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Sample records for advanced fabry disease

  1. [Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Stephan, F; Haber, R

    2017-02-01

    Fabry disease, also known as Anderson-Fabry disease or angiokeratoma corporis diffusum universale, is an X-linked recessive form of sphingolipidosis caused by total or partial deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, alpha-galactosidase A. From the youngest age, it results in a gradual ubiquitous build-up of glycosphingolipids that are not degraded by the missing enzyme. Cutaneous, neurological, nephrologic, cardiac, gastrointestinal, ophthalmological, respiratory, cochleovestibular and haematological involvement are responsible for increased mortality and significant impairment of quality of life in subjects affected by the disease. Angiokeratomas are the most common cutaneous sign of this disease, although they are not specific to it and must be distinguished from angiokeratomas either occurring in isolation or associated with systemic diseases. Other cutaneous signs encountered in this disease include hyperhidrosis, oral lesions, lower limb oedemas, etc. The diagnosis is mainly clinical and should be considered in the presence of a personal and/or familial history; it is confirmed by assay of enzyme activity within leucocytes or by molecular studies. Management is multidisciplinary and involves symptomatic treatment as well as specific treatment, resulting in improved survival and enhanced quality of life for patients presenting the disease. Enzyme replacement therapy with alpha-galactosidase A forms the cornerstone of specific treatment and may be associated with other types of treatments such as galactose and molecular chaperones. Gene therapy is now also used extensively. At present, these marked therapeutic advances, which closely involve dermatologists, could help transform the prognosis for patients presenting Fabry disease.

  2. Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipids that is caused by mutations of the GLA gene that codes for α-galactosidase A, leads to dysfunction of many cell types and includes a systemic vasculopathy. As a result, patients have a markedly increased risk of developing ischemic stroke, small-fiber peripheral neuropathy, cardiac dysfunction and chronic kidney disease. Virtually all complications of Fabry disease are non-specific in nature and clinically indistinguishable from similar abnormalities that occur in the context of more common disorders in the general population. Recent studies suggested a much higher incidence of mutations of the GLA gene, suggesting that this disorder is under-diagnosed. However, some of the gene variants may be benign. Although the etiology of Fabry disease has been known for many years, the mechanism by which the accumulating α-D-galactosyl moieties cause this multi organ disorder has only recently been studied and is yet to be completely elucidated. Specific therapy for Fabry disease has been developed in the last few years but its role in the management of the disorder is still being investigated. Fortunately, standard 'non-specific' medical and surgical therapy is effective in slowing deterioration or compensating for organ failure in patients with Fabry disease.

  3. Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Toyooka, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A and progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in cells throughout the body. The main neurological presentations of Fabry disease patients are painful neuropathy, hypohidrosis, and stroke. Fabry neuropathy is characterized as a length-dependent peripheral neuropathy affecting mainly the small myelinated (Aδ) fibers and unmyelinated (C) fibers. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been shown to have some positive effects on the reduction of neuropathic pain, the improvement of detection threshold for thermal sensation, and sweat function. On the contrary, the effect of ERT on the central nervous system has not been established. Early initiation of ERT before irreversible organ failure is extremely important, and alternative therapeutic approaches are currently being explored. Heterozygotes suffer from peripheral neuropathy at a higher rate than previously shown, significant multisystemic disease, and severely decreased quality of life. As well as being carriers, heterozygotes also display symptoms of Fabry disease, and should be carefully monitored and given adequate therapy.

  4. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal α-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual α-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked α-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human α-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Fabry disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Fabry disease Fabry disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Fabry disease is an inherited disorder that results from the ...

  6. Long-term outcome of enzyme-replacement therapy in advanced Fabry disease: evidence for disease progression towards serious complications

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, F; Niemann, M; Störk, S; Breunig, F; Beer, M; Sommer, C; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Wanner, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective The long-term effects of enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) in Fabry disease are unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ERT in patients with advanced Fabry disease affects progression towards ‘hard’ clinical end-points in comparison with the natural course of the disease. Methods A total of 40 patients with genetically proven Fabry disease (mean age 40 ± 9 years; n = 9 women) were treated prospectively with ERT for 6 years. In addition, 40 subjects from the Fabry Registry, matched for age, sex, chronic kidney disease stage and previous transient ischaemic attack (TIA), served as a comparison group. The main outcome was a composite of stroke, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Secondary outcomes included changes in myocardial left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and replacement fibrosis, change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), new TIA and change in neuropathic pain. Results During a median follow-up of 6.0 years (bottom and top quartiles: 5.1, 7.2), 15 events occurred in 13 patients (n = 7 deaths, n = 4 cases of ESRD and n = 4 strokes). Sudden death occurred (n = 6) only in patients with documented ventricular tachycardia and myocardial replacement fibrosis. The annual progression of myocardial LV fibrosis in the entire cohort was 0.6 ± 0.7%. As a result, posterior end-diastolic wall thinning was observed (baseline, 13.2 ± 2.0 mm; follow-up, 11.4 ± 2.1 mm; P < 0.01). GFR decreased by 2.3 ± 4.6 mL min−1 per year. Three patients experienced a TIA. The major clinical symptom was neuropathic pain (n = 37), and this symptom improved in 25 patients. The event rate was not different between the ERT group and the untreated (natural history) group of the Fabry Registry. Conclusion Despite ERT, clinically meaningful events including sudden cardiac death continue to develop in patients with advanced Fabry disease. PMID:23586858

  7. Skin Globotriaosylceramide 3 Load Is Increased in Men with Advanced Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Schröter, Nils; Kafke, Waldemar; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background The X-chromosomally linked life-limiting Fabry disease (FD) is associated with deposits of the sphingolipid globotriaosylceramide 3 (Gb3) in various tissues. Skin is easily accessible and may be used as an additional diagnostic and follow-up medium. Our aims were to visualize skin Gb3 deposits in FD patients applying immunofluorescence and to determine if cutaneous Gb3 load correlates with disease severity. Methods At our Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy we enrolled 84 patients with FD and 27 healthy controls. All subjects underwent 5-mm skin punch biopsy at the lateral lower leg and the back. Skin samples were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies against CD77 (i.e. Gb3). Cutaneous Gb3 deposition was quantified in a blinded manner and correlated to clinical data. Results We found that Gb3 load was higher in distal skin of male FD patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Men (p<0.01) and women (p<0.05) with a classic FD phenotype had higher distal skin Gb3 load than healthy controls. Men with advanced disease as reflected by impaired renal function, and men and women with small fiber neuropathy had more Gb3 deposits in distal skin samples than males with normal renal function (p<0.05) and without small fiber neuropathy. Gb3 deposits were not different between patients with and without enzyme replacement therapy. Conclusions Immunofluorescence on minimally invasive skin punch biopsies may be useful as a tool for assessment and follow-up in FD patients. PMID:27851774

  8. Fabry disease simulating Crohn's ileitis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carlos A; Villnow, Elizabeth; Sundelin, Birgitta; Eriksson, Elina; Dolapcsiev, Karoli; Björk, Jan; Befrits, Ragnar; Tengvar, Magnus; Iversen, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited (X-linked) lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, leading to accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in various tissues. A 57-year-old male with a family history and laboratory findings of Fabry disease, was consulted for severe abdominal pain, undulating pyrexia, weight loss and diarrhea. The tentative clinical diagnosis of Crohn's ileitis was supported at computed tomographic examination, at laparotomy and at inspection of the resected ileal segment. Histology revealed chronic and acute inflammation, thick-walled occluded vessels, fibrosis and characteristic bi-refringent lamellar deposits of globotriaosylceramide and calcifications. Multi-nucleated giant cells contained phagocytized bi-refringent material. Transmission electron microscopy showed cells with irregular cytoplasmic bodies displaying distinctive zebra-like lamellar structures. It is submitted that the gastrointestinal phenotype of Fabry disease may concur with symptoms resembling abdominal Crohn's disease.

  9. Fabry disease: experience of screening dialysis patients for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Eiji; Saito, Osamu; Akimoto, Tetsu; Asano, Yasushi

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence rate for Fabry disease is conventionally considered to be 1 case in 40,000; however, due to increased screening accuracy, reports now suggest that prevalence is 1 case in 1,500 among male children, and it is likely that the clinical importance of the condition will increase in the future. In dialysis patients to date, prevalence rates are between 0.16 and 1.2 %. Globotriaosylsphingosine (Lyso-GL-3), which is a substrate of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A), has surfaced as a new biomarker, and is also effective in the determination and monitoring of the effects of enzyme replacement therapy. In terms of genetic abnormalities, the E66Q mutation has recently become a topic of discussion, and although doubts have been expressed over whether or not it is the gene responsible for Fabry disease, there is still a strong possibility that it is a functional genetic polymorphism. At present, the standard treatment for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy, and in order to overcome the problems involved with this, a method of producing recombinant human α-Gal A using methanol-assimilating yeast, and chemical or medicinal chaperone treatment are of current interest. Migalastat hydrochloride is known as a pharmacological chaperone, but is currently in Phase III global clinical trials. Adding saposin B to modified α-N-acetyl galactosaminidase is also under consideration as a treatment method.

  10. Anderson-Fabry disease: a multiorgan disease.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Salvatore; Pinto, Antonio; Licata, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. FD causes glycolipids, such as globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), to accumulate in the vascular endothelium of several organs (Fig. 2), including the skin, kidneys, nervous system, and heart, thereby triggering inflammation and fibrosis. These processes generally result in organ dysfunction, which is usually the first clinical evidence of FD. Patients with classic FD have various symptoms, eg, acroparesthesias, hypohidrosis, angiokeratomas, corneal opacities, cerebrovascular lesions, cardiac disorders, andrenal dysfunction.However, evolving knowledge about the natural course of disease suggests that it is more appropriate to describe FD as a disease with a wide spectrum of heterogeneously progressive clinical phenotypes. Indeed, most female heterozygotes develop symptoms due to yet undetermined mechanisms and a high percentage of females develops vital organ involvement including the kidneys, heart and/or brain about a decade later than males. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. The principal clinical manifestations in Fabry disease consist of artery associated complications (such as cerebral disease and nephropathy), but the pathophysiology of this specific vasculopathy is unclear. Several studies

  11. Fabry disease and cardiovascular involvement.

    PubMed

    Anastasakis, Aris; Papatheodorou, Efstathios; Steriotis, Alexandros Klavdios

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD, OMIM 301500) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder of the glycosphigolipid metabolism caused by total or partial deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A). Progressive intralysosomal accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids in a variety of cell types triggers a cascade of pathophysiological events including cellular death, compromised energy metabolism, small vessel injury, K(Ca)3.1 channel dysfunction in endothelial cells, oxidative stress, impaired autophagosome maturation, tissue ischemia and, importantly, development of irreversible cardiac and renal tissue fibrosis, leading to major multisystemic manifestations. Cardiovascular complications of the disease are very frequent and contribute substantially to disease-related morbidity and mortality in men. Cardiovascular involvement is the leading cause of premature death in heterozygous female patients with FD. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most prominent cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, arrhythmias, vessel disease and coronary microvascular dysfunction. The diagnosis of subclinical forms of the disease, before the development of cardiac hypertrophy, using newer techniques (tissue doppler imaging, strain rate and cardiac magnetic resonance) is crucial to the early initation of the treatment. Greatest benefit of the enzyme replacement treatment is achieved when started at an early stage of the disease before extensive fibrosis or other irreversible tissue damage takes place. Fabry disease should be included in the differential diagnosis algorithm of idiopathic hypertrophy. Determination of Alpha-Gal A activity on plasma and peripheral leukocytes in males and genetic testing in females are the diagnostic gold-standards.

  12. Coexistence of Fabry Disease and Membranous Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xie, Hua; Lin, Hongli; Chen, Shuni; Wang, Weidong; Zhao, Guangben; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with no family history or characteristic symptoms of Fabry disease presented with proteinuria. Histological and immunofluorescent analysis of kidney tissue collected revealed stage 1 membranous nephropathy. Electron microscopy of the same tissue revealed a large number of myeloid bodies (zebra bodies) in the glomerular epithelial cytoplasm and a mild irregular thickening of basement membrane. A diagnosis of Fabry disease was supported by the low α-galactosidase A activity detected in the patient's plasma, and confirmed by the detection of a pathogenic homozygous mutation in the α-galactosidase A gene. Therefore, the final diagnosis was of coexistent Fabry disease and stage 1 membranous nephropathy. This is the first case study reporting the coexistence of Fabry disease and membranous nephropathy. Our results emphasize the importance of electron microscopy in Fabry disease diagnosis.

  13. Cognitive and psychological functioning in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Sigmundsdottir, Linda; Tchan, Michel C; Knopman, Alex A; Menzies, Graham C; Batchelor, Jennifer; Sillence, David O

    2014-11-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder which can result in renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular disease. Patients are at increased risk of stroke and neuroimaging studies note cerebrovascular pathology. This study provides a cognitive profile of a cohort of individuals with Fabry disease and investigates the impact of pain, age, renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular functioning on cognition and psychological functioning. Seventeen Fabry patients (12 males) with ages ranging 25 to 60 years (M = 46.6+11.8), and 15 age-matched healthy controls (M = 46.2+12.7) were administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Fabry males demonstrated slower speed of information processing, reduced performance on measures of executive functions (verbal generation, reasoning, problem solving, perseveration), were more likely to show clinically significant reductions, and were more likely to report symptoms of anxiety and depression. Conversely, Fabry females performed at a similar level to controls. Correlational analyses indicated a link between cognitive and clinical measures of disease severity.

  14. Renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis, and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges, and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

  15. Cognitive and Psychological Functioning in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sigmundsdottir, Linda; Tchan, Michel C.; Knopman, Alex A.; Menzies, Graham C.; Batchelor, Jennifer; Sillence, David O.

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder which can result in renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular disease. Patients are at increased risk of stroke and neuroimaging studies note cerebrovascular pathology. This study provides a cognitive profile of a cohort of individuals with Fabry disease and investigates the impact of pain, age, renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular functioning on cognition and psychological functioning. Seventeen Fabry patients (12 males) with ages ranging 25 to 60 years (M = 46.6+11.8), and 15 age-matched healthy controls (M = 46.2+12.7) were administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Fabry males demonstrated slower speed of information processing, reduced performance on measures of executive functions (verbal generation, reasoning, problem solving, perseveration), were more likely to show clinically significant reductions, and were more likely to report symptoms of anxiety and depression. Conversely, Fabry females performed at a similar level to controls. Correlational analyses indicated a link between cognitive and clinical measures of disease severity. PMID:25319043

  16. Dialysis and transplantation in Fabry disease: indications for enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Renzo; Feriozzi, Sandro; Schaefer, Roland M; Breunig, Frank; Oliveira, João Paulo; Ruggenenti, Piero; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2010-02-01

    ESRD is a major cause of morbidity and premature mortality in Fabry disease, particularly in classically affected males. The decline of renal function in Fabry nephropathy is adversely affected by male gender, advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), and severe proteinuria. The diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy may be missed if not specifically addressed in progressive CKD and patients have been first identified in screening programs of dialysis patients. Fabry patients have worse 3-year survival rates on dialysis as compared with nondiabetic controls. The 5-year survival rate of transplanted Fabry patients is also lower than that of controls. However, because Fabry nephropathy does not recur in the allograft and transplanted Fabry patients appear to have better overall outcomes than those maintained on dialysis, kidney transplantation should be recommended as a first choice in renal replacement therapy (RRT) for Fabry disease. Appropriately designed and powered studies are not available to answer the question whether enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) influences outcomes, the course of cardiomyopathy, events, or survival in Fabry patients on RRT. The authors are not aware of compelling indications for ERT in RRT patients because progression of cardiomyopathy was documented during ERT. Whether the excess mortality risk of Fabry patients on RRT can be prevented by ERT is unknown. Despite observational reports of symptomatic improvement, the available evidence supporting ERT for such patients is not compelling enough. To clarify this issue, studies are needed to test the effectiveness of agalsidases in preventing cardiac and cerebrovascular complications in Fabry patients with ESRD.

  17. Kidney transplantation in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cybulla, Markus; Walter, Kerstin Nanette; Schwarting, Andreas; Divito, Raffaelle; Feriozzi, Sandro; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in kidney transplant recipients with Fabry disease. Clinical characteristics of transplant recipients in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were therefore examined in patients with Fabry disease with or without ERT. Of the 837 European patients in FOS (March 2006), 34 male patients and two female patients had received kidney transplants. Mean age at transplantation was 37.6 +/- 10.9 years, mean time since transplantation was 7.7 +/- 6.4 years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 44.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 296 mg/24 h. Of 27 patients with baseline data, 59% had hypertension, 74% had left ventricular hypertrophy, 22% had cardiac valve disease, 30% had arrhythmia, and 22% had transient ischaemic attacks and 15% stroke. Twenty patients (74%; two female patients, 18 male patients) were receiving ERT with agalsidase alfa. At enrollment or at the start of ERT, median eGFRs were 59 and 35 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.05) and median proteinuria levels were 240 and 420 mg/24 h (not significant) in treated and untreated patients respectively. Renal function remained stable in patients receiving ERT. In conclusion, agalsidase alfa is well tolerated in patients with Fabry disease who have undergone renal transplantation.

  18. Multiple parapelvic cysts in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Azancot, María A; Vila, Josefa; Domínguez, Carmen; Serres, Xavier; Espinel, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A (alpha-GLA A), which leads to glycosphingolipid accumulation, mainly globotriaosylceramide, in tissues. Disease prevalence and the index of suspicion are both low, which tends to result in delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a male Fabry disease patient who manifested no angiokeratoma lesions but presented multiple parapelvic cysts and renal failure. The genetic study revealed an alpha-GLA A gene mutation that had not been recorded in the mutations registry. The de novo mutation was not found in his relatives and it was not transmitted to his offspring. The large number and peculiar appearance of the parapelvic cysts led to the diagnosis.

  19. [Fabry disease and cystinosis, two lysosomal diseases: similarities and differences].

    PubMed

    Grünfeld, J-P; Servais, A

    2010-12-01

    Fabry disease and cystinosis are both lysosomal diseases. Some clinical features (such as renal and corneal involvement) are shared by both diseases whereas many other features are different (mode of inheritance, rate of progression, mechanism of lysosomal storage, therapeutic modalities etc.). Intermediary mechanisms that lead from lysosomal overload to lesions and disease are still incompletely understood.

  20. Electrocardiographic Changes and Arrhythmia in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Namdar, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-chromosome-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficient activity or, in most males, absence of the enzyme α-galactosidase A (a-Gal A) leading to systemic, primary lysosomal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) (1). Recent literature refers to an overall birth prevalence of 1:40,000–170,000; however, such data do not allow an estimation on an actual patient number suffering from Fabry disease (2). Multisystem morbidity commonly develops in childhood and, with progression of the disease, life-threatening complications often occur in adulthood, including renal failure, cardiovascular dysfunction, neuropathy, and stroke (3–6). Life expectancy is reduced by an average of 15 years in female patients and 20 years in male patients (7, 8). The pathognomonic Gb3 accumulation has been repeatedly observed over the past decades by many groups in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac conduction tissue, and valvular fibroblasts (3). Although incompletely described, it is likely that inflammatory and neurohormonal mechanisms are involved in subsequent cellular and vascular dysfunction, leading to tissue ischemia, hypertrophy, and fibrosis (9). Furthermore, recently published works on cardiomyocyte dysfunction and conduction tissue involvement have suggested that cardiac dysfunction may reflect increased myocardial nitric oxide production with oxidative damage of cardiomyocyte myofilaments and DNA, causing cell dysfunction and death, and accelerated conduction with prolonged refractoriness and electric instability (10, 11). PMID:27047943

  1. Delayed diagnosis of Fabry disease presenting as myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Marcì, Marcello; Duro, Giovanni; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Tuttolomondo, Bruno; Pinto, Antonio; Cirrincione, Vincenzo; Sanfilippo, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications due to the accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in cardiac cells occur in almost all patients affected by Anderson-Fabry disease. Cardiac manifestations include left ventricular hypertrophy, mitral regurgitation, conduction disturbances and myocardial ischaemia. We report a case of Fabry's disease diagnosed several years after the onset of early cardiac symptoms.

  2. [Cardiological follow-up in patients with Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Chimenti, Cristina; Frustaci, Andrea; Sarais, Cristiano; Cecchi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare tesaurismosis due to a deficit of the lysosomal enzyme activity of alpha-galactosidase, needed for the normal catabolism of globotriaosylceramides (GL3). Fabry cardiac involvement has several clinical manifestations: concentric left ventricular hypertrophy without left ventricular dilation and severe loss of left ventricular systolic function, mitral and aortic valvulopathy, disorders of the atrioventricular conduction or repolarization, and compromised diastolic function. Differentiating Fabry disease from similar conditions is often quite straightforward, e.g., cardiac amyloidosis is often associated with low electrocardiographic voltages, and systemic symptoms are usually associated with hemochromatosis and sarcoidosis. However, sometimes second-level (genetic analysis, alpha-galactosidase levels) or invasive investigations are required, which can include endomyocardial biopsy. Diagnostic imaging techniques have been described, but they lack specificity. Echocardiographic imaging with tissue Doppler analysis and/or strain rate analysis can allow diagnosis of Fabry disease even before left ventricular hypertrophy becomes apparent. This review illustrates the techniques for staging cardiac involvement and damage in Fabry disease and for the long-term follow-up of Fabry patients with or without cardiac involvement. Careful cardiac monitoring is especially important in elderly female carriers, who often develop renal disorders and/or left ventricular hypertrophy as the only manifestations of their late Fabry disease. In some clinical series, Fabry disease was diagnosed in 12% of women with adult-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Cardiological problems and outcomes of enzyme replacement therapy, associated with or without other cardiological treatments, are also discussed.

  3. Electroneuromyographic Features in Fabry Disease: A Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    AKPINAR, Çetin Kürşad; TÜRKER, Hande; BAYRAK, Oytun; CENGİZ, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked recessive inherited disorder characterized by lysosomal alpha-galactosidase deficiency. The purpose of our study was to assess and compare the electroneuromyographic (ENMG) findings of 15 patients with Fabry disease and the electroneurographic (ENG) findings of 15 healthy controls. We have not encountered any similar study in the medical literature of our country. Therefore, we believe that our study will contribute to national literature. Methods Fifteen patients with Fabry disease, 13 females and 2 males and 15 healthy controls, 13 females and 2 males, were included in the study. The definite diagnosis of patients with Fabry disease was made based on the enzyme level and genetic mutation. The patients with Fabry disease were examined with ENMG, while the healthy control group was examined with ENG. In the patients with a normal ENMG examination, neuropathic pain was attributed to the small fiber involvement. Results Patients with Fabry disease had neuropathic pain (LANSS score≥12). While neurological examination was normal in eight patients, glove- and stocking-type hypoesthesia and decreased deep tendon reflexes were observed in five and two patients, respectively. Axonal polyneuropathy was detected in one patient. The ENMG examinations of the other patients were normal. Enzyme replacement therapy could not be initiated in one patient because of pregnancy. The neurological examination of the healthy control group was normal. There was no statistically significant difference between the ENMG features of both groups (p>.05). As in other studies, a routine ENMG examination was normal in our patients with early-stage Fabry disease. Neuropathic pain, seen in patients with Fabry disease in literature, is thought to be due to small fiber involvement. Conclusion Fabry disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with neuropathic pain at young ages. It should be kept in mind that ENMG examination

  4. Characterization of Classical and Nonclassical Fabry Disease: A Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Arends, Maarten; Wanner, Christoph; Hughes, Derralynn; Mehta, Atul; Oder, Daniel; Watkinson, Oliver T; Elliott, Perry M; Linthorst, Gabor E; Wijburg, Frits A; Biegstraaten, Marieke; Hollak, Carla E

    2016-12-15

    Fabry disease leads to renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular manifestations. Phenotypic differences between classically and nonclassically affected patients are evident, but there are few data on the natural course of classical and nonclassical disease in men and women. To describe the natural course of Fabry disease stratified by sex and phenotype, we retrospectively assessed event-free survival from birth to the first clinical visit (before enzyme replacement therapy) in 499 adult patients (mean age 43 years old; 41% men; 57% with the classical phenotype) from three international centers of excellence. We classified patients by phenotype on the basis of characteristic symptoms and enzyme activity. Men and women with classical Fabry disease had higher event rate than did those with nonclassical disease (hazard ratio for men, 5.63, 95% confidence interval, 3.17 to 10.00; P<0.001; hazard ratio for women, 2.88, 95% confidence interval, 1.54 to 5.40; P<0.001). Furthermore, men with classical Fabry disease had lower eGFR, higher left ventricular mass, and higher plasma globotriaosylsphingosine concentrations than men with nonclassical Fabry disease or women with either phenotype (P<0.001). In conclusion, before treatment with enzyme replacement therapy, men with classical Fabry disease had a history of more events than men with nonclassical disease or women with either phenotype; women with classical Fabry disease were more likely to develop complications than women with nonclassical disease. These data may support the development of new guidelines for the monitoring and treatment of Fabry disease and studies on the effects of intervention in subgroups of patients.

  5. Urinary Podocyte Loss Is Increased in Patients with Fabry Disease and Correlates with Clinical Severity of Fabry Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Fall, Brent; Scott, C Ronald; Mauer, Michael; Shankland, Stuart; Pippin, Jeffrey; Jefferson, Jonathan A; Wallace, Eric; Warnock, David; Najafian, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major complication of Fabry disease. Podocytes accumulate globotriaosylceramide inclusions more than other kidney cell types in Fabry patients. Podocyte injury occurs early in age, and is progressive. Since injured podocytes detach into the urine (podocyturia), we hypothesized that podocyturia would increase in Fabry patients and correlate with clinical severity of Fabry nephropathy. Urine specimens from 39 Fabry patients and 24 healthy subjects were evaluated for podocyturia. Most of the Fabry patients and many healthy subjects had podocyturia. The number of podocytes per gram of urine creatinine (UPodo/g Cr) was 3.6 fold greater in Fabry patients (3,741 ± 2796; p = 0.001) than healthy subjects (1,040 ± 972). Fabry patients with normoalbuminuria and normoproteinuria had over 2-fold greater UPodo/g Cr than healthy subjects (p = 0.048). UPodo/gCr was inversely related to eGFR in male patients (r = -0.69, p = 0.003). UPodo/gCr was directly related to urine protein creatinine ratio (r = 0.33; p = 0.04) in all Fabry patients. These studies confirm increased podocyturia in Fabry disease, even when proteinuria and albuminuria are absent. Podocyturia correlates with clinical severity of Fabry nephropathy, and potentially may be of prognostic value.

  6. Urinary Podocyte Loss Is Increased in Patients with Fabry Disease and Correlates with Clinical Severity of Fabry Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Brent; Scott, C. Ronald; Mauer, Michael; Shankland, Stuart; Pippin, Jeffrey; Jefferson, Jonathan A.; Wallace, Eric; Warnock, David; Najafian, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major complication of Fabry disease. Podocytes accumulate globotriaosylceramide inclusions more than other kidney cell types in Fabry patients. Podocyte injury occurs early in age, and is progressive. Since injured podocytes detach into the urine (podocyturia), we hypothesized that podocyturia would increase in Fabry patients and correlate with clinical severity of Fabry nephropathy. Urine specimens from 39 Fabry patients and 24 healthy subjects were evaluated for podocyturia. Most of the Fabry patients and many healthy subjects had podocyturia. The number of podocytes per gram of urine creatinine (UPodo/g Cr) was 3.6 fold greater in Fabry patients (3,741 ± 2796; p = 0.001) than healthy subjects (1,040 ± 972). Fabry patients with normoalbuminuria and normoproteinuria had over 2-fold greater UPodo/g Cr than healthy subjects (p = 0.048). UPodo/gCr was inversely related to eGFR in male patients (r = -0.69, p = 0.003). UPodo/gCr was directly related to urine protein creatinine ratio (r = 0.33; p = 0.04) in all Fabry patients. These studies confirm increased podocyturia in Fabry disease, even when proteinuria and albuminuria are absent. Podocyturia correlates with clinical severity of Fabry nephropathy, and potentially may be of prognostic value. PMID:27992580

  7. Gastrointestinal involvement in Fabry disease. So important, yet often neglected.

    PubMed

    Politei, J; Thurberg, B L; Wallace, E; Warnock, D; Serebrinsky, G; Durand, C; Schenone, A B

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked metabolic storage disorder due to the deficiency of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A which causes accumulation of glycosphingolipids, primarily globotriaosylceramide, throughout the body. Gastrointestinal signs and symptoms-abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea and diverticular disease--are some of the most frequently reported complaints in patients with Fabry disease but are often neglected. Gastrointestinal symptoms are due to intestinal dysmotility as well as impaired autonomic function, vasculopathy and myopathy. Since 2001, enzyme replacement therapy has been a mainstay in treatment of gastrointestinal symptoms of Fabry disease (FD), resulting in reduced gastrointestinal symptoms. Here, we report on four patients with Fabry disease (FD) who manifested early gastrointestinal involvement.

  8. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Methods Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. Results No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). Conclusions In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients. PMID:24207059

  9. Impaired small fiber conduction in patients with Fabry disease: a neurophysiological case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an inborn lysosomal storage disorder which is associated with small fiber neuropathy. We set out to investigate small fiber conduction in Fabry patients using pain-related evoked potentials (PREP). Methods In this case–control study we prospectively studied 76 consecutive Fabry patients for electrical small fiber conduction in correlation with small fiber function and morphology. Data were compared with healthy controls using non-parametric statistical tests. All patients underwent neurological examination and were investigated with pain and depression questionnaires. Small fiber function (quantitative sensory testing, QST), morphology (skin punch biopsy), and electrical conduction (PREP) were assessed and correlated. Patients were stratified for gender and disease severity as reflected by renal function. Results All Fabry patients (31 men, 45 women) had small fiber neuropathy. Men with Fabry disease showed impaired cold (p < 0.01) and warm perception (p < 0.05), while women did not differ from controls. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) was reduced at the lower leg (p < 0.001) and the back (p < 0.05) mainly of men with impaired renal function. When investigating A-delta fiber conduction with PREP, men but not women with Fabry disease had lower amplitudes upon stimulation at face (p < 0.01), hands (p < 0.05), and feet (p < 0.01) compared to controls. PREP amplitudes further decreased with advance in disease severity. PREP amplitudes and warm (p < 0.05) and cold detection thresholds (p < 0.01) at the feet correlated positively in male patients. Conclusion Small fiber conduction is impaired in men with Fabry disease and worsens with advanced disease severity. PREP are well-suited to measure A-delta fiber conduction. PMID:23705943

  10. Experiences of Being Heterozygous for Fabry Disease: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan C; Harris, Anna; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the experiences of women with Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to explore women's experiences of being heterozygous for Fabry disease. We used an explorative qualitative study design and selected ten Norwegian women who were known heterozygous for Fabry disease to participate. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and analyzed the interviews using inductive thematic analysis. We found that learning about one's heterozygous status may be devastating for some. However, for most of the participants, heterozygous status, as well as doctors' acceptance of symptoms in women heterozygous for Fabry disease, provided an explanation and relief. Although many women did not consider themselves ill, they wished to be acknowledged as more than "just carriers." The participants were grateful for enzyme replacement therapy, although it had its burdens regarding time, planning, and absences from school or work. Women with Fabry disease felt that the lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals about Fabry disease was frustrating and worrisome. These findings suggest that healthcare professionals should acknowledge the different ways women react to their diagnosis, and be aware of the personal costs of receiving treatment.

  11. Fibrosis: a key feature of Fabry disease with potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in the AGAL gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is the current cornerstone of Fabry disease management. Involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system shortens life span, and fibrosis of these organs is a hallmark of the disease. Fibrosis was initially thought to result from tissue ischemia secondary to endothelial accumulation of glycosphingolipids in the microvasculature. However, despite ready clearance of endothelial deposits, ERT is less effective in patients who have already developed fibrosis. Several potential explanations of this clinical observation may impact on the future management of Fabry disease. Alternative molecular pathways linking glycosphingolipids and fibrosis may be operative; tissue injury may recruit secondary molecular mediators of fibrosis that are unresponsive to ERT, or fibrosis may represent irreversible tissue injury that limits the therapeutic response to ERT. We provide an overview of Fabry disease, with a focus on the assessment of fibrosis, the clinical consequences of fibrosis, and recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis that may suggest novel therapeutic approaches to Fabry disease. PMID:23915644

  12. Pituitary function and morphology in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luigi; Tortora, Fabio; Modica, Roberta; Ramundo, Valeria; Riccio, Eleonora; Daniele, Aurora; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Colao, Annamaria; Pisani, Antonio; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2015-11-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are known to affect patients with Fabry disease (FD). Pituitary gland theoretically represents an ideal target for FD because of high vascularization and low proliferation rate. We explored pituitary morphology and function in a cohort of FD patients through a prospectic, monocentric study at an Academic Tertiary Center. The study population included 28 FD patients and 42 sex and age-matched normal subjects. The protocol included a contrast enhancement pituitary MRI, the assessment of pituitary hormones, anti-pituitary, and anti-hypothalamus antibodies. At pituitary MRI, an empty sella was found in 11 (39%) FD patients, and in 2 (5%) controls (p < 0.001). Pituitary volume was significantly smaller in FD than in controls (p < 0.001). Determinants of pituitary volume were age and alpha-galactosidase enzyme activity. Both parameters resulted independently correlated at multivariate analysis. Pituitary function was substantially preserved in FD patients. Empty sella is a common finding in patients with FD. The major prevalence in the elderly supports the hypothesis of a progressive pituitary shrinkage overtime. Pituitary function seems not to be impaired in FD. An endocrine workup with pituitary hormone assessment should be periodically performed in FD patients, who are already at risk of cardiovascular complications.

  13. Anderson-Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Sestito, Simona; Ceravolo, Ferdinando; Concolino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical evidence of major organ damage is typical of adulthood, many of the signs and symptoms of Anderson Fabry Disease (AFD) occur frequently in childhood. The clinical phenotype of AFD in pediatric patients has been described in several studies which show a higher incidence and an earlier onset of symptoms in male patients than in females. These include neurological manifestations (acroparaesthesias, chronic neuropathic pain, hypo-anhidrosis, tinnitus, hearing, loss), gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (abdominal pain and diarrhea), angiokeratomas, ocular abnormalities (cornea verticillata, tortuous retinal vessels and subcapsular cataracts). Such manifestations may impair quality of life and, because of their unspecific nature, rarely lead to an early diagnosis. In addition, signs of major organ damage (microalbuminuria or proteinuria, urinary hyperfiltration, impaired heart rate variability, left ventricular hypertrophy, stroke) are encountered in children with AFD. Clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase alfa and agalsidase beta have been conducted in children, with clinical and pharmacodinamc effects proved by both enzyme formulations, whereas differences in safety profile and administration were found. Although several studies suggest that ERT should be started before irreversible damage in critical organs have occurred, the issue of when to initiate it has not yet been resolved. More controlled trials must be done in order to demonstrate that an early start of ERT could prevent adult complications and to assess the optimal timing of treatment in children with AFD. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding for a better approach of pediatric AFD.

  14. [Females with Fabry's disease - an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge].

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Niemann, Markus; Sommer, Claudia; Beer, Meinrad; Breunig, Frank; Wanner, Christoph

    2010-09-01

    Fabry's disease is a rare genetic storage disorder leading to an accumulation of globotriaosylceramides in the lysosomes of various organs. Being X-chromosomal-linked, most studies in the past focused on involvement in male patients. However, it has been elucidated recently that female patients can present typical organ involvement and, thus, have to be treated respectively. This synopsis wants to systematically review the typical organ involvement in female Fabry patients. Moreover, therapy recommendations especially for female patients are discussed.

  15. Understanding the gastrointestinal manifestations of Fabry disease: promoting prompt diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zar-Kessler, Claire; Karaa, Amel; Sims, Katherine Bustin; Clarke, Virginia; Kuo, Braden

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by the dysfunction of multiple systems, including significant gastrointestinal involvement such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, early satiety and nausea. The gastrointestinal symptoms of Fabry disease are thought to be due to neuropathic and myopathic changes leading to symptoms of dysmotility that are encountered in many other disorders. The gastrointestinal symptoms can often be one of the presenting signs of the disease in childhood, but can be misdiagnosed by gastroenterologists for many years due to their nonspecific presentation. As the chief treatment for Fabry is enzyme-replacement therapy that has been shown to stabilize and possibly reverse disease course, recognition of these symptoms and early diagnosis in an attempt to prevent progression with treatment, is critical. PMID:27366228

  16. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions.

  17. Cardiac device implantation in Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Sené, Thomas; Lidove, Olivier; Sebbah, Joel; Darondel, Jean-Marc; Picard, Hervé; Aaron, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Zenone, Thierry; Joly, Dominique; Charron, Philippe; Ziza, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence and predictive factors of arrhythmias and/or conduction abnormalities (ACAs) requiring cardiac device (CD) implantation are poorly characterized in Fabry disease (FD). The aim of our retrospective study was to determine the prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with ACA requiring CD implantation in a monocentric cohort of patients with confirmed FD who were followed up in a department of internal medicine and reference center for FD. Forty-nine patients (20M, 29F) were included. Nine patients (4M, 5F; 18%) had at least one episode of ACA leading to device therapy. Six patients (4M/2F) required a pacemaker (PM) for sinus node dysfunction (n = 4) or atrioventricular disease (n = 2). One female patient required an internal cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) to prevent sudden cardiac death because of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (nSVT). One female patient required PM-ICD for sinus node dysfunction and nSVT. One patient underwent CD implantation before the diagnosis of FD. The annual rate of CD implantation was estimated at 1.90 per 100 person years. On univariate analysis at the end of the follow-up period, the factors associated with ACAs requiring CD implantation were as follows: delayed diagnosis of FD, delayed initiation of enzyme replacement therapy, age at the last follow-up visit, and severe multiorgan phenotype (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, chronic kidney disease, and/or sensorineural hearing loss). On multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis of FD and age at the last follow-up visit were independently associated with an increased risk of ACAs requiring CD (P < 0.05). Considering the high frequency of ACAs requiring CD implantation and the risk of sudden death in patients with FD, regular monitoring is mandatory, especially in patients with a late diagnosis of FD and/or with a severe phenotype. Regular Holter ECGs, therapeutic education of patients, and deliverance of an emergency card including a phenotype

  18. Prevalence of Fabry disease and GLA c.196G>C variant in Japanese stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Kiyoshiro; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Katsuya; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Hattori, Kiyoko; Ota, Masao; Shimizu, Yusaku; Endo, Fumio; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2017-03-09

    Fabry disease is an important underlying disease in young cryptogenic stroke patients. However, little is known regarding the frequency of Fabry disease in the general stroke population, especially in elderly patients. A total of 588 stroke patients (61.7% men; average age 74.1±12.5 years) were enrolled in this prospective study. Blood samples were obtained to produce blood spots to determine α-galactosidase A (α-GalA) activity and for GLA gene analysis. One 65-year-old female patient had a known GLA gene mutation, c.2T>C (p.M1T), causing Fabry disease. Five male patients and two female patients had GLA c.196G>C (p.E66Q) variant, which is not associated with the full clinical manifestations of Fabry disease. The allele frequency of GLA c.196G>C was significantly higher in male patients with small-vessel occlusion (odds ratio 3.95, P=0.048) and non-cardioembolism (odds ratio 4.08, P=0.012) than that in the general Japanese population. Fabry disease is rare in the general Japanese stroke population. However, screening identified one elderly female patient with Fabry disease. GLA c.196G>C variant is a genetic risk factor for cerebral small-vessel occlusion and non-cardioembolism in Japanese males but not in females.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 9 March 2017; doi:10.1038/jhg.2017.31.

  19. Fabry disease - current treatment and new drug development.

    PubMed

    Motabar, Omid; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud; Zheng, Wei

    2010-07-23

    Fabry disease is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of α-galactosidase A (GLA), resulting in the storage of excess cellular glycosphingolipids. Enzyme replacement therapy is available for the treatment of Fabry disease, but it is a costly, intravenous treatment. Alternative therapeutic approaches, including small molecule chaperone therapy, are currently being explored. High throughput screening (HTS) technologies can be utilized to discover other small molecule compounds, including non-inhibitory chaperones, enzyme activators, molecules that reduce GLA substrate, and molecules that activate GLA gene promoters. This review outlines the current therapeutic approaches, emerging treatment strategies, and the process of drug discovery and development for Fabry disease.

  20. Apical left ventricular hypertrophy and mid-ventricular obstruction in fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cianciulli, Tomás F; Saccheri, María C; Fernández, Segundo P; Fernández, Cinthia C; Rozenfeld, Paula A; Kisinovsky, Isaac

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of a rare cardiac presentation of Fabry disease. Although concentric left ventricular hypertrophy is a major cardiac finding in Fabry disease, there is no case report of dynamic obstruction at mid-left ventricular level. We describe a 59-year-old-woman suffering from a severe form of Fabry disease, mimicking an apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction. Differentiation of Fabry disease from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is crucial given the therapeutic and prognostic differences. Fabry disease should always be suspected in an adult, independently of the pattern of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  1. Early markers of Fabry disease revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Matafora, V; Cuccurullo, M; Beneduci, A; Petrazzuolo, O; Simeone, A; Anastasio, P; Mignani, R; Feriozzi, S; Pisani, A; Comotti, C; Bachi, A; Capasso, G

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-GalA) that leads to the intra-lysosomal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in various organ systems. As a consequence, a multisystems disorder develops, culminating in stroke, progressive renal and cardiac dysfunction. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) offers a specific treatment for patients affected by FD, though the monitoring of treatment is hindered by a lack of surrogate markers of response. Remarkably, due to the high heterogeneity of the Fabry phenotype, both diagnostic testing and treatment decisions are more challenging in females than in males; thus, reliable biomarkers for Fabry disease are needed, particularly for female patients. Here, we use a proteomic approach for the identification of disease-associated markers that can be used for the early diagnosis of FD as well as for monitoring the effectiveness of ERT. Our data show that the urinary proteome of Fabry naïve patients is different from that of normal subjects. In addition, biological pathways mainly affected by FD are related to immune response, inflammation, and energetic metabolism. In particular, the up-regulation of uromodulin, prostaglandin H2 d-isomerase and prosaposin in the urine of FD patients was demonstrated; these proteins might be involved in kidney damage at the tubular level, inflammation and immune response. Furthermore, comparing the expression of these proteins in Fabry patients before and after ERT treatment, a decrease of their concentration was observed, thus demonstrating the correlation between the identified markers and the effectiveness of the pharmacological treatment.

  2. Scoring system for renal pathology in Fabry disease: report of the International Study Group of Fabry Nephropathy (ISGFN)

    PubMed Central

    Fogo, Agnes B.; Bostad, Leif; Svarstad, Einar; Cook, William J.; Moll, Solange; Barbey, Federic; Geldenhuys, Laurette; West, Michael; Ferluga, Dusan; Vujkovac, Bojan; Howie, Alexander J.; Burns, Áine; Reeve, Roy; Waldek, Stephen; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Valbuena, Carmen; Oliveira, João Paulo; Müller, Justus; Breunig, Frank; Zhang, Xiao; Warnock, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Background. In Fabry nephropathy, alpha-galactosidase deficiency leads to accumulation of glycosphingolipids in all kidney cell types, proteinuria and progressive loss of kidney function. Methods. An international working group of nephrologists from 11 Fabry centres identified adult Fabry patients, and pathologists scored histologic changes on renal biopsies. A standardized scoring system was developed with a modified Delphi technique assessing 59 Fabry nephropathy cases. Each case was scored independently of clinical information by at least three pathologists with an average final score reported. Results. We assessed 35 males (mean age 36.4 years) and 24 females (43.9 years) who mostly had clinically mild Fabry nephropathy. The average serum creatinine was 1.3 mg/dl (114.9 μmol/l); estimated glomerular filtration rate was 81.7 ml/min/1.73 m2 and urine protein to creatinine ratio was 1.08 g/g (122.0 mg/mmol). Males had greater podocyte vacuolization on light microscopy (mean score) and glycosphingolipid inclusions on semi-thin sections than females. Males also had significantly more proximal tubule, peritubular capillary and vascular intimal inclusions. Arteriolar hyalinosis was similar, but females had significantly more arterial hyalinosis. Chronic kidney disease stage correlated with arterial and glomerular sclerosis scores. Significant changes, including segmental and global sclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis were seen even in patients with stage 1–2 chronic kidney disease with minimal proteinuria. Conclusions. The development of a standardized scoring system of both disease-specific lesions, i.e. lipid deposition related, and general lesions of progression, i.e. fibrosis and sclerosis, showed a spectrum of histologic appearances even in early clinical stage of Fabry nephropathy. These findings support the role of kidney biopsy in the baseline evaluation of Fabry nephropathy, even with mild clinical disease. The scoring system will be useful for

  3. Genetic variants associated with gastrointestinal symptoms in Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Sestito, Simona; Nicoletti, Angela; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Talarico, Valentina; Altomare, Federica; Sanseviero, Maria Teresa; Agapito, Giuseppe; Pisani, Antonio; Riccio, Eleonora; Borrelli, Osvaldo; Concolino, Daniela; Pensabene, Licia

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) are often among the earliest presenting events in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked lysosomal disorder caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase A. Despite recent advances in clinical and molecular characterization of FD, the pathophysiology of the GIS is still poorly understood. To shed light either on differential clinical presentation or on intervariability of GIS in FD, we genotyped 1936 genetic markers across 231 genes that encode for drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transport proteins in 49 FD patients, using the DMET Plus platform. All nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapped within four genes showed statistically significant differences in genotype frequencies between FD patients who experienced GIS and patients without GIS: ABCB11 (odd ratio (OR) = 18.07, P = 0,0019; OR = 8.21, P = 0,0083; OR=8.21, P = 0,0083; OR = 8.21, P = 0,0083),SLCO1B1 (OR = 9.23, P = 0,0065; OR = 5.08, P = 0,0289; OR = 8.21, P = 0,0083), NR1I3 (OR = 5.40, P = 0,0191) and ABCC5 (OR = 14.44, P = 0,0060). This is the first study that investigates the relationships between genetic heterogeneity in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) related genes and GIS in FD. Our findings provide a novel genetic variant framework which warrants further investigation for precision medicine in FD. PMID:27825144

  4. Genomic analysis of Brazilian patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Pereira, F S; Jardim, L B; Netto, C B; Burin, M G; Cecchin, C; Giugliani, R; Matte, U S

    2007-12-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal disorder due to a-galactosidase A deficiency that causes storage of globotriaosylceramide. The gene coding for this lysosomal enzyme is located on the long arm of the X chromosome, in region Xq21.33-Xq22. Disease progression leads to vascular disease secondary to involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. Detection of female carriers based solely on enzyme assays is often inconclusive. Therefore, mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Many mutations of the a-galactosidase A gene have been reported with high genetic heterogeneity, being most mutations private found in only one family. The disease is panethnic, and estimates of incidence range from about 1 in 40,000 to 60,000 males. Our objective was to describe the analysis of 6 male and 7 female individuals belonging to 4 different Fabry disease families by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the alpha-galactosidase gene. Sequencing was performed using PCR fragments for each exon amplified from DNA extracted from peripheral blood. Three known mutations and one previously described in another Brazilian family were detected. Of 7 female relatives studied, 4 were carriers. Although the present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease, the finding of the same mutation previously detected in another Fabry family from our region raises the possibility of some founder effect, or genetic drift. Finally, the present study highlights the importance of molecular analysis for carrier detection and genetic counseling.

  5. Selective arterial distribution of cerebral hyperperfusion in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Moore, D F; Herscovitch, P; Schiffmann, R

    2001-07-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive deficiency of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A associated with an increased risk of early onset cerebrovascular disease. The disorder is reported to affect the posterior circulation predominantly. This hypothesis was investigated directly by the measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with positron emission tomography (PET). Resting regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 26 hemizygous patients with Fabry disease and 10 control participants was examined using H(2)15O and PET. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM(t), SPM99) and PET images of patients and controls were produced. Significantly increased SPM(t) clusters were then color coded and blended with a coregistered T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) template. Cerebral arterial territory maps were digitized and rescaled. Custom OpenGL and ImageVision Library C++ code was written to allow a first-order affine transformation of the blended SPM(t) and MRI template onto the arterial territory map. The affine transformation was constrained by choosing corresponding cerebral landmark "tie points" between the SPM(t) [symbol: see text] MRI template images and the cerebral arterial territory maps. The data demonstrated that the posterior circulation is the predominant arterial territory with a significantly increased rCBF in Fabry disease. No arterial distribution had a decreased rCBF.

  6. Fabry Disease Presenting with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Tricuspid Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Cheol; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Jae Won; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Heo, Ran

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old female who was diagnosed with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy since 1999 presented with dyspnea and severe edema on both legs. For the management of her symptom, cardiac surgery including tricuspid annuloplasty, Maze operation and right atrial reduction plasty was performed. During follow-up after cardiac surgery, a plasma α-galactosidase activity was checked for the screening of Fabry disease and the result was around lower normal limit. DNA analysis was implemented for confirmation and it revealed a heterozygote α-galactosidase mutation at exon 6 [c.901C>T (p.Arg301Ter)]. This case suggests that Fabry disease might be easily undetected, and clinical suspicion is critical. PMID:28090261

  7. Ten-year outcome of enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase beta in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Dominique P; Charrow, Joel; Desnick, Robert J; Guffon, Nathalie; Kempf, Judy; Lachmann, Robin H; Lemay, Roberta; Linthorst, Gabor E; Packman, Seymour; Scott, C Ronald; Waldek, Stephen; Warnock, David G; Weinreb, Neal J; Wilcox, William R

    2015-01-01

    Background Fabry disease results from deficient α-galactosidase A activity and globotriaosylceramide accumulation causing renal insufficiency, strokes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and early demise. We assessed the 10-year outcome of recombinant α-galactosidase A therapy. Methods The outcomes (severe clinical events, renal function, cardiac structure) of 52/58 patients with classic Fabry disease from the phase 3 clinical trial and extension study, and the Fabry Registry were evaluated. Disease progression rates for patients with low renal involvement (LRI, n=32) or high renal involvement (HRI, n=20) at baseline were assessed. Results 81% of patients (42/52) did not experience any severe clinical event during the treatment interval and 94% (49/52) were alive at the end of the study period. Ten patients reported a total of 16 events. Patients classified as LRI started therapy 13 years younger than HRI (mean 25 years vs 38 years). Mean slopes for estimated glomerular filtration rate for LRI and HRI were −1.89 mL/min/1.73 m2/year and −6.82 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, respectively. Overall, the mean left ventricular posterior wall thickness and interventricular septum thickness remained unchanged and normal. Patients who initiated treatment at age ≥40 years exhibited significant increase in left ventricular posterior wall thickness and interventricular septum thickness. Mean plasma globotriaosylceramide normalised within 6 months. Conclusions This 10-year study documents the effectiveness of agalsidase beta (1 mg/kg/2 weeks) in patients with Fabry disease. Most patients remained alive and event-free. Patients who initiated treatment at a younger age and with less kidney involvement benefited the most from therapy. Patients who initiated treatment at older ages and/or had advanced renal disease experienced disease progression. PMID:25795794

  8. Age at First Cardiac Symptoms in Fabry Disease: Association with a Chinese Hotspot Fabry Mutation (IVS4+919G>A), Classical Fabry Mutations, and Sex in a Taiwanese Population from the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Chuan; Perrin, Amandine; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Yang, Chia-Feng; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Yu, Wen-Chung; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2015-01-01

    This is a descriptive analysis of a cohort of 59 Taiwanese patients with Fabry disease and either classical Fabry or cardiac variant IVS4+919G>A (IVS4) mutations from a disease registry, the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS; sponsored by Shire). Most of our classical Fabry patients were symptomatic and were identified upon seeking medical advice at our clinics, whereas most of our IVS4 patients attended our clinics after newborn screening identified this mutation in their grandsons. The objective was to determine differences in cardiac manifestations between patients with classical Fabry or IVS4 mutations by comparing age at onset of selected cardiac symptoms. Data were extracted in August 2013 and analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-nine Taiwanese patients (median age at extract 60.7 years [range 15.0-86.9]; n = 36 [61%] male) with proven IVS4 (n = 41 [69%]) or classical Fabry mutations (n = 18 [31%]) had available data on cardiac symptoms. Of 55 (93%) patients with reported left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), mean [SD] age (years) at first symptom was lower in classical Fabry males (30.0 [15.1]; n = 4) than classical Fabry females (49.6 [8.9]; n = 11; p < 0.05), but not in IVS4 females (57.4 [13.7]; n = 10) compared with IVS4 males (55.9 [11.3]; n = 30). Mean age at first LVH diagnosis was significantly lower in classical Fabry males versus IVS4 males (p < 0.05). No significant difference in age at onset of arrhythmia or conductive abnormality, chest pain, or palpitations or cardiac syncope was found between the groups. The most noteworthy finding of this study is the lack of a significant gender sex difference in age at onset of cardiac symptoms in IVS4 patients.

  9. Females with Fabry disease frequently have major organ involvement: lessons from the Fabry Registry.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Oliveira, João Paulo; Hopkin, Robert J; Ortiz, Alberto; Banikazemi, Maryam; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Sims, Katherine; Waldek, Stephen; Pastores, Gregory M; Lee, Philip; Eng, Christine M; Marodi, Laszlo; Stanford, Kevin E; Breunig, Frank; Wanner, Christoph; Warnock, David G; Lemay, Roberta M; Germain, Dominique P

    2008-02-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The Fabry Registry is a global clinical effort to collect longitudinal data on FD. In the past, most "carrier" females were usually thought to be clinically unaffected. A systematic effort has been made to enroll all FD females, regardless of symptomology. Of the 1077 enrolled females in the Registry, 69.4% had symptoms and signs of FD. The median age at symptom onset among females was 13 years, and even though 84.1% had a positive family history, the diagnosis was not made until a median age of 31 years. Twenty percent experienced major cerebrovascular, cardiac, or renal events, at a median age of 46 years. Among adult females with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) data (N=638), 62.5% had an eGFR <90 ml/min/1.73 m2 and 19.0% had eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Proteinuria 300 mg/day was present in 39.0% of females, and 22.2% had >1 gram/day. Quality of life (QoL), as measured by the SF-36((R)) survey, was impaired at a later age than in males, but both genders experience significantly impaired QoL from the third decade of life onward. Thus, females with FD have a significant risk for major organ involvement and decreased QoL. Females should be regularly monitored for signs and symptoms of FD, and considered for enzyme replacement therapy.

  10. Ocular signs correlate well with disease severity and genotype in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Pitz, Susanne; Kalkum, Gisela; Arash, Laila; Karabul, Nesrin; Sodi, Andrea; Larroque, Sylvain; Beck, Michael; Gal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Ocular signs in Fabry disease have generally been regarded to be primarily of diagnostic value. We explored whether ocular findings, alone or in particular in combination with the α-galactosidase A gene mutation, have predictive value for disease severity. Data from the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS), a large, global database sponsored by Shire, were selected for adult patients who had undergone ophthalmological examination. Three ocular signs were assessed: cornea verticillata, tortuous conjunctival and/or retinal vessels, and cataract. Fabry disease severity was measured using FOS Mainz Severity Score Index and modifications thereof. Ophthalmological data were available for 1203 (699 female, 504 male) adult patients with eye findings characteristic of Fabry disease in 55.1%. Cornea verticillata had a similar distribution in women (51.1%) and men (50.8%), whereas tortuous vessels and Fabry cataract were somewhat more frequent in men than in women. Patients with cornea verticillata, selected as the principal ocular sign for this study, had more severe disease (median score, 20.0) versus those without ocular signs (11.0; P<0.001). This finding could be confirmed by applying age adjusted severity scores. Moreover, the prevalence of cornea verticillata was significantly higher in patients with null (male, 76.9%; female, 64.5%) and missense (male, 79.2%; female, 67.4%) mutations versus mild missense (male, 17.1%; female, 23.1%) and the p.N215S (male, 15.0%; female, 15.6%) mutations (P<0.01). Our analyses show a correlation between the prevalence of ocular changes in Fabry disease and disease severity. Consequently, information on ocular findings and α-galactosidase A gene mutation may help assess the risk for more severe Fabry disease. These observed findings are of notable clinical importance, as Fabry disease is characterized by high clinical course variability and only weak genotype-phenotype correlation at the individual patient level. Further confirmatory studies

  11. Fabry's Disease: Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Muzaffar Maqsood; Khan, Imran; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Muzaffar

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme with the progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in vascular endothelial cells leading to cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, neuropathic, lenticular, and dermatological manifestations. It is a rare cause of end-stage renal disease. It classically affects males whereas 10–15% of female heterozygote carriers are affected depending on localization. Both the FD and its association with ESRD is rare. With this background, this case series of five patient's along with the review of literature is presented here. PMID:27398254

  12. [The Fabry's Disease Cardiomyopathy as Differential Diagnosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Oder, Daniel; Störk, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Ertl, Georg; Weidemann, Frank; Nordbeck, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The progressive cardiomyopathy in patients with Fabry disease is often accompanied by angina pectoris and elevated levels of high-sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT), potentially mimicking acute coronary syndrome. Here, we present to representative cases with focus on clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic settings. An overview on the cardiomyopathy associated with Fabry disease and its role as differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome is provided. Fabry cardiomyopathy might exhibit similar clinical and biochemical constellations as seen in acute coronary syndrome. Thus, Fabry cardiomyopathy should be considered a differential diagnosis in acute coronary syndrome, particularly in patients demonstrating left ventricular hypertrophy of unknown origin.

  13. FAbry STabilization indEX (FASTEX): an innovative tool for the assessment of clinical stabilization in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Renzo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Berri, Francesco; Burlina, Alessandro; Chinea, Benito; Gallieni, Maurizio; Pieroni, Maurizio; Salviati, Alessandro; Spada, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Two disease severity scoring systems, the Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and Fabry Disease Severity Scoring System (DS3), have been validated for quantifying the disease burden of Fabry disease. We aimed to develop a dynamic mathematical model [the FASTEX (FAbry STabilization indEX)] to assess the clinical stability. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in Fabry disease first defined a novel score of severity [raw score (RS)] based on three domains with a small number items in each domain (nervous system domain: pain, cerebrovascular events; renal domain: proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate; cardiac domain: echocardiography parameters, electrocardiograph parameters and New York Heart Association class) and evaluated the clinical stability over time. The RS was tested in 28 patients (15 males, 13 females) with the classic form of Fabry disease. There was good statistical correlation between the newly established RS and a weighted score (WS), with DS3 and MSSI (R (2) = 0.914, 0.949, 0.910 and 0.938, respectively). In order to refine the RS further, a WS, which was expressed as a percentage value, was calculated. This was based on the relative clinical significance of each item within the domain with the panel agreeing on the attribution of a different weight of clinical damage to a specific organ system. To test the variation of the clinical burden over time, the RS was repeated after 1 year. The panel agreed on a cut-off of a 20% change from baseline as the clinical WS to define clinical stability. The FASTEX model showed good correlation with the clinical assessment and with clinical variation over time in all patients.

  14. FAbry STabilization indEX (FASTEX): an innovative tool for the assessment of clinical stabilization in Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Mignani, Renzo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Berri, Francesco; Burlina, Alessandro; Chinea, Benito; Gallieni, Maurizio; Pieroni, Maurizio; Salviati, Alessandro; Spada, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Two disease severity scoring systems, the Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and Fabry Disease Severity Scoring System (DS3), have been validated for quantifying the disease burden of Fabry disease. We aimed to develop a dynamic mathematical model [the FASTEX (FAbry STabilization indEX)] to assess the clinical stability. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in Fabry disease first defined a novel score of severity [raw score (RS)] based on three domains with a small number items in each domain (nervous system domain: pain, cerebrovascular events; renal domain: proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate; cardiac domain: echocardiography parameters, electrocardiograph parameters and New York Heart Association class) and evaluated the clinical stability over time. The RS was tested in 28 patients (15 males, 13 females) with the classic form of Fabry disease. There was good statistical correlation between the newly established RS and a weighted score (WS), with DS3 and MSSI (R2 = 0.914, 0.949, 0.910 and 0.938, respectively). In order to refine the RS further, a WS, which was expressed as a percentage value, was calculated. This was based on the relative clinical significance of each item within the domain with the panel agreeing on the attribution of a different weight of clinical damage to a specific organ system. To test the variation of the clinical burden over time, the RS was repeated after 1 year. The panel agreed on a cut-off of a 20% change from baseline as the clinical WS to define clinical stability. The FASTEX model showed good correlation with the clinical assessment and with clinical variation over time in all patients. PMID:27679722

  15. Identification of a novel GLA mutation (F69 L) in a Japanese patient with late-onset Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Seiji; Noriyasu, Kazuyuki; Takamura, Ayumi; Fujisaki, Miwa; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism caused by a mutation in the GLA gene. We sequenced the α-galactosidase A gene (GLA) of a patient who had been clinically diagnosed with late-onset Fabry disease. Abundant globotriaosylceramide was present in his urine, which indicated typical Fabry disease. Here, we report a novel hemizygous mutation, c.207C>A (Phe69 Leu), which caused a mild/late-onset form of Fabry disease.

  16. Agalsidase alfa and kidney dysfunction in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    West, Michael; Nicholls, Kathy; Mehta, Atul; Clarke, Joe T R; Steiner, Robert; Beck, Michael; Barshop, Bruce A; Rhead, William; Mensah, Robert; Ries, Markus; Schiffmann, Raphael

    2009-05-01

    In male patients with Fabry disease, an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A, kidney dysfunction becomes apparent by the third decade of life and invariably progresses to ESRD without treatment. Here, we summarize the effects of agalsidase alfa on kidney function from three prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials and their open-label extension studies involving 108 adult male patients. The mean baseline GFR among 54 nonhyperfiltrating patients (measured GFR <135 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) treated with placebo was 85.4 +/- 29.6 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); during 6 mo of placebo, the mean annualized rate of change in GFR was -7.0 +/- 32.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Among 85 nonhyperfiltrating patients treated with agalsidase alfa, the annualized rate of change was -2.9 +/- 8.7 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Treatment with agalsidase alfa did not affect proteinuria. Multivariate analysis revealed that GFR and proteinuria category (< 1 or > or = 1 g/d) at baseline significantly predicted the rate of decline of GFR during treatment. This summary represents the largest group of male patients who had Fabry disease and for whom the effects of enzyme replacement therapy on kidney function have been studied. These data suggest that agalsidase alfa may stabilize kidney function in these patients.

  17. Screening, diagnosis, and management of patients with Fabry disease: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Raphael; Hughes, Derralynn A; Linthorst, Gabor E; Ortiz, Alberto; Svarstad, Einar; Warnock, David G; West, Michael L; Wanner, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Patients with Fabry disease (FD) are at a high risk for developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. The availability of specific but costly therapy has elevated the profile of this rare condition. This KDIGO conference addressed controversial areas in the diagnosis, screening, and management of FD, and included enzyme replacement therapy and nonspecific standard-of-care therapy for the various manifestations of FD. Despite marked advances in patient care and improved overall outlook, there is a need to better understand the pathogenesis of this glycosphingolipidosis and to determine the appropriate age to initiate therapy in all types of patients. The need to develop more effective specific therapies was also emphasized.

  18. A male Fabry disease patient treated with intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Jukka T; Sillanpää, Niko; Kantola, Ilkka

    2015-02-01

    The use of intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is associated with improved outcomes. Fabry disease is an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disease with vascular endothelial deposits. Affected males with the classic phenotype develop renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular disease and die prematurely. However, Fabry disease is rare in young men with first ischemic stroke of undetermined cause. We report a 38-year-old man with acute aphasia and a left M2 segment of the middle cerebral artery thrombus with no recanalization who was finally diagnosed with Fabry disease after left ventricular hypertrophy of undetermined cause had been identified. A gene test revealed a R227X mutation typical of Fabry disease with the classical phenotype. To our knowledge our patient is the first reported male Fabry patient who was given intravenous thrombolytic therapy and the first reported Fabry patient who received intravenous thrombolytic therapy between 3 and 4.5 hours of the symptom onset. Despite favorable prognostic indicators on admission imaging, our patient suffered a significant stroke and had an unfavorable clinical outcome. Fortunately, the episode was not complicated by intracranial hemorrhage. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in treating patients with Fabry disease and acute ischemic stroke.

  19. Histopathological evidence of Fabry disease in a female patient with left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Martins, Elisabete; Pinho, Teresa; Carpenter, Stirling; Leite, Sérgio; Garcia, Raquel; Madureira, António; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the alpha-galactosidase gene. The most frequent cardiac presentation of Fabry disease is cardiomyopathy characterized by left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, usually concentric. Heart disease in affected females tends to be clinically recognized later than in males and cardiac complications are the most frequently reported cause of death in females with Fabry disease. There are few data regarding the association between Fabry disease and LV noncompaction. We report a case of a 30-year-old asymptomatic woman, heterozygous for a nonsense alpha-galactosidase gene mutation (p.R220X), who presented LV noncompaction on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, without LV wall hypertrophy. Histopathological examination of myocardial fragments showed marked deposition of glycosphingolipids in cardiomyocytes, confirming the diagnosis of Fabry cardiomyopathy. Based on this finding, the patient was proposed for enzyme replacement therapy. This case illustrates the role of endomyocardial biopsy in the clarification of doubtful or atypical findings related to cardiac Fabry disease, even in heterozygous women, and corroborates the contention that Fabry disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of LV hypertrabeculation/noncompaction.

  20. Increased arterial diameters in the posterior cerebral circulation in men with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males-females; normal-impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity.

  1. [Atypical symptoms of Fabry's disease: sudden bilateral deafness, lymphoedema and Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome].

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta; Ryś, Donata; Wegrzyn, Wojciech; Musiał, Jacek

    2002-11-01

    A 40-year-old man with Fabry disease, confirmed by decreased leukocyte alpha-galactosidase A activity in 2001, complained of sudden bilateral deafness, as evidenced by clinical history and audiometry. Magnetic resonance of the brain revealed features typical of Fabry disease. Other clinical manifestations of the disease included: angiokeratoma, mild proteinuria with normal renal function, lymphoedema of the lower limbs, pre-excitation syndrome, myocardial hypertrophy.

  2. A Renal Variant of Fabry Disease Diagnosed by the Presence of Urinary Mulberry Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimohata, Homare; Ogawa, Yujiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of α-galactosidase A. This disease is classified into two types, namely a classical and variant type. We herein present the case of a 36-year-old man who showed a renal variant of Fabry disease and was diagnosed at an early stage by the presence of mulberry cells. He had no history of general symptoms except for proteinuria. The presence of mulberry cells caused us to suspect Fabry disease and he was thereafter diagnosed to have a renal variant of Fabry disease based on the findings of a renal biopsy, a mutation analysis and a low level of α-galactosidase A activity. PMID:27904112

  3. A renal variant of Fabry disease: A case with a novel Gal A hemizygote mutation

    PubMed Central

    H. Mukdsi, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Silvina; Barrón, Belén; Novoa, Pablo; Fernández, Segundo; de Diller, Ana B; I. Torres, Alicia; Formica Jr., Richard N; Orías, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is caused by an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism with deficient activity of a lysosomal enzyme, alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA). Case Presentation A 46 year-old man with progressive kidney disease showed on kidney biopsy electron microscopic evidence of Fabry disease. The patient had no systemic manifestations of Fabry disease, despite residual α-GalA activity, therefore genetic testing was done by direct DNA sequencing, demonstrating a new GAL A gene mutation (C174G-exon 3). After three years of enzyme replacement therapy (agalsidase beta) treatment, a second biopsy was done. Although there was demonstrable clearance of intracellular inclusions, remarkable podocyte activation was evident. Conclusions This report represents an unusual renal variant of Fabry disease and provides histologic data on long-term follow up after enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:24475416

  4. Reduced glucosylceramide in the mouse model of Fabry disease: correction by successful enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Quinta, Rui; Rodrigues, Daniel; Assunção, Marisa; Macedo, Maria Fatima; Azevedo, Olga; Cunha, Damião; Oliveira, Pedro; Sá Miranda, Maria Clara

    2014-02-15

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by deficient activity of α-Galactosidase A (α-Gal A). As a result, glycosphingolipids, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), progressively accumulate in body fluids and tissues. Studies aiming at the identification of secondary lipid alterations in Fabry disease may be potentially useful for the monitorization of the response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and development of future therapies. The focus of this study was to evaluate if α-Gal A deficiency has an effect on two key groups of molecules of sphingolipids metabolism: glucosylceramides (GlucCers) and ceramides (Cers). Studies performed in a mouse model of Fabry disease showed reduced level of GlucCer and normal level of Cer in plasma, liver, spleen, kidney and heart. Moreover, analysis of GlucCer isoforms in Fabry knockout mice showed that GlucCer isoforms are unequally reduced in different tissues of these animals. ERT had a specific effect on the liver's GlucCer levels of Fabry knockout mice, increasing hepatic GlucCer to the levels observed in wild type mice. In contrast to Fabry knockout mice, plasma of Fabry patients had normal GlucCer and Cer but an increased GlucCer/Cer ratio. This alteration showed a positive correlation with plasma globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) concentration. In conclusion, this work reveals novel secondary lipid imbalances caused by α-Gal A deficiency.

  5. The management and treatment of children with Fabry disease: A United States-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, Robert J; Jefferies, John L; Laney, Dawn A; Lawson, Victoria H; Mauer, Michael; Taylor, Matthew R; Wilcox, William R

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited X-linked disorder that presents during childhood in male and female patients. Young patients may initially experience pain, hypohidrosis, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Other manifestations of Fabry disease, such as renal and cardiac disease, manifest later in adolescence or adulthood. In the pediatric population, renal damage is typically subclinical and identifiable only through biopsy. Specialists from the United States with expertise in Fabry disease convened during 2013-2014 in order to develop these consensus guidelines about the management and treatment of children with Fabry disease. The presence of symptoms in boys and girls of any age is an indication to begin therapy. Early treatment before the onset of potentially irreversible vital organ pathology is ideal. Asymptomatic children with Fabry mutations should be followed closely for the development of renal, cardiac, neurological, or gastrointestinal signs, symptoms, or laboratory changes, which would warrant treatment initiation. A comprehensive care plan should be implemented by the treating physicians to guide the management of children with Fabry disease.

  6. Hormonal profile and fertility in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Hauser, A C; Gessl, A; Harm, F; Wiesholzer, M; Kleinert, J; Wallner, M; Voigtländer, T; Bieglmayer, C; Sunder-Plassmann, G

    2005-09-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a glycosphingolipid storage disorder with an X-linked recessive inheritance. The alpha-galactosidase A deficiency leads to a progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in the endothelium and tissue cells of various organs. The kidney, heart and brain are predominantly affected. Reports on endocrine function and fertility rates in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease are sparse. In the present study, we assessed ovarian, testicular and adrenal function in a cohort of patients with Anderson-Fabry disease. Plasma follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, estradiol, testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, somatotropin, insulin-like growth factor-I and serum cortisol were measured in 13 patients (six female and seven male), currently observed in an outpatient clinic. The profile revealed an undisturbed hormonal function and a normal fertility rate in both male and female Anderson-Fabry patients when compared with the corresponding Austrian population.

  7. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  8. Progressive podocyte injury and globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) accumulation in young patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Svarstad, Einar; Bostad, Leif; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Tøndel, Camilla; Whitley, Chester; Mauer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Progressive renal failure often complicates Fabry disease, the pathogenesis of which is not well understood. To further explore this we applied unbiased stereological quantitative methods to electron microscopic changes of Fabry nephropathy and the relationship between parameters of glomerular structure and renal function in 14 young Fabry patients (median age 12 years). Renal biopsies were obtained shortly before enzyme replacement therapy from these patients and from nine normal living kidney donors as controls. Podocyte globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) inclusion volume density increased progressively with age; however, there were no significant relationships between age and endothelial or mesangial inclusion volume densities. Foot process width, greater in male Fabry patients, also progressively increased with age compared with the controls, and correlated directly with proteinuria. In comparison to the biopsies of the controls, endothelial fenestration was reduced in Fabry patients. Thus, our study found relationships between quantitative parameters of glomerular structure in Fabry nephropathy and age, as well as urinary protein excretion. Hence, podocyte injury may play a pivotal role in the development and progression of Fabry nephropathy.

  9. X-chromosome inactivation in female patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, L; Benistan, K; Toussaint, A; Dubourg, O; Hagege, A A; Eladari, D; Jabbour, F; Beldjord, C; De Mazancourt, P; Germain, D P

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by the deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase (α-Gal). While males are usually severely affected, clinical presentation in female patients may be more variable ranging from asymptomatic to, occasionally, as severely affected as male patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the existence of skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in females with FD, its concordance between tissues, and its contribution to the phenotype. Fifty-six females with FD were enrolled. Clinical and biological work-up included two global scores [Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and DS3], cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, measured glomerular filtration rate, and measurement of α-Gal activity. XCI was analyzed in four tissues using DNA methylation studies. Skewed XCI was found in 29% of the study population. A correlation was found in XCI patterns between blood and the other analyzed tissues although some punctual variability was detected. Significant differences in residual α-Gal levels, severity scores, progression of cardiomyopathy and deterioration of kidney function, depending on the direction and degree of skewing of XCI were evidenced. XCI significantly impacts the phenotype and natural history of FD in females.

  10. Plasma globotriaosylsphingosine: diagnostic value and relation to clinical manifestations of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Rombach, S M; Dekker, N; Bouwman, M G; Linthorst, G E; Zwinderman, A H; Wijburg, F A; Kuiper, S; Vd Bergh Weerman, M A; Groener, J E M; Poorthuis, B J; Hollak, C E M; Aerts, J M F G

    2010-09-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of alpha-Galactosidase A, causing accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and elevated plasma globotriaosylsphingosine (lysoGb3). The diagnostic value and clinical relevance of plasma lysoGb3 concentration was investigated. All male and adult female patients with classical Fabry disease could be discerned by an elevated plasma lysoGb3. In young pre-symptomatic Fabry heterozygotes, lysoGb3 levels can be normal. Individuals carrying the R112H and P60L mutations, without classical Fabry symptoms, showed no elevated plasma lysoGb3. Multiple regression analysis showed that there is no correlation of plasma lysoGb3 concentration with total disease severity score in Fabry males. However, plasma lysoGb3 concentration did correlate with white matter lesions (odds ratio: 6.1 per 100 nM lysoGb3 increase (95% CI: 1.4-25.9, p=0.015). In females, plasma lysoGb3 concentration correlated with overall disease severity. Furthermore, plasma lysoGb3 level was related to left ventricular mass (19.5+/-5.5 g increase per 10 nM lysoGb3 increase; p=0.001). In addition, it was assessed whether lifetime exposure to lysoGb3 correlates with disease manifestations. Male Fabry patients with a high lysoGb3 exposure (>10,000 U), were moderately or severely affected, only one mildly. Female patients with a low exposure (<1000 U) were asymptomatic or mildly affected. A large proportion of the females with an exposure >1000 U showed disease complications. Plasma lysoGb3 is useful for the diagnosis of Fabry disease. LysoGb3 is an independent risk factor for development of cerebrovascular white matter lesions in male patients and left ventricular hypertrophy in females. Disease severity correlates with exposure to plasma lysoGb3.

  11. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  12. Long-term effectiveness of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement in Fabry disease: A Fabry Outcome Survey analysis

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michael; Hughes, Derralynn; Kampmann, Christoph; Larroque, Sylvain; Mehta, Atul; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Ramaswami, Uma; West, Michael; Wijatyk, Anna; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes from 5 years of treatment with agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease in patients enrolled in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were compared with published findings for untreated patients with Fabry disease. Data were extracted from FOS, a Shire-sponsored database, for comparison with data from three published studies. Outcomes evaluated were the annualized rate of change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and left ventricular mass indexed to height (LVMI) as well as time to and ages at a composite morbidity endpoint and at death. FOS data were extracted for 740 treated patients who were followed for a median of ~ 5 years. Compared with no treatment, patients treated with agalsidase alfa demonstrated slower decline in renal function and slower progression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Treated male patients with baseline eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 had a mean (standard error of the mean [SEM]) annualized change in eGFR of − 2.86 (0.53) mL/min/1.73 m2/y compared with − 6.8 (1.5) in the published untreated cohort. The mean (SEM) rate of LVMI increase with treatment was 0.33 (0.10) g/m2.7/y in males and 0.48 (0.09) in females, compared with 4.07 (1.03) in untreated males and 2.31 (0.81) in untreated females. Morbidity occurred later in treated patients, with ~ 16% risk of a composite morbidity event (26% in males) after 24 months with ERT versus ~ 45% without treatment, with first events and deaths also occurring at older ages in patients administered ERT (e.g., estimated median survival in treated males was 77.5 years versus 60 years in untreated males). Findings from these retrospective comparisons of observational data and published literature support the long-term benefits of ERT with agalsidase alfa for Fabry disease in slowing the progression of renal impairment and cardiomyopathy. Treatment also appeared to delay the onset of morbidity and mortality. Interpretation of these findings should take into

  13. Long-term effectiveness of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement in Fabry disease: A Fabry Outcome Survey analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michael; Hughes, Derralynn; Kampmann, Christoph; Larroque, Sylvain; Mehta, Atul; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Ramaswami, Uma; West, Michael; Wijatyk, Anna; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Outcomes from 5 years of treatment with agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease in patients enrolled in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were compared with published findings for untreated patients with Fabry disease. Data were extracted from FOS, a Shire-sponsored database, for comparison with data from three published studies. Outcomes evaluated were the annualized rate of change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and left ventricular mass indexed to height (LVMI) as well as time to and ages at a composite morbidity endpoint and at death. FOS data were extracted for 740 treated patients who were followed for a median of ~ 5 years. Compared with no treatment, patients treated with agalsidase alfa demonstrated slower decline in renal function and slower progression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Treated male patients with baseline eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) had a mean (standard error of the mean [SEM]) annualized change in eGFR of - 2.86 (0.53) mL/min/1.73 m(2)/y compared with - 6.8 (1.5) in the published untreated cohort. The mean (SEM) rate of LVMI increase with treatment was 0.33 (0.10) g/m(2.7)/y in males and 0.48 (0.09) in females, compared with 4.07 (1.03) in untreated males and 2.31 (0.81) in untreated females. Morbidity occurred later in treated patients, with ~ 16% risk of a composite morbidity event (26% in males) after 24 months with ERT versus ~ 45% without treatment, with first events and deaths also occurring at older ages in patients administered ERT (e.g., estimated median survival in treated males was 77.5 years versus 60 years in untreated males). Findings from these retrospective comparisons of observational data and published literature support the long-term benefits of ERT with agalsidase alfa for Fabry disease in slowing the progression of renal impairment and cardiomyopathy. Treatment also appeared to delay the onset of morbidity and mortality. Interpretation of these findings should take

  14. Enhancing the diagnosis of fabry disease in cardiology with a targeted information: a before–after control–impact study

    PubMed Central

    Savary, Anne-Louise; Morello, Remy; Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Milliez, Paul; Bekri, Soumeya; Labombarda, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac complications in Fabry disease are frequent and dominated by a high frequency of left ventricular hypertrophy; therefore, cardiologists may have an essential role in screening for this disease. Providing cardiologists with targeted information on Fabry disease would be valuable and could reduce both diagnostic and therapeutic delays. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of such strategy for Fabry screening. Methods We conducted a before–after control–impact study by comparing observations made before and after targeted information on Fabry disease among cardiologists. The information on Fabry disease consisted of (1) an educational booklet, (2) oral information and (3) screening kits. The programme was evaluated at the end of a 12-month study period. Results Forty-two cardiologists participated to this study. None of them had conducted screening test and new diagnostic for Fabry disease in the 3 years prior the information. After the information, screening with dried blood spots was performed in 55 patients (ranged 18–77 years, men: 39) with cardiac monitoring for supposed sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n=41) or unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (n=14) from January 2015 to January 2016. Two new cases of Fabry disease were diagnosed (3.4%) in two men (ages 58 and 51 years). The information was deemed relevant in both content and structure and was deemed useful for everyday practice. Conclusion Cardiologists valued the targeted information on Fabry disease. This information had a direct clinical impact by allowing the diagnosis of two new families with Fabry disease.

  15. A survey of the pain experienced by males and females with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Gibas, Andrea L; Klatt, Regan; Johnson, Jack; Clarke, Joe TR; Katz, Joel

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND The clinical onset of Fabry disease, a rare, X-linked, multisystemic disorder, is marked by neuropathic pain. Males suffer extensively from this disease. Females, as genetic ‘carriers’, have traditionally been viewed as either asymptomatic or mildly afflicted with this disease. OBJECTIVES To describe Fabry-related pain and compare experiences between the sexes. Patients’ perceptions of physician pain assessments were also examined. METHODS A disease-specific questionnaire was accessible on-line (www.fabry.org) and mailed to 552 members of a Fabry disease support group. RESULTS The response rate was 14.3% for the support group-based mail questionnaire. Females (58.0%) were significantly older (mean ± SD 45.9±13.5 years) than males (mean ± SD 40.0±12.1; t [86]=−2.11, P<0.05). Females were diagnosed with Fabry disease later (31.1±14.0 years) than males (24.2±11.9 years; t [86]=−2.43, P<0.05). Females (mean score for pain disability rating 3.0±1.4) suffered more extensive disability from migraine pain (mean score 2.2±1.3; F [1, 74]=45.0, P<0.005), and, unlike males, did not exhibit a decline in pain intensity with disease duration. Satisfaction with physician pain assessments was moderate. CONCLUSIONS Contrary to the traditional view of females as carriers, females with Fabry disease experienced intense disease-related pain; pain produced comparable distress and impairment in both sexes. The diagnostic delay and absence of a decline in pain symptoms over time in females suggest additional disease burden. Females may be triply disadvantaged in the health care system due to disease rarity, devalued carrier status and sex. PMID:16960635

  16. The Impact of Fabry Disease on Reproductive Fitness.

    PubMed

    Laney, Dawn A; Clarke, Virginia; Foley, Allison; Hall, Eric W; Gillespie, Scott E; Holida, Myrl; Simmons, Morgan; Wadley, Alexandrea

    2017-03-22

    Fabry disease (FD) is a pan-ethnic, X-linked, progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by pathogenic mutations in the GLA gene. Published case reports and abstracts suggest that decreased reproductive fitness may occur in males with FD. In order to understand the impact of FD on reproductive fitness and increase the accuracy of reproductive genetic counseling, this study examines a large, multi-centered population of individuals with FD to determine if males have reduced reproductive fitness. Study data were collected on 376 patients through two, gender-specific surveys distributed across the United States and Canada. The number of biological live-born children among individuals with FD was compared to statistics from the general population. Information was also collected on reduced sperm count, depression, pain, use of assisted reproductive technology, and reproductive choice. On average, females affected by FD had more biological live-born children (1.8) than males affected by FD (1.1). However, males affected by FD had an increased mean number of biological children (1.1) compared to the mean number of biological children fathered by men in the United States (0.9). Sixteen of the 134 males with FD reported oligospermia, which suggests that an infertility work up may be indicated for males having difficulty impregnating their partners. In our large multicenter sample, males and females with FD do not exhibit reduced reproductive fitness; on average they have more biological children than the general population in the United States. This information should assist clinicians in providing accurate reproductive genetic counseling and treatment for individuals with FD.

  17. Prevalence of Raynaud phenomenon and nailfold capillaroscopic abnormalities in Fabry disease: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Deshayes, Samuel; Auboire, Laurent; Jaussaud, Roland; Lidove, Olivier; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Triclin, Nathalie; Imbert, Bernard; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2015-05-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal disorder leading to progressive systemic involvement, including microvascular damage that leads to neurological and cardiovascular disorders. We hypothesize that the latter could be documented at an early stage by performing a microcirculation study with nailfold capillaroscopy and evaluation of Raynaud phenomenon.The objective was to measure the prevalence of Raynaud phenomenon and nailfold capillaroscopic abnormalities in FD.This cross-sectional study included a standardized questionnaire and a nailfold capillaroscopy that assessed previously reported patterns in FD (dystrophic and giant capillaries, avascular fields, irregular architecture, dilatation and density of capillaries, hemorrhage), and was conducted on 32 Fabry patients and 39 controls. Capillaroscopic photographs were reviewed by 2 independent blinded investigators.Twelve Fabry patients (38%) suffered from Raynaud phenomenon, 5 were males (ie, 50% of male Fabry patients), compared with 2 controls (13%) (P < 0.001), of whom none were males (P < 0.001). Raynaud phenomenon was concomitant or before the occurrence of pain in the extremities in 42% of Fabry patients.More ramified capillaries were significantly observed in Fabry patients (12/32, 38%) than in controls (5/39, 13%, P = 0.016).Secondary Raynaud phenomenon should lead to screening for FD, especially in men. By extension, in high-risk populations for FD, the presence of Raynaud phenomenon and ramified capillaries should be assessed.

  18. Cardiac device implantation in Fabry disease: A retrospective monocentric study.

    PubMed

    Sené, Thomas; Lidove, Olivier; Sebbah, Joel; Darondel, Jean-Marc; Picard, Hervé; Aaron, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Zenone, Thierry; Joly, Dominique; Charron, Philippe; Ziza, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    The incidence and predictive factors of arrhythmias and/or conduction abnormalities (ACAs) requiring cardiac device (CD) implantation are poorly characterized in Fabry disease (FD). The aim of our retrospective study was to determine the prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with ACA requiring CD implantation in a monocentric cohort of patients with confirmed FD who were followed up in a department of internal medicine and reference center for FD.Forty-nine patients (20M, 29F) were included. Nine patients (4M, 5F; 18%) had at least one episode of ACA leading to device therapy. Six patients (4M/2F) required a pacemaker (PM) for sinus node dysfunction (n = 4) or atrioventricular disease (n = 2). One female patient required an internal cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) to prevent sudden cardiac death because of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (nSVT). One female patient required PM-ICD for sinus node dysfunction and nSVT. One patient underwent CD implantation before the diagnosis of FD. The annual rate of CD implantation was estimated at 1.90 per 100 person years. On univariate analysis at the end of the follow-up period, the factors associated with ACAs requiring CD implantation were as follows: delayed diagnosis of FD, delayed initiation of enzyme replacement therapy, age at the last follow-up visit, and severe multiorgan phenotype (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, chronic kidney disease, and/or sensorineural hearing loss). On multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis of FD and age at the last follow-up visit were independently associated with an increased risk of ACAs requiring CD (P < 0.05).Considering the high frequency of ACAs requiring CD implantation and the risk of sudden death in patients with FD, regular monitoring is mandatory, especially in patients with a late diagnosis of FD and/or with a severe phenotype. Regular Holter ECGs, therapeutic education of patients, and deliverance of an emergency card including a phenotype summary are

  19. Clinical and electron microscopic studies of a case of glycolipid lipoidosis (Fabry's disease)

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Angus I.; Lee, John C.; Hopper, James

    1967-01-01

    A case of glycolipid lipoidosis (Fabry's disease) in a 27-year-old man is recorded. The case is unusual in that despite extensive disease evidenced by widespread skin lesions, ocular abnormalities, and proteinuria, renal function was only minimally impaired. Electron microscope studies of kidney and skin showed that most cells contained the characteristic lipid described in this condition. Images PMID:6016885

  20. Eight-Year Follow-Up of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and Brain Structural Changes in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, Irene M; Böttcher, Anna; Hennermann, Julia B; Beck, Michael; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Brain structural alterations and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been described repeatedly in Fabry disease, yet cognitive deficits have been shown to be only mild. Here, we aimed to investigate neuropsychiatric symptoms and brain structure longitudinally. We expected no clinically relevant increase of neuropsychiatric symptoms in parallel to increased brain structural alterations. We assessed 14 Fabry patients (46.1 ± 10.8 years) who had participated in our investigation eight years ago. Patients engaged in neuropsychiatric testing, as well as structural magnetic resonance imaging and angiography to determine white matter lesions, hippocampal volume, and the diameter of the larger intracranial arteries. While Fabry patients did not differ on cognitive performance, they showed progressive and significant hippocampal volume loss over the 8-year observation period. White matter lesions were associated with older age and higher white matter lesion load at baseline, but did not reach statistical significance when comparing baseline to follow-up. Likewise, intracranial artery diameters did not increase significantly. None of the imaging parameters were associated with the neuropsychiatric parameters. Depression frequency reduced from 50% at baseline to 21% at follow-up, but it did not reach significance. This investigation demonstrates clinical stability in cognitive function, while pronounced hippocampal atrophy is apparent throughout the 8 years. Our middle-aged Fabry patients appeared to compensate successfully for progressive hippocampal volume loss. The hippocampal volume decline indicates brain regional neuronal involvement in Fabry disease.

  1. Functional and structural nerve fiber findings in heterozygote patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Torvin Møller, Anette; Winther Bach, Flemming; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase; Hasholt, Lis; Lan, He; Sommer, Claudia; Kølvraa, Steen; Ballegaard, Martin; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2009-09-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked inherited lysosomal disorder with dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A causing accumulation of glycolipids in multiple organs including the nervous system. Pain and somatosensory disturbances are prominent manifestations of this disease. Until recently disease manifestations in female carriers of Fabry disease have been questioned. To explore the frequency of symptoms and the functional and structural involvement of the nervous system in female patients we examined the presence of pain, manifestations of peripheral neuropathy and nerve density in skin biopsies in 19 female patients with Fabry disease and 19 sex- and age-matched controls. Diaries, quantitative sensory testing, neurophysiologic tests and skin biopsies were performed. Daily pain was present in 63% of patients, with a median VAS score of 4.0. Tactile detection threshold and pressure pain threshold were lower and cold detection thresholds increased in patients. Sensory nerve action potential amplitude and maximal sensory conduction velocity were not different, whereas there was a highly significant reduction in intraepidermal nerve fiber density. We found no correlation between pain VAS score, quantitative sensory testing and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Our study demonstrates that careful evaluation of symptoms in female Fabry patients is important as small fiber disease manifestations are present, which in some cases is only detected by skin biopsy.

  2. High prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Hauser, A C; Gessl, A; Lorenz, M; Voigtländer, T; Födinger, M; Sunder-Plassmann, G

    2005-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder. It results from a deficiency of the lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A and leads to progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in the endothelium and tissue cells of various organs. Some of the typical clinical findings such as tiredness, dry skin, myalgia and arthralgia as well as vague gastrointestinal complaints are also symptoms of hypothyroidism. Therefore, we studied the thyroid function in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease. Thyroid function was studied in 11 patients (6 female, 5 male) with Anderson-Fabry disease by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine serum levels. Nine patients had chronic kidney disease with stage 1 and two with stage 5. Subclinical hypothyroidism (normal serum free thyroxine concentrations along with elevated serum TSH levels) was found in 4 of 11 patients (36.4%). Subclinical hypothyroidism was observed in both male and female patients as well as in patients with stage 1 and stage 5 kidney disease. Subclinical hypothyroidism is a common finding in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease, showing an excess prevalence as compared to the normal population. The high frequency seems to be relevant regarding the potential consequences of a hypothyroid state.

  3. Cardiomyopathy and response to enzyme replacement therapy in a male mouse model for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Escoubet, Brigitte; Agrapart, Vincent; Griol-Charhbili, Violaine; Schoeb, Trenton; Feng, Wenguang; Jaimes, Edgar; Warnock, David G; Jaisser, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism that results in progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids, (predominately globotriaosylceramide; GL-3) in lysosomes, as well as other cellular compartments and the extracellular space. Our aim was to characterize the cardiac phenotype of male knock-out mice that are deficient in alpha-galactosidase A activity, as a model for Fabry disease and test the efficacy of Enzyme Replacement Therapy with agalsidase-beta. Male mice (3-4 months of age) were characterized with awake blood pressure and heart rate measurements, cardiac echocardiography and electrocardiography measurements under light anesthesia, histological studies and molecular studies with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The Fabry knock-out mouse has bradycardia and lower blood pressure than control wild type (CB7BL/6J) mice. In Fabry knock-out mice, the cardiomyopathy associated mild hypertrophy at echography with normal systolic LV function and mild diastolic dysfunction. Premature atrial contractions were more frequent in without conduction defect. Heart weight normalized to tibial length was increased in Fabry knock-out mice. Ascending aorta dilatation was observed. Molecular studies were consistent with early stages of cardiac remodeling. A single dose of agalsidase-beta (3 mg/kg) did not affect the LV hypertrophy, function or heart rate, but did improve the mRNA signals of early cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mice at 3 to 4 months of age have cardiac and vascular alterations similar to that described in early clinical stage of Fabry disease in children and adolescents. Enzyme replacement therapy affects cardiac molecular remodeling after a single dose.

  4. Does geographical location influence the phenotype of Fabry disease in women in Europe?

    PubMed

    Barba-Romero, M-A; Deegan, P; Giugliani, R; Hughes, D

    2010-02-01

    This study examines the relationship between phenotype and geographical location of patients with Fabry disease in Europe. Data were taken from patients enrolled in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS), as of October 2007. A modified version of the Mainz Severity Score Index (FOS-MSSI) was used to classify patients according to the severity of disease. European patients were grouped depending on country of residence (northern or southern European countries). Results are presented from 762 patients enrolled in FOS in Europe (357 men and 405 women); 66% lived in northern and 34% in southern countries. Median age at onset of symptoms of Fabry disease was similar in both sexes. No differences in disease severity were seen among men, according to place of residence; however, women living in northern countries had higher severity scores (p < 0.001) than those in southern countries. In men and women, FOS-MSSI scores increased with age, irrespective of place of residence. The results suggest that expression of different phenotypic features in Fabry disease in women living in Europe may be influenced by extra-genetic or epigenetic factors. These factors might be related to dietary or environmental influences that differ according to the patient's country of residence.

  5. Establishing 3-nitrotyrosine as a biomarker for the vasculopathy of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Liming; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Smid, Bouwien E; Aerts, Johannes M FG; Hollak, Carla E M; Shayman, James A

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial dysfunction of Fabry disease results from α-galactosidase A deficiency leading to the accumulation of globotriaosylceramide. Vasculopathy in the α-galactosidase A null mouse is manifested as oxidant-induced thrombosis, accelerated atherogenesis, and impaired arterial reactivity. To better understand the pathogenesis of Fabry disease in humans, we generated a human cell model by using RNA interference. Hybrid endothelial cells were transiently transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) specifically directed against α-galactosidase A. Knockdown of α-galactosidase A was confirmed using immunoblotting and globotriaosylceramide accumulation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity was correspondingly decreased by >60%. Levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT), a specific marker for reactive nitrogen species and quantified using mass spectrometry, increased by 40- to 120-fold without corresponding changes in other oxidized amino acids, consistent with eNOS-derived reactive nitrogen species as the source of the reactive oxygen species. eNOS uncoupling was confirmed by the observed increase in free plasma and protein-bound aortic 3NT levels in the α-galactosidase A knockout mice. Finally, 3NT levels, assayed in biobanked plasma samples from patients with classical Fabry disease, were over sixfold elevated compared with age- and gender-matched controls. Thus, 3NT may serve as a biomarker for the vascular involvement in Fabry disease. PMID:24402087

  6. [Fabry disease: clinic and enzymatic diagnosis of homozygous and heterozygous. New therapeutic prospects].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Olea, T

    2002-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide, the glycolipid substrate of this enzyme, leads to severe painful neuropathy with progressive renal, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular dysfunction and early death. Men are predominantly affected but many female carriers have similar clinical involvement, including increased risk of stroke. Physical stigmata, such as angiokeratomas in skin and mucous membranes and characteristic benign corneal abnormalities, facilitate identification of Fabry disease. The finding of a marked decreased activity of (alpha-galactosidase A in plasma, white blood cells or cultured skin fibroblasts confirms the diagnosis. Treatment thus far has been symptomatic only. Etiology-based therapies are being developed that include enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, and substrate deprivation. The recently completed double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of intravenous infusions of (alpha-galactosidase A in patients with Fabry disease demonstrated the safety and efficacy of this treatment. We report a family with Fabry disease composed of hemicygous and heterocygous. The propositus developed chronic renal failure and received a cadaver renal transplant, which remained with adequate renal function during 15 years.

  7. Twenty novel mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A gene causing Fabry disease.

    PubMed Central

    Topaloglu, A. K.; Ashley, G. A.; Tong, B.; Shabbeer, J.; Astrin, K. H.; Eng, C. M.; Desnick, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry disease, an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, results from the deficient activity of the lysosomal exoglycohydrolase alpha-galactosidase A (EC 3.2.1.22; alpha-Gal A). The nature of the molecular lesions in the alpha-Gal A gene in 30 unrelated families was determined to provide precise heterozygote detection, prenatal diagnosis, and define genotype-phenotype correlations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated from affected males and/or carrier females from 30 unrelated families with Fabry disease. The entire alpha-Gal A coding region and flanking intronic sequences were analyzed by PCR amplification and automated sequencing. RESULTS: Twenty new mutations were identified, each in a single family: C142R, G183D, S235C, W236L, D244H, P259L, M267I, I289F, Q321E, C378Y, C52X, W277X, IVS4(+4), IVS6(+2), IVS6(-1), 35del13, 256del1, 892ins1, 1176del4, and 1188del1. In the remaining 10 unrelated Fabry families, 9 previously reported mutations were detected: M42V, R112C, S148R, D165V, N215S (in 2 families), Q99X, C142X, R227X, and 1072del3. Haplotype analysis using markers closely flanking the alpha-Gal A gene indicated that the two patients with the N215S lesion were unrelated. The IVS4(+4) mutation was a rare intronic splice site mutation that causes Fabry disease. CONCLUSIONS: These studies further define the heterogeneity of mutations in the alpha-Gal A gene causing Fabry disease, permit precise heterozygote detection and prenatal diagnosis, and help delineate phenotype-genotype correlations in this disease.

  8. Patients with Fabry disease after enzyme replacement therapy dose reduction versus treatment switch.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krebs, Alice; Guerrero González, Hans; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Niemann, Markus; Störk, Stefan; Schelleckes, Michael; Reiermann, Stefanie; Stypmann, Jörg; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Brand, Eva

    2014-04-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-beta in 2009, many patients with Fabry disease were treated with lower doses or were switched to agalsidase-alfa. This observational study assessed end-organ damage and clinical symptoms during dose reduction or switch to agalsidase-alfa. A total of 105 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-beta (1.0 mg/kg body weight) for ≥1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=38), receive a reduced dose of 0.3-0.5 mg/kg (dose-reduction group, n=29), or switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-alfa (switch group) and were followed prospectively for 1 year. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD); changes in cardiac, renal, and neurologic function; and Fabry-related symptoms (neuropathic pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea, and disease severity scores). Organ function and Fabry-related symptoms remained stable in the regular-dose group. In contrast, estimated GFR decreased by about 3 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (P=0.01) in the dose-reduction group, and the median albumin-to-creatinine ratio increased from 114 (0-606) mg/g to 216 (0-2062) mg/g (P=0.03) in the switch group. Furthermore, mean Mainz Severity Score Index scores and frequencies of pain attacks, chronic pain, gastrointestinal pain, and diarrhea increased significantly in the dose-reduction and switch groups. In conclusion, patients receiving regular agalsidase-beta dose had a stable disease course, but dose reduction led to worsening of renal function and symptoms. Switching to agalsidase-alfa is safe, but microalbuminuria may progress and Fabry-related symptoms may deteriorate.

  9. Plasma mutant α-galactosidase A protein and globotriaosylsphingosine level in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukimura, Takahiro; Nakano, Sachie; Togawa, Tadayasu; Tanaka, Toshie; Saito, Seiji; Ohno, Kazuki; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (GLA) and accumulation of glycolipids, and various GLA gene mutations lead to a wide range of clinical phenotypes from the classic form to the later-onset one. To investigate the biochemical heterogeneity and elucidate the basis of the disease using available clinical samples, we measured GLA activity, GLA protein and accumulated globotriaosylsphingosine (Lyso-Gb3), a biomarker of this disease, in plasma samples from Fabry patients. The analysis revealed that both the enzyme activity and the protein level were apparently decreased, and the enzyme activity was well correlated with the protein level in many Fabry patients. In these cases, a defect of biosynthesis or excessive degradation of mutant GLAs should be involved in the pathogenesis, and the residual protein level would determine the accumulation of Lyso-Gb3 and the severity of the disease. However, there are some exceptional cases, i.e., ones harboring p.C142Y, p.R112H and p.M296I, who exhibit a considerable amount of GLA protein. Especially, a subset of Fabry patients with p.R112H or p.M296I has been attracted interest because the patients exhibit almost normal plasma Lyso-Gb3 concentration. Structural analysis revealed that C142Y causes a structural change at the entrance of the active site. It will lead to a complete enzyme activity deficiency, resulting in a high level of plasma Lyso-Gb3 and the classic Fabry disease. On the other hand, it is thought that R112H causes a relatively large structural change on the molecular surface, and M296I a small one in a restricted region from the core to the surface, both the structural changes being far from the active site. These changes will cause not only partial degradation but also degeneration of the mutant GLA proteins, and the degenerated enzymes exhibiting small and residual activity remain and probably facilitate degradation of Lyso-Gb3 in plasma, leading

  10. Ventricular Tachycardia in Fabry Disease Detected in a 50-Year-Old Woman during 14-Day Continuous Cardiac Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gburek, Jaime; Rochford, Laura; Hopkin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder. Female carriers were long thought to be asymptomatic; however, research has revealed the opposite. Cardiac conditions are the chief causes of death in women with Fabry disease. Although ventricular tachycardia has been reported in male patients with Fabry disease, it is not thought to be a frequent finding in females. We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman in whom we used 14-day continuous electrocardiographic monitoring to identify nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, after electrocardiograms and 24-hour Holter monitoring failed to detect the arrhythmia. A permanent implantable cardioverter-defibrillator relieved the patient's symptoms. We discuss why this case supports the need for more extensive electrophysiologic evaluation in women who have Fabry disease. PMID:28100976

  11. Substrate-specific gene expression profiles in different kidney cell types are associated with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Youn-Jeong; Jeon, Yeo Jin; Jung, Namhee; Park, Joo-Won; Park, Hae-Young; Jung, Sung-Chul

    2015-10-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) lysosomal enzyme, which results in globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) storage in vascular endothelial cells and different cell types throughout the body. Involvement of the kidney and heart is life threatening, and fibrosis of these organs is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of Fabry disease. An increased concentration of deacylated Gb3 (lyso‑Gb3) in the plasma of symptomatic patients has also been suggested as a causative molecular event. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in renal fibrosis in Fabry disease, the present analyzed the changes in global gene expression prior to and following Gb3 or lyso‑Gb3 treatment in two types of kidney cell lines, human proximal renal tubular epithelial (HK‑2) and mouse renal glomerular mesangial (SV40 MES 13) cells. Gb3 and lyso‑Gb3 treatment regulated the expression of 199 and 328 genes in each cell type, demonstrating a >2.0‑fold change. The majority of the biological functions of the regulated genes were associated with fibrogenesis or epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT). The gene expression patterns of sphingolipid‑treated HK‑2 cells were distinguishable from the patterns in the SV40 MES 13 cells. Several genes associated with the EMT were selected and evaluated further in kidney cells and in Fabry mouse kidney tissues. In the SV40 MES 13 cells, the DLL1, F8, and HOXA11 genes were downregulated, and FOXP2 was upregulated by treatment with Gb3 or lyso‑Gb3. In the HK‑2 cells, the ADAMTS6, BEST1, IL4, and MYH11 genes were upregulated. Upregulation of the FOXP2, COL15A1, IL4, and MYH11 genes was also observed in the Fabry mouse kidney tissues. The gene expression profiles in kidney cells following the addition of Gb3 or lyso‑Gb3 revealed substrate‑specific and cell‑specific patterns. These findings suggested that Gb3 and lyso‑Gb3 lead to renal

  12. Increased expression of Trpv1 in peripheral terminals mediates thermal nociception in Fabry disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lakomá, Jarmila; Rimondini, Roberto; Ferrer Montiel, Antonio; Donadio, Vincenzo; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient function of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) enzyme. α-GalA deficiency leads to multisystemic clinical manifestations caused by the preferential accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscles. A hallmark symptom of Fabry disease patients is neuropathic pain that appears in the early stage of the disease as a result of peripheral small fiber damage. The α-GalA gene null mouse model (α-GalA(−/0)) has provided molecular evidence for the molecular alterations in small type-C nociceptors in Fabry disease that may underlie their hyperexcitability, although the specific mechanism remains elusive. Here, we have addressed this question and report that small type-C nociceptors from α-GalA(−/0) mice exhibit a significant increase in the expression and function of the TRPV1 channel, a thermoTRP channel implicated in painful heat sensation. Notably, male α-GalA(−/0) mice displayed a ≈2-fold higher heat sensitivity than wild-type animals, consistent with the augmented expression levels and activity of TRPV1 in α-GalA(−/0) nociceptors. Intriguingly, blockade of neuronal exocytosis with peptide DD04107, a process that inhibits among others the algesic membrane recruitment of TRPV1 channels in peptidergic nociceptors, virtually eliminated the enhanced heat nociception of α-GalA(−/0) mice. Together, these findings suggest that the augmented expression of TRPV1 in α-GalA(−/0) nociceptors may underly at least in part their increased heat sensitivity, and imply that blockade of peripheral neuronal exocytosis may be a valuable pharmacological strategy to reduce pain in Fabry disease patients, increasing their quality of life. PMID:27531673

  13. MALDI-TOF and cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging of Fabry disease biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, David; Roy, Sandrine; Germain, Dominique P.; Chaminade, Pierre; Brunelle, Alain; Laprevote, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism, in which a partial or total deficiency of [alpha]-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme, results in the progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids (globotriaosylceramide and digalactosylceramide) in most fluids and tissues of the body. Few information is available about the composition and distribution in tissues of the accumulated glycosphingolipids species. Mass spectrometry imaging is an innovative technique, which can provide pieces of information about the distribution of numerous biological compounds, such as lipids, directly on the tissue sections. MALDI-TOF and cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging approaches were used to study the localization of lipids (cholesterol, cholesterol sulfate, vitamin E, glycosphingolipids ...) on skin and kidney sections of patients affected by the Fabry disease. Numerous information on pathophysiology were enlightened by both techniques.

  14. Hemizygous Fabry disease associated with IgA nephropathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Homare; Yoh, Keigyou; Takada, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Usui, Joichi; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2009-01-01

    We present a 22-year-old male patient who showed both classical Fabry disease and IgA nephropathy. He had proteinuria (1.5 g/day), hypohidrosis and neuralgia with fever. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were 0.9 mg/dL and 11.4 mg/dL, respectively. Renal biopsy showed strikingly vacuolated podocytes and tubular epithelium cells. Myelin-like bodies were detected in podocytes, mesangial cells, endothelial cells and tubular epithelium cells by electron microscopy. On immunofluorescence microscopy, IgA and C3 deposits were detected in mesangial areas. From these results and a markedly low level of alpha-galactosidase A activity, this patient was diagnosed as having classical Fabry disease and IgA nephropathy.

  15. Fabry disease in children and the effects of enzyme replacement treatment.

    PubMed

    Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Beck, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism caused by a deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme, alpha-galactosidase A. In affected patients, the enzyme substrate, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), accumulates in cells of various tissues and organs. Lysosomal accumulation of Gb3 begins in utero, and signs and symptoms of Fabry disease emerge in childhood and adolescence. The earliest presenting symptoms are typically neuropathic pain and gastrointestinal problems, which can have a substantial impact on health-related quality of life. Life-threatening major organ involvement is rare in young patients, but signs of kidney dysfunction (e.g., proteinuria), left ventricular hypertrophy, and stroke have been reported in children. There are two enzyme preparations for therapy: agalsidase alfa and beta. In two clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase alfa, including 37 children, boys demonstrated reductions in plasma Gb3 levels, and both boys and girls reported reductions in neuropathic pain and in the use of neuropathic pain medications. Heart rate variability, which is reduced in boys with Fabry disease, was statistically significantly improved with 6 months of agalsidase alfa treatment. In a single clinical study of agalsidase beta in children (n =16), skin Gb3 deposits and plasma Gb3 levels were reduced in boys. Differences exist in the administration and the safety profile of these two enzyme formulations. Follow-up of these cohorts and additional studies will be necessary to fully evaluate long-term efficacy of ERT in children with Fabry disease.

  16. Identification of a Novel GLA Mutation (L206 P) in a Patient with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Gee-Hee; Park, Hoon-Suk; Choi, Jin-A; Bae, Jung-Min; Cho, Uiju

    2017-03-01

    We report a new α-Galactosidase A (αGal-A) mutation in a 39-year-old Korean born, male Fabry disease patient. Fabry disease is a devastating, progressive inborn error of metabolism caused by X-linked genetic mutations. In this case, the first clinical symptom to occur was in childhood consisting of a burning pain originating in the extremities then radiating inwards to the limbs. This patient also stated to have ringing in his ears, angiokeratomas on his trunk, and cornea verticillata. He visited an outpatient cardiologist due to intermittent and atypical chest discomfort at the age of 39. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examination showed left ventricular hypertrophy. A physical examination revealed proteinuria without hematuria. The patient's plasma αGal-A activity was markedly lower than the mean value of the controls. After genetic counseling and obtaining written informed consent, we identified one hemizygous mutation in exon 4 of galactosidase alpha, c.617T>C (p.Leu206 Pro). He was eventually diagnosed as having Fabry disease.

  17. Home infusion program for Fabry disease: experience with agalsidase alfa in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kisinovsky, Isaac; Cáceres, Guillermo; Coronel, Cristina; Reisin, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Enzyme replacement treatment using agalsidase alfa significantly reduces pain, improves cardiac function and quality of life, and slows renal deterioration. Nevertheless, it is a life-long treatment which requires regular intravenous infusions and entails a great burden for patients. Our objective was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and tolerability of the home infusion of agalsidase alfa in patients with Fabry disease in Argentina. We evaluated all the patients with Fabry disease who received home infusion with agalsidase alfa 0.2 mg/kg between January 2005 and June 2011. The program included 87 patients; 51 males (mean age: 30 years) and 36 females (mean age: 34 years). A total of 5229 infusions (mean: 59 per patient; range: 1-150) were administered. A total of 5 adverse reactions were seen in 5 patients (5.7% of patients and 0.9% of the total number of infusions). All were mild in severity and resolved by reducing the rate of infusion and by using antihistaminics. All these 5 patients were positive for IgG antibodies, but none of them presented IgE antibodies and none suffered an anaphylactic shock. In our group 18 patients were switched from agalsidase beta to agalsidase alfa without complications. Home infusion with agalsidase alfa is safe, well tolerated and is associated to high compliance.

  18. Identification of a Novel GLA Mutation (L206 P) in a Patient with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Hoon-Suk; Choi, Jin-A; Bae, Jung-Min; Cho, Uiju

    2017-01-01

    We report a new α-Galactosidase A (αGal-A) mutation in a 39-year-old Korean born, male Fabry disease patient. Fabry disease is a devastating, progressive inborn error of metabolism caused by X-linked genetic mutations. In this case, the first clinical symptom to occur was in childhood consisting of a burning pain originating in the extremities then radiating inwards to the limbs. This patient also stated to have ringing in his ears, angiokeratomas on his trunk, and cornea verticillata. He visited an outpatient cardiologist due to intermittent and atypical chest discomfort at the age of 39. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examination showed left ventricular hypertrophy. A physical examination revealed proteinuria without hematuria. The patient's plasma αGal-A activity was markedly lower than the mean value of the controls. After genetic counseling and obtaining written informed consent, we identified one hemizygous mutation in exon 4 of galactosidase alpha, c.617T>C (p.Leu206 Pro). He was eventually diagnosed as having Fabry disease. PMID:28382085

  19. Use of a Modified α-N-Acetylgalactosaminidase in the Development of Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Youichi; Kawashima, Ikuo; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Sugawara, Kanako; Kuroda, Mayuko; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Ohno, Kazuki; Fukushige, Tomoko; Kanekura, Takuro; Itoh, Kohji; Ohashi, Toya; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    A modified α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NAGA) with α-galactosidase A (GLA)-like substrate specificity was designed on the basis of structural studies and was produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The enzyme acquired the ability to catalyze the degradation of 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-D-galactopyranoside. It retained the original NAGA's stability in plasma and N-glycans containing many mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) residues, which are advantageous for uptake by cells via M6P receptors. There was no immunological cross-reactivity between the modified NAGA and GLA, and the modified NAGA did not react to serum from a patient with Fabry disease recurrently treated with a recombinant GLA. The enzyme cleaved globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) accumulated in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with Fabry disease. Furthermore, like recombinant GLA proteins presently used for enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease, the enzyme intravenously injected into Fabry model mice prevented Gb3 storage in the liver, kidneys, and heart and improved the pathological changes in these organs. Because this modified NAGA is hardly expected to cause an allergic reaction in Fabry disease patients, it is highly promising as a new and safe enzyme for ERT for Fabry disease. PMID:19853240

  20. The Mutation p.D313Y is Associated with Organ Manifestation in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    du Moulin, M; Koehn, A F; Golsari, A; Dulz, S; Atiskova, Y; Patten, M; Münch, J; Avanesov, M; Ullrich, K; Muschol, N

    2017-03-09

    Fabry disease is a multisystem lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the GLA gene. The clinical significance of the mutation p.D313Y is still under debate. Retrospective chart analysis of clinical (neurological, cardiac, renal, ophthalmological), genetic, and biochemical (lyso-globotriaosylsphingosine, lyso-Gb3; enzyme activity) data was done in all our patients carrying the p.D313Y mutation. Fourteen patients from 5 families (10 female, 4 male; age range 10-51) were included. Symptoms and organ manifestations compatible with Fabry disease could be identified in 10 patients. Cerebrovascular events occurred in 4 females. Seven patients reported pain or acroparaesthesia. Cornea verticillata was found in one patient, mild retinal vascular tortuosity in 5 patients. Lyso-Gb3 was elevated in 2 females with cerebrovascular involvement. Classical cardiac, renal or skin manifestations could not be identified. The mutation p.D313Y in the GLA gene may lead to organ manifestations and elevation of the Fabry-specific biomarker lyso-Gb3. Neurological symptoms (stroke and pain) and ocular manifestations seem to be the leading findings. Annual routine visits are recommended for patients carrying the p.D313Y mutation. Enzyme replacement therapy might be considered in symptomatic patients.

  1. Infrared imaging microscopy of bone: Illustrations from a mouse model of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Boskey, Adele L.; Goldberg, Michel; Kulkarni, Ashok; Gomez, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Bone is a complex tissue whose composition and properties vary with age, sex, diet, tissue type, health and disease. In this review, we demonstrate how infrared spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopic imaging can be applied to the study of these variations. A specific example of mice with Fabry disease (a lipid storage disease) is presented in which it is demonstrated that the bones of these young animals, while showing typical spatial variation in mineral content, mineral crystal size, and collagen maturity, do not differ from the bones of age- and sex-matched wild type animals. PMID:16697974

  2. Assessment of renal pathology and dysfunction in children with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ramaswami, Uma; Najafian, Behzad; Schieppati, Arrigo; Mauer, Michael; Bichet, Daniel G

    2010-02-01

    Overt renal disease often first presents in male individuals with Fabry disease in early to middle adulthood, but proteinuria and reduced GFR may occur in adolescents and in young children. More recently, kidney biopsy data have shown early renal histologic changes in pediatric patients, and kidney dysfunction, primarily proteinuria, seems to be more common in girls. Renal investigations and their timing in children remain poorly defined. A consensus on renal investigations is necessary to understand the natural progression of the disease and to evaluate the efficacy of treatments such as enzyme replacement therapies. This article addresses three main categories: Use of GFRs, measuring albuminuria, and renal biopsies in children.

  3. Metabolomic Discovery of Novel Urinary Galabiosylceramide Analogs as Fabry Disease Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Michel; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked, complex, multisystemic lysosomal storage disorder presenting marked phenotypic and genotypic variability among affected male and female patients. Glycosphingolipids, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) isoforms/analogs, globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) and analogs, as well as galabiosylceramide (Ga2) isoforms/analogs accumulate in the vascular endothelium, nerves, cardiomyocytes, renal glomerular and tubular epithelial cells, and biological fluids. The search for biomarkers reflecting disease severity and progression is still on-going. A metabolomic study using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry has revealed 22 galabiosylceramide isoforms/analogs in urine of untreated Fabry patients classified in seven groups according to their chemical structure: (1) Saturated fatty acid; (2) one extra double bond; (3) two extra double bonds; (4) hydroxylated saturated fatty acid; (5) hydroxylated fatty acid and one extra double bond; (6) hydrated sphingosine and hydroxylated fatty acid; (7) methylated amide linkage. Relative quantification of both Ga2 and Gb3 isoforms/analogs was performed. All these biomarkers are significantly more abundant in urine samples from untreated Fabry males compared with healthy male controls. A significant amount of Ga2 isoforms/analogs, accounting for 18% of all glycosphingolipids analyzed (Ga2 + Gb3 and respective isoforms/analogs), were present in urine of Fabry patients. Gb3 isoforms containing saturated fatty acids are the most abundant (60.9%) compared with 26.3% for Ga2. A comparison between Ga2 isoforms/analogs and their Gb3 counterparts also showed that the proportion of analogs with hydroxylated fatty acids is significantly greater for Ga2 (35.8%) compared with Gb3 (1.9%). These results suggest different biological pathways involved in the synthesis and/or degradation of Gb3 and Ga2 metabolites.

  4. The ratio of alpha-galactosidase to beta-glucuronidase activities in dried blood for the identification of female Fabry disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Z; Keil, A; Kohlschütter, A; Beck, M; Mengel, E

    2005-01-01

    Female heterozygous patients with Fabry disease are difficult to identify because of the relatively high residual activity of alpha-galactosidase. We systematically evaluated the activities of various lysosomal enzymes in dried blood samples from Fabry patients and found that the beta-glucuronidase activity was frequently elevated. The ratio of alpha-galactosidase to beta-glucuronidase proved to be a helpful tool for the diagnosis of female Fabry disease patients.

  5. Fabry disease presenting as apical left ventricular hypertrophy in a patient carrying the missense mutation R118C.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Francisca; Botelho, Ana; Mota, Paula; Silva, Joana; Leitão Marques, António

    2014-03-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by abnormalities of the GLA gene, which encodes the enzyme α-galactosidase A. A deficiency of this enzyme leads to the lysosomal accumulation of glycosphingolipids, which may cause left ventricular hypertrophy that is typically concentric and symmetric. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman with symptoms of dyspnea, atypical chest pain and palpitations, in whom a transthoracic echocardiogram revealed an apical variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Analysis of specific sarcomeric genetic mutations was negative. The patient underwent a screening protocol for Anderson-Fabry disease, using a dried blood spot test, which was standard at our institution for patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. The enzymatic activity assay revealed reduced α-galactosidase A enzymatic activity. Molecular analysis identified a missense point mutation in the GLA gene (p.R118C). This case report shows that Anderson-Fabry disease may cause an apical form of left ventricular hypertrophy. The diagnosis was only achieved because of systematic screening, which highlights the importance of screening for Anderson-Fabry disease in patients with unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, including those presenting with more unusual patterns, such as apical variants of left ventricular hypertrophy. This case also supports the idea that the missense mutation R118C is indeed a true pathogenic mutation of Anderson-Fabry disease.

  6. Agalsidase alfa: a review of its use in the management of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-10-01

    The enzyme replacement therapy agalsidase alfa (Replagal®) has an amino acid sequence identical to that of native α-galactosidase A; intravenous agalsidase alfa 0.2 mg/kg every other week is indicated for the long-term treatment of patients with confirmed Fabry disease. This article reviews the efficacy and tolerability of agalsidase alfa in patients with Fabry disease, as well as summarizing its pharmacologic properties. Agalsidase alfa had beneficial effects in adult men with Fabry disease, according to the results of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-month trials (n = 15 and 26). For example, left ventricular mass index was reduced to a significantly greater extent with agalsidase alfa than with placebo. Although the change in myocardial globotriaosylceramide content (primary endpoint in one study) did not significantly differ between agalsidase alfa and placebo recipients, the change in the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) 'pain at its worst' score (reflecting neuropathic pain while without pain medications; primary endpoint in the second study) was improved to a significantly greater extent with agalsidase alfa than with placebo. In addition, the change in creatinine clearance, but not inulin clearance, significantly favored agalsidase alfa versus placebo recipients. Abnormalities in functional cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular responses were also reversed with agalsidase alfa therapy. In extensions of these placebo-controlled trials, the reduction in left ventricular mass and improvements in BPI pain scores were maintained after longer-term agalsidase alfa therapy. The significant decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) seen after 48 months' agalsidase alfa treatment was mainly driven by a marked decline in eGFR seen in four patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease at baseline (although the progression of decline appeared slower than that seen in historic controls); renal function appeared stable in patients with

  7. Molecular damage in Fabry disease: characterization and prediction of alpha-galactosidase A pathological mutations.

    PubMed

    Riera, Casandra; Lois, Sergio; Domínguez, Carmen; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Montaner, Joan; Rodríguez-Sureda, Victor; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) causes Fabry disease (FD), that is a rare and potentially fatal disease. Identification of these pathological mutations by sequencing is important because it allows an early treatment of the disease. However, before taking any treatment decision, if the mutation identified is unknown, we first need to establish if it is pathological or not. General bioinformatic tools (PolyPhen-2, SIFT, Condel, etc.) can be used for this purpose, but their performance is still limited. Here we present a new tool, specifically derived for the assessment of GLA mutations. We first compared mutations of this enzyme known to cause FD with neutral sequence variants, using several structure and sequence properties. Then, we used these properties to develop a family of prediction methods adapted to different quality requirements. Trained and tested on a set of known Fabry mutations, our methods have a performance (Matthews correlation: 0.56-0.72) comparable or better than that of the more complex method, Polyphen-2 (Matthews correlation: 0.61), and better than those of SIFT (Matthews correl.: 0.54) and Condel (Matthews correl.: 0.51). This result is validated in an independent set of 65 pathological mutations, for which our method displayed the best success rate (91.0%, 87.7%, and 73.8%, for our method, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT, respectively). These data confirmed that our specific approach can effectively contribute to the identification of pathological mutations in GLA, and therefore enhance the use of sequence information in the identification of undiagnosed Fabry patients.

  8. Relation of burden of myocardial fibrosis to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and outcomes in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Johannes; Niemann, Markus; Störk, Stefan; Frantz, Stefan; Beer, Meinrad; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of myocardial fibrosis in Fabry disease. Seventy-three patients with genetically confirmed Fabry disease were followed for 4.8 ± 2.4 years. In accordance with current guidelines, 57 patients received enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) after study inclusion, whereas 16 did not. At baseline and latest possible follow-up, myocardial fibrosis was assessed noninvasively by cardiac magnetic resonance, and biomarkers of collagen metabolism were determined. Holter electrocardiography and clinical follow-up at yearly intervals were used to monitor malignant ventricular arrhythmias (MVAs; nonsustained and sustained ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death). In total, 48 patients (66%) showed fibrosis assessed by late enhancement (LE) at baseline, and 4 patients developed new LE during follow-up, 2 of them despite ERT. The 2 patients receiving ERT (1.4 ± 1.9% vs 2.5 ± 2.6%, p <0.001) and the patients not receiving ERT (0.5 ± 0.8% vs 0.7 ± 1.0%, p = 0.035) showed a progression of LE during follow-up. None of the patients displayed reductions of LE during follow-up. Collagen biomarkers were elevated in patients with and without LE but did not correlate with LE amount. Thirteen LE-positive patients at the baseline examination had documented MVAs (including 5 sudden cardiac deaths), whereas none of the patients without LE had MVAs. The yearly increase in fibrosis was 0.9 ± 0.6% in patients with MVAs and 0.2 ± 0.3% in patients without MVAs (p <0.001). Logistic multivariate regression analysis revealed that the annual increase in fibrosis during follow-up was the only independent predictor of MVAs. In conclusion, myocardial fibrosis in Fabry disease is progressive, apparently not modified by ERT, and a crucial outcome determinant.

  9. Aging accentuates and bone marrow transplantation ameliorates metabolic defects in Fabry disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio; Schiffmann, Raphael; Murray, Gary J.; Kopp, Jeffrey; Quirk, Jane M.; Stahl, Stefanie; Chan, Chi-Chao; Zerfas, Patricia; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Ward, J. M.; Brady, Roscoe O.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    1999-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). The enzyme defect leads to the systemic accumulation of glycosphingolipids with α-galactosyl moieties consisting predominantly of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). In patients with this disorder, glycolipid deposition in endothelial cells leads to renal failure and cardiac and cerebrovascular disease. Recently, we generated α-Gal A gene knockout mouse lines and described the phenotype of 10-week-old mice. In the present study, we characterize the progression of the disease with aging and explore the effects of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the phenotype. Histopathological analysis of α-Gal A −/0 mice revealed subclinical lesions in the Kupffer cells in the liver and macrophages in the skin with no gross lesions in the endothelial cells. Gb3 accumulation and pathological lesions in the affected organs increased with age. Treatment with BMT from the wild-type mice resulted in the clearance of accumulated Gb3 in the liver, spleen, and heart with concomitant elevation of α-Gal A activity. These findings suggest that BMT may have a potential role in the management of patients with Fabry disease. PMID:10339603

  10. A new mutation found in newborn screening for Fabry disease evaluated by plasma globotriaosylsphingosine levels.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Yasutsugu; Nakamura, Sadao; Yoshida, Tomohide; Maruyama, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kimitoshi

    2017-01-01

    A pilot study of newborn screening for Fabry disease was performed in Okinawa, Japan. A total of 2,443 neonates were screened using dried blood spot samples over 7 years starting in 2007. Of 13 neonates determined to have low α-galactosidase A (GLA) activity, one boy had a new missense mutation, p.G144D of the GLA gene. This mutation was considered to be a late-onset type, as evaluated based on plasma globotriaosylsphingosine levels and family history.

  11. A new mutation found in newborn screening for Fabry disease evaluated by plasma globotriaosylsphingosine levels

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Yasutsugu; Nakamura, Sadao; Yoshida, Tomohide; Maruyama, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kimitoshi

    2017-01-01

    A pilot study of newborn screening for Fabry disease was performed in Okinawa, Japan. A total of 2,443 neonates were screened using dried blood spot samples over 7 years starting in 2007. Of 13 neonates determined to have low α-galactosidase A (GLA) activity, one boy had a new missense mutation, p.G144D of the GLA gene. This mutation was considered to be a late-onset type, as evaluated based on plasma globotriaosylsphingosine levels and family history. PMID:28224042

  12. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, Daniel; Gerard, Nicolas; Bratton, Daniel J.; Wons, Annette; Gaisl, Thomas; Sievi, Noriane A.; Clarenbach, Christian F.; Kohler, Malcolm; Krayenbühl, Pierre A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a frequently reported and not well-understood symptom in patients with Fabry disease (FD). Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a possible factor. As deposition of glycosphingolipids in the upper airway muscles is likely, we hypothesized that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is highly prevalent in FD and positively associated with its severity. All patients with FD who are followed in the Fabry cohort of the University Hospital Zurich (n = 62) were asked to participate in this prospective cohort study. Eligible patients were prospectively investigated by assessing their daytime sleepiness using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the severity of FD using the Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI), and by an ambulatory overnight respiratory polygraphy between November 1, 2013, and January 31, 2015. SDB was defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) of > 5/h. Fifty-two patients (mean ± SD age 42.8 ± 14.7 years, 33% men, mean ± SD BMI 23.4 ± 3.6 kg/m2) with a median (IQR) MSSI of 12 (5–19) were included. Median (IQR) ESS was 6 (2–10) and 7 patients (14%) had an ESS > 10. Thirteen patients (25%) had SDB (78% obstructive sleep apnea, 22% central sleep apnea). In the multivariable analysis, the age was the only statistically significant predictor of SDB (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.04–1.18, P = 0.001). ESS was associated with depression (P < 0.001) but not AHI nor age. This study shows that SDB, especially obstructive sleep apnea is highly prevalent in patients with Fabry disease. However, EDS in FD seems to be related with depression rather than SDB. ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT01947634). PMID:26717401

  13. Novel α-galactosidase A mutation in patients with severe cardiac manifestations of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Duro, Giovanni; Musumeci, M Beatrice; Colomba, Paolo; Zizzo, Carmela; Albeggiani, Giuseppe; Mastromarino, Vittoria; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo

    2014-02-10

    Fabry disease (FD) is a hereditary metabolic disorder caused by the partial or total inactivation of α-galactosidase A (α-gal A), a lysosomal hydrolase. This inactivation is responsible for the accumulation of undegraded glycosphingolipids in the lysosomes with subsequent cellular and microvascular dysfunction. Fabry is considered a rare disease, with an incidence of 1:40,000; however, there are good reasons to believe that it is often seen but rarely diagnosed. To date, more than 600 mutations have been identified in human GLA gene that are responsible for FD. We describe the case of a 54-year-old male patient, who presented with left ventricular hypertrophy, chronic renal failure and acroparaesthesias, which are considered to be specific features of FD. Clinical and instrumental investigations showed several cardiovascular manifestations. The molecular analysis of GLA gene revealed a novel mutation in the fifth exon, called N249K, and the enzymatic analysis showed no α-galactosidase A activity. Family screening detected the same mutation in some relatives and also the enzymatic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of FD. In conclusion, these data suggest that the N249K mutation may be associated with cardiac manifestations of FD combined with other classical features of the disease.

  14. High Variability of Fabry Disease Manifestations in an Extended Italian Family

    PubMed Central

    Cammarata, Giuseppe; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Rodolico, Margherita Stefania; Colomba, Paolo; Sicurella, Luigi; Iemolo, Francesco; Zizzo, Carmela; Bartolotta, Caterina; Duro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by partial or full inactivation of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-GAL). The impairment of α-GAL results in the accumulation of undegraded glycosphingolipids in lysosomes and subsequent cell and microvascular dysfunctions. This study reports the clinical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of 15 members of the same family. Eight members showed the exonic mutation M51I in the GLA gene, a disease-causing mutation associated with the atypical phenotype. The clinical history of this family highlights a wide phenotypic variability, in terms of involved organs and severity. The phenotypic variability of two male patients is not related to differences in α-GAL enzymatic activity: though both have no enzymatic activity, the youngest shows severe symptoms, while the eldest is asymptomatic. It is noticeable that for two female patients with the M51I mutation the initial clinical diagnosis was different from FD. One of them was diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever, the other with Multiple Sclerosis. Overall, this study confirms that the extreme variability of the clinical manifestations of FD is not entirely attributable to different mutations in the GLA gene and emphasizes the need to consider other factors or mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of Fabry Disease. PMID:25977923

  15. Case study on the pathophysiology of Fabry Disease: Abnormalities of cellular membranes can be reversed by substrate reduction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brogden, Graham; Shammas, Hadeel; Maalouf, Katia; Naim, Samara L; Wetzel, Gabi; Amiri, Mahdi; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Das, Anibh M; Naim, Hassan Y

    2017-03-28

    It is still not entirely clear how a-galactosidase (GAA) deficiency translates into clinical symptoms of Fabry disease (FD). The current communication investigates the effects of the mutation N215S in FD on the trafficking and processing of lysosomal GAA and their potential association with alterations in the membrane lipid composition. Abnormalities in lipid rafts were observed in fibroblasts isolated from a male patient with Fabry disease bearing the mutation N215S. Interestingly, lipid raft analysis revealed that the distribution of cholesterol and flotillin-2 are distinctly altered in the Fabry fibroblasts when compared to that of wild type cells. Furthermore, increased levels of glycolipid Gb3 (globotriaosylceramide 3) and sphingomyelin were observed in non-raft membrane fractions of Fabry cells. Substrate reduction with N-butyldeoxynojirimycin in vitro was capable of reversing these abnormalities in this patient. These data lead to the hypothesis that alterations of lipid rafts may contribute to the pathophysiology of Morbus Fabry. Furthermore, it may be suggested that substrate reduction therapy with N-butyldeoxynojirimycin might be a promising approach for the treatment of GAA-deficiency at least for selected patients.

  16. Intrafamilial phenotypic variability in four families with Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Rigoldi, M; Concolino, D; Morrone, A; Pieruzzi, F; Ravaglia, R; Furlan, F; Santus, F; Strisciuglio, P; Torti, G; Parini, R

    2014-09-01

    We analysed the clinical history of 16 hemizygous males affected by Anderson-Fabry Disease, from four families, to verify their intrafamilial phenotypic variability. Seven male patients, ranging from 26 to 61 years of age, died, whereas nine (age range 23-55) are alive. Eleven patients have undergone enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for a period of 5-10 years. We have found a wide range of intrafamilial phenotypic variability in these families, both in terms of target-organs and severity of the disease. Overall, our findings confirm previous data from the literature showing a high degree of intrafamilial phenotypic variability in patients carrying the same mutation. Furthermore, our results underscore the difficulty in giving accurate prognostic information to patients during genetic counselling, both in terms of rate of disease progression and involvement of different organs, when such prognosis is solely based on the patient's family history.

  17. Fabry Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation 4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW Suite 404 Washington DC Washington, DC 20008-2369 info@fabrydisease.org http://www.fabrydisease. ... Foundation 4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW Suite 404 Washington DC Washington, DC 20008-2369 info@fabrydisease.org http:// ...

  18. Gender Differences in the Application of Spanish Criteria for Initiation of Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Fabry Disease in the Fabry Outcome Survey.

    PubMed

    Barba-Romero, Miguel-Ángel; Pintos-Morell, Guillem

    2016-11-24

    Both male/female patients with Fabry disease (FD) may receive enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Previously published analyses of the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS; Shire-sponsored) database suggested gender differences in timing of ERT initiation. We assessed alignment of criteria for ERT initiation in the Spanish adult population included in FOS with recommendations of a Spanish national consensus. This retrospective analysis examined baseline clinical data of 88 adults (49 females) enrolled in the FOS database up to August 2014. Thirty-five (39.8%) patients were not receiving ERT: five (12.8%) males and 30 (61.2%) females. Baseline disease severity on the FOS-derived Mainz Severity Score Index was lower in untreated males (median (interquartile range), 0.0 (0.0-1.0)) than treated males (TM; 15.0 (7.5-26.5)), and was similar in untreated and treated females. The percentage of untreated females with at least one criterion for treatment initiation was 76.7% versus 100.0% of treated females (p = 0.0340) and 97.1% (p = 0.0210) of TM. In discordance with Spanish consensus recommendations, a substantial number of females with evidence of FD who might benefit from ERT have not yet initiated treatment. These results suggest unequal gender perceptions with respect to ERT initiation in Spain.

  19. Gender Differences in the Application of Spanish Criteria for Initiation of Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Fabry Disease in the Fabry Outcome Survey

    PubMed Central

    Barba-Romero, Miguel-Ángel; Pintos-Morell, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    Both male/female patients with Fabry disease (FD) may receive enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Previously published analyses of the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS; Shire-sponsored) database suggested gender differences in timing of ERT initiation. We assessed alignment of criteria for ERT initiation in the Spanish adult population included in FOS with recommendations of a Spanish national consensus. This retrospective analysis examined baseline clinical data of 88 adults (49 females) enrolled in the FOS database up to August 2014. Thirty-five (39.8%) patients were not receiving ERT: five (12.8%) males and 30 (61.2%) females. Baseline disease severity on the FOS-derived Mainz Severity Score Index was lower in untreated males (median (interquartile range), 0.0 (0.0–1.0)) than treated males (TM; 15.0 (7.5–26.5)), and was similar in untreated and treated females. The percentage of untreated females with at least one criterion for treatment initiation was 76.7% versus 100.0% of treated females (p = 0.0340) and 97.1% (p = 0.0210) of TM. In discordance with Spanish consensus recommendations, a substantial number of females with evidence of FD who might benefit from ERT have not yet initiated treatment. These results suggest unequal gender perceptions with respect to ERT initiation in Spain. PMID:27886142

  20. Cystatin C and NT-proBNP as prognostic biomarkers in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Torralba-Cabeza, Miguel-Ángel; Olivera, Susana; Hughes, Derralynn A; Pastores, Gregory M; Mateo, Ramón Nuviala; Pérez-Calvo, Juan-Ignacio

    2011-11-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the α-galactosidase A gene. It is characterized by the deposition of the incompletely metabolized substrate globotriaosylceramide in several cell types and multisystem involvement. Major morbidity results from renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular pathology, mediated by endothelial dysfunction. We examined the potential utility of Cystatin C and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers in FD, and evaluated serum levels in 89 FD patients with varying degrees of disease severity. The results revealed that as a prognostic marker, Cystatin C is a good and cost effective indicator of early renal dysfunction and/or heart failure in FD. It is also more useful than serum creatinine in detecting mild renal damage and small decreases in glomerular filtration. In addition, the natriuretic peptide NT-proBNP, was elevated in patients with FD and cardiac involvement, and found to be an adequate detection marker, not only of cardiac involvement, but also of diastolic dysfunction.

  1. Efficacy of Enzyme and Substrate Reduction Therapy with a Novel Antagonist of Glucosylceramide Synthase for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Karen M; Budman, Eva; Bangari, Dinesh S; Siegel, Craig S; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Wang, Bing; Desnick, Robert J; Scheule, Ronald K; Leonard, John P; Cheng, Seng H; Marshall, John

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disorder, is caused by the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). This results in the lysosomal accumulation in various cell types of its glycolipid substrates, including globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) and lysoglobotriaosylceramide (globotriaosyl lysosphingolipid, lyso-GL-3), leading to kidney, heart, and cerebrovascular disease. To complement and potentially augment the current standard of care, biweekly infusions of recombinant α-Gal A, the merits of substrate reduction therapy (SRT) by selectively inhibiting glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were examined. Here, we report the development of a novel, orally available GCS inhibitor (Genz-682452) with pharmacological and safety profiles that have potential for treating Fabry disease. Treating Fabry mice with Genz-682452 resulted in reduced tissue levels of GL-3 and lyso-GL-3 and a delayed loss of the thermal nociceptive response. Greatest improvements were realized when the therapeutic intervention was administered to younger mice before they developed overt pathology. Importantly, as the pharmacologic profiles of α-Gal A and Genz-682452 are different, treating animals with both drugs conferred the greatest efficacy. For example, because Genz-682452, but not α-Gal A, can traverse the blood–brain barrier, levels of accumulated glycosphingolipids were reduced in the brain of Genz-682452–treated but not α-Gal A–treated mice. These results suggest that combining substrate reduction and enzyme replacement may confer both complementary and additive therapeutic benefits in Fabry disease. PMID:25938659

  2. Social-adaptive and psychological functioning of patients affected by Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Laney, Dawn Alyssia; Gruskin, Daniel J; Fernhoff, Paul M; Cubells, Joseph F; Ousley, Opal Y; Hipp, Heather; Mehta, Ami J

    2010-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. In addition to the debilitating physical symptoms of FD, there are also under-recognized and poorly characterized psychiatric features. As a first step toward characterizing psychiatric features of FD, we administered the Achenbach adult self report questionnaire to 30 FD patients and the Achenbach adult behavior checklist questionnaire to 28 partners/parents/friends of FD patients. Data from at least one of the questionnaires were available on 33 subjects. Analysis focused on social-adaptive functioning in various aspects of daily life and on criteria related to the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders IV (DSM-IV). Adaptive functioning scale values, which primarily measure social and relationship functioning and occupational success, showed that eight FD patients (six female and two male) had mean adaptive functioning deficits as compared to population norms. Greater rates of depression (P < 0.01), anxiety (P = 0.05), depression and anxiety (P = 0.03), antisocial personality (P < 0.001), attention-deficit/hyperactivity (AD/H; P < 0.01), hyperactivity-impulsivity (P < 0.01), and aggressive behavior (P = 0.03) were associated with poorer adaptive functioning. Decreased social-adaptive functioning in this study was not statistically significantly associated to disease severity, pain, or level of vitality. This study shows for the first time that FD patients, particularly women, are affected by decreased social-adaptive functioning. Comprehensive treatment plans for FD should consider assessments and interventions to evaluate and improve social, occupational, and psychological functioning. Attention to the behavioral aspects of FD could lead to improved treatment outcome and improved quality of life. Individuals affected by Fabry disease exhibited social-adaptive functioning deficits that were significantly correlated with anxiety

  3. One Year of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Reduces Globotriaosylceramide Inclusions in Podocytes in Male Adult Patients with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Tøndel, Camilla; Svarstad, Einar; Sokolovkiy, Alexey; Smith, Kelly; Mauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fabry nephropathy is associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in podocytes. Reducing this GL3 burden may reduce podocyte injury. Sensitive methods to quantify podocyte GL3 content may determine whether a given strategy can benefit podocytes in Fabry disease. We developed an unbiased electron microscopic stereological method to estimate the average volume of podocytes and their GL3 inclusions in 6 paired pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) biopsies from 5 men with Fabry disease. Podocyte GL3 content was regularly reduced (average 73%) after 11-12 months of ERT. This was not detectable using a semi-quantitative approach. Parallel to GL3 reduction, podocytes became remarkably smaller (average 63%). These reductions in podocyte GL3 content or size were not significantly correlated with changes in foot process width (FPW). However, FPW after ERT was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in podocyte GL3 content from baseline to 11-12 months of ERT. Also podocytes exocytosed GL3 inclusions, a phenomenon correlated with their reduction in their GL3 content. Demonstrable after11-12 months, reduction in podocyte GL3 content allows for early assessment of treatment efficacy and shorter clinical trials in Fabry disease.

  4. Enzyme replacement therapy in two Japanese siblings with Fabry disease, and its effectiveness on angiokeratoma and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Furujo, Mahoko; Kubo, Toshihide; Kobayashi, Masahisa; Ohashi, Toya

    2013-11-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease does not show a clear benefit in angiokeratoma. We describe two Japanese siblings with Fabry disease, who were diagnosed when angiokeratomas were found on the older sibling at the age of 13 years. Neither of the boys complained of pain, while both suffered from hypohidrosis. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of ERT with recombinant human agalsidase alfa (Replagal®, Dainippon-Sumitomo Pharma. Co., Osaka, Japan) in these siblings over a 5-year period. In both siblings, sweating was observed 3 months after the initiation of ERT, which motivated them to adhere to ERT. Pain sensation was regained after 12 to 36 months of ERT, followed by a decrease after 48 to 60 months. Angiokeratomas on the lateral side of the knee of the older sibling partially disappeared after 48 months of ERT. Although the height of both siblings at baseline was lower than the corresponding average age-related heights in the normal Japanese population, during ERT they were within, or close to, the average +1 standard deviation in the non-Fabry population. Their growth rate seemed to indicate catch-up growth. Other clinical symptoms were maintained at baseline levels. Immunoglobulin G anti-agalsidase alfa antibodies were not detected in both sibling during ERT, and no infusion-associated reaction was observed. The treatment was generally well tolerated. ERT was a safe and effective treatment for angiokeratoma and neuropathic pain for these two siblings with Fabry disease.

  5. One Year of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Reduces Globotriaosylceramide Inclusions in Podocytes in Male Adult Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Najafian, Behzad; Tøndel, Camilla; Svarstad, Einar; Sokolovkiy, Alexey; Smith, Kelly; Mauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fabry nephropathy is associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in podocytes. Reducing this GL3 burden may reduce podocyte injury. Sensitive methods to quantify podocyte GL3 content may determine whether a given strategy can benefit podocytes in Fabry disease. We developed an unbiased electron microscopic stereological method to estimate the average volume of podocytes and their GL3 inclusions in 6 paired pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) biopsies from 5 men with Fabry disease. Podocyte GL3 content was regularly reduced (average 73%) after 11–12 months of ERT. This was not detectable using a semi-quantitative approach. Parallel to GL3 reduction, podocytes became remarkably smaller (average 63%). These reductions in podocyte GL3 content or size were not significantly correlated with changes in foot process width (FPW). However, FPW after ERT was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in podocyte GL3 content from baseline to 11–12 months of ERT. Also podocytes exocytosed GL3 inclusions, a phenomenon correlated with their reduction in their GL3 content. Demonstrable after11–12 months, reduction in podocyte GL3 content allows for early assessment of treatment efficacy and shorter clinical trials in Fabry disease. PMID:27081853

  6. Uric Acid as a Marker of Mortality and Morbidity in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rob, Daniel; Marek, Josef; Dostálová, Gabriela; Goláň, Lubor; Linhart, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum uric acid (UA) elevation is common in patients with cardiovascular, renal and metabolic diseases. However, no study to date has analysed the role of UA in Fabry disease (FD). Objectives To evaluate the association between serum UA levels and mortality and morbidity in FD. Materials and Methods We conducted a post-hoc analysis of a prospectively followed-up cohort of 124 patients with genetically proven FD. Serum UA levels were acquired at baseline; clinical events and mortality were assessed during regular visits every 6 to 12 months. The primary endpoint was a composite of multiple secondary outcomes: all-cause mortality, adverse cardiovascular events, progression of renal dysfunction and stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Predictive value was assessed using the Cox proportional hazards model and the Kaplan Meyer estimator. Results During follow-up of 7.4 ± 3.7 years, 64 (52%) patients reached the primary combined endpoint. Overall, UA levels were significantly associated with combined outcome (p < 0.001) and remained independently associated after correcting for age, sex and estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio [HR] per 20 μmol/l increase 1.09, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] (1.00–1.19), p = 0.04). UA was associated with overall mortality in univariate analysis (p = 0.021); however, the association did not reach statistical significance after multivariate correction (HR per 20 μmol/l increase 1.07 95%CI 0.93–1.25, p = 0.32). Higher UA levels were also associated with cardiac adverse outcomes, progression of left ventricular hypertrophy and progression of renal dysfunction (ps < 0.001). No association was observed between UA levels and stroke or TIA (p = 0.323). Conclusion and Implications Increased serum UA levels may represent an independent risk factor for adverse clinical outcomes in Fabry patients and are associated with all-cause mortality. UA is a widely available and cheap biomarker that may improve risk

  7. Fabry disease: polymorphic haplotypes and a novel missense mutation in the GLA gene.

    PubMed

    Ferri, L; Guido, C; la Marca, G; Malvagia, S; Cavicchi, C; Fiumara, A; Barone, R; Parini, R; Antuzzi, D; Feliciani, C; Zampetti, A; Manna, R; Giglio, S; Della Valle, C M; Wu, X; Valenzano, K J; Benjamin, R; Donati, M A; Guerrini, R; Genuardi, M; Morrone, A

    2012-03-01

    Fabry disease: polymorphic haplotypes and a novel missense mutation in the GLA gene. Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder with a heterogeneous spectrum of clinical manifestations that are caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal-A) activity. Although useful for diagnosis in males, enzyme activity is not a reliable biochemical marker in heterozygous females due to random X-chromosome inactivation, thus rendering DNA sequencing of the α-Gal-A gene, alpha-galactosidase gene (GLA), the most reliable test for the confirmation of diagnosis in females. The spectrum of GLA mutations is highly heterogeneous. Many polymorphic GLA variants have been described, but it is unclear if haplotypes formed by combinations of such variants correlate with FD, thus complicating molecular diagnosis in females with normal α-Gal-A activity. We tested 67 female probands with clinical manifestations that may be associated with FD and 110 control males with normal α-Gal-A activity. Five different combinations of GLA polymorphic variants were identified in 14 of the 67 females, whereas clearcut pathogenetic alterations, p.Met51Ile and p.Met290Leu, were identified in two cases. The latter has not been reported so far, and both mutant forms were found to be responsive to the pharmacological chaperone deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ; migalastat hydrochloride). Analysis of the male control population, as well as male relatives of a suspected FD female proband, permitted the identification of seven different GLA gene haplotypes in strong linkage disequilibrium. The identification of haplotypes in control males provides evidence against their involvement in the development of FD phenotypic manifestations.

  8. Characterization of a chemically modified plant cell culture expressed human α-Galactosidase-A enzyme for treatment of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kizhner, Tali; Azulay, Yaniv; Hainrichson, Mariana; Tekoah, Yoram; Arvatz, Gil; Shulman, Avidor; Ruderfer, Ilya; Aviezer, David; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2015-02-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by the loss of function of the lysosomal enzyme α-Galactosidase-A. Although two enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs) are commercially available, they may not effectively reverse some of the Fabry pathology. PRX-102 is a novel enzyme for the therapy of Fabry disease expressed in a BY2 Tobacco cell culture. PRX-102 is chemically modified, resulting in a cross-linked homo-dimer. We have characterized the in-vitro and in-vivo properties of PRX-102 and compared the results with the two commercially produced α-Galactosidase-A enzymes. Results show that PRX-102 has prolonged in-vitro stability in plasma, after 1h incubation it retains 30% activity compared with complete inactivation of the commercial enzymes. Under lysosomal-like conditions PRX-102 maintains over 80% activity following 10 days of incubation, while commercial enzymes become inactive after 2days. Pharmacokinetic profile of PRX-102 measured in male Fabry mice shows a 10 fold increase in t1/2 in mice (581min) compared to approved drugs. The enzyme has significantly different kinetic parameters to the alternative ERTs available (p-value<0.05, one way ANOVA), although these differences do not indicate any significant biochemical variations. PRX-102 is uptaken to primary human Fabry fibroblasts. The repeat administration of the enzyme to Fabry mice caused significant reduction (p-value<0.05) of Gb3 in various tissues (the measured residual content was 64% in kidney, liver was cleaned, 23% in heart, 5.7% in skin and 16.2% in spleen). PRX-102 has a relatively simple glycosylation pattern, characteristic to plants, having mainly tri-mannose structures with the addition of either α(1-3)-linked fucose or β(1-2)-linked xylose, or both, in addition to various high mannose structures, while agalsidase beta has a mixture of sialylated glycans in addition to high mannose structures. This study concludes that PRX-102 is equivalent in functionality to the current

  9. Hippocampal atrophy as a surrogate of neuronal involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Fellgiebel, Andreas; Wolf, Dominik O; Kolodny, Edwin; Müller, Matthias J

    2012-03-01

    Cerebral micro- and macro-vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease (FD). Neuronal globotriaosylceramide accumulation in selective cortical and brain stem areas including the hippocampus has been reported by autopsy studies in FD, but clinical surrogates as well as the clinical relevance of these findings have not been investigated so far. We measured the hippocampus volumes in a group of clinically affected patients with FD and correlated the findings with the cognitive performance of the patients. Hippocampal volumes were determined manually on T1-weighted MR-images of 25 FD patients (age 36.5 ± 11.0 years) and 20 age-matched controls. Additionally, individual white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) volumes were measured using brain segmentation analyses. After controlling for age, white matter lesion (WML) volume, and WM/GM-volumes hippocampal volumes were significantly decreased in FD. These findings were substantially more pronounced in a subgroup of men with FD. WM and WM/GM volumes, and memory function did not significantly differ between patients and controls. In patients with FD hippocampal volumes were neither significantly correlated to WML volume nor to WM or WM/GM volumes. Hippocampus atrophy was not driven by the WML or other brain tissue atrophy and seems to correlate with the neuronal involvement in FD. In this young to middle-aged Fabry cohort the hippocampus degeneration was functionally compensated without memory impairment. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether this degenerative component in FD will progress and, in concert with the individual WML-load, predict subsequent cognitive decline.

  10. Novel α-Galactosidase A Mutation (K391E) in a Young Woman With Severe Cardiac and Renal Manifestations of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Wakakuri, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Shunichi; Utsumi, Kouichi; Shimizu, Wataru; Yasutake, Masahiro

    2016-09-28

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to α-galactosidase A deficiency, is associated with dysfunction of various cell types and results in a systemic vasculopathy. We describe a 29-year-old woman with Fabry disease presenting with severe cardiac and renal manifestations. Gene analysis demonstrated a novel mutation (K391E) in the GLA gene. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) was started with agalsidase-β after confirming the diagnosis of Fabry disease, resulting in normalization of LV systolic function and improvement of renal function. As early therapy is crucial for preventing life-threatening sequelae, clinicians should consider Fabry disease in young patients presenting with cardiac and renal disease without any likely causes.

  11. Anderson-Fabry disease: clinical manifestations and impact of disease in a cohort of 98 hemizygous males

    PubMed Central

    MacDermot, K; Holmes, A; Miners, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the natural history of Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) as a baseline for efficacy assessment of potentially therapeutic drugs.
DESIGN—The first large cross sectional study of a patient cohort from the AFD clinical and genetic register (UK), maintained for the last 15 years.
MEASURES—Prevalence, mortality, frequency of AFD manifestations, and impact of disease on patient lives, assessed from the AFD register and the disease specific questionnaire.
RESULTS—The median cumulative survival was 50 years (n=51), which represents an approximately 20 year reduction of life span. Neuropathic pain was present in 77% (n=93) with mean pain score of 5 (scale 0-10) despite treatment with anticonvulsants and opiates. Pain stopped in only 11%. Cerebrovascular complications developed in 24.2% and renal failure in 30%. The onset and progression of serious AFD manifestations was highly variable. The relationship of gastrointestinal manifestations on weight, using body mass index (BMI), was significant (p=0.01). High frequency sensorineural deafness was confirmed in 78% of audiograms. Neuropathic pain and angiokeratoma were absent in five adult males (~5%). Median age at diagnosis of AFD was 21.9 years (n=64).
IMPACT OF DISEASE—Attendance at school, sports, and social activity were significantly affected by AFD. Only 56.6% (n=46) of patients were employed. Psychosexual effects of genital angiokeratoma, genital pain, and impotence were not previously recognised.
CONCLUSION—The majority of males experience multiple disease manifestations and the duration of neuropathic pain was lifelong. The AFD register proved useful for the determination of baseline disease parameters in this cohort.


Keywords: Anderson-Fabry disease; natural history; mortality; prevalence PMID:11694547

  12. Fabry nephropathy: a review - how can we optimize the management of Fabry nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Waldek, Stephen; Feriozzi, Sandro

    2014-05-06

    Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Complete or partial deficiency in this enzyme leads to intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and related glycosphingolipids in many cell types throughout the body, including the kidney. Progressive accumulation of Gb3 in podocytes, epithelial cells and the tubular cells of the distal tubule and loop of Henle contribute to the renal symptoms of Fabry disease, which manifest as proteinuria and reduced glomerular filtration rate leading to chronic kidney disease and progression to end-stage renal disease. Early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment of Fabry renal disease is an important facet of disease management. Initiating treatment with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT; agalsidase alfa, Replagal®, Shire; agalsidase beta, Fabrazyme®, Genzyme) as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent complications of the disease, may be beneficial in stabilizing renal function or slowing its decline. Early initiation of ERT may also be more effective than initiating therapy in patients with more advanced disease. Several strategies are required to complement the use of ERT and treat the myriad of associated symptoms and organ involvements. In particular, patients with renal Fabry disease are at risk of cardiovascular events, such as high blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmias and stroke. This review discusses the management of renal involvement in Fabry disease, including diagnosis, treatments, and follow-up, and explores recent advances in the use of biomarkers to assist with diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and response to treatment.

  13. [Heart involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease: Italian recommendations for diagnostic, follow-up and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia; Cecchi, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is characterized by a multisystemic involvement: the renal, neurological, heart, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most damaged. Morbidity and mortality of Anderson-Fabry disease depend on renal insufficiency, heart failure and nervous system involvement. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most common cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, and arrhythmias. Mild to moderate left ventricular hypertrophy may simulate a non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Management of Anderson-Fabry disease starting from the diagnosis of cardiac involvement, the prevention of complications, the therapeutic aspects, up to appropriate clinical follow-up, requires a multidisciplinary approach. According to recent management guidelines, only few evidence-based data are available to guide the clinical and therapeutic approach to this rare disease. An Italian Board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, geneticists, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve by consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic management protocol. The authors report the results of this cardiologic management consensus.

  14. Mild Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Unravels a Novel Nonsense Mutation of the GLA Gene Associated with the Classical Phenotype of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Olga; Gago, Miguel; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Gaspar, Paulo; Sousa, Nuno; Cunha, Damião

    2017-02-03

    We report on the clinical, biochemical, and genetic findings of a large family with the classical phenotype of Fabry disease due to the novel nonsense mutation c.607G>T (p.E203X) of the GLA gene, which occurs in the active site of the α-galactosidase A enzyme. This report highlights that (i) Fabry disease diagnosis should be considered in all cases of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), even in its milder forms; (ii) a complete evaluation of patients with unexplained LVH is important to find diagnostic red flags of treatable causes of LVH, such as Fabry disease; (iii) cascade family screening is paramount to the earlier diagnosis and treatment of other affected family members; and (iv) the Fabry disease phenotype is highly variable in heterozygote females, even within the same family.

  15. Evaluation of oxidative stress markers and cardiovascular risk factors in Fabry Disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Karen B.; Galdieri, Luciano C.; Pereira, Vanessa G.; Martins, Ana M.; D’Almeida, Vânia

    2012-01-01

    Fabry Disease, an X-linked inborn error of metabolism, is characterized by progressive renal insufficiency, with cardio and cerebrovascular involvement. Homocysteine (Hcy) is considered a risk factor for vascular diseases, but the mechanisms by which it produces cardiovascular damage are still poorly understood. Regarding the vascular involvement in FD patients, the analysis of factors related to thromboembolic events could be useful to improving our understanding of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma Hcy and other parameters involved in the methionine cycle, as well as oxidative stress markers. The sample consisted of a group of 10 male FD patients and a control group of 8 healthy individuals, paired by age. Venous blood was collected for Hcy determination, molecular analysis, identification of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, total glutathione and antioxidant enzymes activity, as well as vitamins quantification. Comparative analysis of FD patients versus the control group indicated hyperhomocysteinemia in 8 of the 10 FD patients, as well as a significant increase in overall glutathione levels and catalase activity. It is inferred that FD patients, apart from activation of the antioxidant system, present increased levels of plasma Hcy, although this is probably unrelated to common alterations in the methionine cycle. PMID:22888289

  16. α-Galactosidase delivery using 30Kc19-human serum albumin nanoparticles for effective treatment of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jai; Park, Hee Ho; Sohn, Youngsoo; Ryu, Jina; Park, Ju Hyun; Rhee, Won Jong; Park, Tai Hyun

    2016-12-01

    Fabry disease is a genetic lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase, the enzyme-degrading neutral glycosphingolipid that is transported to lysosome. Glycosphingolipid accumulation by this disease causes multi-organ dysfunction and premature death of the patient. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant α-galactosidase is the only treatment available for Fabry disease. To maximize the efficacy of treatment, enhancement of cellular delivery and enzyme stability is a challenge in ERT using α-galactosidase. In this study, protein nanoparticles using human serum albumin (HSA) and 30Kc19 protein, originating from silkworm, were used to enhance the delivery and intracellular α-galactosidase stability. 30Kc19-HSA nanoparticles loaded with the α-galactosidase were formed by desolvation method. 30Kc19-HSA nanoparticles had a uniform spherical shape and were well dispersed in cell culture media. 30Kc19-HSA nanoparticles had negligible toxicity to human cells. The nanoparticles exhibited enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular stability of delivered α-galactosidase in human foreskin fibroblast. Additionally, they showed enhanced globotriaosylceramide degradation in Fabry patients' fibroblasts. It is expected that 30Kc19-HSA protein nanoparticles could be used as an effective tool for efficient delivery and enhanced stability of drugs.

  17. New mutations in the GLA gene in Brazilian families with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Turaça, Lauro Thiago; Pessoa, Juliana Gilbert; Motta, Fabiana Louise; Muñoz Rojas, Maria Verônica; Müller, Karen Barbosa; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Junior Marques, Wilson; D'Almeida, Vania; Martins, Ana Maria; Pesquero, João Bosco

    2012-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism that results from mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) gene. Evaluating the enzymatic activity in male individuals usually performs the diagnosis of the disease, but in female carriers the diagnosis based only on enzyme assays is often inconclusive. In this work, we analyzed 568 individuals from 102 families with suspect of FD. Overall, 51 families presented 38 alterations in the GLA gene, among which 19 were not previously reported in literature. The alterations included 17 missense mutations, 7 nonsense mutations, 7 deletions, 6 insertions and 1 in the splice site. Six alterations (R112C, R118C, R220X, R227X, R342Q and R356W) occurred at CpG dinucleotides. Five mutations not previously described in the literature (A156D, K237X, A292V, I317S, c.1177_1178insG) were correlated with low GLA enzyme activity and with prediction of molecular damages. From the 13 deletions and insertions, 7 occurred in exons 6 or 7 (54%) and 11 led to the formation of a stop codon. The present study highlights the detection of new genomic alterations in the GLA gene in the Brazilian population, facilitating the selection of patients for recombinant enzyme-replacement trials and offering the possibility to perform prenatal diagnosis.

  18. Late-onset Fabry disease associated with angiokeratoma of Fordyce and multiple cherry angiomas.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, V; Dhoat, S; Mehta, A B; Orteu, C H

    2011-07-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder. The prevalence and clinical spectrum is higher than previously thought. The average time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis is 10 years. Early identification of patients is essential to institute enzyme therapy and reduce morbidity. We report the case of a 76-year-old man, who presented with loss of consciousness following exertional chest pain. He was found to have tortuous corneal vessels, > 100 cherry angiomas on his trunk, and angiokeratomas on his scrotum. The latter were indistinguishable from angiokeratoma of Fordyce, a diagnosis reported in 15% of men over the age of 50 years, and generally ignored by them. The patient's α-galactosidase levels were low, and a mutation in exon 5 of the GLA gene was identified on DNA analysis, confirming the diagnosis of FD. This case highlights the importance of considering a diagnosis of FD in all male patients with angiokeratoma. It also raises the question of whether the presence of multiple cherry angiomas in patients with cardiac disease should raise the possible diagnosis of FD.

  19. Fabry lens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michlovic, J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the properties, operation, and applications of the Fabry lens. As used in stellar photometry, a Fabry lens is nothing more than a simple converging lens inserted into the optical train of a photometer to construct an image of the objective on the photomultiplier cathode. The thereby derived advantages are reviewed, and some techniques designed to maximize these advantages are outlined.

  20. Nano-LC-MS/MS for Quantification of Lyso-Gb3 and Its Analogues Reveals a Useful Biomarker for Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Sueoka, Hideaki; Ichihara, Junji; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers useful for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment for patients with Fabry disease are urgently needed. Recently, plasma globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) and lyso-Gb3-related analogues have attracted attention as promising biomarkers of Fabry disease. However, the plasma concentrations of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues are extremely low or below the detection limits in some Fabry patients as well as in healthy subjects. In this paper, we introduce the novel application of a nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) system to the measurement of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues in plasma. Nano-LC-MS/MS requires smaller amounts of samples and is more sensitive than conventional techniques. Using this method, we measured the plasma concentrations of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues in 40 healthy subjects, 5 functional variants (males with E66Q), and various Fabry patients (9 classic Fabry males/9 mutations; 7 later-onset Fabry males/5 mutations; and 10 Fabry females/9 mutations). The results revealed that the mean lyso-Gb3 and lyso-Gb3(-2) concentrations in all the Fabry patient subgroups were statistically higher, especially in the classic Fabry males, than those in the functional variants and healthy subjects. The plasma concentrations of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues in healthy subjects, functional variants, and some Fabry patients with specific mutations (R112H and M296I) that cannot be established by conventional techniques were successfully determined by means of nano-LC-MS/MS. The lyso-Gb3 and lyso-Gb3(-2) concentrations in male patients with these mutations were lower than those in most Fabry patients having other mutations, but higher than those in the functional variants and healthy subjects. This new method is expected to be useful for sensitive determination of the plasma concentrations of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues. This study also revealed that not only lyso-Gb3 but also lyso-Gb3(-2) in plasma is a useful biomarker for the diagnosis of

  1. Diagnostic dilemmas in Fabry disease: a case series study on GLA mutations of unknown clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Smid, B E; Hollak, C E M; Poorthuis, B J H M; van den Bergh Weerman, M A; Florquin, S; Kok, W E M; Lekanne Deprez, R H; Timmermans, J; Linthorst, G E

    2015-08-01

    Fabry disease' (FD) phenotype is heterogeneous: alpha-galactosidase A gene mutations (GLA) can lead to classical or non-classical FD, or no FD. The aim of this study is to describe pitfalls in diagnosing non-classical FD and assess the diagnostic value of plasma globotriaosylsphingosine. This is a case series study. Family 1 (p.A143T) presented with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), absent classical FD signs, high residual alpha-galactosidase A activity (AGAL-A) and normal plasma globotriaosylsphingosine. Co-segregating sarcomeric mutations were found. Cardiac biopsy excluded FD. In family 2 (p.P60L), FD was suspected after kidney biopsy in a female with chloroquine use. Males had residual AGAL-A, no classical FD signs and minimally increased plasma globotriaosylsphingosine, indicating that p.P60L is most likely non-pathogenic. Non-specific complications and histology can be explained by chloroquine and alternative causes. Males of two unrelated families (p.R112H) show AGAL-A <5%, but slightly elevated plasma globotriaosylsphingosine (1.2-2.0 classical males >50 nmol/l). Histological evidence suggests a variable penetrance of this mutation. Patients with GLA mutations and non-specific findings such as HCM may have non-classical FD or no FD. Other (genetic) causes of FD-like findings should be excluded, including medication inducing FD-like storage. Plasma globotriaosylsphingosine may serve as a diagnostic tool, but histology of an affected organ is often mandatory.

  2. Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes Associated with Fabry and Schindler Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasic, Ivan B.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Clark, Nathaniel E.; Garman, Scott C.

    2010-09-03

    The human lysosomal enzymes {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and {alpha}-N-acetylgalactosaminidase ({alpha}-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-GAL and {alpha}-NAGAL. The engineered {alpha}-GAL (which we call {alpha}-GALSA) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered {alpha}-NAGAL (which we call {alpha}-NAGAL{sup EL}) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the {alpha}-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} and {alpha}-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease.

  3. Increased oxidative stress contributes to cardiomyocyte dysfunction and death in patients with Fabry disease cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Cristina; Scopelliti, Fernanda; Vulpis, Elisabetta; Tafani, Marco; Villanova, Lidia; Verardo, Romina; De Paulis, Ruggero; Russo, Matteo A; Frustaci, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac dysfunction of Fabry disease (FD) has been associated with myofilament damage and cell death as result of α-galactosidase A deficiency and globotriaosylceramide accumulation. We sought to evaluate the role of oxidative stress in FD cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Myocardial tissue from 18 patients with FD was investigated for the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis for nitrotyrosine was also performed. Oxidative damage to DNA was investigated by immunostaining for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), whereas apoptosis was evaluated by in situ ligation with hairpin probes. iNOS and nitrotyrosine expression was increased in FD hearts compared with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and normal controls. Remarkably, immunostaining was homogeneously expressed in FD male cardiomyocytes, whereas it was only detected in the affected cardiomyocytes of FD females. Western blot analysis confirmed an increase in FD cardiomyocyte protein nitration compared with controls. 8-OHdG was expressed in 25% of cardiomyocyte nuclei from FD patients, whereas it was absent in controls. The intensity of immunostaining for iNOS/nitrotyrosine correlated with 8-OHdG expression in cardiomyocyte nuclei. Apoptosis of FD cardiomyocytes was 187-fold higher than in controls, and apoptotic nuclei were positive for 8-OHdG. Cardiac dysfunction of FD reflects increased myocardial nitric oxide production with oxidative damage of cardiomyocyte myofilaments and DNA, causing cell dysfunction and death.

  4. Multicomponent nanoparticles as nonviral vectors for the treatment of Fabry disease by gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Garibay, Aritz Pérez; Delgado, Diego; del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Solinís, María Ángeles; Gascón, Alicia Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Gene-mediated enzyme replacement is a reasonable and highly promising approach for the treatment of Fabry disease (FD). The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the potential applications of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN)-based nonviral vectors for the treatment of FD. Methods: SLNs containing the pR-M10-αGal A plasmid that encodes the α-Galactosidase A (α-Gal A) enzyme were prepared and their in vitro transfection efficacy was studied in Hep G2 cells. We also studied the cellular uptake of the vectors and the intracellular disposition of the plasmid. Results: The enzymatic activity of the cells treated with the vectors increased significantly relative to the untreated cells, regardless of the formulation assayed. When the SLNs were prepared with protamine or dextran and protamine, the activity of the α-Gal A enzyme by the transfected Hep G2 cells increased up to 12-fold compared to that of untreated cells. Conclusion: With this work we have revealed in Hep G2 cells the ability of a multicomponent system based on SLNs to act as efficient nonviral vectors to potentially correct low α-Gal A activity levels in FD with gene therapy. PMID:23118528

  5. Fabry disease: thirty-five mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A gene in patients with classic and variant phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, C. M.; Ashley, G. A.; Burgert, T. S.; Enriquez, A. L.; D'Souza, M.; Desnick, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry disease, an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, results from mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A) gene located at Xq22.1. To determine the nature and frequency of the molecular lesions causing the classical and milder variant Fabry phenotypes and for precise carrier detection, the alpha-Gal A lesions in 42 unrelated Fabry hemizygotes were determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated from affected probands and their family members. The seven alpha-galactosidase A exons and flanking intronic sequences were PCR amplified and the nucleotide sequence was determined by solid-phase direct sequencing. RESULTS: Two patients with the mild cardiac phenotype had missense mutations, I9IT and F113L, respectively. In 38 classically affected patients, 33 new mutations were identified including 20 missense (MIT, A31V, H46R, Y86C, L89P, D92Y, C94Y, A97V, R100T, Y134S, G138R, A143T, S148R, G163V, D170V, C202Y, Y216D, N263S, W287C, and N298S), two nonsense (Q386X, W399X), one splice site mutation (IVS4 + 2T-->C), and eight small exonic insertions or deletions (304del1, 613del9, 777del1, 1057del2, 1074del2, 1077del1, 1212del3, and 1094ins1), which identified exon 7 as a region prone to gene rearrangements. In addition, two unique complex rearrangements consisting of contiguous small insertions and deletions were found in exons 1 and 2 causing L45R/H46S and L120X, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These studies further define the heterogeneity of mutations causing Fabry disease, permit precise carrier identification and prenatal diagnosis in these families, and facilitate the identification of candidates for enzyme replacement therapy. Images FIG. 2 PMID:9100224

  6. Serum-Mediated Inhibition of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Malte; Stypmann, Jörg; Duning, Thomas; Schmitz, Boris; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive multisystemic disorder, treatable with recombinant enzyme replacement therapy (agalsidase). However, recent studies suggest an endogenous inhibition of agalsidase in patients with FD, as reported for other lysosomal storage diseases. To assess the clinical consequences of serum-mediated agalsidase inhibition in affected patients, we determined the agalsidase inhibition status of 168 patients (68 male) with FD and compared outcomes of inhibition-positive patients with those of inhibition-negative patients. The assessment included clinical events during time on agalsidase, determination of renal and cardiac function, and evaluation of FD-related symptoms. The frequency of serum-mediated agalsidase inhibition was 40% in agalsidase-treated males. Inhibition did not depend on the compound initially used (agalsidase-α or -β). Agalsidase inhibition was associated with higher lyso-globotriaosylceramide levels and worse disease severity scores in patients. Compared with agalsidase inhibition-negative men, agalsidase inhibition-positive men showed greater left ventricular mass (P=0.02) and substantially lower renal function (difference in eGFR of about -30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); P=0.04), which was confirmed by a longitudinal 5-year retrospective analysis. Additionally, affected patients presented more often with FD-typical symptoms, such as diarrhea, fatigue, and neuropathic pain, among others. Therefore, patients with poor clinical outcome on agalsidase should be tested for agalsidase inhibition. Future studies are warranted to determine if affected patients with FD benefit from acute reduction of anti-agalsidase antibodies or long-term immune modulation therapies to suppress agalsidase inhibition and to identify mechanisms that minimize antibody generation against agalsidase.

  7. Frequency of Fabry disease in male and female haemodialysis patients in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by a reduced activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. The disorder ultimately leads to organ damage (including renal failure) in males and females. However, heterozygous females usually present a milder phenotype with a later onset and a slower progression. Methods A combined enzymatic and genetic strategy was used, measuring the activity of α-galactosidase A and genotyping the α-galactosidase A gene (GLA) in dried blood samples (DBS) of 911 patients undergoing haemodialysis in centers across Spain. Results GLA alterations were found in seven unrelated patients (4 males and 3 females). Two novel mutations (p.Gly346AlafsX347 and p.Val199GlyfsX203) were identified as well as a previously described mutation, R118C. The R118C mutation was present in 60% of unrelated patients with GLA causal mutations. The D313Y alteration, considered by some authors as a pseudo-deficiency allele, was also found in two out of seven patients. Conclusions Excluding the controversial D313Y alteration, FD presents a frequency of one in 182 individuals (0.55%) within this population of males and females undergoing haemodialysis. Moreover, our findings suggest that a number of patients with unexplained and atypical symptoms of renal disease may have FD. Screening programmes for FD in populations of individuals presenting severe kidney dysfunction, cardiac alterations or cerebrovascular disease may lead to the diagnosis of FD in those patients, the study of their families and eventually the implementation of a specific therapy. PMID:20122163

  8. Advanced Interrogation of Fiber-Optic Bragg Grating and Fabry-Perot Sensors with KLT Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT) is applied to accurate detection of optical fiber sensors in the spectral domain. By processing an optical spectrum, although coarsely sampled, through the KLT, and subsequently processing the obtained eigenvalues, it is possible to decode a plurality of optical sensor results. The KLT returns higher accuracy than other demodulation techniques, despite coarse sampling, and exhibits higher resilience to noise. Three case studies of KLT-based processing are presented, representing most of the current challenges in optical fiber sensing: (1) demodulation of individual sensors, such as Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs); (2) demodulation of dual (FBG/FPI) sensors; (3) application of reverse KLT to isolate different sensors operating on the same spectrum. A simulative outline is provided to demonstrate the KLT operation and estimate performance; a brief experimental section is also provided to validate accurate FBG and FPI decoding. PMID:26528975

  9. Advanced Interrogation of Fiber-Optic Bragg Grating and Fabry-Perot Sensors with KLT Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Daniele

    2015-10-29

    The Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT) is applied to accurate detection of optical fiber sensors in the spectral domain. By processing an optical spectrum, although coarsely sampled, through the KLT, and subsequently processing the obtained eigenvalues, it is possible to decode a plurality of optical sensor results. The KLT returns higher accuracy than other demodulation techniques, despite coarse sampling, and exhibits higher resilience to noise. Three case studies of KLT-based processing are presented, representing most of the current challenges in optical fiber sensing: (1) demodulation of individual sensors, such as Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs); (2) demodulation of dual (FBG/FPI) sensors; (3) application of reverse KLT to isolate different sensors operating on the same spectrum. A simulative outline is provided to demonstrate the KLT operation and estimate performance; a brief experimental section is also provided to validate accurate FBG and FPI decoding.

  10. Advancement of Optical Component Control for an Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Cook, William B.; Flood, Michael A.; Campbell, Joel F.; Boyer, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Risk mitigation activities associated with a prototype imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) system are continuing at the NASA Langley Research Center. The system concept and technology center about enabling and improving future space-based atmospheric composition missions, with a current focus on observing tropospheric ozone around 9.6 micron, while having applicability toward measurement in different spectral regions and other applications. Recent activities have focused on improving an optical element control subsystem to enable precise and accurate positioning and control of etalon plates; this is needed to provide high system spectral fidelity critical for enabling the required ability to spectrally-resolve atmospheric line structure. The latest results pertaining to methodology enhancements, system implementation, and laboratory characterization testing will be reported

  11. Preliminary Screening Results of Fabry Disease in Kidney Transplantation Patients: A Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, M; Uçar, S K; Aşçı, G; Canda, E; Tan, F A; Hoşcoşkun, C; Çoker, M; Töz, H

    2017-04-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alfa-galactosidase A (AGALA) and leads to progressive impairment of renal function in almost all male patients and in a significant proportion of female patients. FD is underdiagnosed or even misdiagnosed in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. We initiated a selective screening study for FD among kidney transplant patients in our center. In this study, 1095 male and female patients were included. Dried blood samples on Guthrie papers were used to analyze galactosidase A enzyme for male patients. Genetic analyses were performed in all female and male patients with low enzyme activity. In total, 648 female and 447 male patients with functioning grafts were evaluated. Among 1095 patients, 5 male patients had AGALA activity below threshold and 3 female patients had galactosidase alpha gene DNA variations. One male patient had a disease-causing mutation. The other 4 patients had polymorphisms causing low enzyme activity. All the 3 female patients had mutations that were associated with FD according to Human Gene Mutation Database (ID: CM025441). In contrast, these mutations were reported as unknown clinical significance in Clinvar (rs149391489). The patients with clinical findings suggesting FD were planned to be analyzed for Lyso Gb3. In our selective screening study, 8 variations were found among 1095 kidney transplantation patients, which needs further investigation to determine causes of FD. Clinical findings, physical examination, and family history are also necessary to evaluate the genetic changes as a mutation in this selected population.

  12. Prevalence of CADASIL and Fabry Disease in a Cohort of MRI Defined Younger Onset Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kilarski, Laura L.; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C. A.; Bevan, Steve; Baker, Rob; Hassan, Ahamad; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, is the most common monogenic disorder causing lacunar stroke and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Fabry disease (FD) due to mutations in the GLA gene has been suggested as an underdiagnosed cause of stroke, and one feature is SVD. Previous studies reported varying prevalence of CADASIL and FD in stroke, likely due to varying subtypes studied; no studies have looked at a large cohort of younger onset SVD. We determined the prevalence in a well-defined, MRI-verified cohort of apparently sporadic patients with lacunar infarct. Methods Caucasian patients with lacunar infarction, aged ≤70 years (mean age 56.7 (SD8.6)), were recruited from 72 specialist stroke centres throughout the UK as part of the Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Resource. Patients with a previously confirmed monogenic cause of stroke were excluded. All MRI’s and clinical histories were reviewed centrally. Screening was performed for NOTCH3 and GLA mutations. Results Of 994 subjects five had pathogenic NOTCH3 mutations (R169C, R207C, R587C, C1222G and C323S) all resulting in loss or gain of a cysteine in the NOTCH3 protein. All five patients had confluent leukoaraiosis (Fazekas grade ≥2). CADASIL prevalence overall was 0.5% (95% CI 0.2%-1.1%) and among cases with confluent leukoaraiosis 1.5% (95% CI 0.6%-3.3%). No classic pathogenic FD mutations were found; one patient had a missense mutation (R118C), associated with late-onset FD. Conclusion CADASIL cases are rare and only detected in SVD patients with confluent leukoaraiosis. No definite FD cases were detected. PMID:26305465

  13. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  14. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction and Switch-2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Reiermann, Stefanie; Sommer, Claudia; Stypmann, Jörg; Blaschke, Daniela; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Hense, Hans-Werner; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Brand, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-β supply between 2009 and 2012, patients with Fabry disease either were treated with reduced doses or were switched to agalsidase-α. In this observational study, we assessed end organ damage and clinical symptoms with special focus on renal outcome after 2 years of dose-reduction and/or switch to agalsidase-α. A total of 89 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-β (1.0 mg/kg body wt) for >1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=24), to receive a reduced dose of 0.3-0.5 mg/kg and a subsequent switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (dose-reduction-switch group, n=28), or to directly switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (switch group, n=37) and were followed-up for 2 years. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD), changes in cardiac and renal function, Fabry-related symptoms (pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea), and disease severity scores. Determination of renal function by creatinine and cystatin C-based eGFR revealed decreasing eGFRs in the dose-reduction-switch group and the switch group. The Mainz Severity Score Index increased significantly in these two groups (P=0.02 and P<0.001, respectively), and higher frequencies of gastrointestinal pain occurred during follow-up. In conclusion, after 2 years of observation, all groups showed a stable clinical disease course with respect to serious clinical events. However, patients under agalsidase-β dose-reduction and switch or a direct switch to agalsidase-α showed a decline of renal function independent of the eGFR formula used.

  15. Control of proteinuria with increased doses of agalsidase alfa in a patient with Fabry disease with atypical genotype-phenotype expression.

    PubMed

    Paliouras, Christos; Aperis, Georgios; Lamprianou, Foteini; Ntetskas, Giorgos; Roufas, Konstantinos; Alivanis, Polichronis

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder of glycosphingolipids, caused by the partial or complete deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (a-Gal A). The missense mutation pN215S usually causes a milder form of the disease with isolated cardiac involvement. We report a case of a male Fabry patient with the pN215S mutation and a generalized disease. He suffered a relapse in proteinuria which responded to increased doses of the administered recombinant enzyme. Individualization of enzyme replacement therapy must be considered in selected cases characterized by clinical deterioration.

  16. Advanced Coats' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Haik, B G

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Coats' disease and retinoblastoma can both present with the triad of a retinal detachment, the appearance of a subretinal mass, and dilated retinal vessels. Thus, even the most experienced observer may not be able to differentiate these entities on ophthalmoscopic findings alone. Coats' disease is the most common reason for which eyes are enucleated with the misdiagnosis of retinoblastoma. Ultrasonography is the auxiliary diagnostic test most easily incorporated into the clinical examination, and can be utilized repeatedly without biologic tissue hazard. Ultrasonically identifiable features allowing differentiation between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma include the topography and character of retinal detachment and presence or absence of subretinal calcifications. Ultrasonography is of lesser use in poorly calcified retinoblastoma and in detecting optic nerve or extraocular extension in heavily calcified retinoblastoma. CT is perhaps the single most valuable test because of its ability to: (a) delineate intraocular morphology, (b) quantify subretinal densities, (c) identify vascularities within the subretinal space through the use of contrast enhancement, and (d) detected associated orbital or intracranial abnormalities. Optimal computed tomographic studies, however, require multiple thin slices both before and after contrast introduction and expose the child to low levels of radiation if studies are repeated periodically. MR imaging is valuable for its multiplanar imaging capabilities, its superior contrast resolution, and its ability to provide insights into the biochemical structure and composition of tissues. It is limited in its ability to detect calcium, which is the mainstay of ultrasonic and CT differentiation. Aqueous LDH and isoenzyme levels were not valuable in distinguishing between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma. The value of aqueous NSE levels in the differentiation of advanced Coats' disease and exophytic retinoblastoma deserves

  17. Cardiac Troponin I: A Valuable Biomarker Indicating the Cardiac Involvement in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Anne Kathrin; Eichler, Sabrina; Sieweke, Nicole; Speth, Maria; Bauer, Timm; Hamm, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of the clinical severity of Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked, rare, progressive disorder based on a genetic defect in alpha-galactosidase is challenging, especially regarding cardiac involvement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in discriminating FD patients with cardiac involvement in a large FD patient cohort. Methods cTnI levels were measured with a contemporary sensitive assay in plasma samples taken routinely from FD patients. The assay was calibrated to measure cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Elevated cTnI values (cut-off ≥0.04 ng/ml) were correlated with clinical data. Results cTnI was assessed in 62 FD patients (median age: 47 years, males: 36%). Elevated cTnI levels were detected in 23 (37%) patients. Patients with a cTnI elevation were older (median 55 years versus 36 years, p<0.001). Elevated cTnI levels were associated with the presence of a LVH (16/23 versus 1/39; OR 65.81, CI: 6.747–641.859; p<0.001). In almost all patients with a left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) elevated cTnI levels were detected (16/17, 94%). Absolute cTnI levels in patients with LVH were higher than in those without (median 0.23 ng/ml versus 0.02 ng/ml; p<0.001). A cTnI level <0.04ng/ml had a high negative predictive value regarding the presence of a LVH (38/39, 97%). In a control group of non-FD patients (n = 17) with LVH (due to hypertension) none showed cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Conclusions Elevated cTnI levels are common in FD patients, reflecting cardiac involvement. FD patients might benefit from a continuous cTnI monitoring. PMID:27322070

  18. The Fabry disease-associated lipid Lyso-Gb3 enhances voltage-gated calcium currents in sensory neurons and causes pain.

    PubMed

    Choi, L; Vernon, J; Kopach, O; Minett, M S; Mills, K; Clayton, P T; Meert, T; Wood, J N

    2015-05-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterised by accumulation of glycosphingolipids, and accompanied by clinical manifestations, such as cardiac disorders, renal failure, pain and peripheral neuropathy. Globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3), a deacylated form of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), has emerged as a marker of Fabry disease. We investigated the link between Gb3, lyso-Gb3 and pain. Plantar administration of lyso-Gb3 or Gb3 caused mechanical allodynia in healthy mice. In vitro application of 100nM lyso-Gb3 caused uptake of extracellular calcium in 10% of sensory neurons expressing nociceptor markers, rising to 40% of neurons at 1μM, a concentration that may occur in Fabry disease patients. Peak current densities of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels were substantially enhanced by application of 1μM lyso-Gb3. These studies suggest a direct role for lyso-Gb3 in the sensitisation of peripheral nociceptive neurons that may provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Fabry disease-associated pain.

  19. Early diastolic mitral annular velocity and color M-mode flow propagation velocity in the evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Palecek, Tomas; Linhart, Ales; Lubanda, Jean Claude; Magage, Sudheera; Karetova, Debora; Bultas, Jan; Aschermann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive intracellular accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids. Cardiac involvement is frequent and left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is present in most of the affected subjects. Pulsed-wave tissue Doppler echocardiography (PW-TDE) and color M-mode are new Doppler methods for LV diastolic function evaluation. Their role in the assessment of Fabry disease-related cardiomyopathy remains to be established. In this study we aimed to determine the utility of PW-TDE and color M-mode-derived parameters in the assessment of LV diastolic function in patients with Fabry disease. Eighty-one echocardiographic examinations performed in 35 patients affected by Fabry disease were retrospectively analyzed. Early diastolic lateral mitral annular velocity (E(m)) determined by PW-TDE and color M-mode flow propagation velocity (V(p)) were measured and compared to LV filling patterns obtained using standard Doppler indexes. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves method was used to determine the summary measure of relative accuracy for E(m) and V(p). A comparison of ROC curves showed a significant difference for areas under the curve in favor of E(m) (P < 0.001). Pseudonormal filling pattern, higher LV mass index, higher relative wall thickness, larger left atrial diameter, and older age were more frequent (all P < 0.001) in patients with incorrect diagnosis of normal LV diastolic function based on the measurement of V(p). E(m) appears to be superior to V(p) in the assessment of LV diastolic function in patients with Fabry disease. V(p) fails to detect abnormal LV diastolic function in subjects with pronounced concentric LV remodeling and pseudonormal filling pattern.

  20. Mutations of the GLA gene in Korean patients with Fabry disease and frequency of the E66Q allele as a functional variant in Korean newborns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Hee; Heo, Sun Hee; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Park, Jung-Young; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kang, Duk-Hee; Choe, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Won-Ho; Yang, Song Hyun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2010-08-01

    Fabry disease is caused by an alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) deficiency. In this study, we identified 28 unrelated Korean families with Fabry disease with 25 distinct mutations in the GLA gene including six novel mutations (p.W47X, p.C90X, p.D61EfsX32, IVS4(-11)T>A, p.D322E and p.W349). Notably, five subjects from four unrelated families carried the p.E66Q variant, previously known as a pathogenic mutation in atypical Fabry disease. Among these patients, only one had proteinuria and two had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy without any other systemic manifestation of Fabry disease. Substantial residual GLA activity was shown both in the leukocytes of p.E66Q patients (19.0-30.3% of normal activity) and in transiently overexpressed COS-7 cells (43.8 + or - 3.03% of normal activity). Although GLA harboring p.E66Q is unstable at neutral pH, the enzyme is efficiently expressed in the lysosomes of COS-7 cells. The location of p.E66 is distant from both the active site and the dimer interface, and has a more accessible surface area than have other mutations of atypical Fabry disease. In addition, the allele frequency of p.E66Q determined in 833 unrelated Korean individuals was remarkably high at 1.046% (95% confidence interval, 0.458-1.634%). These results indicate that p.E66Q is a functional polymorphism rather than a pathogenic mutation.

  1. The Coexistence of Multiple Myeloma-associated Amyloid Light-chain Amyloidosis and Fabry Disease in a Hemodialysis Patient.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kensei; Moriyama, Atsuo; Kodama, Goh; Nakayama, Yosuke; Fukami, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an inherited lysosomal disorder caused by an X-linked α-galactosidase A deficiency. We report the case of a 50-year-old male FD patient on hemodialysis who presented with macroglossia-related speaking difficulty and gastrointestinal symptoms. An endoscopic analysis revealed multiple gastric ulcers, and a histological examination led to a diagnosis of amyloid light-chain amyloidosis. Serum free light-chain and bone marrow analyses detected multiple myeloma (MM). Treatment with bortezomib and dexamethasone significantly improved the patient's symptoms. This is the first case to demonstrate a potential pathogenic relationship between FD and MM. The similar gastrointestinal manifestations might have contributed to the diagnostic difficulty.

  2. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as Non-Viral Vectors for Gene Transfection in a Cell Model of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Garibay, A P; Solinís, M A; del Pozo-Rodríguez, A; Apaolaza, P S; Shen, J S; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2015-03-01

    Here, we demonstrate the ability of solid lipid nanoparticle-based non-viral vectors to increase the α-galactosidase A levels of the IMFE1 cell line, an in vitro model for target cells in Fabry disease. For this purpose, vectors containing the pR-M10-αGal A plasmid, which encodes the α-galactosidase A enzyme, were prepared; the in vitro transfection efficacy was studied in IMFE1 cells, and the results were confirmed by RT-PCR. The cellular uptake of the vectors, intracellular disposition of the plasmid, and probable endocytosis pathways of the nanoparticles were also analyzed. The vectors used for the studies carried protamine (P-DNA-SLN), dextran and protamine (D-P-DNA-SLN), or hyaluronic acid of two different molecular weights and protamine (HA150-P-DNA-SLN or HA500-P-DNA-SLN). The new formulations, which presented a particle size in the range of nanometers (from 218 nm to 348 nm) and a positive superficial charge, were able to increase α-galactosidase A activity up to 4-fold in comparison to non treated IMFE1 cells. The most efficient vectors were those that included HA, and no differences due to changes in the molecular weight of HA were detected. The observed lack of colocalization with each of the four different Nile Red-labeled vectors and transferrin or cholera toxin appears to indicate that clathrin- and caveolae-independent pathways may be involved in their cellular uptake. Additionally, colocalization with LysoTracker indicated that the formulations were exposed to lysosomal activity, which may be responsible for the release of the plasmid from the vector. In conclusion, we reveal the potential of SLN-based vectors to efficiently transfect an immortalized Fabry patient cell line.

  3. Twenty-four-month alpha-galactosidase A replacement therapy in Fabry disease has only minimal effects on symptoms and cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, J W; Hartiala, J J; Nuutila, P; Kalliokoski, R; Viikari, J S; Engblom, E; Penttinen, M; Knuuti, J; Mononen, I; Kantola, I M

    2008-06-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme activity. Decreased enzyme activity leads to accumulation of glycosphingolipids in different tissues including endothelial cells and smooth-muscle cells and cardiomyocytes, and cardiovascular complications are common in the disease. Since 2001, specific enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with alpha-galactosidase A has been available. It has been reported to improve clinical symptoms and quality of life. However, limited and controversial data on its efficacy to cardiac involvement have been published. Nine patients (5 male) with Fabry disease were included in an open-label prospective follow-up study of 24-month ERT. Comprehensive cardiovascular evaluation was performed by MRI, stress echocardiography and quality of life assessment. Plasma globotriaosylceramide decreased from 6.2 to 1.4 microg/ml during ERT (p<0.05). The only other measured parameters that changed significantly were resting heart rate that decreased from 79 to 67 bpm (p<0.01) and end-systolic volume that decreased by 12.4 ml (p<0.05). The other parameters consisting of quality of life, self-estimated cardiovascular condition, diastolic function, exercise capacity, ECG parameters, ejection fraction and ventricular mass did not change. ERT has only minimal effect on symptoms and cardiovascular morphology and function in Fabry disease. Therefore, effective conventional medical therapy is still of major importance in Fabry disease. Larger ERT studies are warranted, especially in women, to solve current open questions, such as the age at which ERT should be started, optimal dosage and intervals between infusions. Furthermore, longer follow-up studies are needed to assess the effects of ERT on prognosis.

  4. High-Risk Screening for Fabry Disease: Analysis by Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 ) in Urine Collected on Filter Paper.

    PubMed

    Auray-Blais, Christiane; Lavoie, Pamela; Boutin, Michel; Abaoui, Mona

    2017-04-06

    Fabry disease is a complex, panethnic lysosomal storage disorder. It is characterized by the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in tissues, organs, the vascular endothelium, and biological fluids. The reported incidence in different populations is quite variable, ranging from 1:1400 to 1:117,000. Its complexity lies in the marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Despite the fact that it is an X-linked disease, more than 600 mutations affect both males and females. In fact, some females may be affected as severely as males. The purpose of this protocol is to focus on the high-risk screening of patients who might have Fabry disease using a simple, rapid, non-invasive high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for urinary globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 ) analysis. Urine filter paper samples are easily collected at home by patients and sent by regular mail. This method has been successfully used for high-risk screening of patients with ophthalmologic manifestations and in an on-going study for high-risk screening of Fabry disease in patients with chronic kidney diseases. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Global cardiac alterations detected by speckle-tracking echocardiography in Fabry disease: left ventricular, right ventricular, and left atrial dysfunction are common and linked to worse symptomatic status.

    PubMed

    Morris, Daniel A; Blaschke, Daniela; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krebs, Alice; Knobloch, Gesine; Walter, Thula C; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that in patients with Fabry disease, 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography (2DSTE) could detect functional myocardial alterations such as left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV), and left atrial (LA) dysfunction, even when conventional cardiac measurements are normal. In addition, we hypothesized that these global cardiac alterations could be linked to worse symptomatic status in these patients. Fifty patients with Fabry disease and a control group of 118 healthy subjects of similar age and gender were included. The myocardial function and structural changes of the LV, RV, and LA were analyzed by 2DSTE and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with Fabry disease had significantly lower functional myocardial values of the LV, RV, and LA than healthy subjects (LV, RV, and LA strain -18.1 ± 4.0, -21.4 ± 4.9, and 29.7 ± 9.9 % vs. -21.6 ± 2.2, -25.2 ± 4.0, and 44.8 ± 11.1 %, respectively, P < 0.001) and elevated rates of LV, RV, and LA myocardial dysfunction (24, 20, and 26 %, respectively), even when conventional cardiac measurements such as LVEF, TAPSE, and LAVI were normal. LV septal wall thickness ≥15 mm, RV free wall thickness ≥7 mm, and LV longitudinal dysfunction were the principal factors linked to reduced LV, RV, and LA strain, respectively. In addition, but to a lesser extent, LV and RV fibrosis were linked to reduced LV and RV strain. Patients with reduced LV, RV, and LA strain had worse functional class (dyspnea-NYHA classification) than those with normal cardiac function. In conclusion, in patients with Fabry disease, 2DSTE analyses detect LV, RV, and LA functional myocardial alterations, even when conventional cardiac measurements are normal. These functional myocardial alterations are common and significantly associated with worse symptomatic status in Fabry patients. Therefore, these findings provide important evidence to introduce global myocardial analyses using 2DSTE in the early

  6. Pedigree analysis of Mexican families with Fabry disease as a powerful tool for identification of heterozygous females.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Amavizca, B E; Orozco-Castellanos, R; R Padilla-Gutiérrez, J; Valle, Y; Figuera, L E

    2014-08-28

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency; in contrast to other X-linked diseases, heterozygous females can be as affected as men. The construction and analysis of a family pedigree is a powerful tool to aid clinicians in diagnosis, establishment of inheritance pattern, and early detection of potentially affected relatives. The present study highlights the importance of pedigree analysis in families with FD for identifying other possibly affected relatives and investigating the clinical manifestations. This clinical report included 12 Mexican index cases with confirmed FD diagnosis. We constructed and analyzed their pedigree, and diagnosed FD in 24 affected relatives. Clinical features were similar to those reported for other populations. Pedigree analysis further identified an additional 30 women as possible carriers. We conclude that pedigree construction and analysis is a useful tool to help physicians detect and diagnose relatives at risk for FD, particularly heterozygous females, so that they can receive genetic counseling and early treatment. Mexican families with FD were similar to other populations reported in the literature, and our findings confirmed that heterozygous females can have signs and symptoms ranging from subtle manifestations to the classical severe presentation described in males.

  7. GLA variation p.E66Q identified as the genetic etiology of Fabry disease using exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Xu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lusi; Zhang, Xuehong; Peng, Hexiang; Zheng, Yu; Luo, Sanchuan; Guo, Hui; Xia, Kun; Li, Jiada; Yao, Hongliang; Hu, Zhengmao

    2016-01-10

    Fabry disease (FD) was an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency in glycosphingolipid catabolism caused by mutations in the α-galactosidase A gene GLA. Variant FD patients did not present with classical symptoms during childhood and were undiagnosed or misdiagnosed with other kidney diseases, such as chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN). In this study, we utilized exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing identified the variation p.E66Q of GLA completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype in a Chinese family, which previously been diagnosed as possible CGN. Female patients exhibited preferential X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) of the normal p.E66 allele, as indicated by XCI analysis. By measuring α-Gal A activity, we found that male patients in the pedigree had just little enzymatic activity while female patients had residual enzymatic activity. These patients were diagnosed with renal variant FD in subsequent clinical review. Our results directly implicated the GLA mutation p.E66Q as the genetic etiology of the Chinese renal variant FD pedigree.

  8. Identification of an Allosteric Binding Site on Human Lysosomal Alpha-Galactosidase Opens the Way to New Pharmacological Chaperones for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    den-Haan, Helena; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Del Prete, Rosita; Liguori, Ludovica; Cimmaruta, Chiara; Lukas, Jan; Andreotti, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Personalized therapies are required for Fabry disease due to its large phenotypic spectrum and numerous different genotypes. In principle, missense mutations that do not affect the active site could be rescued with pharmacological chaperones. At present pharmacological chaperones for Fabry disease bind the active site and couple a stabilizing effect, which is required, to an inhibitory effect, which is deleterious. By in silico docking we identified an allosteric hot-spot for ligand binding where a drug-like compound, 2,6-dithiopurine, binds preferentially. 2,6-dithiopurine stabilizes lysosomal alpha-galactosidase in vitro and rescues a mutant that is not responsive to a mono-therapy with previously described pharmacological chaperones, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin and galactose in a cell based assay. PMID:27788225

  9. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Maria J; Mourão, Ana F; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry's disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No "classic" pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292).

  10. Sudoscan as a noninvasive tool to assess sudomotor dysfunction in patients with Fabry disease: results from a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sahuc, Pauline; Chiche, Laurent; Dussol, Bertrand; Pouget, Jean; Franques, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Hypohidrosis is a frequent and early symptom in patients with Fabry disease. Studies have reported improved sweating in patients treated with enzyme-replacement therapy. A new method, Sudoscan, has been developed that is noninvasive, is quantitative, and can quickly evaluate sweat gland function. It is based on the electrochemical reaction between sweat chlorides and stainless-steel electrodes in contact with the palms and soles. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Sudoscan as a tool to assess sudomotor dysfunction in patients with Fabry disease. Consecutive patients were prospectively recruited who had a diagnosis of Fabry disease, which had been confirmed genetically and/or by measurement of α-galactosidase activity in leukocytes. Healthy controls, matched (1:1) for age and sex, were also enrolled. Test results were expressed immediately as electrochemical skin conductance (ESC, µS) for hands and feet. Sudomotor dysfunction was considered absent, moderate, or severe if the ESC measured on the feet was >60 µS, between 60 and 40 µS, or <40 µS, respectively. Among the 18 patients, 11 had hypohidrosis or anhidrosis. Hand and feet ESCs were significantly lower in patients compared to their controls (P=0.0015 and P=0.0047, respectively). Among patients, 8/18 (44.5%) had a sudomotor dysfunction, moderate in three and severe in five cases. Hand and feet ESCs were significantly lower in those with hypohidrosis/anhidrosis compared to those without (P=0.0014 and P=0.0056, respectively). This study showed that Sudoscan provided a quick, noninvasive, and quantitative measurement of sudomotor function in Fabry disease patients. PMID:26893567

  11. Characterization of Early Disease Status in Treatment-Naive Male Paediatric Patients with Fabry Disease Enrolled in a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wijburg, Frits A.; Bénichou, Bernard; Bichet, Daniel G.; Clarke, Lorne A.; Dostalova, Gabriela; Fainboim, Alejandro; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Forcelini, Cassiano; An Haack, Kristina; Hopkin, Robert J.; Mauer, Michael; Najafian, Behzad; Scott, C. Ronald; Shankar, Suma P.; Thurberg, Beth L.; Tøndel, Camilla; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Ramaswami, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Trial Design This analysis characterizes the degree of early organ involvement in a cohort of oligo-symptomatic untreated young patients with Fabry disease enrolled in an ongoing randomized, open-label, parallel-group, phase 3B clinical trial. Methods Males aged 5–18 years with complete α-galactosidase A deficiency, without symptoms of major organ damage, were enrolled in a phase 3B trial evaluating two doses of agalsidase beta. Baseline disease characteristics of 31 eligible patients (median age 12 years) were studied, including cellular globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) accumulation in skin (n = 31) and kidney biopsy (n = 6; median age 15 years; range 13–17 years), renal function, and glycolipid levels (plasma, urine). Results Plasma and urinary GL-3 levels were abnormal in 25 of 30 and 31 of 31 patients, respectively. Plasma lyso-GL-3 was elevated in all patients. GL-3 accumulation was documented in superficial skin capillary endothelial cells (23/31 patients) and deep vessel endothelial cells (23/29 patients). The mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR), measured by plasma disappearance of iohexol, was 118.1 mL/min/1.73 m2 (range 90.4–161.0 mL/min/1.73 m2) and the median urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was 10 mg/g (range 4.0–27.0 mg/g). On electron microscopy, renal biopsy revealed GL-3 accumulation in all glomerular cell types (podocytes and parietal, endothelial, and mesangial cells), as well as in peritubular capillary and non-capillary endothelial, interstitial, vascular smooth muscle, and distal tubules/collecting duct cells. Lesions indicative of early Fabry arteriopathy and segmental effacement of podocyte foot processes were found in all 6 patients. Conclusions These data reveal that in this small cohort of children with Fabry disease, histological evidence of GL-3 accumulation, and cellular and vascular injury are present in renal tissues at very early stages of the disease, and are noted before onset of microalbuminuria and development of

  12. Bioevaluation of sixteen ADMDP stereoisomers toward alpha-galactosidase A: Development of a new pharmacological chaperone for the treatment of Fabry disease and potential enhancement of enzyme replacement therapy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hon; Li, Huang-Yi; Lu, Sheng-Jhih; Hu, Jia-Ming; Yun, Wen-Yi; Chiu, Cheng-Hsin; Yang, Wen-Bin; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2016-11-10

    A unique molecular library consisting of all sixteen synthetic ADMDP (1-aminodeoxy-DMDP) stereoisomers has been prepared and evaluated for inhibitory activity against α-Gal A, and ability to impart thermal stabilization of this enzyme. The results of this testing led us to develop a novel pharmacological chaperone for the treatment of Fabry disease. 3-Epimer ADMDP was found to be an effective pharmacological chaperone, able to rescue α-Gal A activity in the lymphoblast of the N215S Fabry patient-derived cell line, without impairment of cellular β-galactosidase activity. When 3-epimer ADMDP was administered with rh-α-Gal A (enzyme replacement therapy) for the treatment of Fabry patient-derived cell lines, improvements in the efficacy of rh-α-Gal A was observed, which suggests this small molecule can also provide clinical benefit of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease.

  13. Fabry disease and enzyme replacement therapy in classic patients with same mutation: different formulations--different outcome?

    PubMed

    Politei, J; Schenone, A B; Cabrera, G; Heguilen, R; Szlago, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe the results of the multidisciplinary evaluation in patients with Fabry disease and the same genetic mutation and their outcomes using different approved enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We measured baseline data and serial results of neuropathic pain assessment and renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular functioning. Pain scale showed improvement in all male cases treated with agalsidasa beta. A mild improvement was detected in agalsidasa alfa-treated patients after 1 year with posterior increase. During the agalsidase beta shortage, two male patients were switched to agalsidasa alfa, after 1 year both cases presented an increase in scale values. Renal evolution showed a tendency toward a decrease in proteinuria in patients using agalsidase beta and worsening with agalsidase alfa. We found improvement in two females using agalsidase beta and no changes in the other cases regarding cardiac functioning. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed increase of white matter lesions in four patients. Improvement and stabilization in neuropathic pain, renal and cardiac functioning and brain MRI were found mainly in patients treated with agalsidase beta. Following the reported recommendations on reintroduction of agalsidase beta after the enzyme shortage, we decided to switch all patients to agalsidase beta.

  14. Fabry disease: Evidence for a regional founder effect of the GLA gene mutation 30delG in Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Dayse Oliveira; Netto, Cristina; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Giugliani, Roberto; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea; Pereira, Fernanda; Matte, Ursula; Santos, Ney; Santos, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    The Fabry disease is caused by mutations in the gene (GLA) that encodes the enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). More than 500 pathologic variants of GLA have already been described, most of them are family-specific. In southern Brazil, a frequent single-base deletion (GLA 30delG) was identified among four families that do not recognize any common ancestral. In order to investigate the history of this mutation (investigate the founder effect, estimate the mutation age and the most likely source), six gene-flanking microsatellite markers of the X chromosome on the mutation carriers and their parents, 150 individuals from the same population and 300 individuals that compose the Brazilian parental populations (Europeans, Africans and Native Americans) were genotyped. A common haplotype to the four families was identified and characterized as founder. The age was estimated with two statistics software (DMLE 2.2 and ESTIAGE) that agreed with 11 to 12 generations old. This result indicates that the mutation GLA 30delG was originated from a single event on the X chromosome of a European immigrant, during the southern Brazil colonization between 1710 and 1740.

  15. Replacement of α-galactosidase A in Fabry disease: effect on fibroblast cultures compared with biopsied tissues of treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Keslová-Veselíková, Jana; Hůlková, Helena; Dobrovolný, Robert; Asfaw, Befekadu; Poupětová, Helena; Berná, Linda; Sikora, Jakub; Goláň, Lubor

    2008-01-01

    The function and intracellular delivery of enzyme therapeutics for Fabry disease were studied in cultured fibroblasts and in the biopsied tissues of two male patients to show diversity of affected cells in response to treatment. In the mutant fibroblasts cultures, the final cellular level of endocytosed recombinant α-galactosidases A (agalsidases, FabrazymeTM, and ReplagalTM) exceeded, by several fold, the amount in control fibroblasts and led to efficient direct intra-lysosomal hydrolysis of (3H)Gb3Cer. In contrast, in the samples from the heart and some other tissues biopsied after several months of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with FabrazymeTM, only the endothelial cells were free of storage. Persistent Gb3Cer storage was found in cardiocytes (accompanied by increase of lipopigment), smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, sweat glands, and skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry of cardiocytes demonstrated, for the first time, the presence of a considerable amount of the active enzyme in intimate contact with the storage compartment. Factors responsible for the limited ERT effectiveness are discussed, namely post-mitotic status of storage cells preventing their replacement by enzyme supplied precursors, modification of the lysosomal system by longstanding storage, and possible relative lack of Sap B. These observations support the strategy of early treatment for prevention of lysosomal storage. PMID:18351385

  16. Rapid preparation of (3R,4S,5R) polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine-based libraries to discover a pharmacological chaperone for treatment of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hon; Yun, Wen-Yi; Li, Huang-Yi; Hu, Jia-Ming

    2017-01-27

    The rapid discovery of a pharmacological chaperone toward human α-Gal A for the treatment of Fabry disease is described. Two polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines with the (3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern underwent rapid substituent diversity by conjugating the primary aminomethyl moiety of each with a variety of carboxylic acids to generate two libraries (2 × 60 members). Our bioevaluation results showed one member with the (2R,3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern and bearing a 5-cyclohexylpentanoyl group as a substituent moiety possessed sufficient chaperoning capability to rescue α-Gal A activity in the lymphocyte of the N215S Fabry patient-derived cell line and other α-Gal A mutants in COS7 cells.

  17. Enzyme replacement therapy and Fabry nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Warnock, David G; Daina, Erica; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; West, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Involvement of the kidneys in Fabry disease ("nephropathy") occurs in male and female individuals. The majority of patients with progressive nephropathy will have significant proteinuria and develop progressive loss of kidney function, leading to ESRD. All too often, treating physicians may ignore "normal" serum creatinine levels or "minimal" proteinuria and fail to assess properly the severity of kidney involvement and institute appropriate management. Fabry nephropathy is treatable, even in patients with fairly advanced disease. Although the cornerstone of therapy remains enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase, this treatment alone does not reduce urine protein excretion. Treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors must be added to enzyme replacement therapy to reduce urine protein excretion with the hope that this will stabilize kidney function. Kidney function, with at least estimated GFR based on serum creatinine and measurements of urinary protein, should be measured at every clinic visit, and the rate of change of the estimated GFR should be followed over time. Antiproteinuric therapy can be dosed to a prespecified urine protein target rather than a specific BP goal, with the proviso that successful therapy will usually lower the BP below the goal of 130/80 mmHg that is used for other forms of kidney disease. The overall goal for treating Fabry nephropathy is to reduce the rate of loss of GFR to -1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)/yr, which is that seen in the normal adult population. A systematic approach is presented for reaching this goal in the individual patient.

  18. Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated GLA Gene Knockout as an In Vitro Drug Screening Model for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hui-Yung; Chiang, Huai-Chih; Tseng, Wei-Lien; Wu, Ping; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Yang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Mong-Lien; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 Genome-editing system has revealed promising potential for generating gene mutation, deletion, and correction in human cells. Application of this powerful tool in Fabry disease (FD), however, still needs to be explored. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), a regular administration of recombinant human α Gal A (rhα-GLA), is a currently available and effective treatment to clear the accumulated Gb3 in FD patients. However, the short half-life of rhα-GLA in human body limits its application. Moreover, lack of an appropriate in vitro disease model restricted the high-throughput screening of drugs for improving ERT efficacy. Therefore, it is worth establishing a large-expanded in vitro FD model for screening potential candidates, which can enhance and prolong ERT potency. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout of GLA in HEK-293T cells, we generated GLA-null cells to investigate rhα-GLA cellular pharmacokinetics. The half-life of administrated rhα-GLA was around 24 h in GLA-null cells; co-administration of proteasome inhibitor MG132 and rhα-GLA significantly restored the GLA enzyme activity by two-fold compared with rhα-GLA alone. Furthermore, co-treatment of rhα-GLA/MG132 in patient-derived fibroblasts increased Gb3 clearance by 30%, compared with rhα-GLA treatment alone. Collectively, the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated GLA-knockout HEK-293T cells provide an in vitro FD model for evaluating the intracellular pharmacokinetics of the rhα-GLA as well as for screening candidates to prolong rhα-GLA potency. Using this model, we demonstrated that MG132 prolongs rhα-GLA half-life and enhanced Gb3 clearance, shedding light on the direction of enhancing ERT efficacy in FD treatment. PMID:27983599

  19. Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated GLA Gene Knockout as an In Vitro Drug Screening Model for Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui-Yung; Chiang, Huai-Chih; Tseng, Wei-Lien; Wu, Ping; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Yang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Mong-Lien; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-12-13

    The CRISPR/Cas9 Genome-editing system has revealed promising potential for generating gene mutation, deletion, and correction in human cells. Application of this powerful tool in Fabry disease (FD), however, still needs to be explored. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), a regular administration of recombinant human α Gal A (rhα-GLA), is a currently available and effective treatment to clear the accumulated Gb3 in FD patients. However, the short half-life of rhα-GLA in human body limits its application. Moreover, lack of an appropriate in vitro disease model restricted the high-throughput screening of drugs for improving ERT efficacy. Therefore, it is worth establishing a large-expanded in vitro FD model for screening potential candidates, which can enhance and prolong ERT potency. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout of GLA in HEK-293T cells, we generated GLA-null cells to investigate rhα-GLA cellular pharmacokinetics. The half-life of administrated rhα-GLA was around 24 h in GLA-null cells; co-administration of proteasome inhibitor MG132 and rhα-GLA significantly restored the GLA enzyme activity by two-fold compared with rhα-GLA alone. Furthermore, co-treatment of rhα-GLA/MG132 in patient-derived fibroblasts increased Gb3 clearance by 30%, compared with rhα-GLA treatment alone. Collectively, the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated GLA-knockout HEK-293T cells provide an in vitro FD model for evaluating the intracellular pharmacokinetics of the rhα-GLA as well as for screening candidates to prolong rhα-GLA potency. Using this model, we demonstrated that MG132 prolongs rhα-GLA half-life and enhanced Gb3 clearance, shedding light on the direction of enhancing ERT efficacy in FD treatment.

  20. A Pharmacogenetic Approach to Identify Mutant Forms of α-Galactosidase A that Respond to a Pharmacological Chaperone for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyang; Katz, Evan; Valle, Maria Cecilia Della; Mascioli, Kirsten; Flanagan, John J; Castelli, Jeffrey P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Boudes, Pol; Lockhart, David J; Valenzano, Kenneth J; Benjamin, Elfrida R

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease is caused by mutations in the gene (GLA) that encodes α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). The iminosugar AT1001 (GR181413A, migalastat hydrochloride, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) is a pharmacological chaperone that selectively binds and stabilizes α-Gal A, increasing total cellular levels and activity for some mutant forms (defined as “responsive”). In this study, we developed a cell-based assay in cultured HEK-293 cells to identify mutant forms of α-Gal A that are responsive to AT1001. Concentration-dependent increases in α-Gal A activity in response to AT1001 were shown for 49 (60%) of 81 mutant forms. The responses of α-Gal A mutant forms were generally consistent with the responses observed in male Fabry patient-derived lymphoblasts. Importantly, the HEK-293 cell responses of 19 α-Gal A mutant forms to a clinically achievable concentration of AT1001 (10 µM) were generally consistent with observed increases in α-Gal A activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from male Fabry patients orally administered AT1001 during Phase 2 clinical studies. This indicates that the cell-based responses can identify mutant forms of α-Gal A that are likely to respond to AT1001 in vivo. Thus, the HEK-293 cell-based assay may be a useful aid in the identification of Fabry patients with AT1001-responsive mutant forms. Hum Mutat 32:1–13, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21598360

  1. Detecting the Effects of Fabry Disease in the Adult Human Brain with Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Fast Bound-Pool Fraction Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Golden-Grant, Katie; Garrett, Lauren T.; Uhrich, Stefanie; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Scott, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify quantitative MRI parameters associated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fast bound-pool fraction imaging (FBFI) that may detect alterations in gray matter and/or white matter in adults with Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder. Materials and Methods Twelve healthy controls (mean age ± standard deviation: 48.0±12.4 years) and ten participants with Fabry disease (46.7±12.9 years) were imaged at 3.0 T. Whole-brain parametric maps of diffusion tensor metrics (apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA)) and the bound-pool fraction (f) were acquired. Mean voxel values of parametric maps from regions-of-interest within gray and white matter structures were compared between cases and controls using the independent t-test. Spearman’s rho was used to identify associations between parametric maps and age. Results Compared to controls, the left thalamus of Fabry participants had an increase in FA (0.29±0.02 vs. 0.33±0.05, respectively; p=0.030) and a trend towards an increase in ADC (0.73±00.02 vs. 0.76±0.03 μm2/s, respectively; p=0.082). The left posterior white matter demonstrated a reduction in f (10.45±0.37 vs. 9.00±1.84 %, respectively; p=0.035), an increase in ADC (0.78±0.04 vs. 0.94±0.19 μm2/s, respectively; p=0.024), and a trend towards a reduction in FA (0.42±0.07 vs. 0.36±0.08, respectively; p=0.052). Amongst all parameters, only f measured in the left posterior white matter was significantly associated with age in Fabry participants (rho= −0.71, p=0.022). Conclusions Parameters derived from DTI and FBFI detect Fabry-related changes in the adult human brain, particularly in the posterior white matter where reductions in myelin density as measured by FBFI appear age related. PMID:26018987

  2. Recommendations and guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Fabry nephropathy in adults.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Oliveira, João P; Wanner, Christoph; Brenner, Barry M; Waldek, Stephen; Warnock, David G

    2008-06-01

    Progressive loss of kidney function complicates Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder that arises from deficiency of alpha-galactosidase activity. Heterozygous females with Fabry disease can be as severely affected as hemizygous males, who have the classic form of the disease. Enzyme-replacement therapy with recombinant human alpha-galactosidase clears the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide from kidney cells, and can stabilize renal function in adults with mild to moderate Fabry nephropathy. However, adults with more advanced nephropathy and overt proteinuria do not respond as well. For these patients, antiproteinuric therapy given in conjunction with enzyme-replacement therapy might prevent further decline in kidney function. In this Review, we propose guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of Fabry nephropathy in adults, based on published data and on the consensus of opinion of participants in the 7(th) International Fabry Nephropathy Roundtable in 2007. These organ-specific guidelines could be easier to implement than general guidelines, provided they are used in the context of an overall multisystem care approach.

  3. Reduced Right Ventricular Native Myocardial T1 in Anderson-Fabry Disease: Comparison to Pulmonary Hypertension and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Joseph J.; Chow, Kelvin; Khan, Aneal; Michelakis, Evangelos; Paterson, Ian; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is characterized by progressive multiorgan accumulation of intracellular sphingolipids due to α-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency, resulting in progressive ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, arrhythmias, and death. Decreased native (non-contrast) left ventricular (LV) T1 (longitudinal relaxation time) with MRI discriminates AFD from healthy controls or other presentations of concentric hypertrophy, but the right ventricle (RV) has not been studied. The aims of the current study were to evaluate native RV T1 values in AFD, with a goal of better understanding the pathophysiology of RV involvement. Methods and Results Native T1 values were measured in the inferior RV wall (RVI), interventricular septum (IVS), and inferior LV (LVI) in patients with AFD, patients with pulmonary hypertension, who provided an alternative RV pathological process for comparison, and healthy controls. A minimum wall thickness of 4 mm was selected to minimize partial volume errors in tissue T1 analysis. T1 analysis was performed in 6 subjects with AFD, 6 subjects with PH, and 21 controls. Native T1 values were shorter (adjusted p<0.05 for all comparisons), independent of location, in subjects with AFD (RVI-T1 = 1096±49 ms, IVS-T1 = 1053±41 ms, LVI-T1 = 1072±44 ms) compared to both PH (RVI-T1 = 1239±41 ms, IVS-T1 = 1280±123 ms, LVI-T1 = 1274±57 ms) and HC (IVS-T1 = 1180±60 ms, LVI-T1 = 1183±45 ms). RVI measurements were not possible in controls due to insufficient wall thickness. Conclusion Native T1 values appear similarly reduced in the left and right ventricles of individuals with AFD and RV wall thickening, suggesting a common pathology. In contrast, individuals with PH and thickened RVs showed increased native T1 values in both ventricles, suggestive of fibrosis. PMID:27305064

  4. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  5. Accurate quantification of sphingosine-1-phosphate in normal and Fabry disease plasma, cells and tissues by LC-MS/MS with (13)C-encoded natural S1P as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Mirzaian, Mina; Wisse, Patrick; Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Gabriel, Tanit L; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Eijk, Marco; Codée, Jeroen D C; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-08-01

    We developed a mass spectrometric procedure to quantify sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in biological materials. The use of newly synthesized (13)C5 C18-S1P and commercial C17-S1P as internal standards rendered very similar results with respect to linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Caution is warranted with determination of plasma S1P levels. Earlier it was reported that S1P is elevated in plasma of Fabry disease patients. We investigated this with the improved quantification. No clear conclusion could be drawn for patient plasma samples given the lack of uniformity of blood collection and plasma preparation. To still obtain insight, plasma and tissues were identically collected from α-galactosidase A deficient Fabry mice and matched control animals. No significant difference was observed in plasma S1P levels. A significant 2.3 fold increase was observed in kidney of Fabry mice, but not in liver and heart. Comparative analysis of S1P in cultured fibroblasts from normal subjects and classically affected Fabry disease males revealed no significant difference. In conclusion, accurate quantification of S1P in biological materials is feasible by mass spectrometry using the internal standards (13)C5 C18-S1P or C17-S1P. Significant local increases of S1P in the kidney might occur in Fabry disease as suggested by the mouse model.

  6. Detection of large gene rearrangements in X-linked genes by dosage analysis: identification of novel α-galactosidase A (GLA) deletions causing Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolny, Robert; Nazarenko, Irina; Kim, Jungmin; Doheny, Dana; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-06-01

    For most Mendelian disorders, targeted genome sequencing is an effective method to detect causative mutations. However, sequencing PCR-amplified exonic regions and their intronic boundaries can miss large deletions or duplications and mutations that lead to PCR failures in autosomal dominant disorders and in heterozygote detection for X-linked diseases. Here, a method is described for detecting large (>50 bp) deletions/duplications in the X-linked α-galactosidase A (GLA) gene, which cause Fabry disease. Briefly, multiplex PCR mixtures were designed to amplify each GLA exon and an unrelated internal control exon to normalize GLA exonic amplicon peak heights. For each normalized GLA amplicon, the normal control female to male peak-height ratios were 1.8 to 2.2 (expected 2.0), whereas the expected ratios for deletions or duplications would be ∼1.0 or 3.0, respectively. Using this method, three novel deletions, c.369+3_547+954del4096insT, c.194+2049_369+773del2619insCG, and c.207_369+651del814ins231, were detected in unrelated women with signs and/or symptoms suggestive of Fabry disease, but no "sequencing-detectable" mutations. The deletions were confirmed by sequencing their respective GLA RT-PCR products. This method can identify gene rearrangements that may be cryptic to genomic DNA sequencing and can be readily adapted to other X-linked or autosomal dominant genes.

  7. Recent advances in heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, J; McCall, J W; Genchi, C; Bazzocchi, C; Kramer, L; Simòn, F; Martarino, M

    2004-10-28

    This compilation of articles consists of four papers presented at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) (held in New Orleans, LA, USA, on 10–14 August 2003) in a symposium session titled “ Recent Advances in Heartworm Disease,” organized and chaired by JohnW. McCall and Jorge Guerrero. The first paper(Guerrero) covered the American Heartworm Society’s most recent revision of their guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of heartworm infection in dogs, based on new research and clinical experience, particularly in the areas of heartworm chemoprophylaxis, adulticide therapy,and serologic testing and retesting. The entire updated 2003 “Guidelines” are presented herein.One paper (McCall) reviewed the “soft-kill” adulticidal and “safety-net” (reach-back, retroactive,clinical prophylactic) activity of prolonged dosing of prophylactic doses of macrocyclic lactones,concluding that ivermectin is the most effective in this way, milbemycin oxime is the least effective,and the activity of injectable moxidectin and selamectin lies between that of ivermectin and milbemycin oxime. The two remaining papers provided an overview of the discovery, rediscovery,phylogeny, and biological association between Wolbachia endosymbionts and filarial nematodes(Genchi and co-authors) and compelling evidence that Wolbachia may play a major role in the immunopathogenesis of filarial diseases of man and animals (Kramer and co-authors).

  8. Advances in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Juliane I.; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains a leading cause of death from liver disease in the United States. In studies from the Veterans Administration, patients with cirrhosis and superimposed alcoholic hepatitis had greater than 60% mortality over a 4-year period, with most of those deaths occurring in the first month. Thus, the prognosis for this disease is more ominous than for many common types of cancer (eg, breast, prostate, and colon). Moreover, ALD imposes a significant economic burden from lost wages, health care costs, and lost productivity. Unfortunately, there is still no Food and Drug Administration–approved or widely accepted drug therapy for any stage of ALD. Thus, a pressing need exists for a more detailed understanding of mechanisms of liver injury. This article reviews recent advances in mechanisms and therapy related to five major areas of direct relevance to ALD: oxidative stress; gut-liver axis and cytokine signaling; malnutrition; fibrin/clotting; and stellate cell activation/fibrosis. We also review why therapies related to these mechanisms have performed well in experimental animals and in vitro systems, but have not necessarily translated into effective therapy for humans with ALD. PMID:21088999

  9. Kidney transplantation from a mother with unrecognized Fabry disease to her son with low α-galactosidase A activity: A 14-year follow-up without enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Odani, Keiko; Okumi, Masayoshi; Honda, Kazuho; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of kidney transplantation from mother to son, both of whom were likely to have had an unrecognized renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. The patient was a 54-year-old man, with an unknown primary cause of end stage renal disease. He had no notable past medical history, other than end stage renal disease. He underwent living-related kidney transplantation from his mother at age 40 years. Foam cells in the glomeruli were identified on histology assessment of a 0-hour allograft biopsy, with zebra bodies identified in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells by electron microscopy. These findings were indicative of Fabry disease in the donated kidney. As a definitive diagnosis of Fabry's disease could not be confirmed, enzyme replacement therapy was not initiated. Thirteen years after kidney transplantation, the patient underwent left nephrectomy for a left renal tumour, with pathological findings of clear cell carcinoma, foam cells and zebra bodies in the native kidney. Detailed examinations identified low α-galactosidase A activity and mutation of the α-Gal A gene, confirming a diagnosis of a renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. Histology of several allograft biopsies performed over the 14 years from the time of kidney transplantation revealed only moderate interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, with no evidence of disease progression on electron microscopy, despite the presence of zebra bodies in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells.

  10. Mitochondrial diseases: advances and issues

    PubMed Central

    Scarpelli, Mauro; Todeschini, Alice; Volonghi, Irene; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases (MDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by a dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be related to mutation of genes encoded using either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA. The advent of next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing in studying the molecular bases of MDs will bring about a revolution in the field of mitochondrial medicine, also opening the possibility of better defining pathogenic mechanisms and developing novel therapeutic approaches for these devastating disorders. The canonical rules of mitochondrial medicine remain milestones, but novel issues have been raised following the use of advanced diagnostic technologies. Rigorous validation of the novel mutations detected using deep sequencing in patients with suspected MD, and a clear definition of the natural history, outcome measures, and biomarkers that could be usefully adopted in clinical trials, are mandatory goals for the scientific community. Today, therapy is often inadequate and mostly palliative. However, important advances have been made in treating some clinical entities, eg, mitochondrial neuro-gastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, for which approaches using allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, orthotopic liver transplantation, and carrier erythrocyte entrapped thymidine phosphorylase enzyme therapy have recently been developed. Promising new treatment methods are being identified so that researchers, clinicians, and patients can join forces to change the history of these untreatable disorders. PMID:28243136

  11. Recent Advances in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Murch, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Recent diagnostic advances have demonstrated that celiac disease is relatively common although most patients have less florid symptoms than previously recognised. The mucosal lesion of this autoimmune disorder depends on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The characteristic antibodies to tissue transglutaminase-2 (tTG-2) and deamidated gliadin peptides may be produced in persons possessing the relevant HLA-DQ genotypes if intact gliadin peptides can penetrate the epithelial barrier to reach antigen presenting cells. Progression from celiac autoimmunity to overt disease may depend on innate immune mechanisms, not HLA-restricted, where IL-15 is generated within the epithelial compartment. A specific innate immune response previously thought restricted to invertebrates, the encapsulation reaction, may contribute to mucosal volume expansion through recruitment of syndecan-expressing leukocytes and stimulated matrix production. It is notable that tissue transglutaminase is critical in this reaction in insects, and that the very few insects that can predate wheat, possess specific salivary or intestinal enzymes that degrade gluten. Animal models in HLA-DQ transgenic mice suggest that the microbial flora of the intestine may play a role in host responses and modulate the evolution of the disease. This suggests that therapeutic modulation of the microbiome may contribute to management of celiac disease. In developing world countries, there is a potential difficulty in histological diagnosis because of the widespread incidence of environmental enteropathy amongst apparently healthy children. Thus, recognition of local patterns of enteropathy will be important for histopathologists, and high titre tTG-2 autoantibody titres may hold considerable diagnostic significance.

  12. Advances in motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Dirk; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND), the commonest clinical presentation of which is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is regarded as the most devastating of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. The last decade has seen major improvements in patient care, but also rapid scientific advances, so that rational therapies based on key pathogenic mechanisms now seem plausible. ALS is strikingly heterogeneous in both its presentation, with an average one-year delay from first symptoms to diagnosis, and subsequent rate of clinical progression. Although half of patients succumb within 3-4 years of symptom onset, typically through respiratory failure, a significant minority survives into a second decade. Although an apparently sporadic disorder for most patients, without clear environmental triggers, recent genetic studies have identified disease-causing mutations in genes in several seemingly disparate functional pathways, so that motor neuron degeneration may need to be understood as a common final pathway with a number of upstream causes. This apparent aetiological and clinical heterogeneity suggests that therapeutic studies should include detailed biomarker profiling, and consider genetic as well as clinical stratification. The most common mutation, accounting for 10% of all Western hemisphere ALS, is a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72. This and several other genes implicate altered RNA processing and protein degradation pathways in the core of ALS pathogenesis. A major gap remains in understanding how such fundamental processes appear to function without obvious deficit in the decades prior to symptom emergence, and the study of pre-symptomatic gene carriers is an important new initiative.

  13. The expanding clinical spectrum of Anderson-Fabry disease: a challenge to diagnosis in the novel era of enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hauser, A C; Lorenz, M; Sunder-Plassmann, G

    2004-06-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficient alpha-galactosidase A activity. The conception of the disease has changed within the last decade. Studies of the last years have shown that the disease is not limited to the classical full-blown manifestation in affected males, which is well known since more than a century, but may also occur in carrier females. The phenomenology may differ in severity and kind of organ manifestation. Cardiac and renal variants with solely disease manifestation of these organs have also been described in an increasing number. It is likely that a spectrum exists regarding alpha-galactosidase A activity in both genders on the one hand, and an additional one regarding the severity and the number of organs affected on the other. The purpose of this review is to sharpen physicians' perception of this disease. Early and accurate diagnosis is mandatory considering that this disorder is now, after introduction of the novel enzyme replacement therapy, a treatable disease.

  14. Lysosome-associated protein 1 (LAMP-1) and lysosome-associated protein 2 (LAMP-2) in a larger family carrier of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ester M; do Monte, Semiramis J H; do Nascimento, Fernando F; de Castro, Jose A F; Sousa, Jackeline L M; Filho, Henrique C S A L C; da Silva, Raimundo N; Labilloy, Anatália; Monte Neto, José T; da Silva, Adalberto S

    2014-02-15

    This study investigated the potential relationship between the expression levels of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) 1 and 2 and responses to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in the members of a single family with Fabry disease (FD). LAMP levels were assessed by flow cytometry in leukocytes from 17 FD patients who received an eight-month course of ERT course and 101 healthy individuals. We found that phagocytic cells from the FD patients had higher expression levels of both LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, relative to the levels in phagocytes from the healthy controls (p=0.001). Furthermore, the LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 levels in phagocytes from the FD carriers continuously decreased with ERT administration to reach levels similar to those in healthy controls. We suggest that LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 could be used as additional markers with which to assess ERT effectiveness in FD.

  15. Recent advances in oesophageal diseases.

    PubMed

    Al Dulaimi, David

    2014-01-01

    -quadrant biopsy protocol which may have led to an underestimation of BE prevalence. The review highlights an increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West but unclear disease trend in Asia with inter-country variability. Similarly in Asian and Western countries BE is associated with the presence of hiatus hernia, advancing age, male gender, alcohol consumption, smoking, abdominal obesity and longer duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The authors postulate that Helicobacter pylori infection, more prevalent in Asia than the West, may have a protective effect on BE. There is a need for larger, prospective studies to further clarify the disease pattern of BE in Asian countries. Clearly standardisation of the diagnostic process for BE is important to validate the differences in disease trends between Asian and Western countries. Kiadaliri AA. Gender and social disparities in esophagus cancer incidence in Iran, 2003-2009: a time trend province-level study.Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014;15(2):623-7 Esophageal cancer (EC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality particuarly in Iran where the incidence rate exceeds the global average. An understanding of the factors influencing the province-specific incidence of EC in Iran is important to inform disease-prevention strategies and address health inequalities. This ecological study used cancer registry data to investigate the relationship between gender and social class and the incidence of EC in Iran at province-level between 2003 and 2009. The age standardised incidence rates (ASIR) of EC were greatest in the Northern provinces of Iran, specifically Razavi Khorasan in males and Kordestan in females. Overall the EC incidence did not significantly differ according to gender. Interestingly, during the study period the ASIR increased by 4.6% per year in females (p=0.08) and 6.5% per year in males (p=0.02). This may reflect increasing rates of establised risk factors for EC including obsesity and gastro

  16. NASA Bioreactors Advance Disease Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    the body. Experiments conducted by Johnson scientist Dr. Thomas Goodwin proved that the NASA bioreactor could successfully cultivate cells using simulated microgravity, resulting in three-dimensional tissues that more closely approximate those in the body. Further experiments conducted on space shuttle missions and by Wolf as an astronaut on the Mir space station demonstrated that the bioreactor s effects were even further expanded in space, resulting in remarkable levels of tissue formation. While the bioreactor may one day culture red blood cells for injured astronauts or single-celled organisms like algae as food or oxygen producers for a Mars colony, the technology s cell growth capability offers significant opportunities for terrestrial medical research right now. A small Texas company is taking advantage of the NASA technology to advance promising treatment applications for diseases both common and obscure.

  17. Radiographic Differentiation of Advanced Fibrocystic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Akira, Masanori

    2017-03-01

    The concept of end-stage lung disease suggests a final common pathway for most diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. In accordance with this concept, end-stage disease is characterized radiographically and pathologically by the presence of extensive honeycombing. However, sequential computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained from patients with chronic diffuse lung disease evolve over time to show various advanced lung disease patterns other than honeycombing. In addition, several radiographically distinct honeycomb patterns, including microcystic, macrocystic, mixed, and combined emphysema and honeycombing, differentiate one advanced lung disease from another. For example, usual interstitial pneumonia (IP) usually shows mixed microcystic and macrocystic honeycombing. In contrast, CT images of long-standing fibrotic nonspecific IP typically show only small, scattered foci of honeycombing; instead, most enlarged airspaces observed in the advanced stage of this disease represent dilatation of bronchioles. In desquamative IP and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, focal opacities typically evolve into emphysema-like lesions seen on CT imaging. In combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema and sarcoidosis, the cysts tend to be larger than those observed in usual IP. Sequential CT scans in other chronic, diffuse lung diseases also show various distinctive changes. This article highlights radiographic patterns of lung destruction that belie a single common pathway to end-stage lung disease. Recognition of distinct radiographic patterns of lung destruction can help differentiate diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, even in advanced stages of disease evolution.

  18. eNOS gene Glu298Asp and 4b/a polymorphisms are associated with renal function parameters in Mexican patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Marin-Medina, A; Brambila-Tapia, A J L; Picos-Cárdenas, V J; Gallegos-Arreola, M P; Figuera, L E

    2016-10-24

    Fabry disease (FD) is an inherited X-linked lysosomal disease that causes renal failure in a high percentage of affected individuals. The eNOS gene encodes for endothelial nitric oxide synthase, which plays an important role in glomerular hemodynamics. This gene has two main polymorphisms (Glu298Asp and 4b/a) that have been studied in the context of many different diseases, including those involving cardiovascular and renal alterations. Considering the lack of information regarding eNOS variants and FD, we investigated whether there were associations between eNOS genetic variants and renal function parameters in Mexican patients with FD and renal impairment. In total, 15 FD patients with renal alterations were included in the present study, and associations between eNOS polymorphisms and renal function parameters (urea, creatinine, and GFR) were evaluated. The Asp298 and 4a alleles of the eNOS gene were found to be significantly associated with increased levels of urea and creatinine, and a decreased glomerular filtration rate in FD patients, and this association behaved in a co-dominant fashion. Our results coincide with previous reports showing an association between these polymorphisms and kidney disease, and along with other studies regarding their role in the nitric oxide pathway, suggest that these variants affect the severity of nephropathy in patients with FD.

  19. Parkinson's Disease: The Newest Advances

    MedlinePlus

    ... on genetic findings, investigators have already developed improved animal models, so essential for our understanding of what causes the disease and for testing new treatments, and have made breakthroughs in cell ...

  20. Anti-BlyS antibody reduces the immune reaction against enzyme and enhances the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yohei; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2017-02-02

    Formation of antibodies against a therapeutic enzyme is an important complication during enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for lysosomal storage diseases. Fabry disease (FD) is caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase (GLA), which results in the accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3). We have shown immune tolerance induction (ITI) during ERT in FD model mice by using an anti-B lymphocyte stimulator (anti-BlyS) antibody (belimumab). A single dose of the anti-BlyS antibody temporarily lowered the percentage of B cells and IgG antibody titer against recombinant human GLA. Administration of a low maintenance dose of the anti-BlyS antibody suppressed the B cell population and immunotolerance was induced in 20% of mice, but antibody formation could not be prevented. We then increased the maintenance dose of the anti-BlyS antibody and immunotolerance was induced in 50% of mice. Therapeutic enzyme distribution and clearance of GL-3 were also enhanced by a high maintenance dose of the anti-BlyS antibody.

  1. Progressive renal failure despite long-term biweekly enzyme replacement therapy in a patient with Fabry disease secondary to a new α-galactosidase mutation of Leu311Arg (L311R).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miura, Naoto; Kitagawa, Wataru; Suzuki, Shinkichi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Daisuke; Imai, Hirokazu

    2011-12-01

    A 37-year-old Japanese man affected by Fabry disease secondary to a novel mutation of Leu311Arg (L311R) in α-galactosidase demonstrated progressive renal failure despite biweekly enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for approximately 10 years. Kidney biopsy revealed foamy glomerular epithelial cells, compatible with the typical pathologic features of Fabry disease. The patient entered a phase III study of Replagal (agalsidase alfa) in 2001, allowing him to continue ERT with biweekly dosing for almost 10 years. During 2 years of that period, he was continued on Fabrazyme (agalsidase beta) biweekly dosing. His estimated GFR was calculated to decrease by 9.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per year. Patients with Fabry disease have been reported to have a mean decrease in GFR of 12.2 ± 8.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per year. This result suggests that biweekly ERT is only mildly effective at preventing loss of kidney function.

  2. [Advances in sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    de Montalembert, Mariane

    2008-10-01

    Generation of transgenic mice have identified new pathophysiological mechanisms in sickle disease, including a permanent proinflammatory state and dysregulation of vascular tone. Treatment is no longer solely symptomatic. New agents target red cell hydration and the kinetics of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization. Hydroxyurea, which reactivates fetal hemoglobin synthesis, is now widely used. Anti-adhesion molecules and agents modulating vascular tone are being tried in sickle mice. Bone marrow transplantation is widely used to cure patients with HLA-identical siblings, and gene therapy looks promising for those without a donor.

  3. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Agosta, Federica; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, delineating the structural and functional alterations determined by these conditions. Advanced MRI techniques are of special interest for their potential to characterize the signature of each neurodegenerative condition and aid both the diagnostic process and the monitoring of disease progression. This aspect will become crucial when disease-modifying (personalized) therapies will be established. MRI techniques are very diverse and go from the visual inspection of MRI scans to more complex approaches, such as manual and automatic volume measurements, diffusion tensor MRI, and functional MRI. All these techniques allow us to investigate the different features of neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances concerning the use of MRI in some of the most important neurodegenerative conditions, putting an emphasis on the advanced techniques.

  4. Advanced imaging in equine dental disease.

    PubMed

    Selberg, Kurt; Easley, Jeremiah T

    2013-08-01

    Dental and sinus disorders are relatively common and of major clinical importance in equine medicine. Advanced diagnostic imaging has become an integral part of equine veterinary medicine. Advanced imaging has progressed the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of dental- and sinus-related diseases. As a clinician, it is important to realize the value of advanced diagnostic imaging. Although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are both significantly more expensive compared with other diagnostic tools, the financial cost of inaccurate diagnosis and treatment can often result in higher overall costs.

  5. The Large Phenotypic Spectrum of Fabry Disease Requires Graduated Diagnosis and Personalized Therapy: A Meta-Analysis Can Help to Differentiate Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Citro, Valentina; Cammisa, Marco; Liguori, Ludovica; Cimmaruta, Chiara; Lukas, Jan; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria; Andreotti, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is caused by mutations in the GLA gene and is characterized by a large genotypic and phenotypic spectrum. Missense mutations pose a special problem for graduating diagnosis and choosing a cost-effective therapy. Some mutants retain enzymatic activity, but are less stable than the wild type protein. These mutants can be stabilized by small molecules which are defined as pharmacological chaperones. The first chaperone to reach clinical trial is 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, but others have been tested in vitro. Residual activity of GLA mutants has been measured in the presence or absence of pharmacological chaperones by several authors. Data obtained from transfected cells correlate with those obtained in cells derived from patients, regardless of whether 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin was present or not. The extent to which missense mutations respond to 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin is variable and a reference table of the results obtained by independent groups that is provided with this paper can facilitate the choice of eligible patients. A review of other pharmacological chaperones is provided as well. Frequent mutations can have residual activity as low as one-fourth of normal enzyme in vitro. The reference table with residual activity of the mutants facilitates the identification of non-pathological variants. PMID:27916943

  6. Advances in identifying beryllium sensitization and disease.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Dan; Kowalski, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Beryllium is a lightweight metal with unique qualities related to stiffness, corrosion resistance, and conductivity. While there are many useful applications, researchers in the 1930s and 1940s linked beryllium exposure to a progressive occupational lung disease. Acute beryllium disease is a pulmonary irritant response to high exposure levels, whereas chronic beryllium disease (CBD) typically results from a hypersensitivity response to lower exposure levels. A blood test, the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), was an important advance in identifying individuals who are sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for developing CBD. While there is no true "gold standard" for BeS, basic epidemiologic concepts have been used to advance our understanding of the different screening algorithms.

  7. Imbalanced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Antioxidant SOD2 in Fabry Disease-Specific Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Differentiated Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Lien; Chou, Shih-Jie; Chiang, Huai-Chih; Wang, Mong-Lien; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Chen, Kuan-Hsuan; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Wang, Chien-Ying; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Liu, Yung-Yang; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Lin, Shing-Jong; Yu, Wen-Chung

    2017-03-13

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by α-galactosidase A (GLA) deficiency. Progressive intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) is considered to be pathogenically responsible for the phenotype variability of FD that causes cardiovascular dysfunction; however, molecular mechanisms underlying the impairment of FD-associated cardiovascular tissues remain unclear. In this study, we reprogrammed human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from peripheral blood cells of patients with FD (FD-iPSCs); subsequently differentiated them into vascular endothelial-like cells (FD-ECs) expressing CD31, VE-cadherin, and vWF; and investigated their ability to form vascular tube-like structures. FD-ECs recapitulated the FD pathophysiological phenotype exhibiting intracellular Gb3 accumulation under a transmission electron microscope. Moreover, compared with healthy control iPSC-derived endothelial cells (NC-ECs), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production considerably increased in FD-ECs. Microarray analysis was performed to explore the possible mechanism underlying Gb3 accumulation-induced ROS production in FD-ECs. Our results revealed that superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), a mitochondrial antioxidant, was significantly downregulated in FD-ECs. Compared with NC-ECs, AMPK activity was significantly enhanced in FD-ECs. Furthermore, to investigate the role of Gb3 in these effects, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with Gb3. After Gb3 treatment, we observed that SOD2 expression was suppressed and AMPK activity was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our results indicate that excess accumulation of Gb3 suppressed SOD2 expression, increased ROS production, enhanced AMPK activation, and finally caused vascular endothelial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that dysregulated mitochondrial ROS may be a potential target for treating FD.

  8. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P.; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Gomes, António Caldeira; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C.; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue – GLA p.(Arg118Cys) –, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands’ close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease, since the allelic frequency in stroke patients was 0.0087 (p=0.0185 vs the general population). The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for “rare” condition. PMID:25468652

  9. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Caldeira-Gomes, António; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-02-01

    Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue - GLA p.(Arg118Cys) -, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands' close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease. The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for "rare" condition.

  10. Variations in plasma and urinary lipids in response to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease patients by nanoflow UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Jin-Sung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-03-01

    A deficiency of α-galactosidase A causes Fabry disease (FD) by disrupting lipid metabolism, especially trihexosylceramide (THC). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is clinically offered to FD patients in an attempt to lower the accumulated lipids. Studies on specific types of lipids that are directly or indirectly altered by FD are very scarce, even though they are crucial in understanding the biological process linked to the pathogenesis of FD. We performed a comprehensive lipid profiling of plasma and urinary lipids from FD patients with nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) and identified 129 plasma and 111 urinary lipids. Among these, lipids that exhibited alternations (>twofold) in patients were selected as targets for selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based high-speed quantitation using nanoflow ultra-performance LC-ESI-MS/MS (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) and 31 plasma and 26 urinary lipids showed significant elevation among FD patients. Higher percentages of sphingolipids (SLs; 48% for plasma and 42% for urine) were highly elevated in patients; whereas, a smaller percentage of phospholipids (PLs; 15% for plasma and 13% for urine) were significantly affected. Even though α-galactosidase A is reported to affect THC only, the results show that other classes of lipids (especially SLs) are changed as well, indicating that FD not only alters metabolism of THC but various classes of lipids too. Most lipids showing significant increases in relative amounts before ERT decreased after ERT, but overall, ERT influenced plasma lipids more than urinary lipids.

  11. Safety and pharmacodynamic effects of a pharmacological chaperone on α-galactosidase A activity and globotriaosylceramide clearance in Fabry disease: report from two phase 2 clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fabry disease (FD) is a genetic disorder resulting from deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A), which leads to globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) accumulation in multiple tissues. We report on the safety and pharmacodynamics of migalastat hydrochloride, an investigational pharmacological chaperone given orally at 150 mg every-other-day. Methods Two open-label uncontrolled phase 2 studies of 12 and 24 weeks (NCT00283959 and NCT00283933) in 9 males with FD were combined. At multiple time points, α-Gal A activity and GL-3 levels were quantified in blood cells, kidney and skin. GL-3 levels were also evaluated through skin and renal histology. Results Compared to baseline, increased α-Gal A activity of at least 50% was demonstrated in blood, skin and kidney in 6 of 9 patients. Patients’ increased α-Gal A activities paralleled the α-Gal A increases observed in vitro in HEK-293 cells transfected with the corresponding mutant form of the enzyme. The same 6 patients who demonstrated increases of α-Gal A activity also had GL-3 reduction in skin, urine and/or kidney, and had α-Gal A mutations that responded in transfected cells incubated with the drug. The 3 patients who did not show a consistent response in vivo had α-Gal A mutations that did not respond to migalastat HCl in transfected cells. Migalastat HCl was well tolerated. Conclusions Migalastat HCl is a candidate pharmacological chaperone that provides a novel genotype-specific treatment for FD. It enhanced α-Gal A activity and resulted in GL-3 substrate decrease in patients with responsive GLA mutations. Phase 3 studies are ongoing. Trial registration Clinicaltrial.gov: NCT00283959 and NCT00283933 PMID:23176611

  12. Alzheimer's disease: research advances and medical reality.

    PubMed

    Seiguer, Erica

    2005-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease was the eighth-leading cause of death in 2001. There is no cure and no effective treatment. Alzheimer's disease presents policy-makers with several challenges, including the level of funding and direction of federally funded research, as well as the cost pressures on Medicare and Medicaid of long-term care. These challenges will increase in intensity as demographic changes, particularly the aging of baby boomers, take hold. Better prevention of Alzheimer's, advances in therapy, and appropriate care modalities will likely require significant investment.

  13. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  14. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  15. Sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guggenheimer, James; Close, John M; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-06-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis.

  16. Enzyme replacement therapy for Anderson-Fabry disease: A complementary overview of a Cochrane publication through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    El Dib, Regina; Gomaa, Huda; Ortiz, Alberto; Politei, Juan; Kapoor, Anil; Barreto, Fellype

    2017-01-01

    Background Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Renal failure, heart and cerebrovascular involvement reduce survival. A Cochrane review provided little evidence on the use of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We now complement this review through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ERT for AFD. Materials and methods For the systematic review, a literature search was performed, from inception to March 2016, using Medline, EMBASE and LILACS. Inclusion criteria were cohort studies, patients with AFD on ERT or natural history, and at least one patient-important outcome (all-cause mortality, renal, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, and adverse events) reported. The pooled proportion and the confidence interval (CI) are shown for each outcome. Simple linear regressions for composite endpoints were performed. Results 77 cohort studies involving 15,305 participants proved eligible. The pooled proportions were as follows: a) for renal complications, agalsidase alfa 15.3% [95% CI 0.048, 0.303; I2 = 77.2%, p = 0.0005]; agalsidase beta 6% [95% CI 0.04, 0.07; I2 = not applicable]; and untreated patients 21.4% [95% CI 0.1522, 0.2835; I2 = 89.6%, p<0.0001]. Effect differences favored agalsidase beta compared to untreated patients; b) for cardiovascular complications, agalsidase alfa 28% [95% CI 0.07, 0.55; I2 = 96.7%, p<0.0001]; agalsidase beta 7% [95% CI 0.05, 0.08; I2 = not applicable]; and untreated patients 26.2% [95% CI 0.149, 0.394; I2 = 98.8%, p<0.0001]. Effect differences favored agalsidase beta compared to untreated patients; and c) for cerebrovascular complications, agalsidase alfa 11.1% [95% CI 0.058, 0.179; I2 = 70.5%, p = 0.0024]; agalsidase beta 3.5% [95% CI 0.024, 0.046; I2 = 0%, p = 0.4209]; and untreated patients 18.3% [95% CI 0.129, 0.245; I2 = 95% p < 0

  17. Klinefelter syndrome with fabry disease--a case of nondisjunction of the X-chromosome with sex-linked recessive mutation.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Victoria J; Fietz, Michael J; Tchan, Michel C; Kovoor, Pramesh; Thomas, Liza; Sadick, Norman

    2014-12-01

    A 52 year-old male with Klinefelter syndrome presented with chest tightness and rapid atrial fibrillation with hypotension. His echocardiogram demonstrated symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy with minimal diastolic dysfunction. Subsequent investigations confirmed the diagnosis of Fabry cardiomyopathy. This is the first reported case of Klinefelter syndrome with homozygous sex-linked recessive mutation presenting primarily with cardiac manifestation.

  18. Myeloma Today: Disease Definitions and Treatment Advances

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    There have been major advances in the diagnosis, staging, risk-stratification, and management of multiple myeloma (MM). In addition to established CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal failure, anemia, and lytic bone lesions) features, new diagnostic criteria include 3 new biomarkers to diagnose the disease: bone marrow clonal plasmacytosis ≥60%, serum involved/uninvolved free light chain ratio ≥100, and >1 focal lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. MM can be classified into several subtypes based on baseline cytogenetics, and prognosis varies according to underlying cytogenetic abnormalities. A Revised International Staging System has been developed which combines markers of tumor burden (albumin, beta-2 microglobulin) with markers of aggressive disease biology (high risk cytogenetics and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase). Although the approach to therapy remains largely the same, the treatment options at every stage of the disease have changed. Carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and panobinostat have been approved for the treatment of the disease. Elotuzumab, daratumumab, and ixazomib are expected to be approved shortly. These drugs combined with older agents such as cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide dramatically increase the repertoire of regimens available for the treatment of MM. This review provides a concise overview of recent advances in MM, including updates to diagnostic criteria, staging, risk-stratification, and management. PMID:26565896

  19. Genetic Disorders with Dyshidrosis: Ectodermal Dysplasia, Incontinentia Pigmenti, Fabry Disease, and Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Sweating is regulated by various neurohormonal mechanisms. A disorder in any part of the sweating regulatory pathways, such as the thermal center, neurotransmitters in the central to peripheral nerve, innervation of periglandular neurotransmission, and sweat secretion in the sweat gland itself, induces dyshidrosis. Therefore, hereditary disorders with dyshidrosis result from a variety of causes. These diseases have characteristic symptoms derived from each pathogenesis besides dyshidrosis. The information in this chapter is useful for the differential diagnosis of representative genetic disorders with dyshidrosis.

  20. New Advances in Polycystic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Santos-Laso, A; Izquierdo-Sánchez, L; Lee-Law, P Y; Perugorria, M J; Marzioni, M; Marin, J J G; Bujanda, L; Banales, J M

    2017-02-01

    Polycystic liver diseases (PLDs) include a heterogeneous group of congenital disorders inherited as dominant or recessive genetic traits; they are manifested alone or in association with polycystic kidney disease. Ductal plate malformation during embryogenesis and the loss of heterozygosity linked to second-hit mutations may promote the dilatation and/or development of a large number (> 20) of biliary cysts, which are the main cause of morbidity in these patients. Surgical procedures aimed to eliminate symptomatic cysts show short-term beneficial effects, but are not able to block the disease progression. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative option. Intense studies on the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PLDs have resulted in different clinical trials, some of them with promising outcomes. Here the authors summarize the key aspects of PLD etiology, pathogenesis, and therapy, highlighting the most recent advances and future research directions.

  1. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Maria J.; Mourão, Ana F.; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E.; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry’s disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No “classic” pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292). PMID:28299312

  2. Correction in trans for Fabry disease: expression, secretion and uptake of alpha-galactosidase A in patient-derived cells driven by a high-titer recombinant retroviral vector.

    PubMed Central

    Medin, J A; Tudor, M; Simovitch, R; Quirk, J M; Jacobson, S; Murray, G J; Brady, R O

    1996-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked metabolic disorder due to a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-gal A; EC 3.2.1.22). Patients accumulate glycosphingolipids with terminal alpha-galactosyl residues that come from intracellular synthesis, circulating metabolites, or from the biodegradation Of senescent cells. Patients eventually succumb to renal, cardio-, or cerebrovascular disease. No specific therapy exists. One possible approach to ameliorating this disorder is to target corrective gene transfer therapy to circulating hematopoietic cells. Toward this end, an amphotropic virus-producer cell line has been developed that produces a high titer (>10(6) i.p. per ml) recombinant retrovirus constructed to transduce and correct target cells. Virus-producer cells also demonstrate expression of large amounts of both intracellular and secreted alpha-gal A. To examine the utility of this therapeutic vector, skin fibroblasts from Fabry patients were corrected for the metabolic defect by infection with this recombinant virus and secreted enzyme was observed. Furthermore, the secreted enzyme was found to be taken up by uncorrected cells in a mannose-6-phosphate receptor-dependent manner. In related experiments, immortalized B cell lines from Fabry patients, created as a hematologic delivery test system, were transduced. As with the fibroblasts, transduced patient B cell lines demonstrated both endogenous enzyme correction and a small amount of secretion together with uptake by uncorrected cells. These studies demonstrate that endogenous metabolic correction in transduced cells, combined with secretion, may provide a continuous source of corrective material in trans to unmodified patient bystander cells (metabolic cooperativity). Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8755577

  3. Management of thrombocytopenia in advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gangireddy, V G R; Kanneganti, P C; Sridhar, S; Talla, S; Coleman, T

    2014-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia (defined as a platelet count <150×10(9)) is a well-known complication in patients with liver cirrhosis and has been observed in 76% to 85% of patients. Significant thrombocytopenia (platelet count <50×10(9) to 75×10(9)) occurs in approximately 13% of patients with cirrhosis. Thrombocytopenia can negatively impact the care of patients with severe liver disease by potentially interfering with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Multiple factors can contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia including splenic platelet sequestration, immunological processes, bone marrow suppression by chronic viral infection, and reduced levels or activity of the hematopoietic growth factor thrombopoietin. The present review focuses on the etiologies and management options for severe thrombocytopenia in the setting of advanced liver disease.

  4. Interleukin-18 deteriorates Fabry cardiomyopathy and contributes to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy in Fabry patients with GLA IVS4+919 G>A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Lin; Chou, Shih-Jie; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Chen, Kuan-Hsuan; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Liu, Yung-Yang; Lu, Kai-Hsi; Li, Hsin-Yang; Sung, Yen-Jen; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Chen, Yann-Jang; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Yu, Wen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Rationale A high incidence of GLA IVS4+919 G>A mutation in patients with Fabry disease of the later-onset cardiac phenotype, has been reported in Taiwan. However, suitable biomarkers or potential therapeutic surrogates for Fabry cardiomyopathy (FC) in such patients under enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) remain unknown. Objective Using FC patients carrying IVS4+919 G>A mutation, we constructed an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based disease model to investigate the pathogenetic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in ERT-treated FC. Results and methods The iPSC-differentiated cardiomyocytes derived from FC-patients (FC-iPSC-CMs) carried IVS4+919 G>A mutation recapitulating FC characteristics, including low α-galactosidase A enzyme activity, cellular hypertrophy, and massive globotriaosylceramide accumulation. Microarray analysis revealed that interleukin-18 (IL-18), a pleiotropic cytokine involved in various myocardial diseases, was the most highly upregulated marker in FC-iPSC-CMs. Meanwhile, IL-18 levels were found to be significantly elevated in the culture media of FC-iPSC-CMs and patients’ sera. Notably, the serum IL-18 levels were highly paralleled with the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy in Fabry patients receiving ERT. Finally, using FC-iPSC-CMs as in vitro FC model, neutralization of IL-18 with specific antibodies combined with ERT synergistically reduced the secretion of IL-18 and the progression of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in FC-iPSC-CMs. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that cardiac IL-18 and circulating IL-18 are involved in the pathogenesis of FC and LVH. IL-18 may be a novel marker for evaluating ERT efficacy, and targeting IL-18 might be a potential adjunctive therapy combined with ERT for the treatment of advanced cardiomyopathy in FC patients with IVS4+919 G>A mutation. PMID:27888626

  5. Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C F; Khor, Y

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive airflow limitation in the presence of identifiable risk factors. Inflammation is the central pathological feature in the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition to its pulmonary effects, COPD is associated with significant extrapulmonary manifestations, including ischaemic heart disease, osteoporosis, stroke and diabetes. Anxiety and depression are also common. Spirometry remains the gold standard diagnostic tool. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapy can improve symptoms, quality of life and exercise capacity and, through their effects on reducing exacerbations, have the potential to modify disease progression. Bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy, with guidelines recommending a stepwise escalating approach. Smoking cessation is paramount in managing COPD, with promotion of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation being other key factors in management. Comorbidities should be actively sought and managed in their own right. Given the chronicity and progressive nature of COPD, ongoing monitoring and support with timely discussion of advanced-care planning and end-of-life issues are recommended.

  6. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  7. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of three dosing regimens of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in adults with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Goláň, Lubor; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Holida, Myrl; Kantola, Ikka; Klopotowski, Mariusz; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linhart, Aleš; Musial, Jacek; Nicholls, Kathleen; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Derlis; Sharma, Reena; Vujkovac, Bojan; Chang, Peter; Wijatyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Efficacy and safety of agalsidase alfa at 0.2 mg/kg weekly were compared with 0.2 mg/kg every other week (EOW). Exploratory analyses were performed for 0.4 mg/kg weekly. Patients and methods This was a 53-week, Phase III/IV, multicenter, open-label study (NCT01124643) in treatment-naïve adults (≥18 years) with Fabry disease. Inclusion criteria were left ventricular hypertrophy at baseline, defined as left ventricular mass indexed to height >50 g/m2.7 for males and >47 g/m2.7 for females. Primary endpoint was reduction of left ventricular mass indexed to height as assessed by echocardiography. Secondary endpoints included cardiac (peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, New York Heart Association classification), renal (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and biomarker (plasma globotriaosylceramide) assessments. Safety endpoints were adverse events and anti–agalsidase alfa antibodies. Results Twenty patients were randomized to 0.2 mg/kg EOW (mean age, 50.3 years; 70% male), 19 to 0.2 mg/kg weekly (51.8 years; 53% male), and 5 to 0.4 mg/kg weekly (49.4 years; 40% male). The mean change in left ventricular mass indexed to height by Week 53 in the 0.2-mg/kg EOW and weekly groups was 3.2 g/m2.7 and 0.5 g/m2.7, with no significant difference between groups. No clinically meaningful changes by Week 53 were found within or between the 0.2-mg/kg groups for peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, or Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. Two patients in each group improved by ≥1 New York Heart Association classification. No significant differences were found between 0.2 mg/kg EOW and weekly for mean change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (−1.21 mL/min/1.73 m2 vs −3.32 mL/min/1.73 m2) or plasma globotriaosylceramide (−1.05 nmol/mL vs −2.13 nmol/mL), respectively. Infusion-related adverse events were experienced by 25% and 21% in the

  8. An open-label clinical trial of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in children with Fabry disease who are naïve to enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Longo, Nicola; McDonald, Marie; Shankar, Suma P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Chang, Peter; Shen, Yinghua; Pano, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a drug manufacturing process change, safety/efficacy of agalsidase alfa were evaluated in enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)-naïve children with Fabry disease. Methods In an open-label, multicenter, Phase II study (HGT-REP-084; Shire), 14 children aged ≥7 years received 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase alfa every other week for 55 weeks. Primary endpoints: safety, changes in autonomic function (2-hour Holter monitoring). Secondary endpoints: estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), midwall fractional shortening, pharmacodynamic parameters, and patient-reported quality-of-life. Results Among five boys (median 10.2 [range 6.7, 14.4] years) and nine girls (14.8 [10.1, 15.9] years), eight patients experienced infusion-related adverse events (vomiting, n=4; nausea, n=3; dyspnea, n=3; chest discomfort, n=2; chills, n=2; dizziness, n=2; headache, n=2). One of these had several hypersensitivity episodes. However, no patient discontinued for safety reasons and no serious adverse events occurred. One boy developed immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralizing antidrug antibodies. Overall, no deterioration in cardiac function was observed in seven patients with low/abnormal SDNN (standard deviation of all filtered RR intervals; <100 ms) and no left ventricular hypertrophy: mean (SD) baseline SDNN, 81.6 (20.9) ms; mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) change from baseline to week 55, 17.4 (2.9, 31.9) ms. Changes in SDNN correlated with changes in LVMI (r=−0.975). No change occurred in secondary efficacy endpoints: mean (95% CI) change from baseline at week 55 in LVMI, 0.16 (−3.3, 3.7) g/m2.7; midwall fractional shortening, −0.62% (−2.7%, 1.5%); estimated glomerular filtration rate, 0.15 (−11.4, 11.7) mL/min/1.73 m2; urine protein, −1.8 (−6.0, 2.4) mg/dL; urine microalbumin, 0.6 (−0.5, 1.7) mg/dL; plasma globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), −5.71 (−10.8, −0.6) nmol/mL; urinary Gb3, −1,403.3 (−3,714.0, 907.4) nmol/g creatinine

  9. Potential role of vitamin D deficiency on Fabry cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Christiane; Schmiedeke, Benjamin; Niemann, Markus; Schmiedeke, Daniel; Krämer, Johannes; Turkin, Irina; Blouin, Katja; Emmert, Andrea; Pilz, Stefan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Weidemann, Frank; Breunig, Frank; Wanner, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Patients with Fabry disease frequently develop left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and renal fibrosis. Due to heat intolerance and an inability to sweat, patients tend to avoid exposure to sunlight. We hypothesized that subsequent vitamin D deficiency may contribute to Fabry cardiomyopathy. This study investigated the vitamin D status and its association with LV mass and adverse clinical symptoms in patients with Fabry disease. 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) was measured in 111 patients who were genetically proven to have Fabry disease. LV mass and cardiomyopathy were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography. In cross-sectional analyses, associations with adverse clinical outcomes were determined by linear and binary logistic regression analyses, respectively, and were adjusted for age, sex, BMI and season. Patients had a mean age of 40 ± 13 years (42% males), and a mean 25(OH)D of 23.5 ± 11.4 ng/ml. Those with overt vitamin D deficiency (25[OH]D ≤ 15 ng/ml) had an adjusted six fold higher risk of cardiomyopathy, compared to those with sufficient 25(OH)D levels >30 ng/ml (p = 0.04). The mean LV mass was distinctively different with 170 ± 75 g in deficient, 154 ± 60 g in moderately deficient and 128 ± 58 g in vitamin D sufficient patients (p = 0.01). With increasing severity of vitamin D deficiency, the median levels of proteinuria increased, as well as the prevalences of depression, edema, cornea verticillata and the need for medical pain therapy. In conclusion, vitamin D deficiency was strongly associated with cardiomyopathy and adverse clinical symptoms in patients with Fabry disease. Whether vitamin D supplementation improves complications of Fabry disease, requires a randomized controlled trial.

  10. Fabry disease: incidence of the common later-onset α-galactosidase A IVS4+919G→A mutation in Taiwanese newborns--superiority of DNA-based to enzyme-based newborn screening for common mutations.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Lee, Ni-Chung; Chiang, Shu-Chuan; Desnick, Robert J; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2012-07-18

    Fabry disease is a panethnic, X-linked, inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism resulting from mutations in the α-galactosidase A gene (GLA) that lead to the deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme, α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). Affected males with no α-Gal A activity have the early-onset classic phenotype, whereas those with residual activity present with the later-onset subtype. Recently, we reported that newborn enzyme-based screening using dried blood spots (DBS) in Taiwan revealed a high incidence of newborn males who had the GLA c.936+919G→A (IVS4+919G→A) mutation. This lesion causes cryptic splicing, markedly reducing the amount of wild-type GLA mRNA, and has been found in males with the later-onset Fabry phenotype, manifesting as cardiac, renal and/or cerebrovascular disease. To more accurately determine the incidence of the IVS4+919G→A mutation, 20,063 consecutive newborns were screened by a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based assay. Of the 10,499 males, 12 (1/875) and 24 of the 9,564 females (1/399) had the mutation. On the basis of these frequencies, the previous newborn enzyme-based DBS screening (cutoff: <30% of the normal mean) only identified 67% and 17% of mutation-positive males and females, respectively. The mean DBS α-Gal A activities in the mutation-positive males and females were 23% (1.54 U) and 55% (3.63 U) of normal mean male/female values, respectively. These studies confirm the high incidence of the IVS4+919G→A mutation in the Taiwanese population and indicate that its detectability by enzyme-based DBS screening is unreliable, especially in females. These studies emphasize the superiority of DNA-based newborn screening for common mutations, particularly for X-linked diseases.

  11. Advanced imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2017-04-01

    Although echocardiography remains the mainstay imaging technique for the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), innovations in noninvasive imaging in the past few years have provided new insights into the pathophysiology and quantification of VHD, early detection of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and advanced prognostic assessment. The severity grading of valve dysfunction has been refined with the use of Doppler echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and CT imaging. LV ejection fraction remains an important criterion when deciding whether patients should be referred for surgery. However, echocardiographic strain imaging can now detect impaired LV systolic function before LV ejection fraction reduces, thus provoking the debate on whether patients with severe VHD should be referred for surgery at an earlier stage (before symptom onset). Impaired LV strain correlates with the amount of myocardial fibrosis detected with CMR techniques. Furthermore, accumulating data show that the extent of fibrosis associated with severe VHD has important prognostic implications. The present Review focuses on using these novel imaging modalities to assess pathophysiology, early LV dysfunction, and prognosis of major VHDs, including aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, and aortic regurgitation.

  12. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: Advances and strategies.

    PubMed

    Delenclos, Marion; Jones, Daryl R; McLean, Pamela J; Uitti, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor disturbances and affects more than 1% of the worldwide population. Despite considerable progress in understanding PD pathophysiology, including genetic and biochemical causes, diagnostic approaches lack accuracy and interventions are restricted to symptomatic treatments. PD is a complex syndrome with different clinical subtypes and a wide variability in disorder course. In order to deliver better clinical management of PD patients and discovery of novel therapies, there is an urgent need to find sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers. The development of biomarkers will not only help the scientific community to identify populations at risk, but also facilitate clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, these tools could monitor progression, which could ultimately deliver personalized therapeutic strategies. The field of biomarker discovery in PD has attracted significant attention and there have been numerous contributions in recent years. Although none of the parameters have been validated for clinical practice, some candidates hold promise. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of PD biomarkers and discusses new strategies for their utilization.

  13. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: Advances and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Delenclos, Marion; Jones, Daryl R.; McLean, Pamela J.; Uitti, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor disturbances and affects more than 1% of the worldwide population. Despite considerable progress in understanding PD pathophysiology, including genetic and biochemical causes, diagnostic approaches lack accuracy and interventions are restricted to symptomatic treatments. PD is a complex syndrome with different clinical subtypes and a wide variability in disorder course. In order to deliver better clinical management of PD patients and discovery of novel therapies, there is an urgent need to find sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers. The development of biomarkers will not only help the scientific community to identify populations at risk, but also facilitate clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, these tools could monitor progression, which could ultimately deliver personalized therapeutic strategies. The field of biomarker discovery in PD has attracted significant attention and there have been numerous contributions in recent years. Although none of the parameters have been validated for clinical practice, some candidates hold promise. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of PD biomarkers and discusses new strategies for their utilization. PMID:26439946

  14. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  15. The prevalent deep intronic c. 639+919 G>A GLA mutation causes pseudoexon activation and Fabry disease by abolishing the binding of hnRNPA1 and hnRNP A2/B1 to a splicing silencer.

    PubMed

    Palhais, Bruno; Dembic, Maja; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Nielsen, Kira S; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2016-11-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive inborn disorder of the glycosphingolipid metabolism, caused by total or partial deficiency of the lysosomal α-galactosidase A enzyme due to mutations in the GLA gene. The prevalent c.639+919 G>A mutation in GLA leads to pathogenic insertion of a 57bp pseudoexon sequence from intron 4, which is responsible for the cardiac variant phenotype. In this study we investigate the splicing regulatory mechanism leading to GLA pseudoexon activation. Splicing analysis of GLA minigenes revealed that pseudoexon activation is influenced by cell-type. We demonstrate that the wild-type sequence harbors an hnRNP A1 and hnRNP A2/B1-binding exonic splicing silencer (ESS) overlapping the 5'splice site (5'ss) that prevents pseudoexon inclusion. The c.639+919 G>A mutation disrupts this ESS allowing U1 snRNP recognition of the 5'ss. We show that the wild-type GLA 5'ss motif with the ESS is also able to inhibit inclusion of an unrelated pseudoexon in the FGB gene, and that also in the FGB context inactivation of the ESS by the c.639+919 G>A mutation causes pseudoexon activation, underscoring the universal nature of the ESS. Finally, we demonstrate that splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) mediated blocking of the pseudoexon 3'ss and 5'ss effectively restores normal GLA splicing. This indicates that SSO based splicing correction may be a therapeutic alternative in the treatment of Fabry disease.

  16. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    SciTech Connect

    Glenner, G.G.; Wurtman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease.

  17. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory diseases in 2009.

    PubMed

    Peden, David B; Bush, Robert K

    2010-03-01

    The year 2009 led to a number of significant advances in environmental and occupational allergic diseases. The role of exposure to environmental pollutants, respiratory viruses, and allergen exposure showed significant advances. New allergens were identified. Occupational asthma and the relationship of complementary and alternative medicine to allergic diseases were extensively reviewed. New approaches to immunotherapy, novel vaccine techniques, and methods to reduce risks for severe allergic disease were addressed.

  18. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy: prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Putko, Brendan N; Wen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard B; Mullen, John; Shanks, Miriam; Yogasundaram, Haran; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-03-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the inappropriate accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in tissues due to a deficiency in the enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is characterized by structural, valvular, vascular and conduction abnormalities, and is now the most common cause of mortality in patients with AFD. Large-scale metabolic and genetic screening studies have revealed AFD to be prevalent in populations of diverse ethnic origins, and the variant form of AFD represents an unrecognized health burden. Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder, and genetic testing is critical for the diagnosis of AFD in women. Echocardiography with strain imaging and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late enhancement and T1 mapping are important imaging tools. The current therapy for AFD is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which can reverse or prevent AFD progression, while gene therapy and the use of molecular chaperones represent promising novel therapies for AFD. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially reversible cause of heart failure that involves LVH, increased susceptibility to arrhythmias and valvular regurgitation. Genetic testing and cardiac MRI are important diagnostic tools, and AFD cardiomyopathy is treatable if ERT is introduced early.

  19. Successful Advance Directives through Quality Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Parke, Bob; Krajewski, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Recently there has been talk about the benefit of advance care planning. This is an issue which resurfaces from time to time, as is evident in recent New England Journal of Medicine articles and editorials (April 2010). It has also resurfaced in Canada in a recent document titled Advance Care Planning in Canada: National Framework for Consultation (Health Canada 2010). This document acknowledges that many of us believe in the value of advance directives, finding "that most of the general public (60-90%) is supportive of advance care planning. However, only 10-20% of the public in the US, Canada and Australia have completed an advance care plan of any kind" (Health Canada 2010: 6). In Muriel R. Gillick's editorial in the New England Journal Medicine, she strongly makes the point that few people complete advance directives and further states that "directives have been a resounding failure" (Gillick 2010: 1239). These statements, although not exhaustive on the subject, show that we have a problem translating the support for advance directives into actual plans.

  20. Calibrating echelle spectrographs with Fabry-Pérot etalons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F. F.; Zechmeister, M.; Reiners, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Over the past decades hollow-cathode lamps have been calibration standards for spectroscopic measurements. Advancing to cm/s radial velocity precisions with the next generation of instruments requires more suitable calibration sources with more lines and fewer dynamic range problems. Fabry-Pérot interferometers provide a regular and dense grid of lines and homogeneous amplitudes, which makes them good candidates for next-generation calibrators. Aims: We investigate the usefulness of Fabry-Pérot etalons in wavelength calibration, present an algorithm to incorporate the etalon spectrum in the wavelength solution, and examine potential problems. Methods: The quasi-periodic pattern of Fabry-Pérot lines was used along with a hollow-cathode lamp to anchor the numerous spectral features on an absolute scale. We tested our method with the HARPS spectrograph and compared our wavelength solution to the one derived from a laser frequency comb. Results: The combined hollow-cathode lamp/etalon calibration overcomes large distortion (50 m/s) in the wavelength solution of the HARPS data reduction software. The direct comparison to the laser frequency comb shows differences of only 10 m/s at most. Conclusions: Combining hollow-cathode lamps with Fabry-Pérot interferometers can lead to substantial improvements in the wavelength calibration of echelle spectrographs. Etalons can provide economical alternatives to the laser frequency comb, especially for smaller projects.

  1. [Advances in the diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Fiedler, U; Wiltfang, J; Peters, N; Benninghoff, J

    2012-05-01

    Due to the demographic developments, diagnosis and treatment, dementia constitutes an increasing medical challenge and is likely to have an increasing socioeconomic impact. Dementia does not reflect a single disease but encompasses a variety of underlying conditions, heterogeneous clinical courses and therapeutic approaches, among which Alzheimer's disease represents the most common cause. Therefore, a thorough differential diagnosis of dementia is of major importance. To date the current diagnosis of dementia according to ICD-10/DMS-IV is based on clinical criteria. In addition, the concept of mild cognitive impairment comprises early cognitive dysfunction without clinically apparent dementia. Alzheimer's disease is more and more conceptualized as a disease continuum with mild cognitive impairment as an early and manifest dementia as the later stage of the disease. This review gives an overview on the current diagnostic approaches and the proposed revisions of diagnostic and research criteria for Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment.

  3. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases.

  4. Advances in management of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M B

    2003-08-01

    Sickle cell disease is numerically as common as thalassaemia. However, it affects relatively under privileged population i.e. tribal population belonging to economically poor class and having inadequate access to education and modern health facilities. A recent explosion acknowledged in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease has lead to newer dimensions in treatment. Some of these viz. prevention of overwhelming bacterial infection, present indications and controversies regarding blood transfusion, prevention of stroke, acute chest syndrome, hydroxyurea therapy--probably the best disease modifying agent at the moment, stem cell transplantation--a cure and certain promising experimental therapies including gene therapy have been discussed in this review.

  5. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future.

  6. Glycosphingolipid storage in Fabry mice extends beyond globotriaosylceramide and is affected by ABCB1 depletion

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Mustafa A; Provençal, Philippe; Boutin, Michel; Pacienza, Natalia; Fan, Xin; Novak, Anton; Huang, Tonny C; Binnington, Beth; Au, Bryan C; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Lingwood, Clifford A; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Fabry disease is caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency leading to accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in tissues. Clinical manifestations do not appear to correlate with total Gb3 levels. Studies examining tissue distribution of specific acyl chain species of Gb3 and upstream glycosphingolipids are lacking. Material & methods/Results: Thorough characterization of the Fabry mouse sphingolipid profile by LC-MS revealed unique Gb3 acyl chain storage profiles. Storage extended beyond Gb3; all Fabry tissues also accumulated monohexosylceramides. Depletion of ABCB1 had a complex effect on glycosphingolipid storage. Conclusion: These data provide insights into how specific sphingolipid species correlate with one another and how these correlations change in the α-galactosidase A-deficient state, potentially leading to the identification of more specific biomarkers of Fabry disease. PMID:28116130

  7. Advances in the genetics of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Joanne; Farrer, Matt

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that was long considered the result of environmental factors. In the past 15 years, however, a genetic aetiology for PD has begun to emerge. Here, we review results from linkage and next-generation sequencing studies of familial parkinsonism, as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association findings in sporadic PD. In these studies, many of the genetic findings overlap, despite different designs and study populations, highlighting novel therapeutic targets. The molecular results delineate a sequence of pathological events whereby deficits in synaptic exocytosis and endocytosis, endosomal trafficking, lysosome-mediated autophagy and mitochondrial maintenance increase susceptibility to PD. These discoveries provide the rationale, molecular insight and research tools to develop neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies.

  8. Chemotherapy in advanced malignant diseases in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Talib, Hussein

    1971-01-01

    This work discusses the experience of one surgical team in the Third Surgical Unit at the Republican Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, from 1967 to 1970. 112 patients with advanced malignant lesions in various parts of the body were dealt with. In 84, the intra-arterial route was adopted; in the remaining, systemic administration of cytotoxic agents either singly or in combination was employed. The results are reported in terms of subjective and objective response, and the various complications are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5137574

  9. [Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Belén Arnalich; Pumarega, Irene Cano; Ausiró, Anna Mola; Izquierdo Alonso, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by poorly reversible, chronic airflow obstruction, from the clinical point of view we must continue to make progress in the diagnosis and management of these patients so that spirometry is not the only technique used. Understanding that COPD is a heterogeneous process and that patient complexity usually increases due to the presence of comorbidities will allow more individualized strategies to be designed, which may improve control of the process. The TORCH and UPLIFT trials have shown that current treatment can improve important aspects of the disease, including mortality. However, the finalizing of these two large trials has generated a current of opinion favoring a more individually-tailored approach that should include all the factors -both pulmonary and extrapulmonary- that can modify the patient's form of presentation. Although we are witnessing a change in the therapeutic approach to COPD, future treatment will probably be based on studies performed in specific patient subgroups and on clarifying the interrelation between COPD and other diseases that are common in these patients. Greater knowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease may improve pharmacological treatment but drugs that, by themselves, alter the short- and longterm course of COPD are not on the horizon. However, a more patient-focussed approach may be the main tool available to physicians to increase quality of life -and possibly survival- in these patients.

  10. Advances in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit; Sirlin, Claude B.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Lavine, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents in the United States. A two- to three-fold rise in the rates of obesity and overweight in children over the last 2 decades is probably responsible for the epidemic of NAFLD. Emerging data suggest that children with NASH progress to cirrhosis which may ultimately increase liver-related mortality. More worrisome is the recognition that cardiovascular risk and morbidity in children and adolescents is associated with fatty liver. Pediatric fatty liver disease often displays a histologic pattern distinct from that found in adults. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of NASH. Non-invasive biomarkers are needed to identify individuals with progressive liver injury. Targeted therapies to improve liver histology and metabolic abnormalities associated with fatty liver are needed. Currently, randomized-controlled trials are underway in the pediatric population to define pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD. Public health awareness and intervention are needed to promote healthy diet, exercise, and lifestyle modifications to prevent and reduce the burden of disease in the community. PMID:19637286

  11. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: advances and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ates, Fehmi; Francis, David O; Vaezi, Michael F

    2014-08-01

    'Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease' is one of the most common misnomers in the area of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The term implies reflux as the underlying etiology despite unresponsiveness to aggressive proton pump inhibitor therapy. The term should be replaced with 'refractory symptoms.' We must acknowledge that in many patients symptoms of reflux often overlap with non-GERD causes such as gastroparesis, dyspepsia, hypersensitive esophagus and functional disorders. Lack of response to aggressive acid suppressive therapy often leads to diagnostic testing. In majority of patients these tests are normal. The role of non-acid reflux in this group is uncertain and patients should not undergo surgical fundoplication based on this parameter. In patients unresponsive to acid suppressive therapy GERD is most commonly not causal and a search for non-GERD causes must ensue.

  12. Advances in the prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangialasche, Francesca; Kivipelto, Miia

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, has reached epidemic proportions, with major social, medical and economical burdens. With no currently available curative treatments, both the World Health Organization and the G8 Dementia Summit recently identified dementia and AD prevention as a major public health priority. Dementia and AD have a wide range of risk factors (genetic, vascular/metabolic and lifestyle-related), which often co-occur and thus interact with each other. Previous intervention efforts aimed at preventing dementia and AD focused on the management of single risk factors, with relatively modest findings. Also, the effect of risk factors depends on age at exposure, indicating that the timing of preventive interventions needs to be carefully considered. In view of the complex multifactorial nature of AD, as well as its long pre-clinical (asymptomatic) phase, interventions simultaneously targeting multiple risk factors and disease mechanisms at an early stage of the disease are most likely to be effective. Three large European multidomain prevention trials have been launched with the goal of preventing cognitive decline, dementia and AD in older adults with different risk profiles. Pharmacological trials are also shifting towards prevention of Alzheimer dementia, by targeting at-risk individuals prior to the onset of cognitive symptoms. The current review will summarize and discuss the evidence on risk and protective factors from observational studies, ongoing lifestyle-related and pharmacological randomized controlled trials (RCTs), as well as future directions for dementia and AD prevention. PMID:26097723

  13. Prostate cancer: 9. Treatment of advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, M E; Bruchovsky, N; Moore, M J; Venner, P

    1999-01-01

    A 70-year-old man is referred to a urologist for recommendations on the management of metastatic prostate cancer. His cancer was diagnosed 5 years ago, and he underwent radical prostatectomy at that time. The tumour was confined to the prostate gland (Gleason score 7), and during surgery the lymph nodes were assessed as being clear of cancer. Before the surgery, the patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level had been 8 ng/mL. After the prostatectomy, PSA was at first undetectable, but recently the PSA level rose to 2 ng/mL and then, at the most recent test, to 16 ng/mL. A bone scan was ordered to investigate back discomfort, which has been persistent but easily controlled with acetaminophen. Unfortunately, the bone scan shows several sites of metastatic disease. The man's medical history includes type 2 diabetes, which has developed during the past 3 years and which is controlled by diet, as well as asymptomatic hypertension, which is managed by means of a thiazide diuretic. The patient asks what treatments are available, what impact they are likely to have on his disease and what risks are associated with the therapies. PMID:9951446

  14. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  15. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease in 2010.

    PubMed

    Peden, David B; Bush, Robert K

    2011-03-01

    2010 Found a number of significant advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease. The role of sensitization and the subsequent production of allergic disease have been explored. New allergens and their T- and B-cell epitopes have been characterized. Novel approaches to the diagnosis and evaluation of food allergy have been described. The role of pollutants as they affect respiratory disease and the effects of age extremes on sensitization and asthma have been addressed. Significant advances in the understanding of inflammatory changes in both the upper and lower respiratory systems occurred. Novel therapeutic approaches have been explored, including the development of hypoallergens from improved molecular biology techniques. New effective approaches to asthma therapy have been identified. Exposure reduction through air filtration and novel immunotherapy approaches, such as sublingual therapy, have made significant advances.

  16. Alzheimer's disease: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ubhi, Kiren; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory deficits and other cognitive disturbances. Neuropathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that innervate the hippocampus and cortex and the abnormal extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β and intracellular tau protein. Current research on AD is focused on the mechanisms underlying the abnormal oligomerization, fibrillation, and accumulation of the amyloid-β and tau proteins, mechanisms that may alter the dynamics of this accumulation and on experimental therapeutics approaches aimed at the clearance of the abnormally folded proteins and other potentially neuroprotective interventions. This review will summarize the main areas of investigation in AD and present ways forward for future work.

  17. Kidney disease in children: latest advances and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John F; Goldstein, Stuart L; Pape, Lars; Schaefer, Franz; Shroff, Rukshana C; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-03-01

    To mark World Kidney Day 2016, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited six leading researchers to highlight the key advances and challenges within their specialist field of paediatric nephrology. Here, advances and remaining challenges in the fields of prenatal patterning, acute kidney injury, renal transplantation, genetics, cardiovascular health, and growth and nutrition, are all discussed within the context of paediatric and neonatal patients with kidney disease. Our global panel of researchers describe areas in which further studies and clinical advances are needed, and suggest ways in which research in these areas should progress to optimize renal care and long-term outcomes for affected patients.

  18. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them.

  19. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed Central

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them. PMID:27252737

  20. Glucocerebrosidase and Parkinson disease: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V

    2015-05-01

    Mutations of the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are the most important risk factor yet discovered for Parkinson disease (PD). Homozygous GBA mutations result in Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder. Heterozygous mutations have not until recently been thought to be associated with any pathological process. However, it is clear that the presence of a GBA mutation in homozygous or heterozygous form is associated with an approximately 20-fold increase in the risk for PD, with little if any difference in risk burden related to gene dose. Most studies suggest that 5-10% of PD patients have GBA mutations, although this figure is greater in the Ashkenazi population and may be an underestimate overall if the entire exome is not sequenced. GBA-associated PD is clinically indistinguishable from idiopathic PD, except for slightly earlier age of onset and a greater frequency of cognitive impairment. Pathological and imaging features, and response to pharmacotherapy are identical to idiopathic PD. GBA mutations result in reduced enzyme activity and mutant protein may become trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leading to unfolded protein response and ER associated degradation and stress. Both mechanisms may be relevant in GD and PD pathogenesis and lead to impaired lysosomal function. Of particular relevance to PD is the interaction of glucocerebrosidase enzyme (GCase) with alpha-synuclein (SNCA). There appears to be a bi-directional reciprocal relationship between GCase levels and those of SNCA. Thus reduced GCase in GBA mutation PD brain is associated with increased SNCA, and increased SNCA deposition is associated with reduced GCase even in GBA wild-type PD brains. It is noteworthy that GBA mutations are also associated with an increase in risk for dementia with Lewy bodies, another synucleinopathy. It has been suggested that the relationship between GCase and SNCA may be leveraged to reduce SNCA levels in PD by enhancing GCase levels and activity. This

  1. [Recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing for rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Tohru

    2004-09-01

    Immunologic laboratory tests serve critical roles in the care of patients with various rheumatic diseases. These tests can provide relevant information of rheumatic diseases based on their immunopathophysiological condition. Although immunologic laboratory tests are quite useful for the determination of diagnosis and the estimation of disease activity, organ involvement and prognosis, they are frequently misused and resulted in an inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests and accurate clinical interpretation of the test results can prevent false diagnosis and unnecessary treatment. In order to improve clinical care of patients with rheumatic diseases, clinicians caring patients with rheumatic disease should recognize meanings, characteristics and limitations of each result of immunologic laboratory testing. This article reviewed recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing such as antinuclear antibody, anti-DNA antibody and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, and introduced guidelines for these testing. These guidelines based on evidences of EBM may contribute to the appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests for rheumatic diseases.

  2. Multiplex Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Snell, Hilary E.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) technique in which one of the etalon plates is moved over a large optical distance while the other remains fixed, thus exploiting the multiplex advantage of the instrument. This technique involves the application of Fourier-transform spectrometer to the multiple harmonics passing through the FPI etalon. It is shown that the multiplex FPI acts as several Michelson interferometers working at the same time, over the same spectral interval, and at different spectral resolutions. A high spectral resolution has been obtained over a large wavenumber interval, while the advantage of a reasonable scan length has been retained.

  3. Emerging and Neglected Infectious Diseases: Insights, Advances, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases are a significant burden on public health and economic stability of societies all over the world. They have for centuries been among the leading causes of death and disability and presented growing challenges to health security and human progress. The threat posed by infectious diseases is further deepened by the continued emergence of new, unrecognized, and old infectious disease epidemics of global impact. Over the past three and half decades at least 30 new infectious agents affecting humans have emerged, most of which are zoonotic and their origins have been shown to correlate significantly with socioeconomic, environmental, and ecological factors. As these factors continue to increase, putting people in increased contact with the disease causing pathogens, there is concern that infectious diseases may continue to present a formidable challenge. Constant awareness and pursuance of effective strategies for controlling infectious diseases and disease emergence thus remain crucial. This review presents current updates on emerging and neglected infectious diseases and highlights the scope, dynamics, and advances in infectious disease management with particular focus on WHO top priority emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and neglected tropical infectious diseases. PMID:28286767

  4. A Distinct Urinary Biomarker Pattern Characteristic of Female Fabry Patients That Mirrors Response to Enzyme Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, Andreas D.; Siwy, Justyna; Breunig, Frank; Jeevaratnam, Praveen; Scherl, Alexander; Mullen, William; Warnock, David G.; Wanner, Christoph; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Mischak, Harald; Wüthrich, Rudolf P.; Serra, Andreas L.

    2011-01-01

    Female patients affected by Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, exhibit a wide spectrum of symptoms, which renders diagnosis, and treatment decisions challenging. No diagnostic test, other than sequencing of the alpha-galactosidase A gene, is available and no biomarker has been proven useful to screen for the disease, predict disease course and monitor response to enzyme replacement therapy. Here, we used urine proteomic analysis based on capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry and identified a biomarker profile in adult female Fabry patients. Urine samples were taken from 35 treatment-naïve female Fabry patients and were compared to 89 age-matched healthy controls. We found a diagnostic biomarker pattern that exhibited 88.2% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity when tested in an independent validation cohort consisting of 17 treatment-naïve Fabry patients and 45 controls. The model remained highly specific when applied to additional control patients with a variety of other renal, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Several of the 64 identified diagnostic biomarkers showed correlations with measures of disease severity. Notably, most biomarkers responded to enzyme replacement therapy, and 8 of 11 treated patients scored negative for Fabry disease in the diagnostic model. In conclusion, we defined a urinary biomarker model that seems to be of diagnostic use for Fabry disease in female patients and may be used to monitor response to enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:21698285

  5. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease in 2007.

    PubMed

    Bush, Robert K; Peden, David

    2008-06-01

    This review of key articles appearing in the Journal in 2008 represents significant advances in the understanding of the interrelationships between the environment and allergic respiratory diseases. New allergens have been identified and characterized. Improvements in diagnostic techniques and methods to assess environmental allergen exposure have been developed. The novel therapeutics and refinements of allergen avoidance approaches will improve patient care. A fuller appreciation of the complexities of environmental factors in allergic diseases can lead to better preventative measures. Lastly, the increasingly important role of pollutants on inflammatory processes is evolving. The articles discussed will add to our increasing knowledge base and advance the ability to more effectively treat patients with allergic respiratory diseases and expand research opportunities.

  6. Planetary Fabry-Perot spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Application of high spectral resolution, Earth-based Fabry-Perot spectroscopy to the study of planetary atmospheres, for which current topics are outer planet HD and H2 spectra (atmospheric structure, D/H ratio), Mars CO2, CO, O2, and H2O spectra (atomspheric photochemistry), Venus H2O and HDO, associated laboratory spectroscopy (especially H2 overtone bands, HDO) was accomplished. Monochromatic charge coupled device (CCD) imaging photometry of the Jovian nebula, with images taken in rapid sequence among the diagnostic spectral lines of ionized sulfur species, provided self-supporting snapshots of the Jupiter/Io plasma conditions (spatially resolved electron and ion densities and temperatures), covering the post-Voyager period from 1981 and leading up to the Galileo tour in the early 1990s. High spectral resolution Fabry-Perot/charge coupled device (CCD) imaging of comets (OI, CI, and H2O(+) velocity maps and spatial distriubtions), and Io's charge exchanged neutral jet was studied.

  7. Recent advances in metabolomics in neurological disease, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-10-01

    Discovery of clinically relevant biomarkers for diseases has revealed metabolomics has potential advantages that classical diagnostic approaches do not. The great asset of metabolomics is that it enables assessment of global metabolic profiles of biofluids and discovery of biomarkers distinguishing disease status, with the possibility of enhancing clinical diagnostics. Most current clinical chemistry tests rely on old technology, and are neither sensitive nor specific for a particular disease. Clinical diagnosis of major neurological disorders, for example Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, on the basis of current clinical criteria is unsatisfactory. Emerging metabolomics is a powerful technique for discovering novel biomarkers and biochemical pathways to improve diagnosis, and for determination of prognosis and therapy. Identifying multiple novel biomarkers for neurological diseases has been greatly enhanced with recent advances in metabolomics that are more accurate than routine clinical practice. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is known to be a rich source of small-molecule biomarkers for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and is in close contact with diseased areas in neurological disorders, could potentially be used for disease diagnosis. Metabolomics will drive CSF analysis, facilitate and improve the development of disease treatment, and result in great benefits to public health in the long-term. This review covers different aspects of CSF metabolomics and discusses their significance in the postgenomic era, emphasizing the potential importance of endogenous small-molecule metabolites in this emerging field.

  8. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  9. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all parts of gastroenterology and hepatology, there have been many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed for 2008 and 2009, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part I of this Editorial Review, seven topics are considered: intestinal development; proliferation and repair; intestinal permeability; microbiotica, infectious diarrhea and probiotics; diarrhea; salt and water absorption; necrotizing enterocolitis; and immunology/allergy. These topics were chosen because of their importance to the practicing physician. PMID:22807604

  10. Advances in non-dopaminergic treatments for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Stayte, Sandy; Vissel, Bryce

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1960's treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been directed to restore or replace dopamine, with L-Dopa being the gold standard. However, chronic L-Dopa use is associated with debilitating dyskinesias, limiting its effectiveness. This has resulted in extensive efforts to develop new therapies that work in ways other than restoring or replacing dopamine. Here we describe newly emerging non-dopaminergic therapeutic strategies for PD, including drugs targeting adenosine, glutamate, adrenergic, and serotonin receptors, as well as GLP-1 agonists, calcium channel blockers, iron chelators, anti-inflammatories, neurotrophic factors, and gene therapies. We provide a detailed account of their success in animal models and their translation to human clinical trials. We then consider how advances in understanding the mechanisms of PD, genetics, the possibility that PD may consist of multiple disease states, understanding of the etiology of PD in non-dopaminergic regions as well as advances in clinical trial design will be essential for ongoing advances. We conclude that despite the challenges ahead, patients have much cause for optimism that novel therapeutics that offer better disease management and/or which slow disease progression are inevitable. PMID:24904259

  11. Advances in celiac disease and gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Niewinski, Mary M

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is becoming an increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten. Once thought to be a rare disease of childhood characterized by diarrhea, celiac disease is actually a multisystemic disorder that occurs as a result of an immune response to ingested gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Screening studies have revealed that celiac disease is most common in asymptomatic adults in the United States. Although considerable scientific progress has been made in understanding celiac disease and in preventing or curing its manifestations, a strict gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease to date. Early diagnosis and treatment, together with regular follow-up visits with a dietitian, are necessary to ensure nutritional adequacy and to prevent malnutrition while adhering to the gluten-free diet for life. The purpose of this review is to provide clinicians with current updated information about celiac disease, its diverse clinical presentation and increased prevalence, the complex pathophysiology and strong genetic predisposition to celiac disease, and its diagnosis. This review focuses in detail on the gluten-free diet and the importance of intense expert dietary counseling for all patients with celiac disease. Recent advances in the gluten-free diet include food allergen labeling as well as the US Food and Drug Administration's proposed definition of the food-labeling term gluten-free. The gluten-free diet is complex and patients need comprehensive nutrition education from a skilled dietitian.

  12. Fabry-Perot interferometry for microplasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, H.; Mase, A.

    2006-10-15

    A new method for determining the electron density of a thin plasma by means of Fabry-Perot interferometry is proposed. The interferometer consists of two plasma layers and dielectric material surrounded by two plasma layers. The transmittance of electromagnetic waves across the interferometer is calculated, and Fabry-Perot resonances are demonstrated. It is shown that the electron density can be determined from the measurement of the Fabry-Perot resonance frequencies. This method can also be applied to the measurement of conduction electron density in semiconductor films.

  13. Glutathione peroxidase in early and advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, P; Velander, G; Mai, J; Thorling, E B; Dupont, E

    1991-01-01

    A defective antioxidant scavenging system plays a major role in one of the theories of the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a general difference in antioxidant activity between early and advanced cases of Parkinson's disease. Twenty five recently diagnosed patients, without any clinical fluctuations (group A), and 25 patients in a late phase of the disease with severe fluctuations in response to levodopa therapy (group B) were included in the study. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase was determined as a measure of antioxidant activity and significantly lower values were found in group B than in group A. Regression analyses in groups A and B showed significant correlation between glutathione peroxidase and duration of disease, but not between glutathione peroxidase and age of patients. Images PMID:1940936

  14. Advancing digital methods in the fight against communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Seaman, Vincent Y; Wenger, Jay; Moonen, Bruno; Magill, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Important advances are being made in the fight against communicable diseases by using new digital tools. While they can be a challenge to deploy at-scale, GPS-enabled smartphones, electronic dashboards and computer models have multiple benefits. They can facilitate program operations, lead to new insights about the disease transmission and support strategic planning. Today, tools such as these are used to vaccinate more children against polio in Nigeria, reduce the malaria burden in Zambia and help predict the spread of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

  15. Nutrition Intervention for Advanced Stages of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF For the goals of reducing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) onset and progression, approaches to nutritional therapy are a subject of much debate. This article discusses selected nutrients that have a role in affecting DKD outcomes and introduces application of newer, individualized concepts for healthful eating, as supported by clinical evidence relevant to patients with DKD. Selected aspects of management of advanced DKD are also reviewed. PMID:26300611

  16. Nutrition Intervention for Advanced Stages of Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-08-01

    IN BRIEF For the goals of reducing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) onset and progression, approaches to nutritional therapy are a subject of much debate. This article discusses selected nutrients that have a role in affecting DKD outcomes and introduces application of newer, individualized concepts for healthful eating, as supported by clinical evidence relevant to patients with DKD. Selected aspects of management of advanced DKD are also reviewed.

  17. The birth of Tor Vergata Fabry-Pérot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, L.; Berrilli, F.; Cocciolo, M.; Del Moro, D.; Egidi, A.; Piazzesi, R.; Stangalini, M.

    2012-10-01

    Fabry-Pérot tunable niters are of great interest in high spectral resolution imaging for both ground-based and space astronomical observations. Major advantages include imaging capabilities and the study of extended astronomical sources, such as the solar photosphere. The high transparency of the instrument allows the high time-resolution necessary for the observation of fast dynamic processes. The prototype here presented has been developed as part of the study for the narrow band channel of the ADAHELI mission. The ADvanced Astronomy for HELIophysics (ADAHELI) is a solar satellite designed to investigate the dynamics of solar atmosphere as part of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) program.

  18. Linear and Curvilinear Trajectories of Cortical Loss with Advancing Age and Disease Duration in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Daniel O; Dobolyi, David G; Isaacs, David A; Roman, Olivia C; Herb, Joshua; Wylie, Scott A; Neimat, Joseph S; Donahue, Manus J; Hedera, Peter; Zald, David H; Landman, Bennett A; Bowman, Aaron B; Dawant, Benoit M; Rane, Swati

    2016-05-01

    Advancing age and disease duration both contribute to cortical thinning in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the pathological interactions between them are poorly described. This study aims to distinguish patterns of cortical decline determined by advancing age and disease duration in PD. A convenience cohort of 177 consecutive PD patients, identified at the Vanderbilt University Movement Disorders Clinic as part of a clinical evaluation for Deep Brain Stimulation (age: M= 62.0, SD 9.3), completed a standardized clinical assessment, along with structural brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan. Age and gender matched controls (n=53) were obtained from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and Progressive Parkinson's Marker Initiative (age: M= 63.4, SD 12.2). Estimated changes in cortical thickness were modeled with advancing age, disease duration, and their interaction. The best-fitting model, linear or curvilinear (2(nd), or 3(rd) order natural spline), was defined using the minimum Akaike Information Criterion, and illustrated on a 3-dimensional brain. Three curvilinear patterns of cortical thinning were identified: early decline, late decline, and early-stable-late. In contrast to healthy controls, the best-fit model for age related changes in PD is curvilinear (early decline), particularly in frontal and precuneus regions. With advancing disease duration, a curvilinear model depicts accelerating decline in the occipital cortex. A significant interaction between advancing age and disease duration is evident in frontal, motor, and posterior parietal areas. Study results support the hypothesis that advancing age and disease duration differentially affect regional cortical thickness and display regional dependent linear and curvilinear patterns of thinning.

  19. A Novel Rapid MALDI-TOF-MS-Based Method for Measuring Urinary Globotriaosylceramide in Fabry Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Fahad J.; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Ward, Douglas G.

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in various organs. Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and its isoforms and analogues have been identified and quantified as biomarkers of disease severity and treatment efficacy. The current study aimed to establish rapid methods for urinary Gb3 extraction and quantitation. Urine samples from 15 Fabry patients and 21 healthy control subjects were processed to extract Gb3 by mixing equal volumes of urine, methanol containing an internal standard, and chloroform followed by sonication and centrifugation. Thereafter, the lower phase was analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the relative peak areas of the internal standard and four major species of Gb3 determined. The results showed high reproducibility with intra- and inter-assay coefficients variation of 9.9% and 13.7%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.15 ng/μL and the limit of quantitation was 0.30 ng/μL. Total urinary Gb3 levels in both genders of classic Fabry patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Gb3 levels in Fabry males were higher than in Fabry females (p = 0.08). We have established a novel assay for urinary total Gb3 that takes less than 15 min from start to finish.

  20. A Novel Rapid MALDI-TOF-MS-Based Method for Measuring Urinary Globotriaosylceramide in Fabry Patients.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Fahad J; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Hughes, Derralynn A; Ward, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in various organs. Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and its isoforms and analogues have been identified and quantified as biomarkers of disease severity and treatment efficacy. The current study aimed to establish rapid methods for urinary Gb3 extraction and quantitation. Urine samples from 15 Fabry patients and 21 healthy control subjects were processed to extract Gb3 by mixing equal volumes of urine, methanol containing an internal standard, and chloroform followed by sonication and centrifugation. Thereafter, the lower phase was analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the relative peak areas of the internal standard and four major species of Gb3 determined. The results showed high reproducibility with intra- and inter-assay coefficients variation of 9.9% and 13.7%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.15 ng/μL and the limit of quantitation was 0.30 ng/μL. Total urinary Gb3 levels in both genders of classic Fabry patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Gb3 levels in Fabry males were higher than in Fabry females (p = 0.08). We have established a novel assay for urinary total Gb3 that takes less than 15 min from start to finish. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Biomolecules damage and redox status abnormalities in Fabry patients before and during enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; de Souza, Heryk Motta; Donida, Bruna; Deon, Marion; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-10-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. Its substrates, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), accumulate and seem to induce other pathophysiological findings of FD. Once enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is not completely efficient on preventing disease progress in FD patients, elucidating the underlying mechanisms in FD pathophysiology is essential to the development of additional therapeutic strategies. We investigated 58 Fabry patients (23 male and 35 female) subdivided into two groups (at diagnosis and during long-term ERT) and compared them to healthy individuals. Fabry patients at diagnosis presented altered glutathione (GSH) metabolism (higher GSH levels, lower glutathione peroxidase - GPx - and normal glutathione reductase - GR - activities), higher lipid peroxidation levels (thiobarbituric acid reactive species - TBARS - and malondialdehyde - MDA), nitric oxide (NO(.)) equivalents and urinary Gb3. Fabry patients on ERT presented GSH metabolism similar to controls, although lipid peroxidation and urinary levels of NO(.) equivalents remained higher whereas Gb3 levels were lower than at diagnosis but still higher than controls. These data demonstrated that redox impairment occurs in Fabry patients before and after ERT, probably as a consequence of Gb3 accumulation, providing targets to future therapy approaches using antioxidants in combination with ERT in FD.

  2. Inhibition of Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated K Channel (KCa3.1) and Fibroblast Mitogenesis by α-Linolenic Acid and Alterations of Channel Expression in the Lysosomal Storage Disorders, Fabry Disease, and Niemann Pick C.

    PubMed

    Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Lozano-Gerona, Javier; López de Frutos, Laura; Cebolla, Jorge J; Irún, Pilar; Abarca-Lachen, Edgar; García-Malinis, Ana J; García-Otín, Ángel Luis; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Giraldo, Pilar; Köhler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-gated KCa3.1 channel regulates normal and abnormal mitogenesis by controlling K(+)-efflux, cell volume, and membrane hyperpolarization-driven calcium-entry. Recent studies suggest modulation of KCa3.1 by omega-3 fatty acids as negative modulators and impaired KCa3.1 functions in the inherited lysosomal storage disorder (LSD), Fabry disease (FD). In the first part of present study, we characterize KCa3.1 in murine and human fibroblasts and test the impact of omega-3 fatty acids on fibroblast proliferation. In the second, we study whether KCa3.1 is altered in the LSDs, FD, and Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Our patch-clamp and mRNA-expression studies on murine and human fibroblasts show functional expression of KCa3.1. KCa currents display the typical pharmacological fingerprint of KCa3.1: Ca(2+)-activation, potentiation by the positive-gating modulators, SKA-31 and SKA-121, and inhibition by TRAM-34, Senicapoc (ICA-17043), and the negative-gating modulator, 13b. Considering modulation by omega-3 fatty acids we found that α-linolenic acid (α-LA) and docosahexanenoic acid (DHA) inhibit KCa3.1 currents and strongly reduce fibroblast growth. The α-LA-rich linseed oil and γ-LA-rich borage oil at 0.5% produce channel inhibition while α-LA/γ-LA-low oils has no anti-proliferative effect. Concerning KCa3.1 in LSD, mRNA expression studies, and patch-clamp on primary fibroblasts from FD and NPC patients reveal lower KCa3.1-gene expression and membrane expression than in control fibroblasts. In conclusion, the omega-3 fatty acid, α-LA, and α-LA/γ-LA-rich plant oils, inhibit fibroblast KCa3.1 channels and mitogenesis. Reduced fibroblast KCa3.1 functions are a feature and possible biomarker of cell dysfunction in FD and NPC and supports the concept that biased lipid metabolism is capable of negatively modulating KCa3.1 expression.

  3. Inhibition of Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated K Channel (KCa3.1) and Fibroblast Mitogenesis by α-Linolenic Acid and Alterations of Channel Expression in the Lysosomal Storage Disorders, Fabry Disease, and Niemann Pick C

    PubMed Central

    Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Lozano-Gerona, Javier; López de Frutos, Laura; Cebolla, Jorge J.; Irún, Pilar; Abarca-Lachen, Edgar; García-Malinis, Ana J.; García-Otín, Ángel Luis; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Giraldo, Pilar; Köhler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-gated KCa3.1 channel regulates normal and abnormal mitogenesis by controlling K+-efflux, cell volume, and membrane hyperpolarization-driven calcium-entry. Recent studies suggest modulation of KCa3.1 by omega-3 fatty acids as negative modulators and impaired KCa3.1 functions in the inherited lysosomal storage disorder (LSD), Fabry disease (FD). In the first part of present study, we characterize KCa3.1 in murine and human fibroblasts and test the impact of omega-3 fatty acids on fibroblast proliferation. In the second, we study whether KCa3.1 is altered in the LSDs, FD, and Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Our patch-clamp and mRNA-expression studies on murine and human fibroblasts show functional expression of KCa3.1. KCa currents display the typical pharmacological fingerprint of KCa3.1: Ca2+-activation, potentiation by the positive-gating modulators, SKA-31 and SKA-121, and inhibition by TRAM-34, Senicapoc (ICA-17043), and the negative-gating modulator, 13b. Considering modulation by omega-3 fatty acids we found that α-linolenic acid (α-LA) and docosahexanenoic acid (DHA) inhibit KCa3.1 currents and strongly reduce fibroblast growth. The α-LA-rich linseed oil and γ-LA-rich borage oil at 0.5% produce channel inhibition while α-LA/γ-LA-low oils has no anti-proliferative effect. Concerning KCa3.1 in LSD, mRNA expression studies, and patch-clamp on primary fibroblasts from FD and NPC patients reveal lower KCa3.1-gene expression and membrane expression than in control fibroblasts. In conclusion, the omega-3 fatty acid, α-LA, and α-LA/γ-LA-rich plant oils, inhibit fibroblast KCa3.1 channels and mitogenesis. Reduced fibroblast KCa3.1 functions are a feature and possible biomarker of cell dysfunction in FD and NPC and supports the concept that biased lipid metabolism is capable of negatively modulating KCa3.1 expression. PMID:28197106

  4. Cerebrovascular Disease in Children: Recent Advances in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Karen J.; deVeber, Gabrielle A.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Roach, E. Steve; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Maria, Bernard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease in children manifests in many forms, all of which have devastating and long-lasting effects. Recent advances in diagnostic imaging have revealed that this condition is much more common in the pediatric population than previously believed, affecting as many as 1 in 1500 neonates and 1 in 3000 children. The underlying mechanisms that cause stroke—ischemic stroke, sinovenous thrombosis, and hemorrhagic stroke—are only beginning to be understood; however, progress has been made toward better understanding the mechanisms of disease, particularly in the fields of genetics, inflammation, and thrombus formation. Furthermore, new imaging techniques, and better understanding of how to use imaging in managing stroke, have enabled practitioners to more quickly and accurately identify cerebrovascular disease type in children, which is key to mitigation of negative outcomes. The 2010 Neurobiology of Disease in Children symposium, held in conjunction with the 39th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe clinical issues surrounding childhood stroke, including diagnosis and acute care; (2) discuss recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of childhood stroke; (3) review current management of and therapies for childhood stroke, including controversial therapies; and (4) establish research directions for investigators. This article summarizes the speakers’ presentations and includes an edited transcript of question-and-answer sessions. PMID:21778188

  5. Advances in epigenetics and epigenomics for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    In the post-genomic era, epigenetic factors-literally those that are "over" or "above" genetic ones and responsible for controlling the expression and function of genes-have emerged as important mediators of development and aging; gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions; and the pathophysiology of complex disease states. Here, we provide a brief overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA regulation). We highlight the nearly ubiquitous profiles of epigenetic dysregulation that have been found in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. We also review innovative methods and technologies that enable the characterization of individual epigenetic modifications and more widespread epigenomic states at high resolution. We conclude that, together with complementary genetic, genomic, and related approaches, interrogating epigenetic and epigenomic profiles in neurodegenerative diseases represent important and increasingly practical strategies for advancing our understanding of and the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  6. Advances in Chagas disease drug development: 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Navabi, Nazlee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The need for better drugs to treat patients with Chagas disease remains urgent. This review summarizes the advancements in drug development over the past two years. Recent Findings Drug development efforts are almost exclusively occurring as preclinical research. The exceptions being Phase I safety studies for the cruzain inhibitor, K-777, and potential Phase II studies for the antifungal drug, posaconazole, and a prodrug of ravuconazole. Several recent laboratory investigations demonstrate anti-T. cruzi activity of novel small molecules in animal models. These include nonpeptidic cruzain inhibitors, novel inhibitors of the sterol 14α-demethylase enzyme, new compounds (arylimidamides) related to pentamidine, derivatives of nifurtimox, compounds using ruthenium complexes, and several natural products. The recent implementation of a high-throughput screen of >300,000 compounds against intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes done at the Broad Institute is an important development, yielding ~300 selective inhibitors, many of which may serve as leads for medicinal chemistry efforts. Summary Progress is slow, but recent advancements in both drug development and advocacy for research on neglected diseases are encouraging. Efforts to define a target product profile and to harmonize methodologies for testing drugs for Chagas disease are described herein. PMID:20885320

  7. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Fleseriu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is a condition of hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. While rare, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which suggests that early and aggressive intervention is required. The primary, definitive therapy for patients with Cushing's disease in the majority of patients is pituitary surgery, generally performed via a transsphenoidal approach. However, many patients will not achieve remission or they will have recurrences. The consequences of persistent hypercortisolism are severe and, as such, early identification of those patients at risk of treatment failure is exigent. Medical management of Cushing's disease patients plays an important role in achieving long-term remission after failed transsphenoidal surgery, while awaiting effects of radiation or before surgery to decrease the hypercortisolemia and potentially reducing perioperative complications and improving outcome. Medical therapies include centrally acting agents, adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors and glucocorticoid receptor blockers. Furthermore, several new agents are in clinical trials. To normalize the devastating disease effects of hypercortisolemia, it is paramount that successful patient disease management includes individualized, multidisciplinary care, with close collaboration between endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and general surgeons. This commentary will focus on recent advances in the medical treatment of Cushing's, with a focus on newly approved ACTH modulators and glucocorticoid receptor blockers.

  8. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels.

  9. Recent advances in treating Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Wolfgang H.

    2017-01-01

    This article summarizes (1) the recent achievements to further improve symptomatic therapy of motor Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptoms, (2) the still-few attempts to systematically search for symptomatic therapy of non-motor symptoms in PD, and (3) the advances in the development and clinical testing of compounds which promise to offer disease modification in already-manifest PD. However, prevention (that is, slowing or stopping PD in a prodromal stage) is still a dream and one reason for this is that we have no consensus on primary endpoints for clinical trials which reflect the progression in prodromal stages of PD, such as in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) —a methodological challenge to be met in the future. PMID:28357055

  10. [Advances in the researches of lutein and alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianrong; Lin, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Lutein, a kind of oxycarotenoid, can pass the blood brain barrier and preferentially accumulate in the human brain, which is the most abundant carotenoid in human brain. Evidence from multiple studies suggested that lutein was closely related to age-related cognitive decline and risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in human. Dietary, plasma and brain concentrations of lutein were negatively associated with age-related cognitive decline. Lutein concentrations in plasma and brain were significantly lower in AD patients than those of health control. In human brain, lutein was the sole carotenoid which consistently associated with a range of cognitive function measures. In elderly women, lutein supplement can improve the cognitive function. In this article, we systematically reviewed the literature on the role of lutein in age-related cognitive decline and alzheimer's disease and its possible mechanisms. It may prove some benefit information for the advanced research and prevention of AD.

  11. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD.

  12. Hyperspectral Thermal Fabry-Perot Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Blonski, Slawomir; Zanoni, Vicki; Stanley, Tom

    1999-01-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometer are simple elegant, tunable filters that can be used to make compact hyperspectral thermal imaging system. To foster the development of these sensors, software tools for the design and simulation of tunable Fabry-Perot infrared imagers have been developed. The tools are provided at three levels: basic, design, and system. Basic tools describe a nearly ideal Fabry-Perot filter with perfectly flat and parallel mirrors in collimated space. Design tools that take into account non-ideal behavior such as mirror and collimation defects calculate free spectral range, finesse, and spectral width of the interferometer. System tools help analyze an integration of the Fabry-Perot filter into a camera system. They include spectral convolution, first-order optical layout, and an estimation of signal-to-noise ratio. The complete set of tools allows for simulations of system operation and performance with various illumination sources. Spectral images generated in such simulations were used to examine applicability of Fabry-Perot system in remote sensing of atmospheric gases including detection of environmental pollutants and hazardous gases. Different operating conditions and system configurations are presented.

  13. [Device-aided therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) is a consequence of the severe neurodegenerative process and are characterized by the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, aggravation of non-motor symptoms. Treatment with peroral and transdermal drugs can't provide an adequate control of PD symptoms and quality-of-life of the patients at this stage of disease. Currently, three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), intrajejunal infusion of duodopa, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine can be used in treatment of patients with advanced stages of PD. Timely administration of device-aided therapies and right choice of the method determine, to a large extent, the efficacy and safety of their use. Despite the high efficacy of all three methods with respect to the fluctuation of separate symptoms, each method has its own peculiarities. The authors reviewed the data on the expediency of using each method according to the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms, patient's age, PD duration, concomitant pathology and social support of the patients.

  14. Advances in vaccine research against economically important viral diseases of food animals: Infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2016-11-22

    Numerous reviews have been published on infectious bursal disease (IBD) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Many high quality vaccines are commercially available for the control of IBD that, when used correctly, provide solid protection against infection and disease caused by IBDV. Viruses are not static however; they continue to evolve and vaccines need to keep pace with them. The evolution of IBDV has resulted in very virulent strains and new antigenic types of the virus. This review will discuss some of the limitations associated with existing vaccines, potential solutions to these problems and advances in new vaccines for the control of IBD.

  15. Advances in the assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, M.; Proano, M. )

    1989-07-01

    Knowledge of the severity and extent of the inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases provides a means of determining rational therapeutic strategies in affected patients. During the past 3 decades, several clinical, laboratory, and combined indices have been proposed for the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease; refinements in radiologic methods and the availability of endoscopy and biopsy have facilitated the accurate assessment of the extent and severity of the disease. In relapsing conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, however, the use of such procedures is limited by the radiation exposure or the relatively invasive nature of the technique. In this article, we review the proposed methods and recent advances in assessment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; we also discuss possible strategies at the time of diagnosis, during recurrence, and in evaluation of the efficacy of drug or dietic therapy. 58 references.

  16. Advanced mast cell disease: an Italian Hematological Multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Caira, Morena; Rondoni, Michela; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Candoni, Anna; Allione, Bernardino; Cattaneo, Chiara; Marbello, Laura; Caramatti, Cecilia; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Iannitto, Emilio; Giona, Fiorina; Ferrara, Felicetto; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Fanci, Rosa; Lunghi, Monia; Fianchi, Luana; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Stefani, Pietro Maria; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Martinelli, Giovanni; Leone, Giuseppe; Musto, Pellegrino

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate clinical features, treatments and outcome of patients with systemic mast cell disease (MCD) who arrived to the attention of hematologists. A retrospective study was conducted over 1995-2006 in patients admitted in 18 Italian hematological divisions. Twenty-four cases of advanced MCD were collected: 12 aggressive SM (50%), 8 mast cell leukemia (33%), 4 SM with associated clonal non-mast cell-lineage hematologic disease (17%). Spleen and liver were the principal extramedullary organ involved. The c-kit point mutation D816V was found in 13/18 patients in which molecular biology studies were performed (72%). Treatments were very heterogeneous: on the whole Imatinib was administered in 17 patients, alpha-Interferon in 8, 2-CdA in 3; 2 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The overall response rate to Imatinib, the most frequently employed drugs, was of 29%, registering one complete remission and four partial remission; all responsive patients did not present D816V c-kit mutation. Overall three patients (12%) died for progression of disease. We conclude that MCD is characterized by severe mediator-related symptoms but with a moderate mortality rate. D816V c-kit mutation is frequent and associated with resistance against Imatinib. Because of the rarity of these forms, an effective standard of care is lacking. More data are needed to find new and successful therapeutic strategies.

  17. Advances in stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; ZENG, YI; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEYING

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the primary cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, and represents a group of disorders associated with the loss of cardiac function. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of the disease, the majority of the currently available therapies remain at best palliative, since the problem of cardiac tissue loss has not yet been addressed. Indeed, few therapeutic approaches offer direct tissue repair and regeneration, whereas the majority of treatment options aim to limit scar formation and adverse remodeling, while improving myocardial function. Of all the existing therapeutic approaches, the problem of cardiac tissue loss is addressed uniquely by heart transplantation. Nevertheless, alternative options, particularly stem cell therapy, has emerged as a novel and promising approach. This approach involves the transplantation of healthy and functional cells to promote the renewal of damaged cells and repair injured tissue. Bone marrow precursor cells were the first cell type used in clinical studies, and subsequently, preclinical and clinical investigations have been extended to the use of various populations of stem cells. This review addresses the present state of research as regards stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:27220939

  18. Analysis of Fabry-Perot Velocimeter Records

    SciTech Connect

    Avara, G

    2001-08-03

    Program demonstration and user instructions are presented for FabryVB5. This computer program was created for use in analyzing Fabry-Perot interferometer records that detail the velocity time histories of fast moving surfaces. Graphical curves representing peak fringe positions and fiducial timing dots are extracted from a digitized film record or from a CCD digital image. An analysis is demonstrated on a sample velocimeter record along with some mathematical formula and routine operations. Routines used to analyze calibration records on streak camera distortions are illustrated in an appendix. This is a Microsoft Visual Basic{trademark} version for the PC.

  19. Strained layer Fabry-Perot device

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Fritz, Ian J.; Hammons, Burrell E.

    1994-01-01

    An asymmetric Fabry-Perot reflectance modulator (AFPM) consists of an active region between top and bottom mirrors, the bottom mirror being affixed to a substrate by a buffer layer. The active region comprises a strained-layer region having a bandgap and thickness chosen for resonance at the Fabry-Perot frequency. The mirrors are lattice matched to the active region, and the buffer layer is lattice matched to the mirror at the interface. The device operates at wavelengths of commercially available semiconductor lasers.

  20. Dynamic models of Fabry-Perot interferometers.

    PubMed

    Redding, David; Regehr, Martin; Sievers, Lisa

    2002-05-20

    Long-baseline, high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometers can be used to make distance measurements that are precise enough to detect gravity waves. This level of sensitivity is achieved in part when the interferometer mirrors are isolated dynamically, with pendulum mounts and high-bandwidth cavity length control servos to reduce the effects of seismic noise. We present dynamical models of the cavity fields and signals of Fabry-Perot interferometers for use in the design and evaluation of length control systems for gravity-wave detectors. Models are described and compared with experimental data.

  1. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  2. Advances in Nanotechnology for the Management of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology holds tremendous potential to advance the current treatment of coronary artery disease. Nanotechnology may assist medical therapies by providing a safe and efficacious delivery platform for a variety of drugs aimed at modulating lipid disorders, decreasing inflammation and angiogenesis within atherosclerotic plaques, and preventing plaque thrombosis. Nanotechnology may improve coronary stent applications by promoting endothelial recovery on a stent surface utilizing bio-mimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, and also by preventing in-stent restenosis using nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs that are decoupled from stents. Additionally, nanotechnology may enhance tissue-engineered graft materials for application in coronary artery bypass grafting by facilitating cellular infiltration and remodeling of a graft matrix. PMID:23245913

  3. Nursing staff's understanding expressions of people with advanced dementia disease.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Thomas; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Norberg, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    People with advanced dementia disease (ADD) are known to have communication difficulties and thus it presents a challenge in understanding the expressions of these people. Because successful communication presupposes cooperation at least between 2 individuals, both individual's actions must be acknowledged. The aim of this study is to describe nursing staff's ways of understanding the expressions of people with ADD when communicating with them. Interviews from 8 nursing staff were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes were constructed: "Being in communication" and "Doing communication." Being in communication means that nursing staff perceive people with ADD as being capable of communication. Doing communication means that nursing staff attempt different individualized strategies to understand what people with ADD communicate. Good care of people with ADD presupposes nursing staff that are willing and able to relate to other people and to maintain good care for people with ADD continuous education and supervision are needed.

  4. CAP--advancing the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer disease treatments.

    PubMed

    Reiman, Eric M; Langbaum, Jessica B; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Bateman, Randall J; Morris, John C; Sperling, Reisa A; Aisen, Paul S; Roses, Allen D; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Carrillo, Maria C; Weninger, Stacie

    2016-01-01

    If we are to find treatments to postpone, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), we need faster methods to evaluate promising preclinical AD treatments, new ways to work together in support of common goals, and a determination to expedite the initiation and performance of preclinical AD trials. In this article, we note some of the current challenges, opportunities and emerging strategies in preclinical AD treatment. We describe the Collaboration for Alzheimer's Prevention (CAP)-a convening, harmonizing and consensus-building initiative to help stakeholders advance AD prevention research with rigour, care and maximal impact-and we demonstrate the impact of CAP on the goals and design of new preclinical AD trials.

  5. CAP—advancing the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer disease treatments

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Eric M.; Langbaum, Jessica B.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Bateman, Randall J.; Morris, John C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Aisen, Paul S.; Roses, Allen D.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Weninger, Stacie

    2016-01-01

    If we are to find treatments to postpone, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), we need faster methods to evaluate promising preclinical AD treatments, new ways to work together in support of common goals, and a determination to expedite the initiation and performance of preclinical AD trials. In this article, we note some of the current challenges, opportunities and emerging strategies in preclinical AD treatment. We describe the Collaboration for Alzheimer’s Prevention (CAP)—a convening, harmonizing and consensus-building initiative to help stakeholders advance AD prevention research with rigour, care and maximal impact—and we demonstrate the impact of CAP on the goals and design of new preclinical AD trials. PMID:26416539

  6. Advances in the genetic mechanisms of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Vladutiu, G D

    1997-12-01

    During the past 16 years since the delineation of the human mitochondrial genome, substantial advances have been made in identifying pathogenic mutations causing mitochondrial disorders. However, just as we have come to accept the unexpected in the nontraditional aspects of Mendelian inheritance with the discovery of trinucleotide expansions, imprinting and uniparental disomy, unusual characteristics of mitochondrial inheritance also have been found that defy existing laws. For example, we now know that the nuclear genetic background of an individual might influence the expression and tissue specificity of mitochondrial mutations. Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations contribute to the generation of new mutations by compromising mitochondrial function and increasing free radical production. Evidence for recombination raises new questions about repair mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA. It appears that the more we learn about the bases of mitochondrial disease, the more complex diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling become.

  7. Recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy in the esophageal benign diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the field of endoscopy has witnessed several advances. With the advent of endoscopic mucosal resection, removal of large mucosal lesions have become possible. Thereafter, endoscopic submucosal resection was refined, permitting en bloc removal of large superficial neoplasms. Such techniques have facilitated the development of antireflux mucosectomy, a promising novel treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The introduction and use of over the scope clips has allowed for endoscopic closure of defects in the gastrointestinal tract, which were traditionally treated with surgical intervention. With the development of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), the treatment of achalasia and spastic disorders of the esophagus have been revolutionized. From the submucosal tunnelling technique developed for POEM, Per oral endoscopic tumor resection of subepithelial tumors was made possible. Simultaneously, advances in biotechnology have expanded esophageal stenting capabilities with the introduction of fully covered metal and plastic stents, as well as biodegradable stents. Once deemed a primarily diagnostic tool, endoscopy has quickly transcended to a minimally invasive intervention and therapeutic tool. These techniques are reviewed with regards to their application to benign disease of the esophagus. PMID:25992187

  8. A novel mouse model of advanced diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jean-Francois; Holterman, Chet E; Burger, Dylan; Read, Naomi C; Reudelhuber, Timothy L; Kennedy, Christopher R J

    2014-01-01

    Currently available rodent models exhibit characteristics of early diabetic nephropathy (DN) such as hyperfiltration, mesangial expansion, and albuminuria yet features of late DN (hypertension, GFR decline, tubulointerstitial fibrosis) are absent or require a significant time investment for full phenotype development. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of advanced DN with hypertension superimposed (HD mice). Mice transgenic for human renin cDNA under the control of the transthyretin promoter (TTRhRen) were employed as a model of angiotensin-dependent hypertension. Diabetes was induced in TTRhRen mice through low dose streptozotocin (HD-STZ mice) or by intercrossing with OVE26 diabetic mice (HD-OVE mice). Both HD-STZ and HD-OVE mice displayed more pronounced increases in urinary albumin levels as compared with their diabetic littermates. Additionally, HD mice displayed renal hypertrophy, advanced glomerular scarring and evidence of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Both HD-OVE and HD-STZ mice showed evidence of GFR decline as FITC-inulin clearance was decreased compared to hyperfiltering STZ and OVE mice. Taken together our results suggest that HD mice represent a robust model of type I DN that recapitulates key features of human disease which may be significant in studying the pathogenesis of DN and in the assessment of putative therapeutics.

  9. Advanced glycation end products contribute to amyloidosis in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vitek, M P; Bhattacharya, K; Glendening, J M; Stopa, E; Vlassara, H; Bucala, R; Manogue, K; Cerami, A

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by deposits of an aggregated 42-amino-acid beta-amyloid peptide (beta AP) in the brain and cerebrovasculature. After a concentration-dependent lag period during in vitro incubations, soluble preparations of synthetic beta AP slowly form fibrillar aggregates that resemble natural amyloid and are measurable by sedimentation and thioflavin T-based fluorescence. Aggregation of soluble beta AP in these in vitro assays is enhanced by addition of small amounts of pre-aggregated beta-amyloid "seed" material. We also have prepared these seeds by using a naturally occurring reaction between glucose and protein amino groups resulting in the formation of advanced "glycosylation" end products (AGEs) which chemically crosslink proteins. AGE-modified beta AP-nucleation seeds further accelerated aggregation of soluble beta AP compared to non-modified "seed" material. Over time, nonenzymatic advanced glycation also results in the gradual accumulation of a set of posttranslational covalent adducts on long-lived proteins in vivo. In a standardized competitive ELISA, plaque fractions of AD brains were found to contain about 3-fold more AGE adducts per mg of protein than preparations from healthy, age-matched controls. These results suggest that the in vivo half-life of beta-amyloid is prolonged in AD, resulting in greater accumulation of AGE modifications which in turn may act to promote accumulation of additional amyloid. PMID:8197133

  10. Advances in designs for Alzheimer's disease clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development.

  11. Advances in designs for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development. PMID:23383393

  12. Drosophila models of Alzheimer's disease: advances, limits, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bouleau, Sylvina; Tricoire, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) are the two key players involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are associated with amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles respectively, two key hallmarks of the disease. Besides vertebrate models, Drosophila models have been widely used to understand the complex events leading to AD in relation to aging. Drosophila benefits from the low redundancy of the genome which greatly simplifies the analysis of single gene disruption, sophisticated molecular genetic tools, and reduced cost compared to mammals. The aim of this review is to describe the recent advances in modeling AD using fly and to emphasize some limits of these models. Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed some key aspects of the normal function of Appl and Tau, the fly homologues of AβPP and MAPT that may be disrupted during AD. Drosophila models have also been useful to uncover or validate several pathological pathways or susceptibility genes, and have been readily implemented in drug screening pipelines. We discuss some limitations of the current models that may arise from differences in structure of Appl and Tau compared to their human counterparts or from missing AβPP or MAPT protein interactors in flies. The advent of new genome modification technologies should allow the development of more realistic fly models and to better understand the relationship between AD and aging, taking advantage of the fly's short lifespan.

  13. Advances in pleural disease management including updated procedural coding.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andrew R; Sterman, Daniel H

    2014-08-01

    Over 1.5 million pleural effusions occur in the United States every year as a consequence of a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and malignant conditions. Although rarely fatal in isolation, pleural effusions are often a marker of a serious underlying medical condition and contribute to significant patient morbidity, quality-of-life reduction, and mortality. Pleural effusion management centers on pleural fluid drainage to relieve symptoms and to investigate pleural fluid accumulation etiology. Many recent studies have demonstrated important advances in pleural disease management approaches for a variety of pleural fluid etiologies, including malignant pleural effusion, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema, and chest tube size. The last decade has seen greater implementation of real-time imaging assistance for pleural effusion management and increasing use of smaller bore percutaneous chest tubes. This article will briefly review recent pleural effusion management literature and update the latest changes in common procedural terminology billing codes as reflected in the changing landscape of imaging use and percutaneous approaches to pleural disease management.

  14. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymer Materials for Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Fengting; Qiu, Tian; Liu, Libing; Ying, Jianming; Wang, Shu

    2016-02-10

    The extraordinary optical amplification and light-harvesting properties of conjugated polymers impart sensing systems with higher sensitivity, which meets the primary demands of early cancer diagnosis. Recent advances in the detection of DNA methylation and mutation with polyfluorene derivatives based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a means to modulate fluorescent responses attest to the great promise of conjugated polymers as powerful tools for the clinical diagnosis of diseases. To facilitate the ever-changing needs of diagnosis, the development of detection approaches and FRET signal analysis are highlighted in this review. Due to their exceptional brightness, excellent photostability, and low or absent toxicity, conjugated polymers are verified as superior materials for in-vivo imaging, and provide feasibility for future clinical molecular-imaging applications. The integration of conjugated polymers with clinical research has shown profound effects on diagnosis for the early detection of disease-related biomarkers, as well as in-vivo imaging, which leads to a multidisciplinary scientific field with perspectives in both basic research and application issues.

  15. Optical tests of the LUTIN Fabry-Pérot prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, L.; Berrilli, F.; Del Moro, D.; Greco, V.; Piazzesi, R.; Sordini, A.; Stangalini, M.

    2014-12-01

    The soLar group University of Tor vergata fabry-perot INterferometer (LUTIN) is a narrow band filter based on an optical cavity resonator with Capacitance-Stabilised Etalon (CSE) control. The prototype, developed at the University of Rome Tor Vergata, is part of the study for the narrow band channel of the ADvanced Astronomy for HELIophysics (ADAHELI) mission designed to investigate the dynamics of solar atmosphere as part of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) Small Missions program. We developed the electro-mechanical control for the optical cavity, necessary for the tuning and the gap control of the instrument. We present the measures of the microroughness of the optical plates, performed with a Zygo interferometer, and the instrument spectral stability behaviour in on-optical-bench open-air mode. The measures refer to the upgraded version of the LUTIN prototype, which mounts the new λ/60 optical plates.

  16. Recent Advances in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yifei; Menon, Madhav C; Deng, Yueyi; Chen, Yiping; He, John Cijiang

    2015-09-01

    Because current treatment options for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited, many patients seek out alternative therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is a lack of evidence from large clinical trials to support the use of traditional medicines in patients with CKD. Many active components of traditional medicine formulas are undetermined and their toxicities are unknown. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify active compounds from traditional medicines and understand the mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as their potential toxicity, and subsequently perform well-designed, randomized, controlled, clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of their use in patients with CKD. Significant progress has been made in this field within the last several years. Many active compounds have been identified by applying sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry, and more mechanistic studies of these compounds have been performed using both in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, several well-designed, large, randomized, clinical trials have recently been published. We summarize these recent advances in the field of traditional medicines as they apply to CKD. In addition, current barriers for further research are also discussed. Due to the ongoing research in this field, we believe that stronger evidence to support the use of traditional medicines for CKD will emerge in the near future.

  17. Fourier Transform Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Hilary E.; Hays, Paul B.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a compact, rugged, high-resolution remote sensing instrument with wide spectral scanning capabilities. This relatively new type of instrument, which we have chosen to call the Fourier-Transform Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FT-FPI), is accomplished by mechanically scanning the etalon plates of a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) through a large optical distance while examining the concomitant signal with a Fourier-transform analysis technique similar to that employed by the Michelson interferometer. The FT-FPI will be used initially as a ground-based instrument to study near-infrared atmospheric absorption lines of trace gases using the techniques of solar absorption spectroscopy. Future plans include modifications to allow for measurements of trace gases in the stratosphere using spectral lines at terahertz frequencies.

  18. Extrinsic Fabry-Perot ultrasonic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, J. J.; Berthold, John W., III

    1996-10-01

    We characterized the performance of a commercial fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer for use as an ultrasonic sensor, and compared the performance with a standard lead zirconate titanate (PZT) detector. The interferometer was unstabilized. The results showed that the fiber sensor was about 12 times less sensitive than the PZT detector. Ultrasonic frequency response near 100 kHz was demonstrated. We describe the design of the fiber sensor, the details of the tests performed, and potential applications.

  19. An advanced case of indium lung disease with progressive emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Makiko; Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki; Kumazoe, Hiroyuki; Wakamatsu, Kentaro; Kamada, Dan; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the occurrence of an advanced case of indium lung disease with severely progressive emphysema in an indium-exposed worker. Case report: A healthy 42-year-old male smoker was employed to primarily grind indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates, exposing him to indium for 9 years (1998-2008). In 2004, an epidemiological study was conducted on indium-exposed workers at the factory in which he worked. The subject's serum indium concentration (In-S) was 99.7 μg/l, while his serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 level was 2,350 U/ml. Pulmonary function tests showed forced vital capacity (FVC) of 4.17 l (91.5% of the JRS predicted value), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 3.19 l (80.8% of predicted), and an FEV1-to-FVC ratio of 76.5%. A high-resolution chest computed tomography (HRCT) scan showed mild interlobular septal thickening and mild emphysematous changes. In 2008, he was transferred from the ITO grinding workplace to an inspection work section, where indium concentrations in total dusts had a range of 0.001-0.002 mg/m3. In 2009, the subject's In-S had increased to 132.1 μg/l, and pulmonary function tests revealed obstructive changes. In addition, HRCT scan showed clear evidence of progressive lung destruction with accompanying severe centrilobular emphysema and interlobular septal thickening in both lung fields. The subject's condition gradually worsened, and in 2015, he was registered with the Japan Organ Transplant Network for lung transplantation (LTx). Conclusions: Heavy indium exposure is a risk factor for emphysema, which can lead to a severity level that requires LTx as the final therapeutic option. PMID:27488043

  20. An Archetype Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin; VanZyl, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We introduce and demonstrate the generation of a novel resonator, termed Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP), that exhibits unique features, such as, its use of one plane mirror, allowing the SRFP to be easily fabricated as a symmetrical device. In addition to its unique features, it exhibits advantages of ring and Fabry-Perot resonators: 1) compared to a ring resonator that only allows a transmitted intensity, the Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) supports standing waves, allowing both a reflected and transmitted intensity; 2) the reflected light spectrum of the SRFP resonator is much narrower than similar Fabry-Perot, implying higher finesse.

  1. Improvement with ongoing Enzyme Replacement Therapy in advanced late-onset Pompe disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura E; Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; DeArmey, Stephanie M; Mackey, Joanne; Kishnani, Priya S

    2008-12-01

    Benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa), anecdotally reported in late-onset Pompe disease, range from motor and pulmonary improvement in less severely affected patients, to stabilization with minimal improvement in those with advanced disease. We report a case of a 63-year-old patient with significant morbidity who made notable motor and pulmonary function gains after two years on therapy. Thus, improvements in those with advanced disease may be possible after long-term treatment.

  2. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  3. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... peanut oil canola oil Why is knowing about sodium important for someone with advanced CKD? Too much ... who have high blood pressure. High- and Low-sodium Foods High-sodium Foods Low-sodium Alternatives Salt ...

  4. New MS Drug Shows 'Breakthrough' Promise for Advanced Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- A new drug slows the progress of multiple sclerosis, including an advanced form of the degenerative nerve ... also proved superior in treating people with relapsing multiple sclerosis, the most common form of MS, compared with ...

  5. Current advances on genetic resistance to rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most threatening fungal diseases resulting in significant annual crop losses worldwide. Blast disease has been effectively managed by a combination of resistant (R) gene deployment, application of fungicides, and suita...

  6. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy and localisation of globotriaosylceramide deposits in paraffin-embedded kidney tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Carmen; Leitão, Dina; Carneiro, Fátima; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2012-02-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder of glycosphingolipids, mostly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Proteinuric chronic kidney disease develops frequently, and recognition of Fabry nephropathy on a kidney biopsy may be the first clue to the underlying diagnosis. Since the accumulated glycosphingolipids are largely extracted by the paraffin-embedding procedure, the most characteristic feature of Fabry nephropathy on routine light microscopy (LM) is nonspecific cell vacuolization. To test whether residual Gb3 in kidney tissue might be exploited for the specific diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies of nine FD patients (one boy, four men, four women) and of a female carrier of a mild genetic mutation, with no evidence of Fabry nephropathy, were immunostained with an anti-Gb3 antibody. The adult biopsies were additionally co-stained with a lysosomal marker (anti-lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (anti-LAMP2) antibody). The distribution of Gb3 deposits was scored per cell type and compared to the histological scorings of glycosphingolipid inclusions on semi-thin sections. FD patients had residual Gb3 in all types of glomerular, tubular, interstitial and vascular kidney cells. The highest expression of LAMP2 was seen in tubular cells, but there were no meaningful associations between LAMP2 expression and prevalence of Gb3 deposits on different kidney cell types. The histological scorings of glycosphingolipid inclusions were relatively higher than the corresponding immunohistochemical scorings of Gb3 deposits. In the mildly affected female, Gb3 expression was limited to tubular cells, a pattern similar to controls. Gb3 immunostaining allows the specific diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy even in kidney biopsies routinely processed for LM.

  7. Drug nanocarrier, the future of atopic diseases: Advanced drug delivery systems and smart management of disease.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mei; Hussain, Zahid; Thu, Hnin Ei; Khan, Shahzeb; Katas, Haliza; Ahmed, Tarek A; Tripathy, Minaketan; Leng, Jing; Qin, Hua-Li; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2016-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronically relapsing skin inflammatory disorder characterized by perivascular infiltration of immunoglobulin-E (IgE), T-lymphocytes and mast cells. The key pathophysiological factors causing this disease are immunological disorders and the compromised epidermal barrier integrity. Pruritus, intense itching, psychological stress, deprived physical and mental performance and sleep disturbance are the hallmark features of this dermatological complication. Preventive interventions which include educational programs, avoidance of allergens, exclusive care towards skin, and the rational selection of therapeutic regimen play key roles in the treatment of dermatosis. In last two decades, it is evident from a plethora of studies that scientific focus is being driven from conventional therapies to the advanced nanocarrier-based regimen for an effective management of AD. These nanocarriers which include polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), hydrogel NPs, liposomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanoemulsion, provide efficient roles for the target specific delivery of the therapeutic payload. The success of these targeted therapies is due to their pharmaceutical versatility, longer retention time at the target site, avoiding off-target effects and preventing premature degradation of the incorporated drugs. The present review was therefore aimed to summarise convincing evidence for the therapeutic superiority of advanced nanocarrier-mediated strategies over the conventional therapies used in the treatment of AD.

  8. Advances in surveillance of periodontitis: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention periodontal disease surveillance project.

    PubMed

    Eke, Paul I; Thornton-Evans, Gina; Dye, Bruce; Genco, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has as one of its strategic goals to support and improve surveillance of periodontal disease. In 2003, the CDC initiated the CDC Periodontal Disease Surveillance Project in collaboration with the American Academy of Periodontology to address population-based surveillance of periodontal disease at the local, state, and national levels. This initiative has made significant advancements toward the goal of improved surveillance, including developing valid self-reported measures that can be obtained from interview-based surveys to predict prevalence of periodontitis in populations. This will allow surveillance of periodontitis at the state and local levels and in countries where clinical resources for surveillance are scarce. This work has produced standard case definitions for surveillance of periodontitis that are now widely recognized and applied in population studies and research. At the national level, this initiative has evaluated the validity of previous clinical examination protocols and tested new protocols on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), recommending and supporting funding for the gold-standard full-mouth periodontal examination in NHANES 2009 to 2012. These examinations will generate accurate estimates of the prevalence of periodontitis in the US adult population and provide a superior dataset for surveillance and research. Also, this data will be used to generate the necessary coefficients for our self-report questions for use in subsets of the total US population. The impact of these findings on population-based surveillance of periodontitis and future directions of the project are discussed along with plans for dissemination and translation efforts for broader public health use.

  9. All-optical logic gates and wavelength conversion via the injection locking of a Fabry-Perot semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, E.; Pochet, M.; Schmidt, J.; Locke, T.; Naderi, N.; Usechak, N. G.

    2013-03-01

    This work investigates the implementation of all-optical logic gates based on optical injection locking (OIL). All-optical inverting, NOR, and NAND gates are experimentally demonstrated using two distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, a multi-mode Fabry-Perot laser diode, and an optical band-pass filter. The DFB lasers are externally modulated to represent logic inputs into the cavity of the multi-mode Fabry-Perot slave laser. The input DFB (master) lasers' wavelengths are aligned with the longitudinal modes of the Fabry-Perot slave laser and their optical power is used to modulate the injection conditions in the Fabry-Perot slave laser. The optical band-pass filter is used to select a Fabry- Perot mode that is either suppressed or transmitted given the logic state of the injecting master laser signals. When the input signal(s) is (are) in the on state, injection locking, and thus the suppression of the non-injected Fabry-Perot modes, is induced, yielding a dynamic system that can be used to implement photonic logic functions. Additionally, all-optical photonic processing is achieved using the cavity-mode shift produced in the injected slave laser under external optical injection. The inverting logic case can also be used as a wavelength converter — a key component in advanced wavelength-division multiplexing networks. As a result of this experimental investigation, a more comprehensive understanding of the locking parameters involved in injecting multiple lasers into a multi-mode cavity and the logic transition time is achieved. The performance of optical logic computations and wavelength conversion has the potential for ultrafast operation, limited primarily by the photon decay rate in the slave laser.

  10. Advancing the understanding of autism disease mechanisms through genetics

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Won, Hyejung; Stein, Jason L; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Progress in understanding the genetic etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has fueled remarkable advances in our understanding of its potential neurobiological mechanisms. Yet, at the same time, these findings highlight extraordinary causal diversity and complexity at many levels ranging from molecules to circuits and emphasize the gaps in our current knowledge. Here we review current understanding of the genetic architecture of ASD and integrate genetic evidence, neuropathology and studies in model systems with how they inform mechanistic models of ASD pathophysiology. Despite the challenges, these advances provide a solid foundation for the development of rational, targeted molecular therapies. PMID:27050589

  11. An economic Fabry-Perot wavelength reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fżrész, Gábor; Glenday, Alex; Latham, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Precision radial velocity (PRV) measurements are key in studying exoplanets, and so are wavelength calibrators in PRV instruments. ThAr lamps offer an affordable but somewhat limited solution for the visible passband. Laser frequency combs are ideal calibrators, except the (still) narrow wavelength coverage and large price tag. White light Fabry-Perot (FP) calibrators offer frequency-comb like properties in a more affordable and less complicated package1. Using a commercial solid FP etalon and off-the shelf components we have constructed an economic FP calibrator suitable for observatories on a smaller budget.

  12. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks.

  13. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Luis E.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  14. [Advances in research of dihydroartemisinin against parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Jun; Wang, Wei; Liang, You-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Dihydroartemisinin, the main metabolite of artemisinin and two artemisinin derivatives, artemether and artesunate, is a broad-spectrum anti-parasitic drug. The present paper systematically reviews the advances in research of dihydroartemisinin against Plasmodium, Schistosoma, Pneumocystis, Toxoplasma, Trichomonas vaginalis, Leishmania, Giardia lamblia.

  15. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Black, Richard A.; Mann, David

    2006-02-01

    Within the next 50 years Alzheimer's disease is expected to affect 100 million people worldwide. The progressive decline in the mental health of the patient is caused by severe brain atrophy generated by the breakdown and aggregation of proteins, resulting in β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The greatest challenge to Alzheimer's disease lies in the pursuit of an early and definitive diagnosis, in order that suitable treatment can be administered. At the present time, definitive diagnosis is restricted to post-mortem examination. Alzheimer's disease also remains without a long-term cure. This research demonstrates the potential role of Raman spectroscopy, combined with principle components analysis (PCA), as a diagnostic method. Analyses of ethically approved ex vivo post-mortem brain tissues (originating from frontal and occipital lobes) from control (3 normal elderly subjects and 3 Huntingdon's disease subjects) and Alzheimer's disease (12 subjects) brain sections, and a further set of 12 blinded samples are presented. Spectra originating from these tissues are highly reproducible, and initial results indicate a vital difference in protein content and conformation, relating to the abnormally high levels of aggregated proteins in the diseased tissues. Further examination of these spectra using PCA allows for the separation of control from diseased tissues. The validation of the PCA models using blinded samples also displays promise for the identification of Alzheimer's disease, in conjunction with secondary information regarding other brain diseases and dementias. These results provide a route for Raman spectroscopy as a possible non-invasive, non-destructive tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  17. The advance of tomato disease-related microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weichen; Luan, Yushi

    2015-07-01

    Tomato is a model plant for studying plant-pathogen interactions. As regulatory factors, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely identified and play crucial roles in tomato-pathogen interactions, including host defense and pathogen counter-defense. Here, the review summarizes the discoveries and highlights of miRNAs in tomato diseases. Roles of artificial miRNAs in disease resistance are further discussed. Hence, a better understanding of the contribution of miRNAs in tomato disease will shed light on strategies in enhancing tomato-pathogen resistance.

  18. Periodontitis and Buerger’s Disease: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Pavlic, Verica; Vujic-Aleksic, Vesna; Zubovic, Nina; Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Buerger’s disease (BD) is a relatively rare thrombotic, occlusive and non-atherosclerotic clinical syndrome of unknown etiology. In recent years, numerous epidemiological studies confirmed the strong association between chronic anaerobic periodontal infection and development of cardiovascular diseases, including BD. Therefore, the aim of this study is to clarify association between periodontal pathogens and Buerger’s disease. Confirmation of presence and identification of periopathogens in patients with BD can be considered crucial in developing novel therapies for BD. Further, periodontal therapy will lead to eventual improvement of BD patients’ condition. PMID:24554799

  19. Advances in the genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ombrello, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic diseases usually demonstrate Mendelian inheritance and are caused by highly penetrant genetic variants of a single gene. In contrast, genetically-complex diseases arise from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The concept of autoinflammation originally emerged from the identification of individual, activating lesions of the innate immune system as the molecular basis of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes. In addition to these rare, monogenic forms of autoinflammation, genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases like the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), Behçet’s disease, and systemic arthritis also fulfill the definition of autoinflammatory diseases - namely the development of apparently unprovoked episodes of inflammation without identifiable exogenous triggers and in the absence of autoimmunity. Interestingly, investigations of these genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases have implicated both innate and adaptive immune abnormalities, blurring the line between autoinflammation and autoimmunity. This reinforces the paradigm of concerted innate and adaptive immune dysfunction leading to genetically-complex autoinflammatory phenotypes. PMID:26077134

  20. Advances in the pharmacological management of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Frank, Samuel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2010-03-26

    There is inevitable physical, cognitive and behavioural decline in Huntington's disease (HD), a dominantly inherited progressive neurological disorder. The hallmark of the disease is chorea, an involuntary brief movement that tends to flow between body regions. HD is diagnosed clinically with genetic confirmation. Predictive testing is available; however, it should be undertaken with caution in patients at risk for the disease but without clinical disease expression. Ongoing observational trials have identified not only early subtle motor signs, but also striatal volume, verbal memory and olfaction as possible early manifestations of clinical disease. Multiple areas of the brain degenerate, with dopamine, glutamate and GABA being the predominant neurotransmitters affected in HD. Although many pharmacotherapies have been evaluated targeting these neurotransmitters, few well conducted trials for symptomatic or neuroprotective interventions have yielded positive results. Tetrabenazine is one of the better studied and more effective agents for reducing chorea, although with a risk of potentially serious adverse effects. Newer antipsychotic agents such as olanzapine and aripiprazole may have adequate efficacy with a more favourable adverse-effect profile than older antipsychotics for treating chorea and psychosis. In this review, the pathogenesis, epidemiology and diagnosis of HD are discussed as background for understanding potential pharmacological treatment options. Potential strategies to delay the progression of HD that have been studied and are planned for the future are summarized. Although there is no current method to change the course of this devastating disease, education and symptomatic therapies are effective tools available to clinicians and the families affected by HD.

  1. Disease evaluations and agronomic traits of advanced peanut breeding lines in 2016

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut disease evaluations of advanced breeding lines are conducted annually to compare the agronomic traits (crop value, yield, seed grade, and characteristics) and disease resistance of cultivars that are currently available or close to being released for the Southwest. In 2016, a total of 21 com...

  2. Advances in the treatment of visual hallucinations in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Collerton, Daniel; Taylor, John-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of visual hallucinations in neurodegenerative disorders is not well advanced. The complexity of underlying mechanisms presents a number of potential avenues for developing treatments, but also suggests that any single one may be of limited efficacy. Reducing medication, with the careful introduction of antidementia medication if needed, is the mainstay of current management. Antipsychotic medication leads to excessive morbidity and mortality and should only be used in cases of high distress that do not otherwise respond. Education, reduction of risk factors and psychological treatments have limited evidence of efficacy, but are unlikely to cause harm. PMID:23882162

  3. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Quercus fabri (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z Z; Chen, W W; Bao, W; Wang, R; Li, Y Y

    2016-06-21

    Quercus fabri is a pioneer species of secondary succession in evergreen broadleaved forests in China. In this study, we isolated and developed 12 polymorphic and 2 monomorphic microsatellite loci for Q. fabri using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. We characterized 12 polymorphic loci in 52 individuals from two populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 23. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus were 0.033-0.773 and 0.138-0.924, respectively. These microsatellite loci will facilitate the studies on genetic variation, mating system, and gene flow of Q. fabri.

  4. Advances in nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Review

    PubMed Central

    Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Zając, Andrzej; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic, life-long, and relapsing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there are no complete cure possibilities, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy may induce remission of the disease. Malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies are frequent among IBD patients, so the majority of them need nutritional treatment, which not only improves the state of nutrition of the patients but has strong anti-inflammatory activity as well. Moreover, some nutrients, from early stages of life are suspected as triggering factors in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. Both parenteral and enteral nutrition is used in IBD therapy, but their practical utility in different populations and in different countries is not clearly established, and there are sometimes conflicting theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD. This review presents the actual data from research studies on the influence of nutrition on the etiopathogenesis of IBD and the latest findings regarding its mechanisms of action. The use of both parenteral and enteral nutrition as therapeutic methods in induction and maintenance therapy in IBD treatment is also extensively discussed. Comparison of the latest research data, scientific theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD, and different opinions about them are also presented and discussed. Additionally, some potential future perspectives for nutritional therapy are highlighted. PMID:26811646

  5. Fabry nephropathy: indications for screening and guidance for diagnosis and treatment by the European Renal Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Terryn, Wim; Cochat, Pierre; Froissart, Roseline; Ortiz, Alberto; Pirson, Yves; Poppe, Bruce; Serra, Andreas; Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond; Wanner, Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid catabolism resulting in the accumulation of glycolipids including globotriaosylceramide in cells of various tissues resulting in end-organ manifestations. Initially, FD is typically characterized by angiokeratoma and recurrent episodes of neuropathic pain in the extremities occurring during childhood or adolescence. Most affected patients also exhibit a decreased ability to sweat. Later in life, FD results in left ventricular hypertrophy, proteinuria, renal failure and stroke. These later disease manifestations are non-specific and also common in diabetes, hypertension and atheromatosis and thus for most practitioners do not point into the direction of FD. As a consequence, FD is under-diagnosed and screening of high-risk groups is important for case finding, as is a thorough pedigree analysis of affected patients. In the nephrology clinic, we suggest to screen patients for FD when there is unexplained chronic kidney disease in males younger than 50 years and females of any age. In men, this can be performed by measuring α-galactosidase A activity in plasma, white blood cells or dried blood spots. In women, mutation analysis is necessary, as enzyme measurement alone could miss over one-third of female Fabry patients. A multidisciplinary team should closely monitor all known Fabry patients, with the nephrologist screening kidney impairment (glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria) on a regular basis. Transplanted Fabry patients have a higher mortality than the regular transplant population, but have acceptable outcomes, compared with Fabry patients remaining on dialysis. It is unclear whether enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) prevents deterioration of kidney function. In view of the lack of compelling evidence for ERT, and the low likelihood that a sufficiently powered randomized controlled trial on this topic will be performed, data of all patients with FD should be collected in a central registry.

  6. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Salivary Gland Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Dale H.

    1984-01-01

    Salivary glands may be involved in a wide variety of diseases, which may be broadly grouped into (1) inflammatory, (2) noninflammatory, nonneoplastic and (3) neoplastic categories. Most inflammatory and noninflammatory, nonneoplastic diseases should be managed conservatively and symptomatically. The common exceptions are first-arch branchialcleft cysts and calculi. Neoplastic lesions always require resection if that is feasible. For benign tumors, simple excision with a cuff of normal tissue around it will usually suffice. The prevailing trend for treatment of malignant neoplasms is conservatism. No longer is the facial nerve routinely sacrificed. The resection done is dictated by the tumor size and the facial nerve is spared unless directly invaded. Postoperative radiation therapy is increasingly used. PMID:6328773

  7. Advancing the cellular and molecular therapy for intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-04-01

    The healthy intervertebral disc (IVD) fulfils the essential function of load absorption, while maintaining multi-axial flexibility of the spine. The interrelated tissues of the IVD, the annulus fibrosus, the nucleus pulposus, and the cartilaginous endplate, are characterised by their specific niche, implying avascularity, hypoxia, acidic environment, low nutrition, and low cellularity. Anabolic and catabolic factors balance a slow physiological turnover of extracellular matrix synthesis and breakdown. Deviations in mechanical load, nutrient supply, cellular activity, matrix composition and metabolism may initiate a cascade ultimately leading to tissue dehydration, fibrosis, nerve and vessel ingrowth, disc height loss and disc herniation. Spinal instability, inflammation and neural sensitisation are sources of back pain, a worldwide leading burden that is challenging to cure. In this review, advances in cell and molecular therapy, including mobilisation and activation of endogenous progenitor cells, progenitor cell homing, and targeted delivery of cells, genes, or bioactive factors are discussed.

  8. Advances in paediatric pulmonary vascular disease associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rossor, Thomas; Greenough, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common finding in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The aim of this review is to describe recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of PH and discuss whether they will benefit infants and children with BPD related PH. Echocardiography remains the mainstay of diagnosis but has limitations, further developments in diagnostic techniques and identification of biomarkers are required. There are many potential therapies for PH associated with BPD. Inhaled nitric oxide has been shown to improve short term outcomes only. Sidenafil in resource limited settings was shown in three randomized trials to significantly reduce mortality. The efficacy of other therapies including prostacyclin, PDE3 inhibitors and endothelin receptor blockers has only been reported in case reports or case series. Randomized controlled trials with long term follow up are required to appropriately assess the efficacy of therapies aimed at improving the outcome of children with PH.

  9. The Malus Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, M.; Bretenaker, F.; Le Floch, A.; Le Naour, R.; Oger, M.

    1999-09-01

    We describe a general model for the behaviour of a sensor based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer placed between crossed polarizers. Compared to single-pass polarimeters, the sensitivity for the measurement of intracavity anisotropies is shown to be enhanced by a factor of the order of the square of the finesse compared to single-pass polarimeters. Our model, based on a vectorial spatial description of the cavity, predicts the response of the system to circular and/or linear intracavity anisotropies. It also gives the ultimate sensitivity and takes into account the spurious backgrounds. Experimental illustrations are presented for different types of reciprocal and non-reciprocal anisotropies. Moreover, it is shown that the insertion of an optical bias combined with a modulation of the intracavity anisotropies leads to experimental sensitivities limited only by the shot noise level, in agreement with theoretical predictions. We discuss further improvements and potential applications for the polarimeter.

  10. Fabry-Perot resonance of water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, Louis-Alexandre; Guo, Qiuchen; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-10-01

    We show that significant water wave amplification is obtained in a water resonator consisting of two spatially separated patches of small-amplitude sinusoidal corrugations on an otherwise flat seabed. The corrugations reflect the incident waves according to the so-called Bragg reflection mechanism, and the distance between the two sets controls whether the trapped reflected waves experience constructive or destructive interference within the resonator. The resulting amplification or suppression is enhanced with increasing number of ripples and is most effective for specific resonator lengths and at the Bragg frequency, which is determined by the corrugation period. Our analysis draws on the analogous mechanism that occurs between two partially reflecting mirrors in optics, a phenomenon named after its discoverers Charles Fabry and Alfred Perot.

  11. Optically addressed asymmetric Fabry-Perot modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, A.; Maserjian, J.

    1991-01-01

    A low power, high contrast optically addressed modulator, operating with normal incidence, has been fabricated. Optically controlled reflection modulation is achieved through optically induced absorption modulation in a periodically delta-doped InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well structure inserted in an integrated asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator. A contrast ratio over 60:1 was measured using a spectrally matched low power InGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser to generate the write (control) signal. The insertion loss for the normally off modulator is 4.6 dB at the highest write signal power (30 mW) used. The device lends itself to the fabrication of arrays for optically addressed spatial light modulation.

  12. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  13. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-05-10

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  14. Advance in the pathogenesis and treatment of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. Diagnosis depends primarily on clinical features, biochemical parameters and the presence of the Kayser-Fleischer ring. Genetic analysis for mutations within ATP7B is a convincing diagnostic tool. The traditional treatment for WD includes chelation of excessive copper accumulation and reduction of copper intake. Medical therapy is effective but WD is not yet curable. Liver transplantation is especially helpful for patients who fail to respond to medical therapy or present with fulminant liver failure, although evaluation of its long-term effect are still in need. PMID:23210912

  15. Advances in non-invasive imaging of intracranial vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, H. R.; Grieve, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Intra-arterial catheter angiography has, in the past, been the mainstay for the investigation of intracranial vascular disease. It is, however, invasive, usually requires in-patients admission, and is associated with a rate of neurological complications between 1% and 3%. In recent years, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and CT angiography (CTA) have emerged as non-invasive alternatives for imaging blood vessels and have made a significant impact on neuroradiological investigations. It is the purpose of this article to explain the basic technical principles of these two methods and to give an overview of their current clinical applications. PMID:10700757

  16. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  17. The many facets of the Fabry-Perot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Soto, Luis L.; Monzón, Juan J.; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-11-01

    We address the response, both in amplitude and intensity, of a Fabry-Perot from a variety of viewpoints. These complementary pictures conspire to achieve a comprehensive and consistent theory of the operation of this system.

  18. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciarán P.; Bai, Julio C.; Liu, Edwin; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has a prevalence of ∼1% in many populations worldwide. New diagnoses have increased substantially, due to increased awareness, better diagnostic tools, and probable, real increases in incidence. The breadth of recognized clinical presentations continues to expand, making the disorder highly relevant to all physicians. Newer diagnostic tools, including serologic tests for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide, greatly facilitate diagnosis. Tests for celiac-permissive HLA DQ2 and DQ8 molecules are useful in defined clinical situations. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. However, according to recent controversial guidelines, a diagnosis can be made without biopsy in certain circumstances, especially for children. Symptoms, mortality, and risk for malignancy can each be reduced by adherence to a gluten-free diet. This treatment is a challenge, however, as the diet is expensive, socially isolating, and not always effective in controlling symptoms or intestinal damage. Hence, there is increasing interest in developing non-dietary therapies. PMID:25662623

  19. Advances in kinase inhibition: treating rheumatic diseases and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Gadina, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Kinases inhibitors are now used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here are reviewed the most recent findings related to their mechanism of action and some of the newest molecules and targets which are being investigated for autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Recent findings Similarly to p38 inhibitors, Syk inhibitors have not fulfilled the expectations of researchers and clinicians and will likely not be used therapeutically in autoimmunity. BTK inhibitors remain in the preclinical phase. Studies on the mechanism of action of successful Jak inhibitors have revealed that besides T and B cells, bone cells such as osteoclasts and innate immunity cells such as dendritic cells are positively affected. More specific, novel Jak inhibitors are now in clinical trials and newer Jak inhibitors are being developed. Other kinases are emerging from basic studies as potentially druggable and will surely be investigated. Summary First generation pan-Jak inhibitors can be useful for a wide variety of pathologies. They act on innate immune cells and can promote tolerance. More specific inhibitors will soon be available and these may be used in a disease-specific manner. PMID:24419749

  20. Advances in alcoholic liver disease: An update on alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Randy; Liu, Andy; Perumpail, Ryan B; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is a pro-inflammatory chronic liver disease that is associated with high short-term morbidity and mortality (25%-35% in one month) in the setting of chronic alcohol use. Histopathology is notable for micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, hepatocellular necrosis, perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis, and Mallory hyaline bodies found in ballooned hepatocytes. Other findings include the characteristic eosinophilic fibrillar material (Mallory’s hyaline bodies) found in ballooned hepatocytes. The presence of focal intense lobular infiltration of neutrophils is what typically distinguishes alcoholic hepatitis from other forms of hepatitis, in which the inflammatory infiltrate is primarily composed of mononuclear cells. Management consists of a multidisciplinary approach including alcohol cessation, fluid and electrolyte correction, treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and pharmacological therapy based on the severity of the disease. Pharmacological treatment for severe alcoholic hepatitis, as defined by Maddrey’s discriminant factor ≥ 32, consists of either prednisolone or pentoxifylline for a period of four weeks. The body of evidence for corticosteroids has been greater than pentoxifylline, although there are higher risks of complications. Recently head-to-head trials between corticosteroids and pentoxifylline have been performed, which again suggests that corticosteroids should strongly be considered over pentoxifylline. PMID:26576078

  1. von Willebrand disease: advances in pathogenetic understanding, diagnosis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Lillicrap, David

    2013-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is the most common autosomally inherited bleeding disorder. The disease represents a range of quantitative and qualitative pathologies of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the type 2 qualitative variants of VWF are now well characterized, with most mutations representing missense substitutions influencing VWF multimer structure and interactions with platelet GPIbα and collagen and with factor VIII. The molecular pathology of type 3 VWD has been similarly well characterized, with an array of different mutation types producing either a null phenotype or the production of VWF that is not secreted. In contrast, the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for type 1 VWD remain only partially resolved. In the hemostasis laboratory, the measurement of VWF:Ag and VWF:RCo are key components in the diagnostic algorithm for VWD, although the introduction of direct GPIbα-binding assays may become the functional assay of choice. Molecular genetic testing can provide additional benefit, but its utility is currently limited to type 2 and 3 VWD. The treatment of bleeding in VWD involves the use of desmopressin and plasma-derived VWF concentrates and a variety of adjunctive agents. Finally, a new recombinant VWF concentrate has just completed clinical trial evaluation and has demonstrated excellent hemostatic efficacy and safety.

  2. Advances in alcoholic liver disease: An update on alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Randy; Liu, Andy; Perumpail, Ryan B; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-11-14

    Alcoholic hepatitis is a pro-inflammatory chronic liver disease that is associated with high short-term morbidity and mortality (25%-35% in one month) in the setting of chronic alcohol use. Histopathology is notable for micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, hepatocellular necrosis, perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis, and Mallory hyaline bodies found in ballooned hepatocytes. Other findings include the characteristic eosinophilic fibrillar material (Mallory's hyaline bodies) found in ballooned hepatocytes. The presence of focal intense lobular infiltration of neutrophils is what typically distinguishes alcoholic hepatitis from other forms of hepatitis, in which the inflammatory infiltrate is primarily composed of mononuclear cells. Management consists of a multidisciplinary approach including alcohol cessation, fluid and electrolyte correction, treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and pharmacological therapy based on the severity of the disease. Pharmacological treatment for severe alcoholic hepatitis, as defined by Maddrey's discriminant factor ≥ 32, consists of either prednisolone or pentoxifylline for a period of four weeks. The body of evidence for corticosteroids has been greater than pentoxifylline, although there are higher risks of complications. Recently head-to-head trials between corticosteroids and pentoxifylline have been performed, which again suggests that corticosteroids should strongly be considered over pentoxifylline.

  3. An autocorrelator based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    An, Jungkwuen; Pyun, Kyungsuk; Kwon, Ojoon; Kim, Dong Eon

    2013-01-14

    An autocorrelator based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer is proposed for ultrashort pulse measurement. Main features of this autocorrelator due to the superposition of multiple pulses were investigated experimentally and theoretically. It turns out that the signal from a Fabry-Perot interferometer can be used as an autocorrelator signal. This autocorrelator provides more compact setup with a much easier alignment than a conventional autocorrelator based on a Michelson interferometer.

  4. Fabry-Perot MEMS Accelerometers for Advanced Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chisum, Brad

    2015-05-31

    This report summarizes the technical achievements that occurred over the duration of the project. On November 14th, 2014, Lumedyne Technologies Incorporated was acquired. As a result of the acquisition, the work toward seismic imaging applications was suspended indefinitely. This report captures the progress achieved up to that time.

  5. Advances in the treatment of diseased equine cheek teeth.

    PubMed

    Tremaine, Henry

    2013-08-01

    The last decade has seen a number of studies that have illuminated our knowledge of hypsodont dental disease and re-examined some of the traditionally performed practices. In addition there has been a major interest in routine preventative dentistry and non-traumatic treatments. These have highlighted some potential risks of the use of modern tools when applied to traditional techniques. This has also led to a reflective review of equine dentistry with the emphasis on attempting to preserve and salvage dental and periodontal tissues, with minimal trauma. In addition, precise imaging and instrumentation have facilitated minimally invasive techniques in conscious sedated horses, and there is renewed interest in comparative dentistry leading to trials with restorative techniques that are practiced in other species.

  6. Recent advances in understanding cardiac contractility in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Ken T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of some of the emerging ideas and experimental findings in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology that were published in 2015. To provide context for the non-specialist, a brief summary of cardiac contraction and calcium (Ca) regulation in the heart in health and disease is provided. Thereafter, some recently published articles are introduced that indicate the current thinking on (1) the Ca regulatory pathways modulated by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, (2) the potential influences of nitrosylation by nitric oxide or S-nitrosated proteins, (3) newly observed effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on contraction and Ca regulation following myocardial infarction and a possible link with changes in mitochondrial Ca, and (4) the effects of some of these signaling pathways on late Na current and pro-arrhythmic afterdepolarizations as well as the effects of transverse tubule disturbances. PMID:27508064

  7. Recent advances in the molecular analysis of inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, S

    1990-12-12

    Many important human genes have been cloned during the last ten years. In some cases, using reverse genetic techniques [Orkin, S. H. (1986) Cell 47, 845-850], disease-causing genes have been isolated whose product was previously unknown. Important examples include the dystrophin protein which, when mutated, gives rise to either Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy [Koenig, M., Hoffman, E. P., Bertelson, C. J., Monaco, A. P., Feener, C. and Kunkel, L. M. (1987) Cell 50, 509-517; Monaco, A. P., Bertelson, C. J., Liechti-Gallati, S. & Kunkel, L. M. (1988) Genomics 2, 90-95; Koenig, M., Monaco, A. P. & Kunkel, L. M. (1988) Cell 53, 219-228] and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) [Riordan, J. R., Rommens, J. M., Kerem, B.-S., Alon, N., Rozmahel, R., Grzelczak, Z., Zielenski, J., Lok, S., Plavsic, N., Chou, J.-L., Drumm, M. L., Ianuzzi, M. C., Collins, F. S. & Tsui, L.-C. (1989) Science 245, 1066-1073]. Recently the technology for systematically detecting single base-pair changes by chemical methods, enzymatic methods or direct DNA sequencing has greatly expanded and simplified. In addition to providing structural information about these clinically important genes and information on disease-causing mutations, these studies have led to an increased understanding of mechanisms of mutation, to the discovery of novel genetic mechanisms and to important clinical applications of carrier detection and pre-natal diagnosis. The recent rapid progress has been made possible by the development of DNA amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (pcr) invented by Saiki and colleagues [Saiki, R. K., Chang, C-A., Levenson, C. H., Warren, T. C., Boehm, C. D., Kazazian, H. H. & Ehrlich, H. A. (1988) N. Engl. J. Med. 319, 537-541].

  8. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M. V.; Barros, Paulo S. M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2006-07-15

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength {lambda}=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  9. Moments of homecoming among people with advanced dementia disease in a residential care facility.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Astrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Lundman, Berit

    2015-10-26

    This study concerns moments of homecoming among people with advanced dementia disease living in a residential care facility. Our main finding from participant observations with nine residents was that the residents showed moments of homecoming, i.e. they alternated between verbal and/or nonverbal expressions of feeling at home and of not feeling at home. If care providers understand that they can help people with advanced dementia disease experience moments of homecoming, they can focus on aspects of care that can promote these experiences.

  10. Reaching Those Most in Need – A Call to Action for Advanced Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shashank; Fleisher, Jori E

    2016-01-01

    Much of the clinical and research attention for Parkinson's Disease (PD) has focused on mild to moderate stages. As the disease advances, it can become difficult for patients to attend clinical visits. These patients are often lost to follow-up, and consequently, vanish from the pool of potential research subjects who could inform our management of this understudied population. We aim to increase awareness about this population and potential interventions to improve continuity of care and foster research in advanced PD. PMID:27708720

  11. Gamma radiation resistant Fabry-Perot fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanying; Miller, Don W.; Talnagi, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1998 completed a study of emerging technologies that could be applicable to measurement systems in nuclear power plants [H. M. Hashemian [et al.], "Advanced Instrumentation and Maintenance Technologies for Nuclear Power Plants," NUREG/CR-5501 (1998)]. This study concluded that advanced fiber optic sensing technology is an emerging technology that should be investigated. It also indicated that there had been very little research related to performance evaluation of fiber optic sensors in nuclear plant harsh environments, although substantial research has been performed on nuclear radiation effects on optical fibers in the last two decades. A type of Fabry-Perot fiber optic temperature sensor, which is manufactured by Fiso Technologies in Canada, is qualified to be a candidate for potential applications in nuclear radiation environment due to its unique signal processing technique and its resistance to power loss. The gamma irradiation effects on this type of sensors are investigated in this article. Two sensors were irradiated in a gamma irradiation field and one of them was irradiated up to a total gamma dose of 133 Mrad. The sensor on-line performance was monitored during each gamma irradiation test. Furthermore, the sensor static and dynamic performance before and after each irradiation test were evaluated according to the Standard ISA-dS67.06.01 ("Performance Monitoring for Nuclear Safety-Related Instrument Channels in Nuclear Power Plants", Standard ISA-dS67.06.01, Draft 7, Instrument Society of America, 1999). Although several abnormal phenomena were observed, analysis shows that gamma irradiation is not accredited to the abnormal behavior, which implies that this type of sensor is suitable to a gamma irradiation environment with a high gamma dose.

  12. Building a multicenter telehealth network to advance chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Khairat, Saif; Wijesinghe, Namal; Wolfson, Julian; Scott, Rob; Simkus, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The use of telehealth solutions has proved to improve clinical management of chronic diseases, expand access to healthcare services and clinicians, and reduce healthcare-related costs. The project aims at improving Heart Failure (HF) management through the utilization of a Telemedicine and Personal Health Records systems that will assist HF specialist in Colombo, Sri Lanka to monitor and consult with remote HF patients. A telehealth network will be built at an international site that connects five remote telehealth clinics to a central clinic at a major University Hospital in Sri Lanka where HF specialists are located. In this study, 200 HF patients will be recruited for nine months, 100 patients will be randomly selected for the treatment group and the other 100 will be selected for the control group. Pre, mid, and post study surveys will be conducted to assess the efficacy and satisfaction levels of patients with both care models. Moreover, clinical outcomes will be collected to evaluate the impact of the intervention on the treatment patients compared to control patients. The research aims at enhancing Heart Failure management through eliminating current health challenges and healthcare-related financial burdens.

  13. Recent advances in herbal medicines treating Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu-Zhao; Zhang, Shuai-Nan; Liu, Shu-Min; Lu, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Herbal medicines have attracted considerable attention in recent years, which are used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) in China based on traditional Chinese medicine or modern pharmacological theories. We summarized and analyzed the anti-Parkinsonian activities of herbal medicines and herbal formulations investigated in PD models and provide future references for basic and clinical investigations. All the herbal medicines and herbal formulations were tested on PD models in vitro and in vivo. The relevant compounds and herbal extracts with anti-Parkinsonian activities were included and analyzed according to their genera or pharmacological activities. A total of 38 herbal medicines and 11 herbal formulations were analyzed. The relevant compounds, herbal extracts and formulations were reported to be effective on PD models by modulating multiple key events or signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. The plant species of these herbal medicines belong to 24 genera and 18 families, such as Acanthopanax, Alpinia and Astragalus, etc. These herbal medicines can be an alternative and valuable source for anti-Parkinsonian drug discovery. The plant species in these genera and families may be the most promising candidates for further investigation and deserve further consideration in clinical trials. Active components in some of the herbal extracts and the compatibility law of herbal formulations remain to be further investigated.

  14. Recent advances in understanding and managing Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Stange, Eduard F.; Wehkamp, Jan

    2016-01-01

    There is consensus that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are the result of “dysregulated” immune reactivity towards commensal microorganisms in the intestine. This gut microbiome is clearly altered in IBD, but its primary or secondary role is still debated. The focus has shifted from adaptive to innate immunity, with its multitude of receptor molecules (Toll-like and NOD receptors) and antibacterial effector molecules (defensins, cathelicidin, and others). The latter appear to be at least partly deficient at different intestinal locations. Host genetics also support the notion that microbe–host interaction at the mucosa is the prime site of pathogenesis. In contrast, even the latest therapeutic antibodies are directed against secondary targets like cytokines and integrins identified decades ago. These so-called “biologicals” have disappointing long-term results, with the majority of patients not achieving remission in the long run. A promising approach is the development of novel drugs like defensin-derived molecules that substitute for the missing endogenous antibacterials. PMID:28163902

  15. [Chronic diseases and complexity: new roles in nursing. Advanced practice nurses and chronic patient].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, C Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The increase in chronic diseases and the progressive ageing of the population is a source of concern for the different agencies with responsibility for health care. This has led to the creation of many documents focused on the analysis of the current situation and care of chronic diseases, including the WHO recommendations intended to assist countries and health services design and implement strategies that will address the existing demand, control and prevention of chronic diseases. In addition, there is a need to respond to the demand generated by chronic diseases in every sense, and from the different systems it is becoming more difficult to get enough support from multidisciplinary teams where the nurse has a central importance. While chronic diseases are becoming a threat due to the costs they generate, it is also an opportunity for nursing to be at the forefront for advanced care requirements, performed by professionals with recognized advanced clinical skills and ability for case management while monitoring and controlling complex chronic patients. The different services of the National Health System have introduced nurses that play different roles (cases managers, liaison nurses, advanced practice nurses and so on). However, it could be argued that they are not being trained to a desirable development level. It is therefore time for health care authorities to determine the role of the advanced practice nurse in relation to functional positions, and allow them to make an advance in the development of unified skills for the whole National Health System. From our experience we have learned that the advanced practice nurse is a resource that helps in the sustainability of services, thanks to the efficiency shown in the results obtained from the care given to both chronic and complex chronic patients.

  16. Advances in MR imaging assessment of adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kathiria, Nazima N; Higgins, Charles B; Ordovas, Karen G

    2015-02-01

    Many novel cardiac MR sequences can be used for assessment of adult patients with congenital heart disease. Although most of these techniques are still primarily used in the research arena, there are many potential applications in clinical practice. Advanced cardiac MR assessment of myocardial tissue characterization, flow hemodynamics, and myocardial strain are promising tools for diagnostic and prognostic assessment late after repair of congenital heart diseases.

  17. Advances in sickle cell disease treatment: from drug discovery until the patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Lanaro, Carolina; Chin, Chung Man

    2011-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most prevalent hematological diseases in the world. Despite the immense progress in molecular knowledge about SCD in last years few therapeutical sources are currently available. Nowadays the treatment is performed mainly with drugs such as hydroxyurea or other fetal hemoglobin inducers and chelating agents. This review summarizes current knowledge about the treatment and the advancements in drug design in order to discover more effective and safe drugs. Patient monitoring methods in SCD are also discussed.

  18. Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Challenges and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Mahmoud; Al Beshir, Mohammad; Al-Judaibi, Bandar; Al-Ameel, Turki; Saleem, Abdulaziz; Bessissow, Talat; Ghosh, Subrata; Almadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, several advances have been made in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from both evaluative and therapeutic perspectives. This review discusses the medical advancements that have recently been made as the standard of care for managing patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD) and to identify the challenges associated with implementing their use in clinical practice. A comprehensive literature search of the major databases (PubMed and Embase) was conducted for all recent scientific papers (1990–2013) giving the recent updates on the management of IBD and the data were extracted. The reported advancements in managing IBD range from diagnostic and evaluative tools, such as genetic tests, biochemical surrogate markers of activity, endoscopic techniques, and radiological modalities, to therapeutic advances, which encompass medical, endoscopic, and surgical interventions. There are limited studies addressing the cost-effectiveness and the impact that these advances have had on medical practice. The majority of the advances developed for managing IBD, while considered instrumental by some IBD experts in improving patient care, have questionable applications due to constraints of cost, lack of availability, and most importantly, insufficient evidence that supports their role in improving important long-term health-related outcomes. PMID:24705146

  19. Advances in the diagnosis and management of inflammatory bowel disease: challenges and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Mahmoud; Al Beshir, Mohammad; Al-Judaibi, Bandar; Al-Ameel, Turki; Saleem, Abdulaziz; Bessissow, Talat; Ghosh, Subrata; Almadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, several advances have been made in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from both evaluative and therapeutic perspectives. This review discusses the medical advancements that have recently been made as the standard of care for managing patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD) and to identify the challenges associated with implementing their use in clinical practice. A comprehensive literature search of the major databases (PubMed and Embase) was conducted for all recent scientific papers (1990-2013) giving the recent updates on the management of IBD and the data were extracted. The reported advancements in managing IBD range from diagnostic and evaluative tools, such as genetic tests, biochemical surrogate markers of activity, endoscopic techniques, and radiological modalities, to therapeutic advances, which encompass medical, endoscopic, and surgical interventions. There are limited studies addressing the cost-effectiveness and the impact that these advances have had on medical practice. The majority of the advances developed for managing IBD, while considered instrumental by some IBD experts in improving patient care, have questionable applications due to constraints of cost, lack of availability, and most importantly, insufficient evidence that supports their role in improving important long-term health-related outcomes.

  20. Advanced Therapeutic Strategies for Chronic Lung Disease Using Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yhee, Ji Young; Im, Jintaek; Nho, Richard Seonghun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases include a variety of obstinate and fatal diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and lung cancers. Pharmacotherapy is important for the treatment of chronic lung diseases, and current progress in nanoparticles offers great potential as an advanced strategy for drug delivery. Based on their biophysical properties, nanoparticles have shown improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics and controlled drug delivery, gaining great attention. Herein, we will review the nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Various types of nanoparticles will be introduced, and recent innovative efforts to utilize the nanoparticles as novel drug carriers for the effective treatment of chronic lung diseases will also be discussed. PMID:27657144

  1. Identifying human disease genes: advances in molecular genetics and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, S M; Ali, A; Baig, S M; Barh, D; Miyoshi, A; Azevedo, V

    2014-07-04

    The human genome project is one of the significant achievements that have provided detailed insight into our genetic legacy. During the last two decades, biomedical investigations have gathered a considerable body of evidence by detecting more than 2000 disease genes. Despite the imperative advances in the genetic understanding of various diseases, the pathogenesis of many others remains obscure. With recent advances, the laborious methodologies used to identify DNA variations are replaced by direct sequencing of genomic DNA to detect genetic changes. The ability to perform such studies depends equally on the development of high-throughput and economical genotyping methods. Currently, basically for every disease whose origen is still unknown, genetic approaches are available which could be pedigree-dependent or -independent with the capacity to elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms. Computer algorithms and programs for linkage analysis have formed the foundation for many disease gene detection projects, similarly databases of clinical findings have been widely used to support diagnostic decisions in dysmorphology and general human disease. For every disease type, genome sequence variations, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms are mapped by comparing the genetic makeup of case and control groups. Methods that predict the effects of polymorphisms on protein stability are useful for the identification of possible disease associations, whereas structural effects can be assessed using methods to predict stability changes in proteins using sequence and/or structural information.

  2. Disease evaluations and agronomic traits of advanced peanut breeding lines in 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 23 commercially available peanut cultivars and high-oleic advanced breeding lines were evaluated in small field plots in 2014 for agronomic traits (crop value, yield, seed grade, and characteristics) and resistance to soilborne diseases. Among the 16 runner entries evaluated, Tamrun OL11...

  3. Disease evaluations and agronomic traits of advanced peanut breeding lines in 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 21 peanut cultivars and high-oleic advanced breeding lines were evaluated in small field plots in 2013 for agronomic traits (crop value, yield, seed grade, and characteristics) and resistance to diseases (Sclerotinia blight, southern blight, and Pythium and Rhizoctonia pod rot). Among th...

  4. The Care Needs of Community-Dwelling Seniors Suffering from Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna M.; Ross, Carolyn; Goodridge, Donna; Davis, Penny; Landreville, Alison; Roebuck, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the care needs of Canadian seniors living at home with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background: COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although hospitalizations for illness exacerbations and end-stage care may be common, most persons with COPD live out…

  5. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences.

  6. Fabry-Perot observations of comet Austin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, David; Scherb, F.; Roesler, F. L.; Li, G.; Harlander, J.; Roberts, T. P. P.; Vandenberk, D.; Nossal, S.; Coakley, M.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary results of a program to observe Comet Austin (1990c1) from 16 April to 4 May and from 11 May to 27 May 1990 using the West Auxiliary of the McMath Solar Telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona were presetned. The observations were made with a 15 cm duel-etalon Fabry-Perot scanning and imaging spectrometer with two modes of operation: a high resolution mode with a velocity resolution of 1.2 km/s and a medium resolution mode with a velocity resolution 10 km/s. Scanning data was obtained with an RCA C31034A photomultiplier tube and imaging data was obtained with a Photometrics LN2 cooled CCD camera with a 516 by 516 Ford chip. The results include: (1) information on the coma outflow velocity from high resolution spectral profiles of (OI)6300 and NH2 emissions, (2) gaseous water production rates from medium resolution observation of (OI)6300, (3) spectra of H2O(+) emissions in order to study the ionized component of the coma, (4) spatial distribution of H2O(+) emission features from sequences of velocity resolved images (data cubes), and (5) spatial distribution of (OI)6300 and NH2 emissions from medium resolution images. The field of view on the sky was 10.5 arcminutes in diameter. In the imaging mode the CCD was binned 4 by 4 resulting in 7.6 sec power pixel and a subarray readout for a field of view of 10.5 min.

  7. Advances in understanding and treating liver diseases during pregnancy: A review.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kobayashi, Yuji; Nomoto, Minoru; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-05-07

    Liver disease in pregnancy is rare but pregnancy-related liver diseases may cause threat to fetal and maternal survival. It includes pre-eclampsia; eclampsia; haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome; acute fatty liver of pregnancy; hyperemesis gravidarum; and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Recent basic researches have shown the various etiologies involved in this disease entity. With these advances, rapid diagnosis is essential for severe cases since the decision of immediate delivery is important for maternal and fetal survival. The other therapeutic options have also been shown in recent reports based on the clinical trials and cooperation and information sharing between hepatologist and gynecologist is important for timely therapeutic intervention. Therefore, correct understandings of diseases and differential diagnosis from the pre-existing and co-incidental liver diseases during the pregnancy will help to achieve better prognosis. Therefore, here we review and summarized recent advances in understanding the etiologies, clinical courses and management of liver disease in pregnancy. This information will contribute to physicians for diagnosis of disease and optimum management of patients.

  8. Automated Spectral Reduction in the IRAF Fabry-Perot Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopbell, P. L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    As introduced at ADASS I and II (Bland-Hawthorn, Shopbell, & Cecil 1992), a Fabry-Perot analysis package for IRAF is under development as a joint effort of ourselves and the IRAF group. In this paper, we describe an important component of the Fabry-Perot package, the fpplot task for spectral plotting and fitting. While this task has many similarities with the familiar splot and specplot tasks in the onedspec package, fpplot has been optimized and extended specifically for use with imaging Fabry-Perot data. The task provides for the display and analysis of grids of spectra, including functions for binning, scaling, masking, and over-plotting spectra. The most important features of fpplot use the IRAF nlfit and inlfit nonlinear fitting libraries to perform both interactive and background fitting of Fabry-Perot spectra. Automated techniques are essential for quantifying the thousands of spectra in a Fabry-Perot data cube for velocity and photometric studies. An example is given from current work involving the starburst galaxy M82. IRAF is distributed by the National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  9. Aspirin-Exacerbated Diseases: Advances in Asthma with Nasal Polyposis, Urticaria, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney; Buchheit, Kathleen; Cahill, Katherine N

    2015-12-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated diseases are important examples of drug hypersensitivities and include aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), aspirin- or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced urticaria/angioedema, and aspirin- or NSAID-induced anaphylaxis. While each disease subtype may be distinguished by unique clinical features, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these phenotypes are not fully understood. However, the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 enzyme is thought to play a significant role. Additionally, eosinophils, mast cells, and their products, prostaglandins and leukotrienes, have been identified in the pathogenesis of AERD. Current diagnostic and treatment strategies for aspirin-exacerbated diseases remain limited, and continued research focusing on each of the unique hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin is essential. This will not only advance the understanding of these disease processes, but also lead to the subsequent development of novel therapeutics that patients who suffer from aspirin-induced reactions desperately need.

  10. A review of advances in the study of diseases of fish: 1954-1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Post, G.

    1965-01-01

    STUDY OF DISEASE IN ANIMALS, INCLUDING MAN, has progressed rapidly in the past decade. Looking back, we find amazing success in the study of man's diseases and possibly only a little less success in studies of diseases of domesticated homeothermic animals. We who are interested in the poikilothermic animals may feel at times that we have not advanced so rapidly in our field. The reason for this may be closely associated with economics. The market for drugs and therapeutic agents is greater for domestic livestock than for cultured fishes. A larger income is derived from rearing domestic livestock. Therefore, more public funds are available for study of diseases of man and domestic livestock, while such funds are limited for the study of diseases of fish. The Federal and State fish-cultural systems, as well as colleges and universities, have been most active in research on fish disease and probably will continue to be so.

  11. Wavelength calibration with Fabry Perot Interferometers - yes we can!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franziskus Bauer, Florian; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-08-01

    Hollow-cathode lamps (HCLs) are used as default wavelength standard for spectroscopic measurements but have a number of well-known shortcomings. Advancing to cm/s precision in radial velocity experiments requires more stable calibration sources with more uniform line distributions. Fabry Perot Interferometers (FPI) are a practical alternative with a well-suited line distribution at relatively low cost. We present a simple method to characterize FPIs using standard HCLs and including the FPI spectrum in the wavelength calibration process. We propose to use the HCL wavelength solution to define a rough wavelength scale that is used to approximate the FPI peak positions. We assume that the FPI mirror distance is a smooth function of wavelength and utilize the large number of FPI peaks (typically 10^4) to consistently model all FPI peak wavelengths. With this approach, we anchor the dense FPI lines with the absolute HCL-scale combining their precision and accuracy. We test our method with the HARPS spectrograph and compare our wavelength calibration to one derived from a laser frequency comb (LFC) spectrum. Our combined HCL/FPI wavelength calibration removes the known, large-amplitude distortions of 50 m/s that occur in the HCL solution. Direct comparison with the LFC solution bears only small differences between the LFC and the HCL/FPI solutions and demonstrates that the HCL/FPI solution can overcome the most important shortcomings in HCL wavelength solutions. An FPI can provide an economical alternative to LFCs in particular for smaller projects.

  12. Proteomics and plant disease: advances in combating a major threat to the global food supply.

    PubMed

    Rampitsch, Christof; Bykova, Natalia V

    2012-02-01

    The study of plant disease and immunity is benefiting tremendously from proteomics. Parallel streams of research from model systems, from pathogens in vitro and from the relevant pathogen-crop interactions themselves have begun to reveal a model of how plants succumb to invading pathogens and how they defend themselves without the benefit of a circulating immune system. In this review, we discuss the contribution of proteomics to these advances, drawing mainly on examples from crop-fungus interactions, from Arabidopsis-bacteria interactions, from elicitor-based model systems and from pathogen studies, to highlight also the important contribution of non-crop systems to advancing crop protection.

  13. Fabrication of Fabry-Perot Interferometer Sensors and Characterization of their Performances for Aircraft Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergrass, LeRuth Q.

    1995-01-01

    This work provides the information for fabricating Fabry-Perot Interferometer sensors and their performances. The Fabry-Perot Interferometer sensors developed here will be used for the detection of flaws in aircraft structures. The sequel also contains discussion of the experimental setups for the Ultrasonic technique and the Fabry-Perot Interferometer.

  14. Recent Advances in Kawasaki Disease - Proceedings of the 3rd Kawasaki Disease Summit, Chandigarh, 2014.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surjit; Sharma, Dhrubajyoti; Bhattad, Sagar; Phillip, Saji

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in Japan, North America and Europe. It is now being increasingly recognized from the developing countries as well. If not diagnosed and treated in time, KD can result in coronary artery abnormalities in approximately 15-25% cases. The long-term consequences of these abnormalities may manifest in adults as myocardial ischemia and congestive heart failure. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) remains the drug of choice for treatment of KD, but several new agents like infliximab, cyclosporine, glucocorticoids and statins are now being increasingly used in these patients. While echocardiography has been the preferred imaging modality hitherto, CT coronary angiography has emerged as an exciting new supplementary option and provides an entirely new dimension to this disease. The incidence of KD has shown a progressive increase in several countries and it is likely that this disease would impact public health programmes in the near future even in the developing countries.

  15. Recent advances in host defense mechanisms/therapies against oral infectious diseases and consequences for systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Gaffen, S L; Herzberg, M C; Taubman, M A; Van Dyke, T E

    2014-05-01

    The innate and adaptive immune systems are both crucial to oral disease mechanisms and their impact on systemic health status. Greater understanding of these interrelationships will yield opportunities to identify new therapeutic targets to modulate disease processes and/or increase host resistance to infectious or inflammatory insult. The topics addressed reflect the latest advances in our knowledge of the role of innate and adaptive immune systems and inflammatory mechanisms in infectious diseases affecting the oral cavity, including periodontitis and candidiasis. In addition, several potential links with systemic inflammatory conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, are explored. The findings elucidate some of the defense mechanisms utilized by host tissues, including the role of IL-17 in providing immunity to oral candidiasis, the antimicrobial defense of mucosal epithelial cells, and the pro-resolution effects of the natural inflammatory regulators, proresolvins and lipoxins. They also describe the role of immune cells in mediating pathologic bone resorption in periodontal disease. These insights highlight the potential for therapeutic benefit of immunomodulatory interventions that bolster or modulate host defense mechanisms in both oral and systemic disease. Among the promising new therapeutic approaches discussed here are epithelial cell gene therapy, passive immunization against immune cell targets, and the use of proresolvin agents.

  16. The South Pole Imaging Fabry Perot Interferometer (SPIFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Swain, M. R.; Jackson, J. M.; Bolato, A. D.; Davidson, J. A.; Savage, M.

    1996-01-01

    The design and construction of the South Pole imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer (SPIFI) is reported. The SPIFI is a direct detection imaging spectrometer for use in the far infrared and submillimeter bands accessible to the 1.7 m telescope at the South Pole, and in the submillimeter bands accessible to the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), HI. It employs a 5 x 5 silicon bolometer array and three cryogenic Fabry Perot interferometers in series in order to achieve velocity resolutions of between 300 km/s and 30 km/s over the entire field of view with a resolution of up to 1 km/s at the center pixel. The scientific justification for the instrument is discussed, considering the spectral lines available to SPIFI. The optical path, the cryogenic Fabry-Perot, the adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and the detector array are described. The instrument's sensitivity is presented and compared with coherent systems.

  17. Design and Fabrication of a Fabry-Perot Electrooptic Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, C.; Yelleswarapu, C.; Sharma, A.; Frazier, D.; Penn, B.; Abdeldayem, H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The research to design a Fabry-Perot electrooptic modulator with an intracavity electrooptically active organic material is based on the initial results of Wang et. al. using poled polymer thin films. The main feature of the proposed device is the observation that in traditional electrooptic modulators like a Pockels cell, it requires few kilovolts of driving voltage to cause a 3 dB modulation even in high figure-of-merit electrooptic materials like LiNbO3. The driving voltage for the modulator can be reduced to as low as 10 volts by introducing the electrooptic material inside the resonant cavity of a Fabry-Perot modulator. This is because the transmission of the Fabry-Perot cavity varies nonlinearly with the change of refractive index or phase of light due to applied electric field. We describe in this report the progress made so far in the design and fabrication of the proposed device.

  18. Design and Fabrication of a Fabry-Perot Electrooptic Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, C.; Yelleswarapu, C.; Sharma, A.; Frazier, D.; Penn, B.; Abdeldayem, H.; Geveden, Rex D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The research to design a Fabry-Perot electrooptic modulator with an intracavity electrooptically active organic material is based on the initial results of Wang et. al. [1] using poled polymer thin films. The main feature of the proposed device is the observation that in traditional electrooptic modulators like a Pockels cell, it requires few kilovolts of driving voltage to cause a 3 dB modulation even in high figure-of-merit electrooptic. materials like LiNbO3. The driving voltage for the modulator can be reduced to as low as 10 volts by introducing the electrooptic material inside the resonant cavity of a Fabry-Perot modulator. This is because the transmission of the Fabry-Perot cavity varies nonlinearly with the change of refractive index or phase of light due to applied electric field. We describe in this report the progress made so far in the design and fabrication of the proposed device.

  19. Advanced laparoscopic surgery for colorectal disease: NOTES/NOSE or single port?

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Rishabh; Cahill, Ronan A

    2014-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal disease is an evolving, dynamic subject undergoing constant adaptation. Hence there are significant ongoing advances in technique and technology as has been seen with the emergence of single port and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic operations with already considerable ramifications for many aspects of minimal access surgery. Most recently single port technologies and expertise have synergized with Transanal Endoscopic (TEM/TEO) experience to allow their convergence out of their respective niches so that pelvic surgery can be laparoendoscopically performed from both its abdominal and perineal aspects. Distinct from wound-related benefits, such capacity for high resolution and multi-dimensional imaging relates significant benefit to the operating team and patient. This state of the art review demonstrates the crucial perspective that advanced practices and performance capabilities are intrinsically complimentary rather than competitive. All surgeons need therefore to participate in adapting their practice styles to allow technical step-advance across the discipline.

  20. Triple Fabry-Pérot Imaging Interferometer for High Resolution Solar Spectroscopy using the ATST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, B. M.; Gary, G. A.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2005-05-01

    We present a telecenrically mounted triple Fabry-Pérot imaging interferometer for the NSOs Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). It consists of three Fabry-Pérot etalons and the feed and imaging optics. This system provides high throughput, flexibility and breadth of operation when compared to other spectroscopic imaging systems. It can operate in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, an intermediate-band imager, and broadband high-resolution imager. In the proposed telecentric mount configuration, the transmittance of the etalon system is not a function of position in the field, so that instantaneous spectroscopic measurements can be performed across the entire field of view; however, the transmission peak of the interferometer is broadened. Mitigation of this broadening requires a low F# image at the etalons. Together with the requirement that the field of view be large enough to observe large-scale processes in the solar atmosphere, this limitation dictates that the diameter of the etalons have a large aperture. Specifically, for a spectrographic passband full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of around 2 pm, and entrance pupil diameter of 4 m, and a field of view of 35", the required etalon diameter is around 200 mm. This is beyond the size of current Fabry-Pérot etalons and near the current projected limit of manufacturability. The development of this instrument will bring these large etalons to realization and take Fabry-Pérot imaging interferometry to the next level of operational capability within telescopes of large aperture. This instrument will provide spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution which is not currently available to large aperture solar astronomy, but which is necessary, in conjunction with the new class telescopes, to the continuing discovery of laws that govern the dynamics of the sun and the earth-sun connection. The resolution afforded by higher aperture telescopes and instrumentation will

  1. Low Circulating Levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone in Histologically Advanced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Michael; Angulo, Paul; Chalasani, Naga; Merriman, Ralph; Viker, Kimberly; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Sanderson, Schuyler; Gawrieh, Samer; Krishnan, Anuradha; Lindor, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The biological basis of variability in histological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone(DHEA) is the most abundant steroid hormone and has been shown to influence sensitivity to oxidative stress, insulin sensitivity, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and procollagen messenger RNA. Our aim was to determine whether more histologically advanced NAFLD is associated with low circulating levels of DHEA. Serum samples were obtained prospectively at the time of liver biopsy in 439 patients with NAFLD (78 in an initial and 361 in validation cohorts) and in controls with cholestatic liver disease (n = 44). NAFLD was characterized as mild [simple steatosis or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis stage 0–2] or advanced (NASH with fibrosis stage 3–4). Serum levels of sulfated DHEA (DHEA-S) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with advanced NAFLD had lower plasma levels of DHEA-S than patients with mild NAFLD in both the initial (0.25 ± 0.07 versus 1.1 ± 0.09 µg/mL, P < 0.001) and validation cohorts (0.47 ± 0.06 versus 0.99 ± 0.04 µg/mL, P < 0.001). A “dose effect” of decreasing DHEA-S and incremental fibrosis stage was observed with a mean DHEA-S of 1.03 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.07, 0.83 ± 0.11, 0.66 ± 0.11, and 0.35 ± 0.06 µg/mL for fibrosis stages 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. All patients in both cohorts in the advanced NAFLD group had low DHEA-S levels, with the majority in the hypoadrenal range. The association between DHEA-S and severity of NAFLD persisted after adjusting for age. A relationship between disease/fibrosis severity and DHEA-S levels was not seen in patients with cholestatic liver diseases. Conclusion More advanced NAFLD, as indicated by the presence of NASH with advanced fibrosis stage, is strongly associated with low circulating DHEA-S. These data provide novel evidence for relative DHEA-S deficiency in patients with

  2. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  3. Vibration-induced elastic deformation of Fabry-Perot cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lisheng; Hall, John L.; Ye Jun; Yang Tao; Zang Erjun; Li Tianchu

    2006-11-15

    We perform a detailed numerical analysis of Fabry-Perot cavities used for state-of-the-art laser stabilization. Elastic deformation of Fabry-Perot cavities with various shapes and mounting methods is quantitatively analyzed using finite-element analysis. We show that with a suitable choice of mounting schemes it is feasible to minimize the susceptibility of the resonator length to vibrational perturbations. This investigation offers detailed information on stable optical cavities that may benefit the development of ultrastable optical local oscillators in optical atomic clocks and precision measurements probing the fundamental laws of physics.

  4. CIV Polarization Measurements Using a Vacuum Ultraviolet Fabry Perot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) is developing a Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Fabry Perot that will be launched on a sounding rocket for high throughput, high-cadence, extended field of view CIV (155nm) measurements. These measurements will provide (i) Dopplergrams for studies of waves, oscillations, explosive events, and mass motions through the transition region, and, (ii), polarization measurements to study the magnetic field in the transition region. This paper will describe the scientific goals of the instrument, a brief description of the optics and the polarization characteristics of the VUV Fabry Perot.

  5. Sapphire-fiber-based intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Anbo; Gollapudi, Sridhar; Murphy, Kent A.; May, Russell G.; Claus, Richard O.

    1992-01-01

    A sapphire optical fiber intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor is demonstrated. A length of multimode sapphire fiber that functions as a Fabry-Perot cavity is spliced to a silica single-mode fiber. The interferometric signals of this sensor are produced by the interference between the reflection from the silica-sapphire fiber splice and the reflection from the free end face of the sapphire fiber. This sensor has been demonstrated for temperature measurement. A resolution of 0.2 C has been obtained over a measurement range of 310 C to 976 C.

  6. Advancing research diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease: the IWG-2 criteria.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Bruno; Feldman, Howard H; Jacova, Claudia; Hampel, Harald; Molinuevo, José Luis; Blennow, Kaj; DeKosky, Steven T; Gauthier, Serge; Selkoe, Dennis; Bateman, Randall; Cappa, Stefano; Crutch, Sebastian; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Fox, Nick C; Galasko, Douglas; Habert, Marie-Odile; Jicha, Gregory A; Nordberg, Agneta; Pasquier, Florence; Rabinovici, Gil; Robert, Philippe; Rowe, Christopher; Salloway, Stephen; Sarazin, Marie; Epelbaum, Stéphane; de Souza, Leonardo C; Vellas, Bruno; Visser, Pieter J; Schneider, Lon; Stern, Yaakov; Scheltens, Philip; Cummings, Jeffrey L

    2014-06-01

    In the past 8 years, both the International Working Group (IWG) and the US National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association have contributed criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that better define clinical phenotypes and integrate biomarkers into the diagnostic process, covering the full staging of the disease. This Position Paper considers the strengths and limitations of the IWG research diagnostic criteria and proposes advances to improve the diagnostic framework. On the basis of these refinements, the diagnosis of AD can be simplified, requiring the presence of an appropriate clinical AD phenotype (typical or atypical) and a pathophysiological biomarker consistent with the presence of Alzheimer's pathology. We propose that downstream topographical biomarkers of the disease, such as volumetric MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET, might better serve in the measurement and monitoring of the course of disease. This paper also elaborates on the specific diagnostic criteria for atypical forms of AD, for mixed AD, and for the preclinical states of AD.

  7. Biliary atresia and other cholestatic childhood diseases: Advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Verkade, Henkjan J; Bezerra, Jorge A; Davenport, Mark; Schreiber, Richard A; Mieli-Vergani, Georgina; Hulscher, Jan B; Sokol, Ronald J; Kelly, Deirdre A; Ure, Benno; Whitington, Peter F; Samyn, Marianne; Petersen, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Biliary Atresia and other cholestatic childhood diseases are rare conditions affecting the function and/or anatomy along the canalicular-bile duct continuum, characterised by onset of persistent cholestatic jaundice during the neonatal period. Biliary atresia (BA) is the most common among these, but still has an incidence of only 1 in 10-19,000 in Europe and North America. Other diseases such as the genetic conditions, Alagille syndrome (ALGS) and Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis (PFIC), are less common. Choledochal malformations are amenable to surgical correction and require a high index of suspicion. The low incidence of such diseases hinder patient-based studies that include large cohorts, while the limited numbers of animal models of disease that recapitulate the spectrum of disease phenotypes hinders both basic research and the development of new treatments. Despite their individual rarity, collectively BA and other cholestatic childhood diseases are the commonest indications for liver transplantation during childhood. Here, we review the recent advances in basic research and clinical progress in these diseases, as well as the research needs. For the various diseases, we formulate current key questions and controversies and identify top priorities to guide future research.

  8. [Phase-II-study with vindesine (desacetyl-vinblastine-amide-sulfate) in advanced malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Goldhirsch, A; Beer, M; Sonntag, R W; Tschopp, L; Cavalli, F; Ryssel, H J; Brunner, K W

    1980-07-08

    53 patients with advanced and measurable cancerr were treated with vindesine in doses of 3 mg/m2 (pretreated) and 4 mg/m2 (non pretreated) i.v. once weekly. 48 patients are evaluable for response: of 14 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, 1 partial remission (PR), 1 minor response (MR) and 1 no change (NC) were observed. In 5 patients with large cell carcinoma of the lung: 1 NC. In 3 with adenocarcinoma of the lung: 1 MR. One patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma had progressive disease. Stable disease was observed in a patient with carcinoma of the tongue and in a patient with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Four patients with colorectal carcinoma had progressive disease. One MR was observed in a patient with breast cancer, while all of the other 3 patients had progressive disease. One carcinoma of the penis was stable. One MR was observed in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. One PR was observed in a case with no-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A patient with acute leukemia had progressive disease. Among 9 patients with malignant melanoma, 3 had an MR and 1 patient had stable disease. A patient with fibrosarcoma had progressive disease. Observed toxicity included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, paresthesias, constipation, jaw pain, nausea, stomatitis, alopecia, loss of taste, pruritus and skin rash, weakness and fatigue.

  9. Advances in Cardiovascular MRI for Diagnostics: Applications in Coronary Artery Disease and Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Michael; Kramer, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has emerged as an important cardiac imaging technique for the evaluation of multiple cardiac pathologies. Objective/Method The goal of this review is to describe recent advances in techniques which have extended the potential applications of CMR. The focus will be on the clinical applications of CMR for the evaluation of coronary artery disease and heart failure/cardiomyopathies which are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Conclusion CMR provides unique tissue characterization which is not available from other imaging modalities and has demonstrated important diagnostic and prognostic information in many forms of heart disease. PMID:21113233

  10. Advanced biomaterials and their potential applications in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Guofeng; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Bei; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease is considered as a widespread infectious disease and the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Attempts for developing periodontal disease treatment strategies, including drug delivery and regeneration approaches, provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future periodontal therapies. Recently, emerging advanced biomaterials including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and particles, hold great potential to be utilized as cell/drug carriers for local drug delivery and biomimetic scaffolds for future regeneration therapies. In this review, first, we describe the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, including plaque formation, immune response and inflammatory reactions caused by bacteria. Second, periodontal therapy and an overview of current biomaterials in periodontal regenerative medicine have been discussed. Third, the roles of state-of-the-art biomaterials, including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and micro/nanoparticles, developed for periodontal disease treatment and periodontal tissue regeneration, and their fabrication methods, have been presented. Finally, biological properties, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and immunogenicity of the biomaterials, together with their current applications strategies are given. Conclusive remarks and future perspectives for such advanced biomaterials are discussed.

  11. Advances in the prevention of oral disease; the role of the International Association for Dental Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Since its foundation in 1920, prevention of oral disease has been a priority for the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and the commitment of the organisation to the subject area is clearly expressed in its mission to improve oral health worldwide. The IADR has a current global membership of almost 11,000 people who share an interest in oral and craniofacial research. Contribution of IADR This paper provides an overview of the contribution of IADR to supporting research and associated activities in disease prevention, in disseminating knowledge and in advocating for better oral health for all citizens of the world. It looks back over time and summarises current supports. Two more recent initiatives in disease prevention are described in more detail, the Global Oral Health Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA) and the proceedings at the 2013 World Conference on Preventive Dentistry (WCPD, 2013), a joint initiative between IADR and WHO. Through organisational structure, meetings, publications, scientific groups and networks and external relations, IADR has been at the forefront of advancing research for the prevention of oral diseases. Conclusions IADR is committed to ensuring research advances get disseminated and implemented and at the same time encourages and advocates for basic, clinical and translational research across disciplines so that we may uncover the major breakthrough in prevention of oral disease. PMID:26391001

  12. Dynamic tension EMG to characterize the effects of DBS treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ruonala, V; Pekkonen, E; Rissanen, S; Airaksinen, O; Miroshnichenko, G; Kankaanpää, M; Karjalainen, P

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment method for motor symptoms of advanced Parkinson's disease. DBS-electrode is implanted to subthalamic nucleus to give precisely allocated electrical stimuli to brain. The optimal stimulus type has to be adjusted individually. Disease severity, main symptoms and biological factors play a role in correctly setting up the device. Currently there are no objective methods to assess the efficacy of DBS, hence the adjustment is based solely on clinical assessment. In optimal case an objectively measurable feature would point the right settings of DBS. Surface electromyographic and kinematic measurements have been used in Parkinson's disease research. As Parkinson's disease symptoms are known to change the EMG signal properties, these methods could be helpful aid in the clinical adjustment of DBS. In this study, 13 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease who received DBS treatment were measured. The patients were measured with seven different settings of the DBS in clinical range including changes in stimulation amplitude, frequency and pulse width. The EMG analysis was based on parameters that characterize EMG signal morphology. Correlation dimension and recurrence rate made the most significant difference in relation to optimal settings. In conclusion, EMG analysis is able to detect differences between the DBS setups, and can help in finding the correct parameters.

  13. ATYPICAL MACULOPATHY IN A PATIENT WITH LIGHT CHAIN DEPOSITION DISEASE MIMICKING ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC ATROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Oshry, Lauren J.; Reichel, Elias

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a previously unreported presentation of advanced geographic atrophy of the macula mimicking nonneovascular (dry) age-related macular degeneration in a patient with light chain deposition disease. Methods: Ocular examination included dilated fundus examination, fundus autofluorescence, full-field electroretinography, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Patients: Single-patient case report. Results: Dilated fundus examination demonstrated diffuse loss of the retinal pigment epithelium in a geographic atrophy pattern in the macula and drusenlike deposits localized to the outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium. There were no signs of choroidal neovascularization or retinal pigment epithelium detachments. Fundus autofluorescence demonstrated wide areas of retinal pigment epithelium loss. Full-field electroretinography was normal. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography displayed atrophy of the outer retinal layers. Discussion: This is the first documented case of drusenlike deposits and maculopathy in a patient with light chain deposition disease that mimics advanced geographic atrophy that is typically observed in nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration. Physicians should be aware of the macular changes that can be associated with light chain deposition disease, and patients with light chain deposition disease should be regularly evaluated for associated macular disease. PMID:26934302

  14. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  15. Managing uncertainty in advanced liver disease: a qualitative, multiperspective, serial interview study

    PubMed Central

    Kimbell, Barbara; Boyd, Kirsty; Kendall, Marilyn; Iredale, John; Murray, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the experiences and support needs of people with advanced liver disease and those of their lay and professional carers to inform improvements in the supportive and palliative care of this rapidly growing but currently neglected patient group. Design Multiperspective, serial interviews. We conducted up to three qualitative in-depth interviews with each patient and lay carer over 12 months and single interviews with case-linked healthcare professionals. Data were analysed using grounded theory techniques. Participants Patients with advanced liver disease of diverse aetiologies recruited from an inpatient hepatology ward, and their lay carers and case-linked healthcare professionals nominated by the patients. Setting Primary and secondary care in South-East Scotland. Results 37 participants (15 patients, 11 lay and 11 professional carers) completed 51 individual and 13 joint patient-carer interviews. Nine patients died during the study. Uncertainty dominated experiences throughout the course of the illness, across patients’ considerable physical, psychological, social and existential needs and affected patients, lay carers and professionals. This related to the nature of the condition, the unpredictability of physical deterioration and prognosis, poor communication and information-sharing, and complexities of care. The pervasive uncertainty also shaped patients’ and lay carers’ strategies for coping and impeded care planning. While patients’ acute medical care was usually well coordinated, their ongoing care lacked structure and focus. Conclusions Living, dying and caring in advanced liver disease is dominated by pervasive, enduring and universally shared uncertainty. In the face of high levels of multidimensional patient distress, professionals must acknowledge this uncertainty in constructive ways that value its contribution to the person's coping approach. Pervasive uncertainty makes anticipatory care planning in advanced liver

  16. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  17. Antiproteinuric therapy and Fabry nephropathy: factors associated with preserved kidney function during agalsidase-beta therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G; Thomas, Christie P; Vujkovac, Bojan; Campbell, Ruth C; Charrow, Joel; Laney, Dawn A; Jackson, Leslie L; Wilcox, William R; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Nephropathy is an important feature of classical Fabry disease, which results in alpha-galactosidase A deficiency and cellular globotriaosylceramide accumulation. We report the safety and efficacy of antiproteinuric therapy with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in a study of classical Fabry patients receiving recombinant agalsidase-beta therapy. Methods and design The goal was maintenance of urine protein to creatinine ratio (UPCR) <0.5 g/g or a 50% reduction in baseline UPCR for 24 patients at eight study sites. The change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 21 months of treatment. Results 18 out of 24 patients achieved the UPCR goal with eGFR slopes that were significantly better than six patients who did not achieve the UPCR goal (−3.6 (−4.8 to −1.1) versus −7.0 (−9.0 to −5.6) mL/min/1.73 m2/year, respectively, p=0.018). Despite achieving the UPCR goal, 67% (12/18 patients) still progressed with an eGFR slope <−2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year. Regression analysis showed that increased age at initiation of agalsidase-beta therapy was significantly associated with worsened kidney outcome. Hypotension and hyperkalaemia occurred in seven and eight patients, respectively, which required modification of antiproteinuric therapy but was not associated with serious adverse events. Conclusions This study documents the effectiveness of agalsidase-beta (1 mg/kg/2 weeks) and antiproteinuric therapy with ACE inhibitors and/or ARB in patients with severe Fabry nephropathy. Patients had preservation of kidney function if agalsidase-beta treatment was initiated at a younger age, and UPCR maintained at or below 0.5 g/g with antiproteinuric therapy. Trial registration number NCT00446862. PMID:26490103

  18. Deep Assessment: A Novel Framework for Improving the Care of People with Very Advanced Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Gordon; Arthur-Kelly, Michael; Eidels, Ami; Mavratzakis, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Best practice in understanding and caring for people with advanced Alzheimer's disease presents extraordinary challenges. Their severe and deteriorating cognitive impairments are such that carers find progressive difficulty in authentically ascertaining and responding to interests, preferences, and needs. Deep assessment, a novel multifaceted framework drawn from research into the experiences of others with severe cognitive impairments, has potential to empower carers and other support professionals to develop an enhanced understanding of people with advanced Alzheimer's disease and so deliver better calibrated care in attempts to maximize quality of life. Deep assessment uses a combination of techniques, namely, Behaviour State Observation, Triangulated Proxy Reporting, and Startle Reflex Modulation Measurement, to deliver a comprehensive and deep assessment of the inner states (awareness, preferences, likes, and dislikes) of people who cannot reliably self-report. This paper explains deep assessment and its current applications. It then suggests how it can be applied to people with advanced Alzheimer's disease to develop others' understanding of their inner states and to help improve their quality of life. An illustrative hypothetical vignette is used to amplify this framework. We discuss the potential utility and efficacy of this technique for this population and we also propose other human conditions that may benefit from research using a deep assessment approach. PMID:26688817

  19. [Application of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Toth, Adrián; Nagy, Helga; Wacha, Judit; Bereczki, Dániel; Takáts, Annamária

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder around the world. Levodopa has remained the "gold standard" of the therapy even several decades after its introduction. Chronic levodopa treatment is associated with the development of motor complications in most patients. Advanced Parkinson's disease is characterized by these complications: motor and non-motor fluctuation and disturbing dyskinesia. Continuous dopaminergic stimulation might reduce these complications. In advanced Parkinson's disease levodopa is still effective. In the treatment of this stage there are several advanced or device-aided therapies: apomorphine pump, deep brain stimulation and levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel. Levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel is an aqueous gel that can be delivered to the jejunum via a percutaneous gastrojejunostomy tube which is connected to an infusion pump dosing the levodopa gel continuously to the place of absorption. Levodopa/carbidopa gel infusion can be used as monotherapy, can be tested, can be used individually and this therapy is reversible. Several clinical trials demonstrated that levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel therapy is of long-term benefit, improves the quality of life of the patients and can reduce motor fluctuation and dyskinesia.

  20. Deep Assessment: A Novel Framework for Improving the Care of People with Very Advanced Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Gordon; Arthur-Kelly, Michael; Eidels, Ami; Mavratzakis, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Best practice in understanding and caring for people with advanced Alzheimer's disease presents extraordinary challenges. Their severe and deteriorating cognitive impairments are such that carers find progressive difficulty in authentically ascertaining and responding to interests, preferences, and needs. Deep assessment, a novel multifaceted framework drawn from research into the experiences of others with severe cognitive impairments, has potential to empower carers and other support professionals to develop an enhanced understanding of people with advanced Alzheimer's disease and so deliver better calibrated care in attempts to maximize quality of life. Deep assessment uses a combination of techniques, namely, Behaviour State Observation, Triangulated Proxy Reporting, and Startle Reflex Modulation Measurement, to deliver a comprehensive and deep assessment of the inner states (awareness, preferences, likes, and dislikes) of people who cannot reliably self-report. This paper explains deep assessment and its current applications. It then suggests how it can be applied to people with advanced Alzheimer's disease to develop others' understanding of their inner states and to help improve their quality of life. An illustrative hypothetical vignette is used to amplify this framework. We discuss the potential utility and efficacy of this technique for this population and we also propose other human conditions that may benefit from research using a deep assessment approach.

  1. ‘Reality and desire’ in the care of advanced chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Marrón, Belén; Craver, Lourdes; Remón, César; Prieto, Mario; Gutiérrez, Josep Mª; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    There is a long distance between the actual worldwide reality in advanced chronic kidney disease care and the desire of how these patients should be managed to decrease cardiovascular and general morbidity and mortality. Implementation of adequate infrastructures may improve clinical outcomes and increase the use of home renal replacement therapies (RRT). Current pitfalls should be addressed to optimise care: inadequate medical training for nephrological referral and RRT selection, late referral to nephrologists, inadequate patient education for choice of RRT modality, lack of multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics and lack of programmed RRT initiation. These deficiencies generate unintended consequences, such as inequality of care and limitations in patient education and selection-choice for RRT technique with limited use of peritoneal dialysis. Multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics may have a direct impact on patient survival, morbidity and quality of life. There is a common need to reduce health care costs and scenarios increasing PD incidence show better efficiency. The following proposals may help to improve the current situation: defining the scope of the problem, disseminating guidelines with specific targets and quality indicators, optimising medical speciality training, providing adequate patient education, specially through the use of general decision making tools that will allow patients to choose the best possible RRT in accordance with their values, preferences and medical advice, increasing planned dialysis starts and involving all stakeholders in the process. PMID:25984045

  2. Advances in huntington disease drug discovery: novel approaches to model disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bard, Jonathan; Wall, Michael D; Lazari, Ovadia; Arjomand, Jamshid; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2014-02-01

    Huntington disease is a monogenic, autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the huntingtin (HTT) gene; age of onset of clinical symptoms inversely correlates with expanded CAG repeat length. HD leads to extensive degeneration of the basal ganglia, hypothalamic nuclei, and selected cortical areas, and a wide range of molecular mechanisms have been implicated in disease pathology in animal or cellular models expressing mutated HTT (mHTT) proteins, either full-length or amino-terminal fragments. However, HD cellular models that recapitulate the slow progression of the disease have not been available due to the toxicity of overexpressed exogenous mHTT or to limitations with using primary cells for long-term studies. Most investigations of the effects of mHTT relied on cytotoxicity or aggregation end points in heterologous systems or in primary embryonic neuroglial cultures derived from HD mouse models. More innovative approaches are currently under active investigation, including screening using electrophysiological endpoints, as well as the recent use of primary blood mononuclear cells and of human embryonic stem cells derived from a variety of HD research participants. Here we describe how these cellular systems are being used to investigate HD biology as well as to identify mechanisms with therapeutic potential.

  3. Low vitamin D status is associated with advanced liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Bing; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Shi, Chang-E; Hu, Kai-Feng; Zhou, Ju; Xu, De-Xiang; Chen, Xi

    2017-02-01

    Several studies explored the association between vitamin D status and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with contradictory results. We aimed to investigate the association between vitamin D status, inflammatory cytokines and liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Two hundred nineteen nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients and 166 age- and gender- matched healthy controls were recruited for this study. Serum 25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum interleukin-8 and transforming growth factor-β1 were measured using ELISA. Serum 25(OH)D was only marginally decreased in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Interestingly, serum 25(OH)D was markedly reduced in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced liver fibrosis compared to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with indeterminate liver fibrosis and no advanced fibrosis. Logistic regression analysis showed that there was an inverse association between serum 25(OH)D and severity of liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Further analysis showed that serum interleukin-8 was elevated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients, the highest interleukin-8 in patients with advanced fibrosis. An inverse correlation between serum 25(OH)D and interleukin-8 was observed in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with and without liver fibrosis. Although serum transforming growth factor-β1 was slightly elevated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients, serum transforming growth factor-β1 was reduced in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced fibrosis. Unexpectedly, a positive correlation between serum 25(OH)D and transforming growth factor-β1 was observed in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced fibrosis. In conclusion, low vitamin D status is associated with advanced liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Interleukin-8 may be an important mediator for hepatic fibrosis in nonalcoholic

  4. [Advance in application of syndromic surveillance for detection of emerging infectious diseases and outbreak alerts].

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Wang, Xin; Liang, Dabin

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decade, syndromic surveillance, as supplementation of disease surveillance, has provided possibility of early alert in a real-time way for detection of emerging infectious diseases and outbreaks of widespread infectious diseases, resulting in improvement in sensitivity of outbreak detection and public health alert capacity. This tool has been highly valued and widely used in the world, and effective implementation has been observed in China. Upon abundant literature search, the authors reviewed the progress and advance of syndromic surveillance in early alert of emerging infectious diseases and outbreaks, and analyzed the problem met in the current situation in China when implementing syndromic surveillance in local facilities, which are high cost, lack of medical information platform, lack of real-time digital alert system and lack of a comprehensive information exchange platform. The authors suggested that syndromic surveillance should be implemented considering the local situation and performed in a more effective way in the current situation. Syndromic surveillance has to be integrated into the conventional public health surveillance systems and advanced laboratory networks. Digital information system is urgently needed to achieve real-time alert.

  5. Safety and Efficacy Study of VY-AADC01 for Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-22

    Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease; Parkinson's Disease; Basal Ganglia Disease; Brain Diseases; Central Nervous System Diseases; Movement Disorders; Nervous System Diseases; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Parkinsonian Disorders

  6. GPs’ views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss EM; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP’s workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. Aim To explore GPs’ views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Design and setting Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Method Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. Results GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient’s interests. Conclusion GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. PMID:26120137

  7. Development of the Fabry-Perot Spectrometer Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a greenhouse gas with global warming effects 20 times more detrimental than carbon dioxide. Currently, only aircraft missions measure methane and do not provide continuous monitoring, This presentation will cover the Fabry-Perot spectrometer which will provide continuous monitoring of methane. It will also cover the development of the software used to extract and process the data the spectrometer collects.

  8. Cryogenic far-infrared Fabry-Perot etalon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. B.; Pickett, H. M.

    1991-01-01

    A small cryogenic Fabry-Perot etalon was fabricated for the far-infrared region. The design used freestanding metal meshes for the reflecting elements. Using a combination of gold-coated copper mesh on stainless steel. The spacing is reproduced to 1 part in 10 exp 6 with repeated cooling. The properties and methods used for alignment and calibration are presented.

  9. Characterization of a Fabry - Perot - Based electrooptic Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, C.; Yelleswarapu, C.; Sharma, A.; Frazier, D.; Penn, B.; Abdeldayem, H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An electrooptic modulator using a thin slice of LiNbO3 within the cavity of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is designed and fabricated. The modulator is operated with 633 nm light from a He-Ne laser. Results related to characterization of this modulator are presented.

  10. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  11. Far-IR Fabry-Perot spectrometer for OH measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, H. M.; Peterson, D. B.

    1991-09-01

    The Far Infrared Limb Observing Spectrometer (FILOS) is an instrument designed to measure chemical species in the upper atmosphere using limb emission in the far infrared region of the spectrum. FILOS uses three Fabry-Perot etalons in series to obtain a resolution of 0.0017/cm near 101/cm (99 microns). The instrumental concept and atmospheric measurements are discussed.

  12. Far-IR Fabry-Perot spectrometer for OH measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.; Peterson, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    The Far Infrared Limb Observing Spectrometer (FILOS) is an instrument designed to measure chemical species in the upper atmosphere using limb emission in the far infrared region of the spectrum. FILOS uses three Fabry-Perot etalons in series to obtain a resolution of 0.0017/cm near 101/cm (99 microns). The instrumental concept and atmospheric measurements are discussed.

  13. A Fabry-Perot Solid Etalon for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, P. J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a solid etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer, discussing free spectral range, instrumental finesse, and temperature effects. Provides schematic of temperature control/display circuit. Explains use of 100 millimeter camera lens and 10 power micrometer eyepiece for resolving rings and measure diameters. (JM)

  14. Treatment of Parkinson disease: a 64-year-old man with motor complications of advanced Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tarsy, Daniel

    2012-06-06

    In early stages, Parkinson disease typically begins with asymmetric or unilateral motor symptoms due to combinations of mild bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor. In most cases, with progression, signs of more generalized bradykinesia appear, which include facial masking, reduced voice volume, and slowing of activities of daily living. In more advanced Parkinson disease, other disabling manifestations may follow, such as impaired balance, gait freezing, falls, speech disturbance, and cognitive impairment. Levodopa is the most effective medical treatment for Parkinson disease. However, motor complications uniquely related to levodopa treatment may emerge that may be difficult to manage. These include fluctuating levodopa responses and involuntary movements and postures known as dyskinesia and dystonia. Medication adjustments are usually effective, but in some cases surgical intervention with deep brain stimulation becomes necessary to alleviate motor complications. The case of Mr L, a man with an 11-year history of Parkinson disease, illustrates these emerging motor complications and the manner in which they may be managed both medically and surgically.

  15. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  16. Kienböck Disease: Recent Advances in the Basic Science, Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory Ian; Yeo, Chong Jin; Morse, Levi Philip

    2015-10-01

    Kienböck disease is a disorder of impaired lunate vascularity which ultimately has the potential to lead to marked degeneration of the wrist and impaired wrist function. The aetiology of the avascular necrosis is uncertain, but theories relate to ulnar variance, variability in lunate vascularity and intraosseous pressures. Clinical symptoms can be subtle and variable, requiring a high index of suspicion for the diagnosis. The Lichtmann classification has historically been used to guide management. We present a review of Kienböck disease, with a focus on the recent advances in assessment and treatment. Based on our understanding thus far of the pathoanatomy of Kienböck's disease, we are proposing a pathological staging system founded on the vascularity, osseous and chondral health of the lunate. We also propose an articular-based approach to treatment, with an arthroscopic grading system to guide management.

  17. Update on celiac disease – etiology, differential diagnosis, drug targets, and management advances

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Samantha A; Murray, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to wheat gluten and similar proteins found in rye and barley that affects genetically susceptible persons. This immune-mediated enteropathy is characterized by villous atrophy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and crypt hyperplasia. Once thought a disease that largely presented with malnourished children, the wide spectrum of disease activity is now better recognized and this has resulted in a shift in the presenting symptoms of most patients with CD. New advances in testing, both serologic and endoscopic, have dramatically increased the detection and diagnosis of CD. While the gluten-free diet is still the only treatment for CD, recent investigations have explored alternative approaches, including the use of altered nonimmunogenic wheat variants, enzymatic degradation of gluten, tissue transglutaminase inhibitors, induction of tolerance, and peptides to restore integrity to intestinal tight junctions. PMID:22235174

  18. Advanced glycation end-products produced systemically and by macrophages: A common contributor to inflammation and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyunghee; Yoo, YongCheol; Son, Myeongjoo; Lee, Jaesuk; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Park, Young Mok; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Lee, Bonghee

    2017-02-13

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor have been implicated in the progressions of many intractable diseases, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, and are also critical for pathologic changes in chronic degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and alcoholic brain damage. Recently activated macrophages were found to be a source of AGEs, and the most abundant form of AGEs, AGE-albumin excreted by macrophages has been implicated in these diseases and to act through common pathways. AGEs inhibition has been shown to prevent the pathogenesis of AGEs-related diseases in human, and therapeutic advances have resulted in several agents that prevent their adverse effects. Recently, anti-inflammatory molecules that inhibit AGEs have been shown to be good candidates for ameliorating diabetic complications as well as degenerative diseases. This review was undertaken to present, discuss, and clarify current understanding regarding AGEs formation in association with macrophages, different diseases, therapeutic and diagnostic strategy and links with RAGE inhibition.

  19. Is gardening a stimulating activity for people with advanced Huntington's disease?

    PubMed

    Spring, Josephine A; Viera, Marc; Bowen, Ceri; Marsh, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated adapted gardening as an activity for people with advanced Huntington's disease (HD) and explored its therapeutic aspects. Visitors and staff completed a questionnaire and participated in structured interviews to capture further information, whereas a pictorial questionnaire was designed for residents with communication difficulties. Staff reported that gardening was a constructive, outdoor activity that promoted social interaction, physical activity including functional movement and posed cognitive challenges. Half the staff thought the activity was problem free and a third used the garden for therapy. Visitors used the garden to meet with residents socially. Despite their disabilities, HD clients enjoyed growing flourishing flowers and vegetables, labelling plants, being outside in the sun and the quiet of the garden. The garden is valued by all three groups. The study demonstrates the adapted method of gardening is a stimulating and enjoyable activity for people with advanced HD.

  20. Advances and challenges in biosensor-based diagnosis of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Mandy LY; Mach, Kathleen E; Wong, Pak Kin; Liao, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Conventional in vitro diagnostics for infectious diseases are time-consuming and require centralized laboratories, experienced personnel and bulky equipment. Recent advances in biosensor technologies have potential to deliver point-of-care diagnostics that match or surpass conventional standards in regards to time, accuracy and cost. Broadly classified as either label-free or labeled, modern biosensors exploit micro- and nanofabrication technologies and diverse sensing strategies including optical, electrical and mechanical transducers. Despite clinical need, translation of biosensors from research laboratories to clinical applications has remained limited to a few notable examples, such as the glucose sensor. Challenges to be overcome include sample preparation, matrix effects and system integration. We review the advances of biosensors for infectious disease diagnostics and discuss the critical challenges that need to be overcome in order to implement integrated diagnostic biosensors in real world settings. PMID:24524681

  1. Advances in the Development of Disease-Modifying Treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; White, Anthony R

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive adult-onset, neurodegenerative disease characterized by the degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Over recent years, numerous genes ha ve been identified that promote disease pathology, including SOD1, TARDBP, and the expanded hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) within C9ORF72. However, despite these major advances in identifying genes contributing to ALS pathogenesis, there remains only one currently approved therapeutic: the glutamate antagonist, riluzole. Seminal breakthroughs in the pathomechanisms and genetic factors associated with ALS have heavily relied on the use of rodent models that recapitulate the ALS phenotype; however, while many therapeutics have proved to be significant in animal models by prolonging life and rescuing motor deficits, they have failed in human clinical trials. This may be due to fundamental differences between rodent models and human disease, the fact that animal models are based on overexpression of mutated genes, and confounding issues such as difficulties mimicking the dosing schedules and regimens implemented in mouse models to humans. Here, we review the major pathways associated with the pathology of ALS, the rodent models engineered to test efficacy of candidate drugs, the advancements being made in stem cell therapy for ALS, and what strategies may be important to circumvent the lack of successful translational studies in the clinic.

  2. Clinical and Genetic Advances in Paget's Disease of Bone: a Review.

    PubMed

    Alonso, N; Calero-Paniagua, I; Del Pino-Montes, J

    2017-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is the second most common metabolic bone disorder, after osteoporosis. It is characterised by focal areas of increased and disorganised bone turnover, coupled with increased bone formation. This disease usually appears in the late stages of life, being slightly more frequent in men than in women. It has been reported worldwide, but primarily affects individuals of British descent. Majority of PDB patients are asymptomatic, but clinical manifestations include pain, bone deformity and complications, like pathological fractures and deafness. The causes of the disease are poorly understood and it is considered as a complex trait, combining genetic predisposition with environmental factors. Linkage analysis identified SQSTM1, at chromosome 5q35, as directly related to the disease. A number of mutations in this gene have been reported, pP392L being the most common variant among different populations. Most of these variants affect the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain of the protein, which is involved in autophagy processes. Genome-wide association studies enlarged the number of loci associated with PDB, and further fine-mapping studies, combined with functional analysis, identified OPTN and RIN3 as causal genes for Paget's disease. A combination of risk alleles identified by genome-wide association studies led to the development of a score to predict disease severity, which could improve the management of the disease. Further studies need to be conducted to elucidate other important aspects of the trait, such as its focal nature and the epidemiological changes found in some populations. In this review, we summarize the clinical characteristics of the disease and the latest genetic advances to identify susceptibility genes. We also list current available treatments and prospective options.

  3. Optical cavity characterization of the Tor Vergata Fabry-Pérot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, Luca; Berrilli, Francesco; Del Moro, Dario; Greco, Vincenzo; Piazzesi, Roberto; Sordini, Andrea; Stangalini, Marco

    2014-08-01

    We report the first optical and control performances of the Tor Vergata Fabry-Ṕerot interferometer prototype designed and realized in the framework of the ADvanced Astronomy for HELIophysics (ADAHELI) solar mission project. The characterization of the the coated surfaces of the two plates defining the optical cavity has been carried out with a Zygo interferometer able to measure the microroughness and global curvature of the cavity. The peak-to-valley errors are compliant with the manufacturer specifications and correspond to λ/70 and λ/80 @632.8 nm respectively. In addition, we present a first estimate of the interferometer spectral stability in stable open-air condition. A spectral uncertainty equal to 0.95 pm is found as the typical RMS over one hour of the passband central wavelength position.

  4. Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Recent Advances in Biologic Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory disorder with an unknown etiology. IBD is composed of two different disease entities: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD has been thought to be idiopathic but has two main attributable causes that include genetic and environmental factors. The gastrointestinal tract in which this disease occurs is central to the immune system, and the innate and the adaptive immune systems are balanced in complex interactions with intestinal microbes under homeostatic conditions. However, in IBD, this homeostasis is disrupted and uncontrolled intestinal inflammation is perpetuated. Recently, the pathogenesis of IBD has become better understood owing to advances in genetic and immunologic technology. Moreover, new therapeutic strategies are now being implemented that accurately target the pathogenesis of IBD. Beyond conventional immunesuppressive therapy, the development of biological agents that target specific disease mechanisms has resulted in more frequent and deeper remission in IBD patients, with mucosal healing as a treatment goal of therapy. Future novel biologics should overcome the limitations of current therapies and ensure that individual patients can be treated with optimal drugs that are safe and precisely target IBD. PMID:28261018

  5. CT angiography after 20 years: a transformation in cardiovascular disease characterization continues to advance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; Leipsic, Jonathon; Joseph Schoepf, U; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2014-06-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5-15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography.

  6. Inflammation Biomarkers of Advanced Disease in Nongingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thiago Alvares; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Alves, Polyanna Miranda; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Barcelos, Emilio Zorzo; Giani, Max Antonio Alves; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; da Silva, João Santana; Rodrigues Júnior, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that affects supporting structures of the teeth. Although the gingival response is largely described, little is known about the immune changes in the alveolar bone and neighboring tissues that could indicate periodontal disease (PD) activity. Then, in this study we identified the ongoing inflammatory changes and novel biomarkers for periodontitis in the tissues directly affected by the destructive disease in PD patients. Samples were collected by osteotomy in 17 control subjects during extraction of third molars and 18 patients with advanced PD, in which alveoloplasty was necessary after extraction of teeth with previous extensive periodontal damage. Patients presented mononuclear cells infiltration in the connective tissue next to the bone and higher fibrosis area, along with increased accumulation of IL-17(+) and TRAP(+) cells. The levels of TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA were also elevated compared to controls and a positive and significant correlation was observed between TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA expression, considering all samples evaluated. In conclusion, nongingival tissues neighboring large periodontal pockets present inflammatory markers that could predict ongoing bone resorption and disease spreading. Therefore, we suggested that the detailed evaluation of these regions could be of great importance to the assessment of disease progression.

  7. Inflammation Biomarkers of Advanced Disease in Nongingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thiago Alvares; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Alves, Polyanna Miranda; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Barcelos, Emilio Zorzo; Giani, Max Antonio Alves; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; da Silva, João Santana; Rodrigues Júnior, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that affects supporting structures of the teeth. Although the gingival response is largely described, little is known about the immune changes in the alveolar bone and neighboring tissues that could indicate periodontal disease (PD) activity. Then, in this study we identified the ongoing inflammatory changes and novel biomarkers for periodontitis in the tissues directly affected by the destructive disease in PD patients. Samples were collected by osteotomy in 17 control subjects during extraction of third molars and 18 patients with advanced PD, in which alveoloplasty was necessary after extraction of teeth with previous extensive periodontal damage. Patients presented mononuclear cells infiltration in the connective tissue next to the bone and higher fibrosis area, along with increased accumulation of IL-17+ and TRAP+ cells. The levels of TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA were also elevated compared to controls and a positive and significant correlation was observed between TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA expression, considering all samples evaluated. In conclusion, nongingival tissues neighboring large periodontal pockets present inflammatory markers that could predict ongoing bone resorption and disease spreading. Therefore, we suggested that the detailed evaluation of these regions could be of great importance to the assessment of disease progression. PMID:26063981

  8. Immediately loaded fixed maxillary implant treatment for a patient with advanced periodontal disease: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Binon, Paul

    2010-12-01

    Patients with a failing maxillary dentition typically require an extended treatment sequence that involves extractions, interim prosthesis wear, grafting and subsequent implant placement, and restoration with an implant-supported fixed or bar-retained prosthesis. Established maxillary implant protocols can take up to 15 or more months to complete. The purpose of this report is to describe a treatment sequence using zygomatic implants in a patient with advanced periodontal disease. A fixed prosthesis was fabricated without grafting, resulting in a shortened treatment time.

  9. In search of an advance directive that works for end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Bruce

    2006-10-01

    Although loss, disability, and death are constant possibilities for any end-stage renal disease patient, very few have planned for the last of life. Currently available Advance Directives (ADs) are refusal of specific therapies in only specific but nebulous circumstances. They fail to provide positive guidance for a patient's remaining time. Without addressing goals, quality of life, reversibility of medical problems, and desired end-of-life (EOL) care, such ADs are useless. End-stage renal disease providers are generally untrained and unsupported in offering guidance. Financial, emotional, and structural factors collude to justify ignoring EOL planning. Several alternative ADs are offered, along with a goal-directed approach to EOL counseling for patients and staff.

  10. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    PubMed

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer.

  11. Recent advances in biomarkers for Parkinson's disease focusing on biochemicals, omics and neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Ren, Rutong; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Pu, Xiaoping

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, involving progressive loss of the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons. Cardinal symptoms including tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooping, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons have already been destroyed. Hence, reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis to measure disease progression and response to therapy. We review the current status of protein and small molecule biomarkers involved in oxidative stress, protein aggregation and inflammation etc. which are present in cerebrospinal fluid, human blood, urine or saliva. In recent years, advances in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and functional brain imaging techniques have led to new insights into the pathoetiology of PD. Further studies in the novel discovery of PD biomarkers will provide avenues to treat PD patients more effectively with few or no side effects.

  12. Nitric Oxide Dysregulation in Platelets from Patients with Advanced Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Vittorio; Damato, Antonio; Amico, Enrico; Formisano, Luigi; Vecchione, Carmine; Squitieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active inorganic molecule involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, such as control of blood flow, platelet adhesion, endocrine function, neurotransmission and neuromodulation. In the present study, for the first time, we investigated the modulation of NO signaling in platelets of HD patients. We recruited 55 patients with manifest HD and 28 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Our data demonstrated that NO-mediated vasorelaxation, when evoked by supernatant from insulin-stimulated HD platelets, gradually worsens along disease course. The defective vasorelaxation seems to stem from a faulty release of NO from platelets of HD patients and, it is associated with impairment of eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177) and activity. This study provides important insights about NO metabolism in HD and raises the hypothesis that the decrease of NO in platelets of HD individuals could be a good tool for monitoring advanced stages of the disease. PMID:24587005

  13. Advances in imaging-genetic relationships for Alzheimer's disease: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bagnoli, Silvia; Piaceri, Irene; Sorbi, Sandro; Nacmias, Benedetta

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and represents a major public health problem. From a clinical perspective, AD is devastating to patients and their families. The genetic approach to the study of dementia undoubtedly continues to provide a significant contribution to understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic perspectives, but also raises important ethical implications. With advances in new technology, including genetics and PET/MRI scanning, the role of genetic studies and neuroimaging is being redefined as an aid in the clinical diagnosis of AD, and also in presymptomatic evaluation. Here, we review some of the issues related to the neuroimaging-genetic relationship in AD with a possible clinical implication as a preclinical biomarker for dementia and also for tracking disease progression.

  14. Cardioproteomics: advancing the discovery of signaling mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ziyou; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2011-01-01

    Cardioproteomics (Cardiovascular proteomics) is fast becoming an indispensible technique in deciphering changes in signaling pathways that occur in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The quality and availability of the instruments and bioinformatics software used for cardioproteomics continues to improve, and these techniques are now available to most cardiovascular researchers either directly or indirectly via university core centers. The heart and aorta are specialized tissues which present unique challenges to investigate. Currently, the diverse range of proteomic techniques available for cardiovascular research makes the choice of the best method or best combination of methods for the disease parameter(s) being investigated as important as the equipment used. This review focuses on proteomic techniques and their applications which have advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms involved in CVDs at the levels of protein complex/protein-protein interaction, post-translational modifications and signaling induced protein changes. PMID:22254205

  15. Advances in Microfluidic PCR for Point-of-Care Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seungkyung; Zhang, Yi; Lin, Shin; Wang, Tza-Huei; Yang, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Global burdens from existing or emerging infectious diseases emphasize the need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics to enhance timely recognition and intervention. Molecular approaches based on PCR methods have made significant inroads by improving detection time and accuracy but are still largely hampered by resource-intensive processing in centralized laboratories, thereby precluding their routine bedside- or field-use. Microfluidic technologies have enabled miniaturization of PCR processes onto a chip device with potential benefits including speed, cost, portability, throughput, and automation. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in microfluidic PCR technologies and discuss practical issues and perspectives related to implementing them into infectious disease diagnostics. PMID:21741465

  16. Advances with microRNAs in Parkinson’s disease research

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liuqing; Wei, Liangming; Wu, Fei; Hu, Zhenhua; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second-most common age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and is caused by severe degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Unfortunately, current treatment only targets symptoms and involves dopamine replacement therapy, which does not counteract progressive degeneration. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNA molecules implicated in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression during development. Recent studies show that miRNAs are playing an important role in the pathophysiology of PD. miRNA-based therapy is a powerful tool with which to study gene function, investigate the mechanism of the disease, and validate drug targets. In this review, we focus on the recent advances of the use of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:24109179

  17. Advanced glycation endproducts are increased in rheumatoid arthritis patients with controlled disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are produced and can accumulate during chronic inflammation, as might be present in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AGEs are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether AGEs are increased in patients with long-standing RA and whether AGE accumulation is related to disease activity, disease severity and measures of (premature) atherosclerosis, such as endothelial activation, endothelial dysfunction and intima media thickness (IMT). Methods In a cross-sectional study, 49 consecutive RA patients with longstanding disease (median disease duration of 12.3 years (range 9.3 to 15.1)), receiving standard of care, were included and compared with 49 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). AGEs were determined by skin autofluorescence. Disease activity was evaluated by the Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS-28) score and joint damage by modified Sharp-v.d. Heijde score. Endothelial activation (soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1) sVCAM-1, von Willebrand factor (vWF), thrombomodulin), endothelial dysfunction (determined by small artery elasticity (SAE)) and IMT were measured and related to AGE accumulation. Results AGEs were increased in RA patients (median 2.4 arbitrary units (a.u.), range 1.6 to 4.2) compared to HC (2.2, 1.3 to 3.8). RA patients had a DAS-28 score of 2.9 (0.8 to 6.9) and a modified Sharp-v.d. Heijde score of 19 (0 to 103). sVCAM-1 and vWF levels were higher in RA patients. SAE was significantly decreased in RA (3.9 ml/mmHg (1.4 to 12.2) vs. 6.1 in HC (1.7 to 12.9). IMT did not differ between the two groups. Combining both groups' AGEs correlated with vWF, sVCAM-1 and IMT, and was inversely related to SAE. In RA, AGEs had an inverse relation with SAE, but did not relate to disease activity or radiological damage. In multivariate analysis for both groups, smoking, glucose levels, vWF, SAE and male gender were significantly

  18. Recent Advances in Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery for Diabetes Mellitus Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a widespread metabolic disease with a progressive incidence of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite extensive research, treatment options for diabetic patients remains limited. Although significant challenges remain, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any cell type, including insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, highlighting its potential as a treatment option for DM. Several iPSC lines have recently been derived from both diabetic and healthy donors. Using different reprogramming techniques, iPSCs were differentiated into insulin-secreting pancreatic βcells. Furthermore, diabetes patient-derived iPSCs (DiPSCs) are increasingly being used as a platform to perform cell-based drug screening in order to develop DiPSC-based cell therapies against DM. Toxicity and teratogenicity assays based on iPSC-derived cells can also provide additional information on safety before advancing drugs to clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of techniques for differentiation of iPSCs or DiPSCs into insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, their applications in drug screening, and their role in complementing and replacing animal testing in clinical use. Advances in iPSC technologies will provide new knowledge needed to develop patient-specific iPSC-based diabetic therapies. PMID:26907255

  19. Recent Advances in Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery for Diabetes Mellitus Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-02-19

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a widespread metabolic disease with a progressive incidence of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite extensive research, treatment options for diabetic patients remains limited. Although significant challenges remain, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any cell type, including insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, highlighting its potential as a treatment option for DM. Several iPSC lines have recently been derived from both diabetic and healthy donors. Using different reprogramming techniques, iPSCs were differentiated into insulin-secreting pancreatic βcells. Furthermore, diabetes patient-derived iPSCs (DiPSCs) are increasingly being used as a platform to perform cell-based drug screening in order to develop DiPSC-based cell therapies against DM. Toxicity and teratogenicity assays based on iPSC-derived cells can also provide additional information on safety before advancing drugs to clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of techniques for differentiation of iPSCs or DiPSCs into insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, their applications in drug screening, and their role in complementing and replacing animal testing in clinical use. Advances in iPSC technologies will provide new knowledge needed to develop patient-specific iPSC-based diabetic therapies.

  20. Utility of the advanced chronic kidney disease patient management tools: case studies.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Meenal B; Matchar, David B; Samsa, Gregory P; Haley, William E

    2008-01-01

    Appropriate management of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) delays or limits its progression. The Advanced CKD Patient Management Toolkit was developed using a process-improvement technique to assist patient management and address CKD-specific management issues. We pilot tested the toolkit in 2 community nephrology practices, assessed the utility of individual tools, and evaluated the impact on conformance to an advanced CKD guideline through patient chart abstraction. Tool use was distinct in the 2 sites and depended on the site champion's involvement, the extent of process reconfiguration demanded by a tool, and its perceived value. Baseline conformance varied across guideline recommendations (averaged 54%). Posttrial conformance increased in all clinical areas (averaged 59%). Valuable features of the toolkit in real-world settings were its ability to: facilitate tool selection, direct implementation efforts in response to a baseline performance audit, and allow selection of tool versions and customizing them. Our results suggest that systematically created, multifaceted, and customizable tools can promote guideline conformance.

  1. Inherited retinal diseases in dogs: advances in gene/mutation discovery.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Keiko

    1. Inherited retinal diseases (RDs) are vision-threatening conditions affecting humans as well as many domestic animals. Through many years of clinical studies of the domestic dog population, a wide array of RDs has been phenotypically characterized. Extensive effort to map the causative gene and to identify the underlying mutation followed. Through candidate gene, linkage analysis, genome-wide association studies, and more recently, by means of next-generation sequencing, as many as 31 mutations in 24 genes have been identified as the underlying cause for canine RDs. Most of these genes have been associated with human RDs providing opportunities to study their roles in the disease pathogenesis and in normal visual function. The canine model has also contributed in developing new treatments such as gene therapy which has been clinically applied to human patients. Meanwhile, with increasing knowledge of the molecular architecture of RDs in different subpopulations of dogs, the conventional understanding of RDs as a simple monogenic disease is beginning to change. Emerging evidence of modifiers that alters the disease outcome is complicating the interpretation of DNA tests. In this review, advances in the gene/mutation discovery approaches and the emerging genetic complexity of canine RDs are discussed.

  2. Inherited retinal diseases in dogs: advances in gene/mutation discovery

    PubMed Central

    Miyadera, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    1. Inherited retinal diseases (RDs) are vision-threatening conditions affecting humans as well as many domestic animals. Through many years of clinical studies of the domestic dog population, a wide array of RDs has been phenotypically characterized. Extensive effort to map the causative gene and to identify the underlying mutation followed. Through candidate gene, linkage analysis, genome-wide association studies, and more recently, by means of next-generation sequencing, as many as 31 mutations in 24 genes have been identified as the underlying cause for canine RDs. Most of these genes have been associated with human RDs providing opportunities to study their roles in the disease pathogenesis and in normal visual function. The canine model has also contributed in developing new treatments such as gene therapy which has been clinically applied to human patients. Meanwhile, with increasing knowledge of the molecular architecture of RDs in different subpopulations of dogs, the conventional understanding of RDs as a simple monogenic disease is beginning to change. Emerging evidence of modifiers that alters the disease outcome is complicating the interpretation of DNA tests. In this review, advances in the gene/mutation discovery approaches and the emerging genetic complexity of canine RDs are discussed. PMID:26120276

  3. Recent Advances in Nucleic Acid-Based Delivery: From Bench to Clinical Trials in Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cláudia; Ribeiro, António J; Veiga, Francisco; Silveira, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    Delivery of nucleic acids is the most promising therapy for many diseases that remain untreatable. Therefore, many research efforts have been put on finding a safe and efficient delivery system able to provide a sustained response. Viral vectors have proved to be the most efficient for delivery of nucleic acids and, thus, stand as the foremost vector used in current clinical trials. However, safety issues arise as a main concern and mitigate their use, impelling the improvement of non-viral alternatives. This review focuses on the recent advances in pre-clinical development of non-viral polyplexes and lipoplexes for nucleic acid-based delivery, in contrast with vectors being used in present clinical trials. Nucleic acid vectors for neurodegenerative ataxias, Parkinson's disease, retinitis pigmentosa, cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, pancreatic and lung cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis are discussed to illustrate current state of pre-clinical and clinical studies. Thereby, denoting the prospects for treatment of genetic diseases and elucidating the trend in non-viral vector development and improvement which is expected to significantly increase disease rescue exceeding the modest clinical successes observed so far.

  4. Recent advances in the application of metabolomics to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trushina, Eugenia; Mielke, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiological changes associated with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) begin decades before the emergence of clinical symptoms. Understanding the early mechanisms associated with AD pathology is, therefore, especially important for identifying disease-modifying therapeutic targets. While the majority of AD clinical trials to date have focused on anti-amyloid-beta (Aβ) treatments, other therapeutic approaches may be necessary. The ability to monitor changes in cellular networks that include both Aβ and non-Aβ pathways is essential to advance our understanding of the etiopathogenesis of AD and subsequent development of cognitive symptoms and dementia. Metabolomics is a powerful tool that detects perturbations in the metabolome, a pool of metabolites that reflects changes downstream of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic fluctuations, and represents an accurate biochemical profile of the organism in health and disease. The application of metabolomics could help to identify biomarkers for early AD diagnosis, to discover novel therapeutic targets, and to monitor therapeutic response and disease progression. Moreover, given the considerable parallel between mouse and human metabolism, the use of metabolomics provides ready translation of animal research into human studies for accelerated drug design. In this review, we will summarize current progress in the application of metabolomics in both animal models and in humans to further understanding of the mechanisms involved in AD pathogenesis. PMID:23816564

  5. Advances in the Evaluation of Respiratory Pathophysiology during Exercise in Chronic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Denis E.; Elbehairy, Amany F.; Berton, Danilo C.; Domnik, Nicolle J.; Neder, J. Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Dyspnea and exercise limitation are among the most common symptoms experienced by patients with various chronic lung diseases and are linked to poor quality of life. Our understanding of the source and nature of perceived respiratory discomfort and exercise intolerance in chronic lung diseases has increased substantially in recent years. These new mechanistic insights are the primary focus of the current review. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) provides a unique opportunity to objectively evaluate the ability of the respiratory system to respond to imposed incremental physiological stress. In addition to measuring aerobic capacity and quantifying an individual's cardiac and ventilatory reserves, we have expanded the role of CPET to include evaluation of symptom intensity, together with a simple “non-invasive” assessment of relevant ventilatory control parameters and dynamic respiratory mechanics during standardized incremental tests to tolerance. This review explores the application of the new advances in the clinical evaluation of the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic asthma, interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hope to demonstrate how this novel approach to CPET interpretation, which includes a quantification of activity-related dyspnea and evaluation of its underlying mechanisms, enhances our ability to meaningfully intervene to improve quality of life in these pathologically-distinct conditions. PMID:28275353

  6. Dietary advanced glycation end products and their role in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime; del Castillo, María Dolores; de la Maza, María Pía; Filip, Rosana; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Luevano-Contreras, Claudia; Macías-Cervantes, Maciste H; Markowicz Bastos, Deborah H; Medrano, Alejandra; Menini, Teresita; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Rojas, Armando; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia

    2015-07-01

    Over the past 2 decades there has been increasing evidence supporting an important contribution from food-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to the body pool of AGEs and therefore increased oxidative stress and inflammation, processes that play a major role in the causation of chronic diseases. A 3-d symposium (1st Latin American Symposium of AGEs) to discuss this subject took place in Guanajuato, Mexico, on 1-3 October 2014 with the participation of researchers from several countries. This review is a summary of the different presentations and subjects discussed, and it is divided into 4 sections. The first section deals with current general knowledge about AGEs. The second section dwells on mechanisms of action of AGEs, with special emphasis on the receptor for advanced glycation end products and the potential role of AGEs in neurodegenerative diseases. The third section discusses different approaches to decrease the AGE burden. The last section discusses current methodologic problems with measurement of AGEs in different samples. The subject under discussion is complex and extensive and cannot be completely covered in a short review. Therefore, some areas of interest have been left out because of space. However, we hope this review illustrates currently known facts about dietary AGEs as well as pointing out areas that require further research.

  7. Long-term clinical results and MRI changes after tendon ball arthroplasty for advanced Kienbock's disease.

    PubMed

    Mariconda, M; Soscia, E; Sirignano, C; Smeraglia, F; Soldati, A; Balato, G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term clinical results and morphological changes after tendon ball arthroplasty for advanced Kienböck's disease. Twenty-six patients were reviewed, with a mean follow-up interval of 125 months (range 50-226). At follow-up, mean score on the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire was 7.7 and mean visual analogue scale score for pain was 1. Mean carpal height ratio was significantly reduced with respect to the pre-operative value. On magnetic resonance imaging scans, cartilage damage, synovitis, and erosive or oedematous changes in the bones were detected in most patients. Calcification in the defect filled by the tendon ball was seen in all patients. Narrowing of the radioscaphoid joint and the presence of intercarpal synovitis were negatively associated with clinical outcome. Tendon ball arthroplasty in advanced Kienböck's disease results in long-term satisfactory clinical outcomes, despite widespread changes in the bones and joints within the wrist.

  8. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2007.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2008-06-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects that were reported primarily in the Journal in 2007. Advances in diagnosis include possible biomarkers for anaphylaxis, improved understanding of the relevance of food-specific serum IgE tests, identification of possibly discriminatory T-cell responses for drug allergy, and an elucidation of irritant responses for vaccine allergy diagnostic skin tests. Mechanistic studies are discerning T-cell and cytokine responses central to eosinophilic gastroenteropathies and food allergy, including the identification of multiple potential therapeutic targets. Regarding treatment, clinical studies of oral immunotherapy and allergen vaccination strategies show promise, whereas several clinical studies raise questions about whether oral allergen avoidance reduces atopic risks and whether probiotics can prevent or treat atopic disease. The importance of skin barrier dysfunction has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD), particularly as it relates to allergen sensitization and eczema severity. Research has also continued to identify immunologic defects that contribute to the propensity of patients with AD to have viral and bacterial infections. New therapeutic approaches to AD, urticaria, and angioedema have been reported, including use of sublingual immunotherapy, anti-IgE, and a kallikrein inhibitor.

  9. Recent advances in managing chronic HCV infection: focus on therapy in patients with severe liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Maan, Raoel; van der Meer, Adriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection still represents a major public health problem, as it is thought to be responsible for more than 350,000 deaths around the globe on a yearly basis. Fortunately, successful eradication of the virus has been associated with improved clinical outcome and reduced mortality rates. In the past few years, treatment has improved considerably by the implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). From 2014 onwards, sofosbuvir, simeprevir, daclatasvir, ledipasvir, paritaprevir, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Regimens with various combinations of these new drugs, without the use of interferon (IFN), proved to be very effective and well tolerated, even among patients with advanced liver disease. Moreover, treatment duration could be shortened to 12 weeks in the majority of patients. The high costs of these DAAs, however, limit the availability of IFN-free therapy worldwide. Even in wealthy countries, it is deemed necessary to prioritize DAA treatment in order to limit the immediate impact on the health budget. As patients with advanced liver disease are in most need of HCV clearance, many countries decided to treat those patients first. In the current review, we focus on the currently available IFN-free treatment options for patients with cirrhosis. We discuss the virological efficacy as well as the clinical relevance of these regimens among this specific patient population. PMID:27006761

  10. Proteinuria as a Therapeutic Target in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: a Retrospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hsu; Wu, Hon-Yen; Wang, Chieh-Li; Yang, Feng-Jung; Wu, Pei-Chen; Hung, Szu-Chun; Kan, Wei-Chih; Yang, Chung-Wei; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence of proteinuria reduction as a surrogate target in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is incomplete due to lack of patient-pooled database. We retrospectively studied a multicenter cohort of 1891 patients who were enrolled in the nationwide multidisciplinary pre-end stage renal disease care program with a baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 and followed longitudinally to investigate the effect of the change in proteinuria on renal death (defined as composite of dialysis and death occurring before initiation of dialysis). The group with a change in proteinuria ≤0.30 g/g (n = 1261) had lower cumulative probabilities of renal death (p < 0.001). In a linear regression model, a higher baseline proteinuria and a greater increase in proteinuria were associated with faster annual GFR decline. Cox’s analysis showed that every 1 unit increase in natural log(baseline proteinuria, 10 g/g) and every 0.1 g/g increase in the change in proteinuria resulted in 67% (HR = 1.67, 95% CI: 1.46–1.91) and 1% (HR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.01–1.01) greater risk of renal death respectively after adjusting for the effects of the other covariates. Our study provided a patient-based evidence to support proteinuria as a therapeutic target in advanced CKD. PMID:27198863

  11. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Their Role in Health and Disease12

    PubMed Central

    Uribarri, Jaime; del Castillo, María Dolores; de la Maza, María Pía; Filip, Rosana; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Luevano-Contreras, Claudia; Macías-Cervantes, Maciste H; Markowicz Bastos, Deborah H; Medrano, Alejandra; Menini, Teresita; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Rojas, Armando; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades there has been increasing evidence supporting an important contribution from food-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to the body pool of AGEs and therefore increased oxidative stress and inflammation, processes that play a major role in the causation of chronic diseases. A 3-d symposium (1st Latin American Symposium of AGEs) to discuss this subject took place in Guanajuato, Mexico, on 1–3 October 2014 with the participation of researchers from several countries. This review is a summary of the different presentations and subjects discussed, and it is divided into 4 sections. The first section deals with current general knowledge about AGEs. The second section dwells on mechanisms of action of AGEs, with special emphasis on the receptor for advanced glycation end products and the potential role of AGEs in neurodegenerative diseases. The third section discusses different approaches to decrease the AGE burden. The last section discusses current methodologic problems with measurement of AGEs in different samples. The subject under discussion is complex and extensive and cannot be completely covered in a short review. Therefore, some areas of interest have been left out because of space. However, we hope this review illustrates currently known facts about dietary AGEs as well as pointing out areas that require further research. PMID:26178030

  12. Recent advances in understanding and preventing human papillomavirus-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Hellner, Karin; Dorrell, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPV) are responsible for anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers, which together account for at least 5% of cancers worldwide. Industrialised nations have benefitted from highly effective screening for the prevention of cervical cancer in recent decades, yet this vital intervention remains inaccessible to millions of women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), who bear the greatest burden of HPV disease. While there is an urgent need to increase investment in basic health infrastructure and rollout of prophylactic vaccination, there are now unprecedented opportunities to exploit recent scientific and technological advances in screening and treatment of pre-invasive hrHPV lesions and to adapt them for delivery at scale in resource-limited settings. In addition, non-surgical approaches to the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and other hrHPV lesions are showing encouraging results in clinical trials of therapeutic vaccines and antiviral agents. Finally, the use of next-generation sequencing to characterise the vaginal microbial environment is beginning to shed light on host factors that may influence the natural history of HPV infections. In this article, we focus on recent advances in these areas and discuss their potential for impact on HPV disease. PMID:28357043

  13. Advancing research with Alzheimer disease subjects: investigators' perceptions and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    High, D M

    1993-01-01

    Advancement of Alzheimer disease (AD) research will not only depend on increased participation of patients with AD as subjects, but researchers will likely face increasingly difficult ethical issues. Presented are the results of a survey of researchers at the 15 federally funded Alzheimer Disease Research Centers concerning the ethical issues for subjects with AD participating in research. Experiences from 99 projects are assessed. Major findings include a significant lack of uniformity on the assessment of competency of subjects to consent to research, proxy informed consent overwhelmingly provided informally by family members, no wide use of durable powers of attorney and guardians, perception by the investigators that most projects present only minimal risks to the subjects, and Institutional Review Boards not being viewed by the investigators as preventing or inhibiting the advancement of AD research. It is recommended that research is needed to develop greater clarity in assessment of capacity of subjects to provide informed consent, that ethical and legal empowerment of family members to provide proxy consent be sustained, and that the issue of risk/benefit ratios for AD participants in research be reevaluated in the light of potentially greater risks to subjects.

  14. Fabry-Perot interferometer utilized for displacement measurement in a large measuring range

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yung-Cheng; Shyu, Lih-Horng; Chang, Chung-Ping

    2010-09-15

    The optical configuration of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is uncomplicated. This has already been applied in different measurement systems. For the displacement measurement with the Fabry-Perot interferometer, the result is significantly influenced by the tilt angles of the measurement mirror in the interferometer. Hence, only for the rather small measuring range, the Fabry-Perot interferometer is available. The goal of this investigation is to enhance the measuring range of Fabry-Perot interferometer by compensating the tilt angles. To verify the measuring characteristic of the self-developed Fabry-Perot interferometer, some comparison measurements with a reference standard have been performed. The maximum deviation of comparison experiments is less than 0.3 {mu}m in the traveling range of 30 mm. The experimental results show that the Fabry-Perot interferometer is highly stable, insensitive to environment effects, and can meet the measuring requirement of the submicrometer order.

  15. Fabry in the older patient: Clinical consequences and possibilities for treatment.

    PubMed

    Lidove, Olivier; Barbey, Frédéric; Niu, Dau-Ming; Brand, Eva; Nicholls, Kathleen; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2016-08-01

    Baseline demographic and phenotypic characteristics of patients aged ≥50years in the Fabry Outcome Survey (Shire; data extracted June 2014) were compared with younger adults to investigate potential factors influencing treatment decisions in later life. Age groups were defined using age at treatment initiation or at FOS entry for untreated patients: 18-49 (n=1344; 49.5% male; 64.6% received agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy [ERT]); 50-64 (n=537; 35.4% male; 74.3% treated); 65-74 (n=137; 32.1% male; 68.6% treated); and ≥75years (n=26; 26.9% male; 50.0% treated). Successive age groups showed higher median age at first symptom and diagnosis. Median alpha-galactosidase A activity, measured as percentage activity of the midpoint of the normal range, was much greater in females than males of all groups except ≥75years (33.4% in females; 27.8% in males). Patients aged ≥75years showed greater values than patients aged 18-49years for median left ventricular mass indexed to height (62.7 vs 42.4g/m(2.7)), mean ventricular wall thickness (15.0 vs 10.0mm) and prevalence of hypertension (57.7% vs 21.8%), and lower median estimated glomerular filtration rate (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease: 65.6 vs 98.5mL/min/1.73m(2)). Larger proportions in the groups aged ≥50 exhibited cardiac and/or cerebrovascular manifestations compared with patients aged 18-49years. The smaller proportion of patients receiving ERT aged ≥75years compared with the younger groups might reflect relatively milder disease burden or physician/patient reluctance to initiate/continue ERT at this age. Further studies are needed to increase knowledge of Fabry disease and ERT in later life.

  16. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future.

  17. Fiber optic, Fabry-Perot high temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, K.; Quick, B.

    1984-01-01

    A digital, fiber optic temperature sensor using a variable Fabry-Perot cavity as the sensor element was analyzed, designed, fabricated, and tested. The fiber transmitted cavity reflection spectra is dispersed then converted from an optical signal to electrical information by a charged coupled device (CCD). A microprocessor-based color demodulation system converts the wavelength information to temperature. This general sensor concept not only utilizes an all-optical means of parameter sensing and transmitting, but also exploits microprocessor technology for automated control, calibration, and enhanced performance. The complete temperature sensor system was evaluated in the laboratory. Results show that the Fabry-Perot temperature sensor has good resolution (0.5% of full seale), high accuracy, and potential high temperature ( 1000 C) applications.

  18. Curvature sensor based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Catarina; Ferreira, Marta S.; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Bierlich, Jörg; Frazão, Orlando

    2016-05-01

    A curvature sensor based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer is proposed. A capillary tube of silica is fusion spliced between two single mode fibers, producing a Fabry-Perot cavity. The light propagates in air, when passing through the capillary tube. Two different cavities are subjected to curvature and temperature. The cavity with shorter length shows insensitivity to both measurands. The larger cavity shows two operating regions for curvature measurement, where a linear response is shown, with a maximum sensitivity of 18.77pm/m-1 for the high curvature radius range. When subjected to temperature, the sensing head produces a similar response for different curvature radius, with a sensitivity of 0.87pm/°C.

  19. Orthogonal Fabry-Pérot sensors for photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, R.; Ogunlade, O.; Zhang, E. Z.; Beard, P. C.; Cox, B. T.

    2016-03-01

    Fabry-Pérot (FP) sensors have been used to produce in-vivo photoacoustic images of exquisite quality. However, for simplicity of construction FP sensors are produced in a planar form. Planar sensors suffer from a limited detection aperture, due to their planarity. We present a novel sensor geometry that allowed a greater field of view by placing a second sensor orthogonal to the first. This captured data from the deeper lying regions of interest and mitigated the limited view.

  20. Fabry-Perot interferometer development for rocket engine plume spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickford, R. L.; Madzsar, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a new rugged high-resolution Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) designed for rocket engine plume spectroscopy, which is capable of detecting spectral signatures of eroding engine components during rocket engine tests and/or flight operations. The FPI system will make it possible to predict and to respond to the incipient rocket engine failures and to indicate the presence of rocket components degradation. The design diagram of the FPI spectrometer is presented.

  1. Photon counting detectors for Fabry-Perot interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, E. H.; Haviland, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Sealed channel plate photomultipliers with multiple discrete anodes for use as photon counting detectors in the image plane of Fabry-Perot interferometers are described. The influence of design and construction on performance of completed devices is discussed. Effects on spatial resolution, lifetime, and counting efficiency are described. It is shown that devices can be optimized for particular applications. The results should be generally applicable to resistive anode and wedge and strip anode types of sealed detectors.

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