sub c/ are discussed.

  15. Detection and Sizing of Fatigue Cracks in Steel Welds with Advanced Eddy Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, E. I.; Mohr, W. C.; Lozev, M. G.

    2008-02-01

    Butt-welded specimens were fatigued to produce cracks in the weld heat-affected zone. Advanced eddy current (AEC) techniques were used to detect and size the cracks through a coating. AEC results were compared with magnetic particle and phased-array ultrasonic techniques. Validation through destructive crack measurements was also conducted. Factors such as geometry, surface treatment, and crack tightness interfered with depth sizing. AEC inspection techniques have the potential of providing more accurate and complete sizing flaw data for manufacturing and in-service inspections.

  16. High-quality vertical light emitting diodes fabrication by mechanical lift-off technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Po-Min; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2011-10-01

    We report the fabrication of mechanical lift-off high quality thin GaN with Hexagonal Inversed Pyramid (HIP) structures for vertical light emitting diodes (V-LEDs). The HIP structures were formed at the GaN/sapphire substrate interface under high temperature during KOH wet etching process. The average threading dislocation density (TDD) was estimated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found the reduction from 2×109 to 1×108 cm-2. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the compressive stress of GaN epilayer was effectively relieved in the thin-GaN LED with HIP structures. Finally, the mechanical lift-off process is claimed to be successful by using the HIP structures as a sacrificial layer during wafer bonding process.

  17. Electro-Physical Technique for Post-Fabrication Measurements of CMOS Process Layer Thicknesses

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Janet C.; Vernier, P. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper1 presents a combined physical and electrical post-fabrication method for determining the thicknesses of the various layers in a commercial 1.5 μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundry process available through MOSIS. Forty-two thickness values are obtained from physical step-height measurements performed on thickness test structures and from electrical measurements of capacitances, sheet resistances, and resistivities. Appropriate expressions, numeric values, and uncertainties for each layer of thickness are presented, along with a systematic nomenclature for interconnect and dielectric thicknesses. However, apparent inconsistencies between several of the physical and electrical results for film thickness suggest that further uncertainty analysis is required and the effects of several assumptions need to be quantified. PMID:27110468

  18. Immobilization Techniques in the Fabrication of Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Putzbach, William; Ronkainen, Niina J.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of 1st to 3rd generation electrochemical biosensors reflects a simplification and enhancement of the transduction pathway. However, in recent years, modification of the transducer with nanomaterials has become increasingly studied and imparts many advantages. The sensitivity and overall performance of enzymatic biosensors has improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their fabrication. Given the unique and favorable qualities of gold nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes as applied to electrochemical biosensors, a consolidated survey of the different methods of nanomaterial immobilization on transducer surfaces and enzyme immobilization on these species is beneficial and timely. This review encompasses modification of enzymatic biosensors with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. PMID:23580051

  19. Controlled Fabrication of Bioactive Microfibers for Creating Tissue Constructs Using Microfluidic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yao; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Jie; Shang, Luoran; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-01-20

    The fabrication of heterogeneous microstructures, which exert precise control over the distribution of different cell types within biocompatible constructs, is important for many tissue engineering applications. Here, bioactive microfibers with tunable morphologies, structures, and components are generated and employed for creating different tissue constructs. Multibarrel capillary microfluidics with multiple laminar flows are used for continuously spinning these microfibers. With an immediate gelation reaction of the cell dispersed alginate solutions, the cell-laden alginate microfibers with the tunable morphologies and structures as the designed multiple laminar flows can be generated. The performances of the microfibers in cell culture are improved by incorporating bioactive polymers, such as extracellular matrix (ECM) or methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), into the alginate. It is demonstrated that a series of complex three-dimensional (3D) architectural cellular buildings, including biomimic vessels and scaffolds, can be created using these bioactive microfibers.

  20. A statistical comparison of two carbon fiber/epoxy fabrication techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    A statistical comparison of the compression strengths of specimens that were fabricated by either a platen press or an autoclave were performed on IM6/3501-6 carbon/epoxy composites of 16-ply (0,+45,90,-45)(sub S2) lay-up configuration. The samples were cured with the same parameters and processing materials. It was found that the autoclaved panels were thicker than the platen press cured samples. Two hundred samples of each type of cure process were compression tested. The autoclaved samples had an average strength of 450 MPa (65.5 ksi), while the press cured samples had an average strength of 370 MPa (54.0 ksi). A Weibull analysis of the data showed that there is only a 30 pct. probability that the two types of cure systems yield specimens that can be considered from the same family.

  1. Double-layer anisotropic light diffusion films fabricated using a two-step UV curing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusama, Kentaro; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Katagiri, Baku; Orui, Tomoo; Shoshi, Satoru; Fujikake, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel light diffusion film with a double diffusion layer structure for high reflectivity and a wide diffusion angle range. We demonstrated that the internal layer structure of the light diffusion film is controlled by the diffusion angle of the ultraviolet (UV) light used for photopolymerization. We successfully fabricated two different diffusion layers in a single polymer film using a two-step UV curing process and achieved a wide diffusion angle range and high reflectivity normal to the film surface. Our light diffusion film can control the distribution of diffused light, and should contribute to the development of future low-power reflective displays with high reflectivity similar to the white paper.

  2. Characteristics of heat-annealed silicon homojunction infrared photodetector fabricated by plasma-assisted technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammadi, Oday A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the effect of thermal annealing on the characteristics of silicon homojunction photodetector was studied. This homojunction photodetector was fabricated by means of plasma-induced etching of p-type silicon substrate and plasma sputtering of n-type silicon target in vacuum. The electrical and spectral characteristics of this photodetector were determined and optimized before and after the annealing process. The maximum surface reflectance of 1.89% and 1.81%, the maximum responsivity of 0.495 A/W and 0.55 A/W, the ideality factor of 1.80 and 1.99, the maximum external quantum efficiency of 76% and 83.5%, and the built-in potential of 0.79 V and 0.72 V were obtained before and after annealing, respectively.

  3. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents.

    PubMed

    Yager-Elorriaga, D A; Steiner, A M; Patel, S G; Jordan, N M; Lau, Y Y; Gilgenbach, R M

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ∼600 kA with ∼200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines. PMID:26628134

  4. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    SciTech Connect

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As a result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  5. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As amore » result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.« less

  6. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ˜600 kA with ˜200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  7. Comparison of different fabrication techniques for human adipose tissue engineering in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Frerich, Bernhard; Winter, Karsten; Scheller, Konstanze; Braumann, Ulf-Dietrich

    2012-03-01

    Adipose tissue engineering has been advocated for soft-tissue augmentation and for the treatment of soft tissue defects. The efficacy in terms of persistence of the engineered fat is, however, not yet understood and could depend on the nature of fabrication and application. The high metabolic demand of adipose tissue also points to the problem of vascularization. Endothelial cell (EC) cotransplantation could be a solution. Human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells were seeded on collagen microcarriers and submitted to adipogenic differentiation ("microparticles"). In a first run of experiments, these microparticles were implanted under the skin of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice (n = 45) with and without the addition of human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). A group of carriers without any cells served as control. In a second run, adipose tissue constructs were fabricated by embedding microparticles in fibrin matrix with and without the addition of HUVEC, and were also implanted in SCID mice (n = 30). The mice were sacrificed after 12 days, 4 weeks, and 4 months. Mature adipose tissue, fibrous tissue, and acellular regions were quantified on whole-specimen histological sections. The implantation of microparticles showed a better sustainment of tissue volume and a higher degree of mature adipose tissue compared with adipose tissue constructs. Immunohistology proved obviously perfused human tissue-engineered vessels. There was a limited but not significant advantage in EC cotransplantation after 4 weeks in terms of tissue volume. In groups with EC cotransplantation, there were significantly fewer acellular/necrotic areas after 4 weeks and 4 months. In conclusion, the size of the implanted tissue equivalents is a crucial parameter, affecting volume maintenance and the gain of mature adipose tissue. EC cotransplantation leads to functional stable vascular networks connecting in part to the host vasculature and contributing to tissue perfusion; however

  8. Understanding anisotropic plasma etching of two-dimensional polystyrene opals for advanced materials fabrication.

    PubMed

    Akinoglu, Eser M; Morfa, Anthony J; Giersig, Michael

    2014-10-21

    Anisotropic deformation of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated (O2/Ar) plasma is observed for radio frequency (rf) plasma and inductively coupled plasma (ICP). A facile model based on a ratio of completely isotropic and completely anisotropic etching is presented to describe the anisotropy of the etching process and is implemented to determine the height of the spheroid-shaped polystyrene particles. In our systems, we find the plasma etching to be 54% isotropic in the rf plasma and 79% isotropic in the ICP. With this model, the maximum material deposition thickness for nanofabrication with plasma-etched nanosphere lithography or colloid lithography can be predicted. Moreover, the etching of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated plasma is investigated versus the etching time, gas flow, gas composition, temperature, substrate material, and particle size. The results of this study allow precise shape tuning during the fabrication of nanostructured surfaces with size-dependent properties for bionic, medical, and photonic applications. PMID:24580644

  9. Understanding anisotropic plasma etching of two-dimensional polystyrene opals for advanced materials fabrication.

    PubMed

    Akinoglu, Eser M; Morfa, Anthony J; Giersig, Michael

    2014-10-21

    Anisotropic deformation of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated (O2/Ar) plasma is observed for radio frequency (rf) plasma and inductively coupled plasma (ICP). A facile model based on a ratio of completely isotropic and completely anisotropic etching is presented to describe the anisotropy of the etching process and is implemented to determine the height of the spheroid-shaped polystyrene particles. In our systems, we find the plasma etching to be 54% isotropic in the rf plasma and 79% isotropic in the ICP. With this model, the maximum material deposition thickness for nanofabrication with plasma-etched nanosphere lithography or colloid lithography can be predicted. Moreover, the etching of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated plasma is investigated versus the etching time, gas flow, gas composition, temperature, substrate material, and particle size. The results of this study allow precise shape tuning during the fabrication of nanostructured surfaces with size-dependent properties for bionic, medical, and photonic applications.

  10. Multilayered film microreactors fabricated by a one-step thermal bonding technique with high reproducibility and their applications.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung-Ik; Kim, Jin-Oh; Kim, Heejin; Im, Do Jin; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-03-21

    We report the versatile uses of multilayered polyimide (PI) film microreactors with various functions including pressure tolerance, three-dimensional mixing and multistep membrane emulsification. Such PI film microreactors were fabricated by a simple one-step thermal bonding technique with high reproducibility. Upon bonding at 300 °C for 1 hour, the thin and flexible film microdevices could withstand pressure up to 8.6 MPa and 16.3 MPa with PI adhesive film or fluoropolymer adhesive, respectively, due to differences in wettability. The hydrophilic and hydrophobic microchannel devices were used to generate monodisperse oil-in-water (O/W) and water-in-oil (W/O) droplets, and polymer micro/nanoparticles at a high generation frequency. A monolithic and chemical resistant film microreactor with a three-dimensional serpentine microchannel was used for the selective reduction of ester to aldehyde by efficient mixing and quenching in a flash chemistry manner, within a several 10(1) millisecond time scale. Furthermore, a novel multilayered film microreactor for organic-aqueous biphasic interfacial reactions was devised by embedding a membrane layer to induce chaotic mixing in both the interface and emulsified phase by flowing through multiple numbers of meshed structures along the hydrophobic channel. This simple and economic fabrication technique significantly facilitates mass production of multilayered film devices that could be useful as a platform for various microfluidic applications in chemistry and biology.

  11. Fabrication of assembled ZnO/TiO2 heterojunction thin film transistors using solution processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liau, Leo Chau-Kuang; Lin, Yun-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) field-effect thin film transistors (TFTs), which were assembled by ZnO and TiO2 heterojunction films coated using solution processing technique, were fabricated and characterized. The fabrication of the device began with the preparation of ZnO and TiO2 films by spin coating. The ZnO and TiO2 films that were stacked together and annealed at 450 °C were characterized as a p-n junction diode. Two types of the devices, p-channel and n-channel TFTs, were produced using different assemblies of ZnO and TiO2 films. Results show that the p-channel TFTs (p-TFTs) and n-channel TFTs (n-TFTs) using the assemblies of ZnO and TiO2 films were demonstrated by source-drain current vs. drain voltage (IDS-VDS) measurements. Several electronic properties of the p- and n- TFTs, such as threshold voltage (Vth), on-off ratio, channel mobility, and subthreshold swing (SS), were determined by current-voltage (I-V) data analysis. The ZnO/TiO2-based TFTs can be produced using solution processing technique and an assembly approach.

  12. US DOE-AECL cooperative program for development of high-level radioactive waste container fabrication, closure, and inspection techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, E.W.

    1990-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) plan to initiate a cooperative research program on development of manufacturing processes for high-level radioactive waste containers. This joint program will benefit both countries in the development of processes for the fabrication, final closure in a hot-cell, and certification of the containers. Program activity objectives can be summarized as follows: to support the selection of suitable container fabrication, final closure, and inspection techniques for the candidate materials and container designs that are under development or are being considered in the US and Canadian repository programs; and to investigate these techniques for alternate materials and/or container designs, to be determined in future optimization studies relating to long-term performance of the waste packages. The program participants will carry out this work in a conditional phased approach, and the scope of work for subsequent years will evolve subject to developments in earlier years. The overall term of this cooperative program is planned to run roughly three years. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Fabrication and study of CoF2O4 structures on Graphene substrates employing scanning probe microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuljanishvili, Irma; Surtchev, Marko; Cavin, John; Smetana, Alexander; Nattikadan, Saju

    2013-03-01

    Graphene materials are being investigated in recent years for verity of applications, including electric and optical devices and novel substrates. In this study we explore the route for assembling micro- and nanoscale architectures of magnetic complex oxide material directly on graphene surface using `direct write' parallel patterning techniques. Ferrimagnetic oxide CoFe2O4 (CFO) was prepared by sol-gel chemical route and used as `ink' for patterning structures. An array of CFO dots was fabricated using Dip Pen Nanolithography method at specific locations. Here we will discuss the surface properties of the formed dot structures of CoFe2O4 on graphene as compared to those formed on Si/SiO2 substrate. Structures fabricated on each substrate with the same ambient conditions and thermal processing show different morphology and magnetic interactions when studied using AFM and MFM techniques. We will describe our findings and results acquired on individual CFO dots of different sizes. We will also show that graphene substrate is likely influencing the magnetic characteristics of CFO dots that are formed on its surface, although the role of graphene as a substrate for CFO dot formation should be further investigated. IK acknowledges support provided by SLU start up funds.

  14. One-step fabrication of submicrostructures by low one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique with local thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dam Thuy Trang; Tong, Quang Cong; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-01-01

    In this work, local thermal effect induced by a continuous-wave laser has been investigated and exploited to optimize the low one-photon absorption (LOPA) direct laser writing (DLW) technique for fabrication of polymer-based microstructures. It was demonstrated that the temperature of excited SU8 photoresist at the focusing area increases to above 100 °C due to high excitation intensity and becomes stable at that temperature thanks to the use of a continuous-wave laser at 532 nm-wavelength. This optically induced thermal effect immediately completes the crosslinking process at the photopolymerized region, allowing obtain desired structures without using the conventional post-exposure bake (PEB) step, which is usually realized after the exposure. Theoretical calculation of the temperature distribution induced by local optical excitation using finite element method confirmed the experimental results. LOPA-based DLW technique combined with optically induced thermal effect (local PEB) shows great advantages over the traditional PEB, such as simple, short fabrication time, high resolution. In particular, it allowed the overcoming of the accumulation effect inherently existed in optical lithography by one-photon absorption process, resulting in small and uniform structures with very short lattice constant.

  15. Advanced Fabrication Method for the Preparation of MOF Thin Films: Liquid-Phase Epitaxy Approach Meets Spin Coating Method.

    PubMed

    Chernikova, Valeriya; Shekhah, Osama; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-08-10

    Here, we report a new and advanced method for the fabrication of highly oriented/polycrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films. Building on the attractive features of the liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) approach, a facile spin coating method was implemented to generate MOF thin films in a high-throughput fashion. Advantageously, this approach offers a great prospective to cost-effectively construct thin-films with a significantly shortened preparation time and a lessened chemicals and solvents consumption, as compared to the conventional LPE-process. Certainly, this new spin-coating approach has been implemented successfully to construct various MOF thin films, ranging in thickness from a few micrometers down to the nanometer scale, spanning 2-D and 3-D benchmark MOF materials including Cu2(bdc)2·xH2O, Zn2(bdc)2·xH2O, HKUST-1, and ZIF-8. This method was appraised and proved effective on a variety of substrates comprising functionalized gold, silicon, glass, porous stainless steel, and aluminum oxide. The facile, high-throughput and cost-effective nature of this approach, coupled with the successful thin film growth and substrate versatility, represents the next generation of methods for MOF thin film fabrication. Therefore, paving the way for these unique MOF materials to address a wide range of challenges in the areas of sensing devices and membrane technology. PMID:27415640

  16. Advanced imaging techniques for assessment of structure, composition and function in biofilm systems.

    PubMed

    Neu, Thomas R; Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Dynes, James J; Hitchcock, Adam P; Lawrence, John R

    2010-04-01

    Scientific imaging represents an important and accepted research tool for the analysis and understanding of complex natural systems. Apart from traditional microscopic techniques such as light and electron microscopy, new advanced techniques have been established including laser scanning microscopy (LSM), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These new techniques allow in situ analysis of the structure, composition, processes and dynamics of microbial communities. The three techniques open up quantitative analytical imaging possibilities that were, until a few years ago, impossible. The microscopic techniques represent powerful tools for examination of mixed environmental microbial communities usually encountered in the form of aggregates and films. As a consequence, LSM, MRI and STXM are being used in order to study complex microbial biofilm systems. This mini review provides a short outline of the more recent applications with the intention to stimulate new research and imaging approaches in microbiology.

  17. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The search for advanced measurement techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants was conducted in several parts. A comprehensive survey of the existing measurement and testing technology for determining material-propellant interactions was performed. Selections were made from those existing techniques which were determined could meet or be made to meet the requirements. Areas of refinement or changes were recommended for improvement of others. Investigations were also performed to determine the feasibility and advantages of developing and using new techniques to achieve significant improvements over existing ones. The most interesting demonstration was that of the new technique, the volatile metal chelate analysis. Rivaling the neutron activation analysis in terms of sensitivity and specificity, the volatile metal chelate technique was fully demonstrated.

  18. Fabrication and test of prototype ring magnets for the ALS (Advanced Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, J.; Avery, R.; Caylor, R.; Green, M.I.; Hoyer, E.; Halbach, K.; Hernandez, S.; Humphries, D.; Kajiyama, Y.; Keller, R.; Low, W.; Marks, S.; Milburn, J.; Yee, D.

    1989-03-01

    Prototype Models for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole, Quadrupole and Sextupole and the Storage Ring Gradient Magnet, Quadrupole and Sextupole have been constructed. The Booster Magnet Prototypes have been tested. The Storage Ring Magnets are presently undergoing tests and magnetic measurements. This paper reviews the designs and parameters for these magnets, briefly describes features of the magnet designs which respond to the special constraints imposed by the requirements for both accelerator rings, and reviews some of the results of magnet measurements for the prototype. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  20. Nondestructive Characterization by Advanced Synchrotron Light Techniques: Spectromicroscopy and Coherent Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Margaritondo, Giorgio; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho

    2008-01-01

    The advanced characteristics of synchrotron light has led in recent years to the development of a series of new experimental techniques to investigate chemical and physical properties on a microscopic scale. Although originally developed for materials science and biomedical research, such techniques find increasing applications in other domains – and could be quite useful for the study and conservation of cultural heritage. Specifically, they can nondestructively provide detailed chemical composition information that can be useful for the identification of specimens, for the discovery of historical links based on the sources of chemical raw materials and on chemical processes, for the analysis of damage, their causes and remedies and for many other issues. Likewise, morphological and structural information on a microscopic scale is useful for the identification, study and preservation of many different cultural and historical specimens. We concentrate here on two classes of techniques: in the first case, photoemission spectromicroscopy. This is the result of the advanced evolution of photoemission techniques like ESCA (Electron Microscopy for Chemical Analysis). By combining high lateral resolution to spectroscopy, photoemission spectromicroscopy can deliver fine chemical information on a microscopic scale in a nondestructive fashion. The second class of techniques exploits the high lateral coherence of modern synchrotron sources, a byproduct of the quest for high brightness or brilliance. We will see that such techniques now push radiology into the submicron scale and the submillisecond time domain. Furthermore, they can be implemented in a tomographic mode, increasing the information and becoming potentially quite useful for the analysis of cultural heritage specimens.