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Sample records for advanced fabrication techniques

  1. Advanced fabrication techniques for cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved design for regeneratively cooled engine structures was identified. This design uses photochemically machined (PCM) coolant passages. It permits the braze joint to be placed in a relatively cool area, remote from the critical hot face sheet. The geometry of the passages at the face sheet also minimizes stress concentration and, therefore, enhances the low cycle fatigue performance. The two most promising alloys identified for this application are Inconel 617 and Nickel 201. Inconel 617 was selected because it has excellent creep rupture properties, while Nickel 201 was selected because of its predicted good performance under low cycle fatigue loading. The fabrication of the PCM coolant passages in both Inconel 617 and Nickel 201 was successfully developed. During fabrication of Inconel 617, undesirable characteristics were observed in the braze joints. A development program to resolve this condition was undertaken and led to definition of an isothermal solidification process for joining Inconel 617 panels. This process produced joints which approach parent metal strength and homogeneity.

  2. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high-quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  3. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  4. Advanced Fibre Bragg Grating and Microfibre Bragg Grating Fabrication Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kit Man

    Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) have become a very important technology for communication systems and fibre optic sensing. Typically, FBGs are less than 10-mm long and are fabricated using fused silica uniform phase masks which become more expensive for longer length or non-uniform pitch. Generally, interference UV laser beams are employed to make long or complex FBGs, and this technique introduces critical precision and control issues. In this work, we demonstrate an advanced FBG fabrication system that enables the writing of long and complex gratings in optical fibres with virtually any apodisation profile, local phase and Bragg wavelength using a novel optical design in which the incident angles of two UV beams onto an optical fibre can be adjusted simultaneously by moving just one optical component, instead of two optics employed in earlier configurations, to vary the grating pitch. The key advantage of the grating fabrication system is that complex gratings can be fabricated by controlling the linear movements of two translation stages. In addition to the study of advanced grating fabrication technique, we also focus on the inscription of FBGs written in optical fibres with a cladding diameter of several ten's of microns. Fabrication of microfibres was investigated using a sophisticated tapering method. We also proposed a simple but practical technique to filter out the higher order modes reflected from the FBG written in microfibres via a linear taper region while the fundamental mode re-couples to the core. By using this technique, reflection from the microfibre Bragg grating (MFBG) can be effectively single mode, simplifying the demultiplexing and demodulation processes. MFBG exhibits high sensitivity to contact force and an MFBG-based force sensor was also constructed and tested to investigate their suitability for use as an invasive surgery device. Performance of the contact force sensor packaged in a conforming elastomer material compares favourably to one

  5. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  6. Advanced Manufacturing Techniques Demonstrated for Fabricating Developmental Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Engineering Development Division has been working in support of innovative gas turbine engine systems under development by Glenn's Combustion Branch. These one-of-a-kind components require operation under extreme conditions. High-temperature ceramics were chosen for fabrication was because of the hostile operating environment. During the designing process, it became apparent that traditional machining techniques would not be adequate to produce the small, intricate features for the conceptual design, which was to be produced by stacking over a dozen thin layers with many small features that would then be aligned and bonded together into a one-piece unit. Instead of using traditional machining, we produced computer models in Pro/ENGINEER (Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC), Needham, MA) to the specifications of the research engineer. The computer models were exported in stereolithography standard (STL) format and used to produce full-size rapid prototype polymer models. These semi-opaque plastic models were used for visualization and design verification. The computer models also were exported in International Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) format and sent to Glenn's Thermal/Fluids Design & Analysis Branch and Applied Structural Mechanics Branch for profiling heat transfer and mechanical strength analysis.

  7. Advanced Manufacturing Techniques Demonstrated for Fabricating Developmental Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Engineering Development Division has been working in support of innovative gas turbine engine systems under development by Glenn's Combustion Branch. These one-of-a-kind components require operation under extreme conditions. High-temperature ceramics were chosen for fabrication was because of the hostile operating environment. During the designing process, it became apparent that traditional machining techniques would not be adequate to produce the small, intricate features for the conceptual design, which was to be produced by stacking over a dozen thin layers with many small features that would then be aligned and bonded together into a one-piece unit. Instead of using traditional machining, we produced computer models in Pro/ENGINEER (Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC), Needham, MA) to the specifications of the research engineer. The computer models were exported in stereolithography standard (STL) format and used to produce full-size rapid prototype polymer models. These semi-opaque plastic models were used for visualization and design verification. The computer models also were exported in International Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) format and sent to Glenn's Thermal/Fluids Design & Analysis Branch and Applied Structural Mechanics Branch for profiling heat transfer and mechanical strength analysis.

  8. MEMS pressure sensor fabricated by advanced bulk micromachining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanko, Gabriel; Hudek, Peter; Zehetner, Johann; Dzuba, Jaroslav; Choleva, Pavlina; Vallo, Martin; Rýger, Ivan; Lalinský, Tibor

    2013-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a MEMS pressure sensor with an operation potential under harsh conditions at high temperatures (T = 300 - 800°C). The sensor consists of a circular HEMT (C-HEMT) integrated on a circular AlGaN/GaN membrane. In order to realize MEMS for extreme conditions using AlGaN/GaN material system, two key issues should be solved: (a) realization of MEMS structures by etching of the substrate material and (b) formation of metallic contacts (both ohmic and Schottky) to be able to withstand high thermal loads. In this design concept the piezoresistive and piezoelectric effect of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is used to sense the pressure under static and/or dynamic conditions. The backside bulk micromachining of our SiC wafer in the first experiment started with FS-laser ablation down to ~200 -270μm deep holes of 500μm in diameter. Because no additional intermediate layer can stop the ablation process, the number of laser pulses has to be optimized in order to reach the required ablation depth. 2D structural-mechanical and piezoelectric analyses were performed to verify the mechanical and piezoelectric response of the circular membrane pressure sensor to static pressure load (in the range between 20 and 100kPa). We suggested that suppressing the residual stress in the membrane can improve the sensor response. The parameters of the same devices previously fabricated on bulk substrates and/or membranes were compared. The maxima of drain currents of our C-HEMT devices on SiC exhibit more than four times higher values compared to those measured on silicon substrates.

  9. Fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials using sol-gel processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. T.; Chu, Jay; Zheng, Haixing

    1995-01-01

    Advanced materials play an important role in electrochemical energy devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrochemical capacitors. They are being used as both electrodes and electrolytes. Sol-gel processing is a versatile solution technique used in fabrication of ceramic materials with tailored stoichiometry, microstructure, and properties. The application of sol-gel processing in the fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials will be presented. The potentials of sol-gel derived materials for electrochemical energy applications will be discussed along with some examples of successful applications. Sol-gel derived metal oxide electrode materials such as V2O5 cathodes have been demonstrated in solid-slate thin film batteries; solid electrolytes materials such as beta-alumina for advanced secondary batteries had been prepared by the sol-gel technique long time ago; and high surface area transition metal compounds for capacitive energy storage applications can also be synthesized with this method.

  10. Fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials using sol-gel processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. T.; Chu, Jay; Zheng, Haixing

    1995-01-01

    Advanced materials play an important role in electrochemical energy devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrochemical capacitors. They are being used as both electrodes and electrolytes. Sol-gel processing is a versatile solution technique used in fabrication of ceramic materials with tailored stoichiometry, microstructure, and properties. The application of sol-gel processing in the fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials will be presented. The potentials of sol-gel derived materials for electrochemical energy applications will be discussed along with some examples of successful applications. Sol-gel derived metal oxide electrode materials such as V2O5 cathodes have been demonstrated in solid-slate thin film batteries; solid electrolytes materials such as beta-alumina for advanced secondary batteries had been prepared by the sol-gel technique long time ago; and high surface area transition metal compounds for capacitive energy storage applications can also be synthesized with this method.

  11. Extrusion based rapid prototyping technique: an advanced platform for tissue engineering scaffold fabrication.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M Enamul; Chuan, Y Leng; Pashby, Ian

    2012-02-01

    Advances in scaffold design and fabrication technology have brought the tissue engineering field stepping into a new era. Conventional techniques used to develop scaffolds inherit limitations, such as lack of control over the pore morphology and architecture as well as reproducibility. Rapid prototyping (RP) technology, a layer-by-layer additive approach offers a unique opportunity to build complex 3D architectures overcoming those limitations that could ultimately be tailored to cater for patient-specific applications. Using RP methods, researchers have been able to customize scaffolds to mimic the biomechanical properties (in terms of structural integrity, strength, and microenvironment) of the organ or tissue to be repaired/replaced quite closely. This article provides intensive description on various extrusion based scaffold fabrication techniques and review their potential utility for TE applications. The extrusion-based technique extrudes the molten polymer as a thin filament through a nozzle onto a platform layer-by-layer and thus building 3D scaffold. The technique allows full control over pore architecture and dimension in the x- and y- planes. However, the pore height in z-direction is predetermined by the extruding nozzle diameter rather than the technique itself. This review attempts to assess the current state and future prospects of this technology.

  12. New Advanced Fabrication Technique for Millimeter-Wave Planar Components based on Fluororesin Substrates using Graft Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Naoki; Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao; Sakata, Eiji

    2008-06-01

    As the importance of advanced millimeter-wave diagnostics increases, a reliable and accurate fabrication technique for high-performance devices and relevant components is essential. We describe a new improved fabrication technique for millimeter-wave planar components, such as antennas using low-loss fluororesin substrates. A fragile adhesion between the copper foil and fluororesin substrate and the accuracy of the device pattern using conventional fabrication techniques have been prime suspects in the failure of the devices. In order to solve these problems, surface treatment of fluororesin films and a fabrication method using electro-fine-forming (EF2) are proposed. The peel adhesion strength between the metal and fluororesin films and the value of the dielectric constant of the fluororesin films before and after grafting are reported. A prototype antenna using conventional fluororesin substrates and grafted-poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films produced using the EF2 fabrication technique are also introduced.

  13. Advanced Materials and Fabrication Techniques for the Orion Attitude Control Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Holmes, Richard; O'Dell, John; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy

    2013-01-01

    Rhenium, with its high melting temperature, excellent elevated temperature properties, and lack of a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), is ideally suited for the hot gas components of the ACM (Attitude Control Motor), and other high-temperature applications. However, the high cost of rhenium makes fabricating these components using conventional fabrication techniques prohibitive. Therefore, near-net-shape forming techniques were investigated for producing cost-effective rhenium and rhenium alloy components for the ACM and other propulsion applications. During this investigation, electrochemical forming (EL-Form ) techniques were evaluated for producing the hot gas components. The investigation focused on demonstrating that EL-Form processing techniques could be used to produce the ACM flow distributor. Once the EL-Form processing techniques were established, a representative rhenium flow distributor was fabricated, and samples were harvested for material properties testing at both room and elevated temperatures. As a lower cost and lighter weight alternative to an all-rhenium component, rhenium- coated graphite and carbon-carbon were also evaluated. The rhenium-coated components were thermal-cycle tested to verify that they could withstand the expected thermal loads during service. High-temperature electroforming is based on electrochemical deposition of compact layers of metals onto a mandrel of the desired shape. Mandrels used for electro-deposition of near-net shaped parts are generally fabricated from high-density graphite. The graphite mandrel is easily machined and does not react with the molten electrolyte. For near-net shape components, the inner surface of the electroformed part replicates the polished graphite mandrel. During processing, the mandrel itself becomes the cathode, and scrap or refined refractory metal is the anode. Refractory metal atoms from the anode material are ionized in the molten electrolytic solution, and are deposited

  14. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures. Final report, October 1975-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, O.A.; Arefian, V.V.; Warren, H.A.; Vuigner, A.A.; Pohlman, M.J.

    1985-11-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  15. Techniques of Electrode Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Li, Xinyong; Chen, Guohua

    Electrochemical applications using many kinds of electrode materials as an advanced oxidation/reduction technique have been a focus of research by a number of groups during the last two decades. The electrochemical approach has been adopted successfully to develop various environmental applications, mainly including water and wastewater treatment, aqueous system monitoring, and solid surface analysis. In this chapter, a number of methods for the fabrication of film-structured electrode materials were selectively reviewed. Firstly, the thermal decomposition method is briefly described, followed by introducing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) strategy. Especially, much attention was focused on introducing the methods to produce diamond novel film electrode owing to its unique physical and chemical properties. The principle and influence factors of hot filament CVD and plasma enhanced CVD preparation were interpreted by refereeing recent reports. Finally, recent developments that address electro-oxidation/reduction issues and novel electrodes such as nano-electrode and boron-doped diamond electrode (BDD) are presented in the overview.

  16. Research and Development on Advanced Silicon Carbide Thin Film Growth Techniques and Fabrication of High Power and Microwave Frequency Silicon Carbide-Based Device Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    0W " -Annual Letter Report- N,4 Research and Developmen. on Advanced Silicon Carbide Thin Film Growth Techniques and Fabrication of High Power and...Microwave Frequency Silicon Carbide -Based Device Structures Supported under Grant #N00014-88-K-0341/P00002 Office of the Chief of Naval Research Report...SUBTITLE Research and Development on Advanced S. FUNDING NUMBERS Silicon Carbide Thin Filn.Growth Technl.ques and R&T:212k003---03 Fabrication of High

  17. Feasibility study of applying an advanced composite structure technique to the fabrication of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleich, D.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of helicopter rotary wings from composite materials is discussed. Two composite spar specimens consisting of compressively prestressed stainless steel liner over-wrapped with pretensioned fiberglass were constructed. High liner strength and toughness together with the prescribed prestresses and final sizing of the part are achieved by means of cryogenic stretch forming of the fiber wrapped composite spar at minus 320 F, followed by release of the forming pressure and warm up to room temperature. The prestresses are chosen to provide residual compression in the metal liner under operating loads.

  18. Advances in CIS devices fabricated by a non-vacuum technique

    SciTech Connect

    Leidholm, C.R.; Norsworthy, G.A.; Roe, R.; Halani, A.; Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A novel, non-vacuum technique based on nano-particle deposition has been developed for the formation of CIS-type solar cell absorbers. Solar cells with {gt}12{percent} efficiency were previously demonstrated using this technique. Improvements in module integration processes have recently yielded 8{percent} minimodules of 75 cm{sup 2} area. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. High-performance and high-reliability SOT-6 packaged diplexer based on advanced IPD fabrication techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Tian; Wang, Cong; Kim, Nam-Young

    2017-08-01

    A diplexer offering the advantages of compact size, high performance, and high reliability is proposed on the basis of advanced integrated passive device (IPD) fabrication techniques. The proposed diplexer is developed by combining a third-order low-pass filter (LPF) and a third-order high-pass filter (HPF), which are designed on the basis of the elliptic function prototype low-pass filter. Primary components, such as inductors and capacitors, are designed and fabricated with high Q-factor and appropriate values, and they are subsequently used to construct a compact diplexer having a chip area of 900 μm × 1100 μm (0.009 λ0 × 0.011 λ0, where λ0 is the guided wavelength). In addition, a small-outline transistor (SOT-6) packaging method is adopted, and reliability tests (including temperature, humidity, vibration, and pressure) are conducted to guarantee long-term stability and commercial success. The packaged measurement results indicate excellent RF performance with insertion losses of 1.39 dB and 0.75 dB at operation bands of 0.9 GHz and 1.8 GHz, respectively. The return loss is lower than 10 dB from 0.5 GHz to 4.0 GHz, while the isolation is higher than 15 dB from 0.5 GHz to 3.0 GHz. Thus, it can be concluded that the proposed SOT-6 packaged diplexer is a promising candidate for GSM/CDMA applications. Synthetic solution of diplexer design, RF performance optimization, fabrication process, packaging, RF response measurement, and reliability test is particularly explained and analyzed in this work.

  20. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  1. Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Precisely Controlled Micro and Nano Scale Environments for Complex Tissue Regeneration and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Benjamin

    As modern medicine advances, it is still very challenging to cure joint defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The current clinical standard for catastrophic or late stage joint degradation is a total joint implant, where the damaged joint is completely excised and replaced with a metallic or artificial joint. However, these procedures still only lasts for 10-15 years, and there are hosts of recovery complications which can occur. Thus, these studies have sought to employ advanced biomaterials and scaffold fabricated techniques to effectively regrow joint tissue, instead of merely replacing it with artificial materials. We can hypothesize here that the inclusion of biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials with highly functional electrospun and 3D printed scaffold can improve physical characteristics (mechanical strength, surface interactions and nanotexture) enhance cellular growth and direct stem cell differentiation for bone, cartilage and vascular growth as well as cancer metastasis modeling. Nanomaterial inclusion and controlled 3D printed features effectively increased nano surface roughness, Young's Modulus and provided effective flow paths for simulated arterial blood. All of the approaches explored proved highly effective for increasing cell growth, as a result of increasing micro-complexity and nanomaterial incorporation. Additionally, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, cell to cell interaction and vascular formation were enhanced. Finally, growth-factor(gf)-loaded polymer nanospheres greatly improved vascular cell behavior, and provided a highly bioactive scaffold for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture and bone formation. In conclusion, electrospinning and 3D printing when combined effectively with biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanomaterials, collagen, nHA, polymer

  2. Nozzle fabrication technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to techniques for fabricating hour glass throat or convergent divergent nozzle shapes, and more particularly to new and improved techniques for forming rocket nozzles from electrically conductive material and forming cooling channels in the wall thereof. The concept of positioning a block of electrically conductive material so that its axis is set at a predetermined skew angle with relation to a travelling electron discharge machine electrode and thereafter revolving the body about its own axis to generate a hyperbolic surface of revolution, either internal or external is novel. The method will generate a rocket nozzle which may be provided with cooling channels using the same control and positioning system. The configuration of the cooling channels so produced are unique and novel. Also the method is adaptable to nonmetallic material using analogous cutting tools, such as, water jet, laser, abrasive wire and hot wire.

  3. Advanced fabrication of hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkondin, Evgeniy; Sukham, Johneph; Panah, Mohammad E. Aryaee; Takayama, Osamu; Malureanu, Radu; Jensen, Flemming; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2017-09-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterials can provide unprecedented properties in accommodation of high-k (high wave vector) waves and enhancement of the optical density of states. To reach such performance the metamaterials have to be fabricated with as small imperfections as possible. Here we report on our advances in two approaches in fabrication of optical metamaterials. We deposit ultrathin ultrasmooth gold layers with the assistance of organic material (APTMS) adhesion layer. The technology supports the stacking of such layers in a multiperiod construction with alumina spacers between gold films, which is expected to exhibit hyperbolic properties in the visible range. As the second approach we apply the atomic layer deposition technique to arrange vertical alignment of layers or pillars of heavily doped ZnO or TiN, which enables us to produce hyperbolic metamaterials for the near- and mid-infrared ranges.

  4. Research and Development on Advanced Silicon Carbide Thin Film Growth Techniques and Fabrication of High Power and Microwave Frequency Silicon Carbide-Based Device Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    AD-A243 531IIII!IIHUHllAlll| DTIC Annual Letter Report EL Vr DECA S C Research and Development on Advanced Silicon Carbide Thin Film Growth...Techniques and Fabrication of High Power and Microwave Frequency Silicon Carbide -Based Device Structures Supported under Grant #N00014-88-K-0341/P00002 Office...Letter l/,1- 2 3 lj9 l 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Research and Develp~nt on Advanced S. FUNDING NUMBERS Silicon Carbide Thin Film .Growth Techniques and R&T

  5. 3D printed electromagnetic transmission and electronic structures fabricated on a single platform using advanced process integration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffenbaugh, Paul Issac

    3D printing has garnered immense attention from many fields including in-office rapid prototyping of mechanical parts, outer-space satellite replication, garage functional firearm manufacture, and NASA rocket engine component fabrication. 3D printing allows increased design flexibility in the fabrication of electronics, microwave circuits and wireless antennas and has reached a level of maturity which allows functional parts to be printed. Much more work is necessary in order to perfect the processes of 3D printed electronics especially in the area of automation. Chapter 1 shows several finished prototypes of 3D printed electronics as well as newly developed techniques in fabrication. Little is known about the RF and microwave properties and applications of the standard materials which have been developed for 3D printing. Measurement of a wide variety of materials over a broad spectrum of frequencies up to 10 GHz using a variety of well-established measurement methods is performed throughout chapter 2. Several types of high frequency RF transmission lines are fabricated and valuable model-matched data is gathered and provided in chapter 3 for future designers' use. Of particular note is a fully 3D printed stripline which was automatically fabricated in one process on one machine. Some core advantages of 3D printing RF/microwave components include rapid manufacturing of complex, dimensionally sensitive circuits (such as antennas and filters which are often iteratively tuned) and the ability to create new devices that cannot be made using standard fabrication techniques. Chapter 4 describes an exemplary fully 3D printed curved inverted-F antenna.

  6. Nozzle fabrication technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A block of electrically conductive material which is to be formed into a body with internal and/or external surfaces that approximate hyperboloids of one sheet is placed so that its axis is set at a predetermined skew angle with relation to a traveling EDM electrode wire. The electrode wire is then moved into cutting proximity of the body wire. Thereafter, by revolving the body about its own axis, the external and/or internal surfaces of the body will be cut into an approximate hyperbolic surface of revolution depending upon whether the body is positioned with the cutting wire outside of the body or in a previously formed longitudinal passage in the body. As an alternative technique, elongated channels can also be cut into the wall of the body by successively orienting the body to a selected number of angular positions, with the electrode wire being either outside of the body or in a previously formed passage in the body. At each of these angular positions, the electrode wire is moved orthogonally with respect to the axis of the wire, while both the body axis skew angle and the rotational position about that axis is controlled by cutting a channel or groove in the body to relieve stresses in the body material or to convey a coolant fluid.

  7. Nozzle fabrication technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A block of electrically-conductive material which is to be formed into a body with internal and/or external surfaces that approximate hyperboloids of one sheet is placed so that its axis is set at a predetermined skew angle with relation to a travelling EDM electrode wire and the electrode wire is then moved into cutting proximity of the body. Thereafter, by revolving the body about its own axis, the external and/or internal surfaces of the body will be cut into an approximate hyperbolic surface of revolution depending upon whether the body is positioned with the cutting wire outside of the body or in a previously-formed longitudinal passage in the body. As an alternative technique, elongated channels can also be cut into the walls of the body by successively orienting the body to a selected number of angular positions with the electrode wire being either outside of the body or in a previously-formed passage in the body. At each of these angular positions, the electrode wire is moved orthogonally with respect to the axis of the wire while both the body axis skew angle and the rotational position about that axis are controlled for cutting a channel or groove in the body as required to relieve stresses in the material of the body or to convey a coolant fluid.

  8. Advanced echocardiographic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Echocardiography has advanced significantly since its first clinical use. The move towards more accurate imaging and quantification has driven this advancement. In this review, we will briefly focus on three distinct but important recent advances, three‐dimensional (3D) echocardiography, contrast echocardiography and myocardial tissue imaging. The basic principles of these techniques will be discussed as well as current and future clinical applications. PMID:28191159

  9. Fabrication of Metamaterials by Drawing Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    Final report for AOARD project FA23860914084: Fabrication of metamaterials by drawing techniques Boris Kuhlmey, Simon Fleming, Alessandro...Tuniz Title: Fabrication of metamaterials by drawing techniques Background: While metamaterials enable unprecedented control over propagation of...light with applications such as lenses beating the diffraction limit for hyperfine imaging and lithography, fabrication of metamaterials for the optical

  10. Advances in superconducting quantum electronic microcircuit fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, R. K.; Notarys, H. A.; Mercereau, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard microelectronic fabrication techniques have been utilized to produce batch quantities of superconducting quantum electronic devices and circuits. The overall goal is a fabrication technology yielding circuits that are rugged and stable and capable of being fabricated controllably and reproducibly in sizeable quantities. Our progress toward this goal is presented, with primary emphasis on the most recent work, which includes the use of electron-beam lithography and techniques of hybrid microelectronics. Several prototype microcircuits have been successfully fabricated. These microcircuits are formed in a thin-film parent material consisting of layers of superconducting and normal metals, and use proximity-effect structures as the active circuit elements.

  11. Fabrication techniques for very fast diffractive lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Anthony M.; Marron, Joseph C.

    1993-01-01

    Aspheric lenses with arbitrary phase functions can be fabricated on thin light weight substrates via the binary optics fabrication technique. However, it is difficult and costly to fabricate a fast lens (f/number less than 1) for use as the shorter wavelengths. The pitch of the masks and the alignment accuracy must be very fine. For a large lens, the space-bandwidth product of the element can also become impractically large. In this paper, two alternate approaches for the fabrication of fast aspheric diffractive lenses are described. The first approach fabricates the diffractive lens interferometrically, utilizing a spherical wavefront to provide the optical power of the lens and a computer generated hologram to create the aspheric components. The second approach fabricates the aspheric diffractive lens in the form if a higher order kinoform which trades groove profile fidelity for coarser feature size. The design and implementation issues for these two fabrication techniques are discussed.

  12. Monitoring by Control Technique - Fabric Filters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about fabric filter control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  13. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  14. A photolithographic fabrication technique for magnetohydrodynamic micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuenstner, Stephen; Baylor, Martha-Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) devices use perpendicular electric and magnetic fields to exert a Lorentz body force on a conducting fluid. Miniaturized MHD devices have been used to create pumps, stirrers, heat exchangers, and microfluidic networks. Compared to mechanical micropumps, MHD micropumps are appealing because they require no moving parts, which simplifies fabrication, and because they are amenable to electronic control. This abstract reports the fabrication and testing of a centimeter-scale MHD pump using a thiol-ene/methacrylate-based photopolymer and mask-based photolithographic technique. Pumps like this one could simplify the fabrication of sophisticated optofluidic devices, including liquid-core, liquid cladding (L2) waveguides, which are usually created with PDMS using stamps, or etched into silicon wafers. The photolithographic technique demonstrated here requires only one masking step to create fluid channels with complex geometries.

  15. Advancement on Visualization Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Aeroa and As ronautics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 USA I !ii 1 I This AGARDograph was prepared at the request of the...the fields of science § and technology relating to aerospace for the following purposes: - Exchanging of scientific and technical information...Techniques for providing the pilot visualization have grown rapidly. Technology has developed fron mechanical gauges through electro-mechanical

  16. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  17. Advanced Planarization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basol, Bulent M.

    As the integrated circuit technology nodes reach 45 nm and beyondgrowing requirement for reduced propagation delay dictates inclusion of low-k materials in the interconnect metallization structures. Unfortunately, mechanical properties, such as hardness and Young's modulus of the dielectric materials, deteriorate as their porosity is increased and the k value is reduced to 2.5 and below [1]. Reliability issues such as electromigration, stress migration, and time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) lifetimes are also becoming more challenging for multi-stack low-k structures. The low-k and ultra low-k materials are prone to delamination [2] and cracking [3] during CMP; risk of damage rising as the polishing pressure and time increases [4]. It has been demonstrated that delamination in low-k stacks was driven by the work done against the friction force during the CMP process [5]. Therefore, it is becoming more and more difficult to polish and planarize topographic copper layers, deposited on low-k dielectric materials, at low stress and high rate while maintaining the mechanical integrity of the overall interconnect structure. Furthermore as feature widths and depths shrink, tolerances for metal loss and line resistance variation over the wafer surface are also reduced. In advanced interconnects, adding sacrificial thickness to the dielectric layer which can then be removed during CMP overpolish step is not a good option to minimize topography because hard cap layers are often used to protect the low-k dielectric materials from the negative effects of CMP [6, 7] and thickness of these layers is kept to a minimum to reduce their contribution to the effective dielectric constant of the stack. Therefore, as technology nodes move beyond 45 nm, planarization steps of the interconnect manufacturing process flow are expected to offer reduced stress, higher planarization efficiency, reduced copper dishing, less dielectric erosion, better global line resistance uniformity

  18. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.

  19. Advanced qualification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.

    1993-12-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML ``builds in`` the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structured-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ``process capability`` is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co{sup 60} gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883D, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SSC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe`s Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  20. Reshaping technique for MOEM system fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okyar, Murat M.; Sun, Xiqing; Carr, William N.

    1998-09-01

    Today, the fabrication of microactuators and micromechanical parts is merely based on IC fabrication technologies. However, the 2D world of microelectronics sets a limit to the 3D micromechanical world. With a new micromachining technology, reshaping, which combines advantages of 2D IC fabrication with the third dimension of the mechanical world, a surface micromachined polycrystalline structure can be deformed to any desired 3D shape. In this work, this technique is employed for the first time to realize 3D actuators, and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems. In this work, the design, fabrication and characterization of a micromirror are discussed. The structure is reshaped in such a way that the mirror platform, which is placed between two bimorph actuators, is tilted at a desired angle. The experimental results of electro-thermally actuated structure are in good agreement with the numerical results carried out by using IntelliCAD, an FEA tool to design and simulate MEMS. The reshaped micromirror demonstrates how reshaping technology eliminates complicated, silicon area consuming actuators. The fabrication steps of the micromirror are much simpler than those of previously reported device. A barcode scanner system employing reshaped micromirrors and optical filters is proposed as one example of many possible reshaped 3D MOEM Systems.

  1. Fabrication of advanced design (grooved) cermet anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windisch, C. F., Jr.; Huettig, F. R.

    1993-05-01

    Attempts were made to fabricate full-size anodes with advanced, or grooved, design using isostatic pressing, slip casting injection molding. Of the three approaches, isostatic pressing produced an anode with dimensions nearest to the target specifications, without serious macroscopic flaws. This approach is considered the most promising for making advanced anodes for aluminum smelting. However, significant work still remains to optimize the physical properties and microstructure of the anode, both of which were significantly different from that of previous anodes. Injection molding and slip casting yielded anode materials with serious deficiencies, including cracks and holes. Injection molding gave cermet material with the best intrinsic microstructure, i.e., the microstructure of the material between macroscopic flaws was very similar to that of anodes previously made at PNL. The reason for the similarity may have to do with amount of residual binder in the material prior to sintering.

  2. Fabrication of advanced design (grooved) cermet anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Huettig, F.R.

    1993-05-01

    Attempts were made to fabricate full-size anodes with advanced, or grooved, design using isostatic pressing, slip casting injection molding. Of the three approaches, isostatic pressing produced an anode with dimensions nearest to the target specifications, without serious macroscopic flaws. This approach is considered the most promising for making advanced anodes for aluminum smelting. However, significant work still remains to optimize the physical properties and microstructure of the anode, both of which were significantly different from that of previous anodes. Injection molding and slip casting yielded anode materials with serious deficiencies, including cracks and holes. Injection molding gave cermet material with the best intrinsic microstructure, i.e., the microstructure of the material between macroscopic flaws was very similar to that of anodes previously made at PNL. Reason for the similarity may have to do with amount of residual binder in the material prior to sintering.

  3. Fabrication of advanced design (grooved) cermet anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr. ); Huettig, F.R. )

    1993-05-01

    Attempts were made to fabricate full-size anodes with advanced, or grooved, design using isostatic pressing, slip casting injection molding. Of the three approaches, isostatic pressing produced an anode with dimensions nearest to the target specifications, without serious macroscopic flaws. This approach is considered the most promising for making advanced anodes for aluminum smelting. However, significant work still remains to optimize the physical properties and microstructure of the anode, both of which were significantly different from that of previous anodes. Injection molding and slip casting yielded anode materials with serious deficiencies, including cracks and holes. Injection molding gave cermet material with the best intrinsic microstructure, i.e., the microstructure of the material between macroscopic flaws was very similar to that of anodes previously made at PNL. Reason for the similarity may have to do with amount of residual binder in the material prior to sintering.

  4. Diffraction grating interferometers for mechanical characterisations of advanced fabric laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Molimard, Jérôme; Vautrin, Alain; Surrel, Yves

    2006-02-01

    It is demonstrated that two grating interferometers with high spatial resolutions can successfully be applied for the mechanical characterisation of the advanced fabric composite materials. Based on these two techniques, the mechanical properties of two kinds of fabric laminates are obtained without assumption of uniform strain fields to be used in the characterisation approaches using the local strain sensors. The degree of the yarn crimp effects of the two laminates is compared in terms of the out-of-plane displacement derivatives. Especially, it is shown that the grating shearing interferometer is appropriate for the crimped fabric structure requiring a three-dimensional analysis. The modification from moiré interferometer to grating shearing interferometer is performed by introducing a Michelson interferometer modified for image shearing.

  5. Toner and paper-based fabrication techniques for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Coltro, Wendell Karlos Tomazelli; de Jesus, Dosil Pereira; da Silva, José Alberto Fracassi; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2010-08-01

    The interest in low-cost microfluidic platforms as well as emerging microfabrication techniques has increased considerably over the last years. Toner- and paper-based techniques have appeared as two of the most promising platforms for the production of disposable devices for on-chip applications. This review focuses on recent advances in the fabrication techniques and in the analytical/bioanalytical applications of toner and paper-based devices. The discussion is divided in two parts dealing with (i) toner and (ii) paper devices. Examples of miniaturized devices fabricated by using direct-printing or toner transfer masking in polyester-toner, glass, PDMS as well as conductive platforms as recordable compact disks and printed circuit board are presented. The construction and the use of paper-based devices for off-site diagnosis and bioassays are also described to cover this emerging platform for low-cost diagnostics.

  6. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  7. Techniques in Advanced Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ager, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    For ease of presentation, advanced grammar teaching techniques are briefly considered under the headings of structuralism (belief in the effectiveness of presenting grammar rules) and contextualism (belief in the maximum use by students of what they know in the target language). The structuralist's problem of establishing a syllabus is discussed…

  8. Strength and flexibility properties of advanced ceramic fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Tran, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of four advanced ceramic fabrics are measured at a temperature range of 23 C to 1200 C. The fabrics evaluated are silica, high-and low-boria content aluminoborosilicate, and silicon carbide. Properties studied include fabric break strengths from room temperature to 1200 C, and bending durability after temperature conditioning at 1200 C and 1400 C. The interaction of the fabric and ceramic insulation is also studied for shrinkage, appearance, bend resistance, and fabric-to-insulation bonding. Based on these tests, the low-boria content aluminoborosilicate fabric retains more strength and fabric durability than the other fabrics studied at high temperature.

  9. Strength and flexibility properties of advanced ceramic fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Tran, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of four advanced ceramic fabrics were measured at a temperature range of 23C to 1200C. The fabrics evaluated were silica, high and low-boria content aluminoborosilicate, and silicon carbide. Properties studied included fabric break strengths from room temperature to 1200C, and bending durability after temperature conditioning at 1200C and 1400C. The interaction of the fabric and ceramic insulation was also studied for shrinkage, appearance, bend resistance, and fabric-to-insulation bonding. Based on these tests, the low-boria content aluminoborosilicate fabric retained more strength and fabric durability than the other fabrics studied at high temperature.

  10. Different techniques in fabrication of ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Pinar; Dilber, Erhan; Eraslan, Oguz

    2012-11-01

    Loss of an eye caused by cancer, trauma, or congenital defect creates a deep psychological impact on an individual's life especially social and professional life. Custom-made prosthesis, compared to stock prosthesis, provides a better fit to the eye socket, better cosmetic results, and less discomfort to the patient in the long term. The main objective of this article was to describe 3 different alternative and practical techniques of fabricating custom-made ocular prosthesis. An impression of anophthalmic socket was made with the addition of cured silicone-based precision impression material in all techniques. A master cast was prepared and duplicated with condensation silicone. A self-cure acrylic resin was polymerized in the silicone model and was fitted into the patient's eye socket. A digital photograph of the patient's iris was made using a digital camera and printed on good-quality photo paper in various shades and sizes in the first and the second techniques. Then the photo paper was coated with PVC so as not to allow any color flowing. The proper iris was then inserted to the acrylic base. The prosthesis was final processed using orthodontic heat polymerizing clear acrylic resin.In the other technique, after the trying-in process with wax pattern, an acrylic base was fabricated using heat polymerizing scleral acrylic resin. The prosthetic iris was fabricated from a transparent contact lens by painting the lens with watercolor paints and attaching it to an acrylic resin with tissue conditioner. The final process was made with heat polymerizing transparent acrylic resin. Custom-made prosthesis allows better esthetic and functional results to the patient in comparison to stock prosthesis. Further follow-up is necessary to check the condition and fit of the ocular prosthesis in such patients.

  11. Biomolecule immobilization techniques for bioactive paper fabrication.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanzhi; Hu, Yim Fun

    2012-04-01

    Research into paper-based sensors or functional materials that can perform analytical functions with active recognition capabilities is rapidly expanding, and significant research effort has been made into the design and fabrication of bioactive paper at the biosensor level to detect potential health hazards. A key step in the fabrication of bioactive paper is the design of the experimental and operational procedures for the immobilization of biomolecules such as antibodies, enzymes, phages, cells, proteins, synthetic polymers and DNA aptamers on a suitably prepared paper membrane. The immobilization methods are concisely categorized into physical absorption, bioactive ink entrapment, bioaffinity attachment and covalent chemical bonding immobilization. Each method has individual immobilization characteristics. Although every biomolecule-paper combination has to be optimized before use, the bioactive ink entrapment method is the most commonly used approach owing to its general applicability and biocompatibility. Currently, there are four common applications of bioactive paper: (1) paper-based bioassay or paper-based analytical devices for sample conditioning; (2) counterfeiting and countertempering in the packaging and construction industries; (3) pathogen detection for food and water quality monitoring; and (4) deactivation of pathogenic bacteria using antimicrobial paper. This article reviews and compares the different biomolecule immobilization techniques and discusses current trends. Current, emerging and future applications of bioactive paper are also discussed.

  12. LHC Olympics: Advanced Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Kyle; Larkoski, Andrew; Gray, Amanda; Ventura, Dan; Walsh, Jon; Schabinger, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The LHC Olympics is a series of workshop aimed at encouraging theorists and experimentalists to prepare for the soon-to-be-online Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. One aspect of the LHC Olympics program consists of the study of simulated data sets which represent various possible new physics signals as they would be seen in LHC detectors. Through this exercise, LHC Olympians learn the phenomenology of possible new physics models and gain experience in analyzing LHC data. Additionally, the LHC Olympics encourages discussion between theorists and experimentalists, and through this collaboration new techniques could be developed. The University of Washington LHC Olympics group consists of several first-year graduate and senior undergraduate students, in both theoretical and experimental particle physics. Presented here is a discussion of some of the more advanced techniques used and the recent results of one such LHC Olympics study.

  13. Laser-assisted advanced assembly for MEMS fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Yuriy Andreev

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently fabricated using methods originally designed for manufacturing semiconductor devices, using minimum if any assembly at all. The inherited limitations of this approach narrow the materials that can be employed and reduce the design complexity, imposing limitations on MEMS functionality. The proposed Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly (LA3) method solves these problems by first fabricating components followed by assembly of a MEMS device. Components are micro-machined using a laser or by photolithography followed by wet/dry etching out of any material available in a thin sheet form. A wide range of materials can be utilized, including biocompatible metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, semiconductors, and materials with special properties such as memory shape alloys, thermoelectric, ferromagnetic, piezoelectric, and more. The approach proposed allows enhancing the structural and mechanical properties of the starting materials through heat treatment, tribological coatings, surface modifications, bio-functionalization, and more, a limited, even unavailable possibility with existing methods. Components are transferred to the substrate for assembly using the thermo-mechanical Selective Laser Assisted Die Transfer (tmSLADT) mechanism for microchips assembly, already demonstrated by our team. Therefore, the mechanical and electronic part of the MEMS can be fabricated using the same equipment/method. The viability of the Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly technique for MEMS is demonstrated by fabricating magnetic switches for embedding in a conductive carbon-fiber metamaterial for use in an Electromagnetic-Responsive Mobile Cyber-Physical System (E-RMCPS), which is expected to improve the wireless communication system efficiency within a battery-powered device.

  14. Comparison of fabrication techniques for hollow retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Alix; Merkowitz, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Despite the wide usage of hollow retroreflectors, there is limited literature involving their fabrication techniques and only two documented construction methods could be found. One consists of an adjustable fixture that allows for the independent alignment of each mirror, while the other consists of a modified solid retroreflector that is used as a mandrel. Although both methods were shown to produce hollow retroreflectors with arc second dihedral angle errors, a comparison and analysis of each method could not be found, which makes it difficult to ascertain which method would be better suited to use for precision-aligned retroreflectors. Although epoxy bonding is generally the preferred method to adhere the three mirrors, a relatively new method known as hydroxide-catalysis bonding (HCB) presents several potential advantages over epoxy bonding. HCB has been used to bond several optical components for space-based missions, but has never been applied for construction of hollow retroreflectors. We examine the benefits and limitations of each bonding fixture as well as the present results and analysis of hollow retroreflectors made using both epoxy and HCB techniques.

  15. Advances in information extraction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, G.

    1982-01-01

    Sundry recent developments are presented which show some potential for affecting the automatic extraction of information from remotely sensed data. Pattern representations more abstract than Euclidean vector spaces offer some hope of unifying structural and decision theoretical approaches. The estimation of expected classification error rates is becoming more sophisticated and rigorous, but useful finite-sample results for nonparametric distributions appear unobtainable. Focus on computational complexity allows comparison of algorithms, while software engineering techniques reduce the effort necessary to develop and maintain complex image processing systems. Advances in computer systems architecture, commercial database technology, and man-machine communications should be closely monitored by the remote sensing community. A NASA-sponsored recommendation for research directions in mathematical pattern recognition are offered.

  16. Electromagnetic levitation coil fabrication technique for MSFC containerless processing facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Theiss, J.; Curreri, P. A.; Abbaschian, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is described for more reproducible fabrication of electromagnetic levitation coils. A split mandrel was developed upon which the coil is wound. After fabrication the mandrel can be disassembled to remove it from the coil. Previously, a full day was required to fabricate a levitation coil and the success rate for a functional coil was only 50 percent. About eight coils may be completed in one day using the technique developed and 95 percent of them are good levitation coils.

  17. Contact-eutectic-lens fabrication technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, F. G.; Yue, A. S.; Yu, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Method enables use of crystal or semiconductor materials with selective spectral-response characteristics (ultraviolet, visible, or infrared wavelengths) in fabrication of contact lenses, reading glasses, and photographic processing equipment.

  18. Advanced materials and fabrication processes for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guess, M. K.; Kaneko, R. S.; Wald, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    Research and development programs to develop high-strength aluminum alloys and low-cost materials and fabrication techniques for titanium alloys are being conducted. Thirteen aluminum alloy compositions are being evaluated. A section of a production component was fabricated using superplastic forming and diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) and fabrication studies are being conducted on three low temperature forming beta titanium alloys. Cost studies indicate substantial structural cost reduction potentials resulting from the use of both aluminum alloys and low-cost titanium fabrication techniques. Lowest overall costs are indicated for a composite/aluminum or composite titanium structure.

  19. Fabrication and tuning techniques for side-coupled electron accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hansborough, L.D.; Clark, W.L.; DePaula, R.A.; Martinez, F.A.; Roybal, P.L.; Wilkerson, L.C.; Young, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Beginning in 1979, Los Alamos entered into a collaboration with the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) to develop an advanced cw microtron accelerator. The accelerating structures (one 0.9-m-long, one 2.7-m-long, and two 4.0-m-long) containing a total of 184 accelerating cavities have been fabricated and tuned to the 2380-MHz operating frequency. New methods simplified the fabrication of these structures and eliminated several furnace-brazing steps. These fabrication methods, lathe-mounted tuning fixtures, and streamlined tuning techniques were developed to allow efficient production of side-coupled structures. These techniques are now being applied to the 2450-MHz racetrack microtron accelerator structures being fabricated at Los Alamos for the Nuclear Physics Department of the University of Illinois. Refinements of the described techniques will allow future accelerators of this type to be fabricated by private industry.

  20. Advanced techniques for microwave reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, B.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Zhuravlev, V. |; Hartfuss, H.J.; Hirsch, M.; Geist, T.; Segovia, J.; Oramas, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    Microwave reflectometry has been applied during the last years as a plasma diagnostic of increasing interest, mainly due to its simplicity, no need for large access ports and low radiation damage of exposed components. Those characteristics make reflectometry an attractive diagnostic for the next generation devices. Systems used either for density profile or density fluctuations have also shown great development, from the original single channel heterodyne to the multichannel homodyne receivers. In the present work we discuss three different advanced reflectometer systems developed by CIEMAT members in collaboration with different institutions. The first one is the broadband heterodyne reflectometer installed on W7AS for density fluctuations measurements. The decoupling of the phase and amplitude of the reflected beam allows for quantitative analysis of the fluctuations. Recent results showing the behavior of the density turbulence during the L-H transition on W7AS are shown. The second system shows how the effect of the turbulence can be used for density profile measurements by reflectometry in situations where the complicated geometry of the waveguides cannot avoid many parasitic reflections. Experiments from the TJ-I tokamak will be shown. Finally, a reflectometer system based on the Amplitude Modulation (AM) technique for density profile measurements is discussed and experimental results from the TJ-I tokamak are shown. The AM system offers the advantage of being almost insensitive to the effect of fluctuations. It is able to take a direct measurement of the time delay of the microwave pulse which propagates to the reflecting layer and is reflected back. In order to achieve fast reconstruction for real time monitoring of the density profile application of Neural Networks algorithms will be presented the method can reduce the computing times by about three orders of magnitude. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Advances in Procedural Techniques - Antegrade

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, William; Spratt, James C.

    2014-01-01

    There have been many technological advances in antegrade CTO PCI, but perhaps most importantly has been the evolution of the “hybrid’ approach where ideally there exists a seamless interplay of antegrade wiring, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde approaches as dictated by procedural factors. Antegrade wire escalation with intimal tracking remains the preferred initial strategy in short CTOs without proximal cap ambiguity. More complex CTOs, however, usually require either a retrograde or an antegrade dissection re-entry approach, or both. Antegrade dissection re-entry is well suited to long occlusions where there is a healthy distal vessel and limited “interventional” collaterals. Early use of a dissection re-entry strategy will increase success rates, reduce complications, and minimise radiation exposure, contrast use as well as procedural times. Antegrade dissection can be achieved with a knuckle wire technique or the CrossBoss catheter whilst re-entry will be achieved in the most reproducible and reliable fashion by the Stingray balloon/wire. It should be avoided where there is potential for loss of large side branches. It remains to be seen whether use of newer dissection re-entry strategies will be associated with lower restenosis rates compared with the more uncontrolled subintimal tracking strategies such as STAR and whether stent insertion in the subintimal space is associated with higher rates of late stent malapposition and stent thrombosis. It is to be hoped that the algorithms, which have been developed to guide CTO operators, allow for a better transfer of knowledge and skills to increase uptake and acceptance of CTO PCI as a whole. PMID:24694104

  2. Inverse lithography technique for advanced CMOS nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaret, Alexandre; Tritchkov, Alexander; Entradas, Jorge; Yesilada, Emek

    2013-04-01

    Resolution Enhancement Techniques have continuously improved over the last decade, driven by the ever growing constraints of lithography process. Despite the large number of RET applied, some hotspot configurations remain challenging for advanced nodes due to aggressive design rules. Inverse Lithography Technique (ILT) is evaluated here as a substitute to the dense OPC baseline. Indeed ILT has been known for several years for its near-to-ideal mask quality, while also being potentially more time consuming in terms of OPC run and mask processing. We chose to evaluate Mentor Graphics' ILT engine "pxOPCTM" on both lines and via hotspot configurations. These hotspots were extracted from real 28nm test cases where the dense OPC solution is not satisfactory. For both layer types, the reference OPC consists of a dense OPC engine coupled to rule-based and/or model-based assist generation method. The same CM1 model is used for the reference and the ILT OPC. ILT quality improvement is presented through Optical Rule Check (ORC) results with various adequate detectors. Several mask manufacturing rule constraints (MRC) are considered for the ILT solution and their impact on process ability is checked after mask processing. A hybrid OPC approach allowing localized ILT usage is presented in order to optimize both quality and runtime. A real mask is prepared and fabricated with this method. Finally, results analyzed on silicon are presented to compare localized ILT to reference dense OPC.

  3. Composite material fabrication techniques. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B J; Paulauskas, F L; Miller, J; Parzych, W

    1996-09-30

    This report describes a low cost method of fabricating components for mockups and training simulators used in the transportation industry. This technology was developed jointly by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Metters Industries, Incorporated (MI) as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) ORNL94-0288 sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Economic Impace and Diversity Minority Business Technology Transfer Consortium. The technology involves fabricating component replicas from fiberglass/epoxy composites using a resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The original components are used as masters to fabricate the molds. The molding process yields parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still providing adequate strength and stiffness for use in training simulators. This technology permits MI to overcome an acute shortage in surplus military hardware available to them for use in manufacturing training simulators. In addition, the cost of the molded fiberglass components is expected to be less than that of procuring the original components from the military.

  4. Fabrication and evaluation of advanced titanium and composite structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Hoffman, E. L.; Payne, L.; Carter, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    Advanced manufacturing methods for titanium and composite material structures are being developed and evaluated. The focus for the manufacturing effort is the fabrication of full-scale structural panels which replace an existing shear panel on the upper wing surface of the NASA YF-12 aircraft. The program involves design, fabrication, ground testing, and Mach 3 flight service of full-scale structural panels and laboratory testing of representative structural element specimens.

  5. Advanced techniques for ladar sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, William C.; Wangler, Richard J.; Condatore, Lawrence A., Jr.

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses new techniques for providing a `FLIR like', multi-pixel range receiver for applications of control and guidance by an active LADAR system. The major tradeoffs in developing a LADAR sensor with multi-pixel high resolution capabilities using conventional techniques are large size, high cost, or a slow frame rate. SEO has conceived and is currently developing a new receiver technique using a Charge Coupled Device array element that shows great promise for overcoming all of these drawbacks. Although this technique is a new approach for LADAR sensors, it is a concept that has been used for decades in the receivers of common-module FLIR systems.

  6. Recent advancements in optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianfeng; Liu, Xiaohua; Liang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Xie, Jiaqing; Wang, Xibin

    2017-02-01

    Optical microstructures are increasingly applied in several fields, such as optical systems, precision measurement, and microfluid chips. Microstructures include microgrooves, microprisms, and microlenses. This paper presents an overview of optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding and highlights the applications of optical microstructures in mold fabrication and glass molding. The glass-mold interface friction and adhesion are also discussed. Moreover, the latest advancements in glass molding technologies are detailed, including new mold materials and their fabrication methods, viscoelastic constitutive modeling of glass, and microstructure molding process, as well as ultrasonic vibrationassisted molding technology.

  7. Advanced crystallization techniques of 'solar grade' silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, M.; Calligarich, C.; Rava, P.; Sardi, L.; Alessandri, M.; Redaelli, F.; Pizzini, S.

    Microstructural, electrical and photo-voltaic characteristics of polycrystal line silicon solar cells fabricated with silicon ingots containing 5, 100 and 500 ppmw iron are reported and discussed. All silicon ingots were grown by the directional solidification technique in graphite or special quartz molds and doped intentionally with iron, in order to evaluate the potentiality of the D.S. technique when employed with solar silicon feedstocks. Results indicate that structural breakdown limits the amount of the ingot which is usable for solar cells fabrication, but also that efficiencies in excess of 10 percent are obtained using the 'good' region of the ingot.

  8. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  9. High-throughput plastic microlenses fabricated using microinjection molding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appasamy, Sreeram; Li, Weizhuo; Lee, Se Hwan; Boyd, Joseph T.; Ahn, Chong H.

    2005-12-01

    A novel fabrication scheme to develop high-throughput plastic microlenses using injection-molding techniques is realized. The initial microlens mold is fabricated using the well-known reflow technique. The reflow process is optimized to obtain reliable and repeatable microlens patterns. The master mold insert for the injection-molding process is fabricated using metal electroforming. The electroplating process is optimized for obtaining a low stress electroform. Two new plastic materials, cyclo olefin copolymer (COC) and Poly IR 2 are introduced in this work for fabricating microlenses. The plastic microlenses have been characterized for their focal lengths that range from 200 µm to 1.9 mm. This technique enables high-volume production of plastic microlenses with cycle times for a single chip being of the order of 60 s.

  10. Fabrication of micro/nano-structures by electrohydrodynamic jet technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dazhi; Zhao, Xiaojun; Lin, Yigao; Ren, Tongqun; Liang, Junsheng; Liu, Chong; Wang, Liding

    2017-08-01

    Electrohydrodynamic jet (E-Jet) is an approach to the fabrication of micro/nano-structures by the use of electrical forces. In this process, the liquid is subjected to electrical and mechanical forces to form a liquid jet, which is further disintegrated into droplets. The major advantage of the E-Jet technique is that the sizes of the jet formed can be at the nanoscale far smaller than the nozzle size, which can realize high printing resolution with less risk of nozzle blockage. The E-Jet technique, which mainly includes E-Jet deposition and E-Jet printing, has a wide range of applications in the fabrication of micro/nano-structures for micro/nano-electromechanical system devices. This technique is also considered a micro/nano-fabrication method with a great potential for commercial use. This study mainly reviews the E-Jet deposition/printing fundamentals, fabrication process, and applications.

  11. Advanced Spectroscopy Technique for Biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan

    This chapter presents an overview of the applications of optical spectroscopy in biomedicine. We focus on the optical design aspects of advanced biomedical spectroscopy systems, Raman spectroscopy system in particular. Detailed components and system integration are provided. As examples, two real-time in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems, one for skin cancer detection and the other for endoscopic lung cancer detection, and an in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy system for skin assessment are presented. The applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer diagnosis of the skin, lung, colon, oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, breast, and cervix are summarized.

  12. Advanced Geophysical Environmental Simulation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cloud property retrieval algorithms for processing of large multiple-satellite data sets; development and application of improved cloud -phase and... cloud optical property retrieval algorithms; investigation of techniques potentially applicable for retrieval of cloud spatial properties from very...14. SUBJECT TERMS cirrus cloud retrieval satellite meteorology polar-orbiting geostationary 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  13. Advanced Intellect-Augmentation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbart, D. C.

    This progress report covers a two-year project which is part of a program that is exploring the value of computer aids in augmenting human intellectual capability. The background and nature of the program, its resources, and the activities it has undertaken are outlined. User experience in applying augmentation tools and techniques to various…

  14. ADVANCED ELECTROSTATIC STIMULATION OF FABRIC FILTRATION: PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the performance and economics of advanced electrostatic stimulation of fabric filtration (AESFF), in which a high-voltage electrode is placed coaxially inside a filter bag to establish an electric field between the electrode and the bag surface. The electric f...

  15. ADVANCED ELECTROSTATIC STIMULATION OF FABRIC FILTRATION: PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the performance and economics of advanced electrostatic stimulation of fabric filtration (AESFF), in which a high-voltage electrode is placed coaxially inside a filter bag to establish an electric field between the electrode and the bag surface. The electric f...

  16. Displacement Talbot lithography: an alternative technique to fabricate nanostructured metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Boulbar, E. D.; Chausse, P. J. P.; Lis, S.; Shields, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured materials are essential for many recent electronic, magnetic and optical devices. Lithography is the most common step used to fabricate organized and well calibrated nanostructures. However, feature sizes less than 200 nm usually require access to deep ultraviolet photolithography, e-beam lithography or soft lithography (nanoimprinting), which are either expensive, have low-throughput or are sensitive to defects. Low-cost, high-throughput and low-defect-density techniques are therefore of interest for the fabrication of nanostructures. In this study, we investigate the potential of displacement Talbot lithography for the fabrication of specific structures of interest within plasmonic and metamaterial research fields. We demonstrate that nanodash arrays and `fishnet'-like structures can be fabricated by using a double exposure of two different linear grating phase masks. Feature sizes can be tuned by varying the exposure doses. Such lithography has been used to fabricate metallic `fishnet'-like structures using a lift-off technique. This proof of principle paves the way to a low-cost, high-throughput, defect-free and large-scale technique for the fabrication of structures that could be useful for metamaterial and plasmonic metasurfaces. With the development of deep ultraviolet displacement Talbot lithography, the feature dimensions could be pushed lower and used for the fabrication of optical metamaterials in the visible range.

  17. Advanced intellect-augmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbart, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    User experience in applying our augmentation tools and techniques to various normal working tasks within our center is described so as to convey a subjective impression of what it is like to work in an augmented environment. It is concluded that working-support, computer-aid systems for augmenting individuals and teams, are undoubtedly going to be widely developed and used. A very special role in this development is seen for multi-access computer networks.

  18. Advanced measurement techniques, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Carraway, Debra L.; Manuel, Gregory S.; Croom, Cynthia C.

    1987-01-01

    In modern laminar flow flight and wind tunnel research, it is important to understand the specific cause(s) of laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition. Such information is crucial to the exploration of the limits of practical application of laminar flow for drag reduction on aircraft. The process of transition involves both the possible modes of disturbance growth, and the environmental conditioning of the instabilities by freestream or surface conditions. The possible modes of disturbance growth include viscous, inviscid, and modes which may bypass these natural ones. Theory provides information on the possible modes of disturbance amplification, but experimentation must be relied upon to determine which of those modes actually dominates the transition process in a given environment. The results to date of research on advanced devices and methods used for the study of transition phenomena in the subsonic and transonic flight and wind tunnel environments are presented.

  19. Septoplasty: Basic and Advanced Techniques.

    PubMed

    Most, Sam P; Rudy, Shannon F

    2017-05-01

    Nasal septal deviation is a prevalent problem that can have significant quality of life ramifications. Septoplasty is commonly performed to provide qualitative and quantitative benefit to those with nasal obstruction owing to septal deviation. Although a standard, basic technique is often adequate for individuals with mild to moderate mid to posterior septal deviation, unique challenges arise with caudal septal deviation. Herein, multiple strategies that attempt to address anterior septal deviation are discussed. Anterior septal reconstruction has been shown to be a safe and effective means by which to address severe caudal septal deviation and long-term reduction in preoperative symptoms.

  20. Strategic design and recent fabrication techniques for bioengineered tissue scaffolds to improve peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Ajay; Chen, Xiong-Biao; Schreyer, David J

    2012-12-01

    Bioengineered tissue scaffolds are a potential tool for improving regenerative repair of damaged peripheral nerves. Novel modes of fabrication coupled with scaffold design strategies that are based on an understanding of the biology of nerve injury offer the prospect of intervention at a more sophisticated level. We review the etiology and incidence of peripheral nerve injury and the biological events that unfold during nerve regeneration after an injury. Newly available tissue scaffold fabrication technologies using bioplotting and laser-based techniques are described. Scaffold design strategies are also discussed, including the incorporation of living cells during scaffold fabrication, inclusion of neurotrophic gradients, use of electric stimulation, inclusion of antioxidant compounds to counteract neural apotosis, and promotion of angiogenesis. Use of these advanced fabrication techniques and incorporation of one or more of these active biological strategies may eventually lead to a greater success in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

  1. Improved fabrication techniques for infrared bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, A. E.; Kreysa, E.; McBride, S. E.; Richards, P. L.; Haller, E. E.

    1983-09-01

    Techniques are described for producing improved infrared bolometers from doped germanium. Ion implantation and sputter metalization have been used to make ohmic electrical contacts to Ge:Ga chips. This method results in a high yield of small monolithic bolometers with very little lowfrequency noise. When one of these chips is used as the thermometric element of a composite bolometer, it must be bonded to a dielectric substrate. The thermal resistance of the conventional epoxy bond has been measured and found to be undesirably large. A procedure for soldering the chip to a metalized portion of the substrate is described which reduced this resistance. The contribution of the metal film absorber to the heat capacity of a composite bolometer has been measured. The heat capacity of a NiCr absorber at 1.3K can dominate the bolometer performance. A Bi absorber has significantly lower heat capacity. A low-temperature blackbody calibrator has been built to measure the optical responsivity of bolometers. A composite bolometer system with a throughput of ˜0.1 sr cm2 has been constructed using our new techniques. In negligible background, it has an optical NEP of3.6 \\cdot 10^{ - 15} W/sqrt {Hz} at 1.0K with a time constant of 20 ms. The noise in this bolometer is white above 2.5 Hz and is somewhat below the value predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium theory. It is in agreement with calculations based on a recent nonequilibrium theory.

  2. Improved fabrication techniques for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, A. E.; Kreysa, E.; Mcbride, S. E.; Richards, P. L.; Haller, E. E.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques are described for producing improved infrared bolometers from doped germanium. Ion implantation and sputter metalization have been used to make ohmic electrical contacts to Ge:Ga chips. This method results in a high yield of small monolithic bolometers with very little low-frequency noise. When one of these chips is used as the thermometric element of a composite bolometer, it must be bonded to a dielectric substrate. The thermal resistance of the conventional epoxy bond has been measured and found to be undesirably large. A procedure for soldering the chip to a metalized portion of the substrate is described which reduced this resistance. The contribution of the metal film absorber to the heat capacity of a composite bolometer has been measured. The heat capacity of a NiCr absorber at 1.3 K can dominate the bolometer performance. A Bi absorber has significantly lower heat capacity. A low temperature blackbody calibrator has been built to measure the optical responsivity of bolometers. A composite bolometer system with a throughput of approx. 0.1 sr sq cm was constructed using the new techniques. In negligible background it has an optical NEP of 3.6 10((exp -15) W/sq root of Hz at 1.0 K with a time constant of 20 ms. The noise in this bolometer is white above 2.5 Hz and is somewhat below the value predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium theory. It is in agreement with calculations based on a recent nonequilibrium theory.

  3. nanoparticles fabricated by modified hydrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waseem, Muhammad; Munsif, Sajida; Rashid, Umer; Imad-ud-Din

    2014-06-01

    We have tested modified hydrolysis method for the preparation of α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The particles after synthesis were applied for a series of physicochemical techniques. Iron chloride was used as a precursor material. The particle size distribution was determined using zeta sizer and scanning electron microscopy. The surface area and the morphology of the particles vary by changing the concentration of the precursor material. The size of nanoparticles varies from 10 to 90 nm. The particles having size of 23 ± 1 nm were separated out from the solution and their size remains almost the same even after one month. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of Fe2O3 nanoparticles confirms the purity of the desired material. The weight loss of the particles with respect to the temperature was studied by thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been employed to study the crystallinity of the particles.

  4. Development and fabrication of an advanced liquid cooling garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    A tube/fin concept liquid cooling garment head cooler was developed, fabricated and delivered to NASA-ARC. The head cooler was fabricated from polyurethane film which sandwiches the transport fluid tubing and a thermally conductive fin material. The head cooler garment is sewn to form a skull cap and covered with a comfort liner. In addition, two Neonate heating garments were fabricated and supplied to NASA for further finishing and use in medical tests. The resulting garment is flexible, elastic and conforms to the head comfortably. Tests on a tube/fin element of identical construction as the head cooler demonstrated good thermal effectiveness. Use of commercially available materials and development of relatively simple fabrication techniques give the potential for a low garment cost.

  5. Advanced techniques to prepare seed to sow

    Treesearch

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews research on improving the basic technique of cold stratification for tree and shrub seeds. Advanced stratification techniques include long stratification, stratification re-dry, or multiple cycles of warm-cold stratification. Research demonstrates that careful regulation of moisture levels and lengthening the stratification period have produced a...

  6. Improved fabrication techniques for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, A. E.; Mcbride, S. E.; Richards, P. L.; Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.

    1983-01-01

    Ion implantation and sputter metallization are used to produce ohmic electrical contacts to Ge:Ga chips. The method is shown to give a high yield of small monolithic bolometers with very little low-frequency noise. It is noted that when one of the chips is used as the thermometric element of a composite bolometer it must be bonded to a dielectric substrate. The thermal resistance of the conventional epoxy bond is measured and found to be undesirably large. A procedure for soldering the chip to a metallized portion of the substrate in such a way as to reduce this resistance is outlined. An evaluation is made of the contribution of the metal film absorber to the heat capacity of a composite bolometer. It is found that the heat capacity of a NiCr absorber at 1.3 K can dominate the bolometer performance. A Bi absorber possesses significantly lower heat capacity. A low-temperature blackbody calibrator is built to measure the optical responsivity of bolometers. A composite bolometer system with a throughput of approximately 0.1 sr sq cm is constructed using the new techniques. The noise in this bolometer is white above 2.5 Hz and is slightly below the value predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium theory.

  7. Improved fabrication techniques for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, A. E.; Mcbride, S. E.; Richards, P. L.; Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.

    1983-01-01

    Ion implantation and sputter metallization are used to produce ohmic electrical contacts to Ge:Ga chips. The method is shown to give a high yield of small monolithic bolometers with very little low-frequency noise. It is noted that when one of the chips is used as the thermometric element of a composite bolometer it must be bonded to a dielectric substrate. The thermal resistance of the conventional epoxy bond is measured and found to be undesirably large. A procedure for soldering the chip to a metallized portion of the substrate in such a way as to reduce this resistance is outlined. An evaluation is made of the contribution of the metal film absorber to the heat capacity of a composite bolometer. It is found that the heat capacity of a NiCr absorber at 1.3 K can dominate the bolometer performance. A Bi absorber possesses significantly lower heat capacity. A low-temperature blackbody calibrator is built to measure the optical responsivity of bolometers. A composite bolometer system with a throughput of approximately 0.1 sr sq cm is constructed using the new techniques. The noise in this bolometer is white above 2.5 Hz and is slightly below the value predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium theory.

  8. Advanced sialoendoscopy techniques, rare findings, and complications.

    PubMed

    Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-12-01

    This article presents and discusses advanced minimally invasive sialoendoscopy and combined methods: endoscopy, endoscopic-assisted techniques, and external-lithotripsy combined procedures. It also presents rare situations and complications encountered during sialoendoscopic procedures. Sialoendoscopy is a relatively novel technique, which adds significant new dimensions to the surgeon's armamentarium for management of inflammatory salivary gland diseases. Because of the rapid development in minimally invasive surgical techniques, surgeons are capable of more facilely treating complicated inflammatory and obstructive conditions of the salivary glands.

  9. Fabricating an Accurate Implant Master Cast: A Technique Report.

    PubMed

    Balshi, Thomas J; Wolfinger, Glenn J; Alfano, Stephen G; Cacovean, Jeannine N; Balshi, Stephen F

    2015-12-01

    The technique for fabricating an accurate implant master cast following the 12-week healing period after Teeth in a Day® dental implant surgery is detailed. The clinical, functional, and esthetic details captured during the final master impression are vital to creating an accurate master cast. This technique uses the properties of the all-acrylic resin interim prosthesis to capture these details. This impression captures the relationship between the remodeled soft tissue and the interim prosthesis. This provides the laboratory technician with an accurate orientation of the implant replicas in the master cast with which a passive fitting restoration can be fabricated.

  10. Development of an advanced mask and its fabrication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, Tadahiro; Tojo, Toru; Ogawa, Yoji; Koyama, Kiyomi; Ono, Akira; Inoue, Soichi; Ito, Shinichi; Goto, Mineo

    1995-07-01

    Masks and their fabrication technologies are keys to the further advancement of optical lithography. A stable SiNx single layer attenuated masks for DUV have been developed. A 0.2 micrometers contact hole pattern was fabricated using a KrF stepper with the SiNx attenuated mask. Toshiba mask fabrication system, including an electron beam writing system, a data base inspection system, and a data conversion system, has been developed for 64 Mbit DRAM class. Required mask improvements for increasing optical lithography resolution include better critical dimension (CD) uniformity, higher mask writing system resolution, and automatic shifter patten generation of alternating phase shifting masks. In addition, improved mask pattern positioning accuracy is also required. In this paper, experimental CD uniformity and resolution improvements, automatic phase shifter assignment method, and improvement in positioning accuracy, are described. The future development of masks will incorporate these key technologies.

  11. Development of a Fluid Structures Interaction Test Technique for Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.; Heineck, James T.; Schairer, Edward T.; Mosher, Robert N.; Garbeff, Theodore Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Application of fluid structures interaction (FSI) computational techniques to configurations of interest to the entry, descent and landing (EDL) community is limited by two factors - limited characterization of the material properties for fabrics of interest and insufficient experimental data to validate the FSI codes. Recently ILC Dover Inc. performed standard tests to characterize the static stress-strain response of four candidate fabrics for use in EDL applications. The objective of the tests described here is to address the need for a FSI dataset for CFD validation purposes. To reach this objective, the structural response of fabrics was measured in a very simple aerodynamic environment with well controlled boundary conditions. Two test series were undertaken. The first series covered a range of tunnel conditions and the second focused on conditions that resulted in fabric panel buckling.

  12. Rapid Fabrication Techniques for Liquid Rocket Channel Wall Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The functions of a regeneratively-cooled nozzle are to (1) expand combustion gases to increase exhaust gas velocity while, (2) maintaining adequate wall temperatures to prevent structural failure, and (3) transfer heat from the hot gases to the coolant fluid to promote injector performance and stability. Regeneratively-cooled nozzles are grouped into two categories: tube-wall nozzles and channel wall nozzles. A channel wall nozzle is designed with an internal liner containing a series of integral coolant channels that are closed out with an external jacket. Manifolds are attached at each end of the nozzle to distribute coolant to and away from the channels. A variety of manufacturing techniques have been explored for channel wall nozzles, including state of the art laser-welded closeouts and pressure-assisted braze closeouts. This paper discusses techniques that NASA MSFC is evaluating for rapid fabrication of channel wall nozzles that address liner fabrication, slotting techniques and liner closeout techniques. Techniques being evaluated for liner fabrication include large-scale additive manufacturing of freeform-deposition structures to create the liner blanks. Abrasive water jet milling is being evaluated for cutting the complex coolant channel geometries. Techniques being considered for rapid closeout of the slotted liners include freeform deposition, explosive bonding and Cold Spray. Each of these techniques, development work and results are discussed in further detail in this paper.

  13. Enabling advanced mirror blank design through modern optical fabrication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Timothy J.; Genberg, Victor L.

    1994-02-01

    Mirror blanks used in high-reliability optical systems for airborne and spaceborne applications have many requirements in terms of weight, stiffness and moment of inertia, as well as mounting and gravitational influences. Lightweight and ultra-lightweight mirror blank design techniques have been enhanced by recent technological developments in mirror blank fabrication and optical figuring. This paper briefly reviews traditional mirror blank design considerations in light of new fabrication technologies such as abrasive water jet machining of mirror cores and ion figuring of optical surfaces. The impact of these new technologies on mirror blank design is also discussed, as well as new design and analytical techniques using NASTRAN. Actual production data using these techniques are presented.

  14. Fabrication Techniques for Micro-Optical Device Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    lasers, the first to be commercialized and most common semiconductor laser in use today, can be found in bar code scanners, laser pointers, advanced...stick to gripper tools rather than simply dropping when released. In addition, this method is too time consuming in order to fabricate a dense array...I performed numerical modeling of the VCSEL device with the structure layout specified in the previous section using MATLAB . The model

  15. Fabrication technique of SMA/CFRP smart composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ya; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Nagai, Hideki; Oishi, Ryutaro; Kikushima, Yoshihiro; Yuse, Kaori; Akimune, Yoshio; Kishi, Teruo

    2003-03-01

    In recent years, pre-strained TiNi shape memory alloys (SMA) have been used for fabricating smart structure with carbon fibers reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, since the curing temperature of CFRP is higher than the reverse transformation temperatures of TiNi SMA, special fixture jigs have to be used for keeping the pre-strain during fabrication, which restricted its practical application. We have developed a new method to control the transformation temperatures of SMA by proper thermo-mechanical treatments and composition adjustment, which is suitable to fabricate SMA/CFRP smart composite with a curing temperature of 130C. Furthermore, we tried to develop a new fabrication technique which is also suitable to fabricate SMA/CFRP smart composite with a curing temperature of 180C. It was found that by using cold drawn ultra-thin TiNi wires, TiNi/CFRP composites with a curing temperature of 180C could be fabricated without special fixture jigs. The damage suppression effect by embedded ultra-thin wires in the smart composite was confirmed.

  16. Development and fabrication of an advanced liquid cooling garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leith, J. R.; Hixon, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The elastomeric film fin/tube concept which was developed is a composite of polyurethane film, fine expanded silver mesh, a serpentine pattern polyurethane transport tubing and an integral comfort liner, all bonded via adhesive application and vacuum-bagged for final cure. As demonstrated by thermal analysis, the composite garment material is capable of removing a 293 watt (1000 BTU/hr) metabolic load through a head and torso cooling area of .46 sq m (5 sq ft) with tube spacing of slightly under one inch. A total of 60 test elements, each .15m x .15m (6 in. x 6 in.) were fabricated in support of the liquid cooling garment concept development. In parallel with the fabrication of these elements a continuing series of laboratory tests to support the fabrication techniques was carried out. The elements and supporting tests are described.

  17. Optical properties of GST nanoparticles fabricated by laser printing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Mohammad; Milichko, Valentin A.; Zuev, Dmitry A.; Rybin, Mikhail V.; Makarov, Sergey V.

    2017-09-01

    Laser printing technique offers an effective, fast process and free of lithography for fabricating spherical nanoparticles. on the other hand, GeSbTe (GST) compound has attracted a lot of attention in the field of reconfigurable metamaterials. Here, we use this method to fabricate the spherical GST nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the GST nanoparticles shows a broad size distribution of spherical nanoparticles which makes them resonant in wide spectral range. We also study the nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles demonstrating a sharp increase of second harmonic generation (SHG) at the transition point from amorphous to crystalline states.

  18. Electrohydrodynamics: A facile technique to fabricate drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Liao, I-Chien; Adler, Andrew; Leong, Kam W.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning and electrospraying are facile electrohydrodynamic fabrication methods that can generate drug delivery systems (DDS) through a one-step process. The nano-structured fiber and particle morphologies produced by these techniques offer tunable release kinetics applicable to diverse biomedical applications. Coaxial-electrospinning/electrospraying, a relatively new technique of fabricating core-shell fibers/particles have added to the versatility of these DDS by affording a near zero-order drug release kinetics, dampening of burst release, and applicability to a wider range of bioactive agents. Controllable electrospinning/spraying of fibers and particles and subsequent drug release from these chiefly polymeric vehicles depends on well-defined solution and process parameters. The additional drug delivery capability from electrospun fibers can further enhance the material’s functionality in tissue engineering applications. This review discusses the state-of-the-art of using electrohydrodynamic technique to generate nano-fiber/particles as drug delivery devices. PMID:19651167

  19. Hybrid mesh generation using advancing reduction technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study presents an extension of the application of the advancing reduction technique to the hybrid mesh generation. The proposed algorithm is based on a pre-generated rectangle mesh (RM) with a certain orientation. The intersection points between the two sets of perpendicular mesh lines in RM an...

  20. Advanced Techniques Using Contrast Media in Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Law, Meng

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of advanced MRI techniques using contrast media in neuroimaging, focusing on T2*-weighted dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC-MRI) and T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI). Image acquisition and data processing methods as well as their clinical application in brain tumors, stroke, dementia and multiple sclerosis are discussed. PMID:23088946

  1. Computer-assisted virtual planning and surgical template fabrication for frontoorbital advancement.

    PubMed

    Soleman, Jehuda; Thieringer, Florian; Beinemann, Joerg; Kunz, Christoph; Guzman, Raphael

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The authors describe a novel technique using computer-assisted design (CAD) and computed-assisted manufacturing (CAM) for the fabrication of individualized 3D printed surgical templates for frontoorbital advancement surgery. METHODS Two patients underwent frontoorbital advancement surgery for unilateral coronal synostosis. Virtual surgical planning (SurgiCase-CMF, version 5.0, Materialise) was done by virtual mirroring techniques and superposition of an age-matched normative 3D pediatric skull model. Based on these measurements, surgical templates were fabricated using a 3D printer. Bifrontal craniotomy and the osteotomies for the orbital bandeau were performed based on the sterilized 3D templates. The remodeling was then done placing the bone plates within the negative 3D templates and fixing them using absorbable poly-dl-lactic acid plates and screws. RESULTS Both patients exhibited a satisfying head shape postoperatively and at follow-up. No surgery-related complications occurred. The cutting and positioning of the 3D surgical templates proved to be very accurate and easy to use as well as reproducible and efficient. CONCLUSIONS Computer-assisted virtual planning and 3D template fabrication for frontoorbital advancement surgery leads to reconstructions based on standardizedmeasurements, precludes subjective remodeling, and seems to be overall safe and feasible. A larger series of patients with long-term follow-up is needed for further evaluation of this novel technique.

  2. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilkoy, F.; Flauraud, V.; Rüegg, M.; Kim, B. J.; Brugger, J.

    2016-02-01

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au.

  3. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Yesilkoy, F; Flauraud, V; Rüegg, M; Kim, B J; Brugger, J

    2016-03-07

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au.

  4. Advancements in Binder Systems for Solid Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Paper will present recent developments in advanced material binder systems for solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technologies. The advantage of SFF is the capability to custom fabricate complex geometries directly from computer aided design data in layer- by-layer fashion, eliminated the need for traditional fixturing and tooling. Binders allow for the low temperature processing of 'green' structural materials, either metal, ceramic or composite, in traditional rapid prototyping machines. The greatest obstacle comes when green parts must then go through a sintering or burnout process to remove the binders and fully densify the parent material, without damaging or distorting the original part geometry. Critical issues and up-to-date assessments will be delivered on various material systems.

  5. Advancements in Binder Systems for Solid Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Paper will present recent developments in advanced material binder systems for solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technologies. The advantage of SFF is the capability to custom fabricate complex geometries directly from computer aided design data in layer- by-layer fashion, eliminated the need for traditional fixturing and tooling. Binders allow for the low temperature processing of 'green' structural materials, either metal, ceramic or composite, in traditional rapid prototyping machines. The greatest obstacle comes when green parts must then go through a sintering or burnout process to remove the binders and fully densify the parent material, without damaging or distorting the original part geometry. Critical issues and up-to-date assessments will be delivered on various material systems.

  6. Development of Core Cladding Fabrication Techniques for Phase I Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Reid, Robert S.; Ring, Peter J.; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Phase I fission propulsion systems focus on safety, timely development, and affordability. Prototype and flight units can be tested at full thrust, using resistance heaters to closely simulate heat from a fission reaction. In Phase I ground testing, one goal is to establish a reliable and affordable manufacturing technique for fabricating a flight-like core. A refractory metal (Mo) has been suggested for the core substrate, primarily due to the existence of a significant database for Mo/LJ02 fuel. The core can be fabricated by bundling Mo tubes with a bonding system that meets preliminary test goals. These criteria include materials compatibility, ability to maintain thermal and structural integrity during 10,000 hours of operation, and fabrication with existing facilities. This paper describes an effort to investigate several fabrication techniques in a cost-effective manner. First, inexpensive materials were tested at low temperatures to determine the relative effectiveness of such techniques as welding, brazing, plating, and vacuum plasma spraying (VPSing). Promising techniques were chosen for further evaluation, including thermal and structural studies, using ceramic tubing at intermediate temperatures. The most desirable technique will be tested on actual Mo tubing at anticipated operating temperatures. This work is being performed by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Advanced Methods & Materials (AMM), Inc.

  7. Development of core cladding fabrication techniques for phase I fission propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Reid, Robert S.; Ring, Peter J.

    2001-02-01

    Phase I fission propulsion systems focus on safety, timely development, and affordability. Prototype and flight units can be tested at full thrust, using resistance heaters to closely simulate heat from a fission reaction. In Phase I ground testing, one goal is to establish a reliable and affordable manufacturing technique for fabricating a flight-like core. A refractory metal (Mo) has been suggested for the core substrate, primarily due to the existence of a significant database for Mo/UO2 fuel. The core can be fabricated by bundling Mo tubes with a bonding system that meets preliminary test goals. These criteria include materials compatibility, ability to maintain thermal and structural integrity during 10,000 hours of operation, and fabrication with existing facilities. This paper describes an effort to investigate several fabrication techniques in a cost-effective manner. First, inexpensive materials were tested at low temperatures to determine the relative effectiveness of such techniques as welding, brazing, plating, and vacuum plasma spraying (VPSing). Promising techniques were chosen for further evaluation, including thermal and structural studies, using ceramic tubing at intermediate temperatures. The most desirable technique will be tested on actual Mo tubing at anticipated operating temperatures. This work is being performed by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Advanced Methods & Materials (AMM), Inc. .

  8. Suspended metal mask techniques in Josephson junction fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, R.H.; Sauvageau, J.E.; Jain, A.K.; Schwartz, D.B.; Springer, K.T.; Lukens, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    We report here two processes for in-situ, self-aligned fabrication of niobium based Josephson tunnel junctions and SNS microbridges in which multiple evaporations at varying angles are made through a suspended metal stencil fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL). Both techniques have proved superior to earlier all-polymer suspended masks, particularly with e-gun evaporated refractory metals such as niobium. The first process uses a trilevel resist and ion milling to pattern a gold stencil suspended on PMMA. In the second process, an aluminum stencil suspended on polyimide (PI) is patterned by lift-off with an EBL mask written in a PMMA layer on top of the PI. The PI is then undercut using an oxygen plasma etch through the aluminum mask. Reproducible ( +- 20 nm) submicrometer dimensions and good junction characteristics have been achieved using these techniques without the need for difficult-to-control surface cleaning procedures.

  9. Recent Developments in Microsystems Fabricated by the Liga-Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, J.; Bade, K.; El-Kholi, A.; Hein, H.; Mohr, J.

    1995-01-01

    As an example of microsystems fabricated by the LIGA-technique (x-ray lithography, electroplating and molding), three systems are described and characterized: a triaxial acceleration sensor system, a micro-optical switch, and a microsystem for the analysis of pollutants. The fabrication technologies are reviewed with respect to the key components of the three systems: an acceleration sensor, and electrostatic actuator, and a spectrometer made by the LIGA-technique. Aa micro-pump and micro-valve made by using micromachined tools for molding and optical fiber imaging are made possible by combining LIGA and anisotropic etching of silicon in a batch process. These examples show that the combination of technologies and components is the key to complex microsystems. The design of such microsystems will be facilitated is standardized interfaces are available.

  10. High volume fabrication of laser targets using MEMS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindloe, C.; Arthur, G.; Hall, F.; Tomlinson, S.; Potter, R.; Kar, S.; Green, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Booth, N.; Tolley, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    The latest techniques for the fabrication of high power laser targets, using processes developed for the manufacture of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) devices are discussed. These laser targets are designed to meet the needs of the increased shot numbers that are available in the latest design of laser facilities. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. Such targets can be used for high complexity experiments such as Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) studies and can have many complex components that need assembling and characterisation with high precision. Using the techniques that are common to MEMS devices and integrating these with an existing target fabrication capability we are able to manufacture and deliver targets to these systems. It also enables us to manufacture novel targets that have not been possible using other techniques. In addition, developments in the positioning systems that are required to deliver these targets to the laser focus are also required and a system to deliver the target to a focus of an F2 beam at 0.1Hz is discussed.

  11. 0-G experiments with advanced ceramic fabric wick structures

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.; Cooper, M.F.; Pauley, K.A.

    1991-07-01

    Both Air Force and NASA future spacecraft thermal management needs span the temperature range from cryogenic to liquid metals. Many of these needs are changing and not well defined and will remain so until goals, technology, and missions converge. Nevertheless, it is certain that high-temperature (> 800 K) and medium-temperature (about 450 K) radiator systems will have to be developed that offer significant improvements over current designs. This paper discusses experiments performed in the lower temperature regime as part of a comprehensive advanced ceramic fabric (ACF) heat pipe development program. These experiments encompassed wicking tests with various ceramic fabric samples, and heat transfer tests with a 1-m long prototype ACF water heat pipe. A prototype ceramic fabric/titanium water heat pipe has been constructed and tested; it transported up to 60 W of power at about 390 K. Startup and operation both with and against gravity examined. Wick testing was begun to aid in the design and construction of an improved prototype heat pipe, with a 38-{mu}m stainless steel linear covered by a biaxially-braided Nextel (trademark of the 3M Co., St. Paul, Minnesota) sleeve that is approximately 300-{mu}m thick. Wick testing took place in 1-g; limited testing in 0-g was initiated, and results to date suggest that in 0-g, wick performance improves over that in 1-g.

  12. Fabrication and application of advanced functional materials from lignincellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Sixiao

    This dissertation explored the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into advanced functional materials and their potential applications. Lignocellulosic biomass represents an as-of-yet underutilized renewable source for not only biofuel production but also functional materials fabrication. This renewable source is a great alternative for fossil fuel based chemicals, which could be one of the solutions to energy crisis. In this work, it was demonstrated a variety of advanced materials including functional carbons, metal and silica nanoparticles could be derived from lignocellulosic biomass. Chapter 1 provided overall reviewed of the lignin structures, productions and its utilizations as plastics, absorbents and carbons, as well as the preparation of nano-structured silver, silica and silicon carbide/nitride from biomass. Chapter 2, 3 and 4 discussed the fabrication of highly porous carbons from isolated lignin, and their applications as electric supercapacitors for energy storage. In chapter 2, ultrafine porous carbon fibers were prepared via electrospinning followed by simultaneous carbonization and activation. Chapter 3 covered the fabrication of supercapacitor based on the porous carbon fibers and the investigation of their electrochemical performances. In chapter 4, porous carbon particulates with layered carbon nano plates structures were produced by simple oven-drying followed by simultaneous carbonization and activation. The effects of heat processing parameters on the resulting carbon structures and their electrochemical properties were discussed in details. Chapter 5 and 6 addressed the preparation of silver nanoparticles using lignin. Chapter 5 reported the synthesis, underlying kinetics and mechanism of monodispersed silver nanospheres with diameter less than 25 nm in aqueous solutions using lignin as dual reducing and capping agents. Chapter 6 covered the preparation of silver nanoparticles on electrospun celluloses ultrafine fibers using lignin as both

  13. Composite smart materials using high-volume microelectronics fabrication techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winzer, Stephen R.; Shankar, Natarajan; Caldwell, Paul J.; May, Russell G.

    1995-05-01

    Smart materials, containing sensors, actuators and processing electronics, are of great potential use in defense and commercial applications from acoustic stealth to medial imaging. While 1:3 composites using PZT rods are now available commercially in limited quantities, composites with individually addressable actuator and sensor arrays are not, nor have conditioning and processing electronics been embedded in the same material. There are several technical and cost reasons for this, including the complexity of interconnections, capacitance of individual elements, thermal dissipation, and the expense of fabricating the material. We have been developing composite materials comprising arrays of miniature actuators fabricated using surface mount capacitor technology, and amenable to automated fabrication using `pick and place' techniques. Miniature actuators with up to 0.1% strain, and operating at 30 V bias and ac swing of +/- 30 V have been fabricated, and placed in 10-by- 10 actuator arrays on Kapton sheets on which circuits have been printed. The arrays were then `potted' in RTV liquid rubbers. Individual actuator motion and multiple actuator influence functions were measured as a function of applied voltage and adjacent actuator motion. These results, along with in-water performance (source level and directivity), are presented.

  14. Structural design and fabrication techniques of composite unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Daniel Stephen

    Popularity of unmanned aerial vehicles has grown substantially in recent years both in the private sector, as well as for government functions. This growth can be attributed largely to the increased performance of the technology that controls these vehicles, as well as decreasing cost and size of this technology. What is sometimes forgotten though, is that the research and advancement of the airframes themselves are equally as important as what is done with them. With current computer-aided design programs, the limits of design optimization can be pushed further than ever before, resulting in lighter and faster airframes that can achieve longer endurances, higher altitudes, and more complex missions. However, realization of a paper design is still limited by the physical restrictions of the real world and the structural constraints associated with it. The purpose of this paper is to not only step through current design and manufacturing processes of composite UAVs at Oklahoma State University, but to also focus on composite spars, utilizing and relating both calculated and empirical data. Most of the experience gained for this thesis was from the Cessna Longitude project. The Longitude is a 1/8 scale, flying demonstrator Oklahoma State University constructed for Cessna. For the project, Cessna required dynamic flight data for their design process in order to make their 2017 release date. Oklahoma State University was privileged enough to assist Cessna with the mission of supporting the validation of design of their largest business jet to date. This paper will detail the steps of the fabrication process used in construction of the Longitude, as well as several other projects, beginning with structural design, machining, molding, skin layup, and ending with final assembly. Also, attention will be paid specifically towards spar design and testing in effort to ease the design phase. This document is intended to act not only as a further development of current

  15. Fabrication of advanced fiber Bragg gratings by use of sequential writing with a continuous-wave ultraviolet laser source.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Ingemar; Sahlgren, Bengt; Helmfrid, Sten; Friberg, Ari T; Fonjallaz, Pierre-Yves

    2002-02-20

    We present a novel scheme based on sequential writing for fabrication of advanced fiber Bragg gratings. As opposed to earlier sequential methods this technique uses a cw UV laser source and allows for very precise control and repetitivity of the formation of the gratings. Furthermore it is possible to use high average irradiances without destroying the fiber, resulting in considerable reduction in fabrication time for complex gratings. The method has been applied to several test gratings, which proved its versatility and quality.

  16. Super-smooth surface fabrication technique and experimental research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linghua; Wang, Junlin; Zhang, Jian

    2012-09-20

    Wheel polishing, a new optical fabrication technique, is proposed for super-smooth surface fabrication of optical components in high-precision optical instruments. The machining mechanism and the removal function contours are investigated in detail. The elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory is adopted to analyze the deformation of the wheel head, the pressure distribution, and the fluid film thickness distribution in the narrow machining zone. The pressure and the shear stress distributions at the interface between the slurry and the sample are numerically simulated. Practical polishing experiments are arranged to analyze the relationship between the wheel-sample distance and the machining rate. It is demonstrated in this paper that the wheel-sample distance will directly influence the removal function contours. Moreover, ripples on the wheel surface will eventually induce the transverse prints on the removal function contours. The surface roughness of fused silicon is reduced to less than 0.5 nm (rms) from initial 1.267 nm (rms). The wheel polishing technique is feasible for super-smooth surface fabrication.

  17. FY-87 packing fabrication techniques (commercial waste form) results

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, E.V.; Gates, T.E.; Cabbage, K.S.; Eklund, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    This report covers the investigation of fabrication techniques associated with the development of suitable materials and methods to provide a prefabricated packing for waste packages for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). The principal functions of the packing are to minimize container corrosion during the 300 to 1000 years following repository closure and provide long-term control of the release of radionuclides from the waste package. The investigative work, discussed in this report, was specifically conceived to develop the design criteria for production of full-scale prototypical packing rings. The investigative work included the preparation of procedures, the preparation of fabrication materials, physical properties, and the determination of the engineering properties. The principal activities were the preparation of the materials and the determination of the physical properties. 21 refs., 20 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Investigation of electroforming techniques. [fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Copper and nickel electroforming was examined for the purpose of establishing the necessary processes and procedures for repeatable, successful fabrication of the outer structures of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The selection of electrolytes for copper and nickel deposition is described. The development studies performed to refine and complete the processes necessary for successful chamber shell fabrication and the testing employed to verify the applicability of the processes and procedures to small scale hardware are described. Specifications were developed to afford a guideline for the electroforming of high quality outer shells on regeneratively cooled thrust chamber liners. Test results indicated repeatable mechanical properties could be produced in copper deposits from the copper sulfate electrolyte with periodic current reversal and in nickel deposits from the sulfamate solution. Use of inert, removable channel fillers and the conductivizing of such is described. Techniques (verified by test) which produce high integrity bonds to copper and copper alloy liners are discussed.

  19. Fabrication of Advanced Thermoelectric Materials by Hierarchical Nanovoid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A novel method to prepare an advanced thermoelectric material has hierarchical structures embedded with nanometer-sized voids which are key to enhancement of the thermoelectric performance. Solution-based thin film deposition technique enables preparation of stable film of thermoelectric material and void generator (voigen). A subsequent thermal process creates hierarchical nanovoid structure inside the thermoelectric material. Potential application areas of this advanced thermoelectric material with nanovoid structure are commercial applications (electronics cooling), medical and scientific applications (biological analysis device, medical imaging systems), telecommunications, and defense and military applications (night vision equipments).

  20. Advanced Microstructured Semiconductor Neutron Detectors: Design, Fabrication, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, Steven Lawrence

    The microstructured semiconductor neutron detector (MSND) was investigated and previous designs were improved and optimized. In the present work, fabrication techniques have been refined and improved to produce three-dimensional microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors with reduced leakage current, reduced capacitance, highly anisotropic deep etched trenches, and increased signal-to-noise ratios. As a result of these improvements, new MSND detection systems function with better gamma-ray discrimination and are easier to fabricate than previous designs. In addition to the microstructured diode fabrication improvement, a superior batch processing backfill-method for 6LiF neutron reactive material, resulting in a nearly-solid backfill, was developed. This method incorporates a LiF nano-sizing process and a centrifugal batch process for backfilling the nanoparticle LiF material. To better transition the MSND detector to commercialization, the fabrication process was studied and enhanced to better facilitate low cost and batch process MSND production. The research and development of the MSND technology described in this work includes fabrication of variant microstructured diode designs, which have been simulated through MSND physics models to predict performance and neutron detection efficiency, and testing the operational performance of these designs in regards to neutron detection efficiency, gamma-ray rejection, and silicon fabrication methodology. The highest thermal-neutron detection efficiency reported to date for a solid-state semiconductor detector is presented in this work. MSNDs show excellent neutron to gamma-ray (n/γ) rejection ratios, which are on the order of 106, without significant loss in thermal-neutron detection efficiency. Individually, the MSND is intrinsically highly sensitive to thermal neutrons, but not extrinsically sensitive because of their small size. To improve upon this, individual MSNDs were tiled together into a 6x6-element array

  1. In-office technique to fabricate triple tray.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Aditi; Kaur, Harsimran; Koli, Dheeraj; Manak, Karan; Verma, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Dual arch impressions have been in use for many years. Five in-office techniques for fabrication of the tray have been suggested, in case the manufactured (stock) tray is not available to the clinician. The design consists of two parts of the tray (the plastic frame and lattice). Five types of materials for the lattice have been described. The indications, advantages, and disadvantages of the techniques together with an appraisal of the five different lattice materials have been described. Overall the techniques are simple and require materials that are easily available. It does not take much time and can be used to attain efficient results in case the stock tray is not available in the operatory.

  2. Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques in Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final technical report for grant number NAG-1-02101. The title of this grant was "Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques In Aerospace Systems". The principal investigator on this grant was Dr. John C. Knight of the Computer Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4740. This report summarizes activities under the grant during the period 7/01/2002 to 9/30/2004. This report is organized as follows. In section 2, the technical background of the grant is summarized. Section 3 lists accomplishments and section 4 lists students funded under the grant. In section 5, we present a list of presentations given at various academic and research institutions about the research conducted. Finally, a list of publications generated under this grant is included in section 6.

  3. The occlusal guard: a simplified technique for fabrication and equilibration.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, John; Hottel, Timothy L; Siegel, Sharon C; Brandt, Robert; Silva, Gladston

    2013-01-01

    Hard occlusal guards have been used effectively to treat myofacial pain originating from parafunctional activities. Also, they can protect the natural dentition when it opposes porcelain restorations, help to evaluate changes in occlusal vertical dimension during full mouth rehabilitation, minimize further tooth loss in patients with abfraction lesions, and redirect occlusal loads more favorably onto dental implant-supported prostheses. A simplified technique is described to fabricate a properly designed wax model of an occlusal guard that can be processed in acrylic in the same manner used to construct a complete denture.

  4. General technique for fabricating large arrays of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorritsma, J.; Gijs, M. A. M.; Kerkhof, J. M.; Stienen, J. G. H.

    1996-09-01

    Large arrays of parallel metallic nanowires ranging from 20 - 120 nm in width are fabricated using a general and relatively simple technique. Holographic laser interference exposure of photoresist and anisotropic etching are used to pattern the surface of InP(001) substrates into V-shaped grooves of 200 nm period. Subsequently metal is evaporated at an angle onto the V-grooved substrates, naturally resulting in thousands of ultra-narrow metallic wires in parallel. Resistance measurements proof that as-prepared wires are electrically continuous.

  5. Advanced techniques in echocardiography in small animals.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, Valérie

    2010-07-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography has become a major imaging tool for the diagnosis and management of canine and feline cardiovascular diseases. During the last decade, more recent advances in ultrasound technology with the introduction of newer imaging modalities, such as tissue Doppler imaging, strain and strain rate imaging, and 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography, have provided new parameters to assess myocardial performance, including regional myocardial velocities and deformation, ventricular twist, and mechanical synchrony. An outline of these 4 recent ultrasound techniques, their impact on the understanding of right and left ventricular function in small animals, and their application in research and clinical settings are given in this article.

  6. Basic concepts of advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Elisabetta; Bizzi, Alberto; Di Salle, Francesco; De Stefano, Nicola; Filippi, Massimo

    2008-10-01

    An overview is given of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques sensitized to diffusion, flow, magnetization transfer effect, and local field inhomogeneities induced by physiological changes, that can be viewed, in the clinical practice, as advanced because of their challenging implementation and interpretation. These techniques are known as diffusion-weighted, perfusion, magnetization transfer, functional MRI and MR spectroscopy. An important issue is that they can provide quantitative estimates of structural and functional characteristics that are below the voxel resolution. This review does not deal with the basic concepts of the MR physics and the description of the available acquisition and postprocessing methods, but hopefully provides an adequate background to readers and hence facilitate the understanding of the following clinical contributions.

  7. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Markl, M; Schnell, S; Wu, C; Bollache, E; Jarvis, K; Barker, A J; Robinson, J D; Rigsby, C K

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented.

  8. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications

    PubMed Central

    Markl, M.; Schnell, S.; Wu, C.; Bollache, E.; Jarvis, K.; Barker, A. J.; Robinson, J. D.; Rigsby, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented. PMID:26944696

  9. Development of novel piezoelectric composites by solid freeform fabrication techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Rajesh Kumar

    Piezoelectric ceramic/polymer composites have been widely used for ultrasonic transducers because of their superior properties as compared to bulk piezoceramics or polymers. The electromechanical Properties of the composites can be tailored for various applications by changing the design and connectivity of the piezoceramic skeleton. The goal of this project was to utilize the design flexibility provided by solid freeform fabrication (SFF) techniques to manufacture complex PZT composite transducers for ultrasonic medical imaging applications. The ceramic element shape, size and spatial arrangement could be varied easily; by changing the parameters in the input computer aided design file. Many SFF techniques, including fused deposition modeling (FDM), fused deposition of ceramics (FDC), and Sanders prototyping (SP) were used to fabricate a variety of novel PZT structures. The composites were processed either by a direct, indirect or multiple mold route. In the direct route (FDC), green ceramic preforms were produced from 52 vol.% PZT-5H ceramic loaded polymer filaments. A lost mold technique was used for the indirect and multiple mold routes (SP, FDM). After heat treatment, the sintered PZT skeletons were backfilled with epoxy, polished, electroded and corona poled. A variety of novel and complex designs such as 3-D Honeycomb, 3-D Mesh, ladder, oriented fibers, 1-3 regular and staggered rods, and other composites including concentric polygon, hexagonal patterns, and 2-2 sheets with and without volume fraction gradient (VFG) were fabricated. The 3-D Honeycomb structures with a 3-3 connectivity showed d33 coefficients as high as 340 pC/N. The ladder structure exhibited distinctly different properties when poled along different directions. One of them, i.e. the oriented 3-3 fiber structure was believed to utilize the d33, d31 and d15 coefficients to show an effective d33 of 510 pC/N. VFG composites were fabricated to achieve a reduction the side and grating lobe

  10. Advanced Bode Plot Techniques for Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, D. A.; Schulze, G. W.

    The Bode plot, displayed as either impedance or admittance versus frequency, is the most basic test used by ultrasonic transducer designers. With simplicity and ease-of-use, Bode plots are ideal for baseline comparisons such as spacing of parasitic modes or impedance, but quite often the subtleties that manifest as poor process control are hard to interpret or are nonexistence. In-process testing of transducers is time consuming for quantifying statistical aberrations, and assessments made indirectly via the workpiece are difficult. This research investigates the use of advanced Bode plot techniques to compare ultrasonic transducers with known "good" and known "bad" process performance, with the goal of a-priori process assessment. These advanced techniques expand from the basic constant voltage versus frequency sweep to include constant current and constant velocity interrogated locally on transducer or tool; they also include up and down directional frequency sweeps to quantify hysteresis effects like jumping and dropping phenomena. The investigation focuses solely on the common PZT8 piezoelectric material used with welding transducers for semiconductor wire bonding. Several metrics are investigated such as impedance, displacement/current gain, velocity/current gain, displacement/voltage gain and velocity/voltage gain. The experimental and theoretical research methods include Bode plots, admittance loops, laser vibrometry and coupled-field finite element analysis.

  11. Novel immobilization techniques in the fabrication of efficient electrochemical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, Shridhara; Marx, Kenneth A.; Samuelson, Lynne A.; Kumar, Jayant; Tripathy, Sukant K.; Kaplan, David L.

    1996-02-01

    The development of enzyme electrodes plays a major role in the performance of an electrochemical biosensor. In this paper, we describe two generic methods for efficient immobilization of enzymes or biomolecules at the electrode surface. These methods are based on physical entrapment of the enzymes during biochemical polymerization of phenols and electrochemical copolymerization of aromatic diamines with enzymes that are covalently coupled to the monomer. Both of these techniques have proven to be chemically mild and provide efficient polymer matrices for the fabrication of enzyme electrodes. Enzymes including horseradish peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase and glucose oxidase have been immobilized in these polymeric matrices and used for electrochemical as well as colorimetric detection of various substrates. Response times of the order of 5 - 10 seconds and sensitivities of the order of mM have been achieved with these electrodes. The use of these immobilization techniques towards the development of microelectrode arrays for multianalyte sensors is also discussed.

  12. A hybrid sequential deposition fabrication technique for micro fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Kevin G.; Czyzewska, Eva K.; Vanderhoek, Tom P. K.; Fan, Lilian L. Y.; Abel, Keith A.; Wu, Q. M. Jonathan; Parameswaran, M. Ash

    2005-10-01

    Micro fuel cell systems have elicited significant interest due to their promise for instantly rechargeable, longer duration and portable power. Most micro fuel cell systems are either built as miniaturized plate-and-frame or silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Plate-and-frame systems are difficult to fabricate smaller than 20 cm3. Existing micro fuel cell designs cannot meet the cost, scale and power requirements of some portable power markets. Traditional MEMS scaling advantages do not apply to fuel cells because the minimum area for the fuel cell is fixed by the catalyst area required for a given power output, and minimum volume set by mass transport limitations. We have developed a new hybrid technique that borrows from both micro and macro machining techniques to create fuel cells in the 1-20 cm3 range, suitable for cell phones, PDAs and smaller devices.

  13. New fabrication technique for nanoporous gold nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fusheng; Arnob, Md Masud Parvez; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2017-02-01

    Nanoporous gold nanoparticles (NPG-NP) showcase tunable pore and ligament sizes ranging from nanometers to microns. The nanoporous structure and sub-wavelength nanoparticle shape contribute to its unique LSPR properties. NPG-NP features large specific surface area and high-density plasmonic field enhancement known as "hot-spots". Hence, NPG-NP has found many applications in nanoplasmonic sensor development. In our recent studies, we have shown that NPG-NP array chip can be utilized for high-sensitivity detection by various enhanced spectroscopic modalities, as photothermal agents, and for disease biomarker detection. To date, array-format, substrate-bound NPGN has been fabricated by either colloidal nanosphere lithography or random nucleation during the sputtering deposition process. Although highly cost-effective, these techniques cannot provide precise control of individual particle size and location. In this paper, we report the development of a new fabrication technique based on electron-beam lithography (EBL). Herein, a customized EBL technique is utilized to pattern larger areas (several square millimeters) of randomly distributed NPGN by careful design of the shot pattern, which limits the writing time to the acceptable level. Since the position, size, and shape of a huge number of features need to be generated and stored individually, memory limitations of this unique EBL technique constitutes an additional challenge, which is normally not present if small areas are to be patterned with features on an ordered lattice. This issue is solved by programmatically generating random feature positions within a simulation cell of carefully chosen size and implementing periodic boundary conditions.

  14. Advanced sperm selection techniques for assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Simon; Kroon, Ben; Ford, Emily; Hook, Ysanne; Glujovsky, Demián; Yazdani, Anusch

    2014-10-28

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) bring together gametes outside of the body to enhance the probability of fertilisation and pregnancy. Advanced sperm selection techniques are increasingly being employed in ART, most commonly in cycles utilising ICSI. Advanced sperm selection techniques are thought to improve the chance that structurally intact and mature sperm with high DNA integrity are selected for fertilisation. Advanced sperm selection strategies include selection according to surface charge; sperm apoptosis; sperm birefringence; ability to bind to hyaluronic acid; and sperm morphology under ultra-high magnification. These techniques theoretically improve ART outcomes. To evaluate the impact of advanced sperm selection techniques on ART outcomes. Systematic search of electronic databases (Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information Database (LILACS)), trials registers (ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform), conference abstracts (Web of Knowledge) and grey literature (OpenGrey) for relevant randomised controlled trials. We handsearched the reference lists of included studies and similar reviews. The search was conducted in May 2014. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing an advanced sperm selection technique versus standard IVF or ICSI or versus another advanced sperm selection technique. We excluded studies of sperm selection using ultra-high magnification (intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection, or IMSI), as they are the subject of a separate Cochrane review. Quasi-randomised and pseudo-randomised trials were

  15. Advanced printing and deposition methodologies for the fabrication of biosensors and biodevices.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Macia, Laura; Morrin, Aoife; Smyth, Malcolm R; Killard, Anthony J

    2010-05-01

    Advanced printing and deposition methodologies are revolutionising the way biological molecules are deposited and leading to changes in the mass production of biosensors and biodevices. This revolution is being delivered principally through adaptations of printing technologies to device fabrication, increasing throughputs, decreasing feature sizes and driving production costs downwards. This review looks at several of the most relevant deposition and patterning methodologies that are emerging, either for their high production yield, their ability to reach micro- and nano-dimensions, or both. We look at inkjet, screen, microcontact, gravure and flexographic printing as well as lithographies such as scanning probe, photo- and e-beam lithographies and laser printing. We also take a look at the emerging technique of plasma modification and assess the usefulness of these for the deposition of biomolecules and other materials associated with biodevice fabrication.

  16. Advanced composites: Fabrication processes for selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note is based on present state of the art for epoxy and polyimide matrix composite fabrication technology. Boron/epoxy and polyimide and graphite/epoxy and polyimide structural parts can be successfully fabricated. Fabrication cycles for polyimide matrix composites have been shortened to near epoxy cycle times. Nondestructive testing has proven useful in detecting defects and anomalies in composite structure elements. Fabrication methods and tooling materials are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of different tooling materials. Types of honeycomb core, material costs and fabrication methods are shown in table form for comparison. Fabrication limits based on tooling size, pressure capabilities and various machining operations are also discussed.

  17. Electrohydrodynamic direct-writing lithography: An alternative maskless technique for microstructure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiankang; Xu, Fangyuan; Cao, Yi; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-12-01

    A maskless electrohydrodynamic direct-writing lithographic strategy was presented to flexibly fabricate user-specific micropatterns on silicon substrates. By optimizing the operating parameters, parallel lines as well as lattices with line width of about 2 μm could be stably deposited. The printed micropatterns were found to function as sacrificial template to transfer microstructures into silicon substrates and the etching processes had little effect on the predefined size. It is envisioned that this simple approach provides an alternative to the existing microfabrication techniques, which might enable the wide accessibility of microscale technologies to advance various research fields such as microfluidics, biomedical chips, and microscale tissue engineering.

  18. Micro cycloid-gear system fabricated by multiexposure LIGA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Toru; Chung, Song-Jo; Hein, Herbert; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Mohr, Juergen

    1999-09-01

    In this paper, a prototype of 2 mm-diameter micro-cycloid gear system fabricated by the multi-exposure LIGA technique is presented. The entire gear system consists of a casing and three vertically stacked disks and gears. Each part is composed of three different levels. The first level, 40 micrometers high, was fabricated by UV-lithography, and the second as well as the third level, 195 micrometers and 250 micrometers high respectively, were processed by aligned deep X-ray lithography (DXL). The alignment error between two DXL- processed layers was measured, and the results have turned out to be within +/- 5 micrometers range. As a result of the height control process by the mechanical surface machining, the deviation of structural height has been maintained within +/- 3 micrometers range for the UV-lithography-processed structures, and +/- 10 micrometers for the DXL-processed structures. Further the tests of gear assembly were implemented with 125 micrometers -diameter glass fiber, by using a die-bonding machine with vacuum gripper under stereo- microscope. Finally the dynamic tests of the gear system were successfully conducted with the mechanical torque input by an electrical motor. A proper rotational speed reduction was observed in the operational input range of 3 to 1500 rpm with the designed gear ratio of 18.

  19. A microelectromechanical accelerometer fabricated using printed circuit processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. E.; Ramadoss, R.; Ozmun, P. M.; Dean, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive-type accelerometer fabricated using printed circuit processing techniques is presented. A Kapton polymide film is used as the structural layer for fabricating the MEMS accelerometer. The accelerometer proof mass along with four suspension beams is defined in the Kapton polyimide film. The proof mass is suspended above a Teflon substrate using a spacer. The deflection of the proof mass is detected using a pair of capacitive sensing electrodes. The top electrode of the accelerometer is defined on the top surface of the Kapton film. The bottom electrode is defined in the metallization on the Teflon substrate. The initial gap height is determined by the distance between the bottom electrode and the Kapton film. For an applied external acceleration (normal to the proof mass), the proof mass deflects toward or away from the fixed bottom electrode due to inertial force. This deflection causes either a decrease or increase in the air-gap height thereby either increasing or decreasing the capacitance between the top and the bottom electrodes. An example PCB MEMS accelerometer with a square proof mass of membrane area 6.4 mm × 6.4 mm is reported. The measured resonant frequency is 375 Hz and the Q-factor in air is 0.52.

  20. Mirror substrate fabrication techniques of low expansion glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangenberg-Jolley, J.; Hobbs, T.

    Low expansion glasses offer many advantages as mirror blank materials due to their thermal and mechanical properties as well as the flexibility they offer in design and fabrication. Fused Silica, Corning Code 7940 and ULETM titanium silicate, Code 7971, produced by the flame hydrolysis process, are high purity and homogeneous glasses. The ability to fusion seal each of the glasses offers mirror manufacturing design freedom of shape, size and weight. Solid monolithic mirror blanks have been successfully manufactured by the hex-seal method up to 4 meters diameter and 10 meter blanks are an extension of the proven fusion techniques. Ultralightweight (10% solid weight) low expansion mirrors produced by "frit bonding" a fusion core between two precision machined plates, maintain an optical figure when exposed to thermal cycling and mechanical abuse environments.

  1. Fabrication of a Bronze Age Sword using Ancient Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiro, David; Webler, Bryan

    2016-12-01

    A khopesh was cast and forged for the TMS 2016 Bladesmithing Symposium. The khopesh was the first sword style, originating during the Bronze Age in the Near East. The manufacturing process used in this study closely followed Bronze Age techniques to determine the plausibility of open mold casting coupled with cold work and annealing cycles. Forging and annealing cycles substantially increased blade strength and diminished intergranular δ-phase inclusions. While a functional blade was not completed due to casting defects, the process gives valuable insight into the effort required to fabricate a khopesh during the Bronze Age. Forging and annealing cycles following casting were necessary to produce the mechanical properties desired in a sword.

  2. Fabrication techniques for septum magnets at the APS.

    SciTech Connect

    Jaski, M.; Thompson, K.; Kim, S.; Friedsam, H.; Toter, W.; Humbert, J.

    2002-09-16

    The design, construction, and installation of pulsed septum magnets for particle accelerators presents many challenges for the magnet engineer. Issues associated with magnet core structure design, component alignment, weldment design, and electrical insulation choices are among those requiring careful attention. The designs of the six septum magnets required for the APS facility have evolved since operation began in 1996. Improvements in the designs have provided better injection/extraction performance parameters and extended the machine reliability to meet the requirements of a world-class, third-generation synchrotron radiation facility. Details of the techniques used to address issues involved in producing septum magnets at the APS are described here to aid magnet engineers in the fabrication of future septum magnets.

  3. Use of CAD-CAM technology for the fabrication of complete dentures: An alternative technique.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; Azak, Aysen Nekora; Alp, Gülce; Ekşi, Hilal

    2017-01-31

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology is available for the fabrication of complete dentures as an alternative to conventional fabrication techniques. This report describes a work flow for a technique that combines the use of conventional impressions and maxillomandibular relationship records with CAD-CAM technology for the fabrication of maxillary and mandibular complete dentures.

  4. Advanced techniques in current signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. F.; Castleberry, K. N.

    1992-02-01

    In general, both ac and dc motors can be characterized as weakly nonlinear systems, in which both linear and nonlinear effects occur simultaneously. Fortunately, the nonlinearities are generally well behaved and understood and can be handled via several standard mathematical techniques already well developed in the systems modeling area; examples are piecewise linear approximations and Volterra series representations. Field measurements of numerous motors and motor-driven systems confirm the rather complex nature of motor current spectra and illustrate both linear and nonlinear effects (including line harmonics and modulation components). Although previous current signature analysis (CSA) work at Oak Ridge and other sites has principally focused on the modulation mechanisms and detection methods (AM, PM, and FM), more recent studies have been conducted on linear spectral components (those appearing in the electric current at their actual frequencies and not as modulation sidebands). For example, large axial-flow compressors (approximately 3300 hp) in the US gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants exhibit running-speed (approximately 20 Hz) and high-frequency vibrational information (greater than 1 kHz) in their motor current spectra. Several signal-processing techniques developed to facilitate analysis of these components, including specialized filtering schemes, are presented. Finally, concepts for the designs of advanced digitally based CSA units are offered, which should serve to foster the development of much more computationally capable 'smart' CSA instrumentation in the next several years.

  5. Advanced techniques for computer-controlled polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinhaerl, Markus; Stamp, Richard; Pitschke, Elmar; Rascher, Rolf; Smith, Lyndon; Smith, Gordon; Geiss, Andreas; Sperber, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Computer-controlled polishing has introduced determinism into the finishing of high-quality surfaces, for example those used as optical interfaces. Computer-controlled polishing may overcome many of the disadvantages of traditional polishing techniques. The polishing procedure is computed in terms of the surface error-profile and the material removal characteristic of the polishing tool, the influence function. Determinism and predictability not only enable more economical manufacture but also facilitate considerably increased processing accuracy. However, there are several disadvantages that serve to limit the capabilities of computer-controlled polishing, many of these are considered to be issues associated with determination of the influence function. Magnetorheological finishing has been investigated and various new techniques and approaches that dramatically enhance the potential as well as the economics of computer-controlled polishing have been developed and verified experimentally. Recent developments and advancements in computer-controlled polishing are discussed. The generic results of this research may be used in a wide variety of alternative applications in which controlled material removal is employed to achieve a desired surface specification, ranging from surface treatment processes in technical disciplines, to manipulation of biological surface textures in medical technologies.

  6. Advanced Imaging Techniques for Multiphase Flows Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoresano, A.; Langella, G.; Di Santo, M.; Iodice, P.

    2017-08-01

    Advanced numerical techniques, such as fuzzy logic and neural networks have been applied in this work to digital images acquired on two applications, a centrifugal pump and a stationary spray in order to define, in a stochastic way, the gas-liquid interface evolution. Starting from the numeric matrix representing the image it is possible to characterize geometrical parameters and the time evolution of the jet. The algorithm used works with the fuzzy logic concept to binarize the chromatist of the pixels, depending them, by using the difference of the light scattering for the gas and the liquid phase.. Starting from a primary fixed threshold, the applied technique, can select the ‘gas’ pixel from the ‘liquid’ pixel and so it is possible define the first most probably boundary lines of the spray. Acquiring continuously the images, fixing a frame rate, a most fine threshold can be select and, at the limit, the most probably geometrical parameters of the jet can be detected.

  7. Advanced techniques in current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

    1992-03-01

    In general, both ac and dc motors can be characterized as weakly nonlinear systems, in which both linear and nonlinear effects occur simultaneously. Fortunately, the nonlinearities are generally well behaved and understood and an be handled via several standard mathematical techniques already well developed in the systems modeling area; examples are piecewise linear approximations and Volterra series representations. Field measurements of numerous motors and motor-driven systems confirm the rather complex nature of motor current spectra and illustrate both linear and nonlinear effects (including line harmonics and modulation components). Although previous current signature analysis (CSA) work at Oak Ridge and other sites has principally focused on the modulation mechanisms and detection methods (AM, PM, and FM), more recent studies have been conducted on linear spectral components (those appearing in the electric current at their actual frequencies and not as modulation sidebands). For example, large axial-flow compressors ({approximately}3300 hp) in the US gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants exhibit running-speed ({approximately}20 Hz) and high-frequency vibrational information (>1 kHz) in their motor current spectra. Several signal-processing techniques developed to facilitate analysis of these components, including specialized filtering schemes, are presented. Finally, concepts for the designs of advanced digitally based CSA units are offered, which should serve to foster the development of much more computationally capable ``smart`` CSA instrumentation in the next several years. 3 refs.

  8. Design, fabrication, and calibration of curved integral coils for measuring transfer function, uniformity, and effective length of LBL ALS (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Advanced Light Source) Booster Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Nelson, D.; Marks, S.; Gee, B.; Wong, W.; Meneghetti, J.

    1989-03-01

    A matched pair of curved integral coils has been designed, fabricated and calibrated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for measuring Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole Magnets. Distinctive fabrication and calibration techniques are described. The use of multifilar magnet wire in fabrication integral search coils is described. Procedures used and results of AC and DC measurements of transfer function, effective length and uniformity of the prototype booster dipole magnet are presented in companion papers. 8 refs.

  9. A Comparison of Fabrication Techniques for Hollow Retroreflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Alix; Merkowitz, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide usage of hollow retroreflectors, there is limited literature involving their fabrication techniques and only two documented construction methods could be found. One consists of an adjustable fixture that allows for the independent alignment of each mirror, while the other consists of a modified solid retroreflector that is used as a mandrel. Although both methods were shown to produce hollow retroreflectors with arcsecond dihedral angle errors, a comparison and analysis of each method could not be found which makes it difficult to ascertain which method would be better suited to use for precision-aligned retroreflectors. Although epoxy bonding is generally the preferred method to adhere the three mirrors, a relatively new method known as hydroxide-catalysis bonding (HCB) presents several potential advantages over epoxy bonding. HCB has been used to bond several optical components for space-based missions, but has never been applied for construction of hollow retroreflectors. In this paper we examine the benefits and limitations of each bonding fixture as well as present results and analysis of hollow retroreflectors made using both epoxy and HCB techniques.

  10. Characterization of a Viking Blade Fabricated by Traditional Forging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Traylor, R.; Austin, J.; Pringle, J.; Bickel, J.; Connick, R.; Connick, W.; Hosemann, P.

    2016-12-01

    A team of students from the University of California, Berkeley, participated in a blade-smithing competition hosted by the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society at the TMS 2015 144th annual meeting and exhibition. Motivated by ancient forging methods, the UC Berkeley team chose to fabricate our blade from historical smithing techniques utilizing naturally-occurring deposits of iron ore. This approach resulted in receiving the "Best Example of a Traditional Blade Process/Ore Smelting Technique" award for our blade named "Berkelium." First, iron-enriched sand was collected from local beaches. Magnetite (Fe3O4) was then extracted from the sand and smelted into individual high- and low-carbon steel ingots. Layers of high- and low-carbon steels were forge-welded together, predominantly by hand, to form a composite material. Optical microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness mechanical testing were conducted at different stages throughout the blade-making process to evaluate the microstructure and hardness evolution during formation. It was found that the pre-heat-treated blade microstructure was composed of ferrite and pearlite, and contained many nonmetallic inclusions. A final heat treatment was performed, which caused the average hardness of the blade edge to increase by more than a factor of two, indicating a martensitic transformation.

  11. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M.

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  12. Accuracy of three corrective techniques for implant bar fabrication.

    PubMed

    Romero, G G; Engelmeier, R; Powers, J M; Canterbury, A A

    2000-12-01

    Numerous articles emphasize the importance of passivity of implant-prosthetic component interfaces. Nonpassive interfaces can lead to bone loss, abutment fracture, and connecting screw breakage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 3 postcasting techniques for the correction of non-passive fit between a cast bar superstructure and its interface with an implant abutment. Thirty implant Hader bars were fabricated based on a metal model composed of two 3.8/4.5 HL PME titanium implant abutments. Initial measurements were collected on the y-axis of the left implant abutment-bar interface by using a M2001ARS toolmaker microscope. Means were calculated from buccal, distal, and lingual measurements on each specimen. Ten specimens were sectioned, indexed, and corrected by casting the same alloy (group 1). Ten specimens were sectioned, indexed, and corrected by soldering (group 2). The last 10 specimens were submitted to 2 cycles of electrical discharge machining on a MedArc M-2 EDM machine (group 3). Postcorrection measurements were collected on the 3 groups. A 1-way ANOVA and a Tukey-Kramer test at a 0.05 significance level were performed on the 3 groups after the corrective techniques. Initial gap means were 192 microm for group 1, 190 microm for group 2, and 198 microm for group 3. There was a significant difference (P<0.05) in gap means between group 1 (15 microm) and group 2 (72 microm) as well as between group 2 and group 3 (7.5 microm) after each correction technique. No difference was detected between group 1 and group 3. The electrical discharge machining group resulted in the smallest mean gap distance of 7.5 microm, thus meeting the criteria of passive fit (within 10 microm) described in the literature.

  13. Advanced digital modulation: Communication techniques and monolithic GaAs technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. G.; Oliver, J. D., Jr.; Kot, R. C.; Richards, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Communications theory and practice are merged with state-of-the-art technology in IC fabrication, especially monolithic GaAs technology, to examine the general feasibility of a number of advanced technology digital transmission systems. Satellite-channel models with (1) superior throughput, perhaps 2 Gbps; (2) attractive weight and cost; and (3) high RF power and spectrum efficiency are discussed. Transmission techniques possessing reasonably simple architectures capable of monolithic fabrication at high speeds were surveyed. This included a review of amplitude/phase shift keying (APSK) techniques and the continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) methods, of which MSK represents the simplest case.

  14. Carbon MEMS from the nanoscale to the macroscale: Novel fabrication techniques and applications in electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaouk, Rabih Bachir

    Micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) have strongly impacted our way of life in the last two decades. From accelerometers and gyroscopes that ensure your driving safety, to inkjet printer cartridges that transpose your ideas onto paper, to micromirrors that enable your small projectors. MEMS have become more and more ubiquitous. Silicon, the material on which the semiconductor industry based its revolution, has so far been the material of choice for MEMS. While silicon is a great platform for constructing electronics, it is less than ideal for applications that involve electrodes exposed to aggressive liquid and gaseous environments. Carbon is one of the most commonly used materials when it comes to electrochemical applications, it is therefore the best candidate to carry over the trend of miniaturization in arenas such as smart chemical sensing, biological microdevices, miniature power, etc. Recent advances in engineering nanoscale structures show great promise towards delivering higher performance sensors, detectors, transistors, displays, etc. In order to leverage the power of nanostructures in general, new manufacturing processes that can bridge between the nanoscale and the macroscale are needed. Such integrated fabrication methods are essential in enabling the transfer of the advantages boasted by nanostructures from the research labs towards mass manufacturing. The present work starts by introducing the basic photolithography technique that has been used so far to fabricate Carbon MEMS (C-MEMS). Several novel techniques stemming for the original process are then described in details and lithium-ion microbattery anodes are presented as an example application of these novel fabrication methods. These Carbon MEMS anodes are characterized through a combination of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (OS). A new finite element analysis (FEA) technique is then proposed to more accurately model the current density distributions of 3

  15. Synthesis of Nacre-Like Structures using Novel Fabrication Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-18

    objectives are 2-fold: (1) to fabricate a nano / micro -laminate that mimics the nacre in the abalone shell using engineering ceramic compositions and...fabricate and test a bioinspired material based on its structure. Our objectives are 2-fold: (1) to fabricate a nano / micro -laminate that mimics the...mechanical properties of the nano -constituents in cancellous bone,” First International Conference on Nanostructured Materials and Nanocomposites Kottayam

  16. Thermocapillary Technique for Shaping and Fabricating Optical Ribbon Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Kevin; Troian, Sandra

    The demand for ever increasing bandwidth and higher speed communication has ushered the next generation optoelectronic integrated circuits which directly incorporate polymer optical waveguide devices. Polymer melts are very versatile materials which have been successfully cast into planar single- and multimode waveguides using techniques such as embossing, photolithography and direct laser writing. In this talk, we describe a novel thermocapillary patterning method for fabricating waveguides in which the free surface of an ultrathin molten polymer film is exposed to a spatially inhomogeneous temperature field via thermal conduction from a nearby cooled mask pattern held in close proximity. The ensuring surface temperature distribution is purposely designed to pool liquid selectively into ribbon shapes suitable for optical waveguiding, but with rounded and not rectangular cross sectional areas due to capillary forces. The solidified waveguide patterns which result from this non-contact one step procedure exhibit ultrasmooth interfaces suitable for demanding optoelectronic applications. To complement these studies, we have also conducted finite element simulations for quantifying the influence of non-rectangular cross-sectional shapes on mode propagation and losses. Kf gratefully acknowledges support from a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  17. Fabrication of a microreactor by proton beam writing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huszank, R.; Szilasi, S. Z.; Vad, K.; Rajta, I.

    2009-06-01

    Microreactors are innovative and promising tools in technology nowadays because of their advantages compared to the conventional-scale reactors. These advantages include vast improvements in surface to volume ratio, energy efficiency, reaction speed and yield and increased control of reaction conditions, to name a few examples. The high resolution capability of the micromachining technique utilizing accelerated ion beams in the fabrication technology of microreactors has not yet been taken advantage of. In this work we present the design of a prototype micro-electrochemical cell of 1.5 μL volume (2.5 × 2.5 × 0.240 mm) created with a 3 MeV proton microbeam. The cell can be separated into two half-cells with a suitable membrane applicable to galvanic or fuel cells as well. We deposited gold electrodes on both of the half-cells. The operability of the device was demonstrated by electric current flow between the two electrodes in this micro-electrochemical cell containing a simple electrolyte solution. We used a polycapillary film to separate the two half-cells, hindering the mixing of the anolyte and catholyte solutions. As a result of the minimal mixing caused by the polycapillary film, this cell design can be suitable for electro-synthesis. Due to the high resolution of proton beam writing, it is planned to reduce the dimensions of this kind of microreactor.

  18. Effect of fabrication technique on direct methanol fuel cells designed to operate at low airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of catalyst ink constituents and MEA fabrication techniques on improving cell performance. Particular attention was focused on increasing the overall cell efficiency.

  19. Effect of fabrication technique on direct methanol fuel cells designed to operate at low airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of catalyst ink constituents and MEA fabrication techniques on improving cell performance. Particular attention was focused on increasing the overall cell efficiency.

  20. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  1. Thin resist performance comparison for advanced e-beam reticle fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideo; Higuchi, Takao; Asakawa, Keishi; Yokoya, Yasunori; Yamashiro, Kazuhide

    1997-07-01

    There seem to be much activities, in the mask-making industry at present, in re-establishing a new proces technique and condition for conventional high-molecular polymer resists such as EBR-9TM series rather than in seeking an alternative. This is because of infeasibility of an alternative such as DNQ-Novolak or chemical amplified resist. And 'thin resist' is a promising option for advanced e-beam reticle fabrication. We had investigated optimum coating thickness as thin resist, baking condition and exposure dose firstly on PBS and ZEP- 7000TM, and reported the results and its efficacy in pattering performance at 16th BACUS annual symposium in '96. This time, we tried to determine the optimum coating conditions for EBR-9, EBR-9 HS31TM and ZEP-810TM, and evaluated patterning performance, by which all major five resists to be covered for a comparison. We examined pre-baking latitude, coating thickness latitude, exposure dose latitude, develop latitude, and pattern linearity and fidelity, under the optimum conditions, in order to see advantages and disadvantages of thin resist coating on each individual resist. This paper describes our investigation results on the optimum condition in coating thickness, pre-baking and exposure dose, as well as comparison results on patterning performance of thin resist coating between major five conventional resists, PBSTM, EBR-9, EBR-9 HS31, ZEP-810 and ZEP-7000, for advanced e-beam reticle fabrication.

  2. A study for development of aerothermodynamic test model materials and fabrication technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.; Connor, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    A literature survey, materials reformulation and tailoring, fabrication problems, and materials selection and evaluation for fabricating models to be used with the phase-change technique for obtaining quantitative aerodynamic heat transfer data are presented. The study resulted in the selection of two best materials, stycast 2762 FT, and an alumina ceramic. Characteristics of these materials and detailed fabrication methods are presented.

  3. Improved ceramic slip casting technique. [application to aircraft model fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A primary concern in modern fluid dynamics research is the experimental verification of computational aerothermodynamic codes. This research requires high precision and detail in the test model employed. Ceramic materials are used for these models because of their low heat conductivity and their survivability at high temperatures. To fabricate such models, slip casting techniques were developed to provide net-form, precision casting capability for high-purity ceramic materials in aqueous solutions. In previous slip casting techniques, block, or flask molds made of plaster-of-paris were used to draw liquid from the slip material. Upon setting, parts were removed from the flask mold and cured in a kiln at high temperatures. Casting detail was usually limited with this technique -- detailed parts were frequently damaged upon separation from the flask mold, as the molded parts are extremely delicate in the uncured state, and the flask mold is inflexible. Ceramic surfaces were also marred by 'parting lines' caused by mold separation. This adversely affected the aerodynamic surface quality of the model as well. (Parting lines are invariably necessary on or near the leading edges of wings, nosetips, and fins for mold separation. These areas are also critical for flow boundary layer control.) Parting agents used in the casting process also affected surface quality. These agents eventually soaked into the mold, the model, or flaked off when releasing the case model. Different materials were tried, such as oils, paraffin, and even an algae. The algae released best, but some of it remained on the model and imparted an uneven texture and discoloration on the model surface when cured. According to the present invention, a wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell

  4. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  5. Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Roger; Helms, Richard; Bilbro, Jim; Brown, Norman; Eng, Sverre; Hinman, Steve; Hull-Allen, Greg; Jacobs, Stephen; Keim, Robert; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-08-01

    What aspects of optical fabrication technology need to be developed so as to facilitate existing planned missions, or enable new ones? Throughout the submillimeter to UV wavelengths, the common goal is to push technology to the limits to make the largest possible apertures that are diffraction limited. At any one wavelength, the accuracy of the surface must be better than lambda/30 (rms error). The wavelength range is huge, covering four orders of magnitude from 1 mm to 100 nm. At the longer wavelengths, diffraction limited surfaces can be shaped with relatively crude techniques. The challenge in their fabrication is to make as large as possible a reflector, given the weight and volume constraints of the launch vehicle. The limited cargo diameter of the shuttle has led in the past to emphasis on deployable or erectable concepts such as the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), which was studied by NASA for a submillimeter astrophysics mission. Replication techniques that can be used to produce light, low-cost reflecting panels are of great interest for this class of mission. At shorter wavelengths, in the optical and ultraviolet, optical fabrication will tax to the limit the most refined polishing methods. Methods of mechanical and thermal stabilization of the substrate will be severely stressed. In the thermal infrared, the need for large aperture is tempered by the even stronger need to control the telescope's thermal emission by cooled or cryogenic operation. Thus, the SIRTF mirror at 1 meter is not large and does not require unusually high accuracy, but the fabrication process must produce a mirror that is the right shape at a temperature of 4 K. Future large cooled mirrors will present more severe problems, especially if they must also be accurate enough to work at optical wavelengths. At the very shortest wavelengths accessible to reflecting optics, in the x-ray domain, the very low count fluxes of high energy photons place a premium on the collecting area. It is

  6. Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Roger; Helms, Richard; Bilbro, Jim; Brown, Norman; Eng, Sverre; Hinman, Steve; Hull-Allen, Greg; Jacobs, Stephen; Keim, Robert; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    What aspects of optical fabrication technology need to be developed so as to facilitate existing planned missions, or enable new ones? Throughout the submillimeter to UV wavelengths, the common goal is to push technology to the limits to make the largest possible apertures that are diffraction limited. At any one wavelength, the accuracy of the surface must be better than lambda/30 (rms error). The wavelength range is huge, covering four orders of magnitude from 1 mm to 100 nm. At the longer wavelengths, diffraction limited surfaces can be shaped with relatively crude techniques. The challenge in their fabrication is to make as large as possible a reflector, given the weight and volume constraints of the launch vehicle. The limited cargo diameter of the shuttle has led in the past to emphasis on deployable or erectable concepts such as the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), which was studied by NASA for a submillimeter astrophysics mission. Replication techniques that can be used to produce light, low-cost reflecting panels are of great interest for this class of mission. At shorter wavelengths, in the optical and ultraviolet, optical fabrication will tax to the limit the most refined polishing methods. Methods of mechanical and thermal stabilization of the substrate will be severely stressed. In the thermal infrared, the need for large aperture is tempered by the even stronger need to control the telescope's thermal emission by cooled or cryogenic operation. Thus, the SIRTF mirror at 1 meter is not large and does not require unusually high accuracy, but the fabrication process must produce a mirror that is the right shape at a temperature of 4 K. Future large cooled mirrors will present more severe problems, especially if they must also be accurate enough to work at optical wavelengths. At the very shortest wavelengths accessible to reflecting optics, in the x-ray domain, the very low count fluxes of high energy photons place a premium on the collecting area. It is

  7. A direct technique to fabricate an intraoral shield for unilateral head and neck radiation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zafrulla; Abdel-Azim, Tamer

    2014-09-01

    A radiation oncologist may ask the prosthodontist to fabricate an intraoral shield when ipsilateral fields are used for patients with head and neck cancer. A technique for its fabrication is described that can be accomplished with materials and equipment that are readily available in the dental office. Baseplate wax is used intraorally to fabricate a pattern, which is duplicated with irreversible hydrocolloid material. Autopolymerizing acrylic resin is then used to make the shield. This simple technique can be completed in a single visit.

  8. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Monitoring Using Advanced Machine Learning Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    This project explored the use of advanced machine learning techniques to noninvasively estimate real-time intracranial pressure (ICP) in traumatic...brain injury patients from continuous electronic physiological monitoring data. We hypothesized that advanced machine learning techniques could process...provide a valid analytic platform for the noninvasive monitoring of ICP for defined periods and clinical needs. We developed a machine learning algorithm

  9. Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

  10. Achieving miniature sensor systems via advanced packaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartup, David C.; Bobier, Kevin; Demmin, Jeffrey

    2005-05-01

    Demands for miniaturized networked sensors that can be deployed in large quantities dictate that the packages be small and cost effective. In order to accomplish these objectives, system developers generally apply advanced packaging techniques to proven systems. A partnership of Nova Engineering and Tessera begins with a baseline of Nova's Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) technology and utilizes Tessera's three-dimensional (3D) Chip-Scale Packaging (CSP), Multi-Chip Packaging (MCP), and System-in-Package (SIP) innovations to enable novel methods for fabricating compact, vertically integrated sensors utilizing digital, RF, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. These technologies, applied to a variety of sensors and integrated radio architectures, enable diverse multi-modal sensing networks with wireless communication capabilities. Sensors including imaging, accelerometers, acoustical, inertial measurement units, and gas and pressure sensors can be utilized. The greatest challenge to high density, multi-modal sensor networks is the ability to test each component prior to integration, commonly called Known Good Die (KGD) testing. In addition, the mix of multi-sourcing and high technology magnifies the challenge of testing at the die level. Utilizing Tessera proprietary CSP, MCP, and SIP interconnection methods enables fully testable, low profile stacking to create multi-modal sensor radios with high yield.

  11. Advanced fabrication technology for high speed aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Hoffman, E. K.; Bird, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the development of the weld-brazing process for fabricating Ti-6Al-4V skin-stiffened panels, a brazing process for fabricating Bsc/Al titanium honeycomb core panels, and the enhanced diffusion bonding (EDB) process for fabricating Ti-14Al-21Nb titanium aluminide structural elements are presented. Data presented include the shear strengths of full-scale weldbrazed Ti-6Al-4V skin stiffened and Bsc/Al titanium honeycomb core sandwich panels designed to meet the requirements of an upper wing panel on the NASA YF-12. These results verified that the materials, fabrication processes, and structural concepts were qualified for Mach 3 flight. Shear strengths of each of the panel concepts following flight service evaluation are also reported. Comparisons made with the cost and weight of the original wing panel indicated that the weldbrazed titanium panels resulted in a 15-20 percent cost savings and the brazed Bsc/Al panel showed a 30 percent weight savings. It was also shown that the strengths of the EDB joints were sufficient to develop stresses in the Ti-14Al-21Nb face sheets of the sandwich structure which were above the yield strength of the material.

  12. Advanced Techniques for MIMO Broadband Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    Multiple input multiple output ( MIMO ) systems can provide high...Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited 20060614025 Abstract Multiple input multiple output ( MIMO ) systems can provide high diversity, high... multiple transmit/receive antennas are referred to as multiple input multiple output ( MIMO ) systems. As studies advance, it is shown that MIMO

  13. Wire electric-discharge machining and other fabrication techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Wire electric discharge machining and extrude honing were used to fabricate a two dimensional wing for cryogenic wind tunnel testing. Electric-discharge cutting is done with a moving wire electrode. The cut track is controlled by means of a punched-tape program and the cutting feed is regulated according to the progress of the work. Electric-discharge machining involves no contact with the work piece, and no mechanical force is exerted. Extrude hone is a process for honing finish-machined surfaces by the extrusion of an abrasive material (silly putty), which is forced through a restrictive fixture. The fabrication steps are described and production times are given.

  14. Advances in the Fabrication of Antimicrobial Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    González-Henríquez, Carmen M.; Sarabia-Vallejos, Mauricio A.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Juan

    2017-01-01

    This review describes, in an organized manner, the recent developments in the elaboration of hydrogels that possess antimicrobial activity. The fabrication of antibacterial hydrogels for biomedical applications that permits cell adhesion and proliferation still remains as an interesting challenge, in particular for tissue engineering applications. In this context, a large number of studies has been carried out in the design of hydrogels that serve as support for antimicrobial agents (nanoparticles, antibiotics, etc.). Another interesting approach is to use polymers with inherent antimicrobial activity provided by functional groups contained in their structures, such as quaternary ammonium salt or hydrogels fabricated from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) or natural polymers, such as chitosan. A summary of the different alternatives employed for this purpose is described in this review, considering their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, more recent methodologies that lead to more sophisticated hydrogels that are able to react to external stimuli are equally depicted in this review. PMID:28772591

  15. Advances in the Fabrication of Antimicrobial Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    González-Henríquez, Carmen M; Sarabia-Vallejos, Mauricio A; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Juan

    2017-02-26

    This review describes, in an organized manner, the recent developments in the elaboration of hydrogels that possess antimicrobial activity. The fabrication of antibacterial hydrogels for biomedical applications that permits cell adhesion and proliferation still remains as an interesting challenge, in particular for tissue engineering applications. In this context, a large number of studies has been carried out in the design of hydrogels that serve as support for antimicrobial agents (nanoparticles, antibiotics, etc.). Another interesting approach is to use polymers with inherent antimicrobial activity provided by functional groups contained in their structures, such as quaternary ammonium salt or hydrogels fabricated from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) or natural polymers, such as chitosan. A summary of the different alternatives employed for this purpose is described in this review, considering their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, more recent methodologies that lead to more sophisticated hydrogels that are able to react to external stimuli are equally depicted in this review.

  16. Advances in high-rate uncooled detector fabrication at Raytheon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, S. H.; Kraft, R.; Medrano, A.; Kocian, T.; Bradstreet, D.; Williams, R.; Yang, T.

    2010-04-01

    Over the past two years Raytheon has made a major investment aimed at establishing a high volume uncooled manufacturing capability. This effort has addressed three elements of the uncooled value stream, namely bolometer fabrication, packaging and calibration/test. To facilitate a low cost / high volume source of bolometers Raytheon has formed a partnership with a high volume 200mm commercial silicon wafer fabrication. Over a 12 month period Raytheon has installed 200mm VOx deposition equipment, matched the metrology used on the Raytheon 150mm line, transferred the process flow used to fabricate Raytheon's double layer bolometer process and qualified the product. In this paper we will review the process transfer methodology and bolometer performance. To reduce bolometer packaging cost and increase production rates, Raytheon has implemented an automated packaging line. This line utilizes automated adhesive dispense, component pick and place, wire bonding and solder seal. In this paper we will review the process flow, qualification process and line capacity Calibration and test has traditionally been performed using a number of temperature chambers, with increased throughput being obtained by adding more chambers. This comes at the expense of increased test labor required to feed the chambers and an increased energy and floor space foot print. To avoid these collateral costs, Raytheon has implemented an automated robotic calibration cell capable of performing in excess of 5,000 calibrations a month. In this paper we will provide an overview of the calibration cell along with takt time and throughput data.

  17. Planar techniques for fabricating X-ray diffraction gratings and zone plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. I.; Anderson, E. H.; Hawryluk, A. M.; Schattenburg, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The state of current planar techniques in the fabrication of Fresnel zone plates and diffraction gratings is reviewed. Among the fabrication techniques described are multilayer resist techniques; scanning electron beam lithography; and holographic lithography. Consideration is also given to: X-ray lithography; ion beam lithography; and electroplating. SEM photographs of the undercut profiles obtained in a type AZ 135OB photoresistor by holographic lithography are provided.

  18. Core-suction technique for the fabrication of optical fiber preforms.

    PubMed

    Goel, Nitin K; Stolen, Roger H; Morgan, Steven; Kim, Jong-Kook; Kominsky, Dan; Pickrell, Gary

    2006-02-15

    A novel technique, named "core suction," for fabricating optical fiber preforms has been devised. The technique involves drawing the molten nonconventional core glass material into the cladding tube to form the preform. The developed technique is simple, inexpensive, and shows great potential for fabricating preforms of highly nonlinear nonconventional glasses as the core material. Preforms were made with Schott SF6 and a lead-tellurium-germanate glass in silica cladding tubes, and these preforms were then pulled into fibers.

  19. [Advanced MRI techniques of the fetal brain].

    PubMed

    Schöpf, V; Dittrich, E; Berger-Kulemann, V; Kasprian, G; Kollndorfer, K; Prayer, D

    2013-02-01

    Evaluation of the normal and pathological fetal brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Advanced MRI of the fetal brain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used in clinical practice, all other methods are used at a research level. Serving as standard methods in the future. Combined structural and functional data for all gestational ages will allow more specific insight into the developmental processes of the fetal brain. This gain of information will help provide a common understanding of complex spatial and temporal procedures of early morphological features and their impact on cognitive and sensory abilities.

  20. Retention of denture bases fabricated by three different processing techniques – An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Chalapathi Kumar, V. H.; Surapaneni, Hemchand; Ravikiran, V.; Chandra, B. Sarat; Balusu, Srilatha; Reddy, V. Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Distortion due to Polymerization shrinkage compromises the retention. To evaluate the amount of retention of denture bases fabricated by conventional, anchorized, and injection molding polymerization techniques. Materials and Methods: Ten completely edentulous patients were selected, impressions were made, and master cast obtained was duplicated to fabricate denture bases by three polymerization techniques. Loop was attached to the finished denture bases to estimate the force required to dislodge them by retention apparatus. Readings were subjected to nonparametric Friedman two-way analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni correction methods and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Denture bases fabricated by injection molding (3740 g), anchorized techniques (2913 g) recorded greater retention values than conventional technique (2468 g). Significant difference was seen between these techniques. Conclusions: Denture bases obtained by injection molding polymerization technique exhibited maximum retention, followed by anchorized technique, and least retention was seen in conventional molding technique. PMID:27382542

  1. Preparation, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Advanced Polymeric and Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis titles are given below: physical and mechanical behavior of amorphous poly(arylene ether-co-imidasole)s and poly(arylene ether-co-imidasole) modification epoxies; the requirements of patentability as applied to the chemical arts; fabrication of thermoplastic polymer composite ribbon; blend of reactive diluents with phenylethynyl-terminated arylene ether oligomers; the synthesis, characterization, and application of ether-containing polyimides; the synthesis of reflective and electrically conductive polyimide films via an in-situ self-metalization procedure using silver (I) complexes; the thermal cure of phenylethynyl terminated polyimides and selected model compounds; and the synthesis, characterization, and molecular modeling of cyclic arylene ether oligomers.

  2. Epoxy nanodielectrics fabricated with in situ and ex situ techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report fabrication and characterisation of a nanocomposite system composed of a commercial resin and extremely small (several nanometres in diameter) titanium dioxide particles. Nanoparticles were synthesised in situ with particle nucleation occurring inside the resin matrix. In this nanodielectric fabrication method, the nanoparticle precursor was mixed to the resin solution, and the nanoparticles were in situ precipitated. Note that no high shear mixing equipment was needed to improve particle dispersion - nanoparticles were distributed in the polymer matrix uniformly since particle nucleation occurs uniformly throughout the matrix. The properties of in situ nanodielectrics are compared to the unfilled resin and an ex situ nanocomposite. We anticipate that the presented in situ nanocomposite would be employed in high-temperature superconductivity applications. In additions, the improvement shown in the dielectric breakdown indicates that conventional high-voltage components and systems can be reduced in size with novel nanodielectrics.

  3. Flexible Fabrics with High Thermal Conductivity for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kesterson, Matt; Connel, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Southward, Robin E.; Working, Dennis; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effort and accomplishments for developing flexible fabrics with high thermal conductivity (FFHTC) for spacesuits to improve thermal performance, lower weight and reduce complexity. Commercial and additional space exploration applications that require substantial performance enhancements in removal and transport of heat away from equipment as well as from the human body can benefit from this technology. Improvements in thermal conductivity were achieved through the use of modified polymers containing thermally conductive additives. The objective of the FFHTC effort is to significantly improve the thermal conductivity of the liquid cooled ventilation garment by improving the thermal conductivity of the subcomponents (i.e., fabric and plastic tubes). This paper presents the initial system modeling studies, including a detailed liquid cooling garment model incorporated into the Wissler human thermal regulatory model, to quantify the necessary improvements in thermal conductivity and garment geometries needed to affect system performance. In addition, preliminary results of thermal conductivity improvements of the polymer components of the liquid cooled ventilation garment are presented. By improving thermal garment performance, major technology drivers will be addressed for lightweight, high thermal conductivity, flexible materials for spacesuits that are strategic technical challenges of the Exploration

  4. Flexible Fabrics with High Thermal Conductivity for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kesterson, Matt; Connel, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Southward, Robin E.; Working, Dennis; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effort and accomplishments for developing flexible fabrics with high thermal conductivity (FFHTC) for spacesuits to improve thermal performance, lower weight and reduce complexity. Commercial and additional space exploration applications that require substantial performance enhancements in removal and transport of heat away from equipment as well as from the human body can benefit from this technology. Improvements in thermal conductivity were achieved through the use of modified polymers containing thermally conductive additives. The objective of the FFHTC effort is to significantly improve the thermal conductivity of the liquid cooled ventilation garment by improving the thermal conductivity of the subcomponents (i.e., fabric and plastic tubes). This paper presents the initial system modeling studies, including a detailed liquid cooling garment model incorporated into the Wissler human thermal regulatory model, to quantify the necessary improvements in thermal conductivity and garment geometries needed to affect system performance. In addition, preliminary results of thermal conductivity improvements of the polymer components of the liquid cooled ventilation garment are presented. By improving thermal garment performance, major technology drivers will be addressed for lightweight, high thermal conductivity, flexible materials for spacesuits that are strategic technical challenges of the Exploration

  5. An Advanced Wafer Stepper For Sub-Micron Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Herbert E.; Loebach, Ernst W.

    1987-09-01

    An advanced wafer stepper is presented addressing the specific problems involved by sub-micron lithography such as alignment and focusing to multilayer resist films. New sub-systems were developed while maintaining principles well proven in a previous design. The system is described emphasizing the new sub-systems, and performance data are presented.

  6. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    PubMed

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines.

  7. Development of low cost fabrication techniques for large solid rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warga, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Property measurements and fabrication characteristics were determined and the performance in subscale (Minuteman Wing 2 second stage) motors was evaluated. It was demonstrated that the incorporation of low cost fabrication techniques in a full scale 260 in. nozzle could result in savings of $149,000 when compared with an identical design using tape-wrapped components throughout.

  8. Fabrication techniques developed for small- diameter, thin-wall tungsten and tungsten alloy tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillhart, D. C.; Burt, W. R.; Karasek, F. J.; Mayfield, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes methods for the fabrication of tungsten and tungsten alloys into small-diameter, thin-wall tubing of nuclear quality. The tungsten, or tungsten alloy tube blanks are produced by double extrusion. Plug-drawing has emerged as an excellent secondary fabrication technique for the reduction of the overall tube dimensions.

  9. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  10. Advanced automated char image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Wu; Edward Lester; Michael Cloke

    2006-05-15

    Char morphology is an important characteristic when attempting to understand coal behavior and coal burnout. In this study, an augmented algorithm has been proposed to identify char types using image analysis. On the basis of a series of image processing steps, a char image is singled out from the whole image, which then allows the important major features of the char particle to be measured, including size, porosity, and wall thickness. The techniques for automated char image analysis have been tested against char images taken from ICCP Char Atlas as well as actual char particles derived from pyrolyzed char samples. Thirty different chars were prepared in a drop tube furnace operating at 1300{sup o}C, 1% oxygen, and 100 ms from 15 different world coals sieved into two size fractions (53-75 and 106-125 {mu}m). The results from this automated technique are comparable with those from manual analysis, and the additional detail from the automated sytem has potential use in applications such as combustion modeling systems. Obtaining highly detailed char information with automated methods has traditionally been hampered by the difficulty of automatic recognition of individual char particles. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  12. ADVANCE: An effective and feasible technique in acute stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Gurkas, Erdem; Akpinar, Cetin Kursad; Aytac, Emrah

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose Different techniques regarding efficient utilization of thrombectomy devices have been reported. Here, we described a novel technique named ADVANCE that is based on advancing a distal access catheter over the stent retriever. In this study, we aimed to report our initial results with this novel thrombectomy technique. Methods and results Sixty-seven consecutive acute anterior circulation ischemic stroke patients (35 male, 32 female) between January 2015 and January 2016 who were treated by mechanical thrombectomy were included in this prospective study. Patients were classified randomly into two groups: patients treated with either the ADVANCE technique or standard technique. Patients had a mean age of 61.1 ± 12.9 years. The average NIHSS score was 15.8 ± 3.8. In the ADVANCE group, the successful revascularization (mTICI 2b-3) rate was 87.1% and the 90-day good functional outcome rate (mRS 0-2) was 74.1%. The revascularization rate in the ADVANCE group was significantly ( p = 0.005) better than the standard technique group and good functional outcome at 90 days in the ADVANCE group was non-significantly better than the standard technique group ( p = 0.052). Conclusions ADVANCE is the first comparison of this technique to standard stent retriever thrombectomy with a higher rate of revascularization with no emboli to new territory and fewer distal emboli to target territory. This safe and efficient technique needs to be validated in large patient series in new thrombectomy trials.

  13. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumal, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    The design and evaluation of built-up attachments and bonded joint concepts for use at elevated temperatures is documented. Joint concept screening, verification of GR/PI material, fabrication of design allowables panels, definition of test matrices, and analysis of bonded and bolted joints are among the tasks completed. The results provide data for the design and fabrication of lightly loaded components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft.

  14. Advances in LIGA-Based Post-Mold Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, T.R.

    1998-10-21

    The establishment of a process to allow planarization of deep x-ray lithography based microfabncated metal components via diamond lapping has enabled examination of three additional microfabrication issues. The areas of improvement that are discussed include materials, microassembly and packaging, and multilevel fabrication. New materials work has centered on magnetic materials including precision micromagnets and surface treatments of electrodeposited materials. Assembly and packaging has been aided by deep silicon etch processing and the use of conventional precision milling equipment combined with press-tit assembly. Diffhsion bonding is shown to be a particularly important approach to achieving multilevel metal mechanisms and furthermore shows promise for achieving batch assembled and packaged high aspect-ratio metal micromechanics,

  15. Advances in fabrication of Ag-clad Bi-2223 superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.

    1998-09-04

    Powder-in-tube (PIT) processing was used to fabricate multifilamentary Ag-clad Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (Bi-2223) superconductors for various electric power applications. Enhancements in the transport current properties of long lengths of multifilament tapes were achieved by increasing the packing density of the precursor powder, improving the mechanical deformation, and adjusting the cooling rate. The dependence of the critical current density on magnetic field and temperature for the optimally processed tapes was measured. J{sub c} was greater than 10{sup 4} (A/cm{sup 2}) at 20 K for magnetic field up to 3 T and parallel to the c-axis which is of interest for use in refrigerator coded magnets. An attempt was made to combine the good alignment of Bi-2223 grains in Ag-sheathed superconducting tapes to obtain high J{sub c} values at high temperature and low field, and good intrinsic pinning of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}d} (Y-123) thin film to maintain high J{sub c} values in high fields. A new composite multifilament tape was fabricated such that the central part contained Bi-2223 filaments, with the primary function of conducting the transport current. The central Bi-2223 filaments were surrounded by Y-123 thin film to shield the applied magnetic field and protect the Bi-2223 filaments. The J{sub c} values of the composite tape were better than those of an uncoated tape. In the case of 77 K applications, an I{sub c} of about 60 A was obtained in a 150 m long tape and zero applied magnetic field. In-situ strain characteristics of the mono- and multifilament tapes were conducted.

  16. Fabrication and evaluation of advanced titanium structural panels for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, L.

    1977-01-01

    Flightworthy primary structural panels were designed, fabricated, and tested to investigate two advanced fabrication methods for titanium alloys. Skin-stringer panels fabricated using the weldbraze process, and honeycomb-core sandwich panels fabricated using a diffusion bonding process, were designed to replace an existing integrally stiffened shear panel on the upper wing surface of the NASA YF-12 research aircraft. The investigation included ground testing and Mach 3 flight testing of full-scale panels, and laboratory testing of representative structural element specimens. Test results obtained on full-scale panels and structural element specimens indicate that both of the fabrication methods investigated are suitable for primary structural applications on future civil and military supersonic cruise aircraft.

  17. Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rama Shankar

    2013-06-01

    Successful mapping of the draft human genome in 2001 and more recent mapping of the human microbiome genome in 2012 have relied heavily on the parallel processing of the second generation/Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) DNA machines at a cost of several millions dollars and long computer processing times. These have been mainly biochemical approaches. Here a system analysis approach is used to review these techniques by identifying the requirements, specifications, test methods, error estimates, repeatability, reliability and trends in the cost reduction. The first generation, NGS and the Third Generation Single Molecule Real Time (SMART) detection sequencing methods are reviewed. Based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) data, the achieved cost reduction of 1.5 times per yr. from Sep. 2001 to July 2007; 7 times per yr., from Oct. 2007 to Apr. 2010; and 2.5 times per yr. from July 2010 to Jan 2012 are discussed.

  18. A Simplified Technique for Fabrication of Orbital Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, G.K.; Mohapatra, Abhilash; Seth, Jyotsna; Vashisht, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Eye is a vital organ not only for vision, but also an important component of facial expression, and over-all personality of a person. Loss of eye, apart from leading to impaired vision has a crippling effect on the psychology of the patient. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of such cases includes fabrication of prosthesis by acrylic resin, silicone and implants. However, not all patients are willing to use implants for maxillofacial rehabilitation. Therefore, a custom made orbital prosthesis serves as an affordable and satisfactory alternative. PMID:25121068

  19. Optical waveguides in Er:LiNbO3 fabricated by different techniques - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajzl, Jakub; Nekvindová, Pavla; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Oswald, Jiří; Staněk, Stanislav; Vytykáčová, Soňa; Špirková, Jarmila

    2016-03-01

    We report on the comparison of three techniques used for the fabrication of optical waveguides in erbium doped lithium niobate crystal substrates (Er:LiNbO3). The techniques include ion in-diffusion from a titanium metal layer, annealed proton exchange (APE), and He+ ion implantation. The main focus of the work was placed on the investigation of the influence of the used optical waveguides fabrication techniques on the structural and luminescence properties of Er:LiNbO3 substrates. The results have shown that none of the used optical-waveguide-fabrication techniques significantly affect the position of erbium in the host crystal structure. It turned out, however, that the fabrication process affected luminescence intensities of the characteristic luminescence bands of erbium ions - the most significant decrease in the luminescence intensity was observed in the Ti-indiffused waveguides.

  20. Development of a Direct Fabrication Technique for Full-Shell X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Kolodziejczak, J. K.; Griffith, C.; Roche, J.; Smith, W. S.; Kester, T.; Atkins, C.; Arnold, W.; Ramsey, B.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrophysical missions will require fabrication technology capable of producing high angular resolution x-ray optics. A full-shell direct fabrication approach using modern robotic polishing machines has the potential for producing high resolution, light-weight and affordable x-ray mirrors that can be nested to produce large collecting area. This approach to mirror fabrication, based on the use of the metal substrates coated with nickel phosphorous alloy, is being pursued at MSFC. The design of the polishing fixtures for the direct fabrication, the surface figure metrology techniques used and the results of the polishing experiments are presented.

  1. Two-beam laser fabrication technique and the application for fabricating conductive silver nanowire on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gui-Cang; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Liu, Jie; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a two-beam laser fabrication technique is proposed to fabricate silver nanowire (AgNW) on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The femtosecond pulse laser in the technique plays a role in generating Ag nanoparticles from the silver aqueous solution by multiphoton photoreduction. The continuous wave (CW) laser of the technique works as optical tweezers, and make the Ag nanoparticles gather to a continuous AgNW by the optical trapping force. The optical trapping force of the CW laser was calculated under our experimental condition. The flexibility and the resistance stability of the AgNW that fabricated by this technique are very excellent. Compared to the resistance of the AgNW without bending, the decreasing rate of the AgNW resistance is about 16% under compressed bending condition at the radius of 1 mm, and the increasing rate of the AgNW resistance is only 1.3% after the AgNW bended about 3500 times at the bending radius of 1 mm. The study indicates that the AgNW is promising for achieving flexible device and would promote the development of the flexible electronics.

  2. Diagnostics of nonlocal plasmas: advanced techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafaev, Alexander; Grabovskiy, Artiom; Strakhova, Anastasiya; Soukhomlinov, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    This talk generalizes our recent results, obtained in different directions of plasma diagnostics. First-method of flat single-sided probe, based on expansion of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in series of Legendre polynomials. It will be demonstrated, that flat probe, oriented under different angles with respect to the discharge axis, allow to determine full EVDF in nonlocal plasmas. It is also shown, that cylindrical probe is unable to determine full EVDF. We propose the solution of this problem by combined using the kinetic Boltzmann equation and experimental probe data. Second-magnetic diagnostics. This method is implemented in knudsen diode with surface ionization of atoms (KDSI) and based on measurements of the magnetic characteristics of the KDSI in presence of transverse magnetic field. Using magnetic diagnostics we can investigate the wide range of plasma processes: from scattering cross-sections of electrons to plasma-surface interactions. Third-noncontact diagnostics method for direct measurements of EVDF in remote plasma objects by combination of the flat single-sided probe technique and magnetic polarization Hanley method.

  3. Pectoralis major turnover versus advancement technique for sternal wound reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zahiri, Hamid R; Lumpkins, Kimberly; Kelishadi, Shahrooz; Stromberg, Jeffrey A; Silverman, Ronald P; Slezak, Sheri; Goldberg, Nelson H; Holton, Luther; Singh, Devinder P

    2013-02-01

    We compared the efficacy of pectoralis turnover versus advancement technique for sternal wound reconstruction. A retrospective chart review was performed, December 1989 to December 2010, to compare postoperative complication rates between pectoralis major turnover versus pectoralis major advancement reconstruction techniques. Complications included hematomas, wound infections, tissue necrosis, dehiscence, and need for reoperation. Pearson χ and logistic regression were used and significance was P < 0.05. Sixty-seven patients received 91 tissue flaps. Eleven patients (16%) required reoperation due to complications, including recurrent wound infection, tissue necrosis, wound dehiscence, mediastinitis, and hematoma formation. Four patients (6%) were treated conservatively for minor complications. Overall, complication rates were significantly higher after pectoralis major advancement reconstruction (32.5% vs. 3.7%, P = 0.004). When feasible, pectoralis major turnover flap offers a superior reconstructive technique for complex sternal wounds, with diminished complications compared with the pectoralis advancement flap.

  4. Evaluation of Advanced Retrieval Techniques in an Experimental Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses subject searching problems in online library catalogs; explains advanced information retrieval (IR) techniques; and describes experiments conducted on a test collection database, CHESHIRE (California Hybrid Extended SMART for Hypertext and Information Retrieval Experimentation), which was created to evaluate IR techniques in online…

  5. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  6. Advances in the fabrication of graphene transistors on flexible substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lo Verso, Stella; Di Marco, Silvestra; Vinciguerra, Vincenzo; Schilirò, Emanuela; Di Franco, Salvatore; Lo Nigro, Raffaella; Roccaforte, Fabrizio; Zurutuza, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Ravesi, Sebastiano; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Graphene is an ideal candidate for next generation applications as a transparent electrode for electronics on plastic due to its flexibility and the conservation of electrical properties upon deformation. More importantly, its field-effect tunable carrier density, high mobility and saturation velocity make it an appealing choice as a channel material for field-effect transistors (FETs) for several potential applications. As an example, properly designed and scaled graphene FETs (Gr-FETs) can be used for flexible high frequency (RF) electronics or for high sensitivity chemical sensors. Miniaturized and flexible Gr-FET sensors would be highly advantageous for current sensors technology for in vivo and in situ applications. In this paper, we report a wafer-scale processing strategy to fabricate arrays of back-gated Gr-FETs on poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) substrates. These devices present a large-area graphene channel fully exposed to the external environment, in order to be suitable for sensing applications, and the channel conductivity is efficiently modulated by a buried gate contact under a thin Al2O3 insulating film. In order to be compatible with the use of the PEN substrate, optimized deposition conditions of the Al2O3 film by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) at a low temperature (100 °C) have been developed without any relevant degradation of the final dielectric performance. PMID:28326237

  7. Fabrication of synthetic diffractive elements using advanced matrix laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, M.; Svoboda, J.; Květoň, M.; Fiala, P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a matrix laser writing device based on a demagnified projection of a micro-structure from a computer driven spatial light modulator. The device is capable of writing completely aperiodic micro-structures with resolution higher than 200 000 DPI. An optical system is combined with ultra high precision piezoelectric stages with an elementary step ~ 4 nm. The device operates in a normal environment, which significantly decreases the costs compared to competitive technologies. Simultaneously, large areas can be exposed up to 100 cm2. The capabilities of the constructed device will be demonstrated on particular elements fabricated for real applications. The optical document security is the first interesting field, where the synthetic image holograms are often combined with sophisticated aperiodic micro-structures. The proposed technology can easily write simple micro-gratings creating the color and kinetic visual effects, but also the diffractive cryptograms, waveguide couplers, and other structures recently used in the field of optical security. A general beam shaping elements and special photonic micro-structures are another important applications which will be discussed in this paper.

  8. MICRO-SEISMOMETERS VIA ADVANCED MESO-SCALE FABRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Caesar A; Onaran, Guclu; Avenson, Brad; Hall, Neal

    2014-11-07

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) seek revolutionary sensing innovations for the monitoring of nuclear detonations. Performance specifications are to be consistent with those obtainable by only an elite few products available today, but with orders of magnitude reduction in size, weight, power, and cost. The proposed commercial innovation calls upon several technologies including the combination of meso-scale fabrication and assembly, photonics-based displacement / motion detection methods, and the use of digital control electronics . Early Phase II development has demonstrated verified and repeatable sub 2ng noise floor from 3Hz to 100Hz, compact integration of 3-axis prototypes, and robust deployment exercises. Ongoing developments are focusing on low frequency challenges, low power consumption, ultra-miniature size, and low cross axis sensitivity. We are also addressing the rigorous set of specifications required for repeatable and reliable long-term explosion monitoring, including thermal stability, reduced recovery time from mass re-centering and large mechanical shocks, sensitivity stability, and transportability. Successful implementation will result in small, hand-held demonstration units with the ability to address national security needs of the DOE/NNSA. Additional applications envisioned include military/defense, scientific instrumentation, oil and gas exploration, inertial navigation, and civil infrastructure monitoring.

  9. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Fixed Interim Prosthesis Using a Duplicate Denture: An Alternative Technique.

    PubMed

    Al-Thobity, Ahmad M

    2016-06-22

    The fabrication of an implant-supported fixed complete denture prosthesis involves multiple clinical and laboratory steps. One of the main steps is to provide the patient with an interim fixed prosthesis to evaluate the patient's esthetic and functional needs as well as to enhance the patient's psychology before proceeding to the definitive prosthesis. Different techniques for fabricating interim prostheses have been described in the literature. This report describes an alternative technique that uses a duplicate denture made of self-curing acrylic resin to fabricate an implant-supported fixed interim prosthesis. The interim prosthesis was later used as a blueprint for the definitive implant-supported hybrid prosthesis.

  10. Bulk FinFET fabrication with new approaches for oxide topography control using dry removal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redolfi, A.; Kubicek, S.; Rooyackers, R.; Kim, M.-S.; Sleeckx, E.; Devriendt, K.; Shamiryan, D.; Vandeweyer, T.; Delande, T.; Horiguchi, N.; Togo, M.; Wouters, J. M. D.; Jurczak, M.; Hoffmann, T.; Cockburn, A.; Gravey, V.; Diehl, D. L.

    2012-05-01

    This work presents a process to fabricate Bulk FinFETs with advancements in critical fabrication steps such as the shallow trench oxide recess and the adjustment of the fin height. These steps are accomplished with the adoption of Siconi™ Selective Material Removal (SMR™) in the fabrication flow. FinFETs obtained with this new integration scheme were tested in a co-fabrication process flow proposed to integrate planar CMOS and Bulk FinFETs on the same wafer. Morphological and electrical results indicate perfectly filled trenches, a better fin height control and a Bulk FinFET static performance similar to planar CMOS. The 20 nm wide fins are fabricated using 193 nm illumination lithography followed by a series of trimming steps during the trench etching, the filling and a fin re-oxidation during the steam densification of the trench filling oxide. Trench depth is 300 nm and the electrically active fin height is 40 nm.

  11. Fabrication of Rod-Coil Nanocomposites via Emulsion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Gregory; Beaucage, Gregory; Vaia, Richard; Dang, Thuy

    2001-03-01

    There is increasing technological interest in polymers reinforced by nanoparticles because of their potential to provide enhanced mechanical properties, decreased permeability and flammability, as well as increased conductivity. Emulsion polymerization offers a viable, flexible route for nanocomposite fabrication from nanoscale spheres, rods, and plates. Combining emulsion generated poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles that are ionically stabilized in aqueous solution with a dispersion of nanoparticles of opposite sense results in an interfacial exchange reaction and co-precipitation. The rod-coil nanocomposites are composed of fully conjugated sulfonated phenylene benzobisimidazole polymer (sPBI) with pendant PMMA chains. Synthesis and characterization of sPBI-PMMA nanocomposites with increasing nanoparticle content using reactive and non-reactive emulsifiers are discussed, and related according to their inherent physical properties.

  12. Fabrication of Microdots Using Piezoelectric Dispensing Technique for Viscous Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ho-Lin; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Wang, Jhih-Kai; Peng, Wen-Chih; Chen, Shin-Hau

    2015-01-01

    A simple microfluidic control method that uses a piezoelectric dispenser head is developed to fabricate microdots. A glycerol mixture was used as the test fluid to simulate conductive metallic solutions. The orifice diameter of the dispenser was 50 μm. Investigations were conducted at room temperature (25 °C). For each bipolar waveform, fluid was extruded in the form of a stretching liquid column, which eventually retracted into the dispenser orifice. Microdots were obtained by governing the liquid transfer process between the dispenser orifice and the target surface, where the gap was smaller than the maximum extrusion length during liquid column formation. Three fluid behaviors were observed using high-speed imaging, namely extrusion, impact on the target surface, and pinch-off of liquid ligament. For gaps of below 70 μm, some of the fluid sticking on the target surface resulted in a microdot diameter of 26 μm (about half of the orifice diameter). PMID:28793614

  13. [Current progress of fabricating tissue engineering scaffold using rapid prototyping techniques].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Chengtao

    2008-08-01

    As one of the key factors for tissue engineering, scaffolds affect the spread and proliferation of seeded cells and the formation of new tissue. Although conventional methods can produce porous scaffolds with different porosities, they are lack controls the porous structures of the scaffolds. In recent years, rapid prototyping (RP) techniques have been developed and have successfully applied to fabricate TE scaffolds. RP techniques can provide accurate control over internal pore architectures and complex-shapes. As a result of these techniques, ideal tissue-engineered constructs could be prepared. This paper reviewed the advantages, potential and future directions of RP techniques in the design and fabrication of TE scaffolds.

  14. Simple multimask technique for fabrication of high-resolution polymer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowin, Michael A.; Penty, Richard V.; White, Ian H.

    2000-05-01

    The performance of many integrated photonic deices is often determined by the accuracy by which the structure can be defined and ultimately fabricated. However the manufacture of highly defined vertices in photonic structures is often limited by the mask quality and by the limited resolution obtainable by standard photolithography. A simplified fabrication technique is presented here, that offers advantages over previously reported methods for the fabrication of highly defined vertices in polymeric integrated optical components so overcoming these limiting factors. The application of this technique for the fabrication of 2D integrated optical wavelength division multiplexing components is demonstrated. The possible application of this component to the low cost datacom market is also reviewed and compared to competitive technologies. The advantages of the technique is discussed and the improved resolution obtainable in comparison to standard single mask photolithography is illustrated.

  15. Artificial submicron or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and electron microscope speckle photography

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhanwei; Xie Huimin; Fang Daining; Dai Fulong; Wang Weining; Fang Yan

    2007-03-15

    In this article, a novel artificial submicro- or nanometer speckle fabricating technique is proposed by taking advantage of submicro or nanometer particles. In the technique, submicron or nanometer particles were adhered to an object surface by using ultrasonic dispersing technique. The particles on the object surface can be regarded as submicro or nanometer speckle by using a scanning electronic microscope at a special magnification. In addition, an electron microscope speckle photography (EMSP) method is developed to measure in-plane submicron or nanometer deformation of the object coated with the artificial submicro or nanometer speckles. The principle of artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and the EMSP method are discussed in detail in this article. Some typical applications of this method are offered. The experimental results verified that the artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and EMSP method is feasible.

  16. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2006-10-10

    Low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures provide solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one aspect the invention provides techniques for co-firing of device substrate (often an electrode) with an electrolyte or membrane layer to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another aspect, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe and Cu, or alloys thereof.

  17. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-08-12

    Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one embodiment the invention provides techniques for co-firing of device substrate (often an electrode) with an electrolyte or membrane layer to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another embodiment, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe, Cu and Ag, or alloys thereof.

  18. Structures And Fabrication Techniques For Solid State Electrochemical Devices

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2005-12-27

    Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one embodiment the invention provides techniques for co-firing of device substrate (often an electrode) with an electrolyte or membrane layer to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another embodiment, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe, Cu and Ag, or alloys thereof.

  19. Comparison of denture base adaptation between CAD-CAM and conventional fabrication techniques.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2016-08-01

    Currently no data comparing the denture base adaptation of CAD-CAM and conventional denture processing techniques have been reported. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the denture base adaptation of pack and press, pour, injection, and CAD-CAM techniques for fabricating dentures to determine which process produces the most accurate and reproducible adaptation. A definitive cast was duplicated to create 40 gypsum casts that were laser scanned before any fabrication procedures were initiated. A master denture was made using the CAD-CAM process and was then used to create a putty mold for the fabrication of 30 standardized wax festooned dentures, 10 for each of the conventional processing techniques (pack and press, pour, injection). Scan files from 10 casts were sent to Global Dental Science, LLC for fabrication of the CAD-CAM test specimens. After specimens for each of the 4 techniques had been fabricated, they were hydrated for 24 hours and the intaglio surface laser scanned. The scan file of each denture was superimposed on the scan file of the corresponding preprocessing cast using surface matching software. Measurements were made at 60 locations, providing evaluation of fit discrepancies at the following areas: apex of the denture border, 6 mm from the denture border, crest of the ridge, palate, and posterior palatal seal. The use of median and interquartile range was used to assess accuracy and reproducibility. The Levine and Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences between processing techniques at the 5 specified locations (α=.05). The ranking of results based on median and interquartile range determined that the accuracy and reproducibility of the CAD-CAM technique was more consistently localized around zero at 3 of the 5 locations. Therefore, the CAD-CAM technique showed the best combination of accuracy and reproducibility among the tested fabrication techniques. The pack and press technique was more accurate at

  20. Marginal accuracy of titanium copings fabricated by casting and CAD/CAM techniques.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Siegbert; Komine, Futoshi; Gerds, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Advances in computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology purportedly enhance the marginal fit of dental restorations. However, little information is available on the marginal accuracy of restorations manufactured with various CAD/CAM systems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the marginal accuracy and refinement time of titanium copings fabricated by 3 different CAD/CAM systems relative to standard casting techniques. Sixty-four stone die duplicates of a human maxillary central incisor, prepared for a metal-ceramic crown, with a uniform chamfer design, were divided into 4 groups (n=16). The specimens were restored with titanium copings using CAD/CAM systems Pro 50 (PRO), DCS (DCS), and Everest (EVE). A conventional titanium casting technique, Biotan (BIO), served as a control. Vertical and horizontal discrepancies between restoration margins and the preparations were each measured before and after manual refinement. This refinement was completed using a disclosing agent and by removing the internal positive defects of the copings. The marginal discrepancies of the copings were evaluated at 4 standard areas using 10 measurements, for a total of 160 measurements of each margin. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used for analyzing marginal accuracy. The coping refinement time was analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc Wilcoxon rank sum tests (alpha=.05). The marginal discrepancies (microm) ranged from 32.9 to 127.8 before and from 3.4 to 58.4 after the manual refinement of copings. Manual refinement significantly improved the marginal accuracy (P<.0001) when compared with the initial fabrication. The relative (%) gain of marginal accuracy was PRO, 74.1%; DCS, 69.7%; EVE, 68.7%; and the control, BIO, 69.2%. The median duration of manual refinement time in minutes was 6.0 for PRO, 9.5 for DCS, 4.0 for EVE, and 4.0 for BIO (Kruskal-Wallis-test: P<.0001). Manual adjustment significantly improves the marginal accuracy of

  1. Recent advances in bioprinting techniques: approaches, applications and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Li, Jipeng; Chen, Mingjiao; Fan, Xianqun; Zhou, Huifang

    2016-09-20

    Bioprinting technology shows potential in tissue engineering for the fabrication of scaffolds, cells, tissues and organs reproducibly and with high accuracy. Bioprinting technologies are mainly divided into three categories, inkjet-based bioprinting, pressure-assisted bioprinting and laser-assisted bioprinting, based on their underlying printing principles. These various printing technologies have their advantages and limitations. Bioprinting utilizes biomaterials, cells or cell factors as a "bioink" to fabricate prospective tissue structures. Biomaterial parameters such as biocompatibility, cell viability and the cellular microenvironment strongly influence the printed product. Various printing technologies have been investigated, and great progress has been made in printing various types of tissue, including vasculature, heart, bone, cartilage, skin and liver. This review introduces basic principles and key aspects of some frequently used printing technologies. We focus on recent advances in three-dimensional printing applications, current challenges and future directions.

  2. Advances in gamma titanium aluminides and their manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides display attractive properties for high temperature applications. For over a decade in the 1990s, the attractive properties of titanium aluminides were outweighed by difficulties encountered in processing and machining at room temperature. But advances in manufacturing technologies, deeper understanding of titanium aluminides microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and advances in micro-alloying, has led to the production of gamma titanium aluminide sheets. An in-depth review of key advances in gamma titanium aluminides is presented, including microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and alloy development. Traditional manufacturing techniques such as ingot metallurgy and investment casting are reviewed and advances via powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques are discussed. Finally, manufacturing challenges facing gamma titanium aluminides, as well as avenues to overcome them, are discussed.

  3. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  4. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  5. Advanced regenerative-cooling techniques for future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.; Shoji, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A review of regenerative-cooling techniques applicable to advanced planned engine designs for space booster and orbit transportation systems has developed the status of the key elements of this cooling mode. This work is presented in terms of gas side, coolant side, wall conduction heat transfer, and chamber life fatigue margin considerations. Described are preliminary heat transfer and trade analyses performed using developed techniques combining channel wall construction with advanced, high-strength, high-thermal-conductivity materials (NARloy-Z or Zr-Cu alloys) in high heat flux regions, combined with lightweight steel tubular nozzle wall construction. Advanced cooling techniques such as oxygen cooling and dual-mode hydrocarbon/hydrogen fuel operation and their limitations are indicated for the regenerative cooling approach.

  6. Levofloxacin implants with predefined microstructure fabricated by three-dimensional printing technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weidong; Zheng, Qixin; Sun, Wangqiang; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2007-07-18

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) printing technique was utilized in the preparation of drug implants that can be designed to have complex drug release profiles. The method we describe is based on a lactic acid polymer matrix with a predefined microstructure that is amenable to rapid prototyping and fabrication. We describe how the process parameters, especially selection of the binder, were optimized. Implants containing levofloxacin (LVFX) with predefined microstructures using an optimized binder solution of ethanol and acetone (20:80, v/v) were prepared by a 3D printing process that achieved a bi-modal profile displaying both pulsatile and steady state LVFX release from a single implant. The pulse release appeared from day 5 to 25, followed by a steady state phase of 25 days. The next pulse release phase then began at the 50th day and ended at the 80th day. To evaluate the drug implants structurally and analytically, the microscopic morphologies and the in vitro release profiles of the implants fabricated by both the 3D printing technique and the conventional lost mold technique were assessed using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and UV absorbance spectrophotometry. The results demonstrate that the 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate drug implants with sophisticated micro- and macro-architecture in a single device that may be rapidly prototyped and fabricated. We conclude that drug implants with predefined microstructure fabricated by 3D printing techniques can have clear advantages compared to implants fabricated by conventional compressing methods.

  7. A technique to facilitate the fabrication of provisional restorations for ITI solid abutments.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Murat; Güler, Ahmet Umut; Erkoçak, Ayça; Sanal, Fatma Ayşe

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this technique report was to present a procedure for the fabrication of provisional restorations for ITI solid abutments using impression caps in the laboratory with a number of advantages over intraoral techniques. There may be no need for cementation, and elimination of cementation may assist tissue healing.

  8. A direct technique for fabricating esthetic anterior fixed provisional restorations using polycarbonate veneers.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; Manzotti, Anna

    2012-06-01

    Fabrication of esthetic interim restorations by a chairside technique often challenges the clinician with regard to the required time and skills, as well as meeting the expectations of the patient. Autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate resin has been reported to be the most popular material for fabricating provisional restorations. However, this material does not routinely yield esthetic provisional restorations via a chairside technique. This article describes a simple technique to overcome some of the disadvantages of this material by using prefabricated polycarbonate facings backed with autopolymerizing acrylic resin. This technique can be used chairside for fabricating esthetic anterior interim restorations, utilizing the beneficial properties of both materials. It exploits the manufactured smooth-surface finish, superior esthetics, color stability, and durability of polycarbonate facings, as well as the marginal adaptation, strength, and low cost of autopolymerizing acrylic resin.

  9. Design and fabrication of an advanced, lightweight, high stiffness, railgun barrel concept

    SciTech Connect

    Vrable, D.L.; Rosenwasser, S.N.; Korican, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    An advanced lightweight and high stiffness railgun barrel design and incorporates several new design features and advanced materials is being developed by SPARTA, Inc. The program is sponsored by the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center ARDEC and by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The railgun is 7 m long and has a 90 mm round bore. It is designed to accommodate both solid and plasma armatures. Muzzle energies are expected in the range of 9 to 15 MJ. Analysis and final design has been completed and the barrel and other railgun subassemblies are in the fabrication stage at SPARTA, Inc. in San Diego, California. Initial testing will be conducted at Maxwell Laboratories Green Farm facility in September 1990 and will subsequently be shipped to the ARDEC Railgun Laboratory in October 1990 for full power operation and testing. This paper discusses the design features and fabrication approaches for this high performance, lightweight railgun barrel system.

  10. Biomedical microfluidic devices by using low-cost fabrication techniques: A review.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Vera; Catarino, Susana O; Lima, Rui; Minas, Graça

    2016-07-26

    One of the most popular methods to fabricate biomedical microfluidic devices is by using a soft-lithography technique. However, the fabrication of the moulds to produce microfluidic devices, such as SU-8 moulds, usually requires a cleanroom environment that can be quite costly. Therefore, many efforts have been made to develop low-cost alternatives for the fabrication of microstructures, avoiding the use of cleanroom facilities. Recently, low-cost techniques without cleanroom facilities that feature aspect ratios more than 20, for fabricating those SU-8 moulds have been gaining popularity among biomedical research community. In those techniques, Ultraviolet (UV) exposure equipment, commonly used in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) industry, replaces the more expensive and less available Mask Aligner that has been used in the last 15 years for SU-8 patterning. Alternatively, non-lithographic low-cost techniques, due to their ability for large-scale production, have increased the interest of the industrial and research community to develop simple, rapid and low-cost microfluidic structures. These alternative techniques include Print and Peel methods (PAP), laserjet, solid ink, cutting plotters or micromilling, that use equipment available in almost all laboratories and offices. An example is the xurography technique that uses a cutting plotter machine and adhesive vinyl films to generate the master moulds to fabricate microfluidic channels. In this review, we present a selection of the most recent lithographic and non-lithographic low-cost techniques to fabricate microfluidic structures, focused on the features and limitations of each technique. Only microfabrication methods that do not require the use of cleanrooms are considered. Additionally, potential applications of these microfluidic devices in biomedical engineering are presented with some illustrative examples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New fabrication techniques for high dynamic range tunneling sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, David T.; Stratton, Fred P.; Kubena, Randall L.; Vickers-Kirby, Deborah J.; Joyce, Richard J.; Schimert, Thomas R.; Gooch, Roland W.

    2000-08-01

    We have developed high dynamic range (105-106 g's) tunneling accelerometers1,2 that may be ideal for smart munitions applications by employing both surface and bulk micromachining processing techniques. The highly miniaturized surface-micromachined devices can be manufactured at very low cost and integrated on chip with the control electronics. Bulk-micromachined devices with Si as the cantilever material should have reduced long-term bias drift as well as better stability at higher temperatures. Fully integrated sensors may provide advantages in minimizing microphonics for high-g applications. Previously, we described initial test results using electrostatic forces generated by a self-test electrode located under a Au cantilever3. In this paper, we describe more recent testing of Ni and Au cantilever devices on a shaker table using a novel, low input voltage (5 V) servo controller on both printed wiring board and surface-mount control circuitry. In addition, we report our initial test results for devices packaged using a low-temperature wafer-level vacuum packaging technique for low-cost manufacturing.

  12. An Alternative Technique for Fabrication of Frameworks in an Immediate Loading Implant Fixed Mandibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Paleari, André Gustavo; Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Vasconcelos, Juliano Alencar; Nunes Reis, José Maurício dos Santos; Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira; Tavares da Silva, Regina Helena Barbosa; Quishida, Cristiane Campos Costa

    2015-01-01

    The oral rehabilitation of edentulous patients with immediate loading has become a safe procedure with high predictability. The success is related to immediate fabrication of a passive fit framework to attach the implants. Based on these considerations, this case report shows an alternative technique for mandibular rehabilitation using implants immediately loaded, where the framework was fabricated using cylinders with internal reinforcement and precast pieces, electrowelding, and conventional welding providing esthetics and function to the patient in a short period of time. PMID:25628899

  13. Combinatorial-mold imprint lithography: A versatile technique for fabrication of three-dimensional polymer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Hong Yee; Zhao, Wei; Dumond, Jarrett

    2006-07-01

    A two-step fabrication technique based on nanoimprint lithography is described for the fabrication of three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures. By combining simple two-dimensional geometries from two molds, complex and useful three-dimensional structures are obtained. The careful selection of mold geometries constitutes a simplified and efficient approach toward building up desirable three-dimensional structures without resorting to the use of a sacrificial process or components. Three-dimensional structures fabricated for a variety of specific applications are presented using both thermoplastic and cross-linked polymer materials.

  14. Organic Lasers: Recent Developments on Materials, Device Geometries, and Fabrication Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Alexander J C; Gather, Malte C

    2016-11-09

    Organic dyes have been used as gain medium for lasers since the 1960s, long before the advent of today's organic electronic devices. Organic gain materials are highly attractive for lasing due to their chemical tunability and large stimulated emission cross section. While the traditional dye laser has been largely replaced by solid-state lasers, a number of new and miniaturized organic lasers have emerged that hold great potential for lab-on-chip applications, biointegration, low-cost sensing and related areas, which benefit from the unique properties of organic gain materials. On the fundamental level, these include high exciton binding energy, low refractive index (compared to inorganic semiconductors), and ease of spectral and chemical tuning. On a technological level, mechanical flexibility and compatibility with simple processing techniques such as printing, roll-to-roll, self-assembly, and soft-lithography are most relevant. Here, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the developments in the field over the past decade, discussing recent advances in organic gain materials, which are today often based on solid-state organic semiconductors, as well as optical feedback structures, and device fabrication. Recent efforts toward continuous wave operation and electrical pumping of solid-state organic lasers are reviewed, and new device concepts and emerging applications are summarized.

  15. Paper-based microfluidics: fabrication technique and dynamics of capillary-driven surface flow.

    PubMed

    Songok, Joel; Tuominen, Mikko; Teisala, Hannu; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki; Kuusipalo, Jurkka; Toivakka, Martti

    2014-11-26

    Paper-based devices provide an alternative technology for simple, low-cost, portable, and disposable diagnostic tools for many applications, including clinical diagnosis, food quality control, and environmental monitoring. In this study we report a two-step fabrication process for creating two-dimensional microfluidic channels to move liquids on a hydrophobized paper surface. A highly hydrophobic surface was created on paper by TiO2 nanoparticle coating using a high-speed, roll-to-roll liquid flame spray technique. The hydrophilic pattern was then generated by UV irradiation through a photomask utilizing the photocatalytic property of TiO2. The flow dynamics of five model liquids with differing surface tensions 48-72 mN·m(-1) and viscosities 1-15 mN·m(-2) was studied. The results show that the liquid front (l) in a channel advances in time (t) according to the power law l=Zt0.5 (Z is an empirical constant which depend on the liquid properties and channel dimensions). The flow dynamics of the liquids with low viscosity show a dependence on the channel width and the droplet volume, while the flow of liquids with high viscosity is mainly controlled by the viscous forces.

  16. Wafer hot spot identification through advanced photomask characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yohan; Green, Michael; McMurran, Jeff; Ham, Young; Lin, Howard; Lan, Andy; Yang, Richer; Lung, Mike

    2016-10-01

    As device manufacturers progress through advanced technology nodes, limitations in standard 1-dimensional (1D) mask Critical Dimension (CD) metrics are becoming apparent. Historically, 1D metrics such as Mean to Target (MTT) and CD Uniformity (CDU) have been adequate for end users to evaluate and predict the mask impact on the wafer process. However, the wafer lithographer's process margin is shrinking at advanced nodes to a point that the classical mask CD metrics are no longer adequate to gauge the mask contribution to wafer process error. For example, wafer CDU error at advanced nodes is impacted by mask factors such as 3-dimensional (3D) effects and mask pattern fidelity on subresolution assist features (SRAFs) used in Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) models of ever-increasing complexity. These items are not quantifiable with the 1D metrology techniques of today. Likewise, the mask maker needs advanced characterization methods in order to optimize the mask process to meet the wafer lithographer's needs. These advanced characterization metrics are what is needed to harmonize mask and wafer processes for enhanced wafer hot spot analysis. In this paper, we study advanced mask pattern characterization techniques and their correlation with modeled wafer performance.

  17. Fundamentals and advances in the development of remote welding fabrication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agapakis, J. E.; Masubuchi, K.; Von Alt, C.

    1986-01-01

    Operational and man-machine issues for welding underwater, in outer space, and at other remote sites are investigated, and recent process developments are described. Probable remote welding missions are classified, and the essential characteristics of fundamental remote welding tasks are analyzed. Various possible operational modes for remote welding fabrication are identified, and appropriate roles for humans and machines are suggested. Human operator performance in remote welding fabrication tasks is discussed, and recent advances in the development of remote welding systems are described, including packaged welding systems, stud welding systems, remotely operated welding systems, and vision-aided remote robotic welding and autonomous welding systems.

  18. Advanced Marketing Core Curriculum. Test Items and Assessment Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.; And Others

    This document contains duties and tasks, multiple-choice test items, and other assessment techniques for Missouri's advanced marketing core curriculum. The core curriculum begins with a list of 13 suggested textbook resources. Next, nine duties with their associated tasks are given. Under each task appears one or more citations to appropriate…

  19. Advanced alloy design technique: High temperature cobalt base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Freche, J. C.; Sandrock, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced alloy design technique was developed for treating alloys that will have extended life in service at high temperature and intermediate temperatures. Process stabilizes microstructure of the alloy by designing it so that compound identified with embrittlement is eliminated or minimized. Design process is being used to develop both nickel and cobalt-base superalloys.

  20. Bringing The Web Down to Size: Advanced Search Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Joe; Miley, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Examines advanced Internet search techniques, focusing on six search engines. Includes a chart comparison of nine search features: "include two words,""exclude one of two words,""exclude mature audience content,""two adjacent words,""exact match,""contains first and neither of two following…

  1. Bringing The Web Down to Size: Advanced Search Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Joe; Miley, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Examines advanced Internet search techniques, focusing on six search engines. Includes a chart comparison of nine search features: "include two words,""exclude one of two words,""exclude mature audience content,""two adjacent words,""exact match,""contains first and neither of two following…

  2. Advanced techniques in safeguarding a conditioning facility for spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf, K.; Weh, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Although reprocessing continues to be the main factor in the waste management of nuclear reactors, the alternative of direct final disposal is currently being developed to the level of industrial applications, based on an agreement between the heads of the federal government and the federal states of Germany. Thus, the Konrad and Gorleben sites are being studied as potential final repositories as is the pilot conditioning facility (PKA) under construction. Discussions on the application of safeguards measures have led to the drafting of an approach that will cover the entire back end of the fuel cycle. The conditioning of fuel prior to direct final disposal represents one element in the overall approach. A modern facility equipped with advanced technology, PKA is a pilot plant with regard to conditioning techniques as well as to safeguards. Therefore, the PKA safeguards approach is expected to facilitate future industrial applications of the conditioning procedure. This cannot be satisfactorily implemented without advanced safeguards techniques. The level of development of the safeguards techniques varies. While advanced camera and seal systems are basically available, the other techniques and methods still require research and development. Feasibility studies and equipment development are geared to providing applicable safeguards techniques in time for commissioning of the PKA.

  3. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Strum, G.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recent advances in the fabrication and adhesion testing of biomimetic dry adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameoto, D.; Menon, C.

    2010-10-01

    In the past two years, there have been a large number of publications on the topic of biomimetic dry adhesives from modeling, fabrication and testing perspectives. We review and compare the most recent advances in fabrication and testing of these materials. While there is increased convergence and consensus as to what makes a good dry adhesive, the fabrication of these materials is still challenging, particularly for anisotropic or hierarchal designs. Although qualitative comparisons between different adhesive designs can be made, quantifying the exact performance and rating each design is significantly hampered by the lack of standardized testing methods. Manufacturing dry adhesives, which can reliably adhere to rough surfaces, show directional and self-cleaning behavior and are relatively simple to manufacture, is still very challenging—great strides by multiple research groups have however made these goals appear achievable within the next few years.

  5. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria.

  6. Innovative sputtering techniques for CIS and CdTe submodule fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.M.; Misra, M.S.; Lanning, B. . Astronautics Group)

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work done during Phase 1 of the subject subcontract. The subcontract was designed to study innovative deposition techniques, such as the rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering system and electrodeposition for large-area, low-cost copper indium diselenide (CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) devices. A key issue for photovoltaics (PV) in terrestrial and future space applications is producibility, particularly for applications using a large quantity of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV, such as CIS and CdTe, are production volume, cost, and minimization of waste. Both rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag[trademark]) sputtering and electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials, and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mae facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput reduced health and safety risks, and, ultimately, lower fabrication cost. Electrodeposited films appear to be adherent and comparable with low-cost fabrication techniques. Phase I involved the initial film and device fabrication using the two techniques mentioned herein. Devices were tested by both internal facilities, as well as NREL and ISET.

  7. Recent advances in high-temperature superconductor wire fabrication and applications development

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, recent advances in fabrication of HTS wires are summarized, and detailed discussion is provided for developments in near- and intermediate-term applications. Near-term applications, using presently obtainable current densities, include: liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, cryostat current leads, and magnetic bearings. Intermediate-term applications, using current densities expected to be available in the near future include fault-current limiters and short transmission lines. 25 refs.

  8. Recent advances in high-temperature superconductor wire fabrication and applications development

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1992-08-01

    In this paper, recent advances in fabrication of HTS wires are summarized, and detailed discussion is provided for developments in near- and intermediate-term applications. Near-term applications, using presently obtainable current densities, include: liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, cryostat current leads, and magnetic bearings. Intermediate-term applications, using current densities expected to be available in the near future include fault-current limiters and short transmission lines. 25 refs.

  9. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  10. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  11. High frequency PMN-PT single crystal focusing transducer fabricated by a mechanical dimpling technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Lam, K H; Zhou, D; Cheng, W F; Dai, J Y; Luo, H S; Chan, H L W

    2013-02-01

    High frequency (∼30MHz and ∼80MHz) focusing ultrasound transducers were fabricated using a PMN-0.28PT single crystal by a mechanical dimpling technique. The dimpled single crystal was used as an active element for the focusing transducer. Compared with a plane transducer, the focusing transducer fabricated with a dimpled active element exhibits much broader bandwidth and higher sensitivity. Besides, a high quality image can be obtained by the 30MHz focusing transducer, in which the -6dB axial and lateral resolution is 27μm and 139μm, respectively. These results prove that the dimpling technique is capable to fabricate the high frequency focusing transducers with excellent performance for imaging applications.

  12. A new fabrication technique for back-to-back varactor diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. Peter; Choudhury, Debabani; Martin, Suzanne; Frerking, Margaret A.; Liu, John K.; Grunthaner, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    A new varactor diode process has been developed in which much of the processing is done from the back of an extremely thin semiconductor wafer laminated to a low-dielectric substrate. Back-to-back BNN diodes were fabricated with this technique; excellent DC and low-frequency capacitance measurements were obtained. Advantages of the new technique relative to other techniques include greatly reduced frontside wafer damage from exposure to process chemicals, improved capability to integrate devices (e.g. for antenna patterns, transmission lines, or wafer-scale grids), and higher line yield. BNN diodes fabricated with this technique exhibit approximately the expected capacitance-voltage characteristics while showing leakage currents under 10 mA at voltages three times that needed to deplete the varactor. This leakage is many orders of magnitude better than comparable Schottky diodes.

  13. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  14. Emerging fabrication techniques for 3D nano-structuring in plasmonics and single molecule studies.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, F; Liberale, C; Coluccio, M L; Cojoc, G; Di Fabrizio, E

    2011-07-01

    The application of new methods and techniques to fields such as biology and medicine is becoming more and more demanding since the request of detailed information down to single molecules is a scientific necessity and a technical realistic possibility. In this effort a key role is played by emerging fabrication techniques. One of the hardest challenges is to incorporate the third dimension in the design and fabrication of novel devices. Significantly, this means that conventional nano-fabrication methods, intrinsically useful for planar structuring, have to be substituted or complemented with new approaches. In this paper we show how emerging techniques can be used for 3D structuring of noble metals down to nanoscale. In particular, the paper deals with electroless deposition of silver, ion and electron beam induced deposition, focused ion beam milling, and two-photon lithography. We exploited these techniques to fabricate different plasmonics nanolenses, nanoprobes and novel beads for optical tweezers. In the future these devices will be used for the manipulation and chemical investigation of single cells with sensitivity down to a few molecules in label free conditions and native environment. Although this paper is only devoted to nanofabrication, we foresee that the fields of biology and medicine will directly gain substantial advantages from this approach.

  15. Application of Optical Measurement Techniques During Fabrication and Testing of Liquid Rocket Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a series of optical measurement techniques that were developed for use during large-scale fabrication and testing of nozzle components. A thorough understanding of hardware throughout the fabrication cycle and hotfire testing is critical to meet component design intent. Regeneratively cooled nozzles and associated tooling require tight control of tolerances during the fabrication process to ensure optimal performance. Additionally, changes in geometry during testing can affect performance of the nozzle and mating components. Structured light scanning and digital image correlation techniques were used to collect data during the fabrication and test of nozzles, in addition to other engine components. This data was used to analyze deformations data during machining, heat treatment, assembly and testing operations. A series of feasibility experiments were conducted for these techniques that led to use on full scale nozzles during the J-2X upper stage engine program in addition to other engine development programs. This paper discusses the methods and results of these measurement techniques throughout the nozzle life cycle and application to other components.

  16. Development of processing techniques for advanced thermal protection materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.

    1994-01-01

    The effort, which was focused on the research and development of advanced materials for use in Thermal Protection Systems (TPS), has involved chemical and physical testing of refractory ceramic tiles, fabrics, threads and fibers. This testing has included determination of the optical properties, thermal shock resistance, high temperature dimensional stability, and tolerance to environmental stresses. Materials have also been tested in the Arc Jet 2 x 9 Turbulent Duct Facility (TDF), the 1 atmosphere Radiant Heat Cycler, and the Mini-Wind Tunnel Facility (MWTF). A significant part of the effort hitherto has gone towards modifying and upgrading the test facilities so that meaningful tests can be carried out. Another important effort during this period has been the creation of a materials database. Computer systems administration and support have also been provided. These are described in greater detail below.

  17. Data Compression Techniques for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced space transportation systems, including vehicle state of health systems, will produce large amounts of data which must be stored on board the vehicle and or transmitted to the ground and stored. The cost of storage or transmission of the data could be reduced if the number of bits required to represent the data is reduced by the use of data compression techniques. Most of the work done in this study was rather generic and could apply to many data compression systems, but the first application area to be considered was launch vehicle state of health telemetry systems. Both lossless and lossy compression techniques were considered in this study.

  18. Advanced thermal management techniques for space power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Angel Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Modern electronic systems used in space must be reliable and efficient with thermal management unaffected by outer space constraints. Current thermal management techniques are not sufficient for the increasing waste heat dissipation of novel electronic technologies. Many advanced thermal management techniques have been developed in recent years that have application in high power electronic systems. The benefits and limitations of emerging cooling technologies are discussed. These technologies include: liquid pumped devices, mechanically pumped two-phase cooling, capillary pumped evaporative cooling, and thermoelectric devices. Currently, liquid pumped devices offer the most promising alternative for electronics thermal control.

  19. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to positive Gz accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1973-01-01

    Tolerance to positive g accelerations was measured in ten normal male subjects using both standard and advanced techniques. In addition to routine electrocardiogram, heart rate, respiratory rate, and infrared television, monitoring techniques during acceleration exposure included measurement of peripheral vision loss, noninvasive temporal, brachial, and/or radial arterial blood flow, and automatic measurement of indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Although brachial and radial arterial flow measurements reflected significant cardiovascular changes during and after acceleration, they were inconsistent indices of the onset of grayout or blackout. Temporal arterial blood flow, however, showed a high correlation with subjective peripheral light loss.

  20. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  1. The Advanced Space Plant Culture Device with Live Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Zhang, Tao; Tong, Guanghui

    The live imaging techniques, including the color and fluorescent imags, are very important and useful for space life science. The advanced space plant culture Device (ASPCD) with live imaging Technique, developed for Chinese Spacecraft, would be introduced in this paper. The ASPCD had two plant experimental chambers. Three cameras (two color cameras and one fluorescent camera) were installed in the two chambers. The fluorescent camera could observe flowering genes, which were labeled by GFP. The lighting, nutrient, temperature controling and water recycling were all independent in each chamber. The ASPCD would beed applied to investigate for the growth and development of the high plant under microgravity conditions on board the Chinese Spacecraft.

  2. Three-dimensional hybrid grid generation using advancing front techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Noack, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional hybrid grid generation technique has been developed, based on ideas of advancing fronts for both structured and unstructured grids. In this approach, structured grids are first generate independently around individual components of the geometry. Fronts are initialized on these structure grids, and advanced outward so that new cells are extracted directly from the structured grids. Employing typical advancing front techniques, cells are rejected if they intersect the existing front or fail other criteria When no more viable structured cells exist further cells are advanced in an unstructured manner to close off the overall domain, resulting in a grid of 'hybrid' form. There are two primary advantages to the hybrid formulation. First, generating blocks with limited regard to topology eliminates the bottleneck encountered when a multiple block system is used to fully encapsulate a domain. Individual blocks may be generated free of external constraints, which will significantly reduce the generation time. Secondly, grid points near the body (presumably with high aspect ratio) will still maintain a structured (non-triangular or tetrahedral) character, thereby maximizing grid quality and solution accuracy near the surface.

  3. Strategies and advanced techniques for marine pollution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giam, C.S.; Dou, H.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Here is a review of strategies and techniques for evaluating marine pollution by hazardous organic compounds. Geo-chemical considerations such as the relationship between the inputs, atmospheric and estuarine transport, and the outputs, sedimentation and degradation, guide the decision on appropriate approaches to pollution monitoring in the marine environment. The latest instrumental methods and standard protocols for analysis of organic compounds are presented, as well as advances in interpretation and correlation of data made possible by the accessibility of commercial data bases.

  4. Advanced endoscopic ultrasound management techniques for preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Bharmal, Sheila; Duman, Deniz Guney; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Turner, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions can be benign, premalignant or malignant. The recent increase in detection and tremendous clinical variability of pancreatic cysts has presented a significant therapeutic challenge to physicians. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are of particular interest given their known malignant potential. This review article provides a brief but comprehensive review of premalignant pancreatic cystic lesions with advanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) management approaches. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases. Preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions include mucinous cystadenoma and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. The 2012 International Sendai Guidelines guide physicians in their management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Some of the advanced EUS management techniques include ethanol ablation, chemotherapeutic (paclitaxel) ablation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. In future, EUS-guided injections of drug-eluting beads and neodymium:yttrium aluminum agent laser ablation is predicted to be an integral part of EUS-guided management techniques. In summary, International Sendai Consensus Guidelines should be used to make a decision regarding management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Advanced EUS techniques are proving extremely beneficial in management, especially in those patients who are at high surgical risk. PMID:27574295

  5. Simplified versus traditional techniques for complete denture fabrication: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Marcília R; Alves, Luana R; Gurgel, Bruno C V; Calderon, Patrícia S

    2015-01-01

    A number of methods have been described for the fabrication of complete dentures. There are 2 common ways to make conventional complete dentures: a traditional method and a simplified method. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to compare the efficiency of simplified and traditional methods for the fabrication of complete dentures. The review was conducted by 3 independent reviewers and included articles published up to December 2013. Three electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE-PubMed, The Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science. A manual search also was performed to identify clinical trials of simplified versus traditional fabrication of complete dentures. Six articles were classified as randomized controlled clinical trials and were included in this review. The majority of the selected articles analyzed general satisfaction, denture stability, chewing ability and function, comfort, hygiene, esthetics, speech function, quality of life, cost, and fabrication time. Although the studies reviewed demonstrate some advantages of simplified over traditional prostheses, such as lower cost and clinical time, good chewing efficiency, and a positive effect on the quality of life, the reports related the use of different simplified methods for the fabrication of complete dentures. Additional randomized controlled trials that used similar simplified techniques for the fabrication of complete dentures should be performed with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid Prototyping Technique for the Fabrication of Millifluidic Devices for Polymer Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Joao; Harrison, Christopher; Eric, Amis; Karim, Alamgir

    2003-03-01

    We describe a rapid prototyping technique for the fabrication of 600 micron deep fluidic channels in a solvent-resistant polymeric matrix. Using a conventional illumination source, a laser-jet printed mask, and a commercially available thioelene-based adhesive, we demonstrate the fabrication of fluidic channels which are impervious to a wide range of solvents. The fabrication of channels with this depth by conventional lithography would be both challenging and time-consuming. We demonstrate two lithography methods: one which fabricates channels sealed between glass plates (closed face) and one which fabricates structures on a single plate (open-faced). Furthermore, we demonstrate that this technology can be used to fabricate channels with a depth which varies linearly with distance. The latter is completely compatible with silicone replication technniques. Additionally, we demonstrate that siloxane-based elastomer molds of these channels can be readily made for aqueous applications. Applications to on-line phase mapping of polymer solutions (PEO-Water-Salt) and off line phase separation studies will be discussed.

  7. Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol-gel and rf-sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Alombert-Goget, G.; Armellini, C.; Berneschi, S.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Boulard, B.; Brenci, M.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Duverger-Arfuso, C.; Féron, P.; Gonçalves, R. R.; Jestin, Y.; Minati, L.; Moser, E.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Rao, D. N.; Retoux, R.; Righini, G. C.; Speranza, G.

    2009-05-01

    The realization of photonic structures operating at visible and near infrared frequencies is a highly attractive scientific and technological challenge. Since optical fiber innovation, a huge of activity has been performed leading to interesting results, such as optical waveguides and planar lightwave circuits, microphotonic devices, optical microcavities, nanowires, plasmonic structures, and photonic crystals. These systems have opened new possibilities in the field of both basic and applied physics, in a large area covering Information Communication Technologies, Health and Biology, Structural Engineering, and Environment Monitoring Systems. Several materials and techniques are employed to successfully fabricate photonic structures. Concerning materials, Er3+-activated silica-based glasses still play an important role, although recently interesting results have been published about fluoride glass-ceramic waveguides. As far as regards the fabrication methods sol-gel route and rf sputtering have proved to be versatile and reliable techniques. In this article we will present a review of some Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol gel route and rf sputtering deposition. In the discussion on the sol-gel approach we focus our attention on the silica-hafnia binary system presenting an overview concerning fabrication protocols and structural, optical and spectroscopic assessment of SiO2-HfO2 waveguides activated by Er3+ ions. In order to put in evidence the reliability and versatility of the sol-gel route for photonics applications four different confined structures are briefly presented: amorphous waveguides, coated microspheres, monolithic waveguide laser, and core-shell nanospheres. As examples of rf sputtering technique, we will discuss Er3+-activated silica-hafnia and silica-germania waveguides, the latter system allowing fabrication of integrated optics structures by UV photo-imprinting. Finally, two examples of photonic crystal structures, one

  8. Fabrication of enzyme-degradable and size-controlled protein nanowires using single particle nano-fabrication technique

    PubMed Central

    Omichi, Masaaki; Asano, Atsushi; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Takano, Katsuyoshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Saeki, Akinori; Sakamaki, Daisuke; Onoda, Akira; Hayashi, Takashi; Seki, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Protein nanowires exhibiting specific biological activities hold promise for interacting with living cells and controlling and predicting biological responses such as apoptosis, endocytosis and cell adhesion. Here we report the result of the interaction of a single high-energy charged particle with protein molecules, giving size-controlled protein nanowires with an ultra-high aspect ratio of over 1,000. Degradation of the human serum albumin nanowires was examined using trypsin. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires bound avidin, demonstrating the high affinity of the nanowires. Human serum albumin–avidin hybrid nanowires were also fabricated from a solid state mixture and exhibited good mechanical strength in phosphate-buffered saline. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires can be transformed into nanowires exhibiting a biological function such as avidin–biotinyl interactions and peroxidase activity. The present technique is a versatile platform for functionalizing the surface of any protein molecule with an extremely large surface area. PMID:24770668

  9. High T(sub c) superconductors fabricated by plasma aerosol mist deposition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. W.; Vuong, K. D.; Leone, A.; Shen, C. Q.; Williams, J.; Coy, M.

    1995-01-01

    We report new results on high T(sub c) superconductors fabricated by a plasma aerosol mist deposition technique, in atmospheric environment. Materials fabricated are YBaCuO, BiPbSrCaCuO, BaCaCuO precursor films for TlBaCaCuO, and other buffers such as YSZ. Depending on processing conditions, sizes of crystallites and/or particles are between dozens of nano-meters and several micrometers. Superconductive properties and other material characteristics can also be tailored.

  10. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints is reported. The program consists of two concurrent tasks: (1) design and test of specific built up attachments; and (2) evaluation of standard advanced bonded joint concepts. A data base for the design and analysis of advanced composite joints for use at elevated temperatures (561K (550 deg F)) to design concepts for specific joining applications, and the fundamental parameters controlling the static strength characteristics of such joints are evaluated. Data for design and build GR/PI of lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Results for compression and interlaminar shear strengths of Celion 6000/PMR-15 laminates are given. Static discriminator test results for type 3 and type 4 bonded and bolted joints and final joint designs for TASK 1.4 scale up fabrication and testing are presented.

  11. Instantly AgNPs deposition through facile solventless technique for poly-functional cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Emam, Hossam E; Saleh, N H; Nagy, Khaled S; Zahran, M K

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, functional clothes are employed for human body protection in addition to be fashionable clothes. Hence functionalization of clothes increases the attention of scientists and business. In the current study, poly-functional cotton fabric was carried out by instantly deposition of AgNPs using two solventless techniques namely; sorption and padding. Sorption technique was exhibited extremely high efficiency than padding one by ca. 10 times. By using the same concentrations of AgNO3, Ag content was ranged 69.3-6094.8 mg/kg and 33.8-609.3 mg/kg for sorption and padding, respectively. After AgNPs deposition, fabrics color was turned to gray-reddish yellow. By applying 5912.3 mgAg/kg fabric, bacterial reduction and UPF value were reached 99% and 12.59. Bacterial reduction and UPF were lessened to 90% and 10.19 after 20 washings. These findings proved that the direct AgNPs deposition into cotton using solventless/sorption technique is applicable in manufacturing of antibacterial/UV resistant fabrics with acquired decorative color.

  12. Fabrication techniques for multiscale 3D-MEMS with vertical metal micro- and nanowire integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, F.; Quednau, S.; Dassinger, F.; Sarwar, R.; Schlaak, H. F.; Guttmann, M.; Meyer, P.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents different low-temperature and high-throughput LIGA-like processes for the batch fabrication of metal micro systems that use long nano- or microwires perpendicularly rising from a substrate. First, circuit paths and seed layers are fabricated applying standard UV lithography and PVD. Second, three lithography techniques are used, namely ion track lithography, enhanced UV lithography and aligned x-ray lithography, to structure 20-400 µm thick polymer films. Ion track lithography is only used to fabricate extremely high aspect ratio cylindrical pores with 0.1-1 µm diameter and 20-100 µm length. The aligned UV and x-ray lithographies are employed to structure templates for various micro system components. Third, these polymer templates are filled using low-temperature electroplating processes transferring the polymer openings into metal structures. Finally, the polymer is dry etched to release all metal structures. These structures are applicable in future accelerometers and gas flow sensors. Using five configurations to define five different functional structures, we demonstrate fabrication processes applying the three different types of lithography. The main aspects concern the combination of both standard lithography techniques and especially developed lithography techniques. Furthermore, these aspects comprise the use of structures created by lithography for high aspect ratio polymer templates and multilayer electroplating with varying aspect ratios. The growth in place of nanowire arrays and micropillars along with surrounding structures is the key feature for low-temperature large-scale micro-nano integration technology without harmful transfer technologies.

  13. Teaching advanced wound closure techniques using cattle digits.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Philipe N; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Siebeck, Matthias; Mutschler, Wolf

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate a model used to impart advanced wound closure skills because available models do not meet the necessary requirements to a substantial degree. Seventy-one residents were asked to evaluate a 75-minute-long skills course using cadaveric cattle digits to learn Z-plasty, V-Y-plasty, and oval-shaped rotational flaps. A short film and the course instructor demonstrated each technique first. A Likert rating scale ranging from 1 to 6 was used for questions in the survey given to the residents. There was strong agreement among residents (1.65 ± 1.17 years of experience) that advanced wound closure training courses are necessary (5.73 ± 0.73), which corresponded to the residents' low level of knowledge and self-assessment of practical skills and present experience (2.84 ± 1.01). The course was evaluated with high acceptance, even though it was found to be demanding for the trainees (5.84 ± 0.40). This might also be related to the high rating of the model itself, which was found to be a suitable method for teaching advanced wound closure techniques (5.50 ± 0.71) that was easily comprehensible (5.73 ± 0.53). Skills training courses for young trainees are warranted to impart advanced wound closure techniques. The curriculum using cattle digits presented here is recommended. The authors have indicated no significant interest with commercial supporters. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  14. An Advanced Electrospinning Method of Fabricating Nanofibrous Patterned Architectures with Controlled Deposition and Desired Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasel, Sheikh Md

    We introduce a versatile advanced method of electrospinning for fabricating various kinds of nanofibrous patterns along with desired alignment, controlled amount of deposition and locally variable density into the architectures. In this method, we employed multiple electrodes whose potentials have been altered in milliseconds with the help of microprocessor based control system. Therefore, key success of this method was that the electrical field as well as charge carrying fibers could be switched shortly from one electrode's location to another, as a result, electrospun fibers could be deposited on the designated areas with desired alignment. A wide range of nanofibrous patterned architectures were constructed using proper arrangement of multiple electrodes. By controlling the concurrent activation time of two adjacent electrodes, we demonstrated that amount of fibers going into the pattern can be adjusted and desired alignment in electrospun fibers can be obtained. We also revealed that the deposition density of electrospun fibers in different areas of patterned architectures can be varied. We showed that by controlling the deposition time between two adjacent electrodes, a number of functionally graded patterns can be generated with uniaxial alignment. We also demonstrated that this handy method was capable of producing random, aligned, and multidirectional nanofibrous mats by engaging a number of electrodes and switching them in desired patterns. A comprehensive study using finite element method was carried out to understand the effects of electrical field. Simulation results revealed that electrical field strength alters shortly based on electrode control switch patterns. Nanofibrous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds and its composite reinforced with wollastonite and wood flour were fabricated using rotating drum electrospinning technique. Morphological, mechanical, and thermal, properties were characterized on PVA/wollastonite and PVA/wood flour nanocomposites

  15. A Novel Technique for Performing PID Susceptibility Screening during the Solar Cell Fabrication Process

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jaewon; Dahal, Som; Dauksher, Bill; Bowden, Stuart; Tamizhmani, Govindasamy; Hacke, Peter

    2016-11-21

    Various characterization techniques have historically been developed in order to screen potential induced degradation (PID)-susceptible cells, but those techniques require final solar cells. We present a new characterization technique for screening PID-susceptible cells during the cell fabrication process. Illuminated Lock-In Thermography (ILIT) was used to image PID shunting of the cell without metallization and clearly showed PID-affected areas. PID-susceptible cells can be screened by ILIT, and the sample structure can advantageously be simplified as long as the sample has the silicon nitride antireflection coating and an aluminum back surface field.

  16. Fabrication of high quality and low cost microlenses on a glass substrate by direct printing technique.

    PubMed

    Zang, Zhigang; Tang, Xiaosheng; Liu, Xianming; Lei, Xiaohua; Chen, Weiming

    2014-11-20

    The fabrication of high quality and low cost microlenses on a glass substrate using a simple, rapid, and precise direct microplotting technique is shown in this paper. The fabrication method is based on the use of a microplotter system, which is significantly different from the existing inkjet, roll-to-roll printing, and reactive ion etching technology and could work with higher viscosity materials. By optimizing the parameters of voltage, dispense time, and concentration of the polymer solution, high quality microlenses with a diameter of 20 μm could be obtained. The geometrical and optical characteristics of the microlenses are analyzed by measurement of the surface profile and the imaging properties in the near-field and far-field zones as well as the diffraction pattern. We think that the fabricated microlenses could be attractive for enhancing the light extraction efficiency of light emitting diodes.

  17. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Objects Including Amorphous Metal Using Techniques Akin to Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including amorphous metals using techniques akin to additive manufacturing. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes an amorphous metal includes: applying a first layer of molten metallic alloy to a surface; cooling the first layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a first layer including amorphous metal; subsequently applying at least one layer of molten metallic alloy onto a layer including amorphous metal; cooling each subsequently applied layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a layer including amorphous metal prior to the application of any adjacent layer of molten metallic alloy; where the aggregate of the solidified layers including amorphous metal forms a desired shape in the object to be fabricated; and removing at least the first layer including amorphous metal from the surface.

  18. Electroless-plating technique for fabricating thin-wall convective heat-transfer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.; Ballard, G. K.; Wilson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for fabricating uniform thin-wall metallic heat-transfer models and which simulates a Shuttle thermal protection system tile is described. Two 6- by 6- by 2.5-in. tiles were fabricated to obtain local heat transfer rates. The fabrication process is not limited to any particular geometry and results in a seamless thin-wall heat-transfer model which uses a one-wire thermocouple to obtain local cold-wall heat-transfer rates. The tile is relatively fragile because of the brittle nature of the material and the structural weakness of the flat-sided configuration; however, a method was developed and used for repairing a cracked tile.

  19. Wearable strain sensors fabricated by silver nanowire patterning method based on parylene stencil technique.

    PubMed

    Namsun Chou; Sohee Kim

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a fabrication method of the silver nanowire (AgNW) patterns on PDMS substrate using a parylene stencil technique. The AgNW electrodes with the straight line and serpentine line traces were fabricated and characterized in terms of electromechanical properties. The sensitivity of the AgNW patterns was measured using a custom-designed stretch test module, resulting in gauge factors from 55.2 to 2.7 at 2% strain for two different 100 um-wide AgNW patterns. The wearable sensor based on AgNW patterns was designed and fabricated to epidermally detect the respiration and heart rate from the abdomen and neck. The respiration was continuously recorded for 10 min successfully. The heart rate from the carotid artery was also recorded without applying external pressure.

  20. Characterization of CdTe Nanoparticles Fabricated by Pulsed Electron Deposition Technique at Different Ablation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E.; Aga, R.; Steigerwald, A.; Ueda, A.; Pan, Z.; Collins, W. E.; Mu, R.

    2008-03-01

    Telluride (CdTe) is a front-runner photovoltaic (PV) material because it has already attained efficiencies above 16%. The fabrication of CdTe nanoparticles has aroused considerable interest because of their potential application as active layer in organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells. They can also be used for sensitisation of wide band gap semiconductors. In this work, we explore pulsed electron beam deposition (PED) technique to fabricate CdTe nanoparticles. Two ablation parameters, namely background gas pressure and electron energy were varied to investigate their effects on the nanoparticle formation. AFM and optical transmission measurements indicate that we have fabricated CdTe nanocrystalline films exhibiting quantum confinement effect. These films contain scattered nanoparticles with diameters varying from 40 nm to 500 nm, which contribute to the optical absorption near the bulk bandgap energy. However, increasing the background pressure to 19 mTorr improves the nanocrystalline film uniformity.

  1. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  2. Advanced ACTPol Multichroic Polarimeter Array Fabrication Process for 150 mm Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duff, S. M.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Datta, R.; Gallardo, P. A.; Henderson, S. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Nati, F.; Niemack, M. D.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schmitt, B. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is a third-generation cosmic microwave background receiver to be deployed in 2016 on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). Spanning five frequency bands from 25 to 280 GHz and having just over 5600 transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers, this receiver will exhibit increased sensitivity and mapping speed compared to previously fielded ACT instruments. This paper presents the fabrication processes developed by NIST to scale to large arrays of feedhorn-coupled multichroic AlMn-based TES polarimeters on 150-mm diameter wafers. In addition to describing the streamlined fabrication process which enables high yields of densely packed detectors across larger wafers, we report the details of process improvements for sensor (AlMn) and insulator (SiN(sub x)) materials and microwave structures, and the resulting performance improvements.

  3. Advanced ACTPol Multichroic Polarimeter Array Fabrication Process for 150 mm Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, S. M.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Datta, R.; Gallardo, P. A.; Henderson, S. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Nati, F.; Niemack, M. D.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schmitt, B. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is a third-generation cosmic microwave background receiver to be deployed in 2016 on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). Spanning five frequency bands from 25 to 280 GHz and having just over 5600 transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers, this receiver will exhibit increased sensitivity and mapping speed compared to previously fielded ACT instruments. This paper presents the fabrication processes developed by NIST to scale to large arrays of feedhorn-coupled multichroic AlMn-based TES polarimeters on 150-mm diameter wafers. In addition to describing the streamlined fabrication process which enables high yields of densely packed detectors across larger wafers, we report the details of process improvements for sensor (AlMn) and insulator (SiN_x) materials and microwave structures, and the resulting performance improvements.

  4. Design and fabrication of brazed Rene 41 honeycomb sandwich structural panels for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Swegle, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The design and fabrication of two large brazed Rene 41 honeycomb panels, the establishment of a test plan, the design and fabrication of a test fixture to subject the panels to cyclic thermal gradients and mechanical loads equivalent to those imposed on an advanced space transportation vehicle during its boost and entry trajectories are discussed. The panels will be supported at four points, creating three spans. The outer spans are 45.7 cm (18 in.) and the center span 76.2 cm (30 in). Specimen width is 30.5 cm (12 in.). The panels were primarily designed by boost conditions simulated by subjecting the panels to liquid nitrogen, 77K (-320 F) on one side and 455K (360 F) on the other side and by mechanically imposing loads representing vehicle fuel pressure loads. Entry conditions were simulated by radiant heating to 1034K (1400 F). The test program subjected the panels to 500 boost thermal conditions. Results are presented.

  5. Advanced ACTPol Multichroic Polarimeter Array Fabrication Process for 150 mm Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duff, S. M.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Datta, R.; Gallardo, P. A.; Henderson, S. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is a third-generation cosmic microwave background receiver to be deployed in 2016 on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). Spanning five frequency bands from 25 to 280 GHz and having just over 5600 transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers, this receiver will exhibit increased sensitivity and mapping speed compared to previously fielded ACT instruments. This paper presents the fabrication processes developed by NIST to scale to large arrays of feedhorn-coupled multichroic AlMn-based TES polarimeters on 150-mm diameter wafers. In addition to describing the streamlined fabrication process which enables high yields of densely packed detectors across larger wafers, we report the details of process improvements for sensor (AlMn) and insulator (SiN(sub x)) materials and microwave structures, and the resulting performance improvements.

  6. Computational Electromagnetic Modeling of Optical Responses in Plasmonically Enhanced Nanoscale Devices Fabricated with Nanomasking Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Eric; Debu, Desalegn; Saylor, Cameron; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    This work computationally explores plasmonic nanoscale devices fabricated with a recently developed nanomasking technique that is based on the self-aligned process. Computational electromagnetic modeling has determined enhancement factors and the plasmonic and optical properties of these structures. The nanomasking technique is a new process that is employed to overcome the resolution limits of traditional electron beam lithography and can also be used to increase resolution in photolithography fabrication as well. This technique can consistently produce accurate features with nanostructures and gaps smaller than 10 nm. These smaller dimensions can allow for increased and more localized plasmonically enhanced electric fields. These unique metal devices encompass tunable, enhanced plasmonic and optical properties that can be useful in a wide range of applications. Finite element methods are used to approximate the electromagnetic responses, giving the ability to alter the designs and dimensions in order to optimize the enhancement. Ultimately, we will fabricate devices and characterize the plasmonic properties with optical techniques, including dark-field spectroscopy, to confirm the properties with the goal of generating more efficient devices.

  7. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  8. Advanced aeroservoelastic stabilization techniques for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Samuel Y.; Cheng, Peter Y.; Myers, Thomas T.; Klyde, David H.; Magdaleno, Raymond E.; Mcruer, Duane T.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced high performance vehicles, including Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) hypersonic flight vehicles, that are statically unstable, require higher bandwidth flight control systems to compensate for the instability resulting in interactions between the flight control system, the engine/propulsion dynamics, and the low frequency structural modes. Military specifications, such as MIL-F-9490D and MIL-F-87242, tend to limit treatment of structural modes to conventional gain stabilization techniques. The conventional gain stabilization techniques, however, introduce low frequency effective time delays which can be troublesome from a flying qualities standpoint. These time delays can be alleviated by appropriate blending of gain and phase stabilization techniques (referred to as Hybrid Phase Stabilization or HPS) for the low frequency structural modes. The potential of using HPS for compensating structural mode interaction was previously explored. It was shown that effective time delay was significantly reduced with the use of HPS; however, the HPS design was seen to have greater residual response than a conventional gain stablized design. Additional work performed to advance and refine the HPS design procedure, to further develop residual response metrics as a basis for alternative structural stability specifications, and to develop strategies for validating HPS design and specification concepts in manned simulation is presented. Stabilization design sensitivity to structural uncertainties and aircraft-centered requirements are also assessed.

  9. Advances in Testing Techniques for Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Vineeta; Hussin, Fawnizu Azmadi; Hamid, Nor Hisham; Zain Ali, Noohul Basheer

    2017-01-01

    With the advancement of digital microfluidics technology, applications such as on-chip DNA analysis, point of care diagnosis and automated drug discovery are common nowadays. The use of Digital Microfluidics Biochips (DMFBs) in disease assessment and recognition of target molecules had become popular during the past few years. The reliability of these DMFBs is crucial when they are used in various medical applications. Errors found in these biochips are mainly due to the defects developed during droplet manipulation, chip degradation and inaccuracies in the bio-assay experiments. The recently proposed Micro-electrode-dot Array (MEDA)-based DMFBs involve both fluidic and electronic domains in the micro-electrode cell. Thus, the testing techniques for these biochips should be revised in order to ensure proper functionality. This paper describes recent advances in the testing technologies for digital microfluidics biochips, which would serve as a useful platform for developing revised/new testing techniques for MEDA-based biochips. Therefore, the relevancy of these techniques with respect to testing of MEDA-based biochips is analyzed in order to exploit the full potential of these biochips. PMID:28749411

  10. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  11. Fabrication and assembly of a superconducting undulator for the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Hasse, Quentin; Fuerst, J. D.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Doose, C.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Skiadopoulos, D.

    2014-01-29

    A prototype superconducting undulator magnet (SCU0) has been built at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and has successfully completed both cryogenic performance and magnetic measurement test programs. The SCU0 closed loop, zero-boil-off cryogenic system incorporates high temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads, cryocoolers, a LHe reservoir supplying dual magnetic cores, and an integrated cooled beam chamber. This system presented numerous challenges in the design, fabrication, and assembly of the device. Aspects of this R and D relating to both the cryogenic and overall assembly of the device are presented here. The SCU0 magnet has been installed in the APS storage ring.

  12. Techniques used to fabricate all-ceramic restorations in the dental practice.

    PubMed

    Puri, Sameer

    2005-07-01

    Porcelain is an increasingly popular material to use for restorations. This article will discuss the 3 main ways to fabricate porcelain restorations. The first method involves waxing up the restoration to the proper form and casting it in molten porcelain similar to the lost wax technique for gold. The second technique requires the use of porcelain in a powder form to be stacked on top of a refractory die or a platinum foil and then fired in the oven. The third main technique is the use of a CAD/CAM system to mill the porcelain restoration from a solid block of porcelain. All 3 techniques are valid and the clinician should have a thorough understanding of which techniques are appropriate in various clinical situations.

  13. Investigation of etching techniques for superconductive Nb/Al-Al2O3/Nb fabrication processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberger, A. W.; Lea, D. M.; Lloyd, F. L.

    1993-01-01

    Wet etching, CF4 and SF6 reactive ion etching (RIE), RIE/wet hybrid etching, Cl-based RIE, ion milling, and liftoff techniques have been investigated for use in superconductive Nb/Al-Al2O3/Nb fabrication processes. High-quality superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junctions have been fabricated using a variety of these etching methods; however, each technique offers distinct tradeoffs for a given process an wafer design. In particular, it was shown that SF6 provides an excellent RIE chemistry for low-voltage anisotropic etching of Nb with high selectivity to Al. The SF6 tool has greatly improved the trilevel resist junction insulation process. Excellent repeatability, selectivity with respect to quartz, and submicron resolution make Cl2 + BCl3 + CHCl3 RIE a very attractive process for trilayer patterning.

  14. Recent advances in UHV techniques for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Rao

    1995-01-01

    The ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) requirements for storage rings and accelerators, and the development of the science and technology of UHV for particle accelerators and magnetic fusion devices have been recently reviewed by N.B. Mistry and H.F. Dylla respectively. In this paper, the latest developments in the advancement of UHV techniques for the vacuum integrity of Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and for successfully dealing with the synchrotron radiation related beam line vacuum problem encountered in the design of the SSC are reviewed: the review includes developments in extreme sensitivity He leak detection technique based on the dynamic adsorption and desorption of He, operation of ionization gauges at Lhe temperatures, metal sponges for the effective cryopumping of H{sup 2} and He to pressures better than 10{sup -14} torr, and low cost and high He sensitivity RGA's. The details of a new extreme sensitivity He leak detector system are also discussed here.

  15. Novel fabrication technique for improving the figure-of-merit of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaty, J. S.; Masters, R.; Vandersande, J. W.; Wood, C.

    1989-01-01

    Reduction of the thermal conductivity of thermoelectric materials in order to improve the figure of merit and, hence, the conversion efficiency is discussed. A novel fabrication technique that reduces the thermal conductivity without too adverse an effect on the electrical properties is reported. This is achieved by producing an oxygen-free, very-fine-grain SiGe alloy with very small (on the order of 50 A) precipitates.

  16. Effects of Different Fabrication Techniques on the Yttrium-Barium-Copper Oxide High Temperature Superconductor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    lanthanum -barium-copper oxide, with a Tc of 35 K (9:1134), which was followed by a similar capound in which the lanthanum was replaced by yttrium, with a Tc...barium acetate, barium hydroxide, and barium fluoride . Barium oxide was not selected because it is not stable in air. Barium acetate was not used because...these two precursors could not be used in identical fabrication techniques. Barium fluoride was not selected because it only reacts at talperatures

  17. A New Technique for Fabricating Three-Dimensional Micro- and Nanostructures of Various Shapes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP013151 TITLE: A New Technique for Fabricating Three-Dimensional Micro ...three-dimensional micro - and nanostructures of various shapes V. Ya. Prinz, D. Griitzmacher, A. Beyer, C. David, B. Ketterer and E. Deccard Laboratory...for Micro - and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland Abstract. We have shown that complex 3-dimensional micro - and

  18. A modified technique for fabricating a mirror image wax pattern for an auricular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Gajdhar, Shaiq; Gajdhar, Sajda Khan; Salakalakonda, Srikanth Reddy; Vasthare, Abubakkar

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a technique for fabricating a wax pattern for an auricular prosthesis by tracing the shape of a sliced cast of the contralateral ear at an interval of 1-mm and transferring the shape of each 1-mm slice to a similar dimension modeling wax sheet. In this way, slices of modeling wax are obtained, which can be reversed and placed over the previous slice to produce a mirror image wax pattern of the contralateral ear.

  19. Fabrication technique for the production of on- and off-axis conic surfaces of revolution (WAGNER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faehnle, Oliver W.; van Brug, Hedser H.; Frankena, Hans J.

    1997-11-01

    A new fabrication technique, derived from an earlier development to produce on- and off-axis optical surfaces of revolution is presented. Although based on a shape copying method, it is possible to generate different types of surfaces with the same machine tool. Load controlled point- contact machining is applied using a small tool which is guided along a pre-determined tool-path, not requiring an in-process tool-path control. This fabrication technique employs a self-correcting process and is characterized by an advantageous error propagation between tool and workpiece. The characteristics of this fabrication technique are discussed together with its application for the generation of on- and off-axis surfaces with conic sections as generators. The design of a first set-up for production of conic surfaces is presented with which it is possible to generate all kinds of conic surfaces on the same machine, featuring a pantograph enabling the production of different scales of the surfaces, together with the discussion of fist experimental data.

  20. Nasal base narrowing: the alar flap advancement technique.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmed Soliman

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of creating an alar-based advancement flap in narrowing the nasal base and correcting excessive alar flare. Case series with chart review. This is a retrospective record review study. The study included 35 cases presenting with a wide nasal base and excessive alar flaring. The surgical procedure combined the alar base reduction with alar flare excision by creating a single laterally based alar flap. Any caudal septal deformities and any nasal tip modification procedures were corrected before the nasal base narrowing. The mean follow-up period was 23 months. The mean alar flap narrowing was 6.3 mm, whereas the mean width of sill narrowing was 2.9 mm. This single laterally based advancement alar flap resulted in a more conservative external resection, thus avoiding alar wedge overresection or blunting of the alar-facial crease. No cases of postoperative bleeding, infection, or keloid were encountered, and the external alar wedge excision healed with no apparent scar that was hidden in the depth of the alar-facial crease. The risk of notching of the alar rim at the sill incision is reduced by adopting a 2-layer closure of the vestibular floor. The alar base advancement flap is an effective technique in narrowing both the nasal base and excessive alar flare. It adopts a single skin excision to correct the 2 deformities while commonly feared complications were avoided.

  1. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  2. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; hide

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  3. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  4. Advanced IMCW Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel; lin, bing; nehrir, amin; harrison, fenton; obland, michael

    2015-04-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation.

  5. [Fabricating facial prostheses using CAD/CAM and rapid prototyping technique].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuemei; Jiao, Ting; Lin, Yanping; Zhang, Wenqiang; Wang, Chengtao; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2005-04-01

    At present, the treatments of hemifacial microsomia such as the missing of ear and eye still rely on the skill of technician to make the wax model of contralateral apparatus of patient in China. In this paper, CAD/CAM and rapid prototyping (RP) techniques are integrated to successfully create a silastic prosthesis by using the patient's data of CT or laser scanning. The clinical results suggest that a high accuracy has been achieved in shape, size, and protrusion of the facial prostheses, which indicates that the application of RP techniques in conjunction with CAD/CAM is a suitable approach for fabricating facial prosthesis.

  6. Analytical and experimental evaluation of techniques for the fabrication of thermoplastic hologram storage devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on recording information on thermoplastic are given. A description was given of a typical fabrication configuration, the recording sequence, and the samples which were examined. There are basically three configurations which can be used for the recording of information on thermoplastic. The most popular technique uses corona which furnishes free charge. The necessary energy for deformation is derived from a charge layer atop the thermoplastic. The other two techniques simply use a dc potential in place of the corona for deformation energy.

  7. Technique for fabricating individualized dentures with a gingiva-shade composite resin.

    PubMed

    Park, Beom-Woo; Kim, Nam-Jin; Lee, Jonghyuk; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-05-01

    More natural dental esthetics have been sought by patients who wear conventional complete or partial dentures. Recently, gingiva-shade composite resins (GSCRs) have become available for replicating soft tissue for both fixed and removable prostheses. The technique presented is for fabricating individualized complete dentures. First the acrylic resin is mixed with a coloring agent and processed to modify the base shade of the denture. GSCRs are light polymerized onto a prepared space on the buccal surfaces of denture base to replicate the appearance of gingival tissues including blood vessels. The technique provides an outstanding natural, gingiva-like, appearance and allows complete dentures to harmonize with the individual patient's surrounding oral tissues.

  8. Evaluation of Three Different Processing Techniques in the Fabrication of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Chintalacheruvu, Vamsi Krishna; Balraj, Rajasekaran Uttukuli; Putchala, Lavanya Sireesha; Pachalla, Sreelekha

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of three different processing techniques and to find out the accuracy of processing techniques through number of occlusal interferences and increase in vertical dimension after denture processing. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 18 patients indicated for complete denture fabrication was selected for the study and they were divided into three subgroups. Three processing techniques, compression molding and injection molding using prepolymerized resin and unpolymerized resin, were used to fabricate dentures for each of the groups. After processing, laboratory-remounted dentures were evaluated for number of occlusal interferences in centric and eccentric relations and change in vertical dimension through vertical pin rise in articulator. Data were analyzed using statistical test ANOVA and SPSS software version 19.0 by IBM was used. Data obtained from three groups were subjected to one-way ANOVA test. After ANOVA test, results with significant variations were subjected to post hoc test. Number of occlusal interferences with compression molding technique was reported to be more in both centric and eccentric positions as compared to the two injection molding techniques with statistical significance in centric, protrusive, right lateral nonworking, and left lateral working positions (P < 0.05). Mean vertical pin rise (0.52 mm) was reported to more in compression molding technique as compared to injection molding techniques, which is statistically significant (P < 0.001). Within the limitations of this study, injection molding techniques exhibited less processing errors as compared to compression molding technique with statistical significance. There was no statistically significant difference in processing errors reported within two injection molding systems.

  9. Aesthetic Lateral Canthoplasty Using Tarso-Conjunctival Advancement Technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Lew, Dae Hyun; Song, Seung Han; Lee, Myung Chul

    2017-01-01

    Reduced horizontal length of the palpebral fissure is a distinctive characteristic of Asian eyelids, and aesthetic lateral canthal lengthening techniques have been performed for a refinement. The aim of this study is to describe a novel lateral canthoplasty using tarso-conjunctival advancement with a lid margin splitting procedure on the upper eyelids and to report the postoperative results. From December 2011 to June 2014, patients who underwent lateral canthoplasty using the tarso-conjunctival advancement procedure for aesthetic purposes were reviewed retrospectively. The predictor variables were grouped into demographic and operative categories. The primary outcome variables were the distances from the mid-pupillary line to the lateral canthus and the horizontal length of the palpebral aperture (distance from the medial to lateral canthus). Data analyses were performed using descriptive and univariate statistics. Patients who showed increment in objective measurements were considered significant. Aesthetic appearance was also evaluated based on pre- and postoperative clinical photographs. A total of 45 patients were enrolled in this study. Both the distance from the mid-pupil to the lateral canthus (ΔDpupil-lateral; 2.78 ± 0.54 mm, P <0.05) and the palpebral aperture horizontal length (ΔDmedial-lateral 2.93 ± 0.81 mm, P <0.05) increased significantly from pre- to postoperative state. All the patients demonstrated satisfactory results aesthetically during the follow-up. The tarso-conjunctival advancement technique for lateral canthoplasty produced satisfactory aesthetic results with an enlarged palpebral aperture. Future research is required to fully delineate the risk of possible complications, including injury to the eyelashes and meibomian glands.

  10. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  11. Advanced fabrication and calibration of high-temperature sensor elements based on sapphire fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsmann, Tino; Habisreuther, Tobias; Rothhardt, Manfred; Willsch, Reinhardt; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, improved fabrication and calibration techniques of Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) for very high temperature sensing applications up to more than 1500 °C will be presented. The fibers used are single crystalline sapphire fibers, which are applicable in such high temperature ranges due to their high melting point at 2040 °C and their extreme thermal stability. The inscription of the FBGs was performed by the second harmonic wave of a Ti:Sa-femtosecond laser system. With pulses of 400 nm wavelength first order gratings could be achieved. Using a two-beam phase mask interferometer, grating arrays within a wide spectral range have been fabricated with only one phase mask and without additional calibration routine. The inscribed grating arrays were wavelength-calibrated using a reference FBG, and their temperature sensitivity was evaluated.

  12. Marginal adaptation and CAD-CAM technology: A systematic review of restorative material and fabrication techniques.

    PubMed

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2017-09-27

    The comparative assessment of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology and other fabrication techniques pertaining to marginal adaptation should be documented. Limited evidence exists on the effect of restorative material on the performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether the marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM single crowns, fixed dental prostheses, and implant-retained fixed dental prostheses or their infrastructures differs from that obtained by other fabrication techniques using a similar restorative material and whether it depends on the type of restorative material. An electronic search of English-language literature published between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2016, was conducted of the Medline/PubMed database. Of the 55 included comparative studies, 28 compared CAD-CAM technology with conventional fabrication techniques, 12 contrasted CAD-CAM technology and copy milling, 4 compared CAD-CAM milling with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), and 22 investigated the performance of a CAD-CAM system regarding marginal adaptation in restorations/infrastructures produced with different restorative materials. Most of the CAD-CAM restorations/infrastructures were within the clinically acceptable marginal discrepancy (MD) range. The performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation is influenced by the restorative material. Compared with CAD-CAM, most of the heat-pressed lithium disilicate crowns displayed equal or smaller MD values. Slip-casting crowns exhibited similar or better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with CAD-CAM. Cobalt-chromium and titanium implant infrastructures produced using a CAD-CAM system elicited smaller MD values than zirconia. The majority of cobalt-chromium restorations/infrastructures produced by DMLS displayed better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with the casting technique. Compared with copy

  13. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now. PMID:27095912

  14. Adjunctive techniques to traditional advancement procedures for treating severe blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Baik, Bong Soo; Ha, Won; Lee, Ji Won; Ji, So Young; Yang, Wan Suk; Park, Daeun; Kim, Kenneth K

    2014-04-01

    To create a more physiologic eyelid opening in patients with severe blepharoptosis, the authors used lamina propria mucosa of conjunctiva, which continues to the check ligament of the superior fornix, in addition to levator aponeurosis and Müller's muscle as a composite flap. In patients with epicanthal folds with associated telecanthus, the authors also performed epicanthoplasty with medial canthal tendon shortening. Fifty blepharoptosis patients (85 eyelids) with a degree of ptosis of greater than 4 mm underwent the advancement technique using the levator aponeurosis-Müller's muscle-lamina propria mucosa of conjunctiva as a composite flap. Twenty-one (42 percent) of those patients also underwent split V-W epicanthoplasty and plication of the medial canthal tendon for epicanthal folds with associated telecanthus. Degree of ptosis and levator function were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Complete or near-complete correction of ptosis (degree of ptosis, <1 mm) was achieved in 54 eyelids (63.5 percent) and mild residual ptosis (degree of ptosis, 1 to 2 mm) was observed in 22 eyelids (25.9 percent) in postoperative follow-up after 6 months. The most common complication was reoperation, which was done in 15 eyelids (17.6 percent) because of incomplete correction. The advancement technique using the levator aponeurosis- Müller's muscle-lamina propria mucosa of conjunctiva composite was effective in the treatment of severe blepharoptosis with levator function of 2 to 7 mm. The technique produced elevating motion of the physiologic eyelid in a superior-posterior direction. There were no serious complications, such as long-term lagophthalmos or lid lag. Therapeutic, IV.

  15. Fabrication of Converging and Diverging Polymeric Microlens Arrays By A Thermocapillary Replication Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soon Wei Daniel; Fiedler, Kevin; Troian, Sandra

    Thermocapillary forces offer a powerful method for sculpting interfaces at microscale dimensions. Here we demonstrate how periodic arrays of cooled pins placed in close proximity to the surface of a molten polymer nanofilm can be used to fabricate various large area microlens arrays, which when solidified exhibit ultrasmooth surfaces and excellent focusing capability. This technique was used to fabricate both homogeneous converging and diverging microlens shapes by application of various thermal distributions. The converging arrays were incorporated into a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor able to image moving currents of airborne spray droplets. Feature overlap was also used to achieve hierarchical arrays comprising two superimposed patterns. By varying the width of the cooled pins, it was also possible to fabricate converging microlens structures featuring a caldera-like depression at the vertex able to focus collimated light into a sharp annulus. These demonstrations prove that with suitable microscale control over the thermal distributions projected onto molten nanofilms, a diverse set of micro-optical components can be fabricated by thermocapillary replication from a nearby mask without contact and in a single step. S. W. D. Lim acknowledges funding from the Toshi Kubota SURF fellowship. KRF is supported by a NASA Science and Technology Research Fellowship.

  16. Novel fabrication techniques for low-mass composite structures in silicon particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Neal; Silber, Joseph; Anderssen, Eric; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gilchriese, Murdock; Johnson, Thomas; Cepeda, Mario

    2013-12-01

    The structural design of silicon-based particle detectors is governed by competing demands of reducing mass while maximizing stability and accuracy. These demands can only be met by fiber reinforced composite laminates (CFRP). As detecting sensors and electronics become lower mass, the motivation to reduce structure as a proportion of overall mass pushes modern detector structures to the lower limits of composite ply thickness, while demanding maximum stiffness. However, classical approaches to composite laminate design require symmetric laminates and flat structures, in order to minimize warping during fabrication. This constraint of symmetry in laminate design, and a “flat plate” approach to fabrication, results in more massive structures. This study presents an approach to fabricating stable and accurate, geometrically complex composite structures by bonding warped, asymmetric, but ultra-thin component laminates together in an accurate tool, achieving final overall precision normally associated with planar structures. This technique has been used to fabricate a prototype “I-beam” that supports two layers of detecting elements, while being up to 20 times stiffer and up to 30% lower mass than comparable, independent planar structures (typically known as “staves”).

  17. Comparison of denture tooth movement between CAD-CAM and conventional fabrication techniques.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2017-05-12

    Data comparing the denture tooth movement of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) and conventional denture processing techniques are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the denture tooth movement of pack-and-press, fluid resin, injection, CAD-CAM-bonded, and CAD-CAM monolithic techniques for fabricating dentures to determine which process produces the most accurate and reproducible prosthesis. A total of 50 dentures were evaluated, 10 for each of the 5 groups. A master denture was fabricated and milled from prepolymerized poly(methyl methacrylate). For the conventional processing techniques (pack-and-press, fluid resin, and injection) a polyvinyl siloxane putty mold of the master denture was made in which denture teeth were placed and molten wax injected. The cameo surface of each wax-festooned denture was laser scanned, resulting in a standard tessellation language (STL) format file. The CAD-CAM dentures included 2 subgroups: CAD-CAM-bonded teeth in which the denture teeth were bonded into the milled denture base and CAD-CAM monolithic teeth in which the denture teeth were milled as part of the denture base. After all specimens had been fabricated, they were hydrated for 24 hours, and the cameo surface laser scanned. The preprocessing and postprocessing scan files of each denture were superimposed using surface-matching software. Measurements were made at 64 locations, allowing evaluation of denture tooth movement in a buccal, lingual, mesial-distal, and occlusal direction. The use of median and interquartile range values was used to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Levene and Kruskal-Wallis analyses of variance were used to evaluate differences between processing techniques (α=.05). The CAD-CAM monolithic technique was the most accurate, followed by fluid resin, CAD-CAM-bonded, pack-and-press, and injection. CAD-CAM monolithic technique was the most reproducible, followed by pack-and-press, CAD

  18. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

  19. Fabrication of flex sensors through direct ink write technique and its electrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, Muhammad; Rahman, Khalid

    2016-11-01

    The present work is intended to fabricate low-cost flex sensor from conductive carbon paste using direct ink write (DIW) technique. DIW method is one of the additive manufacturing processes, which is capable to deposit a variety of material on a variety of substrates by a different mechanism to feature resolution at a microns level. It is widely used in the electronic industry for fabrication of PCBS and electrodes for different electronic devices. The DIW system in present study extrudes material stored in the syringe barrel through nozzle using compressed air. This mechanism will assist in creating patterns on a variety of substrates. Pneumatic controller is employed to control deposition of material, while computer-controlled X-Y stage is employed to control pattern generation. For effective and control patterning, printing parameters were optimized using Taguchi design optimization technique. The conductive carbon paste is used as ink for pattern generation on flexible PET substrate. Samples of flex sensor having different dimensions are prepared through DIW. The fabricated sensors were used as flexion sensor, and its electrical characteristic was evaluated. The obtained sensors are stable and reliable in performance.

  20. Semiconductor fabrication techniques for producing an ultra-flat reflective slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervelde, Thomas E.; Cabral, Michael J.; Wilson, John; Skrutskie, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The most difficult aspects in manufacturing a reflective slit substrate are achieving a precisely fabricated slit surrounded by an optically flat surface. A commonly used technique is to polish a metal substrate that has a slit cut by electric discharge machine (EDM) methods. This process can produce 'optically flat' surfaces; however, the EDM can produce a slit with edge roughness on the order of 10 microns and a RMS field roughness of ~1 micron. Here, we present a departure from these traditional methods and employ the advantages inherent in integrated circuit fabrication. By starting with a silicon wafer, we begin with a nearly atomically flat surface. In addition, the fabrication tools and methodologies employed are traditionally used for high precision applications: this allows for the placement and definition of the slit with high accuracy. If greater accuracy in slit definition is required, additional tools, such as a focused ion beam, are used to define the slit edge down to tens of nanometers. The deposition of gold, after that of a suitable bonding layer, in an ultra-high vacuum chamber creates a final surface without the need of polishing. Typical results yield a surface RMS-roughness of approximately 2nm. Most of the techniques and tools required for this process are commonly available at research universities and the cost to manufacture said mirrors is a small fraction of the purchase price of the traditional ones.

  1. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth. PMID:26202477

  2. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-07-01

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth.

  3. EML Array fabricated by SAG technique monolithically integrated with a buried ridge AWG multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junjie; Liang, Song; Zhang, Zhike; An, Junming; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    We report the fabrication of a ten channel electroabsorption modulated DFB laser (EML) array. Different emission wavelengths of the laser array are obtained by selective area growth (SAG) technique, which is also used for the integration of electroabsorption modulators (EAM) with the lasers. An arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) combiner is integrated monolithically with the laser array by butt-joint regrowth (BJR) technique. A buried ridge waveguide structure is adopted for the AWG combiner. A self aligned fabrication procedure is adopted for the fabrication of the waveguide structure of the device to eliminate the misalignment between the laser active waveguide and the passive waveguide. A Ti thin film heater is integrated for each laser in the array. With the help of the heaters, ten laser emissions with 1.8 nm channel spacing are obtained. The integrated EAM has a larger than 11 dB static extinction ratios and larger than 8 GHz small signal modulation bandwidths. The light power collected in the output waveguide of the AWG is larger than -13 dBm for each wavelength.

  4. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-07-23

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth.

  5. Fabrication of dielectrophoretic microfluidic chips using a facile screen-printing technique for microparticle trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Wei Hong; Li, Zedong; Hu, Jie; Adib Kadri, Nahrizul; Xu, Feng; Li, Fei; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-10-01

    Trapping of microparticles finds wide applications in numerous fields. Microfluidic chips based on a dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique hold several advantages for trapping microparticles, such as fast result processing, a small amount of sample required, high spatial resolution, and high accuracy of target selection. There is an unmet need to develop DEP microfluidic chips on different substrates for different applications in a low cost, facile, and rapid way. This study develops a new facile method based on a screen-printing technique for fabrication of electrodes of DEP chips on three types of substrates (i.e. polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), poly(ethylene terephthalate) and A4 paper). The fabricated PMMA-based DEP microfluidic chip was selected as an example and successfully used to trap and align polystyrene microparticles in a suspension and cardiac fibroblasts in a cell culture solution. The developed electrode fabrication method is compatible with different kinds of DEP substrates, which could expand the future application field of DEP microfluidic chips, including new forms of point-of care diagnostics and trapping circulating tumor cells.

  6. Fabrication of superconducting MgB2 nanostructures by an electron beam lithography-based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portesi, C.; Borini, S.; Amato, G.; Monticone, E.

    2006-03-01

    In this work, we present the results obtained in fabrication and characterization of magnesium diboride nanowires realized by an electron beam lithography (EBL)-based method. For fabricating MgB2 thin films, an all in situ technique has been used, based on the coevaporation of B and Mg by means of an e-gun and a resistive heater, respectively. Since the high temperatures required for the fabrication of good quality MgB2 thin films do not allow the nanostructuring approach based on the lift-off technique, we structured the samples combining EBL, optical lithography, and Ar milling. In this way, reproducible nanowires 1 μm long have been obtained. To illustrate the impact of the MgB2 film processing on its superconducting properties, we measured the temperature dependence of the resistance on a nanowire and compared it to the original magnesium diboride film. The electrical properties of the films are not degraded as a consequence of the nanostructuring process, so that superconducting nanodevices may be obtained by this method.

  7. Surface properties and corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy fabricated with selective laser melting technique.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xian-zhen; Chen, Jie; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study the corrosion behavior and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy which was fabricated with selective laser melting (SLM) technique. For this purpose, specimens were fabricated using different techniques, such as SLM system and casting methods. Surface hardness testing, microstructure observation, surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test were carried out to evaluate the corrosion properties and surface properties of the specimens. We found that microstructure of SLM specimens was more homogeneous than that of cast specimens. The mean surface hardness values of SLM and cast specimens were 458.3 and 384.8, respectively; SLM specimens showed higher values than cast ones in hardness. Both specimens exhibited no differences in their electrochemical corrosion properties in the artificial saliva through potentiodynamic curves and EIS, and no significant difference via XPS. Therefore, we concluded that within the scope of this study, SLM-fabricated restorations revealed good surface properties, such as proper hardness, homogeneous microstructure, and also showed sufficient corrosion resistance which could meet the needs of dental clinics.

  8. Advanced Synchrotron Techniques at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Chow, P.; Kono, Y.; Meng, Y.; Park, C.; Popov, D.; Rod, E.; Smith, J.; Xiao, Y.; Mao, H.

    2012-12-01

    High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) is dedicated to advancing cutting-edge, multidisciplinary, high-pressure science and technology using synchrotron radiation at Sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory. At HPCAT an array of novel x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques has been integrated with high pressure and extreme temperature instrumentation for studies of structure and materials properties at extreme conditions.. HPCAT consists of four active independent beamlines performing a large range of various experiments at extreme conditions. 16BM-B beamline is dedicated to energy dispersive and white Laue X-ray diffraction. The majority of experiments are performed with a Paris-Edinburgh large volume press (to 7GPa and 2500K) and include amorphous and liquid structure measurement, white beam radiography, elastic sound wave velocity measurement of amorphous solid materials, with viscosity and density measurement of liquid being under development. 16BM-D is a monochromatic diffraction beamline for powder and single crystal diffraction at high pressure and high (resistive heating) / low (cryostats) temperature. The additional capabilities include high-resolution powder diffraction and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The insertion device beamline of HPCAT has two undulators in canted mode (operating independently) and LN cooled Si monochromators capable of providing a large range of energies. 16IDB is a microdiffraction beamline mainly focusing on high-pressure powder and single crystal diffraction in DAC at high temperatures (double-sided laser heating and resistive heating) and low temperature (various cryostats). The modern instrumentation allows high-quality diffraction at megabar pressures from light element, fast experiments with pulsed laser heating, fast dynamic experiments with Pilatus detector, and so on. 16ID-D beamline is dedicated to x-ray scattering and spectroscopy research

  9. Focused ion beam techniques for fabricating geometrically-complex components and devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Adams, David Price; Hodges, V. Carter; Vasile, Michael J.

    2004-03-01

    We have researched several new focused ion beam (FIB) micro-fabrication techniques that offer control of feature shape and the ability to accurately define features onto nonplanar substrates. These FIB-based processes are considered useful for prototyping, reverse engineering, and small-lot manufacturing. Ion beam-based techniques have been developed for defining features in miniature, nonplanar substrates. We demonstrate helices in cylindrical substrates having diameters from 100 {micro}m to 3 mm. Ion beam lathe processes sputter-define 10-{micro}m wide features in cylindrical substrates and tubes. For larger substrates, we combine focused ion beam milling with ultra-precision lathe turning techniques to accurately define 25-100 {micro}m features over many meters of path length. In several cases, we combine the feature defining capability of focused ion beam bombardment with additive techniques such as evaporation, sputter deposition and electroplating in order to build geometrically-complex, functionally-simple devices. Damascene methods that fabricate bound, metal microcoils have been developed for cylindrical substrates. Effects of focused ion milling on surface morphology are also highlighted in a study of ion-milled diamond.

  10. Fatigue Life of Titanium Alloys Fabricated by Additive Layer Manufacturing Techniques for Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Mason, Robert L.; Okabe, Toru

    2013-02-01

    Additive layer deposition techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM) have been utilized to fabricate rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) contents. The layer-by-layer deposition techniques resulted in plates that have different surface finishes which can impact significantly on the fatigue life by providing potential sites for fatigue cracks to initiate. The fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys fabricated by EBM and LBM deposition techniques was investigated by three-point testing of rectangular beams of as-fabricated and electro-discharge machined surfaces under stress-controlled conditions at 10 Hz until complete fracture. Fatigue life tests were also performed on rolled plates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI, regular Ti-6Al-4V, and CP Ti as controls. Fatigue surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy to identify the crack initiation site in the various types of specimen surfaces. The fatigue life data were analyzed statistically using both analysis of variance techniques and the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis method with the Gehan-Breslow test. The results indicate that the LBM Ti-6Al-4V ELI material exhibits a longer fatigue life than the EBM counterpart and CP Ti, but a shorter fatigue life compared to rolled Ti-6Al-4V ELI. The difference in the fatigue life behavior may be largely attributed to the presence of rough surface features that act as fatigue crack initiation sites in the EBM material.

  11. Curved grating fabrication techniques for concentric-circle grating, surface-emitting semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Rebecca H.; King, Oliver; Wicks, Gary W.; Hall, Dennis G.; Anderson, Erik H.; Rooks, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and operational characteristics of a novel, surface-emitting semiconductor laser that makes use of a concentric-circle grating to both define its resonant cavity and to provide surface emission. A properly fabricated circular grating causes the laser to operate in radially inward- and outward-going circular waves in the waveguide, thus, introducing the circular symmetry needed for the laser to emit a beam with a circular cross-section. The basic circular-grating-resonator concept can be implemented in any materials system; an AlGaAs/GaAs graded-index, separate confinement heterostructure (GRINSCH), single-quantum-well (SQW) semiconductor laser, grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), was used for the experiments discussed here. Each concentric-circle grating was fabricated on the surface of the AlGaAs/GaAs semiconductor laser. The circular pattern was first defined by electron-beam (e-beam) lithography in a layer of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and subsequently etched into the semiconductor surface using chemically-assisted (chlorine) ion-beam etching (CAIBE). We consider issues that affect the fabrication and quality of the gratings. These issues include grating design requirements, data representation of the grating pattern, and e-beam scan method. We provide examples of how these techniques can be implemented and their impact on the resulting laser performance. A comparison is made of the results obtained using two fundamentally different electron-beam writing systems. Circular gratings with period lambda = 0.25 microns and overall diameters ranging from 80 microns to 500 microns were fabricated. We also report our successful demonstration of an optically pumped, concentric-circle grating, semiconductor laser that emits a beam with a far-field divergence angle that is less than one degree. The emission spectrum is quite narrow (less than 0.1 nm) and is centered at wavelength lambda = 0.8175 microns.

  12. Advances in image-guided intratumoral drug delivery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Luis; Patel, Ravi B; Wu, Hanping; Krupka, Tianyi; Exner, Agata A

    2017-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery provides a means for treating a variety of diseases with minimal systemic involvement while concurrently monitoring treatment efficacy. These therapies are particularly useful to the field of interventional oncology, where elevation of tumor drug levels, reduction of systemic side effects and post-therapy assessment are essential. This review highlights three such image-guided procedures: transarterial chemoembolization, drug-eluting implants and convection-enhanced delivery. Advancements in medical imaging technology have resulted in a growing number of new applications, including image-guided drug delivery. This minimally invasive approach provides a comprehensive answer to many challenges with local drug delivery. Future evolution of imaging devices, image-acquisition techniques and multifunctional delivery agents will lead to a paradigm shift in patient care. PMID:22816134

  13. COAL AND CHAR STUDIES BY ADVANCED EMR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson; Mark J. Nilges; Boris M. Odintsov; Alex I. Smirnov

    2001-04-30

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have been used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During the span of this grant, progress was made on construction and applications to coals and chars of two high frequency EMR systems particularly appropriate for such studies--48 GHz and 95 GHz electron magnetic resonance spectrometer, on new low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments to examine the interaction between water and the surfaces of suspended char particulates in slurries, and on a variety of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to measure characteristics of the water directly in contact with the surfaces and pore spaces of carbonaceous particulates.

  14. Robotic suturing: technique and benefit in advanced laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kenngott, Hannes G; Muller-Stich, Beat P; Reiter, Michael A; Rassweiler, Jens; Gutt, Carsten N

    2008-01-01

    Suturing is one of the main tasks in advanced laparoscopic surgery, but limited degrees of freedom, 2D vision, fulcrum and pivoting effect make it difficult to perform. Robotic systems provide corresponding solutions as three-dimensional (3D) view, intuitive motion and additional degrees of freedom. This review evaluates these benefits for their impact on suturing in experimental and clinical studies. The Medline database was searched for "robot*, telemanipulat* and laparoscop*". A total of 1150 references were found and further limited to "suturing" for experimental evaluation, finding 89 references. All references were considered for information on robotic suturing in advanced laparoscopy. Further references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each work. In experimental studies current robotic systems have proven their superior suturing capabilities compared to conventional laparoscopic techniques, mainly attributed to 3D visualization and full seven degrees of freedom. In clinical studies these benefits have not yet been sufficiently reproduced. Robotic systems have to prove the benefits shown in experimental studies for suturing tasks in clinical applications. Robotic devices shorten the learning curve of laparoscopic procedures. Further clinical trials focusing on anastomosis time are needed to assess this question.

  15. Microcomposition of Human Urinary Calculi Using Advanced Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Miller, Joe; Chi, Thomas; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kahn, Arnold; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Common methods of commercial urolithiasis analysis, such as light microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, provide limited or no information on the molecular composition of stones, which is vital when studying early stone pathogenesis. We used synchrotron radiation based microfocused x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction advanced imaging techniques to identify and map the elemental composition, including trace elements, of urinary calculi on a μm (0.0001 cm) scale. Materials and Methods Human stone samples were obtained during serial percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy procedures. A portion of each sample was sent for commercial stone analysis and a portion was retained for synchrotron radiation based advanced imaging analysis. Results Synchrotron radiation based methods of stone analysis correctly identified stone composition and provided additional molecular detail on elemental components and spatial distribution in uroliths. Resolution was on the order of a few μm. Conclusions Knowledge of all elements present in lithogenesis at this detail allows for better understanding of early stone formation events, which may provide additional insight to prevent and treat stone formation. PMID:23021997

  16. Microcomposition of human urinary calculi using advanced imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Blaschko, Sarah D; Miller, Joe; Chi, Thomas; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kahn, Arnold; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L

    2013-02-01

    Common methods of commercial urolithiasis analysis, such as light microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, provide limited or no information on the molecular composition of stones, which is vital when studying early stone pathogenesis. We used synchrotron radiation based microfocused x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction advanced imaging techniques to identify and map the elemental composition, including trace elements, of urinary calculi on a μm (0.0001 cm) scale. Human stone samples were obtained during serial percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy procedures. A portion of each sample was sent for commercial stone analysis and a portion was retained for synchrotron radiation based advanced imaging analysis. Synchrotron radiation based methods of stone analysis correctly identified stone composition and provided additional molecular detail on elemental components and spatial distribution in uroliths. Resolution was on the order of a few μm. Knowledge of all elements present in lithogenesis at this detail allows for better understanding of early stone formation events, which may provide additional insight to prevent and treat stone formation. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Liver MRI: From basic protocol to advanced techniques.

    PubMed

    Donato, Henrique; França, Manuela; Candelária, Isabel; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe

    2017-08-01

    Liver MR is a well-established modality with multiparametric capabilities. However, to take advantage of its full capacity, it is mandatory to master the technique and optimize imaging protocols, apply advanced imaging concepts and understand the use of different contrast media. Physiologic artefacts although inherent to upper abdominal studies can be minimized using triggering techniques and new strategies for motion control. For standardization, the liver MR protocol should include motion-resistant T2-w sequences, in-op phase GRE T1 and T2-w fast spin echo sequences with fat suppression. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is mandatory, especially for detection of sub-centimetre metastases. Contrast-enhanced MR is the cornerstone of liver MR, especially for lesion characterization. Although extracellular agents are the most extensively used contrast agents, hepatobiliary contrast media can provide an extra-layer of functional diagnostic information adding to the diagnostic value of liver MR. The use of high field strength (3T) increases SNR but is more challenging especially concerning artefact control. Quantitative MR belongs to the new and evolving field of radiomics where the use of emerging biomarkers such as perfusion or DWI can derive new information regarding disease detection, prognostication and evaluation of tumour response. This information can overcome some of the limitations of current tests, especially when using vascular disruptive agents for oncologic treatment assessment. MR is, today, a robust, mature, multiparametric imaging modality where clinical applications have greatly expanded from morphology to advanced imaging. This new concept should be acknowledged by all those involved in producing high quality, high-end liver MR studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Advances in fabrication of mono- and multifilament Ag-CLAD BSCCO superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Iyer, A.N.; Jammy, R.; Haldar, P.; Hoehn, J.G. Jr.; Suenaga, M.

    1995-07-01

    Fabricating long lengths of robust and high-quality conductors is imperative for various applications of high-{Tc} superconductors. Long lengths of mono- and multifilament Ag-clad Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-0 conductors have been fabricated by the powder-in-tube technique. High values for critical current density (J{sub c}) have been achieved in both short- and long-length conductors. J{sub c} values up to 12,000 A/cm{sup 2} have been achieved in an 850-m-long multifilament conductor. Pancake-shaped coils and test magnets fabricated from long-length conductors were characterized at various temperatures and applied magnetic fields. A magnet containing 770 m of high-{Tc} conductor generated a record high field of {approx} 1 T at 4.2 K in a background field of {approx} 20 T. In-situ tensile and bending characteristics of both mono- and multifilament conductors have also been studied. Multifilament conductors exhibited better axial strain tolerance ({var_epsilon} {approx} 1%) than that of monofilament conductor ({var_epsilon} {approx} 0.2%), while retaining 90% of their initial critical current. An analysis of the results is presented, along with effects of parameters such as thickness, superconductor/Ag ratio, and microstructural details.

  19. Fabrication of advanced organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings for biomedical applications by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xin

    Novel electrodeposition strategies have been developed for the fabrication of thick adherent zirconia ceramic and composite coatings for biomedical applications. The new method is based on the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of polyelectrolyte additives combined with the cathodic precipitation of zirconia. The method enables the room-temperature electrosynthesis of crystalline zirconia nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. Adherent crack-free coatings up to several microns thick were obtained. The deposits were studied by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Obtained results pave the way for electrodeposition of other ceramic-polymer composites. Novel advanced nanocomposite coatings based on bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HA) have been developed for the surface modification of orthopaedic and dental implant metals. HA nanopartic1es prepared by a chemical precipitation method were used for the fabrication of novel HA-chitosan nanocomposite coatings. The use of chitosan enables room-temperature fabrication of the composite coatings. The problems related to the sintering of HA can be avoided. A new electrodeposition strategy, based on the EPD of HA nanoparticles and electrochemical deposition of chitosan macromolecules, has been developed. The method enabled the formation of dense, adherent and uniform coatings of various thicknesses in the range of up to 60 mum. Bioactive composite coatings containing 40.9-89.8 wt% HA were obtained. The deposit composition and microstructure can be tailored by varying the chitosan and HA concentrations in the deposition bath. A mathematical model describing the formation of the HA-chitosan composite deposit has been developed. X-ray studies revealed preferred orientation of HA nanoparticles in the nanocomposites. Obtained coatings provide corrosion protection of the substrates and can be utilized for the fabrication of

  20. Advances in the Rising Bubble Technique for discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgersom, Koen; Luxemburg, Willem; Willemsen, Geert; Bussmann, Luuk

    2014-05-01

    Already in the 19th century, d'Auria described a discharge measurement technique that applies floats to find the depth-integrated velocity (d'Auria, 1882). The basis of this technique was that the horizontal distance that the float travels on its way to the surface is the image of the integrated velocity profile over depth. Viol and Semenov (1964) improved this method by using air bubbles as floats, but still distances were measured manually until Sargent (1981) introduced a technique that could derive the distances from two photographs simultaneously taken from each side of the river bank. Recently, modern image processing techniques proved to further improve the applicability of the method (Hilgersom and Luxemburg, 2012). In the 2012 article, controlling and determining the rising velocity of an air bubble still appeared a major challenge for the application of this method. Ever since, laboratory experiments with different nozzle and tube sizes lead to advances in our self-made equipment enabling us to produce individual air bubbles with a more constant rising velocity. Also, we introduced an underwater camera to on-site determine the rising velocity, which is dependent on the water temperature and contamination, and therefore is site-specific. Camera measurements of the rising velocity proved successful in a laboratory and field setting, although some improvements to the setup are necessary to capture the air bubbles also at depths where little daylight penetrates. References D'Auria, L.: Velocity of streams; A new method to determine correctly the mean velocity of any perpendicular in rivers and canals, (The) American Engineers, 3, 1882. Hilgersom, K.P. and Luxemburg, W.M.J.: Technical Note: How image processing facilitates the rising bubble technique for discharge measurement, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(2), 345-356, 2012. Sargent, D.: Development of a viable method of stream flow measurement using the integrating float technique, Proceedings of

  1. Advances in mask fabrication and alignment for masked ion-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumbo, David P.; Damm, George A.; Engler, D. W.; Fong, F. O.; Sen, S.; Wolfe, John C.; Randall, John N.; Mauger, Phillip E.; Shimkunas, Alex R.; Loeschne, Hans

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes recent developments in three areas ofmasked ion beam lithography (MIBL). These are 1) fabrication oflarge area, low distortion, silicon stencilmasks for demagnifying ion projection lithography, 2) fabrication ofstencil masks with nanometer scale resolution for 1:1 proximity printing, and 3) development of a direct method of alignment using the ion beam induced fluorescence of Si02. These topics are discussed below. Demagnifying ion projection masks: We describe the fabrication of stencil masks in large area, low stress (10 MPa), n-type silicon membranes. The projection masks have a silicon foil area 95 mm in diameter, thicknesses between 1.5-5 and resolution of0.6um. Measured distortion (3a) in the IPL masks ranges between 0.23gm and 0.65,um, with an experimental error of 0.20 1um. Proximity printing masks: A process is described for fabricating stencil masks with 50 nm resolution in low stress, n-type silicon membranes. Membranes less than 0.5 ,ttm thick are shown to be free of the sidewall taper that limits resolution in thicker masks. These thin membranes show a slightly flared profile due to the imperfectly collimated etching ions. Alignment: A direct method of alignment is being developed which uses the ion beam induced fluorescence of Si02 marks. Fluorescence yield is characterized as a function of ion energy and resist coating thickness. The yield for Si02 is in the range between 0.1-1.0 photons/proton, while the yields for Si, Al, and photoresist are negligibly small. Thus, a simple alignment technique can be implemented where registration of a grating in the mask with a corresponding oxide pattern is detected as a fluorescence maximum. A simple model predicts that 50 nm alignment can be accomplished, following a 1 im prealignment, in 2 seconds.

  2. Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) Method for Fabricating Stiffened Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, Mary Cecilia; Hehir, Austin R.; Ivanco, Marie L.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2016-01-01

    This cost-benefit analysis assesses the benefits of the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) manufacturing process for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. These preliminary, rough order-of-magnitude results report a 46 to 58 percent reduction in production costs and a 7-percent reduction in weight over the conventional metallic manufacturing technique used in this study for comparison. Production cost savings of 35 to 58 percent were reported over the composite manufacturing technique used in this study for comparison; however, the ANNST concept was heavier. In this study, the predicted return on investment of equipment required for the ANNST method was ten cryogenic tank barrels when compared with conventional metallic manufacturing. The ANNST method was compared with the conventional multi-piece metallic construction and composite processes for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. A case study compared these three alternatives for manufacturing a cylinder of specified geometry, with particular focus placed on production costs and process complexity, with cost analyses performed by the analogy and parametric methods. Furthermore, a scalability study was conducted for three tank diameters to assess the highest potential payoff of the ANNST process for manufacture of large-diameter cryogenic tanks. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was subsequently used with a group of selected subject matter experts to assess the value of the various benefits achieved by the ANNST method for potential stakeholders. The AHP study results revealed that decreased final cylinder mass and quality assurance were the most valued benefits of cylinder manufacturing methods, therefore emphasizing the relevance of the benefits achieved with the ANNST process for future projects.

  3. Advanced Cytologic Techniques for the Detection of Malignant Pancreatobiliary Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Luna, Laura E.; Kipp, Benjamin; Halling, Kevin C.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Kremers., Walter K.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Barr Fritcher, Emily G.; Levy, Michael J.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    Background & Aims Two advanced cytologic techniques for detecting aneuploidy, digital image analysis (DIA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have recently been developed to help identify malignant pancreatobiliary strictures. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of cytology, DIA, and FISH for the identification of malignant pancreatobiliary strictures. Methods Brush cytologic specimens from 233 consecutive patients undergoing ERCP for pancreatobiliary strictures were examined by all three techniques. Strictures were stratified as proximal (n=33) or distal (n=114) based on whether they occurred above or below the cystic duct, respectively. Strictures in patients with PSC (n=86) were analyzed separately. Results Despite the stratification, the performances of the tests were similar. Routine cytology has a low sensitivity (5–20%) but 100% specificity. Because of the high specificity for cytology, we assessed the performance of the other tests when routine cytology was negative. In this clinical context, FISH had an increased sensitivity (35–60%) when assessing for chromosomal gains (polysomy) while preserving the specificity of cytology. The sensitivity and specificity of DIA was intermediate as compared to routine cytology and FISH, but was additive to FISH values demonstrating only trisomy of chromosome 7 or chromosome 3. Conclusions These findings suggest that FISH and DIA increase the sensitivity for the diagnosis of malignant pancreatobiliary tract strictures over that obtained by conventional cytology while maintaining an acceptable specificity. PMID:17030177

  4. Combined external lithotripsy and endoscopic techniques for advanced sialolithiasis cases.

    PubMed

    Nahlieli, Oded; Shacham, Rachel; Zaguri, Ami

    2010-02-01

    To assess a combined external lithotripsy-sialoendoscopy method developed for advanced salivary gland sialolithiasis. A total of 94 patients (43 males and 51 females) underwent these treatment methods. Of these 94 patients, 60 had pathologic features in the submandibular gland and 34 in the parotid gland. A miniature external lithotripter was used, combined with multifunctional sialoendoscopes and endoscopic-assisted techniques, to achieve effective removal/elimination of the stones in these difficult cases. Total elimination of the stone using lithotripsy alone was achieved in 32% of the cases; in 29%, intraductal endoscopic assistance was needed. In the remaining 39%, the removal of a stone was achieved with the help of an endoscopy-assisted extraductal approach (37 cases). At 6 months of follow-up, all patients who had undergone lithotripsy or lithotripsy plus intraductal endoscopy had an absence of symptoms. Of the 37 patients who had undergone an endoscopy-assisted extraductal approach, 35 (95%) remained asymptomatic. Lithotripsy plus intraductal or extraductal endoscopic treatment of sialolithiasis is a highly effective surgical method of eliminating/removing salivary stones, especially those attached to the surrounding tissue and in the secondary ducts. This method helps to avoid resection of the salivary glands and represents an additional development of minimal invasive surgical techniques. Copyright 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fabrication of optical 1x2 POF couplers using the laser-LIGA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbuecher, Thomas; Braune, Torsten; Dadic, Dalibor; Sprzagala, M.; Koch, Anne

    2003-04-01

    Plastic optical fibers (POF) continuously gained its importance during the last decade, since they are widely used in automotive applications for optical data communications (for e.g. MOST). The application of POF for in-flight-entertainment (IFE) optical networks in civil aircraft cabin areas is currently under investigation. Since it is expected that the optical networks will develop from a point-to-point network architecture to more complicated structures there will be a need for optical couplers distributing the signals to different suppliers. Typical applications would be for e.g. the distribution of optical data to IFE implemented within single seats of a seat row of an airplane. Within this work the fabrication of an optical 1x2 POF coupler by the Laser-LIGA technique is demonstrated. The Laser-LIGA technique compared to standard X-ray lithography is simpler and more cost effective. Moreover, the Laser ablation technique also allows rapid prototyping of the same structures. The POF couplers fabricated by this technology show insertion loss values down to about 5.6 dB, depending on the waveguide core material and exhibit good uniformity values in the order of 0.1 dB.

  6. Fabrication of deterministic nanostructure assemblies with sub-nanometer spacing using a nanoimprinting transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Barcelo, Steven J; Kim, Ansoon; Wu, Wei; Li, Zhiyong

    2012-07-24

    Deterministic patterning or assembly of nanoparticles often requires complex processes that are not easily incorporated into system architectures of arbitrary design. We have developed a technique to fabricate deterministic nanoparticle assemblies using simple and inexpensive nanoimprinting equipment and procedures. First, a metal film is evaporated onto flexible polymer pillars made by nanoimprinting. The resulting metal caps on top of the pillars can be pulled into assemblies of arbitrary design by collapsing the pillars in a well-controlled manner. The nanoparticle assemblies are then transferred from the pillars onto a new substrate via nanoimprinting with the aid of either cold welding or chemical bonding. Using this technique, a variety of patterned nanoparticle assemblies of Au and Ag with a critical dimension less than 2 nm were fabricated and transferred to silicon-, glass-, and metal-coated substrates. Separating the nanostructure assembly from the final architecture removes significant design constraints from devices incorporating nanoparticle assemblies. The application of this process as a technique for generating surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates is presented.

  7. Resonant marker design and fabrication techniques for device visualization during interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Mandy; Detert, Markus; Rube, Martin A; El-Tahir, Abubakr; Elle, Ole Jakob; Melzer, Andreas; Schmidt, Bertram; Rose, Georg H

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has great potential as an imaging modality for guiding minimally invasive interventions because of its superior soft tissue contrast and the possibility of arbitrary slice positioning while avoiding ionizing radiation and nephrotoxic iodine contrast agents. The major constraints are: limited patient access, the insufficient assortment of compatible instruments and the difficult device visualization compared to X-ray based techniques. For the latter, resonant MRI markers, fabricated by using the wire-winding technique, have been developed. This fabrication technique serves as a functional model but has no clinical use. Thus, the aim of this study is to illustrate a four-phase design process of resonant markers involving microsystems technologies. The planning phase comprises the definition of requirements and the simulation of electromagnetic performance of the MRI markers. The following technologies were considered for the realization phase: aerosol-deposition process, hot embossing technology and thin film technology. The subsequent evaluation phase involves several test methods regarding electrical and mechanical characterization as well as MRI visibility aspects. The degree of fulfillment of the predefined requirements is determined within the analysis phase. Furthermore, an exemplary evaluation of four realized MRI markers was conducted, focusing on the performance within the MRI environment.

  8. UV-transmitting step-index fluorophosphate glass fiber fabricated by the crucible technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleani, Gustavo; Ledemi, Yannick; de Lima Filho, Elton Soares; Morency, Steeve; Delaizir, Gaëlle; Chenu, Sébastien; Duclere, Jean René; Messaddeq, Younes

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we report on the fabrication process of highly pure step-index fluorophosphate glass optical fibers by a modified crucible technique. High-purity fluorophosphate glasses based on 10 mol% of barium metaphosphate and 90 mol% of metal fluorides (AlF3sbnd CaF2sbnd MgF2sbnd SrF2) have been studied in order to produce step-index optical fibers transmitting in the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) region. The characteristic temperatures, viscosity around softening temperature and optical transmission in the UV-visible region of the prepared bulk glasses were characterized in a first step. The selected glass compositions were then used to prepare core-cladding optical preforms by using a modified built-in casting technique. While uncontrolled crystallization of the fiber was observed during the preform stretching by using the conventional method, we successfully obtained crystal-free fiber by using a modified crucible technique. In this alternative approach, the produced core-cladding preforms were inserted into a home-designed fused silica crucible assembly and heated at 643 °C to allow glass flowing throughout the crucible, preventing the formation of crystals. Single index fluorophosphate glass fibers were fabricated following the same process as well. The optical attenuation at 244 nm and in the interval 350-1750 nm was measured on both single index and step-index optical fibers. Their potential for using in DUV applications is discussed.

  9. An Innovative and Simple Technique of Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya; Mysore, Ashwin; Da Costa, Godwin Clovis

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of severely atrophic ridges has always been an ordeal for the clinician due to decreased support, stability and retention. Because of severe resorption the restorative space between maxillary and mandibular residual ridges is increased. Rehabilitation in such cases may result in increased height and weight of the prosthesis further compromising its retention and stability. This in turn overloads the underlying hard and soft tissues exacerbating ridge resorption so, in order to break this vicious cycle, the weight of the prosthesis needs to be reduced which can be achieved by making hollow prosthesis. This article describes a novel technique of fabricating a hollow maxillary complete denture. PMID:27656580

  10. One-step fabrication of multifunctional silica microbelt with the novel stacked structure by electrospinning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong; Li, Jianjun

    2014-03-01

    In this study, novel route for the preparation of novel stacked structure and one-step fabrication of electrospun silica microbelt with controllable wettability by a combination of sol-gel chemistry and electrospinning techniques. The application field of the one-dimensional silica in different environmental conditions was controlled by functionalization of the hydroxyl groups and non-polar groups on the backbone. Experimental results reveal that the formation of one-dimensional stacked structure is strongly related to the conductive properties of collective substrate. The exploration of the one-dimensional stacked structure mechanism was also conducted.

  11. Sensing and identification of carbon monoxide using carbon films fabricated by methane arc discharge decomposition technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials have recently received attention in electronic applications and measurement systems. In this work, we demonstrate the electrical behavior of carbon films fabricated by methane arc discharge decomposition technique. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of carbon films are investigated in the presence and absence of gas. The experiment reveals that the current passing through the carbon films increases when the concentration of CO2 gas is increased from 200 to 800 ppm. This phenomenon which is a result of conductance changes can be employed in sensing applications such as gas sensors. PMID:25177219

  12. A Simple Technique for Fabricating a Screw-Retained/Cemented Implant-Supported Crown.

    PubMed

    Helvey, Gregg A

    2017-03-01

    Many factors figure into the long-term success of an implant-supported restoration. While some are uncontrollable, others are manageable. The cement-retained implant-supported restoration is easier to fabricate, while the screw-retained implant-supported restoration involves more complicated, timeconsuming laboratory procedures. Most research has found the screw-retained restoration has had more minimal complications than the cement-retained counterpart. This article describes a simple, low-cost technique of converting a cement-retained implant crown to a screw-retained implant crown, which allows for easy retrievability and eliminates a number of laboratory steps and costs.

  13. Comparison of quartz crystallographic preferred orientations identified with optical fabric analysis, electron backscatter and neutron diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Hunter, N J R; Wilson, C J L; Luzin, V

    2017-02-01

    Three techniques are used to measure crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in a naturally deformed quartz mylonite: transmitted light cross-polarized microscopy using an automated fabric analyser, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and neutron diffraction. Pole figure densities attributable to crystal-plastic deformation are variably recognizable across the techniques, particularly between fabric analyser and diffraction instruments. Although fabric analyser techniques offer rapid acquisition with minimal sample preparation, difficulties may exist when gathering orientation data parallel with the incident beam. Overall, we have found that EBSD and fabric analyser techniques are best suited for studying CPO distributions at the grain scale, where individual orientations can be linked to their source grain or nearest neighbours. Neutron diffraction serves as the best qualitative and quantitative means of estimating the bulk CPO, due to its three-dimensional data acquisition, greater sample area coverage, and larger sample size. However, a number of sampling methods can be applied to FA and EBSD data to make similar approximations.

  14. Recent Advances in Seismic Wavefront Tracking Techniques and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambridge, M.; Rawlinson, N.; Hauser, J.

    2007-12-01

    In observational seismology, wavefront tracking techniques are becoming increasingly popular as a means of predicting two point traveltimes and their associated paths. Possible applications include reflection migration, earthquake relocation and seismic tomography at a wide variety of scales. Compared with traditional ray based techniques such as shooting and bending, wavefront tracking has the advantage of locating traveltimes between the source and every point in the medium; in many cases, improved efficiency and robustness; and greater potential for tracking multiple arrivals. In this presentation, two wavefront tracking techniques will be considered: the so-called Fast Marching Method (FMM), and a wavefront construction (WFC) scheme. Over the last several years, FMM has become a mature technique in seismology, with a number of improvements to the underlying theory and the release of software tools that allow it to be used in a variety of applications. At its core, FMM is a grid based solver that implicitly tracks a propagating wavefront by seeking finite difference solutions to the eikonal equation along an evolving narrow band. Recent developments include the use of source grid refinement to improve accuracy, the introduction of a multi-stage scheme to allow reflections and refractions to be tracked in layered media, and extension to spherical coordinates. Implementation of these ideas has led to a number of different applications, including teleseismic tomography, wide-angle reflection and refraction tomography, earthquake relocation, and ambient noise imaging using surface waves. The WFC scheme represents the wavefront surface as a set of points in 6-D phase space; these points are advanced in time using local initial value ray tracing in order to form a sequence of wavefront surfaces that fill the model volume. Surface refinement and simplification techniques inspired by recent developments in computer graphics are used to maintain a fixed density of nodes

  15. Investigation of the Thermomechanical Behavior of a 2 × 2 TWILL Weave Fabric Advanced Textile Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, A.; Mali, H. S.; Misra, R. K.

    2015-05-01

    The thermomechanical performance of a 2 × 2 twill weave fabric advanced textile composite was evaluated. The tensile, compressive, and flexural properties of flat beam specimens of the composite were tested at room temperature, in water (24.9 to 96.7°C), and in liquid nitrogen (-96.9 to 99.4°C) by using a high-precision instrument called the dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). The storage modulus and tanδ of the carbonfiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) specimens at various temperatures were evaluated. The scanning electron micrograph (SEMs) of deformed composite specimens revealed their failure mode (fiber pull-out, debonding, crack propagation, delamination, matrix cracking, and kinking of fibers).

  16. Fabrication technologies and sensing applications of graphene-based composite films: Advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Wensi; Zhang, Panpan; Su, Zhiqiang

    2017-03-15

    Graphene (G)-based composite materials have been widely explored for the sensing applications ascribing to their atom-thick two-dimensional conjugated structures, high conductivity, large specific surface areas and controlled modification. With the enormous advantages of film structure, G-based composite films (GCFs), prepared by combining G with different functional nanomaterials (noble metals, metal compounds, carbon materials, polymer materials, etc.), show unique optical, mechanical, electrical, chemical, and catalytic properties. Therefore, great quantities of sensors with high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability have been created in recent years. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the fabrication technologies of GCFs and their specific sensing applications. In addition, the relationship between the properties of GCFs and sensing performance is concentrated on. Finally, the personal perspectives and key challenges of GCFs are mentioned in the hope to shed a light on their potential future research directions.

  17. Dilatancy-based impression and fabrication technique for custom foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Sletto, Larissa A; Wu, Yeongchi; Robinson, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Current methods used to take impressions for custom foot orthoses include plaster bandage, foam box, fiberglass, and laser-optical scanner. Impressions are converted to positive plaster or foam models. These methods create waste and may not be feasible in resource-limited areas. This technical note presents an alternative, greener impression and fabrication technique for foot orthoses that utilizes the dilatancy principle. Steps of the dilatancy (vacuum-based) procedure include taking an impression of the foot, converting the negative mold to a positive sand model, modifying the positive sand model, and thermoforming the foot orthosis. This plaster-less system is inexpensive to set up and maintain, is reusable thereby minimizing cost and waste, and is clean to use. It enables a practitioner to quickly take an impression for fabricating a foot orthosis in a short period of time during a single clinic visit by the patient. The dilatancy casting system could potentially be a cheaper, faster, and greener alternative procedure for fabricating custom foot orthoses in both developing and developed countries. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  18. Fabrication of low-cost, cementless femoral stem 316L stainless steel using investment casting technique.

    PubMed

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Suhasril, Andril Arafat; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Omar, Mohd Afian; Abd Kader, Ab Saman; Mohd Noor, Alias; A Harris, Arief Ruhullah; Abdul Majid, Norazman

    2014-07-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a flourishing orthopedic surgery, generating billions of dollars of revenue. The cost associated with the fabrication of implants has been increasing year by year, and this phenomenon has burdened the patient with extra charges. Consequently, this study will focus on designing an accurate implant via implementing the reverse engineering of three-dimensional morphological study based on a particular population. By using finite element analysis, this study will assist to predict the outcome and could become a useful tool for preclinical testing of newly designed implants. A prototype is then fabricated using 316L stainless steel by applying investment casting techniques that reduce manufacturing cost without jeopardizing implant quality. The finite element analysis showed that the maximum von Mises stress was 66.88 MPa proximally with a safety factor of 2.39 against endosteal fracture, and micromotion was 4.73 μm, which promotes osseointegration. This method offers a fabrication process of cementless femoral stems with lower cost, subsequently helping patients, particularly those from nondeveloped countries.

  19. Characterization of fabricated three dimensional scaffolds of bioceramic-polymer composite via microstereolithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Marina; Covington, James A.; Bolarinwa, Aminat

    2014-02-01

    Microstereolithography is a method used for rapid prototyping of polymeric and ceramic components. This technique converts a computer-aided design (CAD) to a three dimensional (3D) model, and enables layer per layer fabrication curing a liquid resin with UV-light or laser source. The aim of this project was to formulate photocurable polymer reinforced with synthesized calcium pyrophosphate (CPP), and to fabricate a 3D scaffolds with optimum mechanical properties for specific tissue engineering applications. The photocurable ceramic suspension was prepared with acrylate polyester, multifunctional acrylate monomer with the addition of 50-70wt% of CPP, photoinitiators and photoinhibitors. The 3D structure of disc (5 mm height × 4 mm diameter) was successfully fabricated using Envisiontec Perfactory3® . They were then sintered at high temperature for polymer removal, to obtain a ceramic of the desired porosity. The density increased to more than 35% and the dimensional shrinkage after sintering were 33%. The discs were then subjected compressive measurement, biodegradation and bioactivity test. Morphology and CPP content of the sintered polymer was investigated with SEM and XRD, respectively. The addition of CPP coupled with high temperature sintering, had a significant effect on the compressive strength exhibited by the bioceramic. The values are in the range of cancellous bone (2-4 MPa). In biodegradation and bioactivity test, the synthesized CPP induced the formation of apatite layer and its nucleation onto the composite surface.

  20. Recent advances in graphene-based nanomaterials for fabricating electrochemical hydrogen peroxide sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruizhong; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-15

    Due to the large specific surface area, extraordinary mechanical flexibility, chemical stability, and superior electrical and thermal conductivities, graphene (G)-based materials have recently opened up an exciting field in the science and technology of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials with continuously growing academic and technological impetus. In the past several years, graphene-based materials have been well designed, synthesized, and investigated for sensing applications. In this review, we discuss the synthesis and application of graphene-based 2D nanomaterials for the fabrication of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) electrochemical sensors. In particular, graphene-based nanomaterials as immobilization matrix of heme proteins for the fabrication of enzymatic H2O2 electrochemical biosensors is first summarized. Then, the application of graphene-based electrocatalysts (metal-free, noble-metals and non-noble metals) in constructing non-enzymatic H2O2 electrochemical sensors is discussed in detail. We hope that this review is helpful to push forward the advancement of this academic issue (189 references).

  1. PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    S. T. Khericha

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

  2. Fabrication and physical testing of graphite composite panels utilizing woven graphite fabric with current and advanced state-of-the-art resin systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C. S.

    1979-01-01

    Three weaves were evaluated; a balanced plain weave, a balanced 8-harness satin weave, and a semiunidirectional crowfoot satin weave. The current state-of-the-art resin system selected was Fiberite's 934 Epoxy; the advanced resin systems evaluated were Phenolic, Phenolic/Novolac, Benzyl and Bismaleimide. The panels were fabricated for testing on NASA/Ames Research Center's Composites Modification Program. Room temperature mechanical tests only were performed by Hitco; the results are presented.

  3. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  4. Comparison of the fit of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital and the conventional impression techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the fit of cast gold crowns fabricated from the conventional and the digital impression technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Artificial tooth in a master model and abutment teeth in ten patients were restored with cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital and the conventional impression technique. The forty silicone replicas were cut in three sections; each section was evaluated in nine points. The measurement was carried out by using a measuring microscope and I-Soultion. Data from the silicone replica were analyzed and all tests were performed with α-level of 0.05. RESULTS 1. The average gaps of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital impression technique were larger than those of the conventional impression technique significantly. 2. In marginal and internal axial gap of cast gold crowns, no statistical differences were found between the two impression techniques. 3. The internal occlusal gaps of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital impression technique were larger than those of the conventional impression technique significantly. CONCLUSION Both prostheses presented clinically acceptable results with comparing the fit. The prostheses fabricated from the digital impression technique showed more gaps, in respect of occlusal surface. PMID:28243386

  5. Comparison of the fit of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital and the conventional impression techniques.

    PubMed

    Yun, Mi-Jung; Jeon, Young-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the fit of cast gold crowns fabricated from the conventional and the digital impression technique. Artificial tooth in a master model and abutment teeth in ten patients were restored with cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital and the conventional impression technique. The forty silicone replicas were cut in three sections; each section was evaluated in nine points. The measurement was carried out by using a measuring microscope and I-Soultion. Data from the silicone replica were analyzed and all tests were performed with α-level of 0.05. 1. The average gaps of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital impression technique were larger than those of the conventional impression technique significantly. 2. In marginal and internal axial gap of cast gold crowns, no statistical differences were found between the two impression techniques. 3. The internal occlusal gaps of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital impression technique were larger than those of the conventional impression technique significantly. Both prostheses presented clinically acceptable results with comparing the fit. The prostheses fabricated from the digital impression technique showed more gaps, in respect of occlusal surface.

  6. Polymer microfluidic bioreactor fabrication by means of gray scale lithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Prokaryn, Piotr; Dobrowolski, Rafał; Malinowska, Anna; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Trojanowski, Damian; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a new method of polymer microfluidic bioreactor fabrication by means of a gray scale lithography technique. As a result of the gray scale lithography process the 3D model of the bioreactor is defined in photoresist. The obtained model serves as a sacrificial layer for the subsequent transfer of the 3D shape into the polymer material. The proposed method allows simultaneous definition of both the overall bioreactor geometry and the multi steps cell traps in a single photolithography step. Such microfluidic structure can be used for sorting cells based on their size. The developed solution significantly simplifies the production technology and reduces its costs in comparison to standard photolithography techniques.

  7. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. As a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.

  8. PMN-PT single crystal focusing transducer fabricated using a mechanical dimpling technique.

    PubMed

    Lam, K H; Chen, Y; Cheung, K F; Dai, J Y

    2012-01-01

    A ∼5MHz focusing PMN-PT single crystal ultrasound transducer has been fabricated utilizing a mechanical dimpling technique, where the dimpled crystal wafer was used as an active element of the focusing transducer. For the dimpled focusing transducer, the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient was enhanced significantly from 0.42 to 0.56. The dimpled transducer also yields a -6dB bandwidth of 63.5% which is almost double the bandwidth of the plane transducer. An insertion loss of the dimpled transducer (-18.1dB) is much lower than that of the plane transducer. Finite element simulation also reveals specific focused beam from concave crystal surface. These promising results show that the dimpling technique can be used to develop high-resolution focusing single crystal transducers.

  9. Technique for the efficient and reproducible fabrication of electromagnetic levitation coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Curreri, P. A.; Theiss, J.; Abbaschian, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    A technique has been developed for fabricating electromagnetic induction coils in a reproducible manner. The process utilizes a split mandrel that can be disassembled to remove the mandrel from the coil. The technique has increased coil production rates by a factor of 8 over the freehand winding method. The success rate for producing a functional levitation coil has been increased from 50 percent to 95 percent. The levitation coil designed during this work has successfully levitated and melted a variety of alloys including Cu, Ag, Ag-Ni, Cu-Fe, Fe-C, and Nb-Ge. W was also levitated but not melted at temperatures as high as 2700 C. The highest sample melt temperature achieved was 2400 C for the Nb-Ge samples.

  10. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; ...

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. Asmore » a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.« less

  11. Internal and marginal fit of cobalt-chromium fixed dental prostheses fabricated with 3 different techniques.

    PubMed

    Nesse, Harald; Ulstein, Dina Mari Åkervik; Vaage, Malene Myhre; Øilo, Marit

    2015-11-01

    Conventionally, the fabrication method for Co-Cr restorations has been casting by the lost-wax method. Milling and selective laser melting (SLM) are more cost effective and thereby increasingly used. The precision of the different methods regarding internal and marginal fit, however, is not fully known. The purpose of this in vitro study was to examine and evaluate whether the 3 fabrication methods of conventional casting, milling, and SLM differ in internal and marginal fit for Co-Cr fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Thirty Co-Cr metal frameworks for 3-unit FDPs were made with 3 fabrication methods for a model with 2 abutment preparations. Internal fit was measured with the replica method. A white silicone indicator material simulated the cement space. This was measured by light microscopy at ×20 magnification and a digital measurement program. Marginal fit was evaluated with the direct-sight technique at ×4.6 magnification and given a score from 1 to 5. One-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significance tests were used to evaluate differences among groups with regard to internal fit. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to calculate differences among groups with regard to marginal gap. The Pearson r test was used for correlations calculations (α=.05). Statistically significant differences were found in both internal and marginal fit among the test groups (P<.003). The milled group had the best overall fit, followed by the cast and SLM groups. SLM restorations had the poorest internal and marginal fit, whereas the milling method had the best results. The SLM technique did not achieve clinically acceptable values for internal fit. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Custom-made antibiotic cement nails: a comparative study of different fabrication techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Wan; Cuellar, Derly O; Hao, Jiandong; Seligson, David; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2014-08-01

    The management of intramedullary long bone infections remains a challenge. Placement of antibiotic cement nails is a useful adjuvant to the antibiotic treatment of osteomyelitis. However, fabrication of antibiotic cement nails can be arduous. The purpose of this article is to introduce an easy and reproducible technique for the fabrication of antibiotics cement nails. We compared the time required to peel the chest tube off the 6 antibiotic cement nail using 2 different cement-cooling techniques and the addition of mineral oil in the chest tube. Additionally, we evaluated the optimal time to cut the chest tube (before and after cement hardening), consistency of nail's diameter, and the roughness of its surface. Cooling and peeling times were measured and failure was defined as a working time (from cement mixing to have a usable antibiotic cement nail) that exceeded 1 h. When the antibiotic cement nail was left to cool by convection (i.e. air-cooling), we failed to peel the plastic off the cement nail. When the chest tube was cut after conductive cooling (i.e. cold water-cooled), the cooling time was 10 min and the peeling time was 30 min without the use of mineral oil; the addition of mineral oil reduced peeling time to 7.5 min. Following peeling, residual adherent plastic pieces were found along the entire surface of the nail when no mineral oil was used. This was rarely seen when mineral oil was utilized to coat the inner layer of the chest tube. Conductively cooling of the cement nail (in cold water) and pre-lubricating the chest tube with mineral oil are 2 tricks that render fabrication of antibiotic nail more efficient, reliable, and practical. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  14. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  15. Porous titanium scaffolds fabricated using a rapid prototyping and powder metallurgy technique.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Garrett E; Pandit, Abhay S; Apatsidis, Dimitrios P

    2008-09-01

    One of the main issues in orthopaedic implant design is the fabrication of scaffolds that closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the surrounding bone. This research reports on a multi-stage rapid prototyping technique that was successfully developed to produce porous titanium scaffolds with fully interconnected pore networks and reproducible porosity and pore size. The scaffolds' porous characteristics were governed by a sacrificial wax template, fabricated using a commercial 3D-printer. Powder metallurgy processes were employed to generate the titanium scaffolds by filling around the wax template with titanium slurry. In the attempt to optimise the powder metallurgy technique, variations in slurry concentration, compaction pressure and sintering temperature were investigated. By altering the wax design template, pore sizes ranging from 200 to 400 microm were achieved. Scaffolds with porosities of 66.8 +/- 3.6% revealed compression strengths of 104.4+/-22.5 MPa in the axial direction and 23.5 +/- 9.6 MPa in the transverse direction demonstrating their anisotropic nature. Scaffold topography was characterised using scanning electron microscopy and microcomputed tomography. Three-dimensional reconstruction enabled the main architectural parameters such as pore size, interconnecting porosity, level of anisotropy and level of structural disorder to be determined. The titanium scaffolds were compared to their intended designs, as governed by their sacrificial wax templates. Although discrepancies in architectural parameters existed between the intended and the actual scaffolds, overall the results indicate that the porous titanium scaffolds have the properties to be potentially employed in orthopaedic applications.

  16. Fabrication of a highly sensitive penicillin sensor based on charge transfer techniques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ro; Rahman, M M; Sawada, Kazuaki; Ishida, Makoto

    2009-03-15

    A highly sensitive penicillin biosensor based on a charge-transfer technique (CTTPS) has been fabricated and demonstrated in this paper. CTTPS comprised a charge accumulation technique for penicilloic acid and H(+) ions perception system. With the proposed CTTPS, it is possible to amplify the sensing signals without external amplifier by using the charge accumulation cycles. The fabricated CTTPS exhibits excellent performance for penicillin detection and exhibit a high-sensitivity (47.852 mV/mM), high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), large span (1445 mV), wide linear range (0-25 mM), fast response time (<3s), and very good reproducibility. A very lower detection limit of about 0.01 mM was observed from the proposed sensor. Under optimum conditions, the proposed CTTPS outstripped the performance of the widely used ISFET penicillin sensor and exhibited almost eight times greater sensitivity as compared to ISFET (6.56 mV/mM). The sensor system is implemented for the measurement of the penicillin concentration in penicillin fermentation broth.

  17. Fabrication of high-transmission microporous membranes by proton beam writing-based molding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liping; Meyer, Clemens; Guibert, Edouard; Homsy, Alexandra; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2017-08-01

    Porous membranes are widely used as filters in a broad range of micro and nanofluidic applications, e.g. organelle sorters, permeable cell growth substrates, and plasma filtration. Conventional silicon fabrication approaches are not suitable for microporous membranes due to the low mechanical stability of thin film substrates. Other techniques like ion track etching are limited to the production of randomly distributed and randomly orientated pores with non-uniform pore sizes. In this project, we developed a procedure for fabricating high-transmission microporous membranes by proton beam writing (PBW) with a combination of spin-casting and soft lithography. In this approach, focused 2 MeV protons were used to lithographically write patterns consisting of hexagonal arrays of high-density pillars of few μm size in a SU-8 layer coated on a silicon wafer. After development, the pillars were conformably coated with a thin film of poly-para-xylylene (Parylene)-C release agent and spin-coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). To facilitate demolding, a special technique based on the use of a laser-cut sealing tape ring was developed. This method facilitated the successful delamination of 20-μm thick PDMS membrane with high-density micropores from the mold without rupture or damage.

  18. Use of advanced modeling techniques to optimize thermal packaging designs.

    PubMed

    Formato, Richard M; Potami, Raffaele; Ahmed, Iftekhar

    2010-01-01

    Through a detailed case study the authors demonstrate, for the first time, the capability of using advanced modeling techniques to correctly simulate the transient temperature response of a convective flow-based thermal shipper design. The objective of this case study was to demonstrate that simulation could be utilized to design a 2-inch-wall polyurethane (PUR) shipper to hold its product box temperature between 2 and 8 °C over the prescribed 96-h summer profile (product box is the portion of the shipper that is occupied by the payload). Results obtained from numerical simulation are in excellent agreement with empirical chamber data (within ±1 °C at all times), and geometrical locations of simulation maximum and minimum temperature match well with the corresponding chamber temperature measurements. Furthermore, a control simulation test case was run (results taken from identical product box locations) to compare the coupled conduction-convection model with a conduction-only model, which to date has been the state-of-the-art method. For the conduction-only simulation, all fluid elements were replaced with "solid" elements of identical size and assigned thermal properties of air. While results from the coupled thermal/fluid model closely correlated with the empirical data (±1 °C), the conduction-only model was unable to correctly capture the payload temperature trends, showing a sizeable error compared to empirical values (ΔT > 6 °C). A modeling technique capable of correctly capturing the thermal behavior of passively refrigerated shippers can be used to quickly evaluate and optimize new packaging designs. Such a capability provides a means to reduce the cost and required design time of shippers while simultaneously improving their performance. Another advantage comes from using thermal modeling (assuming a validated model is available) to predict the temperature distribution in a shipper that is exposed to ambient temperatures which were not bracketed

  19. A new method of fabricating a blend scaffold using an indirect three-dimensional printing technique.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Hyungseok; Hong, Jung Min; Park, Jeong Hun; Shim, Jung Hee; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-03

    Due to its simplicity and effectiveness, the physical blending of polymers is considered to be a practical strategy for developing a versatile scaffold having desirable mechanical and biochemical properties. In the present work, an indirect three-dimensional (i3D) printing technique was proposed to fabricate a 3D free-form scaffold using a blend of immiscible materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin. The i3D printing technique includes 3D printing of a mold and a sacrificial molding process. PCL/chloroform and gelatin/water were physically mixed to prepare the blend solution, which was subsequently injected into the cavity of a 3D printed mold. After solvent removal and gelatin cross-linking, the mold was dissolved to obtain a PCL-gelatin (PG) scaffold, with a specific 3D structure. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that PCL masses and gelatin fibers in the PG scaffold homogenously coexisted without chemical bonding. Compression tests confirmed that gelatin incorporation into the PCL enhanced its mechanical flexibility and softness, to the point of being suitable for soft-tissue engineering, as opposed to pure PCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells, cultured on a PG scaffold, exhibited enhanced in vitro chondrogenic differentiation and tissue formation, compared with those on a PCL scaffold. The i3D printing technique can be used to blend a variety of materials, facilitating 3D scaffold fabrication for specific tissue regeneration. Furthermore, this convenient and versatile technique may lead to wider application of 3D printing in tissue engineering.

  20. Unconventional low-cost fabrication and patterning techniques for point of care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu; Nguyen, Diep; Chen, Aaron; Lew, Valerie; Khine, Michelle

    2011-04-01

    The potential of rapid, quantitative, and sensitive diagnosis has led to many innovative 'lab on chip' technologies for point of care diagnostic applications. Because these chips must be designed within strict cost constraints to be widely deployable, recent research in this area has produced extremely novel non-conventional micro- and nano-fabrication innovations. These advances can be leveraged for other biological assays as well, including for custom assay development and academic prototyping. The technologies reviewed here leverage extremely low-cost substrates and easily adoptable ways to pattern both structural and biological materials at high resolution in unprecedented ways. These new approaches offer the promise of more rapid prototyping with less investment in capital equipment as well as greater flexibility in design. Though still in their infancy, these technologies hold potential to improve upon the resolution, sensitivity, flexibility, and cost-savings over more traditional approaches.

  1. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  2. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    PubMed

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted.

  3. Fabrication of Lightweight Radiation Shielding Composite Materials by Field Assisted Sintering Technique (FAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha; Trivedi, Sudhir; Chen, Henry; Kutcher, Susan; Zhang, Dajie; Singh, Jogender

    2017-01-01

    Advances in radiation shielding technologies are needed to protect humans and electronic components from all threats of space radiation over long durations. In this paper, we report on the use of the innovative and novel fabrication technology known as Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) to fabricate lightweight material with enhanced radiation shielding strength to safeguard humans and electronics suitable for next generation space exploration missions. The base materials we investigated were aluminum (Al), the current standard material for space hardware, and Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE), which has high hydrogen content and resistance to nuclear reaction from neutrons, making it a good shielding material for both gamma radiation and particles. UHMWPE also has high resistance to corrosive chemicals, extremely low moisture sensitivity, very low coefficient of friction, and high resistance to abrasion. We reinforced the base materials by adding high density (ie, high atomic weight) metallic material into the composite. These filler materials included: boron carbide (B4C), tungsten (W), tungsten carbide (WC) and gadolinium (Gd).

  4. Hydrothermal fabrication of selectively doped organic assisted advanced ZnO nanomaterial for solar driven photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Namratha, K; Byrappa, K; Byrappa, S; Venkateswarlu, P; Rajasekhar, D; Deepthi, B K

    2015-08-01

    Hydrothermal fabrication of selectively doped (Ag(+)+Pd(3+)) advanced ZnO nanomaterial has been carried out under mild pressure temperature conditions (autogeneous; 150°C). Gluconic acid has been used as a surface modifier to effectively control the particle size and morphology of these ZnO nanoparticles. The experimental parameters were tuned to achieve optimum conditions for the synthesis of selectively doped ZnO nanomaterials with an experimental duration of 4 hr. These selectively doped ZnO nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The solar driven photocatalytic studies have been carried out for organic dyes, i.e., Procion MX-5B dye, Cibacron Brilliant Yellow dye, Indigo Carmine dye, separately and all three mixed, by using gluconic acid modified selectively doped advanced ZnO nanomaterial. The influence of catalyst, its concentration and initial dye concentration resulted in the photocatalytic efficiency of 89% under daylight. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  6. Recent advances in fabrication of high-T{sub c} superconductors for electric power applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.

    1998-03-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports an applied superconductivity program entitled ''Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems.'' Activities within this program contribute to development of the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology needed for industry to proceed with the commercial development of electric power applications such as motors, generators, transformers, transmission cables, and current limiters. Research is conducted in three categories: wire development, systems technology development, and Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). Wire development activities are devoted to improving the critical current density (J{sub c}) of short-length HTS wires, whereas systems technology development focuses on fabrication of long-length wires, coils, and on magnets. The SPI activities are aimed at development of prototype products. Significant progress has been made in the development of (HTSs) for various applications: some applications have already made significant strides in the marketplace, while others are still in the developmental stages. For successful electric power applications, it is very important that the HTS be fabricated into long-length conductors that exhibit desired superconducting and mechanical properties. Several parameters of the PIT technique must be carefully controlled to obtain the desired properties. Long lengths of Bi-2223 tapes with respectable superconducting properties have been fabricated by a carefully designed thermomechanical treatment process. A 1-MVA capacity fault current limiter, a 286-hp motor, and 630-kVA transformers, and a 50-m-long conductor, all using HTSs, have already been demonstrated. While the use of HTS devices in the electric utility area has clear advantages, impediments to successful commercialization remain. Issues such as AC losses, conductor cost, and reliable superconducting joints must be addressed. The cost of HTS conductors are still quite high, and significant R and D

  7. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  8. Dissecting cell adhesion architecture using advanced imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Penny E

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins or to other cells is essential for the control of embryonic development, tissue integrity, immune function and wound healing. Adhesions are tightly spatially regulated structures containing over one hundred different proteins that coordinate both dynamics and signaling events at these sites. Extensive biochemical and morphological analysis of adhesion types over the past three decades has greatly improved understanding of individual protein contributions to adhesion signaling and, in some cases, dynamics. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that these diverse macromolecular complexes contain a variety of protein sub-networks, as well as distinct sub-domains that likely play important roles in regulating adhesion behavior. Until recently, resolving these structures, which are often less than a micron in size, was hampered by the limitations of conventional light microscopy. However, recent advances in optical techniques and imaging methods have revealed exciting insight into the intricate control of adhesion structure and assembly. Here we provide an overview of the recent data arising from such studies of cell:matrix and cell:cell contact and an overview of the imaging strategies that have been applied to study the intricacies and hierarchy of proteins within adhesions. PMID:21785274

  9. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  10. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The key elements of pathophysiology that impact and match the timing, intensity, duration, and variability of the hypoxic-ischemic insult to evidence-based interventions are reviewed. Exciting discoveries in basic and applied-science laboratories are now relevant for specific subpopulations of pediatric cardiac arrest victims and circumstances (eg, ventricular fibrillation, neonates, congenital heart disease, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Improving the quality of interventions is increasingly recognized as a key factor for improving outcomes. Evolving training strategies include simulation training, just-in-time and just-in-place training, and crisis-team training. The difficult issue of when to discontinue resuscitative efforts is addressed. Outcomes from pediatric cardiac arrests are improving. Advances in resuscitation science and state-of-the-art implementation techniques provide the opportunity for further improvement in outcomes among children after cardiac arrest. PMID:18977991

  11. Recommended advanced techniques for waterborne pathogen detection in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Alhamlan, Fatimah S; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N

    2015-02-19

    The effect of human activities on water resources has expanded dramatically during the past few decades, leading to the spread of waterborne microbial pathogens. The total global health impact of human infectious diseases associated with pathogenic microorganisms from land-based wastewater pollution was estimated to be approximately three million disability-adjusted life years (DALY), with an estimated economic loss of nearly 12 billion US dollars per year. Although clean water is essential for healthy living, it is not equally granted to all humans. Indeed, people who live in developing countries are challenged every day by an inadequate supply of clean water. Polluted water can lead to health crises that in turn spread waterborne pathogens. Taking measures to assess the water quality can prevent these potential risks. Thus, a pressing need has emerged in developing countries for comprehensive and accurate assessments of water quality. This review presents current and emerging advanced techniques for assessing water quality that can be adopted by authorities in developing countries.

  12. REVIEW ARTICLE: Emission measurement techniques for advanced powertrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Masayuki

    2000-10-01

    Recent developments in high-efficiency low-emission powertrains require the emission measurement technologies to be able to detect regulated and unregulated compounds with very high sensitivity and a fast response. For example, levels of a variety of nitrogen compounds and sulphur compounds should be analysed in real time in order to develop aftertreatment systems to decrease emission of NOx for the lean burning powertrains. Also, real-time information on the emission of particulate matter for the transient operation of diesel engines and direct injection gasoline engines is invaluable. The present paper reviews newly introduced instrumentation for such emission measurement that is demanded for the developments in advanced powertrain systems. They include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and fast response flame ionization detection. In addition, demands and applications of the fuel reformer developments for fuel cell electric vehicles are discussed. Besides the detection methodologies, sample handling techniques for the measurement of concentrations emitted from low emission vehicles for which the concentrations of the pollutants are significantly lower than the concentrations present in ambient air, are also described.

  13. Development of advanced strain diagnostic techniques for reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Miller, Timothy J.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Urrea, David Anthony,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    The following research is operated as a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The long-term goals of the program include sophisticated diagnostics of advanced fuels testing for nuclear reactors for the Department of Energy (DOE) Gen IV program, with the future capability to provide real-time measurement of strain in fuel rod cladding during operation in situ at any research or power reactor in the United States. By quantifying the stress and strain in fuel rods, it is possible to significantly improve fuel rod design, and consequently, to improve the performance and lifetime of the cladding. During the past year of this program, two sets of experiments were performed: small-scale tests to ensure reliability of the gages, and reactor pulse experiments involving the most viable samples in the Annulated Core Research Reactor (ACRR), located onsite at Sandia. Strain measurement techniques that can provide useful data in the extreme environment of a nuclear reactor core are needed to characterize nuclear fuel rods. This report documents the progression of solutions to this issue that were explored for feasibility in FY12 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  14. Improved fabrication of melt electrospun tissue engineering scaffolds using direct writing and advanced electric field control.

    PubMed

    Ristovski, Nikola; Bock, Nathalie; Liao, Sam; Powell, Sean K; Ren, Jiongyu; Kirby, Giles T S; Blackwood, Keith A; Woodruff, Maria A

    2015-03-25

    Direct writing melt electrospinning is an additive manufacturing technique capable of the layer-by-layer fabrication of highly ordered 3d tissue engineering scaffolds from micron-diameter fibers. The utility of these scaffolds, however, is limited by the maximum achievable height of controlled fiber deposition, beyond which the structure becomes increasingly disordered. A source of this disorder is charge build-up on the deposited polymer producing unwanted coulombic forces. In this study, the authors introduce a novel melt electrospinning platform with dual voltage power supplies to reduce undesirable charge effects and improve fiber deposition control. The authors produced and characterized several 90° cross-hatched fiber scaffolds using a range of needle/collector plate voltages. Fiber thickness was found to be sensitive only to overall potential and invariant to specific tip/collector voltage. The authors also produced ordered scaffolds up to 200 layers thick (fiber spacing 1 mm and diameter 40 μm) and characterized structure in terms of three distinct zones: ordered, semiordered, and disordered. Our in vitro analysis indicates successful cell attachment and distribution throughout the scaffolds, with little evidence of cell death after seven days. This study demonstrates the importance of electrostatic control for reducing destabilizing polymer charge effects and enabling the fabrication of morphologically suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  15. Fabricating and controlling PCL electrospun microfibers using filament feeding melt electrospinning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Junghyuk; Ahsani, Vahid; Xiangxiao Yao, Selina; Mohtaram, Nima K.; Lee, Patrick C.; Jun, Martin B. G.

    2017-02-01

    The process of melt electrospinning has received noteworthy attention due to its ability to fabricate micro scaled polymer fibers. Recently, a melt electrospinning process has been attracting attention for biomedical applications, in particular with scaffold fabrication for tissue engineering. In order to enhance cell attachment and proliferation on scaffolds, it is important to control fiber diameters to create an environment to which cells can attach, grow, and proliferate with ease. However, because electrospinning is a process with many parameters, it is particularly difficult to precisely control the diameter of the resulting fibers. Also, polymer powders or pellets melted in nozzles are typically used for melt electrospinning. However, a filament feeding melt electrospinning process has not been yet been implemented. In this study, we developed a melt electrospinning device which can feed PCL (Polycaprolactone, Mw: 80 000 g mol-1) filaments for advanced electrospun fiber diameter control. The PCL filaments were first fabricated by a small scale micro-compounder and then fed into the melting chamber of the electrospinning device. The system was then heated to a desired temperature, and the melt was extruded through a nozzle. The potential difference between the nozzle and counter electrode then drew down the PCL extrudate, creating fine microfibers. Temperature was controlled and monitored via a customized temperature control system. In order to control the dispensing of the PCL filaments, a customized control algorithm using NI (National Instruments) LabVIEW was used. In order to actively cool PCL filaments, a miniature computer fan was attached on the side of the melting chamber so that the filaments would not buckle. This paper reveals the investigation of significant process parameters that influence fiber diameters and their optimization. For instance, applied voltages, distances between the nozzle and a counter electrode, processing temperatures, and

  16. Fabrication techniques for bioinspired, mechanically-durable, superliquiphobic surfaces for water, oil, and surfactant repellency.

    PubMed

    Martin, Samuel; Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2017-03-01

    Nature provides inspiration for liquid-repellant and low-adhesive surfaces, such as the lotus leaf and pitcher plant. While water-repellency is frequently found in nature, oil-repellency and surfactant-repellency are uncommon to nonexistent. To obtain oil- and surfactant-repellency, hierarchical, re-entrant, bioinspired surface structures along with low surface energy materials are needed. This overview presents wetting literature, common liquids and their composition, and fabrication techniques for superliquiphobic surfaces with repellency toward water, oil, and surfactant-containing liquids. Four techniques for creating such surfaces are explained in detail: nanoparticle/binder, layer-by-layer, nanoparticle-encapsulation, and liquid-impregnation. Static contact and tilt angles with water and hexadecane liquids, morphology, wear, transparency, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, and oil-water separation data are examined to compare the techniques. Data for these techniques are presented showing evidence of re-entrant geometry and the ability for these surfaces to repel surfactant-containing liquids such as shampoo and laundry detergent. The data will provide guidance in implementing superliquiphobic surfaces for self-cleaning, anti-smudge, antifouling, and low-adhesion properties for various applications including plastic packaging and biomedical devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced inductively coupled plasma etching processes for fabrication of resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Choi, K. K.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A.; Olver, K.

    2015-05-01

    Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors (R-QWIPs) are the next generation of QWIP detectors that use resonances to increase the quantum efficiency (QE). To achieve the expected performance, the detector geometry must be produced in precise specification. In particular, the height of the diffractive elements (DE) and the thickness of the active resonator must be uniformly and accurately realized to within 0.05 μm accuracy and the substrates of the detectors have to be removed totally. To achieve these specifications, two optimized inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching processes are developed. Using these etching techniques, we have fabricated a number of R-QWIP test detectors and FPAs with the required dimensions and completely removed the substrates of the test detectors and FPAs. Their QE spectra were tested to be in close agreement with the theoretical predictions. The operability and spectral non-uniformity of the FPA is about 99.57% and 3% respectively.

  18. Fabrication of a 45° microreflector ended polymer waveguide using one-step UV embossing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Shinmo; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Lee, Seung-Gul; O, Beom-Hoan; Kim, Hyong-Hon; Park, Se-Geun; Lee, El-Hang

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, a new method of fabricating a 45°-micro-reflector-ended polymer waveguide using one-step UV embossing technique. This technique allowed us to fabricate an array twelve channel multimode polymer waveguides equipped with a 45°-micro-reflector by using a one-step UV embossing technique. For the embossing we used a 45°-ended silicon waveguide mold. The silicon waveguides mold has a 45° slope prefabricated at the end of each waveguide structure. First, a 1um-thick-SiO II layer is grown on the (100) silicon substrate. Then, the waveguide channel is patterned. The patterned waveguide channel is tilted at 45° from (100) silicon alignment base line to use the wet etching morphology which has 90° and 45° etched slopes when exposed to KOH and isopropanol saturated KOH solutions. After that, silicon substrate is wet etched with KOH solution to form the rectangular waveguide patterns. Another thin SiO II layer is deposited again to protect the waveguide patterns and substrate. A thin line is then patterned on the top of the waveguide structure and a thin-line shaped silicon surface of the top of the waveguide structure is opened. Then, the opened silicon surface is wet etched in KOH saturated with isopropanol solution. The other area is protected by SiO II layer. The etched shape has a V-shape and the angle from the bottom side is 45°. After SiO II removal and cleaning, 45°-ended silicon waveguide mold is completed. With this mold, UV embossing is performed to form undercladding structure and 45° slope simultaneously. And a metal film is coated on the surface of the 45° slope. And then, core polymer is filled and cured by UV irradiation. This method can be applicable to waveguide structures of sizes ranging from multimode to single mode.

  19. Fabrication of poly-DL-lactide/polyethylene glycol scaffolds using the gas foaming technique.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chengdong; Annabi, Nasim; Hosseinkhani, Maryam; Sivaloganathan, Sobana; Dehghani, Fariba

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare poly-DL-lactide/polyethylene glycol (PDLLA/PEG) blends to improve medium absorption and cell proliferation in the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of their scaffolds. Carbon dioxide (CO2) was used as a foaming agent to create porosity in these blends. The results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrated that the blends were homogeneous mixtures of PDLLA and PEG. The peak shifts at 1092 and 1744 cm(-1) confirmed the presence of molecular interactions between these two compounds. Increasing the PEG weight ratio enhanced the relative crystallinity and hydrophilicity. The PDLLA/PEG blends (especially 80/20 and 70/30 weight ratios) exhibited linear degradation profiles over an incubation time of 8 weeks. The mechanical properties of PDLLA/PEG blends having less than 30 wt.% PEG were suitable for the fabrication of porous scaffolds. Increasing the concentration of PEG to above 50% resulted in blends that were brittle and had low mechanical integrity. Highly porous scaffolds with controllable pore size were produced for 30 wt.% PEG samples using the gas foaming technique at temperatures between 25 and 55 °C and pressures between 60 and 160 bar. The average pore diameters achieved by gas foaming process were between 15 and 150 μm, and had an average porosity of 84%. The medium uptake and degradation rate of fabricated PDLLA/PEG scaffolds were increased compared with neat PDLLA film due to the presence of PEG and porosity. The porous scaffolds also demonstrated a lower modulus of elasticity and a higher elongation at break compared to the non-porous film. The fabricated PDLLA/PEG scaffolds have high potential for various tissue-engineering applications.

  20. A novel porous scaffold fabrication technique for epithelial and endothelial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Kevin J; Tao, Sarah L; Saint-Geniez, Magali

    2013-07-01

    Porous scaffolds have the ability to minimize transport barriers for both two- (2D) and three-dimensional tissue engineering. However, current porous scaffolds may be non-ideal for 2D tissues such as epithelium due to inherent fabrication-based characteristics. While 2D tissues require porosity to support molecular transport, pores must be small enough to prevent cell migration into the scaffold in order to avoid non-epithelial tissue architecture and compromised function. Though electrospun meshes are the most popular porous scaffolds used today, their heterogeneous pore size and intense topography may be poorly-suited for epithelium. Porous scaffolds produced using other methods have similar unavoidable limitations, frequently involving insufficient pore resolution and control, which make them incompatible with 2D tissues. In addition, many of these techniques require an entirely new round of process development in order to change material or pore size. Herein we describe "pore casting," a fabrication method that produces flat scaffolds with deterministic pore shape, size, and location that can be easily altered to accommodate new materials or pore dimensions. As proof-of-concept, pore-cast poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds were fabricated and compared to electrospun PCL in vitro using canine kidney epithelium, human colon epithelium, and human umbilical vein endothelium. All cell types demonstrated improved morphology and function on pore-cast scaffolds, likely due to reduced topography and universally small pore size. These results suggest that pore casting is an attractive option for creating 2D tissue engineering scaffolds, especially when the application may benefit from well-controlled pore size or architecture.

  1. Analysis of Translucency Parameter of Glass-Ceramics Fabricated by Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ledić, Karla; Majnarić, Igor; Milardović, Slađana; Ortolan; Špalj, Stipe; Štefančić, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse translucency parameter (TP values) of glass-ceramics fabricated by different techniques and investigate the effect of the corrosive medium on TP values. Materials and methods Three specimens of each type of IPS e.max ceramics (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) were made in three colours (A2, C2 and B3) by three fabrication techniques (layering – e.max Ceram Dentin; heat-pressing – e.max Press; CAD/CAM – e.max CAD). Specimens were made in the form of plates (10 mm x 12 mm x 0.8 mm). CIE L*a*b* values were measured by a spectrophotometer (X-Rite DTP 20 Pulse, Neu Isenburg, Germany) before and after exposure to 4% acetic acid at 80 °C for 16 hours (ISO 6872) to calculate translucency parameter (TP values). Statistical data were analysed using the IBM SPSS 22 software. Results IPS e.max Ceram Dentin had significantly the lowest TP values, and IPS e.max Press the highest TP values of all colours (A2, C2, B3), both prior and after exposure to acid (p<0.001). The difference in TP values among colours was evident in the IPS e.max Ceram Dentin material, both before and after exposure to acid with a great effect size (p<0.001; η2 = 0.702 and 0.741), and in the IPS e.max Press material (p<0.001, effect size 0.547 and 0.576). CAD/CAD specimens showed uniform TP values between three colours. Further, exposure to a corrosive medium did not result in a statistically significant change of TP values in any of the materials tested. Conclusions Different types of glass-ceramics showed significant difference in TP values both with respect to the fabrication technique and colour. Exposure to a corrosive medium did not result in a statistically significant change of TP values. PMID:27688383

  2. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  3. A technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns in conjunction with implant surgery.

    PubMed

    McRory, M Eric; Cagna, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an intraoral technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns immediately after surgical implant placement in extraction sites. The technique may be used with any implant system that provides a provisional abutment or an open-tray impression coping that can be modified for use as a provisional abutment.

  4. Universal Nanopatterning Technique Combining Secondary Sputtering with Nanoscale Electroplating for Fabricating Size-Controllable Ultrahigh-Resolution Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Song, Tae-Eun; Ahn, Chi Won; Jeon, Hwan-Jin

    2017-08-22

    Here, we describe a next-generation lithographic technique for fabricating ultrahigh-resolution nanostructures. This technique makes use of the secondary sputtering phenomenon of plasma ion etching and of nanoscale electroplating to finely control the resolution of the fabricated structures from ten nanometers to hundreds of nanometers from a single microsized master pattern. In contrast to previously described techniques that incorporate a recently developed secondary sputtering lithography (SSL) patterning approach, which could only yield 10 nm-resolution structures, in the current technique, we used an improved SSL approach to produce various-sized, high-resolution structures. Additionally, this improved SSL approach was used to fabricate size-controllable 3D patterns on various types of substrates, in particular, a silicon wafer, transparent glass, and flexible polycarbonate (PC) film. Thus, this method can serve as a new-concept patterning method for the efficient mass production of ultrahigh-resolution nanostructures.

  5. Colloidal lithography and current fabrication techniques producing in-plane nanotopography for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Wood, M A

    2007-02-22

    Substrate topography plays a vital role in cell and tissue structure and function in situ, where nanometric features, for example, the detail on single collagen fibrils, influence cell behaviour and resultant tissue formation. In vitro investigations demonstrate that nanotopography can be used to control cell reactions to a material surface, indicating its potential application in tissue engineering and implant fabrication. Developments in the catalyst, optical, medical and electronics industries have resulted in the production of nanopatterned surfaces using a variety of methods. The general protocols for nanomanufacturing require high resolution and low cost for fabricating devices. With respect to biological investigations, nanotopographies should occur across a large surface area (ensuring repeatability of experiments and patterning of implant surfaces), be reproducible (allowing for consistency in experiments), and preferably, accessible (limiting the requirement for specialist equipment). Colloidal lithography techniques fit these criteria, where nanoparticles can be utilized in combination with a functionalized substrate to produce in-plane nanotopographies. Subsequent lithographic processing of colloidal substrates utilizing, for example, reactive ion etching allows the production of modified colloidal-derived nanotopographies. In addition to two-dimensional in-plane nanofabrication, functionalized structures can be dip coated in colloidal sols, imparting nanotopographical cues to cells within a three-dimensional environment.

  6. Hemoglobin protein hollow shells fabricated through covalent layer-by-layer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Li; He Qiang; Cui Yue; Wang Kewei; Li Junbai . E-mail: jbli@iccas.ac.cn

    2007-03-09

    Hemoglobin (Hb) protein microcapsules held together by cross-linker, glutaraldehyde (GA), were successfully fabricated by covalent layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The Schiff base reaction occurred on the colloid templates between the aldehyde groups of GA and free amino sites of Hb results in the formation of GA/Hb microcapsules after the removal of the templates. The structure of obtained monodisperse protein microcapsule was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The UV-Vis spectra measurements demonstrate the existence of Hb in the assembled capsules. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and potential-controlled amperometric measurements (I-t curve) confirm that hemoglobin microcapsules after fabrication remain their heme electroactivity. Moreover, direct electron transfer process from protein to electrode surface was performed to detect the heme electrochemistry without using any mediator or promoter. The experiments of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) by CLSM demonstrate that the hemoglobin protein microcapsules have an improved permeability comparing to the conventional polyelectrolyte microcapsules.

  7. Processing Techniques Developed to Fabricate Lanthanum Titanate Piezoceramic Material for High-Temperature Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic materials are potential candidates for use as actuators and sensors in intelligent gas turbine engines. For piezoceramics to be applied in gas turbine engines, they will have to be able to function in temperatures ranging from 1000 to 2500 F. However, the maximum use temperature for state-of-the-art piezoceramic materials is on the order of 300 to 400 F. Research activities have been initiated to develop high-temperature piezoceramic materials for gas turbine engine applications. Lanthanum titanate has been shown to have high-temperature piezoelectric properties with Curie temperatures of T(sub c) = 1500 C and use temperatures greater than 1000 C. However, the fabrication of lanthanum titanate poses serious challenges because of the very high sintering temperatures required for densification. Two different techniques have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to fabricate dense lanthanum titanate piezoceramic material. In one approach, lower sintering temperatures were achieved by adding yttrium oxide to commercially available lanthanum titanate powder. Addition of only 0.1 mol% yttrium oxide lowered the sintering temperature by as much as 300 C, to just 1100 C, and dense lanthanum titanate was produced by pressure-assisted sintering. The second approach utilized the same commercially available powders but used an innovative sintering approach called differential sintering, which did not require any additive.

  8. Fabrication of Converging and Diverging Polymeric Microlens Arrays By A Thermocapillary Replication Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soon Wei Daniel; Fiedler, Kevin R.; Troian, Sandra M.

    2016-11-01

    Thermocapillary forces offer a powerful method for sculpting air/liquid interfaces at microscale dimensions. Here we demonstrate how square arrays of slender chilled pins in close proximity to a molten nanofilm enforce periodic distributions of thermocapillary stresses suitable for fabricating microlens arrays with ultrasmooth surfaces and excellent focusing capability. We applied this technique to shape and then solidify polystyrene films on quartz to form converging and diverging microlens arrays. By adjusting the growth time, width of the chilled pins, and pin pitch, we created simple convex, simple concave, caldera-like and even hierarchical microarray components. The latter two tend to form when the pitch and pin width are comparable in size. The diverging arrays were incorporated into a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for imaging spatial fluctuations in refractive index caused by bursts of cooled spray. The caldera-like arrays were used to collimate an incident beam into annuli. These demonstrations illustrate how spatiotemporal control over thermocapillary distributions can be used to fabricate a multiplicity of micro-optical components in a single, non-contact step. This work was supported by the Kiyo and Eiko Tomiyasu SURF scholarship (SWDL) and an NSTRF fellowship (KRF).

  9. Study on fabrication of scaffold using three-dimensional electrohydrodynamic ink-jet technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Han Seo; Lee, Soo-Hong; Lee, Pil-Ho; Kim, Dae-Hoon; Yu, Chiang Wei; Lee, Sang Won

    2013-11-01

    The EHD ink-jet technique uses the electrostatic force by applied voltage between a nozzle and an electrode to fabricate a three-dimensional scaffold by accumulating layers. In this study, a PLA (Polylactide) which is a polymer material was used to make the biodegradable scaffold. The experiment was performed by various inks with different solvent ratios because the layer thickness and width on the substrate are influenced by the ink properties such as the solvent ratio and boiling point. The cone-jet mode which looks cone-shaped on the meniscus was used for the EHD jetting by various stage velocities and solvent ratios of the PCL material. The micro-zoom lens and the LED lamp were used to visualize the jetting performance. The three-dimensional printing was completed by the movement of the stages using the Gentry structure. The optimum condition was selected for the fabrication of the scaffold after investigating the width of the pattern and the thickness of the multiple layers. This work supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. S-2011-0023457).

  10. Fabrication of Al-Cu alloy with elongated pores by continuous casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Kim, T.-B.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-05-01

    A1-4.5wt%Cu was unidirectionally solidified by continuous casting technique under hydrogen pressure of 0.1MPa at the transference velocities ranging from 1 to 50 mmmidmin-1. The fabricated slabs have microstructures of columnar α-dendrite and eutectic, which are typical for hypo-eutectic Al-Cu alloys. Elongated pores are observed in the eutectic region surrounded by several columnar α-dendrites. The shapes of the pores are affected by that of the surrounding α-dendrites. The average pores diameter is several ten μm smaller than the average dendrite arm spacing, which decreases with increasing solidification rate. Therefore, the pore diameter varies from about 200 μm to 30 μm with increasing transference velocity from 1 to 50 mmmidmin-1. The porosity of the fabricated samples is in the range between 2 ~ 6 %. There is not significant dependence of the porosity on the transference velocity in the range of the present study. The porosity is similar to the reported value of Al-Si, where the area fraction of eutectic region is smaller than that of α-dendrite.

  11. Elastomeric PDMS Planoconvex Lenses Fabricated by a Confined Sessile Drop Technique.

    PubMed

    Ekgasit, S; Kaewmanee, N; Jangtawee, P; Thammacharoen, C; Donphoongpri, M

    2016-08-10

    The ubiquity of high quality smartphones at affordable prices not only accelerated the social penetration in the global population but also promoted nontraditional usage of smartphones as point-of-care medical diagnostic devices, sensors, and portable digital microscopes. This paper reveals a simple, rapid, cost-effective, and template-free technique for mass-scale production of an elastomeric PDMS (ePDMS) planoconvex lens capable of converting a smartphone into a portable digital microscope. By taking advantage of the resistance to spreading of liquid by a sharp edge, highly stable spherical cap of viscous liquid PDMS (lPDMS) on a smooth PMMA circular disk was fabricated. The axisymmetric spreading of lPDMS under the gravitational force and interfacial tension force enable the formation of spherical cap with a certain radius of curvature. A thermal treatment at 80 °C for 30 min cured the spherical cap lPDMS into a bubble-free ePDMS planoconvex lens. Lenses with focal lengths of 55.2-3.4 mm could be reproducibly fabricated by adjusting the volume of dispensed lPDMSs and diameter of PMMA disks. High-resolution panoramic microscope images without a distortion of small cylindrical object could be constructed on-the-fly using the imbedded smartphone app. Applications of the smartphone digital microscope equipped with an ePDMS planoconvex lens for imaging of micro printings, gun shot residues, cylindrical objects, and bullet toolmarks were explored.

  12. A novel technique for fabricating an ear prosthesis in a patient with congenital ear deformity.

    PubMed

    Mardani, Mohammad Ali; Aminian, Gholamreza; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Arazpour, Mokhtar; Hutchins, Stephen W; Head, John S

    2013-08-01

    Microtia is one of the forms of ear loss and deformity. A prosthesis that is simple to apply, and which has adequate suspension and acceptable aesthetics, can be useful in the rehabilitation of patients with this deficit and can improve the social and psychological effects of patients with ear amputation. The aim of this article was to describe a novel technique for fabricating ear prosthesis in a patient with congenital ear deformity. This method involves a novel method to produce an ear prosthesis using clips that were located within the layers of the final silicone ear. This study demonstrated ease of use and acceptance by the patient. Design and fabrication of silicone ear prosthesis via this new method of suspension could also be suitable for provision to children with ear microtia who are not yet suitable for surgery or would not be suited to other methods of suspension. The new method of suspension demonstrated that this approach could be used to provide low cost and acceptable silicone ear prosthesis for patients with microtia and partial ear amputation.

  13. Thermal Skin fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques applicable to Thermal Skin structures were investigated, including: (1) chemical machining; (2) braze bonding; (3) diffusion bonding; and (4) electron beam welding. Materials investigated were nickel and nickel alloys. Sample Thermal Skin panels were manufactured using the advanced fabrication techniques studied and were structurally tested. Results of the program included: (1) development of improved chemical machining processes for nickel and several nickel alloys; (2) identification of design geometry limits; (3) identification of diffusion bonding requirements; (4) development of a unique diffusion bonding tool; (5) identification of electron beam welding limits; and (6) identification of structural properties of Thermal Skin material.

  14. Role of span length in the adaptation of implant-supported cobalt chromium frameworks fabricated by three techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Li, Yong; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Yiqing

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effect of span length on the adaptation of implant-supported cobalt chromium frameworks fabricated by three techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS Models with two solid abutment analogs at different inter-abutment distances were digitized using a laboratory scanner. Frameworks of two-, three-, and four-unit fixed prostheses were designed by a computer. Six dots with a diameter of 0.2 mm were preset on the surface of each framework. A total of 54 implant-supported cobalt chromium frameworks were fabricated by milling, selective laser melting (SLM), and cast techniques. The frameworks were scanned and exported as Stereolithography files. Distances between two dots in X, Y, and Z coordinates were measured in both the designed and fabricated frameworks. Marginal gaps between the framework and the abutments were also evaluated by impression replica method. RESULTS In terms of distance measurement, significant differences were found between three- and four-unit frameworks, as well as between two- and four-unit frameworks prepared by milling technique (P<.05). Significant differences were also noted between two- and three-unit frameworks, as well as between two- and four-unit frameworks prepared by cast technique (P<.05). The milling technique presented smaller differences than the SLM technique, and the SLM technique showed smaller differences than the cast technique at any unit prostheses (P<.05). Evaluation with the impression replica method indicated significant differences among the span lengths for any fabrication method (P<.05), as well as among the fabrication methods at any unit prostheses (P<.05). CONCLUSION The adaptation of implant-supported cobalt chromium frameworks was affected by the span length and fabrication method. PMID:28435622

  15. Role of span length in the adaptation of implant-supported cobalt chromium frameworks fabricated by three techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Li, Yong; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Yiqing; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of span length on the adaptation of implant-supported cobalt chromium frameworks fabricated by three techniques. Models with two solid abutment analogs at different inter-abutment distances were digitized using a laboratory scanner. Frameworks of two-, three-, and four-unit fixed prostheses were designed by a computer. Six dots with a diameter of 0.2 mm were preset on the surface of each framework. A total of 54 implant-supported cobalt chromium frameworks were fabricated by milling, selective laser melting (SLM), and cast techniques. The frameworks were scanned and exported as Stereolithography files. Distances between two dots in X, Y, and Z coordinates were measured in both the designed and fabricated frameworks. Marginal gaps between the framework and the abutments were also evaluated by impression replica method. In terms of distance measurement, significant differences were found between three- and four-unit frameworks, as well as between two- and four-unit frameworks prepared by milling technique (P<.05). Significant differences were also noted between two- and three-unit frameworks, as well as between two- and four-unit frameworks prepared by cast technique (P<.05). The milling technique presented smaller differences than the SLM technique, and the SLM technique showed smaller differences than the cast technique at any unit prostheses (P<.05). Evaluation with the impression replica method indicated significant differences among the span lengths for any fabrication method (P<.05), as well as among the fabrication methods at any unit prostheses (P<.05). The adaptation of implant-supported cobalt chromium frameworks was affected by the span length and fabrication method.

  16. Modified technique to improve fabrication and outcome of definitive orbital prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshi; Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, Saumyendra V

    2016-01-01

    Facial prostheses are generally fabricated from silicones, which provide life-like appearance and flexibility. The longevity of silicone, however, is limited because of its tendency to support fungal growth, absorb oils and grease, and edge-tearing susceptibility. Polyurethane (PU) liners have been used on the tissue-bearing surface of such prosthesis to improve tear resistance and fungal resistance. Technique sensitivity, discoloration and metamerism are significant limitations of urethane lining. Further, this liner is incorporated during processing of definitive prosthesis, which precludes try-in of tissue surface of prosthesis. This article describes an alternative lining material for fitting surface of definitive orbital prostheses, which could overcome limitations associated with all silicone or PU lined silicone prostheses.

  17. Zinc Oxide Thin Films Fabricated with Direct Current Magnetron Sputtering Deposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon, Jian-Wei; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Krishnasamy, Jegenathan; Tou, Teck-Yong

    2011-03-30

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a very promising material for emerging large area electronic applications including thin-film sensors, transistors and solar cells. We fabricated ZnO thin films by employing direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering deposition technique. ZnO films with different thicknesses ranging from 100 nm to 1020 nm were deposited on silicon (Si) substrate. The deposition pressure was varied from 12 mTorr to 25 mTorr. The influences of the film thickness and the deposition pressure on structural properties of the ZnO films were investigated using Mahr surface profilometer and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental results reveal that the film thickness and the deposition pressure play significant role in the structural formation of the deposited ZnO thin films. ZnO films deposited on Si substrates are promising for variety of thin-film sensor applications.

  18. Two-step fabrication technique of gold tips for use in point-contact spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Narasiwodeyar, S.; Dwyer, M.; Liu, M.; Park, W. K. Greene, L. H.

    2015-03-15

    For a successful point-contact spectroscopy (PCS) measurement, metallic tips of proper shape and smoothness are essential to ensure the ballistic nature of a point-contact junction. Until recently, the fabrication of Au tips suitable for use in point-contact spectroscopy has remained more of an art involving a trial and error method rather than an automated scientific process. To address these issues, we have developed a technique with which one can prepare high quality Au tips reproducibly and systematically. It involves an electronic control of the driving voltages used for an electrochemical etching of a gold wire in a HCl-glycerol mixture or a HCl solution. We find that a stopping current, below which the circuit is set to shut off, is a single very important parameter to produce an Au tip of desired shape. We present detailed descriptions for a two-step etching process for Au tips and also test results from PCS measurements using them.

  19. Experimental study on a resonance mesh coating fabricated using a UV-lithography technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmeng; Tan, Jiubin

    2013-02-25

    In order to achieve high optical transparency and Ka-band bandpass filtering simultaneously, a resonance mesh coating sample is fabricated using a UV-lithography technique. Optical transmission is measured using an Ocean Optics QE65000 spectrometer. And Ka-band bandpass filtering is measured using an Agilent E8363B PNA series network analyzer. Experimental results indicate that the optical transmission of the resonance mesh coating is 63.4% higher than that of non-meshed Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS) with equivalent aperture parameters, and the transmittance loss of the coating is lower than 0.21 dB while the coating has a Ka-band resonance frequency of 32 GHz. It can therefore be concluded that the resonance mesh coating can be used as a dual-mode spatial filter to achieve high optical transparency and Ka-band bandpass filtering.

  20. Fabricate Optical Microfiber by Using Flame Brushing Technique and Coated with Polymer Polyaniline for Sensing Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, N. A.; Hamida, B. A.; Irawati, N.; Habaebi, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    Adiabaticity is one of the essential criteria in producing good fabricated tapered fibers. Good tapered fibers can be use in sensor application such as humidity sensor, temperature sensor and refractive index sensor. In this paper, good tapering silica fiber is produced by using flame brushing technique and then, the microfiber is coated with polymer Polyaniline (PAni) to sense different type of alcohols with different concentrations. The outcome of this experiment gives excellent repeatability in the detection of alcohol sensing with a sensitivity of 0.1332 μW/% and a resolution of 3.764%. In conclusion, conducting polymer coated optical microfiber sensor for alcohol detection with low cost, effective and simple set-up was successfully achieved in this study.

  1. Fabrication of Nano-Composite Surface Layers on Aluminium Employing Friction Stir Processing Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorg, S. F. K.; Zarghani, A. S.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.

    2010-03-11

    Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-composite surface layer was fabricated via friction stir processing technique. Commercial AA6082 aluminium alloy extruded bar and nanometric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder were subjected to friction stir processing at a substrate travel speed of 80 mm/min and a tool rotation speed of 1000 rpm using a hardened H-13 tool steel. The grain structure and reinforcement particles were investigated by using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles can be more uniformly dispread in aluminium substrate by increasing the number of processing passes. Also, hardness enhancement of the nano-composite surface layer was found. This is attributed to uniform dispersion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles.

  2. A noise filtration technique for fabric defects image using curvelet transform domain filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jing; Ni, Jian-Yun; Lin, Shu-Zhong; Song, Li-Mei

    2010-08-01

    A noise filtration technique for fabric defects image using curvelet transform domain Filters is proposed in this paper. Firstly, we used FDCT_WARPING to decompose image into five scales curvelet coefficients. Secondly, the proposed algorithm distinguished major edges from noise background at the third scale. Thirdly, the possible lost edges in the procedure above were detected according to the decaying lever of the coefficients. Fourthly, the edges of the defect at the second scale were detected by four correlation coefficients in the two directions at the third scale. Fifthly, the curvelet coefficients at the fourth scale are filtered by the decaying lever. Sixthly, the curvelet coefficients at the fifth scale are filtered by hard threshing. Finally, the processed coefficients are reconstructed. The tests on the developed algorithms were performed with images from TILDA's Textile Texture Database, and suggest that the new approach outperforms wavelet methods in image denoising.

  3. A post-fabrication selective magnetic annealing technique in standard MEMS processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Karmakar, N. C.; Yuce, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    A selective electrothermal magnetic annealing technique is introduced that provides programming capabilities for mechanical micro-resonators. In the proposed approach, the magnetic properties of resonators can be locally tuned in a post-fabrication batch-compatible process step. A prototype is implemented in a standard microfabrication process, where resonating ferromagnetic elements are suspended on top of a polysilicon resistive heater. The ferromagnetic elements consist of electroplated Nickel (Ni) with minor Iron (Fe) impurities. The electro-thermo-mechanical heating phenomenon is simulated for design purposes. The magnetization of micro-resonators with and without magnetic annealing is measured. The resulting magnetic property enhancement is illustrated by hysteresis (M-H) loop variations.

  4. Biomimetic Collagen–Hydroxyapatite Composite Fabricated via a Novel Perfusion-Flow Mineralization Technique

    PubMed Central

    Antebi, Ben; Cheng, Xingguo; Harris, Jeffrey N.; Gower, Laurie B.; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Prevalent three-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering are mineralized collagen–hydroxyapatite (Col/HA) composites. Conventional mineralization techniques are either to coat collagen scaffold surfaces with minerals or to simply mix collagen and mineral nanoparticles together. These conventional in vitro collagen mineralization methods are different from the in vivo bone formation process and often result in scaffolds that are not suitable for bone tissue engineering. In this study, a unique perfusion-flow (i.e., dynamic) in conjunction with a previously described polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) method was used to fabricate a porous Col/HA composite. The dynamic flow emulated the physiological extracellular fluid flow containing the mineralization ions, while the PILP method facilitated the deposition of the HA crystals within the collagen fibrils (i.e., intrafibrillar mineralization). By utilizing a dynamic PILP technique to mimic the in vivo bone formation process, the resultant Col/HA composite has a similar structure and compositions like human trabecular bone. A comparison of the dynamic and static mineralization methods revealed that the novel dynamic technique facilitates more efficient and homogenous mineral deposition throughout the Col/HA composite. The dynamic intrafibrillar mineralization method generated stiff Col/HA composites with excellent surface property for cell attachment and growth. The human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the Col/HA composites quickly remodeled the scaffolds and resulted in constructs with an extensive cell-derived extracellular matrix network. PMID:23157544

  5. Development of Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Protective Fabric Using Combined Electrospinning and Electrospraying Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Mukesh Kumar; Das, B. R.; Kumar, Kamal; Kishore, Brij; Prasad, N. Eswara

    2017-06-01

    The article reports a novel technique for functionization of nanoweb to develop ultraviolet (UV) radiation protective fabric. UV radiation protection effect is produced by combination of electrospinning and electrospraying technique. A nanofibrous web of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) coated on polypropylene nonwoven fabric is produced by latest nanospider technology. Subsequently, web is functionalized by titanium dioxide (TiO2). The developed web is characterized for evaluation of surface morphology and other functional properties; mechanical, chemical, crystalline and thermal. An optimal (judicious) nanofibre spinning condition is achieved and established. The produced web is uniformly coated by defect free functional nanofibres in a continuous form of useable textile structural membrane for ultraviolet (UV) protective clothing. This research initiative succeeds in preparation and optimization of various nanowebs for UV protection. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) result reveals that PVDF webs photo-degradative behavior is non-accelerated, as compared to normal polymeric grade fibres. Functionalization with TiO2 has enhanced the photo-stability of webs. The ultraviolet protection factor of functionalized and non-functionalized nanowebs empirically evaluated to be 65 and 24 respectively. The developed coated layer could be exploited for developing various defence, para-military and civilian UV protective light weight clothing (tent, covers and shelter segments, combat suit, snow bound camouflaging nets). This research therefore, is conducted in an attempt to develop a scientific understanding of PVDF fibre coated webs for photo-degradation and applications for defence protective textiles. This technological research in laboratory scale could be translated into bulk productionization.

  6. Fabrication of porous polymeric matrix drug delivery devices using the selective laser sintering technique.

    PubMed

    Leong, K F; Phua, K K; Chua, C K; Du, Z H; Teo, K O

    2001-01-01

    New techniques in solid freeform fabrication (SFF) have prompted research into methods of manufacturing and controlling porosity. The strategy of this research is to integrate computer aided design (CAD) and the SFF technique of selective laser sintering (SLS) to fabricate porous polymeric matrix drug delivery devices (DDDs). This study focuses on the control of the porosity of a matrix by manipulating the SLS process parameters of laser beam power and scan speed. Methylene blue dye is used as a drug model to infiltrate the matrices via a degassing method; visual inspection of dye penetration into the matrices is carried out. Most notably, the laser power matrices show a two-stage penetration process. The matrices are sectioned along the XZ planes and viewed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphologies of the samples reveal a general increase in channel widths as laser power decreases and scan speed increases. The fractional release profiles of the matrices are determined by allowing the dye to diffuse out in vitro within a controlled environment. The results show that laser power and scan speed matrices deliver the dye for 8-9 days and have an evenly distributed profile. Mercury porosimetry is used to analyse the porosity of the matrices. Laser power matrices show a linear relationship between porosity and variation in parameter values. However, the same relationship for scan speed matrices turns out to be rather inconsistent. Relationships between the SLS parameters and the experimental results are developed using the fractional release rate equation for the infinite slab porous matrix DDD as a basis for correlation.

  7. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Jiang, Wenxue; Sun, Yufu; Li, Hui

    2016-09-02

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.

  8. Development of Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Protective Fabric Using Combined Electrospinning and Electrospraying Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Mukesh Kumar; Das, B. R.; Kumar, Kamal; Kishore, Brij; Prasad, N. Eswara

    2017-03-01

    The article reports a novel technique for functionization of nanoweb to develop ultraviolet (UV) radiation protective fabric. UV radiation protection effect is produced by combination of electrospinning and electrospraying technique. A nanofibrous web of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) coated on polypropylene nonwoven fabric is produced by latest nanospider technology. Subsequently, web is functionalized by titanium dioxide (TiO2). The developed web is characterized for evaluation of surface morphology and other functional properties; mechanical, chemical, crystalline and thermal. An optimal (judicious) nanofibre spinning condition is achieved and established. The produced web is uniformly coated by defect free functional nanofibres in a continuous form of useable textile structural membrane for ultraviolet (UV) protective clothing. This research initiative succeeds in preparation and optimization of various nanowebs for UV protection. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) result reveals that PVDF webs photo-degradative behavior is non-accelerated, as compared to normal polymeric grade fibres. Functionalization with TiO2 has enhanced the photo-stability of webs. The ultraviolet protection factor of functionalized and non-functionalized nanowebs empirically evaluated to be 65 and 24 respectively. The developed coated layer could be exploited for developing various defence, para-military and civilian UV protective light weight clothing (tent, covers and shelter segments, combat suit, snow bound camouflaging nets). This research therefore, is conducted in an attempt to develop a scientific understanding of PVDF fibre coated webs for photo-degradation and applications for defence protective textiles. This technological research in laboratory scale could be translated into bulk productionization.

  9. Fabrication of multi-well chips for spheroid cultures and implantable constructs through rapid prototyping techniques.

    PubMed

    Lopa, Silvia; Piraino, Francesco; Kemp, Raymond J; Di Caro, Clelia; Lovati, Arianna B; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Moroni, Lorenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Rasponi, Marco; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are widely used in basic and translational research. In this study, to generate and culture multiple 3D cell spheroids, we exploited laser ablation and replica molding for the fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) multi-well chips, which were validated using articular chondrocytes (ACs). Multi-well ACs spheroids were comparable or superior to standard spheroids, as revealed by glycosaminoglycan and type-II collagen deposition. Moreover, the use of our multi-well chips significantly reduced the operation time for cell seeding and medium refresh. Exploiting a similar approach, we used clinical-grade fibrin to generate implantable multi-well constructs allowing for the precise distribution of multiple cell types. Multi-well fibrin constructs were seeded with ACs generating high cell density regions, as shown by histology and cell fluorescent staining. Multi-well constructs were compared to standard constructs with homogeneously distributed ACs. After 7 days in vitro, expression of SOX9, ACAN, COL2A1, and COMP was increased in both constructs, with multi-well constructs expressing significantly higher levels of chondrogenic genes than standard constructs. After 5 weeks in vivo, we found that despite a dramatic size reduction, the cell distribution pattern was maintained and glycosaminoglycan content per wet weight was significantly increased respect to pre-implantation samples. In conclusion, multi-well chips for the generation and culture of multiple cell spheroids can be fabricated by low-cost rapid prototyping techniques. Furthermore, these techniques can be used to generate implantable constructs with defined architecture and controlled cell distribution, allowing for in vitro and in vivo investigation of cell interactions in a 3D environment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  11. Demonstration of Logic Operations in High-Performance RRAM Crossbar Array Fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Runze; Huang, Peng; Zhao, Yudi; Chen, Zhe; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, resistive random access memory (RRAM)-based crossbar arrays with the cell structure of Pt/[AlO y /HfO x ] m /TiN were fabricated by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The RRAM devices in the arrays show excellent performances such as good uniformity and high reliability. Based on the fabricated RRAM array, a complete set of basic logic operations including NOR and XNOR were successfully demonstrated.

  12. Electrochemical Evaluation of Lead Base Composite Anodes Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbasi, Maryam; Keshavarz Alamdari, Eskandar

    2015-04-01

    Accumulative roll bonding is used for the first time in lead systems to fabricate advanced lead base composite anodes. For this purpose, Ag as the most common and effective additive, Co as the best metallic immiscible substitution for Ag, and MnO2 as the ceramic and electrocatalytic agent have been used as additives to produce anodes. The accumulative roll bonding processed sheets have been fabricated under determined conditions. The electrochemical properties of the prepared samples are investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, Polarization tests, electrowinning tests, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results indicate that the ARB-processed composite lead sheets can be perfectly used as novel developed anodes. The advantages include 5.51 times increase of current density, in the Pb-pct0.5Ag 9-pass sample compared to pure lead anode, decreased charge transfer resistance from 56.31 (Ω cm2) in pure lead anode to 17.5 (Ω cm2) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (72 pct lower), and decreased oxygen evolution potential from 1.95 (V/SHE) in pure lead anode to 1.77 (V/SHE) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (0.18 (V/SHE) lower). Electrowinning tests results reveal Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass showed best anodic performance withsignificant lower compared corrosion rate (75 pct), product and electrolyte contamination, slime formation, energy consumption and higher Zn deposit and energy conservation (to 294 kWh/t-Zn). Finest Zn deposit morphology (effective reduced grain size corresponding to smoothness and compaction) has been supplied by Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass sample resulted from enhanced growth rate of Zn in lack of Pb contaminations that could act as suitable nucleation sites.

  13. Advances in crystal growth, device fabrication and characterization of thallium bromide detectors for room temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amlan; Moed, Demi; Becla, Piotr; Overholt, Matthew; Motakef, Shariar

    2016-10-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a promising room-temperature radiation detector candidate with excellent charge transport properties. However, several critical issues need to be addressed before deployment of this material for long-term field applications can be realized. In this paper, progress made towards solving some of these challenges is discussed. The most significant factors for achieving long-term performance stability for TlBr devices include residual stress as generated during crystal growth and fabrication processes, surface conditions, and the choice of contact metal. Modifications to the commonly used traveling molten zone growth technique for TlBr crystals can significantly minimize the stresses generated by large temperature gradients near the melt-solid interface of the growing crystal. Plasma processing techniques were introduced for the first time to modify the Br-etched TlBr surfaces, which resulted in improvements to the surface conditions, and consequently the spectroscopic response of the detectors. Palladium electrodes resulted a 20-fold improvement in the room-temperature device lifetime when compared to its Br-etched Pt counterpart.

  14. Advanced engineering tools for design and fabrication of a custom nasal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Inês; Leal, Nuno; Silva, Pedro; da Costa Ferreira, A.; Neto, Rui J.; Lino, F. Jorge; Reis, Ana

    2012-09-01

    Unexpected external defects resulting from neoplasms, burns, congenital malformations, trauma or other diseases, particularly when involving partial or total loss of an external organ, can be emotionally devastating. These defects can be restored with prosthesis, obtained by different techniques, materials and methods. The increase of patient numbers and cost constraints lead to the need of exploring new techniques that can increase efficiency. The main goal of this project was to develop a full engineering-based manufacturing process to obtain soft-tissue prosthesis that could provide faster and less expensive options in the manufacturing of customized prosthesis, and at the same time being able to reproduce the highest degree of details, with the maximum comfort for the patient. Design/methodology/approach - This case report describes treatment using silicone prosthesis with an anatomic retention for an 80-years-old woman with a rhinectomy. The proposed methodology integrates non-contact structured light scanning, CT and reverse engineering with CAD/CAM and additive manufacturing technology. Findings - The proposed protocol showed encouraging results since reveals being a better solution for fabricating custom-made facial prostheses for asymmetrical organs than conventional approaches. The process allows the attainment of prosthesis with the minimum contact and discomfort for the patient, disclosing excellent results in terms of aesthetic, prosthesis retention and in terms of time and resources consumed.

  15. Fabrication of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Optics: A Deterministic, Precision Engineering Approach to Optical Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The mirror assembly of the AXAF observatory consists of four concentric, confocal, Wolter type 1 telescopes. Each telescope includes two conical grazing incidence mirrors, a paraboloid followed by a hyperboloid. Fabrication of these state-or-the-art optics is now complete, with predicted performance that surpasses the goals of the program. The fabrication of these optics, whose size and requirements exceed those of any previous x-ray mirrors, presented a challenging task requiring the use of precision engineering in many different forms. Virtually all of the equipment used for this effort required precision engineering. Accurate metrology required deterministic support of the mirrors in order to model the gravity distortions which will not be present on orbit. The primary axial instrument, known as the Precision Metrology Station (PMS), was a unique scanning Fizeau interferometer. After metrology was complete, the optics were placed in specially designed Glass Support Fixtures (GSF's) for installation on the Automated Cylindrical Grinder/Polishers (ACG/P's). The GSF's were custom molded for each mirror element to match the shape of the outer surface to minimize distortions of the inner surface. The final performance of the telescope is expected to far exceed the original goals and expectations of the program.

  16. Site-controlled and advanced epitaxial Ge/Si quantum dots: fabrication, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, Moritz; Grydlik, Martyna

    2017-09-01

    In this review, we report on fabrication paths, challenges, and emerging solutions to integrate group-IV epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) as active light emitters into the existing standard Si technology. Their potential as laser gain material for the use of optical intra- and inter-chip interconnects as well as possibilities to combine a single-photon-source-based quantum cryptographic means with Si technology will be discussed. We propose that the mandatory addressability of the light emitters can be achieved by a combination of organized QD growth assisted by templated self-assembly, and advanced inter-QD defect engineering to boost the optical emissivity of group-IV QDs at room-temperature. Those two main parts, the site-controlled growth and the light emission enhancement in QDs through the introduction of single defects build the main body of the review. This leads us to a roadmap for the necessary further development of this emerging field of CMOS-compatible group-IV QD light emitters for on-chip applications.

  17. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an experimental program to develop several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints for lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Tasks accomplished include: a literature survey; design of static discriminator specimens; design allowables testing; fabrication of test panels and specimens; small specimen testing; and standard joint testing. Detail designs of static discriminator specimens for each of the four major attachment types are presented. Test results are given for the following: (1) transverse tension of Celion 3000/PMR-15 laminate; (2) net tension of a laminate for both a loaded and unloaded bolt hole; (3) comparative testing of bonded and co-cured doublers along with pull-off tests of single and double bonded angles; (4) single lap shear tests, transverse tension and coefficient of thermal expansion tests of A7F (LARC-13 amide-imide modified) adhesive; and (5) tension tests of standard single lap, double lap, and symmetric step lap bonded joints. Also, included are results of a finite element analysis of a single lap bonded composite joint.

  18. CARs blanks feasibility study results for advanced EB reticle fabrication: III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Fumiko; Yokoya, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Hideo

    2001-09-01

    For advanced EB reticle fabrication with CAR blanks, we have been trying blanks life improvement and resolution enhancement. This paper describes several options to extend CAR blanks life by shipping package and storage manners. Dry-N2 purged shipping package and desiccant showed efficiency for PCD improvement. However, desiccant is not available for products since it is not investigated yet if particle contamination could be happened. To extend blanks life after blanks package opened, we blanks maker really recommend the fresh dry-N2 purged box (overflowed) as an ideal storage manner, or regular shipping box storage at least. We tried a BARC as isolator and thinning CAR for resolution enhancement, and found that a neutral-BARC showed an improvement. However, we needs further study about its feasibility, especially for coating uniformity and defect quality control. Thin resist showed almost no improvement for CAR resolution enhancement. To improve CAR performance further, we continuously need the resist-makers cooperation to design and develop a CAR that provides us footing-less pattern profile and long-life after coating.

  19. Site-controlled and advanced epitaxial Ge/Si quantum dots: fabrication, properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Moritz; Grydlik, Martyna

    2017-09-29

    In this review, we report on fabrication paths, challenges, and emerging solutions to integrate group-IV epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) as active light emitters into the existing standard Si technology. Their potential as laser gain material for the use of optical intra- and inter-chip interconnects as well as possibilities to combine a single-photon-source-based quantum cryptographic means with Si technology will be discussed. We propose that the mandatory addressability of the light emitters can be achieved by a combination of organized QD growth assisted by templated self-assembly, and advanced inter-QD defect engineering to boost the optical emissivity of group-IV QDs at room-temperature. Those two main parts, the site-controlled growth and the light emission enhancement in QDs through the introduction of single defects build the main body of the review. This leads us to a roadmap for the necessary further development of this emerging field of CMOS-compatible group-IV QD light emitters for on-chip applications.

  20. Computational design and fabrication of a novel bioresorbable cage for tibial tuberosity advancement application.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Rodrigues, Jorge; Vorndran, Elke; Gbureck, Uwe; Quental, Carlos; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R

    2017-01-01

    Tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) is a promising method for the treatment of cruciate ligament rupture in dogs that usually implies the implantation of a titanium cage as bone implant. This cage is non-biodegradable and fails in providing adequate implant-bone tissue integration. The objective of this work is to propose a new process chain for designing and manufacturing an alternative biodegradable cage that can fulfill specific patient requirements. A three-dimensional finite element model (3D FEM) of the TTA system was first created to evaluate the mechanical environment at cage domain during different stages of the dog walk. The cage microstructure was then optimized using a topology optimization tool, which addresses the accessed local mechanical requirements, and at same time ensures the maximum permeability to allow nutrient and oxygen supply to the implant core. The designed cage was then biofabricated by a 3D powder printing of tricalcium phosphate cement. This work demonstrates that the combination of a 3D FEM with a topology optimization approach enabled the design of a novel cage for TTA application with tailored permeability and mechanical properties, that can be successfully 3D printed in a biodegradable bioceramic material. These results support the potential of the design optimization strategy and fabrication method to the development of customized and bioresorbable implants for bone repair.

  1. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    NARloy-Z alloy (Cu-3 percent, Ag-0.5 percent, Zr) is a state of the art alloy currently used for fabricating rocket engine combustion chamber liners. Research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State – Applied Research Laboratory has shown that thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z can be increased significantly by adding diamonds to form a composite (NARloy-Z-D). NARloy-Z-D is also lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes make this advanced composite material an ideal candidate for fabricating combustion chamber liner for an advanced rocket engine. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. This paper describes the process development for fabricating a subscale high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D combustion chamber liner using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). The FAST process uses a mixture of NARloy-Z and diamond powders which is sintered under pressure at elevated temperatures. Several challenges were encountered, i.e., segregation of diamonds, machining the super hard NARloy-Z-D composite, net shape fabrication and nondestructive examination. The paper describes how these challenges were addressed. Diamonds coated with copper (CuD) appear to give the best results. A near net shape subscale combustion chamber liner is being fabricated by diffusion bonding cylindrical rings of NARloy-Z-CuD using the FAST process.

  2. Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) Method for Fabricating Stiffened Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Marie L.; Domack, Marcia S.; Stoner, Mary Cecilia; Hehir, Austin R.

    2016-01-01

    Low Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and high levels of uncertainty make it challenging to develop cost estimates of new technologies in the R&D phase. It is however essential for NASA to understand the costs and benefits associated with novel concepts, in order to prioritize research investments and evaluate the potential for technology transfer and commercialization. This paper proposes a framework to perform a cost-benefit analysis of a technology in the R&D phase. This framework was developed and used to assess the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) manufacturing process for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. The ANNST method was compared with the conventional multi-piece metallic construction and composite processes for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. Following the definition of a case study for a cryogenic tank cylinder of specified geometry, data was gathered through interviews with Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), with particular focus placed on production costs and process complexity. This data served as the basis to produce process flowcharts and timelines, mass estimates, and rough order-of-magnitude cost and schedule estimates. The scalability of the results was subsequently investigated to understand the variability of the results based on tank size. Lastly, once costs and benefits were identified, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used to assess the relative value of these achieved benefits for potential stakeholders. These preliminary, rough order-of-magnitude results predict a 46 to 58 percent reduction in production costs and a 7-percent reduction in weight over the conventional metallic manufacturing technique used in this study for comparison. Compared to the composite manufacturing technique, these results predict cost savings of 35 to 58 percent; however, the ANNST concept was heavier. In this study, the predicted return on investment of equipment required for the ANNST method was ten cryogenic tank barrels

  3. Transfer printing techniques for materials assembly and micro/nanodevice fabrication.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Andrew; Bowen, Audrey M; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A

    2012-10-09

    Transfer printing represents a set of techniques for deterministic assembly of micro-and nanomaterials into spatially organized, functional arrangements with two and three-dimensional layouts. Such processes provide versatile routes not only to test structures and vehicles for scientific studies but also to high-performance, heterogeneously integrated functional systems, including those in flexible electronics, three-dimensional and/or curvilinear optoelectronics, and bio-integrated sensing and therapeutic devices. This article summarizes recent advances in a variety of transfer printing techniques, ranging from the mechanics and materials aspects that govern their operation to engineering features of their use in systems with varying levels of complexity. A concluding section presents perspectives on opportunities for basic and applied research, and on emerging use of these methods in high throughput, industrial-scale manufacturing. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A modified SAG technique for the fabrication of DWDM DFB laser arrays with highly uniform wavelength spacings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Liang, Song; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Baojun; Wang, Wei

    2012-12-31

    A modified selective area growth (SAG) technique, in which the effective index of only the upper separate confinement heterostructure (SCH) layer are modulated to obtain different emission wavelengths, is reported for the fabrication of dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) multi-wavelength laser arrays (MWLAs). InP based 1.5 μm distributed feedback (DFB) laser arrays with 0.8 nm, 0.42 nm, and 0.19 nm channel separations are demonstrated, all showing highly uniform wavelength spacings. The standard deviation of the distribution of the wavelength residues with respect to the corresponding linear fitting values is 0.0672 nm, which is a lot smaller than those of the MWLAs fabricated by other techniques including electron beam lithography. These results indicate that our SAG technique which needs only a simple procedure is promising for the fabrication of low cost DWDM MWLAs.

  5. Quantification of Changes in Mulberry Silk Fabrics due to Different Laundering: Using WAXS Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswara, P.; Nivedita, S.; Somashekar, R.

    2011-07-01

    Loom finished mulberry silk fabrics (Taffeta) were machine laundered and hand laundered several times. X-ray diffractograms of pure and laundered fabrics were used to calculate microstructural parameters like average crystallite size (D) and lattice strain (Vegr) employing Williamson-Hall plot. Microstructural parameters were compared with measured mechanical properties like breaking load, tenacity, and elongation of warp yarns unraveled from fabrics. Surface morphology and texture of silk fabrics changed upon washing is evident from SEM images.

  6. Fabrication of nanostructure by physical vapor deposition with glancing angle deposition technique and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horprathum, M.; Eiamchai, P.; Kaewkhao, J.; Chananonnawathorn, C.; Patthanasettakul, V.; Limwichean, S.; Nuntawong, N.; Chindaudom, P.

    2014-09-01

    A nanostructural thin film is one of the highly exploiting research areas particularly in applications in sensor, photocatalytic, and solar-cell technologies. In the past two decades, the integration of glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) technique to physical vapor deposition (PVD) process has gained significant attention for well-controlled multidimensional nanomorphologies because of fast, simple, cost-effective, and mass-production capability. The performance and functional properties of the coated thin films generally depend upon their nanostructural compositions, i.e., large aspect ratio, controllable porosity, and shape. Such structural platforms make the fabricated thin films very practical for several realistic applications. We therefore present morphological and nanostructural properties of various deposited materials, which included metals, i.e., silver (Ag), and oxide compounds, i.e., tungsten oxide (WO3), titanium dioxide (TiO2), and indium tin oxide (ITO). Different PVD techniques based on DC magnetron sputtering and electron-beam evaporation, both with the integrated GLAD component, were discussed. We further explore engineered nanostructures which enable controls of optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. These improvements led to several practical applications in surface-enhanced Raman, smart windows, gas sensors, self-cleaning materials and transparent conductive oxides (TCO).

  7. Creating tissues from textiles: scalable nonwoven manufacturing techniques for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tuin, S A; Pourdeyhimi, B; Loboa, E G

    2016-02-23

    Electrospun nonwovens have been used extensively for tissue engineering applications due to their inherent similarities with respect to fibre size and morphology to that of native extracellular matrix (ECM). However, fabrication of large scaffold constructs is time consuming, may require harsh organic solvents, and often results in mechanical properties inferior to the tissue being treated. In order to translate nonwoven based tissue engineering scaffold strategies to clinical use, a high throughput, repeatable, scalable, and economic manufacturing process is needed. We suggest that nonwoven industry standard high throughput manufacturing techniques (meltblowing, spunbond, and carding) can meet this need. In this study, meltblown, spunbond and carded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nonwovens were evaluated as tissue engineering scaffolds using human adipose derived stem cells (hASC) and compared to electrospun nonwovens. Scaffolds were seeded with hASC and viability, proliferation, and differentiation were evaluated over the course of 3 weeks. We found that nonwovens manufactured via these industry standard, commercially relevant manufacturing techniques were capable of supporting hASC attachment, proliferation, and both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hASC, making them promising candidates for commercialization and translation of nonwoven scaffold based tissue engineering strategies.

  8. Applications of Semiconductor Fabrication Methods to Nanomedicine: A Review of Recent Inventions and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, Achanta; Gimi, Barjor; Hu, Walter

    2013-05-01

    We live in a world of convergence where scientific techniques from a variety of seemingly disparate fields are being applied cohesively to the study and solution of biomedical problems. For instance, the semiconductor processing field has been primarily developed to cater to the needs of the ever decreasing transistor size and cost while increasing functionality of electronic circuits. In recent years, pioneers in this field have equipped themselves with a powerful understanding of how the same techniques can be applied in the biomedical field to develop new and efficient systems for the diagnosis, analysis and treatment of various conditions in the human body. In this paper, we review the major inventions and experimental methods which have been developed for nano/micro fluidic channels, nanoparticles fabricated by top-down methods, and in-vivo nanoporous microcages for effective drug delivery. This paper focuses on the information contained in patents as well as the corresponding technical publications. The goal of the paper is to help emerging scientists understand and improvise over these inventions.

  9. Applications of Semiconductor Fabrication Methods to Nanomedicine: A Review of Recent Inventions and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, Achanta; Gimi, Barjor; Hu, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We live in a world of convergence where scientific techniques from a variety of seemingly disparate fields are being applied cohesively to the study and solution of biomedical problems. For instance, the semiconductor processing field has been primarily developed to cater to the needs of the ever decreasing transistor size and cost while increasing functionality of electronic circuits. In recent years, pioneers in this field have equipped themselves with a powerful understanding of how the same techniques can be applied in the biomedical field to develop new and efficient systems for the diagnosis, analysis and treatment of various conditions in the human body. In this paper, we review the major inventions and experimental methods which have been developed for nano/micro fluidic channels, nanoparticles fabricated by top-down methods, and in-vivo nanoporous microcages for effective drug delivery. This paper focuses on the information contained in patents as well as the corresponding technical publications. The goal of the paper is to help emerging scientists understand and improvise over these inventions. PMID:24312161

  10. Automatic fabrication of 3-dimensional tissues using cell sheet manipulator technique.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Wada, Masanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-03-01

    Automated manufacturing is a key for tissue-engineered therapeutic products to become common-place and economical. Here, we developed an automatic cell sheet stacking apparatus to fabricate 3-dimensional tissue-engineered constructs exploiting our cell sheet manipulator technique, where cell sheets harvested from temperature-responsive culture dishes are stacked into a multilayered cell sheet. By optimizing the stacking conditions and cell seeding conditions, the apparatus was eventually capable of reproducibly making five-layer human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) sheets with a thickness of approximately 70-80 μm within 100 min. Histological sections and confocal topographies of the five-layer HSMM sheets revealed a stratified structure with no delamination. In cell counts using trypsinization, the live cell numbers in one-, three- and five-layer HSMM sheets were equivalent to the seeded cell numbers at 1 h after the stacking processes; however, after subsequent 5-day static cultures, the live cell numbers of the five-layered HSMM sheets decreased slightly, while one- and three-layer HSMM sheets maintained their live cell numbers. This suggests that there are thickness limitations in maintaining tissues in a static culture. We concluded that by combining our cell sheet manipulator technique and industrial robot technology we can create a secure, cost-effective manufacturing system able to produce tissue-engineered products from cell sheets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication of a Mo based high temperature TZM alloy by non-consumable arc melting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.P.; Krishnamurthy, N.

    2014-07-01

    High temperature structural materials are in great demand for power, chemical and nuclear industries which can perform beyond 1000 °C as super alloys usually fail. In this regard, Mo based TZM alloy is capable of retaining strength up to 1500 °C with excellent corrosion compatibility against molten alkali metals. Hence, currently this alloy is considered an important candidate material for high temperature compact nuclear and fusion reactors. Due to reactive nature of Mo and having high melting point, manufacturing this alloy by conventional process is unsuitable. Powder metallurgy technique has limited success due to restriction in quantity and purity. This paper deals with fabrication of TZM alloy by nonconsumable tungsten arc melting technique. Initially a ternary master alloy of Mo-Ti-Zr was prepared which subsequently by dilution method, was converted into TZM alloy gradually by external addition of Mo and C in various proportions. A number of melting trials were conducted to optimize the process parameters like current, voltage and time to achieve desired alloy composition. The alloy was characterized with respect to composition, elemental distribution profile, microstructure, hardness profile and phase analysis. Well consolidated alloy button was obtained having desired composition, negligible material loss and having microstructure as comparable to standard TZM alloy. (author)

  12. Research on subsurface defects of potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals fabricated by single point diamond turning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Guipeng; Dai, Yifan; Guan, Chaoliang; Chen, Shaoshan; Song, Bing

    2013-03-01

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals, which are widely used in high-power laser systems, are required to be free of defects on fabricated subsurfaces. The depth of subsurface defects (SSD) of KDP crystals is significantly influenced by the parameters used in the single point diamond turning technique. In this paper, based on the deliquescent magnetorheological finishing technique, the SSD of KDP crystals is observed and the depths under various cutting parameters are detected and discussed. The results indicate that no SSD is generated under small parameters and with the increase of cutting parameters, SSD appears and the depth rises almost linearly. Although the ascending trends of SSD depths caused by cutting depth and feed rate are much alike, the two parameters make different contributions. Taking the same material removal efficiency as a criterion, a large cutting depth generates shallower SSD depth than a large feed rate. Based on the experiment results, an optimized cutting procedure is obtained to generate defect-free surfaces.

  13. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Jiang, Wenxue; Sun, Yufu; Li, Hui

    2016-09-02

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young's modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Fabrication of nanostructure by physical vapor deposition with glancing angle deposition technique and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horprathum, M. Eiamchai, P. Patthanasettakul, V.; Limwichean, S.; Nuntawong, N.; Chindaudom, P.; Kaewkhao, J.; Chananonnawathorn, C.

    2014-09-25

    A nanostructural thin film is one of the highly exploiting research areas particularly in applications in sensor, photocatalytic, and solar-cell technologies. In the past two decades, the integration of glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) technique to physical vapor deposition (PVD) process has gained significant attention for well-controlled multidimensional nanomorphologies because of fast, simple, cost-effective, and mass-production capability. The performance and functional properties of the coated thin films generally depend upon their nanostructural compositions, i.e., large aspect ratio, controllable porosity, and shape. Such structural platforms make the fabricated thin films very practical for several realistic applications. We therefore present morphological and nanostructural properties of various deposited materials, which included metals, i.e., silver (Ag), and oxide compounds, i.e., tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}), titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), and indium tin oxide (ITO). Different PVD techniques based on DC magnetron sputtering and electron-beam evaporation, both with the integrated GLAD component, were discussed. We further explore engineered nanostructures which enable controls of optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. These improvements led to several practical applications in surface-enhanced Raman, smart windows, gas sensors, self-cleaning materials and transparent conductive oxides (TCO)

  15. A novel wet extrusion technique to fabricate self-assembled microfiber scaffolds for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Danya M; Harrison, Michael W; Tee, Louis Y; Wei, Karen A; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a novel wet extrusion process to fabricate nonwoven self-assembled microfiber scaffolds with uniform diameters less than 5 μm and without any postmanipulation. In this method, a poly(L-lactic acid) solution flows dropwise into a stirring nonsolvent bath, deforming into liquid polymer streams that self-assemble into a nonwoven microfiber scaffold. The ability to tune fiber diameter was achieved by decreasing polymer spin dope concentration and increasing the silicon oil to petroleum ether ratio of the nonsolvent spin bath. To demonstrate the drug delivery capabilities of scaffolds, heparin was encapsulated using a conventional water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion technique and a cryogenic emulsion technique developed in our laboratory. Spin dope preparation was found to significantly effect the release kinetics of self-assembled scaffolds by altering the interconnectivity of pores within the precipitating filaments. After 35 days, scaffolds prepared from W/O emulsions released up to 45% encapsulated heparin, whereas nearly 80% release of heparin was observed from cryogenic emulsion formulations. The versatility of our system, combined with the prolonged release of small molecules and the ability to control the homogeneity of self-assembling scaffolds, could be beneficial for many tissue regeneration and engineering applications.

  16. Fabricating tubular scaffolds with a radial pore size gradient by a spinning technique.

    PubMed

    Harley, Brendan A; Hastings, Abel Z; Yannas, Ioannis V; Sannino, Alessandro

    2006-02-01

    A novel fabrication process has been developed to produce collagen-based, porous tubular scaffolds to facilitate the study of myofibroblast migration during peripheral nerve regeneration; however, this fabrication technique offers broader appeal for the production of a variety of tubular structures without the use of a complicated mold system. A collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) suspension in acetic acid was spun in a cylindrical copper mold about its longitudinal axis at variable angular velocities and for different times, resulting in variable relative sedimentation of the CG content towards the mold outer edge; after the specified spinning time, the spinning mold was placed into a bath of liquid nitrogen where the CG suspension was rapidly frozen. Due to the rapid solidification, the CG content remained sedimented while an interconnected network of ice crystals formed throughout. Sublimation of the frozen mass removed the solvent (acetic acid) content, producing a porous, tubular structure defined by sedimentation and ice crystal nucleation processes. A porous, tubular scaffold with a sharply defined inner tube wall can be produced; further, increasing the spinning time and/or spinning velocity increases the sedimentation effect leading to the production of a hollow tube with a larger inner diameter. The tube walls display a radially aligned pore structure, even in cases where sedimentation was not sufficient to produce a hollow tube. A gradient of porosity along the tube radius was also observed in cases of extreme sedimentation: the pore structure of the external portion of the tube wall had a larger solid volume fraction and a smaller mean pore size compared to the internal portion of the tube. This tubular structure may allow preferential cell migration from the inner tube lumen towards the outer tube edge while blocking cell entrance into the tube through its outer surface due to increased scaffold relative density and decreased pore size.

  17. Development of Hot Pressing as a Low Cost Processing Technique for Fuel Cell Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V

    2003-01-14

    Dependable, plentiful, and economical energy has been the driving force for financial, industrial, and political growth in the US since the mid 19th century. For a country whose progress is so deeply rooted in abundant energy and whose current political agenda involves stabilizing world fossil fuel prices, the development of a reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly power generating source seems compulsory. The maturing of high technology fuel cells may be the panacea the country will find indispensable to free itself from foreign dependence. Fuel cells offer an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions. Fuel cells have few moving parts and run almost silently. Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly to electrical energy. Unlike batteries, which store a finite amount of energy, fuel cells will generate electricity continuously, as long as fuel and oxidant are available to the electrodes. Additionally, fuel cells offer clean, efficient, and reliable power and they can be operated using a variety of fuels. Hence, the fuel cell is an extremely promising technology. Over the course of this research, the fundamental knowledge related to ceramic processing, sintering, and hot pressing to successfully hot press a single operational SOFC in one step has been developed. Ceramic powder processing for each of the components of an SOFC has bene tailored towards this goal. Processing parameter for the electrolyte and cathode have been studied and developed until they converted. Several anode fabrication techniques have been developed. Additionally, a novel anode structured has been developed and refined. These individual processes have been cultivated until a single cell SOFC has been fabricated in one step.

  18. Fabrication of ultra-fine grained aluminium tubes by RTES technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadeh, H. Abrinia, K.

    2015-04-15

    Recently, repetitive tube expansion and shrinking have been exploited as a means for producing ultra-fine grained and nano-crystalline microstructures for magnesium alloy tubes. This method includes two different half-cycles and was based on pressing a tubular part through an angular channel die with two shear zones. Since the aluminium alloys are the most widely used materials in industries, in this study, repetitive tube expansion and shrinking as a new severe plastic deformation technique was applied to commercially pure aluminium for fabricating ultra-fine grained aluminium tubes for the first time and the ability of this process in significant grain refinement is determined even after single cycle. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to evaluate the microstructure of the repetitive tube expansion and shrinking processed materials and the examinations showed ultra-fine grains with the average grain size of 320 nm after one cycle of repetitive tube expansion and shrinking. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength increased notably by the factor of 2.17 and 1.27 respectively, after one cycle of repetitive tube expansion and shrinking, whereas the elongation to failure as well as the uniform elongation decreased. Furthermore, micro-hardness distribution through the part's section proposed the hardness increasing to ~ 55 HV from the initial value of ~ 28 HV after one cycle of repetitive tube expansion and shrinking. - Highlights: • RTES was introduced for fabricating the UFGed AA1050 tubes for the first time. • Nano-grained AA1050 tube was obtained by RTES process. • Grain size of ~ 320 nm was obtained after two half-cycles of RTES process. • Yield and ultimate strength increased by the factor of 2.17 and 1.27 respectively. • The microhardness increased to ~ 55 HV from the initial value of ~ 28 HV.

  19. Recent advances in sample preparation techniques for effective bioanalytical methods.

    PubMed

    Kole, Prashant Laxman; Venkatesh, Gantala; Kotecha, Jignesh; Sheshala, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent developments in bioanalysis sample preparation techniques and gives an update on basic principles, theory, applications and possibilities for automation, and a comparative discussion on the advantages and limitation of each technique. Conventional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), protein precipitation (PP) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques are now been considered as methods of the past. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of novel sample preparation techniques in bioanalysis. Developments in SPE techniques such as selective sorbents and in the overall approach to SPE, such as hybrid SPE and molecularly imprinted polymer SPE, have been addressed. Considerable literature has been published in the area of solid-phase micro-extraction and its different versions, e.g. stir bar sorptive extraction, and their application in the development of selective and sensitive bioanalytical methods. Techniques such as dispersive solid-phase extraction, disposable pipette extraction and micro-extraction by packed sorbent offer a variety of extraction phases and provide unique advantages to bioanalytical methods. On-line SPE utilizing column-switching techniques is rapidly gaining acceptance in bioanalytical applications. PP sample preparation techniques such as PP filter plates/tubes offer many advantages like removal of phospholipids and proteins in plasma/serum. Newer approaches to conventional LLE techniques (salting-out LLE) are also covered in this review article.

  20. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  1. Advanced rehabilitation techniques for the multi-limb amputee.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Zach T; Loomis, Gregory A; Mitsch, Sarah; Murphy, Ian C; Griffin, Sarah C; Potter, Benjamin K; Pasquina, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Advances in combat casualty care have contributed to unprecedented survival rates of battlefield injuries, challenging the field of rehabilitation to help injured service members achieve maximal functional recovery and independence. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in the care of the multiple-limb amputee. Specialized medical, surgical, and rehabilitative interventions are needed to optimize the care of this unique patient population. This article describes lessons learned at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda in providing advanced therapy and prosthetics for combat casualties, but provides guidelines for all providers involved in the care of individuals with amputation.

  2. Advanced radiation measurement techniques in diagnostic radiology and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Belcari, Nicola; Llacer, Gabriela Llosa; Marcatili, Sara; Moehrs, Sascha; Panetta, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports some technological advances recently achieved in the fields of micro-CT and small animal PET instrumentation. It highlights a balance between image-quality improvement and dose reduction. Most of the recent accomplishments in these fields are due to the use of novel imaging sensors such as CMOS-based X-ray detectors and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). Some of the research projects carried out at the University of Pisa for the development of such advanced radiation imaging technology are also described.

  3. Design & fabrication of two seated aircraft with an advanced rotating leading edge wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Ahmari, Saeed Abdullah Saeed

    The title of this thesis is "Design & Fabrication of two Seated Aircraft with an Advanced Rotating Leading Edge Wing", this gives almost a good description of the work has been done. In this research, the moving surface boundary-layer control (MSBC) concept was investigated and implemented. An experimental model was constructed and tested in wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics using the leading edge moving surface of modified semi-symmetric airfoil NACA1214. The moving surface is provided by a high speed rotating cylinder, which replaces the leading edge of the airfoil. The angle of attack, the cylinder surfaces velocity ratio Uc/U, and the flap deflection angle effects on the lift and drag coefficients and the stall angle of attack were investigated. This new technology was applied to a 2-seat light-sport aircraft that is designed and built in the Aerospace Engineering Department at KFUPM. The project team is led by the aerospace department chairman Dr. Ahmed Z. AL-Garni and Dr. Wael G. Abdelrahman and includes graduate and under graduate student. The wing was modified to include a rotating cylinder along the leading edge of the flap portion. This produced very promising results such as the increase of the maximum lift coefficient at Uc/U=3 by 82% when flaps up and 111% when flaps down at 40° and stall was delayed by 8degrees in both cases. The laboratory results also showed that the effective range of the leading-edge rotating cylinder is at low angles of attack which reduce the need for higher angles of attack for STOL aircraft.

  4. Analytic Syntax: A Technique for Advanced Level Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Ruth

    1975-01-01

    The technique explained here can increase a foreign student's awareness of English grammatical and rhetorical structures. Structural paraphrase is a syntactic reformulation of difficult phrases with minimal vocabulary changes. The technique is illustrated and suggestions are given for class presentation. (CHK)

  5. Novel Engineering and Fabrication Techniques Tested in Low-Noise- Research Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Cameron C.

    2003-01-01

    A major source of fan noise in commercial turbofan engines is the interaction of the wake from the fan blades with the stationary vanes (stators) directly behind them. The Trailing Edge Blowing (TEB) project team at the NASA Glenn Research Center designed and fabricated new fan blades to study the effects of fan trailing edge blowing as a potential noise-reduction concept. The intent is to fill the rotor wake by supplying air to the rotor blade trailing edge at the proper conditions to minimize the wake deficit, and thus generate less noise. The TEB hardware is designed for the Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) test rig in Glenn's Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory. For this test, the air is fed from an external supply through the shaft of the rig. It is distributed to the base of each blade through an impeller, where it is forced into a plenum at the core of each blade. In actual engine configuration, air would most likely be bled from the compressor, but only at times when noise is an issue, such as takeoffs and landings. Glenn researchers designed and manufactured the blades in-house, using new techniques and concepts. The skins, which were designed for maximum strength in the directions of highest stress, were molded from multiple layers of carbon fiber. Considerable use was made of rapid prototyping techniques, such as laser sintering. The core was sintered from a lightweight polymer, and the retainer was CNC-machined (computer numerical control machined) from aluminum. All the components were joined with a cold-cure aerospace adhesive. These techniques and processes reduced the overall cost and allowed the new concept to be studied much sooner than would be possible using traditional fabrication methods. Since this test rig did not support the use of blade-monitoring techniques such as strain gauges, extensive bench testing was required to qualify the design. The blades were examined using a variety of methods including holography, pull tests (cyclic and

  6. Advanced NDE techniques for quantitative characterization of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center and their applications that have resulted in quantitative assessment of material properties based on thermal and ultrasonic measurements are reviewed. Specific applications include ultrasonic determination of bolt tension, ultrasonic and thermal characterization of bonded layered structures, characterization of composite materials, and disbonds in aircraft skins.

  7. Advanced NDE techniques for quantitative characterization of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center and their applications that have resulted in quantitative assessment of material properties based on thermal and ultrasonic measurements are reviewed. Specific applications include ultrasonic determination of bolt tension, ultrasonic and thermal characterization of bonded layered structures, characterization of composite materials, and disbonds in aircraft skins.

  8. Bricklaying Curriculum: Advanced Bricklaying Techniques. Instructional Materials. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turcotte, Raymond J.; Hendrix, Laborn J.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist bricklaying instructors in providing performance-based instruction in advanced bricklaying. Included in the first section of the guide are units on customized or architectural masonry units; glass block; sills, lintels, and copings; and control (expansion) joints. The next two units deal with cut,…

  9. Recent advances in microscopic techniques for visualizing leukocytes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rohit; Tikoo, Shweta; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes are inherently motile and interactive cells. Recent advances in intravital microscopy approaches have enabled a new vista of their behavior within intact tissues in real time. This brief review summarizes the developments enabling the tracking of immune responses in vivo. PMID:27239292

  10. Bricklaying Curriculum: Advanced Bricklaying Techniques. Instructional Materials. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turcotte, Raymond J.; Hendrix, Laborn J.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist bricklaying instructors in providing performance-based instruction in advanced bricklaying. Included in the first section of the guide are units on customized or architectural masonry units; glass block; sills, lintels, and copings; and control (expansion) joints. The next two units deal with cut,…

  11. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. During the first quarter of the project, the thrust of the work was directed towards setting up the experimental facilities and undertaking preliminary tests to gauge the ability of coal tar derived binder in fabricating the brake skeletons. In addition systematic scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), fly ash (ADM), FBC fly ash, FBC spent bed bottom ash, bottom ash (ADM), and scrubber sludge residues to characterize their geometrical shape and thermal stability. The PCC fly ash particles being highly spherical in shape and thermally inert up to 1100{degrees}C will make an excellent raw material for our composites. This is born out by fabricating brake skeletons from PCC fly ash colloids. Unlike the PCC fly ash and FBC fly ash, the scrubber sludge particles are not suitable hosts for our brake lining materials because of a whisker-like particle structure. Six different compositions of various combustion residues were tested in the fabrication of brake skeletons, and our tar derived binder shows great promise in the fabrication of composite materials.

  12. High-Quality Large-Magnification Polymer Lens from Needle Moving Technique and Thermal Assisted Moldless Fabrication Process

    PubMed Central

    Pongsoon, Prasit; Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Chaitavon, Kosom; Porntheeraphat, Supanit; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Koanantakool, Thaweesak

    2016-01-01

    The need of mobile microscope is escalating as well as the demand of high quality optical components in low price. We report here a novel needle moving technique to fabricate milli-size lens together with thermal assist moldless method. Our proposed protocol is able to create a high tensile strength structure of the lens and its base which is beneficial for exploiting in convertinga smart phone to be a digital microscope. We observe that no bubble trapped in a lens when this technique is performed which can overcome a challenge problem found in a typical dropping technique. We demonstrate the symmetry, smoothness and micron-scale resolution of the fabricated structure. This proposed technique is promising to serve as high quality control mass production without any expensive equipment required. PMID:26765524

  13. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-03-31

    The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

  14. Backscattered Electron Microscopy as an Advanced Technique in Petrography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsley, David Henry; Manley, Curtis Robert

    1989-01-01

    Three uses of this method with sandstone, desert varnish, and granite weathering are described. Background information on this technique is provided. Advantages of this type of microscopy are stressed. (CW)

  15. Backscattered Electron Microscopy as an Advanced Technique in Petrography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsley, David Henry; Manley, Curtis Robert

    1989-01-01

    Three uses of this method with sandstone, desert varnish, and granite weathering are described. Background information on this technique is provided. Advantages of this type of microscopy are stressed. (CW)

  16. Recent Advances in Fluorescent Labeling Techniques for Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Haruo; Aoki, Takeo; Takata, Kuniaki

    2007-01-01

    Tremendous progress in recent computer-controlled systems for fluorescence and laser-confocal microscopy has provided us with powerful tools to visualize and analyze molecular events in the cells. Various fluorescent staining and labeling techniques have also been developed to be used with these powerful instruments. Fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) allow us to directly label particular proteins of interest in living cells. This technique has been extended over a large area of cell biology, and a variety of fluorescent protein-derived techniques have been developed to visualize the functions and conditions of the molecules within living cells. In this review, we summarize the techniques for fluorescent staining and labeling for recent fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18224244

  17. Advanced Statistical Signal Processing Techniques for Landmine Detection Using GPR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-12

    based ground penetrating radars for the detection of subsurface objects that are low in metal content and hard to detect. The derived techniques...penetrating radars for the detection of subsurface objects that are low in metal content and hard to detect. The derived techniques include the exploitation...5.00 4.00 3.00 9.00 T. Glenn, J. Wilson, D. Ho. A MULTIMODAL MATCHING PURSUITS DISSIMILARITY MEASURE APPLIED TO LANDMINE/CLUTTER DISCRIMINATION

  18. Polyaniline-based organic memristive device fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhina, Svetlana; Sorokin, Vladimir; Erokhin, Victor

    2015-09-01

    Memristors and memristive devices represent a splendid area of research due to the unique possibilities for the realization of new types of computer hardware elements and mimicking several essential properties of the nervous system of living beings. The organic memristive device was developed as an electronic single-device analogue of the synapse, suitable for the realization of circuits allowing Hebbian type of learning. This work is dedicated to the realization of the active channel of organic memristive devices by polyelectrolyte self-assembling (layer-by-layer technique). Stable and reproducible electrical characteristics of the device were obtained when the thickness of the active channel was more than seven bilayers. The device revealed rectifying behaviour and the presence of hysteresis—important properties for the realization of neuromorphic systems with synapse-like properties of the individual elements. Compared to previously reported results on organic memristive devices fabricated using other methods, the present device does not require any additional doping that is usually performed through acid treatment. Such a behaviour is extremely important for the cases in which biological systems (nervous cells, slime mould, etc.) must be interfaced with the system of organic memristive devices, since acid treatment can kill living beings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Charged Nanoparticle Translocation through solid state nanopores fabricated using different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandivada, Santoshi; Li, Jiali; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-03-01

    Solid-state nanopores are widely used for detection of biomolecules and small particles by measuring the pore resistance change when the molecules or particles are electrophoretically driven through. In this work, we use well-characterized spherical nanoparticles and long chain double-stranded DNA molecules to study the interactions of these nanoparticles and voltage biased solid-state nanopores. Charged nanoparticles of ~ 30nm or smaller are used to study the volume and charge dependence of their translocation dynamics in solid-state nanopores made from silicon nitride. Nanopores fabricated using two different techniques are used in this study: one is to use noble gas ion beams to sculpt ~ 100 nm pores milled by focused ion beam; another is to use e-beam lithography to first write a micrometer size pattern, then to thin the patterned region, and finally drill a nanopore in the thinned micrometer region by a high energy electron beam in a TEM. The 3D geometry of both types of nanopores are measured using HR-TEM . Furthermore, COMSOL is used to model the experimental results. These studies will improve our understanding of solid-state nanopore as a sensor for charged nanoparticle detection.

  20. Fabrication of Lotus-Type Porous Al-Si Alloys Using the Continuous Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Hyun, S. K.; Suzuki, S.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-02-01

    Lotus-type porous Al-Si (4, 8, 12, 14, and 18 wt pct) alloys were fabricated using the continuous casting technique under a hydrogen gas pressure of 0.1 MPa at various transference velocities, and the effects of the silicon content level and transference velocity on the pore morphology and porosity were investigated. Both the porosity and the average pore diameter increase as the silicon content level increases and decrease as the transference velocity increases. In particular, the velocity dependence is obviously exhibited at a silicon content level higher than 12 wt pct. The pore shape is changed from irregular in the higher-dendrite fraction to nearly circular in the lower-dendrite fraction. The porosity and the pore morphology are influenced by the silicon content level and transference velocity. In the model, these results can be understood with the explanation that the pores, which contribute to the increase in porosity, are generated at the eutectic fronts. This indicated that the porosity and the pore size in lotus-type porous Al-Si alloys can be well controlled by varying the silicon content level and the transference velocity.

  1. Electrical characterization and comparison of CIGS solar cells made with different structures and fabrication techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Garris, Rebekah L.; Johnston, Steven; Li, Jian V.; ...

    2017-08-31

    In a previous study, we reported on Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based (CIGS) solar cell samples collected from different research laboratories and industrial companies with the purpose of understanding the range of CIGS materials that can lead to high-quality and high-efficiency solar panels. Here, we report on electrical measurements of those same samples. Electron-beam induced current and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) gave insights about the collection probability and the lifetime of carriers generated in each absorber. Capacitance and drive-level capacitance profiling revealed nonuniformity in carrier-density profiles. Admittance spectroscopy revealed small activation energies (= 0.03 eV) indicative of the inversion strength, larger activation energies (> 0.1more » eV) reflective of thermal activation of absorber conductivity and a deeper defect level. Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) probed deep hole-trapping defects and showed that all samples in this study had a majority-carrier defect with activation energy between 0.3 eV and 0.9 eV. Optical-DLTS revealed deep electron-trapping defects in several of the CIGS samples. This work focused on revealing similarities and differences between high-quality CIGS solar cells made with various structures and fabrication techniques.« less

  2. Fabrication of YSZ buffer layer by single source MOCVD technique for YBCO coated conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Sun, Jong-Won; Kim, Ho-Jin; Lee, Dong-Wook; Jung, Choong-Hwan; Park, Soon-Dong; Kim, Chan-Joong

    2003-10-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers were deposited by a metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique using a single liquid source for the application of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) coated conductor. Y:Zr mole ratio was 0.2:0.8, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) was used as a solvent. The (1 0 0) single crystal MgO substrate was used for searching the deposition conditions. Bi-axially oriented CeO 2 and NiO films were fabricated on {1 0 0} <0 0 1> textured Ni substrate by the same method and used as templates. At a constant working pressure of 10 Torr, the deposition temperatures (660-800 °C) and oxygen flow rates (100-500 sccm) were changed to find the optimum deposition condition. The best (1 0 0) oriented YSZ film on MgO was obtained at 740 °C and O 2 flow rate of 300 sccm. For a YSZ buffer layer with this deposition condition on a CeO 2/Ni template, full width half maximum values of the in-plane ( ϕ-scan) and out-of-plane ( ω-scan) alignments were 10.6° and 9.8°, respectively. The SEM image of YSZ film on CeO 2/Ni showed surface morphologies without microcracks. The film deposition rate was about 100 nm/min.

  3. Characterization and analysis of surface notches on Ti-alloy plates fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-12-01

    Rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) were fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition techniques that included electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM). The surface conditions of these plates were characterized using x-ray micro-computed tomography. The depth and radius of surface notch-like features on the LBM and EBM plates were measured from sectional images of individual virtual slices of the rectangular plates. The stress concentration factors of individual surface notches were computed and analyzed statistically to determine the appropriate distributions for the notch depth, notch radius, and stress concentration factor. These results were correlated with the fatigue life of the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys from an earlier investigation. A surface notch analysis was performed to assess the debit in the fatigue strength due to the surface notches. The assessment revealed that the fatigue lives of the additively manufactured plates with rough surface topographies and notch-like features are dominated by the fatigue crack growth of large cracks for both the LBM and EBM materials. The fatigue strength reduction due to the surface notches can be as large as 60%-75%. It is concluded that for better fatigue performance, the surface notches on EBM and LBM materials need to be removed by machining and the surface roughness be improved to a surface finish of about 1 μm.

  4. A precision star tracker utilizing advanced techniques and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. F.; Mcaloon, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    An image dissector star tracker has been developed which operates in the photon counting mode making it possible to utilize all digital electronics. A unique pulse processing circuit allows bright stars to be tracked as well as dim stars. Thermal mechanical stability has been greatly enhanced by fabricating a housing with graphite/epoxy composite material with a linear coefficient of thermal expansion near zero. Test results indicate the +10 Mv stars can be acquired and tracked, while position variation with star intensity is less than 2 arc seconds from 2.5 Mv to +10 Mv. The noise equivalent angle for a +8 Mv star is 3 arc seconds. Polynominal correction for remaining cross-coupling and nonlinearity reduced error over total 1 x 1 deg field to 1.5 arc seconds.

  5. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique

    PubMed Central

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections. PMID:24991524

  6. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique.

    PubMed

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections.

  7. Recognition of Prior Learning as a Technique for Fabricating the Adult Learner: A Genealogical Analysis on Swedish Adult Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Per; Fejes, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the recognition of prior learning and the figure of thought it represents in Swedish policy on adult education. It can be seen as a technique for governing the adult learner and a way of fabricating the subject. We are tracing this thought back in time to see how it has changed and what it consists of. The material analysed…

  8. Nacre-like materials using a simple doctor blading technique: Fabrication, testing and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mirkhalaf, M; Barthelat, F

    2016-03-01

    The remarkable mechanical performance of biological materials such as bone, nacre, and spider silk stems from their staggered microstructure in which stiff and strong reinforcements are elongated in the direction of loading, separated by softer interfaces, and shifted relative to each other. This structure results in useful combinations of modulus, strength and toughness and therefore is increasingly mimicked in bio-inspired engineering composites. Here, we report the use of a simple and versatile technique based on doctor-blading to fabricate staggered composites of microscopic alumina tablets with high alignment in a chitosan matrix. Tensile tests on these nacre-like materials show that the modulus and strength of the composite films are enhanced by the incorporation of ceramic tablets, but only up to 15vol% after which all properties degrade. This phenomenon, also reported in the past for most of nacre-like materials, composed of micro/nano tablets, obtained from different techniques, has been limiting our ability to produce large volumes of high-performance nacre-like materials. Examination of the structure of the films revealed that at lower tablet concentrations the tablets are well-aligned and well dispersed thorough the volume of the film. At 15vol% and beyond, we observed tablet misalignment and clustering. In order to investigate the impact of these imperfections on material performance we developed large scale finite element models representative of the structure of the composite films. These models show that the mechanical performance significantly degrades with tablet misalignment, and especially at high tablet concentrations. The simulations along with the SEM images therefore quantitatively explain the experimental trends, e.g. the degradation of mechanical properties at high tablet contents.

  9. Rapid vacuum sintering: a novel technique for fabricating fluorapatite ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Denry, Isabelle; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Harless, Jeffrey; Holloway, Julie A

    2017-01-30

    Macroporous bioceramic scaffolds are often fabricated via the foam replica technique, based on polymeric foam impregnation with a glass slurry, followed by slow heat treatment to allow for drying, polymeric burnout, and sintering of the glass particles. As a consequence, the process is time consuming and complicated by concurrent crystallization of the glass, often leading to incomplete sintering. Our goal was to investigate the effect of heating rate on sintering behavior, architecture, and mechanical properties of fluorapatite-based glass and glass-ceramic scaffolds. Glass scaffolds were prepared and sintered by rapid vacuum sintering (RVS) at 785°C under vacuum at a fast heating rate (55°C/min.) or without vacuum at a slow heating rate (2°C/min.). Two additional groups were further crystallized at 775°C/1 h. XRD confirmed the presence of fluorapatite for crystallized scaffolds. All groups presented interconnected porosity with a pore size in the 500 μm range. Scaffolds produced by RVS exhibited an excellent degree of sintering while scaffolds produced by slow sintering were incompletely sintered. The mean compressive strength was significantly higher for the RVS groups (1.52 ± 0.55 and 1.72 ± 0.61 MPa) compared to the slow-sintered groups (0.54 ± 0.30 and 0.45 ± 0.26 MPa). Meanwhile, the total production time was reduced by more than 12 h by using the RVS technique. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  10. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  11. Electroextraction and electromembrane extraction: Advances in hyphenation to analytical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Oedit, Amar; Ramautar, Rawi; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Electroextraction (EE) and electromembrane extraction (EME) are sample preparation techniques that both require an electric field that is applied over a liquid‐liquid system, which enables the migration of charged analytes. Furthermore, both techniques are often used to pre‐concentrate analytes prior to analysis. In this review an overview is provided of the body of literature spanning April 2012–November 2015 concerning EE and EME, focused on hyphenation to analytical techniques. First, the theoretical aspects of concentration enhancement in EE and EME are discussed to explain extraction recovery and enrichment factor. Next, overviews are provided of the techniques based on their hyphenation to LC, GC, CE, and direct detection. These overviews cover the compounds and matrices, experimental aspects (i.e. donor volume, acceptor volume, extraction time, extraction voltage, and separation time) and the analytical aspects (i.e. limit of detection, enrichment factor, and extraction recovery). Techniques that were either hyphenated online to analytical techniques or show high potential with respect to online hyphenation are highlighted. Finally, the potential future directions of EE and EME are discussed. PMID:26864699

  12. Coal and char studies by advanced EMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.

    1999-03-31

    Advanced magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During this grant period, further progress was made on proton NMR and low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to examine the interaction between fluids such as water and the surface of suspended char particles. Effects of char particle size and type on water nuclear spin relaxation, T2, were measured and modeled.

  13. Coal and char studies by advanced EMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.

    1998-09-30

    Advanced magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During this grant period, further progress was made on proton NMR and low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to examine the interaction between fluids such as water and the surface of suspended char particles. Effects of char particle size on water nuclear spin relaxation, T2, were measured.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A; Barker, Alan M; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Albright, Austin P; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years [1]. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  15. Application of Active Learning Techniques to an Advanced Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, R. A.

    2004-05-01

    The New Faculty Workshop provided a wealth of techniques as well as an overriding philosophy for the teaching of undergraduate Physics and Astronomy courses. The focus of the workshop was active learning, summarized in ``Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching" by Slater & Adams: it's not what you do in class that matters, it's what the students do. Much of the specific focus of the New Faculty Workshop is on teaching the large, introductory Physics classes that many of the faculty present are sure to teach, both algebra-based and calculus-based. Many of these techniques apply directly and with little modification to introductory Astronomy courses. However, little direct attention is given to upper-division undergraduate, or even graduate, courses. In this presentation, I will share my experience in attempting to apply some of the techniques discussed at the New Faculty Workshop to an upper-division course in Galactic Astrophysics at Vanderbilt University during the Spring semester of 2004.

  16. The bumper technique for advancing a large profile microcatheter.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Christopher P; Chartrain, Alexander G; Schwegel, Claire; Oxley, Thomas J; Shoirah, Hazem; Mocco, J

    2017-03-09

    Operators commonly encounter difficulty maneuvering a microcatheter beyond the distal lip of wide neck aneurysms and aneurysms in challenging locations. Few techniques have been described to guide operators in these particular situations. In this case report of a 56-year-old woman with a 16 mm ophthalmic artery aneurysm, the microcatheter continually snagged the distal aneurysm lip, preventing delivery of a flow diverter into the distal parent vessel. In troubleshooting this obstacle, a second microguidewire was introduced alongside the microcatheter and was used to cover the distal lip of the aneurysm to prevent further snagging. The second guidewire successfully deflected the microcatheter into the distal vessel, a technique that we have aptly dubbed the 'bumper technique'.

  17. Containerless Processing: Fabrication of Advanced Functional Materials from Undercooled Oxide Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. S. Vijaya; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-07-01

    Materials science in Microgravity condition is one of newly established cutting edge science field. After the effort of space development and space utilization, microgravity of space environment has been considered as one of novel tools for materials science because it assures containerless levitation. Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the technologically important materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt. Recently, rare-earth ferrites and manganites have attracted great interest towards their wide applications in the field of electronic industry. Among these new hexagonal phases with a space group of P6 _{3}cm are technologically important materials because of multiferroic characteristics, i.e., the coexistence of ferroelectricity and magnetism in one compound. In the present study, containerless solidification of the R-Fe-O, and R-Mn-O melts were carried out to fabricate multiferroics under the controlled Po _{2}. Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the new materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt because it provides large undercooling prior to nucleation. In order to undercool the melt deeply below the melting temperature under a precisely controlled oxygen partial pressure, an aerodynamic levitator (ADL) combined with ZrO _{2} oxygen sensor was designed. A spherical RFeO _{3} and RMnO _{3} sample was levitated by an ADL and completely melted by a CO _{2} laser in an atmosphere with predetermined Po _{2}.The surface temperature of the levitated droplet was monitored by a two-color pyrometer. Then, the droplet was cooled by turning off the CO _{2} laser. The XRD results of the rapidly solidified LuFeO _{3} and LuMnO _{3} samples at Po _{2} of 1x10 ^{5} Pa confirms the existence of the hexagonal metastable LuFeO _{3} phase. On the other hand, orthorhombic RFeO _{3} (R=Yb, Er, Y and Dy)and hexagonal RMnO _{3} (R=Ho-Lu)phases were identified. The cross-sectioned scanning

  18. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  19. Transcranial Doppler: Techniques and advanced applications: Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind K.; Bathala, Lokesh; Batra, Amit; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only diagnostic tool that can provide continuous information about cerebral hemodynamics in real time and over extended periods. In the previous paper (Part 1), we have already presented the basic ultrasound physics pertaining to TCD, insonation methods, and various flow patterns. This article describes various advanced applications of TCD such as detection of right-to-left shunt, emboli monitoring, vasomotor reactivity (VMR), monitoring of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), monitoring of intracranial pressure, its role in stoke prevention in sickle cell disease, and as a supplementary test for confirmation of brain death. PMID:27011639

  20. New Synthetic Techniques for Advanced Propellant Ingredients: Trifluoromethanesulfonate Derivitive Intermediates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Advanced Propellant Ingredients: Trifluoromethanesulfonate Derivitive Intermediates April 1987 Authors: R . D. Chapman J. L. Andreshak S. A. Shackelford...31 Sun«. P. J.. Hanack, M.. Subraroanian. L. R . Hvnthau 1982, 8M26 (4) Ho»ella. R D; McCown. J D Chrm Rrv 1177. 77. 69-92 (5) Sung. P J.; Whit«, M R ...Brr l»gl lit. 810-813 (8) Beard, C D . Baum, K. J Urf Vht-m l»74. J9. 3875 ;W77 (9) Shone. R 1. Tttrahtdron Ltll 1977. »93 996. (10) Hildreth