Science.gov

Sample records for advanced flash memories

  1. Space Radiation Effects in Advanced Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    Memory storage requirements in space systems have steadily increased, much like storage requirements in terrestrial systems. Large arrays of dynamic memories (DRAMs) have been used in solid-state recorders, relying on a combination of shielding and error-detection-and correction (EDAC) to overcome the extreme sensitivity of DRAMs to space radiation. For example, a 2-Gbit memory (with 4-Mb DRAMs) used on the Clementine mission functioned perfectly during its moon mapping mission, in spite of an average of 71 memory bit flips per day from heavy ions. Although EDAC worked well with older types of memory circuits, newer DRAMs use extremely complex internal architectures which has made it increasingly difficult to implement EDAC. Some newer DRAMs have also exhibited catastrophic latchup. Flash memories are an intriguing alternative to DRAMs because of their nonvolatile storage and extremely high storage density, particularly for applications where writing is done relatively infrequently. This paper discusses radiation effects in advanced flash memories, including general observations on scaling and architecture as well as the specific experience obtained at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in evaluating high-density flash memories for use on the NASA mission to Europa, one of Jupiter's moons. This particular mission must pass through the Jovian radiation belts, which imposes a very demanding radiation requirement.

  2. TID and SEE Response of an Advanced Samsung 4G NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Friendlich, M.; Howard, J. W.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Irwin, T. L.; LaBel, K. A.

    2007-01-01

    Initial total ionizing dose (TID) and single event heavy ion test results are presented for an unhardened commercial flash memory, fabricated with 63 nm technology. Results are that the parts survive to a TID of nearly 200 krad (SiO2), with a tractable soft error rate of about 10(exp -l2) errors/bit-day, for the Adams Ten Percent Worst Case Environment.

  3. NAND FLASH Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Charles; Wang, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The NAND Flash Radiation Tolerant and Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH) is a User's Friendly, Plug-and- Play and Radiation Protected high density NAND Flash Memory. It provides a very high density, radiation hardened by design and non-volatile memory module suitable for all space applications such as commercial or scientific geo-stationary missions, earth observation, navigation, manned space vehicles and deep space scientific exploration. The Intelligent Memory Module embeds a very high density of non-volatile NAND Flash memory and one Intelligent Flash Memory Controller (FMC). The FMC provides the module with a full protection against the radiation effects such as SEL, SEFI and SEU. It's also granting the module with bad block immunity as well as high level service functions that will benefit to the user's applications.

  4. Non Volatile Flash Memory Radiation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.; Allen, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Commercial flash memory industry has experienced a fast growth in the recent years, because of their wide spread usage in cell phones, mp3 players and digital cameras. On the other hand, there has been increased interest in the use of high density commercial nonvolatile flash memories in space because of ever increasing data requirements and strict power requirements. Because of flash memories complex structure; they cannot be treated as just simple memories in regards to testing and analysis. It becomes quite challenging to determine how they will respond in radiation environments.

  5. Efficient Wear Leveling in NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Hao; Chang, Li-Pin

    In the recent years, flash storage devices such as solid-state drives (SSDs) and flash cards have become a popular choice for the replacement of hard disk drives, especially in the applications of mobile computing devices and consumer electronics. However, the physical constraints of flash memory pose a lifetime limitation on these storage devices. New technologies for ultra-high density flash memory such as multilevel-cell (MLC) flash further degrade flash endurance and worsen this lifetime concern. As a result, flash storage devices may experience a unexpectedly short lifespan, especially when accessing these devices with high frequencies. In order to enhance the endurance of flash storage device, various wear leveling algorithms are proposed to evenly erase blocks of the flash memory so as to prevent wearing out any block excessively. In this chapter, various existing wear leveling algorithms are investigated to point out their design issues and potential problems. Based on this investigation, two efficient wear leveling algorithms (i.e., the evenness-aware algorithm and dual-pool algorithm) are presented to solve the problems of the existing algorithms with the considerations of the limited computing power and memory space in flash storage devices. The evenness-aware algorithm maintains a bit array to keep track of the distribution of block erases to prevent any cold data from staying in any block for a long period of time. The dual-pool algorithm maintains one hot pool and one cold pool to maintain the blocks that store hot data and cold data, respectively, and the excessively erased blocks in the hot pool are exchanged with the rarely erased blocks in the cold pool to prevent any block from being erased excessively. In this chapter, a series of explanations and analyses shows that these two wear leveling algorithms could evenly distribute block erases to the whole flash memory to enhance the endurance of flash memory.

  6. Extended Word-Line NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jang-Gn; Park, Il Han; Kim, Wandong; Lee, Jong Duk; Park, Byung-Gook

    2009-08-01

    A NAND flash memory array having extended word-lines is proposed. Without scarifying areal density, both physical gate length and charge storage node size are increased through the word-line extension process. Simple fabrication flow is delivered and device performances in a viewpoint of the short channel effect are simulated. The effect of gate length variation on the cell threshold voltage (VTH) distribution is addressed. Programming characteristics in the inversion-type source/drain NAND flash memory are also described. Some side effects concerned with the program disturbance and cell-to-cell interference are investigated in comparison with the conventional NAND flash memory.

  7. Method for programming a flash memory

    DOEpatents

    Brosky, Alexander R.; Locke, William N.; Maher, Conrado M.

    2016-08-23

    A method of programming a flash memory is described. The method includes partitioning a flash memory into a first group having a first level of write-protection, a second group having a second level of write-protection, and a third group having a third level of write-protection. The write-protection of the second and third groups is disabled using an installation adapter. The third group is programmed using a Software Installation Device.

  8. FPGA Flash Memory High Speed Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, April

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design and implement a VHDL ONFI Controller module for a Modular Instrumentation System. The goal of the Modular Instrumentation System will be to have a low power device that will store data and send the data at a low speed to a processor. The benefit of such a system will give an advantage over other purchased binary IP due to the capability of allowing NASA to re-use and modify the memory controller module. To accomplish the performance criteria of a low power system, an in house auxiliary board (Flash/ADC board), FPGA development kit, debug board, and modular instrumentation board will be jointly used for the data acquisition. The Flash/ADC board contains four, 1 MSPS, input channel signals and an Open NAND Flash memory module with an analog to digital converter. The ADC, data bits, and control line signals from the board are sent to an Microsemi/Actel FPGA development kit for VHDL programming of the flash memory WRITE, READ, READ STATUS, ERASE, and RESET operation waveforms using Libero software. The debug board will be used for verification of the analog input signal and be able to communicate via serial interface with the module instrumentation. The scope of the new controller module was to find and develop an ONFI controller with the debug board layout designed and completed for manufacture. Successful flash memory operation waveform test routines were completed, simulated, and tested to work on the FPGA board. Through connection of the Flash/ADC board with the FPGA, it was found that the device specifications were not being meet with Vdd reaching half of its voltage. Further testing showed that it was the manufactured Flash/ADC board that contained a misalignment with the ONFI memory module traces. The errors proved to be too great to fix in the time limit set for the project.

  9. Hold-up power supply for flash memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, William E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A hold-up power supply for flash memory systems is provided. The hold-up power supply provides the flash memory with the power needed to temporarily operate when a power loss exists. This allows the flash memory system to complete any erasures and writes, and thus allows it to shut down gracefully. The hold-up power supply detects when a power loss on a power supply bus is occurring and supplies the power needed for the flash memory system to temporally operate. The hold-up power supply stores power in at least one capacitor. During normal operation, power from a high voltage supply bus is used to charge the storage capacitors. When a power supply loss is detected, the power supply bus is disconnected from the flash memory system. A hold-up controller controls the power flow from the storage capacitors to the flash memory system. The hold-up controller uses feedback to assure that the proper voltage is provided from the storage capacitors to the flash memory system. This power supplied by the storage capacitors allows the flash memory system to complete any erasures and writes, and thus allows the flash memory system to shut down gracefully.

  10. Exploring Shared Memory Protocols in FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Mark; Kunz, Robert; Hall, Mary; Lucas, Robert; Chame, Jacqueline

    2007-04-01

    ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to improve the performance of large scientific and engineering applications through collaborative hardware and software mechanisms to manage the memory hierarchy of non-uniform memory access time (NUMA) shared-memory machines, as well as their component individual processors. In spite of the programming advantages of shared-memory platforms, obtaining good performance for large scientific and engineering applications on such machines can be challenging. Because communication between processors is managed implicitly by the hardware, rather than expressed by the programmer, application performance may suffer from unintended communication – communication that the programmer did not consider when developing his/her application. In this project, we developed and evaluated a collection of hardware, compiler, languages and performance monitoring tools to obtain high performance on scientific and engineering applications on NUMA platforms by managing communication through alternative coherence mechanisms. Alternative coherence mechanisms have often been discussed as a means for reducing unintended communication, although architecture implementations of such mechanisms are quite rare. This report describes an actual implementation of a set of coherence protocols that support coherent, non-coherent and write-update accesses for a CC-NUMA shared-memory architecture, the Stanford FLASH machine. Such an approach has the advantages of using alternative coherence only where it is beneficial, and also provides an evolutionary migration path for improving application performance. We present data on two computations, RandomAccess from the HPC Challenge benchmarks and a forward solver derived from LS-DYNA, showing the performance advantages of the alternative coherence mechanisms. For RandomAccess, the non-coherent and write-update versions can outperform the coherent version by factors of 5 and 2.5, respectively. In LS-DYNA, we obtain

  11. Flash Memory Device with ‘I’ Shape Floating Gate for Sub-70 nm NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sang-Goo; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2006-11-01

    In this article, we proposed a novel ‘I’ shape floating gate applicable to the sub-70 nm flash memory cell with high performance and scalability. It has modified floating gate of conventional flash memory to have high coupling-ratio (\\mathit{CR}), low effect of interference or cross-talk. Specifically, it has ˜13% higher \\mathit{CR} and ˜33/46% lower effect of cross-talk of the bit-line/word-line state than those of conventional flash memory cell with scale-downed geometry. In addition, ‘I’ shape flash memory cell shows improved characteristics about programming time, drain disturbance, read current, sub-threshold swing, and drain induced barrier lowering than conventional flash memory cell.

  12. Advanced mask technique to improve bit line CD uniformity of 90 nm node flash memory in low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-doo; Choi, Jae-young; Kim, Jea-hee; Han, Jae-won

    2008-10-01

    As devices size move toward 90nm technology node or below, defining uniform bit line CD of flash devices is one of the most challenging features to print in KrF lithography. There are two principal difficulties in defining bit line on wafer. One is insufficient process margin besides poor resolution compared with ArF lithography. The other is that asymmetric bit line should be made for OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) modeling. Therefore advanced ArF lithography scanner should be used for define bit line with RETs (Resolution Enhancement Techniques) such as immersion lithography, OPC, PSM(Phase Shift Mask), high NA(Numerical Aperture), OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), SRAF(Sub-resolution Assistant Feature), and mask biasing.. Like this, ArF lithography propose the method of enhancing resolution, however, we must spend an enormous amount of CoC(cost of ownership) to utilize ArF photolithography process than KrF. In this paper, we suggest method to improve of bit line CD uniformity, patterned by KrF lithographic process in 90nm sFlash(stand alone Flash) devices. We applied new scheme of mask manufacturing, which is able to realize 2 different types of mask, binary and phase-shift, into one plate. Finally, we could get the more uniform bit lines and we expect to get more stable properties then before applying this technique.

  13. Some Improvements in Utilization of Flash Memory Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James; Ott, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Two developments improve the utilization of flash memory devices in the face of the following limitations: (1) a flash write element (page) differs in size from a flash erase element (block), (2) a block must be erased before its is rewritten, (3) lifetime of a flash memory is typically limited to about 1,000,000 erases, (4) as many as 2 percent of the blocks of a given device may fail before the expected end of its life, and (5) to ensure reliability of reading and writing, power must not be interrupted during minimum specified reading and writing times. The first development comprises interrelated software components that regulate reading, writing, and erasure operations to minimize migration of data and unevenness in wear; perform erasures during idle times; quickly make erased blocks available for writing; detect and report failed blocks; maintain the overall state of a flash memory to satisfy real-time performance requirements; and detect and initialize a new flash memory device. The second development is a combination of hardware and software that senses the failure of a main power supply and draws power from a capacitive storage circuit designed to hold enough energy to sustain operation until reading or writing is completed.

  14. Flash drive memory apparatus and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A memory apparatus includes a non-volatile computer memory, a USB mass storage controller connected to the non-volatile computer memory, the USB mass storage controller including a daisy chain component, a male USB interface connected to the USB mass storage controller, and at least one other interface for a memory device, other than a USB interface, the at least one other interface being connected to the USB mass storage controller.

  15. 76 FR 55417 - In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory and Nand Flash Memory Devices and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory and Nand Flash Memory Devices and Products... States after importation of certain dynamic random access memory and NAND flash memory devices and... the sale within the United States after importation of certain dynamic random access memory and...

  16. Multi-Level Bitmap Indexes for Flash Memory Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Madduri, Kamesh; Canon, Shane

    2010-07-23

    Due to their low access latency, high read speed, and power-efficient operation, flash memory storage devices are rapidly emerging as an attractive alternative to traditional magnetic storage devices. However, tests show that the most efficient indexing methods are not able to take advantage of the flash memory storage devices. In this paper, we present a set of multi-level bitmap indexes that can effectively take advantage of flash storage devices. These indexing methods use coarsely binned indexes to answer queries approximately, and then use finely binned indexes to refine the answers. Our new methods read significantly lower volumes of data at the expense of an increased disk access count, thus taking full advantage of the improved read speed and low access latency of flash devices. To demonstrate the advantage of these new indexes, we measure their performance on a number of storage systems using a standard data warehousing benchmark called the Set Query Benchmark. We observe that multi-level strategies on flash drives are up to 3 times faster than traditional indexing strategies on magnetic disk drives.

  17. Charge Trapping Flash Memory With High-k Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Dong Seog

    2011-12-01

    High capacity and affordable price of flash memory make portable electronic devices popular, which in turn stimulates the further scaling down effort of the flash memory cells. Indeed the flash memory cells have been scaling down aggressively and face several crucial challenges. As a result, the technology trend is shifting from the floating-gate cell to the charge-trap cell in order to overcome fatal interference problems between cells. There are critical problems in the charge-trap memory cell which will become main-stream in the near future. The first potential problem is related to the memory retention which is degraded by the charge leakage through thin tunnel dielectrics. The second is the reduction of charge-storage capacity in the scaled down SiN trapping layer. The third is the low operation-efficiency resulting from the methods used to solve the first two problems. Using high-k tunnel dielectrics can solve the first problem. The second problem can be overcome by adopting a high-k trapping dielectric. The dielectric constant of the blocking layer must be higher than those of the tunnel dielectric and the trapping dielectric in order to maintain operation efficiency. This dissertation study is focused on adopting high-k dielectrics in all three of the aforementioned layers for figure generations of flash memory technology. For the high-k tunnel dielectric, the MAD Si3N4 and the MAD Al2O3 are used to fabricate the MANNS structure and the MANAS structure. The MANNS structure has the advantage of reducing the erase voltage due to its low barrier height for holes. In addition, the retention characteristic of the MANAS structure is not sensitive to temperature. The reason is that the carrier transport in MAD Al2O3 is dominated by F-N tunneling, which is nearly independent of temperature. Adopting TiOx as the trapping dielectric forms the MATAS structure. Although the charge capacity of TiOx is not very high, the operating voltage can be reduced to less than 10V

  18. Flash memory management system and method utilizing multiple block list windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, James (Inventor); Gender, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides a flash memory management system and method with increased performance. The flash memory management system provides the ability to efficiently manage and allocate flash memory use in a way that improves reliability and longevity, while maintaining good performance levels. The flash memory management system includes a free block mechanism, a disk maintenance mechanism, and a bad block detection mechanism. The free block mechanism provides efficient sorting of free blocks to facilitate selecting low use blocks for writing. The disk maintenance mechanism provides for the ability to efficiently clean flash memory blocks during processor idle times. The bad block detection mechanism provides the ability to better detect when a block of flash memory is likely to go bad. The flash status mechanism stores information in fast access memory that describes the content and status of the data in the flash disk. The new bank detection mechanism provides the ability to automatically detect when new banks of flash memory are added to the system. Together, these mechanisms provide a flash memory management system that can improve the operational efficiency of systems that utilize flash memory.

  19. Proton irradiation effects on 2Gb flash memory

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, William; Nelson, Charles; Marriner, John

    2004-08-18

    The authors report total ionizing dose and single event effects on 2Gb Samsung flash memory devices after exposure to 200 MeV protons to various doses up to 83 krad(Si). They characterize observed failures and single event upsets on 22 devices from two different lots. Devices from both lots are robust to greater than 20 krad(Si) although they see evidence for lot-to-lot variation where only one lot appears robust up to about 50 krad(Si). Single event upsets are observed at a relatively low rate and are consistent with single isolated bit flips within registers that transfer bits to and from the flash memory cells.

  20. Radiation Tests on 2Gb NAND Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc N.; Guertin, Steven M.; Patterson, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    We report on SEE and TID tests of highly scaled Samsung 2Gbits flash memories. Both in-situ and biased interval irradiations were used to characterize the response of the total accumulated dose failures. The radiation-induced failures can be categorized as followings: single event upset (SEU) read errors in biased and unbiased modes, write errors, and single-event-functional-interrupt (SEFI) failures.

  1. 78 FR 55095 - Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... COMMISSION Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... the sale within the United States after importation of certain flash memory chips and products... memory chips and products containing the same by reason of infringement of one or more of claims 1-3...

  2. Solution processed molecular floating gate for flexible flash memories.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhou, Li; Huang, Jing; Roy, V A L

    2013-01-01

    Solution processed fullerene (C60) molecular floating gate layer has been employed in low voltage nonvolatile memory device on flexible substrates. We systematically studied the charge trapping mechanism of the fullerene floating gate for both p-type pentacene and n-type copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) semiconductor in a transistor based flash memory architecture. The devices based on pentacene as semiconductor exhibited both hole and electron trapping ability, whereas devices with F16CuPc trapped electrons alone due to abundant electron density. All the devices exhibited large memory window, long charge retention time, good endurance property and excellent flexibility. The obtained results have great potential for application in large area flexible electronic devices. PMID:24172758

  3. Solution processed molecular floating gate for flexible flash memories

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhou, Li; Huang, Jing; Roy, V. A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Solution processed fullerene (C60) molecular floating gate layer has been employed in low voltage nonvolatile memory device on flexible substrates. We systematically studied the charge trapping mechanism of the fullerene floating gate for both p-type pentacene and n-type copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) semiconductor in a transistor based flash memory architecture. The devices based on pentacene as semiconductor exhibited both hole and electron trapping ability, whereas devices with F16CuPc trapped electrons alone due to abundant electron density. All the devices exhibited large memory window, long charge retention time, good endurance property and excellent flexibility. The obtained results have great potential for application in large area flexible electronic devices. PMID:24172758

  4. Characteristics of junctionless charge trap flash memory for 3D stacked NAND flash.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jinho; Na, Heedo; Park, Sunghoon; Sohn, Hyunchul

    2013-09-01

    The electrical characteristics of tunnel barrier engineered-charge trap flash (TBE-CTF) memory devices with junctionless (JL) source and drain (S/D) were investigated. The JL structure is composed of an n(+)-poly-Si based ultra-thin channel and S/D with identical doping concentrations. The band engineered Hf-silicate/Al2O3 tunnel barrier stack was applied to a JL-TBE-CTF memory device in order to enhance the field sensitivity. The Hf-silicate/Al2O3 tunnel barrier, HfO2 trap layer, and Al2O3 blocking layer were deposited by atomic layer deposition. The fabricated device exhibited a large memory window of 9.43 V, as well as high programming and erasing speeds. Moreover, it also showed adequate retention times and endurance properties. Hence, the JL-TBE-CTF memory (which has a low process complexity) is expected to be an appropriate structure for 3D stacked ultra-high density memory applications. PMID:24205672

  5. NAND- Flash Memory Technology in Mass Memory Systems for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassel, M.; Walter, D.; Schmidt, H.; Gliem, F.; Michalik, H.; Stähle, M.; Vögele, K.; Roos, P.

    2008-08-01

    In the frame of the ESA/ESTEC Safeguard Data Recorder study a highly reliable NAND-Flash based memory system for use in space was developed. As for all space borne semiconductor memories specific measures against radiation induced data errors and malfunctions are mandatory in order to maintain the required high data integrity. For this purpose an Orthogonal Reed- Solomon Error Correction in combination with an Orthogonal Data Commutation is applied. Additionally algorithms to detect and to cope with radiation induced Single Event Functional Interrupts are implemented. In a demonstration model these functions were realized in a Field Programmable Gate Array. An associated file system enables an easy access to data structures of variable size. The demonstration model is ready for integration into the ESA/ESTEC "Aviation Lab". A representative version of the memory core is going to be flown on PROBA-2. Finally NAND-Flash u sage for telemetry buffer memories is discussed.

  6. Effect of Radiation Exposure on the Retention of Commercial NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Chen, D.; Friendlich, M.; Carts, M. A.; Seidleck, C. M.; LaBel, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    We have compared the data retention of irradiated commercial NAND flash memories with that of unirradiated controls. Under some circumstanc es, radiation exposure has a significant effect on the retention of f lash memories.

  7. Radiation Tests of Highly Scaled, High-Density, Commercial, Nonvolatile NAND Flash Memories - Update 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.

    2010-01-01

    High-density, commercial, nonvolatile flash memories with NAND architecture are now available from several manufacturers. This report examines SEE effects and TID response in single-level cell (SLC) and multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memories manufactured by Micron Technology.

  8. Radiation Tests of Highly scaled, High-Density, Commercial, Nonvolatile NAND Flash Memories--Update 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.

    2011-01-01

    High-density, commercial, nonvolatile flash memories with NAND architecture are now available from several manufacturers. This report examines SEE effects and TID response in single-level cell (SLC) 32Gb and multi-level cell (MLC) 64Gb NAND flash memories manufactured by Micron Technology.

  9. Fault-tolerant NAND-flash memory module for next-generation scientific instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Tobias; Michel, Holger; Fiethe, Björn; Michalik, Harald; Walter, Dietmar

    2015-10-01

    Remote sensing instruments on today's space missions deliver a high amount of data which is typically evaluated on ground. Especially for deep space missions the telemetry downlink is very limited which creates the need for the scientific evaluation and thereby a reduction of data volume already on-board the spacecraft. A demanding example is the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI) instrument on Solar Orbiter. To enable on-board offline processing for data reduction, the instrument has to be equipped with a high capacity memory module. The module is based on non-volatile NAND-Flash technology, which requires more advanced operation than volatile DRAM. Unlike classical mass memories, the module is integrated into the instrument and allows readback of data for processing. The architecture and safe operation of such kind of memory module is described in the following paper.

  10. Advances in flash flood monitoring using UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, Matthew; Russell, Andrew; Large, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    UAVs have the potential to capture information about the earth's surface in dangerous and previously inaccessible locations. Through image acquisition of flash flood events and subsequent object-based analysis, highly dynamic and oft-immeasurable hydraulic phenomenon may be quantified at previously unattainable spatial and temporal resolutions. The potential for this approach to provide valuable information about the hydraulic conditions present during dynamic, high-energy flash floods has until now not been explored. In this paper we adopt a novel approach, utilising the Kande-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) algorithm to track features present on the water surface which are related to the free-surface velocity. Following the successful tracking of features, a method analogous to the vector correction method has enabled accurate geometric rectification of velocity vectors. Uncertainties associated with the rectification process induced by unsteady camera movements are subsequently explored. Geo-registration errors are relatively stable and occur as a result of persistent residual distortion effects following image correction. The apparent ground movement of immobile control points between measurement intervals ranges from 0.05 - 0.13m. The application of this approach to assess the hydraulic conditions present in Alyth Burn, Scotland during a 1:200 year flash flood resulted in the generation of an average 4.2 measurements/m2 at a rate of 508 measurements/s. Analysis of these vectors provide a rare insight into the complexity of channel-overbank interactions during flash floods. The uncertainty attached to the calculated velocities is relatively low with a spatial average across the area of ± 0.15m/s. Little difference is observed in the uncertainty attached to out-of-bank velocities (± 0.15m/s), and within-channel velocities (± 0.16m/s), illustrating the consistency of the approach.

  11. 75 FR 55604 - In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing the Same; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing the Same; Notice of... importation of certain flash memory chips and products containing the same by reason of infringement of... after importation of certain flash memory chips and products containing the same that infringe one...

  12. 78 FR 48188 - Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing the Same Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing the Same Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing the Same, DN 2971; the Commission is... certain flash memory chips and products containing the same. The complaint names as respondents...

  13. Redox-Active Molecular Nanowire Flash Memory for High-Endurance and High-Density Nonvolatile Memory Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Pookpanratana, Sujitra J; Bonevich, John E; Natoli, Sean N; Hacker, Christina A; Ren, Tong; Suehle, John S; Richter, Curt A; Li, Qiliang

    2015-12-16

    In this work, high-performance top-gated nanowire molecular flash memory has been fabricated with redox-active molecules. Different molecules with one and two redox centers have been tested. The flash memory has clean solid/molecule and dielectric interfaces, due to the pristine molecular self-assembly and the nanowire device self-alignment fabrication process. The memory cells exhibit discrete charged states at small gate voltages. Such multi-bit memory in one cell is favorable for high-density storage. These memory devices exhibit fast speed, low power, long memory retention, and exceptionally good endurance (>10(9) cycles). The excellent characteristics are derived from the intrinsic charge-storage properties of the protected redox-active molecules. Such multi-bit molecular flash memory is very attractive for high-endurance and high-density on-chip memory applications in future portable electronics. PMID:26600234

  14. Abnormal Disturbance Mechanism of Sub-100 nm NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Seok Jin; Yang, Hea Jong; Noh, Keum Hwan; Lee, Hee Gee; Woo, Won Sik; Lee, Joo Yeop; Lee, Min Kyu; Choi, Won Yol; Hwang, Kyoung Pil; Kim, Hyoung Seok; Sim, Sa Yong; Kim, Sook Kyoung; Chang, Hee Hyoun; Bae, Gi Hyoun

    2006-08-01

    An abnormal program disturbance mode was found in 32-string NAND flash memory which was fabricated with 0.09 μm complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor shallow trench isolation (CMOS STI) process technology. This new disturbance mainly occurs in cells next to source select line (SSL) transistor and is not suppressed even when program bias is not applied. This is strongly related to the boosted channel bias level and the interface state which is located between the tunnel oxide and the silicon substrate. This unexpected program disturbance is a hot carrier program which results from the high electric field between the SSL transistor and its nearest cell and the leakage current to the boosted channel. The leakage current to the channel is due to the interface state of the SSL transistor, not the gate induced drain leakage (GIDL) effect. We present a brief model of this abnormal program disturbance mechanism.

  15. Comparison of TID Response and SEE Characterization of Single and Multi Level High Density NAND Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.; Harboe-Sorensen, Reno; Virtanen, Ari

    2009-01-01

    Heavy ion single-event measurements and TID response for 8Gb commercial NAND flash memories are reported. Radiation results of multi-level flash technology are compared with results from single-level flash technology. In general, these commercial high density memories appear to be much less susceptible to SEE and have better TID response compared to older generations of flash memories. The charge pump survived up to 600 krads.

  16. 3-Dimensional Terraced NAND (3D TNAND) Flash Memory-Stacked Version of Folded NAND Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon; Cho, Seongjae; Lee, Gil Sung; Park, Il Han; Lee, Jong Duk; Shin, Hyungcheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    We propose a 3-dimensional terraced NAND flash memory. It has a vertical channel so it is possible to make a long enough channel in 1F2 size. And it has 3-dimensional structure whose channel is connected vertically along with two stairs. So we can obtain high density as in the stacked array structure, without silicon stacking process. We can make NAND flash memory with 3F2 cell size. Using SILVACO ATLAS simulation, we study terraced NAND flash memory characteristics such as program, erase, and read. Also, its fabrication method is proposed.

  17. Investigation of Current Spike Phenomena During Heavy Ion Irradiation of NAND Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Berg, Melanie; Friendlich, Mark; Wilcox, Ted; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Irom, Farokh; Buchner, Steven P.; McMorrow, Dale; Mavis, David G.; Eaton, Paul H.; Castillo, James

    2011-01-01

    A series of heavy ion and laser irradiations were performed to investigate previously reported current spikes in flash memories. High current events were observed, however, none matches the previously reported spikes. Plausible mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Memristive behavior in a junctionless flash memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orak, Ikram; Ürel, Mustafa; Bakan, Gokhan; Dana, Aykutlu

    2015-06-01

    We report charge storage based memristive operation of a junctionless thin film flash memory cell when it is operated as a two terminal device by grounding the gate. Unlike memristors based on nanoionics, the presented device mode, which we refer to as the flashristor mode, potentially allows greater control over the memristive properties, allowing rational design. The mode is demonstrated using a depletion type n-channel ZnO transistor grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), with HfO2 as the tunnel dielectric, Al2O3 as the control dielectric, and non-stoichiometric silicon nitride as the charge storage layer. The device exhibits the pinched hysteresis of a memristor and in the unoptimized device, Roff/Ron ratios of about 3 are presented with low operating voltages below 5 V. A simplified model predicts Roff/Ron ratios can be improved significantly by adjusting the native threshold voltage of the devices. The repeatability of the resistive switching is excellent and devices exhibit 106 s retention time, which can, in principle, be improved by engineering the gate stack and storage layer properties. The flashristor mode can find use in analog information processing applications, such as neuromorphic computing, where well-behaving and highly repeatable memristive properties are desirable.

  19. Memristive behavior in a junctionless flash memory cell

    SciTech Connect

    Orak, Ikram; Ürel, Mustafa; Dana, Aykutlu; Bakan, Gokhan

    2015-06-08

    We report charge storage based memristive operation of a junctionless thin film flash memory cell when it is operated as a two terminal device by grounding the gate. Unlike memristors based on nanoionics, the presented device mode, which we refer to as the flashristor mode, potentially allows greater control over the memristive properties, allowing rational design. The mode is demonstrated using a depletion type n-channel ZnO transistor grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), with HfO{sub 2} as the tunnel dielectric, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the control dielectric, and non-stoichiometric silicon nitride as the charge storage layer. The device exhibits the pinched hysteresis of a memristor and in the unoptimized device, R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratios of about 3 are presented with low operating voltages below 5 V. A simplified model predicts R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratios can be improved significantly by adjusting the native threshold voltage of the devices. The repeatability of the resistive switching is excellent and devices exhibit 10{sup 6 }s retention time, which can, in principle, be improved by engineering the gate stack and storage layer properties. The flashristor mode can find use in analog information processing applications, such as neuromorphic computing, where well-behaving and highly repeatable memristive properties are desirable.

  20. Advanced image memory architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercillo, Richard; McNeill, Kevin M.

    1994-05-01

    A workstation for radiographic images, known as the Arizona Viewing Console (AVC), was developed at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in the Department of Radiology. This workstation has been in use as a research tool to aid us in investigating how a radiologist interacts with a workstation, to determine which image processing features are required to aid the radiologist, to develop user interfaces and to support psychophysical and clinical studies. Results from these studies have show a need to increase the current image memory's available storage in order to accommodate high resolution images. The current triple-ported image memory can be allocated to store any number of images up to a combined total of 4 million pixels. Over the past couple of years, higher resolution images have become easier to generate with the advent of laser digitizers and computed radiology systems. As part of our research, a larger 32 million pixel image memory for AVC has been designed to replace the existing image memory.

  1. Flash Memory Reliability: Read, Program, and Erase Latency Versus Endurance Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidecker, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and results of the fiscal year (FY) 2010 NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program (NEPP) task for nonvolatile memory (NVM) reliability. This year's focus was to measure latency (read, program, and erase) of NAND Flash memories and determine how these parameters drift with erase/program/read endurance cycling.

  2. A Fault-Tolerant Radiation-Robust Mass Storage Concept for Highly Scaled Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Cristian M.; Trinitis, Carsten; Appel, Nicolas; Langer, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Future spacemissions will require vast amounts of data to be stored and processed aboard spacecraft. While satisfying operational mission requirements, storage systems must guarantee data integrity and recover damaged data throughout the mission. NAND-flash memories have become popular for space-borne high performance mass memory scenarios, though future storage concepts will rely upon highly scaled flash or other memory technologies. With modern flash memory, single bit erasure coding and RAID based concepts are insufficient. Thus, a fully run-time configurable, high performance, dependable storage concept, requiring a minimal set of logic or software. The solution is based on composite erasure coding and can be adjusted for altered mission duration or changing environmental conditions.

  3. Embedded Ultra High Density Flash Memory Cell and Corresponding Array Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kung-Hong; Wu, Meng-Yi; Dai, Sen-Hue; King, Ya-Chin

    2005-04-01

    A novel flash memory cell fabricated by standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) logic process and its corresponding array architecture is presented. The cell which consists of two metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET) in series is programmed by channel current induced drain avalanche hot hole and erased by channel hot electron injection. With novel operation principles and array architecture, a feature-sized n-MOSFET per non-volatile memory bit is successfully demonstrated and the CMOS-process-based flash cell size can be as small as multi-gated flash memory. The smallest bit area of a CMOS-process-based flash memory cell with good programming and erasing characteristics along with endurance up to 105 cycles, 10 years excellent read disturbance and data retention characteristics of data retention at 150°C is proposed. With its small cell size and full compatibility with standard CMOS logic process, the novel flash memory cell can be easily adapted in highly integrated very large scale integration (VLSI) systems.

  4. Surface potential compact model for embedded flash devices oriented to IC memory design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Davide; Rideau, Denis; Gilibert, Fabien; Schmid, Alexandre; Jaouen, Hervé; Leblebici, Yusuf

    2013-10-01

    A surface potential-based model for embedded flash memory cells has been developed with the purpose of providing a comprehensive physical understanding of the device operation suitable for performance optimization in memory circuit design. The device equations account for charge balance effects on the isolated floating gate node and parasitic couplings between the terminals of the memory cell. The compact model supports DC, AC and transient analyses, including program/erase bias scalability, drain disturb and memory endurance degradation due to oxide aging. After validation, the model has been applied to parametric analysis and used to evaluate critical trade-offs in memory design.

  5. Radiation Tests of Highly Scaled, High-Density, Commercial, Nonvolatile NAND Flash Memories - Update 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Allen, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    The space radiation environment poses a certain risk to all electronic components on Earth-orbiting and planetary mission spacecraft. In recent years, there has been increased interest in the use of high-density, commercial, nonvolatile flash memories in space because of ever-increasing data volumes and strict power requirements. They are used in a wide variety of spacecraft subsystems. At one end of the spectrum, flash memories are used to store small amounts of mission-critical data such as boot code or configuration files and, at the other end, they are used to construct multi-gigabyte data recorders that record mission science data. This report examines single-event effect (SEE) and total ionizing dose (TID) response in single-level cell (SLC) 32-Gb, multi-level cell (MLC) 64-Gb, and Triple-level (TLC) 64-Gb NAND flash memories manufactured by Micron Technology with feature size of 25 nm.

  6. 76 FR 41824 - In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory Chips And Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... complaint filed by Spansion LLC of Sunnyvale, California (``Spansion''). 75 FR. 55604-5 (Sept 13, 2010). The... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory Chips And Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission..., Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing Same on the basis of a settlement agreement....

  7. 78 FR 49287 - Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing the Same Correction to Notice of Receipt of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... FR 48188, August 7, 2013) of receipt of complaint entitled, Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing the Same Correction to Notice of Receipt...

  8. 75 FR 11909 - In the Matter of: Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of: Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission... flash memory chips and products containing the same by reason of infringement of various claims...

  9. 76 FR 4375 - In the Matter of Certain MLC Flash Memory Devices and Products Containing Same; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...''). 74 FR 43723-4 (August 27, 2009). The complaint, as amended and supplemented, alleges violations of... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain MLC Flash Memory Devices and Products Containing Same; Notice of... flash memory devices and products containing same by reason of infringement of certain claims of...

  10. Flash!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Govert

    2002-04-01

    About three times a day our sky flashes with a powerful pulse of gamma ray bursts (GRB), invisible to human eyes but not to astronomers' instruments. The sources of this intense radiation are likely to be emitting, within the span of seconds or minutes, more energy than the sun will in its entire 10 billion years of life. Where these bursts originate, and how they come to have such incredible energies, is a mystery scientists have been trying to solve for three decades. The phenomenon has resisted study -- the flashes come from random directions in space and vanish without trace -- until very recently. In what could be called a cinematic conflation of Flash Gordon and The Hunt for Red October, Govert Schilling's Flash!: The Hunt for the Biggest Explosions in the Universe describes the exciting and ever-changing field of GRB research. Based on interviews with leading scientists, Flash! provides an insider's account of the scientific challenges involved in unravelling the enigmatic nature of GRBs. A science writer who has followed the drama from the very start, Schilling describes the ambition and jealousy, collegiality and competition, triumph and tragedy, that exists among those who have embarked on this recherche. Govert Schilling is a Dutch science writer and astronomy publicist. He is a contributing editor of Sky and Telescope magazine, and regularly writes for the news sections of Science and New Scientist. Schilling is the astronomy writer for de Volkskrant, one of the largest national daily newspapers in The Netherlands, and frequently talks about the Universe on Dutch radio broadcasts. He is the author of more than twenty popular astronomy books, and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles on astronomy.

  11. Microcontact printing of ultrahigh density gold nanoparticle monolayer for flexible flash memories.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Xu, Zong-Xiang; Huang, Long-Biao; Yang, Xiong-Bo; Roy, V A L

    2012-07-10

    A uniform monolayer of alkanethiol-protected gold nanoparticle arrays with ultrahigh density have been used as microcontact-printable charge-trapping layers for the application in flexible flash memories. The new devices are compared to two reference devices with a floating gate created by thermal evaporation and electrostatic self-assembly, and show a large memory window, long retention times and good endurance properties. PMID:22678769

  12. Advanced Mass Memory Concept Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, A. V.; Furano, G.; Ciccone, M.; Taylor, C.; Tejedor, N. G.; Knoblauch, M.; Parra Espada, P.; PrietoMateo, M.

    2008-08-01

    Current Solid State Mass Memory (SSMM) developments for space borne data handling systems are ad-hoc designs tailored f or a specific mission or mission class. This is mainly due to the technological constraints given b y the use of specific memory chips (SRAM, DRAM, DDRAM and in future FLASH), b y the interfaces towards other DHS units (packetwire, spacewire, custom) and, by the services that are needed in the SSMM unit (file store, mailbox, compression). Those designs n ormally lack of re-usability, and involve significant customization once ported to different systems. Within this work we will demonstrate that existing space technologies (including, hardware, interfaces and SW) already cover the building blocks required for an implementation of a scalable and modular SSMM, providing also a greater level of redundancy a nd greater capabilities with respect to existing designs. Providing that standard interfaces agreed for each building block, complex subsystems may be constructed from relatively simple individual blocks. By applying this approach the SSMM will be developed from already existing satellite technology a dapted to provide standard interfaces. This design a pproach also allows any block within the SSMM to be replaced without affecting the remaining blocks, thus decreasing development times and increasing the re-usability and adaptability between different missions, not mentioning the inherent redundancy. A nother key aspect in the SSMM design is the number of services implemented within the unit and their purpose. Several trade-off can be performed for example: should the SSMM provide a file system? If so, which kind of file system should be implemented? S hall the file system wrap up and enhance the functionality of another storage systems (e.g. packet store)? W hich kind of technology should be implemented to increase the resilience to failure? And many more. T his paper is intended to present the current conceptual view of a SSMM using a building

  13. Flash memory: photochemical imprinting of neuronal action potentials onto a microbial rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Veena; Brinks, Daan; Maclaurin, Dougal; Hochbaum, Daniel; Kralj, Joel; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-02-12

    We developed a technique, "flash memory", to record a photochemical imprint of the activity state--firing or not firing--of a neuron at a user-selected moment in time. The key element is an engineered microbial rhodopsin protein with three states. Two nonfluorescent states, D1 and D2, exist in a voltage-dependent equilibrium. A stable fluorescent state, F, is reached by a photochemical conversion from D2. When exposed to light of a wavelength λ(write), population transfers from D2 to F, at a rate determined by the D1 ⇌ D2 equilibrium. The population of F maintains a record of membrane voltage which persists in the dark. Illumination at a later time at a wavelength λ(read) excites fluorescence of F, probing this record. An optional third flash at a wavelength λ(reset) converts F back to D2, for a subsequent write-read cycle. The flash memory method offers the promise to decouple the recording of neural activity from its readout. In principle, the technique may enable one to generate snapshots of neural activity in a large volume of neural tissue, e.g., a complete mouse brain, by circumventing the challenge of imaging a large volume with simultaneous high spatial and high temporal resolution. The proof-of-principle flash memory sensors presented here will need improvements in sensitivity, speed, brightness, and membrane trafficking before this goal can be realized. PMID:24428326

  14. Synergistic High Charge-Storage Capacity for Multi-level Flexible Organic Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minji; Khim, Dongyoon; Park, Won-Tae; Kim, Jihong; Kim, Juhwan; Noh, Yong-Young; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Electret and organic floating-gate memories are next-generation flash storage mediums for printed organic complementary circuits. While each flash memory can be easily fabricated using solution processes on flexible plastic substrates, promising their potential for on-chip memory organization is limited by unreliable bit operation and high write loads. We here report that new architecture could improve the overall performance of organic memory, and especially meet high storage for multi-level operation. Our concept depends on synergistic effect of electrical characterization in combination with a polymer electret (poly(2-vinyl naphthalene) (PVN)) and metal nanoparticles (Copper). It is distinguished from mostly organic nano-floating-gate memories by using the electret dielectric instead of general tunneling dielectric for additional charge storage. The uniform stacking of organic layers including various dielectrics and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as an organic semiconductor, followed by thin-film coating using orthogonal solvents, greatly improve device precision despite easy and fast manufacture. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] as high-k blocking dielectric also allows reduction of programming voltage. The reported synergistic organic memory devices represent low power consumption, high cycle endurance, high thermal stability and suitable retention time, compared to electret and organic nano-floating-gate memory devices.

  15. Synergistic High Charge-Storage Capacity for Multi-level Flexible Organic Flash Memory

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minji; Khim, Dongyoon; Park, Won-Tae; Kim, Jihong; Kim, Juhwan; Noh, Yong-Young; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Electret and organic floating-gate memories are next-generation flash storage mediums for printed organic complementary circuits. While each flash memory can be easily fabricated using solution processes on flexible plastic substrates, promising their potential for on-chip memory organization is limited by unreliable bit operation and high write loads. We here report that new architecture could improve the overall performance of organic memory, and especially meet high storage for multi-level operation. Our concept depends on synergistic effect of electrical characterization in combination with a polymer electret (poly(2-vinyl naphthalene) (PVN)) and metal nanoparticles (Copper). It is distinguished from mostly organic nano-floating-gate memories by using the electret dielectric instead of general tunneling dielectric for additional charge storage. The uniform stacking of organic layers including various dielectrics and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as an organic semiconductor, followed by thin-film coating using orthogonal solvents, greatly improve device precision despite easy and fast manufacture. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] as high-k blocking dielectric also allows reduction of programming voltage. The reported synergistic organic memory devices represent low power consumption, high cycle endurance, high thermal stability and suitable retention time, compared to electret and organic nano-floating-gate memory devices. PMID:26201747

  16. Co-design of application software and NAND flash memory in solid-state drive for relational database storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Kousuke; Sun, Chao; Soga, Ayumi; Takeuchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    A relational database management system (RDBMS) is designed based on NAND flash solid-state drive (SSD) for storage. By vertically integrating the storage engine (SE) and the flash translation layer (FTL), system performance is maximized and the internal SSD overhead is minimized. The proposed RDBMS SE utilizes physical information about the NAND flash memory which is supplied from the FTL. The query operation is also optimized for SSD. By these treatments, page-copy-less garbage collection is achieved and data fragmentation in the NAND flash memory is suppressed. As a result, RDBMS performance increases by 3.8 times, power consumption of SSD decreases by 46% and SSD life time is increased by 61%. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme increases with larger erase block sizes, which matches the future scaling trend of three-dimensional (3D-) NAND flash memories. The preferable row data size of the proposed scheme is below 500 byte for 16 kbyte page size.

  17. Flash Memory: Photochemical Imprinting of Neuronal Action Potentials onto a Microbial Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We developed a technique, “flash memory”, to record a photochemical imprint of the activity state—firing or not firing—of a neuron at a user-selected moment in time. The key element is an engineered microbial rhodopsin protein with three states. Two nonfluorescent states, D1 and D2, exist in a voltage-dependent equilibrium. A stable fluorescent state, F, is reached by a photochemical conversion from D2. When exposed to light of a wavelength λwrite, population transfers from D2 to F, at a rate determined by the D1 ⇌ D2 equilibrium. The population of F maintains a record of membrane voltage which persists in the dark. Illumination at a later time at a wavelength λread excites fluorescence of F, probing this record. An optional third flash at a wavelength λreset converts F back to D2, for a subsequent write–read cycle. The flash memory method offers the promise to decouple the recording of neural activity from its readout. In principle, the technique may enable one to generate snapshots of neural activity in a large volume of neural tissue, e.g., a complete mouse brain, by circumventing the challenge of imaging a large volume with simultaneous high spatial and high temporal resolution. The proof-of-principle flash memory sensors presented here will need improvements in sensitivity, speed, brightness, and membrane trafficking before this goal can be realized. PMID:24428326

  18. Degradation of Flash Memory Using Drain-Avalanche Hot Electron (DAHE) Self-Convergence Operation Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shih-Jye; Yang, Evans; Wong, Wei-Jer; Wang, Yen-Sen; Lin, Chrong-Jung; Liang, Mong-Song; Hsu, Charles

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, the n-channel Flash memory device degradation by utilizing the drain-avalanche hot electron (DAHE) self-convergence (S-C) scheme is demonstrated for the first time. The injected hole originated by the channel electron induced avalanche hot hole generation is believed to be responsible for this degradation. This hole injection phenomena not only result in the interface state generation but also lead to the hole trapping in the tunnel oxide. The increased interface states degrade the conduction of the channel current severely, which leads to abnormal write/erase (W/E) endurance characteristics. The trapped holes in the tunnel oxide increase the tunneling probability and cause the gate disturbance issue. From the concerns of long term reliability, the self-convergence operation by utilizing the DAHE mechanism is not a proper scheme for reliable Flash memory products.

  19. Reliability Degeneration Mechanisms of the 20-nm Flash Memories Due to the Word Line Stress.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Soo; Ryu, Ju Tae; Yoo, Keon-Ho; Kim, T W

    2016-02-01

    The electrical characteristics of NAND flash memories with a high-k dielectric layer were simulated by using a full three-dimensional technology computer-aided design simulator. The occurrence rate of the errors in the flash memories increases with increasing program/erase cycles. To verify the word line stress effect, electron density in the floating gate of target cell and non-target cell, the drain current in the channel of non-target cell and depletion region of the non-target cell were simulated as a function of program/erase cycle, for various floating gate thicknesses. The electron density in the floating gate became decreased with increasing program/erase cycles. The reliability degradation occured by the increased depletion region at the bottom of the polysilicon floating gate in the continued program/erase cycle situation due to the word line stress. The degradation mechanisms for the program characteristics of 20-nm NAND flash memories were clarified by examining electron density, darin current and depletion region. PMID:27433643

  20. Charge-trap flash memory using zirconium-nitride-based memristor switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Kyeong Heon; An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Tae Geun

    2014-11-01

    Charge-trap flash (CTF) memory using a zirconium nitride (ZrN)-based memristor switch (MRS) is demonstrated for next-generation nonvolatile memory. This device consists of a metal/MRS/nitride/oxide/silicon (M/MRS/N/O/S) structure so that electrical transport via the ZrN-based MRS layer can be utilized. Compared to previous oxide materials used as conduction paths, the proposed CTF device with a ZrN-based MRS exhibits a faster program/erase switching speed (20 ns/7 ns), along with comparable endurance and retention properties.

  1. Fly-by-Light Advanced Systems Hardware (FLASH) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedoya, Carlos A.

    1995-05-01

    hundreds of MHz are available. Applications of fiber optic buses would then result in the reduction of wires and connections because of reduction in the number of buses needed for information transfer due to the fact that a large number of different signals can be sent across one fiber by multiplexing each signal. The Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP) Fly-by-Light Advanced Systems Hardware (FLASH) program addresses the development of Fly-by-Light Technology in order to apply the benefits of fiber optics to military and commercial aircraft.

  2. Threshold voltage instability mechanisms of nitride based charge trap flash memory--a review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng Chuan; Wong, Hirt Yong

    2014-07-01

    Technological scaling of charge trap device has become significantly more challenging due to two major physical limits revealed by International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) 2011, i.e., (1) neighboring bit interference due to consistent shrinking in design floor space; (2) balancing act of ensuring sufficient number of electrons in shrinking storage layer to maintain stable threshold voltage (V(t)) against various V(t) instability mechanisms. Nitride based charge trap flash (CTF) is one of the better candidates to replace floating gate (FG) flash as the mainstream flash memory technology due to its inherent immunity to point defects and better device scalability. However, post cycled V(t) instability in the form of V(t) distribution shift and broadening of programmed/erased cells is still genuine reliability concerns for nitride based CTF devices. This is because the shift and broadening of V(t) distribution could degrade the operating window and thus caused premature failures of the devices. V(t) instability of nitride based CTF memory inevitably introduces statistical fluctuations in V(t) distribution of nitride based CTF which is detrimental to its long-term data retention performance. The scope of this review paper focuses on critical reliability challenges of future development of nitride based CTF development with emphasis on cell level V(t) instability mechanisms. Our review on recent findings of V(t) instability mechanisms are useful references for future development of nitride based CTF devices. PMID:24757947

  3. Experimental study of three-dimensional fin-channel charge trapping flash memories with titanium nitride and polycrystalline silicon gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongxun; Matsukawa, Takashi; Endo, Kazuhiko; O'uchi, Shinichi; Tsukada, Junichi; Yamauchi, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Mizubayashi, Wataru; Morita, Yukinori; Migita, Shinji; Ota, Hiroyuki; Masahara, Meishoku

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) fin-channel charge trapping (CT) flash memories with different gate materials of physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) titanium nitride (TiN) and n+-polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) have successfully been fabricated by using (100)-oriented silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and orientation-dependent wet etching. Electrical characteristics of the fabricated flash memories including statistical threshold voltage (Vt) variability, endurance, and data retention have been comparatively investigated. It was experimentally found that a larger memory window and a deeper erase are obtained in PVD-TiN-gated metal-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (MONOS)-type flash memories than in poly-Si-gated poly-Si-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS)-type memories. The larger memory window and deeper erase of MONOS-type flash memories are contributed by the higher work function of the PVD-TiN metal gate than of the n+-poly-Si gate, which is effective for suppressing electron back tunneling during erase operation. It was also found that the initial Vt roll-off due to the short-channel effect (SCE) is directly related to the memory window roll-off when the gate length (Lg) is scaled down to 46 nm or less.

  4. A novel symmetrical split-gate structure for 2-bit per cell flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fang; Weiran, Kong; Jing, Gu; Bo, Zhang; Shichang, Zou

    2014-07-01

    A fully self-aligned symmetrical split-gate cell structure for 2-bit per cell flash memory with a very competitive bit size is presented. One common select gate is located between two floating gates and a pair of source/drain junctions are shared by the 2 bits. The fabrication method utilized here to create a self-aligned structure is to form a spacer against the prior layer without any additional mask. Although the cell consists of three channels in a series, the attributes from conventional split gate flash are still preserved with appropriate bias conditions. Program and erase operation is performed by using a source side injection (SSI) and a poly-to-poly tunneling mechanism respectively.

  5. A light writable microfluidic "flash memory": optically addressed actuator array with latched operation for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhishan; Pal, Rohit; Srivannavit, Onnop; Burns, Mark A; Gulari, Erdogan

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel optically addressed microactuator array (microfluidic "flash memory") with latched operation. Analogous to the address-data bus mediated memory address protocol in electronics, the microactuator array consists of individual phase-change based actuators addressed by localized heating through focused light patterns (address bus), which can be provided by a modified projector or high power laser pointer. A common pressure manifold (data bus) for the entire array is used to generate large deflections of the phase change actuators in the molten phase. The use of phase change material as the working media enables latched operation of the actuator array. After the initial light "writing" during which the phase is temporarily changed to molten, the actuated status is self-maintained by the solid phase of the actuator without power and pressure inputs. The microfluidic flash memory can be re-configured by a new light illumination pattern and common pressure signal. The proposed approach can achieve actuation of arbitrary units in a large-scale array without the need for complex external equipment such as solenoid valves and electrical modules, which leads to significantly simplified system implementation and compact system size. The proposed work therefore provides a flexible, energy-efficient, and low cost multiplexing solution for microfluidic applications based on physical displacements. As an example, the use of the latched microactuator array as "normally closed" or "normally open" microvalves is demonstrated. The phase-change wax is fully encapsulated and thus immune from contamination issues in fluidic environments. PMID:18305870

  6. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  7. The split-gate flash memory with an extra select gate for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsair, Yong-Shiuan; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Chu, Wen-Ting; Hsieh, Chia-Ta; Lin, Yung-Tao; Wang, Chung S.; Wong, Myron; Lee, Scott; Smolen, Richard; Liu, Bill

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, novel split-gate flash memory with an extra select gate (ESG) to improve the operation window has been investigated in details. Experimental results show that with the ESG (called 2.5T cell), the cell showed a better program wordline disturb window than that of the traditional split-gate flash memory cells (called 1.5T cell) around 0.5 V (at Vs = 10 V). The offset of minimum drain voltage to avoid punch through disturb between without and with wordline stress for 2.5T cell and 1.5T cell are around 0.05 V and 0.2 V, respectively. We attribute these improvements in wordline disturb behaviors to the reduction of channel leakage current with the addition of ESG. During the erase stage, the gate oxide of the ESG suffers free stress, thus having better oxide integrity to resist the generation of channel leakage current. In addition, the ESG offers a reverse bias to retard the leakage current from drain to source.

  8. Error correction capability aware BCH implementation for NAND flash memories in Earth observation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogdu, M. Fatih; Mert, Yakup Murat

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a parallel FPGA architecture implementing BCH error correction for NAND flash memories in storage modules of Earth observation satellites (EOS) is presented. In order to satisfy the error correction requirements of NAND flash memories the designed module is capable of correcting 4 erroneous bits in code words (CW) of 4148 bits using shortened BCH (4148, 4096) algorithm. Besides the standard BCH encoding and decoding procedure a code selection module is added to the architecture to guess whether or not the CW has more than 4 errors. If more than 4 errors occurs in the CW the architecture understands that the CW is uncorrectable and does not try to change any bits which will most probably inject more errors to the CW. The design is implemented on a XC7VX485T FPGA from Virtex 7 series of Xilinx and with a 300 MHz system clock, it is capable of encoding and decoding information at 4,78GBits/sec.

  9. Asymmetric Programming: A Highly Reliable Metadata Allocation Strategy for MLC NAND Flash Memory-Based Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Liu, Zhaoqing; Qiao, Liyan

    2014-01-01

    While the NAND flash memory is widely used as the storage medium in modern sensor systems, the aggressive shrinking of process geometry and an increase in the number of bits stored in each memory cell will inevitably degrade the reliability of NAND flash memory. In particular, it's critical to enhance metadata reliability, which occupies only a small portion of the storage space, but maintains the critical information of the file system and the address translations of the storage system. Metadata damage will cause the system to crash or a large amount of data to be lost. This paper presents Asymmetric Programming, a highly reliable metadata allocation strategy for MLC NAND flash memory storage systems. Our technique exploits for the first time the property of the multi-page architecture of MLC NAND flash memory to improve the reliability of metadata. The basic idea is to keep metadata in most significant bit (MSB) pages which are more reliable than least significant bit (LSB) pages. Thus, we can achieve relatively low bit error rates for metadata. Based on this idea, we propose two strategies to optimize address mapping and garbage collection. We have implemented Asymmetric Programming on a real hardware platform. The experimental results show that Asymmetric Programming can achieve a reduction in the number of page errors of up to 99.05% with the baseline error correction scheme. PMID:25310473

  10. PIYAS-proceeding to intelligent service oriented memory allocation for flash based data centric sensor devices in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sanam Shahla; Chung, Tae-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Flash memory has become a more widespread storage medium for modern wireless devices because of its effective characteristics like non-volatility, small size, light weight, fast access speed, shock resistance, high reliability and low power consumption. Sensor nodes are highly resource constrained in terms of limited processing speed, runtime memory, persistent storage, communication bandwidth and finite energy. Therefore, for wireless sensor networks supporting sense, store, merge and send schemes, an efficient and reliable file system is highly required with consideration of sensor node constraints. In this paper, we propose a novel log structured external NAND flash memory based file system, called Proceeding to Intelligent service oriented memorY Allocation for flash based data centric Sensor devices in wireless sensor networks (PIYAS). This is the extended version of our previously proposed PIYA [1]. The main goals of the PIYAS scheme are to achieve instant mounting and reduced SRAM space by keeping memory mapping information to a very low size of and to provide high query response throughput by allocation of memory to the sensor data by network business rules. The scheme intelligently samples and stores the raw data and provides high in-network data availability by keeping the aggregate data for a longer period of time than any other scheme has done before. We propose effective garbage collection and wear-leveling schemes as well. The experimental results show that PIYAS is an optimized memory management scheme allowing high performance for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22315541

  11. Pt/Ta2 O5 /HfO2- x /Ti resistive switching memory competing with multilevel NAND flash.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Ho; Kim, Kyung Min; Song, Seul Ji; Seok, Jun Yeong; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Kwon, Dae Eun; Park, Tae Hyung; Kwon, Young Jae; Shao, Xinglong; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2015-07-01

    Pt/Ta2 O5 /HfO2- x /Ti resistive switching memory with a new circuit design is presented as a feasible candidate to succeed multilevel-cell (MLC) NAND flash memory. This device has the following characteristics: 3 bit MLC, electroforming-free, self-rectifying, much higher cell resistance than interconnection wire resistance, low voltage operation, low power consumption, long-term reliability, and only an electronic switching mechanism, without an ionic-motion-related mechanism. PMID:25973913

  12. 76 FR 25707 - In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory and Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission Decision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... Electronics Co. (``Samsung'') of Suwon City, South Korea on August 21, 2009. 74 FR 45469 (Sept. 2, 2009). The... 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this period, the subject articles would be entitled to... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory and Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission...

  13. 75 FR 82071 - In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    .... and Spansion LLC both of Sunnyvale, California (collectively, ``Spansion''). 73 FR 77059-061 (Dec. 18... terminate several respondents from the investigation and to add certain entities as respondents. 75 FR 11909... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory Chips and Products Containing Same; Notice of...

  14. 76 FR 13207 - In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory and Products Containing Same Notice of Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flash Memory and Products Containing Same Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 provides that if the Commission finds a violation it shall exclude the...

  15. Total ionizing dose effect in an input/output device for flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhang-Li; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan; Shao, Hua; Chen, Ming; Bi, Da-Wei; Ning, Bing-Xu; Zou, Shi-Chang

    2011-12-01

    Input/output devices for flash memory are exposed to gamma ray irradiation. Total ionizing dose has been shown great influence on characteristic degradation of transistors with different sizes. In this paper, we observed a larger increase of off-state leakage in the short channel device than in long one. However, a larger threshold voltage shift is observed for the narrow width device than for the wide one, which is well known as the radiation induced narrow channel effect. The radiation induced charge in the shallow trench isolation oxide influences the electric field of the narrow channel device. Also, the drain bias dependence of the off-state leakage after irradiation is observed, which is called the radiation enhanced drain induced barrier lowing effect. Finally, we found that substrate bias voltage can suppress the off-state leakage, while leading to more obvious hump effect.

  16. Tunneling current modulation by Ge incorporation into Si oxide films for flash memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Toshihide; Mitani, Yuuichiro; Nakasaki, Yasushi; Koike, Masahiro; Konno, Takuya; Matsuba, Hiroshi; Kai, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Wakana; Ozawa, Yoshio

    2012-02-13

    Current-voltage characteristic for a Ge-incorporated Si oxide was investigated. Current enhancement was observed for the electric field larger than 10 MV/cm. Such a current enhancement only under high electric field is expected to improve programming performance without deteriorating reading performance. From secondary ion mass spectrometry and hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and current simulation, it is concluded that the Ge impurity in Ge{sup 4+} state around the tunnel oxide/substrate interface enhances the current by trap-assisted tunneling. The programming current enhancement induced by the Ge incorporation is expected to be one of the promising solutions for the next-generation flash memory.

  17. Effect with high density nano dot type storage layer structure on 20 nm planar NAND flash memory characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takeshi; Muraguchi, Masakazu; Seo, Moon-Sik; Park, Sung-kye; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The merits, concerns and design principle for the future nano dot (ND) type NAND flash memory cell are clarified, by considering the effect of storage layer structure on NAND flash memory characteristics. The characteristics of the ND cell for a NAND flash memory in comparison with the floating gate type (FG) is comprehensively studied through the read, erase, program operation, and the cell to cell interference with device simulation. Although the degradation of the read throughput (0.7% reduction of the cell current) and slower program time (26% smaller programmed threshold voltage shift) with high density (10 × 1012 cm-2) ND NAND are still concerned, the suppress of the cell to cell interference with high density (10 × 1012 cm-2) plays the most important part for scaling and multi-level cell (MLC) operation in comparison with the FG NAND. From these results, the design knowledge is shown to require the control of the number of nano dots rather than the higher nano dot density, from the viewpoint of increasing its memory capacity by MLC operation and suppressing threshold voltage variability caused by the number of dots in the storage layer. Moreover, in order to increase its memory capacity, it is shown the tunnel oxide thickness with ND should be designed thicker (>3 nm) than conventional designed ND cell for programming/erasing with direct tunneling mechanism.

  18. Hierarchically built gold nanoparticle supercluster arrays as charge storage centers for enhancing the performance of flash memory devices.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Vignesh; Kusuma, Damar Yoga; Lee, Pooi See; Yap, Fung Ling; Srinivasan, M P; Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar

    2015-01-14

    Flash memory devices with high-performance levels exhibiting high charge storage capacity, good charge retention, and high write/erase speeds with lower operating voltages are widely in demand. In this direction, we demonstrate hierarchical self-assembly of gold nanoparticles based on block copolymer templates as a promising route to engineer nanoparticle assemblies with high nanoparticle densities for application in nanocrystal flash memories. The hierarchical self-assembly process allows systematic multiplication of nanoparticle densities with minimal increase in footprint, thereby increasing the charge storage density without an increase in operating voltage. The protocol involves creation of a parent template composed of gold nanoclusters that guides the self-assembly of diblock copolymer reverse micelles which in turn directs electrostatic assembly of gold nanoparticles resulting in a three-level hierarchical system. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of the hierarchical nanopatterns with a metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor configuration reveal promising enhancement in memory window as compared to nonhierarchical nanoparticle controls. Capacitance-time (C-t) measurements show that over half the stored charges were retained when extrapolated to 10 years. The fabrication route can be readily extended to programmed density multiplication of features made of other potential charge storage materials such as platinum, palladium, or hybrid metal/metal oxides for next generation, solution-processable flash memory devices. PMID:25427075

  19. LaAlO 3 as tunnel dielectric for low-voltage and low-power p-channel flash memory free of drain disturb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru; Shan, Xiaonan; Zhou, Falong; Li, Yan; Wang, Yangyuan

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, high- k LaAlO 3 is proposed as tunnel dielectric for p-channel flash memory device application. The program/erase (P/E) injection current characteristic of p-channel flash memory cells with LaAlO 3 tunnel dielectric is investigated compared to the cells with SiO 2 tunnel dielectric by two-dimensional (2-D) device simulation, which shows that the bit line bias can be lowered from -5 V to -3 V during both P/E operations of flash memory cells with LaAlO 3 tunnel dielectric, meanwhile retains the fast P/E speed and high injection efficiency. Our work also shows that drain disturb, one of the main issues for p-channel flash memory, is alleviated dramatically due to the lower P/E voltage.

  20. Investigation of Hafnium oxide/Copper resistive memory for advanced encryption applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beland, Laurent Karim

    The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a widely used encryption algorithm to protect data and communications in today's digital age. Modern AES CMOS implementations require large amounts of dedicated logic and must be tuned for either performance or power consumption. A high throughput, low power, and low die area AES implementation is required in the growing mobile sector. An emerging non-volatile memory device known as resistive memory (ReRAM) is a simple metal-insulator-metal capacitor device structure with the ability to switch between two stable resistance states. Currently, ReRAM is targeted as a non-volatile memory replacement technology to eventually replace flash. Its advantages over flash include ease of fabrication, speed, and lower power consumption. In addition to memory, ReRAM can also be used in advanced logic implementations given its purely resistive behavior. The combination of a new non-volatile memory element ReRAM along with high performance, low power CMOS opens new avenues for logic implementations. This dissertation will cover the design and process implementation of a ReRAM-CMOS hybrid circuit, built using IBM's 10LPe process, for the improvement of hardware AES implementations. Further the device characteristics of ReRAM, specifically the HfO2/Cu memory system, and mechanisms for operation are not fully correlated. Of particular interest to this work is the role of material properties such as the stoichiometry, crystallinity, and doping of the HfO2 layer and their effect on the switching characteristics of resistive memory. Material properties were varied by a combination of atomic layer deposition and reactive sputtering of the HfO2 layer. Several studies will be discussed on how the above mentioned material properties influence switching parameters, and change the underlying physics of device operation.

  1. Investigation of Threshold Voltage Disturbance Caused by Programmed Adjacent Cell in Virtual Source/Drain NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wandong; Kwon, Dae Woong; Ji, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Shin, Hyungcheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the threshold voltage disturbance caused by programmed adjacent cells in virtual source/drain (VSD) NAND flash memory device. The fringing field induced by charge in an adjacent memory node inhibits the inversion of virtual source/drain region. So, it increases the threshold voltage of the read cell. This is a drawback for the multi-level cell (MLC) operation. The device simulation and measurement data of fabricated devices show that the disturbance increases as the cell gate length and VSD length decreases. It can be minimized by the electric field concentration induced by the arch shape structure.

  2. Low temperature atomic layer deposited HfO2 film for high performance charge trapping flash memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoxing; Huo, Zongliang; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Shengjie; Han, Yulong; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2014-04-01

    The impact of key process parameters on the electrical characteristics of atomic layer deposited HfO2 films has been systematically studied with MHOS devices via capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement. C-V hysteresis curves revealed that charge storage capacity is significantly enhanced with decreasing substrate temperature from 350 down to 150 °C and/or increasing purge time of the inert gas. The developed HfO2 trapping layer was also demonstrated by a MAHOS memory device. Improved memory window, fast program speed and good retention characteristics have been obtained. The study provides a reference for memory performance improvement of HfO2-based charge trap flash memory.

  3. Impact of the array background pattern on cycling-induced threshold-voltage instabilities in nanoscale NAND Flash memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolucci, G. M.; Bertuccio, M.; Monzio Compagnoni, C.; Beltrami, S.; Spinelli, A. S.; Lacaita, A. L.; Visconti, A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper highlights that cycling-induced threshold-voltage instabilities in nanoscale NAND Flash technologies display a non-negligible dependence on the background pattern of the memory array during idle/bake periods. Experimental results clearly reveal, in fact, that instabilities in a (victim) cell do not depend only on its memory state, but also on the memory state of its first neighboring (aggressor) cells. The magnitude of this new cell-to-cell interference effect, moreover, appears to depend on the memory state of the victim cell, decreasing with the increase of its threshold-voltage level. From all of the gathered experimental evidence a physical picture explaining the phenomenon is provided, which is, finally, confirmed with the help of numerical simulations.

  4. A high efficiency all-PMOS charge pump for 3D NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyin, Fu; Yu, Wang; Qi, Wang; Zongliang, Huo

    2016-07-01

    For 3D vertical NAND flash memory, the charge pump output load is much larger than that of the planar NAND, resulting in the performance degradation of the conventional Dickson charge pump. Therefore, a novel all PMOS charge pump with high voltage boosting efficiency, large driving capability and high power efficiency for 3D V-NAND has been proposed. In this circuit, the Pelliconi structure is used to enhance the driving capability, two auxiliary substrate bias PMOS transistors are added to mitigate the body effect, and the degradation of the output voltage and boost efficiency caused by the threshold voltage drop is eliminated by dynamic gate control structure. Simulated results show that the proposed charge pump circuit can achieve the maximum boost efficiency of 86% and power efficiency of 50%. The output voltage of the proposed 9 stages charge pump can exceed 2 V under 2 MHz clock frequency in 2X nm 3D V-NAND technology. Our results provide guidance for the peripheral circuit design of high density 3D V-NAND integration.

  5. Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boboila, Simona; Kim, Youngjae; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Desnoyers, Peter; Shipman, Galen M

    2012-01-01

    In this abstract, we study the performance and energy tradeoffs involved in migrating data analysis into the flash device, a process we refer to as Active Flash. The Active Flash paradigm is similar to 'active disks', which has received considerable attention. Active Flash allows us to move processing closer to data, thereby minimizing data movement costs and reducing power consumption. It enables true out-of-core computation. The conventional definition of out-of-core solvers refers to an approach to process data that is too large to fit in the main memory and, consequently, requires access to disk. However, in Active Flash, processing outside the host CPU literally frees the core and achieves real 'out-of-core' analysis. Moving analysis to data has long been desirable, not just at this level, but at all levels of the system hierarchy. However, this requires a detailed study on the tradeoffs involved in achieving analysis turnaround under an acceptable energy envelope. To this end, we first need to evaluate if there is enough computing power on the flash device to warrant such an exploration. Flash processors require decent computing power to run the internal logic pertaining to the Flash Translation Layer (FTL), which is responsible for operations such as address translation, garbage collection (GC) and wear-leveling. Modern SSDs are composed of multiple packages and several flash chips within a package. The packages are connected using multiple I/O channels to offer high I/O bandwidth. SSD computing power is also expected to be high enough to exploit such inherent internal parallelism within the drive to increase the bandwidth and to handle fast I/O requests. More recently, SSD devices are being equipped with powerful processing units and are even embedded with multicore CPUs (e.g. ARM Cortex-A9 embedded processor is advertised to reach 2GHz frequency and deliver 5000 DMIPS; OCZ RevoDrive X2 SSD has 4 SandForce controllers, each with 780MHz max frequency

  6. Advances in shape-memory polymer actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju; Lan, Xin

    2009-03-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is a promising smart material, which is able to perform a large deformation upon applying an external stimulus, such as heat, light and moisture, etc. In recent years, many investigations have been advanced in thermo-responsive SMP actuation, and several novel actuations have been applied in SMP. In this paper, the mechanism and demonstration of three types of SMP actuations (infrared laser, physical swelling effect and electricity) are presented. These novel actuation approaches may help SMP to fully reach its potential application. Firstly, for the infrared laser-activated SMP, it is concerned about the drive of SMP by infrared light. The infrared laser, transmitted through the optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, was chosen to drive the SMP. The working frequency of infrared laser was installed in 3-4μm. Moreover, this paper presents a study on the effects of solution on the glass transition temperature (Tg). It shows that the hydrogen bonding of SMP was aroused by the absorbed solution that significantly reduces transition temperature of polymer. In this way, the shape memory effect (SME) can undergo solution-driven shape recovery. Finally, the actuation of two types of electro-active SMP composites filled with electrically conductive powders (carbon black, nickel powers) have been carried out, and the SMP composite can be driven by applying a relatively low voltage.

  7. Low-temperature post-deposition annealing investigation for 3D charge trap flash memory by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zongliang; Jin, Lei; Han, Yulong; Li, Xinkai; Ye, Tianchun; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The influence of post-deposition annealing (PDA) temperature condition on charge distribution behavior of HfO2 thin films was systematically investigated by various-temperature Kelvin probe force microscopy technology. Contact potential difference profiles demonstrated that charge storage capability shrinks with decreasing annealing temperature from 1,000 to 500 °C and lower. Compared to 1,000 °C PDA, it was found that 500 °C PDA causes deeper effective trap energy level, suppresses lateral charge spreading, and improves the retention characteristics. It is concluded that low-temperature PDA can be adopted in 3D HfO2-based charge trap flash memory to improve the thermal treatment compatibility of the bottom peripheral logic and upper memory arrays.

  8. Dependence of Grain Size on the Performance of a Polysilicon Channel TFT for 3D NAND Flash Memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Yoon; Park, Jong Kyung; Hwang, Wan Sik; Lee, Seung-Jun; Lee, Ki-Hong; Pyi, Seung Ho; Cho, Byung Jin

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the dependence of grain size on the performance of a polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) channel TFT for application to 3D NAND Flash memory devices. It has been found that the device performance and memory characteristics are strongly affected by the grain size of the poly-Si channel. Higher on-state current, faster program speed, and poor endurance/reliability properties are observed when the poly-Si grain size is large. These are mainly attributed to the different local electric field induced by an oxide valley at the interface between the poly-Si channel and the gate oxide. In addition, the trap density at the gate oxide interface was successfully measured using a charge pumping method by the separation between the gate oxide interface traps and traps at the grain boundaries in the poly-Si channel. The poly-Si channel with larger grain size has lower interface trap density. PMID:27483868

  9. High-speed and parallel approach for decoding of binary BCH codes with application to Flash memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prashantha Kumar, H.; Sripati, U.; Shetty, K. Rajesh

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we propose a high-speed decoding algorithm for binary BCH codes that can correct up to 7 bits in error. Evaluation of the error-locator polynomial is the most complicated and time-consuming step in the decoding of a BCH code. We have derived equations for specifying the coefficients of the error-locator polynomial, which can form the basis for the development of a parallel architecture for the decoder. This approach has the advantage that all the coefficients of the error locator polynomial are computed in parallel (in one step). The roots of error-locator polynomial can be obtained by Chien's search and inverting these roots gives the error locations. This algorithm can be employed in any application where high-speed decoding of data encoded by a binary BCH code is required. One important application is in Flash memories where data integrity is preserved using a long, high-rate binary BCH code. We have synthesized generator polynomials for binary BCH codes (error-correcting capability, s ? ) that can be employed in Flash memory devices to improve the integrity of information storage. The proposed decoding algorithm can be used as an efficient, high-speed decoder in this important application.

  10. Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheet-covered metal nanoparticle array as a floating gate in multi-functional flash memories.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Li; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Hua; Roy, V A L

    2015-11-01

    Semiconducting two-dimensional materials appear to be excellent candidates for non-volatile memory applications. However, the limited controllability of charge trapping behaviors and the lack of multi-bit storage studies in two-dimensional based memory devices require further improvement for realistic applications. Here, we report a flash memory consisting of metal NPs-molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) as a floating gate by introducing a metal nanoparticle (NP) (Ag, Au, Pt) monolayer underneath the MoS2 nanosheets. Controlled charge trapping and long data retention have been achieved in a metal (Ag, Au, Pt) NPs-MoS2 floating gate flash memory. This controlled charge trapping is hypothesized to be attributed to band bending and a built-in electric field ξbi between the interface of the metal NPs and MoS2. The metal NPs-MoS2 floating gate flash memories were further proven to be multi-bit memory storage devices possessing a 3-bit storage capability and a good retention capability up to 10(4) s. We anticipate that these findings would provide scientific insight for the development of novel memory devices utilizing an atomically thin two-dimensional lattice structure. PMID:26445097

  11. Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheet-covered metal nanoparticle array as a floating gate in multi-functional flash memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Li; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Hua; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Semiconducting two-dimensional materials appear to be excellent candidates for non-volatile memory applications. However, the limited controllability of charge trapping behaviors and the lack of multi-bit storage studies in two-dimensional based memory devices require further improvement for realistic applications. Here, we report a flash memory consisting of metal NPs-molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) as a floating gate by introducing a metal nanoparticle (NP) (Ag, Au, Pt) monolayer underneath the MoS2 nanosheets. Controlled charge trapping and long data retention have been achieved in a metal (Ag, Au, Pt) NPs-MoS2 floating gate flash memory. This controlled charge trapping is hypothesized to be attributed to band bending and a built-in electric field ξbi between the interface of the metal NPs and MoS2. The metal NPs-MoS2 floating gate flash memories were further proven to be multi-bit memory storage devices possessing a 3-bit storage capability and a good retention capability up to 104 s. We anticipate that these findings would provide scientific insight for the development of novel memory devices utilizing an atomically thin two-dimensional lattice structure.Semiconducting two-dimensional materials appear to be excellent candidates for non-volatile memory applications. However, the limited controllability of charge trapping behaviors and the lack of multi-bit storage studies in two-dimensional based memory devices require further improvement for realistic applications. Here, we report a flash memory consisting of metal NPs-molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) as a floating gate by introducing a metal nanoparticle (NP) (Ag, Au, Pt) monolayer underneath the MoS2 nanosheets. Controlled charge trapping and long data retention have been achieved in a metal (Ag, Au, Pt) NPs-MoS2 floating gate flash memory. This controlled charge trapping is hypothesized to be attributed to band bending and a built-in electric field ξbi between the interface of the metal NPs and MoS2. The metal

  12. A 72% error reduction scheme based on temperature acceleration for long-term data storage applications: Cold flash and millennium memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Senju; Iwasaki, Tomoko Ogura; Hachiya, Shogo; Takahashi, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Ken

    2016-07-01

    A solid-state drive (SSD) with 1Xnm triple-level cell (TLC) NAND flash is proposed for low cost data storage applications with long-term data-retention requirements. Specifically, cold data storage requires 20 years data-retention with 100 write/erase (W/E) cycles, whereas digital archive storage requires 1000 years retention time with 1 W/E cycle. To achieve these requirements, a flexible-nLC scheme is proposed to improve the reliability of 1Xnm TLC NAND flash (Yamazaki et al., 2015). The proposed scheme combines two schemes, n-out-of-8 level cell (nLC) (Tanakamaru et al., 2014) and asymmetric coding (AC) (Tanakamaru et al., 2012) with the addition of a vertical flag. By measuring 1Xnm TLC NAND flash memory, the proposed scheme reduces errors by 72% and 69% for digital archive and cold flash respectively, compared to the conventional nLC scheme.

  13. A Hierarchical Statistic Methodology for Advanced Memory System Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X.-J.; He, D.; Cameron, K.W.; Luo, Y.

    1999-04-12

    Advances in technology have resulted in a widening of the gap between computing speed and memory access time. Data access time has become increasingly important for computer system design. Various hierarchical memory architectures have been developed. The performance of these advanced memory systems, however, varies with applications and problem sizes. How to reach an optimal cost/performance design eludes researchers still. In this study, the authors introduce an evaluation methodology for advanced memory systems. This methodology is based on statistical factorial analysis and performance scalability analysis. It is two fold: it first determines the impact of memory systems and application programs toward overall performance; it also identifies the bottleneck in a memory hierarchy and provides cost/performance comparisons via scalability analysis. Different memory systems can be compared in terms of mean performance or scalability over a range of codes and problem sizes. Experimental testing has been performed extensively on the Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) machines and benchmarks available at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to validate this newly proposed methodology. Experimental and analytical results show this methodology is simple and effective. It is a practical tool for memory system evaluation and design. Its extension to general architectural evaluation and parallel computer systems are possible and should be further explored.

  14. Analysis of read disturbance mechanism in retention of sub-20 nm NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Duckseoung; Lee, Kyunghwan; Kwon, Sangjin; Kim, Shinhyung; Hwang, Yuchul; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2015-04-01

    We observed an increase of Vth by read disturbance mechanism at programmed threshold voltage state (PV1) and erase state (ERS) states in retention characteristics of sub-20 nm NAND flash main-chip. We also confirmed that the charge gain behavior by read disturbance has dependency on the number of read and cycling operations. As a result, we quantitatively modeled read disturbance mechanism by the amount of final ΔVth and deterioration coefficient α which is related to the number of read operation times. It was also observed that those parameters increase with increasing cycling times and have larger value at ERS state than that at PV1 state.

  15. Non-Volatile Flash Memory Characteristics of Tetralayer Nickel-Germanide Nanocrystals Embedded Structure.

    PubMed

    Panda, D; Panda, M

    2016-01-01

    Formation of tetralayer memory structure having nickel-germanide nanocrystals using a Ge/Ni multilayers is proposed. X-ray diffraction study shows the NiGe (002) phase formation after proper annealing. Cross sectional HRTEM clearly shows the sharpness and the size (~4-6 nm) of the stacked nanocrystals embedded in the oxide matrix. A large anti-clockwise hysteresis memory win- dow of 13.4 Volt at ± 15 Volt is observed for the optimized samples. This large memory window indicates for the MLC applications. Frequency independent C-V curve confirms about the charge storage in the nanocrystals. A good charge retention and endurance characteristics are exhibited upto 125 °C for the nonvolatile memory application. PMID:27398590

  16. Disturbance characteristics of charge trap flash memory with tunneling field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Cho, Eou-Sik; Choi, Woo Young; Cho, Il Hwan

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the disturbance characteristics of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) memory based on the tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET) are investigated in terms of the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) program. Since the TFET SONOS memory uses a depletion channel region for program inhibition, the tunneling of an inhibited cell considers both the electron concentration and the vertical electric field. The effects of both parameters on tunneling current are analyzed using device simulation and the tunneling current equation. The tunneling current of the source-side region depends on the electric field and that of the drain-side region depends on the electron concentration. These results can be applied to the performance optimization of the TFET SONOS memory.

  17. Effects of Interfacial Fluorination on Performance Enhancement of High-k-Based Charge Trap Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenjie; Huo, Zongliang; Liu, Ziyu; Liu, Yu; Cui, Yanxiang; Wang, Yumei; Li, Fanghua; Liu, Ming

    2013-07-01

    The effects of interfacial fluorination on the metal/Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2/Si (MAHOS) memory structure have been investigated. By comparing MAHOS memories with and without interfacial fluorination, it was identified that the deterioration of the performance and reliability of MAHOS memories is mainly due to the formation of an interfacial layer that generates excess oxygen vacancies at the interface. Interfacial fluorination suppresses the growth of the interfacial layer, which is confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profile analysis, increases enhanced program/erase efficiency, and improves data retention characteristics. Moreover, it was observed that fluorination at the SiO-HfO interface achieves a more effective performance enhancement than that at the HfO-AlO interface.

  18. Channel doping concentration and cell program state dependence on random telegraph noise spatial and statistical distribution in 30 nm NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Toshihiro; Miyaji, Kousuke

    2015-04-01

    The dependence of spatial and statistical distribution of random telegraph noise (RTN) in a 30 nm NAND flash memory on channel doping concentration NA and cell program state Vth is comprehensively investigated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo device simulation considering random dopant fluctuation (RDF). It is found that single trap RTN amplitude ΔVth is larger at the center of the channel region in the NAND flash memory, which is closer to the jellium (uniform) doping results since NA is relatively low to suppress junction leakage current. In addition, ΔVth peak at the center of the channel decreases in the higher Vth state due to the current concentration at the shallow trench isolation (STI) edges induced by the high vertical electrical field through the fringing capacitance between the channel and control gate. In such cases, ΔVth distribution slope λ cannot be determined by only considering RDF and single trap.

  19. Number of traps and trap depth position on statistical distribution of random telegraph noise in scaled NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Toshihiro; Miyaji, Kousuke

    2016-04-01

    The dependence of random telegraph noise (RTN) amplitude distribution on the number of traps and trap depth position is investigated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo device simulation including random dopant fluctuation (RDF) in a 30 nm NAND multi level flash memory. The ΔV th tail distribution becomes broad at fixed double traps, indicating that the number of traps greatly affects the worst RTN characteristics. It is also found that for both fixed single and fixed double traps, the ΔV th distribution in the lowest cell threshold voltage (V th) state shows the broadest distribution among all cell V th states. This is because the drain current flows at the channel surface in the lowest cell V th state, while at a high cell V th, it flows at the deeper position owing to the fringing coupling between the control gate (CG) and the channel. In this work, the ΔV th distribution with the number of traps following the Poisson distribution is also considered to cope with the variations in trap number. As a result, it is found that the number of traps is an important factor for understanding RTN characteristics. In addition, considering trap position in the tunnel oxide thickness direction is also an important factor.

  20. Impact of Source/Drain Junction and Cell Shape on Random Telegraph Noise in NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fu-Hai; Shirota, Riichiro

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive numerical study of threshold voltage fluctuation (ΔVT) in scaled NAND flash memory caused by random telegraph noise (RTN) and discrete dopant fluctuation (RDF) in both the channel and the cell-to-cell space [source/drain (S/D)] region was carried out. Following a three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo (MC) procedure, the statistical distribution of ΔVT is estimated, considering the effects of both the random placement of discrete doping atoms and a discrete single trap at the tunnel oxide/substrate interface. The result demonstrates the significant influence of the doping in the S/D regions. For the cells with and without an S/D junction, the electron concentration in the S/D region is determined by the pass voltage of the unselected cell (Vpass) and the neighboring cell VT (VT(n)), owing to the fringing fields of neighboring floating gates (FGs). As a result, ΔVT increases in the S/D region as Vpass - VT(n) decreases. The fluctuation amplitude strongly depends on the [single-trap RTN] position along the cell length (L) and width (W) directions. For the cell shape with rounding of the active area (AA) at the shallow trench isolation (STI) edge, the results indicate that the high ΔVT area moves from the AA edge towards the center area along the W-direction.

  1. High throughput Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography for semiconductor memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Fletcher, Brian; Thompson, Ecron; Liu, Weijun; Stachowiak, Tim; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; Irving, J. W.; Longsine, Whitney; Traub, Matthew; Truskett, Van; LaBrake, Dwayne; Ye, Zhengmao

    2016-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. There are two critical components to meeting throughput requirements for imprint lithography. Using a similar approach to what is already done for many deposition and etch processes, imprint stations can be clustered to enhance throughput. The FPA-1200NZ2C is a four station cluster system designed for high volume manufacturing. For a single station, throughput includes overhead, resist dispense, resist fill time (or spread time), exposure and separation. Resist exposure time and mask/wafer separation are well understood processing steps with typical durations on the order of 0.10 to 0.20 seconds. To achieve a total process throughput of 15 wafers per hour (wph) for a single station, it is necessary to complete the fluid fill step in 1.5 seconds. For a throughput of 20 wph, fill time must be reduced to only one second. There are several parameters that can impact resist filling. Key parameters include resist drop volume (smaller is better), system controls (which address drop spreading after jetting), Design for Imprint or DFI (to accelerate drop spreading) and material engineering (to promote wetting between the resist and underlying adhesion layer). In addition, it is mandatory to maintain fast filling, even for edge field imprinting. In this paper, we address the improvements made in all of these parameters to enable a 1.50 second filling process for a sub-20nm device like pattern and have demonstrated this capability

  2. Human sensory-evoked responses differ coincident with either "fusion-memory" or "flash-memory", as shown by stimulus repetition-rate effects

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Don L; Hart, Toryalai; Larson-Prior, Linda J; Baird, Bill; Olson, Marram; Trumpis, Michael; Makayed, Katherine; Bavafa, Payam

    2006-01-01

    Background: A new method has been used to obtain human sensory evoked-responses whose time-domain waveforms have been undetectable by previous methods. These newly discovered evoked-responses have durations that exceed the time between the stimuli in a continuous stream, thus causing an overlap which, up to now, has prevented their detection. We have named them "A-waves", and added a prefix to show the sensory system from which the responses were obtained (visA-waves, audA-waves, somA-waves). Results: When A-waves were studied as a function of stimulus repetition-rate, it was found that there were systematic differences in waveshape at repetition-rates above and below the psychophysical region in which the sensation of individual stimuli fuse into a continuity. The fusion phenomena is sometimes measured by a "Critical Fusion Frequency", but for this research we can only identify a frequency-region [which we call the STZ (Sensation-Transition Zone)]. Thus, the A-waves above the STZ differed from those below the STZ, as did the sensations. Study of the psychophysical differences in auditory and visual stimuli, as shown in this paper, suggest that different stimulus features are detected, and remembered, at stimulation rates above and below STZ. Conclusion: The results motivate us to speculate that: 1) Stimulus repetition-rates above the STZ generate waveforms which underlie "fusion-memory" whereas rates below the STZ show neuronal processing in which "flash-memory" occurs. 2) These two memories differ in both duration and mechanism, though they may occur in the same cell groups. 3) The differences in neuronal processing may be related to "figure" and "ground" differentiation. We conclude that A-waves provide a novel measure of neural processes that can be detected on the human scalp, and speculate that they may extend clinical applications of evoked response recordings. If A-waves also occur in animals, it is likely that A-waves will provide new methods for

  3. Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Community Observer Program including the Science Enhancement Option Box (SEO Box) - 12 TB On-board Flash Memory for Serendipitous Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schingler, Robert; Villasenor, J. N.; Ricker, G. R.; Latham, D. W.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ennico, K. A.; Lewis, B. S.; Bakos, G.; Brown, T. M.; Burgasser, A. J.; Charbonneau, D.; Clampin, M.; Deming, L. D.; Doty, J. P.; Dunham, E. W.; Elliot, J. L.; Holman, M. J.; Ida, S.; Jenkins, J. M.; Jernigan, J. G.; Kawai, N.; Laughlin, G. P.; Lissauer, J. J.; Martel, F.; Sasselov, D. D.; Seager, S.; Torres, G.; Udry, S.; Winn, J. N.; Worden, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will perform an all-sky survey in a low-inclination, low-Earth orbit. TESS's 144 GB of raw data collected each orbit will be stacked, cleaned, cut, compressed and downloaded. The Community Observer Program is a Science Enhancement Option (SEO) that takes advantage of the low-radiation environment, technology advances in flash memory, and the vast amount of astronomical data collected by TESS. The Community Observer Program requires the addition of a 12 TB "SEO Box” inside the TESS Bus. The hardware can be built using low-cost Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components and fits within TESS's margins while accommodating GSFC gold rules. The SEO Box collects and stores a duplicate of the TESS camera data at a "raw” stage ( 4.3 GB/orbit, after stacking and cleaning) and makes them available for on-board processing. The sheer amount of onboard storage provided by the SEO Box allows the stacking and storing of several months of data, allowing the investigator to probe deeper in time prior to a given event. Additionally, with computation power and data in standard formats, investigators can utilize data-mining techniques to investigate serendipitous phenomenon, including pulsating stars, eclipsing binaries, supernovae or other transient phenomena. The Community Observer Program enables ad-hoc teams of citizen scientists to propose, test, refine and rank algorithms for on-board analysis to support serendipitous science. Combining "best practices” of online collaboration, with careful moderation and community management, enables this `crowd sourced’ participatory exploration with a minimal risk and impact on the core TESS Team. This system provides a powerful and independent tool opening a wide range of opportunity for science enhancement and secondary science. Support for this work has been provided by NASA, the Kavli Foundation, Google, and the Smithsonian Institution.

  4. Hybrid inverse lithography techniques for advanced hierarchical memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guangming; Hooker, Kevin; Irby, Dave; Zhang, Yunqiang; Ward, Brian; Cecil, Tom; Hall, Brett; Lee, Mindy; Kim, Dave; Lucas, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    greatly improve the ability of ILT to optimize advanced embedded memory designs while retaining significant hierarchy and cell design symmetry, therefore, have good turnaround time and CD uniformity. This paper will explain the enhancements which have been developed in order to overcome the traditional difficulties listed above. These enhancements are in the categories of local CD control, global chip processing options, process window benefit, turn-around time and hierarchy retention.

  5. Two-Bit/Cell Programming Characteristics of High-Density NOR-Type Flash Memory Device with Recessed Channel Structure and Spacer-Type Nitride Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyoung-Rok; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2006-10-01

    The structure of novel 2-bit/cell silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) flash memory device was proposed and characterized for sub-50 nm non-volatile memory (NVM) technology. A proposed memory cell has spacer-type storage nodes on both sidewalls in a recessed channel region. It was shown that counter channel doping near the bottom of the recessed channel is very important and can improve the Vth margin for 2-bit/cell operation by ˜2.5 times. By controlling doping profiles of the channel doping and the counter channel doping in the recessed channel region, we could obtain the Vth margin more than ˜1.5 V.

  6. Overview of emerging nonvolatile memory technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    class of memory technologies and scaling of scientific procedures based on an investigation of recent progress in advanced Flash memory devices. PMID:25278820

  7. Overview of emerging nonvolatile memory technologies.

    PubMed

    Meena, Jagan Singh; Sze, Simon Min; Chand, Umesh; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    class of memory technologies and scaling of scientific procedures based on an investigation of recent progress in advanced Flash memory devices. PMID:25278820

  8. Electron-Beam Dynamics for an Advanced Flash-Radiography Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-11-17

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for multipulse flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Furthermore, beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in-cell codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup, image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and the resistive wall instability. The beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.

  9. Electron-Beam Dynamics for an Advanced Flash-Radiography Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-12-01

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for multipulse flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Furthermore, beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in-cell codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup, image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and the resistive wall instability. The beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.

  10. Practical Consideration of Both Endurance and Performance for Sub-90 nm Embedded Two Transistor Fowler-Nordheim Tunneling Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Kyu; Seo, Boyoung

    2012-02-01

    Practical consideration about performance and endurance of two transistor Fowler-Nordheim tunneling (2T-FN) embedded flash cell has been suggested to expand its application not only for subscriber identity module (SIM) but also new various uses in smart-phone. We present practical 35% improvement on endurance characteristics (ΔVth) without any performance degradation.

  11. Electron-Beam Dynamics for an Advanced Flash-Radiography Accelerator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-12-01

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for multipulse flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Furthermore, beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in-cell codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup, image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and themore » resistive wall instability. The beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.« less

  12. Subwavelength alignment mark signal analysis of advanced memory products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Wong, Alfred K. K.; Wheeler, Donald C.; Williams, Gary; Lehner, Eric A.; Zach, Franz X.; Kim, Byeong Y.; Fukuzaki, Yuzo; Lu, Zhijian G.; Credendino, Santo; Wiltshire, Timothy J.

    2000-06-01

    The impact of alignment mark structure, mark geometry, and stepper alignment optical system on mark signal contrast was investigated using computer simulation. Several sub-wavelength poly silicon recessed film stack alignment targets of advanced memory products were studied. Stimulated alignment mark signals for both dark-field and bright-field systems using the rigorous electromagnetic simulation program TEMPEST showed excellent agreement with experimental data. For a dark-field alignment system, the critical parameters affecting signal contrast were found to be mark size and mark recess depth below silicon surface. On the other hand, film stack thickness and mark recess depth below/above silicon surface are the important parameters for a bright-field alignment system. From observed simulation results optimal process parameters are determined. Based on the simulation results some signal enhancement techniques will be discussed.

  13. GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices with InAs quantum dots as charge storage nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Sk Masiul; Chowdhury, Sisir; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Nagabhushan, B.; Banerji, P.; Chakraborty, S.; Mukherjee, Rabibrata

    2015-06-01

    Ultra-thin InP passivated GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices were fabricated using InAs quantum dots (QDs) as charge storing elements by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique to study the efficacy of the QDs as charge storage elements. The grown QDs were embedded between two high-k dielectric such as HfO2 and ZrO2, which were used for tunneling and control oxide layers, respectively. The size and density of the QDs were found to be 5 nm and 1.8×1011 cm-2, respectively. The device with a structure Metal/ZrO2/InAs QDs/HfO2/GaAs/Metal shows maximum memory window equivalent to 6.87 V. The device also exhibits low leakage current density of the order of 10-6 A/cm2 and reasonably good charge retention characteristics. The low value of leakage current in the fabricated memory device is attributed to the Coulomb blockade effect influenced by quantum confinement as well as reduction of interface trap states by ultra-thin InP passivation on GaAs prior to HfO2 deposition.

  14. GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices with InAs quantum dots as charge storage nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Sk Masiul Chowdhury, Sisir; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Nagabhushan, B.; Banerji, P.; Chakraborty, S.

    2015-06-24

    Ultra-thin InP passivated GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices were fabricated using InAs quantum dots (QDs) as charge storing elements by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique to study the efficacy of the QDs as charge storage elements. The grown QDs were embedded between two high-k dielectric such as HfO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, which were used for tunneling and control oxide layers, respectively. The size and density of the QDs were found to be 5 nm and 1.8×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}, respectively. The device with a structure Metal/ZrO{sub 2}/InAs QDs/HfO{sub 2}/GaAs/Metal shows maximum memory window equivalent to 6.87 V. The device also exhibits low leakage current density of the order of 10{sup −6} A/cm{sup 2} and reasonably good charge retention characteristics. The low value of leakage current in the fabricated memory device is attributed to the Coulomb blockade effect influenced by quantum confinement as well as reduction of interface trap states by ultra-thin InP passivation on GaAs prior to HfO{sub 2} deposition.

  15. Control gate length, spacing, channel hole diameter, and stacked layer number design for bit-cost scalable-type three-dimensional stackable NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Kousuke; Yanagihara, Yuki; Hirasawa, Reo; Ning, Sheyang; Takeuchi, Ken

    2014-02-01

    A cell design for three-dimensional (3D) stackable NAND (3D NAND) flash memory are investigated with emphases on control gate length (Lg), spacing (Lspace) and channel hole diameter (Φ). The requirements for the Lg and Lspace are derived from the 3D device simulation and the effective cell size that competes with the planar NAND. The simulations reveal that Lg = Lspace = 20 nm (40 nm layer pitch) is achievable for bit-cost scalable (BiCS)-type 3D NAND with the 90 nm diameter hole. If the number of stacked layers is 22 with the layer pitch of 40 nm, the effective cell size of the 3D NAND corresponds to that of 15 nm planar NAND technology. Furthermore, cell characteristics of the macaroni body channel with various Φ are investigated. Although macaroni body channel improves cell characteristics at Φ = 90 nm, a cell with Φ = 60 nm without macaroni body structure shows better characteristics.

  16. Recent Advances in Shape Memory Soft Materials for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Benjamin Qi Yu; Low, Zhi Wei Kenny; Heng, Sylvester Jun Wen; Chan, Siew Yin; Owh, Cally; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-04-27

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart and adaptive materials able to recover their shape through an external stimulus. This functionality, combined with the good biocompatibility of polymers, has garnered much interest for biomedical applications. In this review, we discuss the design considerations critical to the successful integration of SMPs for use in vivo. We also highlight recent work on three classes of SMPs: shape memory polymers and blends, shape memory polymer composites, and shape memory hydrogels. These developments open the possibility of incorporating SMPs into device design, which can lead to vast technological improvements in the biomedical field. PMID:27018814

  17. Characterization and 3D TCAD simulation of NOR-type flash non-volatile memories with emphasis on corner effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaka, A.; Singer, J.; Dornel, E.; Garetto, D.; Rideau, D.; Rafhay, Q.; Clerc, R.; Manceau, J.-P.; Degors, N.; Boccaccio, C.; Tavernier, C.; Jaouen, H.

    2011-09-01

    The impact of 3D device architecture in aggressively scaled embedded non-volatile memories has been investigated by means of experiments and 3D TCAD simulations. A complete 3D calibration methodology covering DC and transient operating regimes has been introduced and validated against measurements for different technological options. This approach has been employed to determine the key features for device optimization. In particular, shallow trench isolation corners around the active area have been identified as critical regions of the memory cell for program and erase operations, as well as for gate coupling ratio optimization.

  18. Why musical memory can be preserved in advanced Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jörn-Henrik; Stelzer, Johannes; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Chételat, Gael; La Joie, Renaud; Turner, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Musical memory is considered to be partly independent from other memory systems. In Alzheimer's disease and different types of dementia, musical memory is surprisingly robust, and likewise for brain lesions affecting other kinds of memory. However, the mechanisms and neural substrates of musical memory remain poorly understood. In a group of 32 normal young human subjects (16 male and 16 female, mean age of 28.0 ± 2.2 years), we performed a 7 T functional magnetic resonance imaging study of brain responses to music excerpts that were unknown, recently known (heard an hour before scanning), and long-known. We used multivariate pattern classification to identify brain regions that encode long-term musical memory. The results showed a crucial role for the caudal anterior cingulate and the ventral pre-supplementary motor area in the neural encoding of long-known as compared with recently known and unknown music. In the second part of the study, we analysed data of three essential Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in a region of interest derived from our musical memory findings (caudal anterior cingulate cortex and ventral pre-supplementary motor area) in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (10 male and 10 female, mean age of 68.9 ± 9.0 years) and 34 healthy control subjects (14 male and 20 female, mean age of 68.1 ± 7.2 years). Interestingly, the regions identified to encode musical memory corresponded to areas that showed substantially minimal cortical atrophy (as measured with magnetic resonance imaging), and minimal disruption of glucose-metabolism (as measured with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography), as compared to the rest of the brain. However, amyloid-β deposition (as measured with (18)F-flobetapir positron emission tomography) within the currently observed regions of interest was not substantially less than in the rest of the brain, which suggests that the regions of interest were still in a very early stage of the expected course of

  19. Superoxide Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Fang, Huaqiang; Shang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Xu, Zhengshuang; Ye, Tao; Wang, Xianhua; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Quan; Cheng, Heping

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible mitochondrial permeability transition and the resultant cytochrome c release signify the commitment of a cell to apoptotic death. However, the role of transient MPT (tMPT) because of flickering opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore remains elusive. Here we show that tMPT and the associated superoxide flashes (i.e. tMPT/superoxide flashes) constitute early mitochondrial signals during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Selenite (a ROS-dependent insult) but not staurosporine (a ROS-independent insult) stimulated an early and persistent increase in tMPT/superoxide flash activity prior to mitochondrial fragmentation and a global ROS rise, independently of Bax translocation and cytochrome c release. Selectively targeting tMPT/superoxide flash activity by manipulating cyclophilin D expression or scavenging mitochondrial ROS markedly impacted the progression of selenite-induced apoptosis while exerting little effect on the global ROS response. Furthermore, the tMPT/superoxide flash served as a convergence point for pro- and anti-apoptotic regulation mediated by cyclophilin D and Bcl-2 proteins. These results indicate that tMPT/superoxide flashes act as early mitochondrial signals mediating the apoptotic response during oxidative stress, and provide the first demonstration of highly efficacious local mitochondrial ROS signaling in deciding cell fate. PMID:21659534

  20. Novel conformal organic antireflective coatings for advanced I-line lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Shreeram V.; Nowak, Kelly A.; Fowler, Shelly; Williams, Paul; Arjona, Mikko

    2001-08-01

    Flash memory chips are playing a critical role in semiconductor devices due to increased popularity of hand held electronic communication devices such as cell phones and PDAs (personal Digital Assistants). Flash memory offers two primary advantages in semiconductor devices. First, it offers flexibility of in-circuit programming capability to reduce the loss from programming errors and to significantly reduce commercialization time to market for new devices. Second, flash memory has a double density memory capability through stacked gate structures which increases the memory capability and thus saves significantly on chip real estate. However, due to stacked gate structures the requirements for manufacturing of flash memory devices are significantly different from traditional memory devices. Stacked gate structures also offer unique challenges to lithographic patterning materials such as Bottom Anti-Reflective Coating (BARC) compositions used to achieve CD control and to minimize standing wave effect in photolithography. To be applicable in flash memory manufacturing a BARC should form a conformal coating on high topography of stacked gate features as well as provide the normal anti-reflection properties for CD control. In this paper we report on a new highly conformal advanced i-line BARC for use in design and manufacture of flash memory devices. Conformal BARCs being significantly thinner in trenches than the planarizing BARCs offer the advantage of reducing BARC overetch and thus minimizing resist thickness loss.

  1. Materials and other needs for advanced phase change memory (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Norma E.

    2015-09-01

    Phase change memory (PCM), with its long history, may now hold its brightest promise to date. This bright future is being fueled by the "push" from big data. PCM is a non-volatile memory technology used to create solid-state random access memory devices that operate based the resistance properties of materials. Employing the electrical resistance differences-as opposed to differences in charge stored-between the amorphous and crystalline phases of the material, PCM can store bits, namely one's and zero's. Indeed, owing to the method of storage, PCM can in fact be designed to hold multiple bits thus leading to a high-density technology twice the storage density and less than half the cost of DRAM, the main kind found in typical personal computers. It has been long known that PCM can fill a need gap that spans 3 decades in performance from DRAM to solid state drive (NAND Flash). Furthermore, PCM devices can lead to performance and reliability improvements essential to enabling significant steps forward to supporting big data centric computing. This talk will focus on the science and challenges of aggressive scaling to realize the density needed, how this scaling challenge is intertwined with materials needs for endurance into the giga-cycles, and the associated forefront research aiming to realizing multi-level functionality into these nanoscale programmable resistor devices.

  2. Post-Flash Calibration Darks for the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel (ACS/WFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaz, S.; Anderson, J.; Golimowski, D.

    2015-06-01

    We present a summary and analysis of the changes made to the ACS/WFC dark reference files. As of January 15, 2015 the ACS team has begun to produce post- flashed dark reference files for the Wide Field Channel (WFC). This change was made to combat the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) losses caused by radiation damage that the two WFC CCDs have suffered since being put into orbit by artificially increasing the background in the dark images. This has resulted in several changes to the reference file pipeline, and an improved calibration dark.

  3. Advancing Reversible Shape Memory by Tuning Network Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaoxi; Zhou, Jing; Vatankhah Varnosfaderani, Mohammad; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Gang, Oleg; Sheiko, Sergei; University of north carolina at chapel hill Collaboration; Brookhaven National Lab-CFN Collaboration

    Recently, reversible shape memory (RSM) has been realized in conventional semi-crystalline elastomers without applying any external force and synthetic programming. The mechanism is ascribed to counteraction between thermodynamically driven relaxation of a strained polymer network and kinetically preferred self-seeding recrystallization of constrained network strands. In order to maximize RSM's performance in terms of (i) range of reversible strain, (ii) rate of strain recovery, and (iii) relaxation time of reversibility, we have designed a systematic series of networks with different topologies and crosslinking densities, including purposely introduced dangling chains and irregular meshes. Within a broad range of crosslink density ca. 50-1000 mol/m3, we have demonstrated that the RSM's properties improve significantly with increasing crosslink density, regardless of network topology. Actually, one of the most irregular networks with densest crosslinking allowed achieving up to 80% of the programmed strain being fully reversible, fast recovery rate up to 0.05 K-1, and less than 15% decrease of reversibility after hours of annealing at partial melt state. With this understanding and optimization of RSM, we pursue an idea of shape control through self-assembly of shape-memory particles. For this purpose, 3D printing has been employed to prepare large assemblies of particles possessing specific shapes and morphologies.

  4. New Rule Use Drives the Relation between Working Memory Capacity and Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Jennifer; Jarosz, Andrew F.; Cushen, Patrick J.; Colflesh, Gregory J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between individual differences in working memory capacity and performance on the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM) is well documented yet poorly understood. The present work proposes a new explanation: that the need to use a new combination of rules on RAPM problems drives the relation between performance and working…

  5. Knowing in Advance: The Impact of Prior Event Information on Memory and Event Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Rachel; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Schick, Katherine; Murray, Janice; Gobbo, Camilla

    2003-01-01

    Examined influence of newly acquired information on 5- to 7-year-olds' memory and general representation of a personally experienced novel event. Found that advance information specific to the event led to better recall and better integration of the experience into a general event representation both soon after the event and 4 months later.…

  6. Amityville Memorial High School History Journal Advance Placement History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlett, Charles F., Ed.

    The history of Amityville, New York, compiled by 11th and 12th grade advance placement history students, is presented in journal form. Six papers focus on: (1) South Oaks: The Long Island Home; (2) A History of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, Amityville; (3) Amityville: A Vacationland; (4) Amityville School System from 1904 to Present;…

  7. A Comprehensive Study on Energy Efficiency and Performance of Flash-based SSD

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seon-Yeon; Kim, Youngjae; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Lee, Joonwon; Seo, Euiseong

    2011-01-01

    Use of flash memory as a storage medium is becoming popular in diverse computing environments. However, because of differences in interface, flash memory requires a hard-disk-emulation layer, called FTL (flash translation layer). Although the FTL enables flash memory storages to replace conventional hard disks, it induces significant computational and space overhead. Despite the low power consumption of flash memory, this overhead leads to significant power consumption in an overall storage system. In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of flash-based storage devices from the viewpoint of power consumption and energy efficiency by using various methodologies. First, we utilize simulation to investigate the interior operation of flash-based storage of flash-based storages. Subsequently, we measure the performance and energy efficiency of commodity flash-based SSDs by using microbenchmarks to identify the block-device level characteristics and macrobenchmarks to reveal their filesystem level characteristics.

  8. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  9. An upconverted photonic nonvolatile memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Chen, Xian; Wang, Feng; Tang, Yong-Bing; Roy, V. A. L.

    2014-08-01

    Conventional flash memory devices are voltage driven and found to be unsafe for confidential data storage. To ensure the security of the stored data, there is a strong demand for developing novel nonvolatile memory technology for data encryption. Here we show a photonic flash memory device, based on upconversion nanocrystals, which is light driven with a particular narrow width of wavelength in addition to voltage bias. With the help of near-infrared light, we successfully manipulate the multilevel data storage of the flash memory device. These upconverted photonic flash memory devices exhibit high ON/OFF ratio, long retention time and excellent rewritable characteristics.

  10. Zero Additional Process, Local Charge Trap, Embedded Flash Memory with Drain-Side Assisted Erase Scheme Using Minimum Channel Length/Width Standard Complemental Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single Transistor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Kousuke; Shinozuka, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Ken

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes for the first time the completely complemental metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible embedded flash memory with the small cell size as well as the lowest process cost. The single transistor cell with the minimum channel length and width realizes the ideal smallest cell. The non-volatile memory operation is realized with locally injected electrons at the drain-edge by the hot electron injection. This paper also proposes the novel forward-bias assisted erase. The proposed memory is experimentally demonstrated with the 65 nm standard CMOS process without additional process or mask. The cell size is 10F2 with the 65 nm CMOS logic design rule. The excellent reliability such as 100-times program/erase endurance, 10-year data retention and high immunity to the read/program/erase disturb is also experimentally demonstrated. The proposed cell is the ideal candidate for the code-storage embedded non-volatile memories in system-on-chip and microcontroller unit.

  11. Data Movement Dominates: Advanced Memory Technology to Address the Real Exascale Power Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Keren

    2014-08-28

    Energy is the fundamental barrier to Exascale supercomputing and is dominated by the cost of moving data from one point to another, not computation. Similarly, performance is dominated by data movement, not computation. The solution to this problem requires three critical technologies: 3D integration, optical chip-to-chip communication, and a new communication model. The central goal of the Sandia led "Data Movement Dominates" project aimed to develop memory systems and new architectures based on these technologies that have the potential to lower the cost of local memory accesses by orders of magnitude and provide substantially more bandwidth. Only through these transformational advances can future systems reach the goals of Exascale computing with a manageable power budgets. The Sandia led team included co-PIs from Columbia University, Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and the University of Maryland. The Columbia effort of Data Movement Dominates focused on developing a physically accurate simulation environment and experimental verification for optically-connected memory (OCM) systems that can enable continued performance scaling through high-bandwidth capacity, energy-efficient bit-rate transparency, and time-of-flight latency. With OCM, memory device parallelism and total capacity can scale to match future high-performance computing requirements without sacrificing data-movement efficiency. When we consider systems with integrated photonics, links to memory can be seamlessly integrated with the interconnection network-in a sense, memory becomes a primary aspect of the interconnection network. At the core of the Columbia effort, toward expanding our understanding of OCM enabled computing we have created an integrated modeling and simulation environment that uniquely integrates the physical behavior of the optical layer. The PhoenxSim suite of design and software tools developed under this effort has enabled the co-design of and performance evaluation photonics-enabled OCM

  12. Knowing in advance: the impact of prior event information on memory and event knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Rachel; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Schick, Katherine; Murray, Janice; Gobbo, Camilla

    2003-03-01

    We examined the influence of newly acquired information on children's memory and general representation of a personally experienced event. Thirty-five children between the ages of 5 and 7 years participated in the novel event (Visiting the Pirate). The day before participating, children were: (1) provided with new information specific to the up-coming event; (2) engaged in a discussion generally related to the event topic based on existing knowledge; or (3) discussed an unrelated topic. Advance information specific to the event led to better recall and, in particular, to better integration of the experience into a general event representation both soon after the event and at a follow-up interview 4 months later, whereas general discussion of the topic without the event specific information neither enhanced memory reports nor facilitated the integration of event information. Providing information in advance can have significant effects on memory and knowledge acquisition although many variables, including those relating to the specific content of the information, will affect this relation. PMID:12706386

  13. Lunar Impact Flash Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    A bright impact flash detected by the NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash location. A process for locating the impact flash, and presumably its associated crater, was developed using commercially available software tools. The process was successfully applied to the March 2013 impact flash and put into production on an additional 300 impact flashes. The goal today: provide a description of the geolocation technique developed.

  14. Simple flash evaporator for making thin films of compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hemanadhan, M.; Bapanayya, Ch.; Agarwal, S. C.

    2010-07-15

    A simple and compact arrangement for flash evaporation is described. It uses a cell phone vibrator for powder dispensing that can be incorporated into a vacuum deposition chamber without any major alterations. The performance of the flash evaporation system is checked by making thin films of the optical memory chalcogenide glass Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST). Energy dispersive x-ray analysis shows that the flash evaporation preserves the stoichiometry in thin films.

  15. Advanced error-prediction LDPC with temperature compensation for highly reliable SSDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokutomi, Tsukasa; Tanakamaru, Shuhei; Iwasaki, Tomoko Ogura; Takeuchi, Ken

    2015-09-01

    To improve the reliability of NAND Flash memory based solid-state drives (SSDs), error-prediction LDPC (EP-LDPC) has been proposed for multi-level-cell (MLC) NAND Flash memory (Tanakamaru et al., 2012, 2013), which is effective for long retention times. However, EP-LDPC is not as effective for triple-level cell (TLC) NAND Flash memory, because TLC NAND Flash has higher error rates and is more sensitive to program-disturb error. Therefore, advanced error-prediction LDPC (AEP-LDPC) has been proposed for TLC NAND Flash memory (Tokutomi et al., 2014). AEP-LDPC can correct errors more accurately by precisely describing the error phenomena. In this paper, the effects of AEP-LDPC are investigated in a 2×nm TLC NAND Flash memory with temperature characterization. Compared with LDPC-with-BER-only, the SSD's data-retention time is increased by 3.4× and 9.5× at room-temperature (RT) and 85 °C, respectively. Similarly, the acceptable BER is increased by 1.8× and 2.3×, respectively. Moreover, AEP-LDPC can correct errors with pre-determined tables made at higher temperatures to shorten the measurement time before shipping. Furthermore, it is found that one table can cover behavior over a range of temperatures in AEP-LDPC. As a result, the total table size can be reduced to 777 kBytes, which makes this approach more practical.

  16. Secrets of a Flash Card-Carrying Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Mel

    1983-01-01

    Eight ways to use flash cards in mathematics instruction are described. These games and other gimmicks help increase students' concentration, build memory skills, sharpen thinking skills, and enliven drills. (PP)

  17. Design and fabrication of memory devices based on nanoscale polyoxometalate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busche, Christoph; Vilà-Nadal, Laia; Yan, Jun; Miras, Haralampos N.; Long, De-Liang; Georgiev, Vihar P.; Asenov, Asen; Pedersen, Rasmus H.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Mirza, Muhammad M.; Paul, Douglas J.; Poblet, Josep M.; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-11-01

    Flash memory devices--that is, non-volatile computer storage media that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed--are vital for portable electronics, but the scaling down of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) flash memory to sizes of below ten nanometres per data cell presents challenges. Molecules have been proposed to replace MOS flash memory, but they suffer from low electrical conductivity, high resistance, low device yield, and finite thermal stability, limiting their integration into current MOS technologies. Although great advances have been made in the pursuit of molecule-based flash memory, there are a number of significant barriers to the realization of devices using conventional MOS technologies. Here we show that core-shell polyoxometalate (POM) molecules can act as candidate storage nodes for MOS flash memory. Realistic, industry-standard device simulations validate our approach at the nanometre scale, where the device performance is determined mainly by the number of molecules in the storage media and not by their position. To exploit the nature of the core-shell POM clusters, we show, at both the molecular and device level, that embedding [(Se(IV)O3)2]4- as an oxidizable dopant in the cluster core allows the oxidation of the molecule to a [Se(V)2O6]2- moiety containing a {Se(V)-Se(V)} bond (where curly brackets indicate a moiety, not a molecule) and reveals a new 5+ oxidation state for selenium. This new oxidation state can be observed at the device level, resulting in a new type of memory, which we call `write-once-erase'. Taken together, these results show that POMs have the potential to be used as a realistic nanoscale flash memory. Also, the configuration of the doped POM core may lead to new types of electrical behaviour. This work suggests a route to the practical integration of configurable molecules in MOS technologies as the lithographic scales approach the molecular limit.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW Nanoscale memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Andy; Deen, Jamal; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-10-01

    This article reviews the current status and future prospects for the use of nanomaterials and devices in memory technology. First, the status and continuing scaling trends of the flash memory are discussed. Then, a detailed discussion on technologies trying to replace flash in the near-term is provided. This includes phase change random access memory, Fe random access memory and magnetic random access memory. The long-term nanotechnology prospects for memory devices include carbon-nanotube-based memory, molecular electronics and memristors based on resistive materials such as TiO2.

  19. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  20. 0.6-1.0 V operation set/reset voltage (3 V) generator for three-dimensional integrated resistive random access memory and NAND flash hybrid solid-state drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Hachiya, Shogo; Ishii, Tomoya; Ning, Sheyang; Tsurumi, Kota; Takeuchi, Ken

    2016-04-01

    A 0.6-1.0 V, 25.9 mm2 boost converter is proposed to generate resistive random access memory (ReRAM) write (set/reset) voltage for three-dimensional (3D) integrated ReRAM and NAND flash hybrid solid-state drive (SSD). The proposed boost converter uses an integrated area-efficient V BUF generation circuit to obtain short ReRAM sector write time, small circuit size, and small energy consumption simultaneously. In specific, the proposed boost converter reduces ReRAM sector write time by 65% compared with a conventional one-stage boost converter (Conventional 1) which uses 1.0 V operating voltage. On the other hand, by using the same ReRAM sector write time, the proposed boost converter reduces 49% circuit area and 46% energy consumption compared with a conventional two-stage boost converter (Conventional 2). In addition, by using the proposed boost converter, the operating voltage, V DD, can be reduced to 0.6 V. The lowest 159 nJ energy consumption can be obtained when V DD is 0.7 V.

  1. Probing S-state advancements and recombination pathways in photosystem II with a global fit program for flash-induced oxygen evolution pattern.

    PubMed

    Pham, Long Vo; Messinger, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II catalyzes the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. Four decades ago, measurements of flash-induced oxygen evolution have shown that the OEC steps through oxidation states S(0), S(1), S(2), S(3) and S(4) before O(2) is released and the S(0) state is reformed. The light-induced transitions between these states involve misses and double hits. While it is widely accepted that the miss parameter is S state dependent and may be further modulated by the oxidation state of the acceptor side, the traditional way of analyzing each flash-induced oxygen evolution pattern (FIOP) individually did not allow using enough free parameters to thoroughly test this proposal. Furthermore, this approach does not allow assessing whether the presently known recombination processes in photosystem II fully explain all measured oxygen yields during Si state lifetime measurements. Here we present a global fit program that simultaneously fits all flash-induced oxygen yields of a standard FIOP (2 Hz flash frequency) and of 11-18 FIOPs each obtained while probing the S(0), S(2) and S(3) state lifetimes in spinach thylakoids at neutral pH. This comprehensive data treatment demonstrates the presence of a very slow phase of S(2) decay, in addition to the commonly discussed fast and slow reduction of S(2) by YD and QB(-), respectively. Our data support previous suggestions that the S(0)→S(1) and S(1)→S(2) transitions involve low or no misses, while high misses occur in the S(2)→S(3) or S(3)→S(0) transitions. PMID:27033305

  2. Apollo light flash investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, W. Z.; Pinsky, L. S.; Bailey, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    The visual phenomenon of light flashes resulting from high energy, heavy cosmic rays penetrating the command module structure and crewmembers' eyes is investigated. Light flash events observed during dedicated sessions on Apollo 15, 16, 17 are described along with a Monte Carlo simulation of the exposure of an astronaut to cosmic radiation during a mission. Results of the Apollo Light Flash Moving Emulsion Detector experiment developed for Apollo 16 and 17 to obtain a direct record of incident cosmic ray particles are correlated with crewmembers' reports of light flashes.

  3. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, Lee K.

    1981-01-01

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  4. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-12-07

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  5. Flash-Type Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  6. Flash Signal Processing and NAND/ReRAM SSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.

    The widespread use of NAND Flash memories in SSDs has unleashed new avenues of innovation for the enterprise and client computing. System-wide architectural changes are required to make full use of the advantages of SSDs in terms of performance, reliability and power. Signal processing technologies are becoming more and more popular to countermeasure all the parasitic effects of a Flash NAND array: the first part of this chapter deals with such techniques.

  7. Understanding Green Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Andrew T.

    1998-05-01

    Most astronomers learn about green flashes from either Minnaert's old book (Dover, 1954) or O'Connell's ``The Green Flash....'' Both have defects. Minnaert's account mostly represents what was known in the 1920s; it repeats Mulder's 3-fold classification, which omits Joule's second type of flash --- the one most commonly seen from mountain observatories. O'Connell searched only the astronomical literature, missing Dietze's crucially important paper (Z.f.Met. 9, 169 (1955)) showing that the ``textbook'' mechanism cannot produce flashes visible to the naked eye. He also erred in thinking that distortions of the setting Sun arise in the upper atmosphere (they are due to the marine boundary layer), and copied an error from Feenstra Kuiper's thesis that misidentified a common mirage-like phenomenon as Wegener's ``blank strip'' (Young et al., Appl. Opt. 36, 2689 (1997).) Most phenomena shown in O'Connell's book are caused by inversion layers below eye level, not above as in Wegener's phenomenon. The two commonest forms of green flash are associated with the inferior mirage and the mock mirage, corresponding to Fisher's Type A and Type B sunsets, respectively. Superrefraction, advocated by Wood and by Rayleigh as the cause of large flashes, actually suppress them: the airmass is proportional to the refraction (by Laplace's extinction theorem), so no green is transmitted when refraction is much larger than average. Although there is a physical green flash that can be photographed, the colors seen at sunset are strongly modified by bleaching of the L cones. Most ``green'' sunset flashes are actually yellow. Writers should stop representing Jules Verne's ``ancient legend'' as fact, as it was invented by Verne as a plot device for his novel ``Le Rayon Vert.'' Green-flash photos and simulations will be shown. This material is based upon work supported by the NSF under Award No. ATM-9714357.

  8. EDITORIAL: Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-10-01

    Solid State Commun. 17 1425 [4]Gunnarsson O and Lundqvist B I 1976 Exchange and correlation in atoms, molecules, and solids by the spin-density-functional formalism Phys. Rev. B 13 4274 [5]Langreth D C and Mehl M J 1981 Beyond the local-density approximation in calculations of ground-state electronic properties Phys. Rev. B 47 446 [6]Dion M, Rydberg H, Schröder E, Langreth D C and Lundqvist B I 2004 Van der Waals density functional for general geometries Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 246401 Thonhauser T, Cooper V R, Li S, Puzder A, Hyldgaard P and Langreth D C 2007 Van der Waals density functional: self-consistent potential and the nature of the van der Waals bond Phys. Rev. B 76 125112 [7]Lee K, Murray E D, Kong L, Lundqvist B I and Langreth D C 2010 A higher-accuracy van der Waals density functional Phys. Rev. B 82 081101 [8]Rapcewicz K and Ashcroft N W 1991 Fluctuation attraction in condensed matter: a nonlocal functional approach Phys. Rev. B 44 4032 Lundqvist B I, Andersson Y, Shao H, Chan S and Langreth D C 1995 Density functional theory including van der Waals forces Int. J. Quant. Chem. 56 247 [9]Langreth D C et al 2009 A density functional for sparse matter J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084203 [10]For example, Kohn W, Meir Y and Makarov D E 1998 The exchange-correlation energy of a metallic surface Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 4153 Kurth S and Perdew J P 1999 Phys. Rev. B 59 10461 Dobson J F and Wang J 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 2123 Pitarke J M and Perdew J P 2003 Phys. Rev. B 67 045101 Vydrov O A and van Voorhi T 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 063004 [11]For example, Grimme S 2004 J. Comput. Phys. 25 1463 Tkatchenko A and Scheffler M 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 073005 Grimme S, Antony J, Ehrlich S and Krieg H 2010 J. Chem. Phys. 132 154004 [12]Burke K 2012 Perspectives on density functional theory J. Chem. Phys. 136 150901 Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials contents Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C LangrethPer Hyldgaard and Talat S

  9. Evaluating Non-In-Place Update Techniques for Flash-Based Transaction Processing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongkun; Goda, Kazuo; Kitsuregawa, Masaru

    Recently, flash memory is emerging as the storage device. With price sliding fast, the cost per capacity is approaching to that of SATA disk drives. So far flash memory has been widely deployed in consumer electronics even partly in mobile computing environments. For enterprise systems, the deployment has been studied by many researchers and developers. In terms of the access performance characteristics, flash memory is quite different from disk drives. Without the mechanical components, flash memory has very high random read performance, whereas it has a limited random write performance because of the erase-before-write design. The random write performance of flash memory is comparable with or even worse than that of disk drives. Due to such a performance asymmetry, naive deployment to enterprise systems may not exploit the potential performance of flash memory at full blast. This paper studies the effectiveness of using non-in-place-update (NIPU) techniques through the IO path of flash-based transaction processing systems. Our deliberate experiments using both open-source DBMS and commercial DBMS validated the potential benefits; x3.0 to x6.6 performance improvement was confirmed by incorporating non-in-place-update techniques into file system without any modification of applications or storage devices.

  10. Longitudinal Diagnostics of Short Bunches at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shaukat

    2009-01-22

    Novel acceleration concepts such as laser- or beam-driven plasma acceleration require advanced diagnostic techniques to characterize and monitor the beam. A particular challenge is to measure bunch lengths of the order of 10 femtoseconds. Several methods are currently explored at the free-electron laser FLASH at DESY/Hamburg and will be discussed it this paper, such as electro-optical sampling, streaking bunches with a transversely deflecting cavity, and -most recently implemented at FLASH--the optical-replica synthesizer, a laser-based technique promising a time resolution of a few femtoseconds.

  11. Flash Bulletin: Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Debbie

    1984-01-01

    Explains the flashes of light emitted by fireflies as competition, species-specific code, species identification and mating behavior and ecology. Suggests activities to conduct to study the insects and their behavior. (ERB)

  12. Flashes and Floaters

    MedlinePlus

    ... either in the form of lightening bolts, shooting stars, sparks, or an arc of light to the ... against it that causes the sparks and shooting stars phenomenon. But flashes and floaters may have more ...

  13. Floods and Flash Flooding

    MedlinePlus

    Floods and flash flooding Now is the time to determine your area’s flood risk. If you are not sure whether you ... If you are in a floodplain, consider buying flood insurance. Do not drive around barricades. If your ...

  14. The Relieving Effects of BrainPower Advanced, a Dietary Supplement, in Older Adults with Subjective Memory Complaints: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingfen; Shi, Rong; Chen, Su; Dai, Lihua; Shen, Tian; Feng, Yi; Gu, Pingping; Shariff, Mina; Nguyen, Tuong; Ye, Yeats; Rao, Jianyu; Xing, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are common in older adults that can often predict further cognitive impairment. No proven effective agents are available for SMCs. The effect of BrainPower Advanced, a dietary supplement consisting of herbal extracts, nutrients, and vitamins, was evaluated in 98 volunteers with SMCs, averaging 67 years of age (47–88), in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective hypomnesis/memory loss (SML) and attention/concentration deficits (SAD) were evaluated before and after 12-week supplementation of BrainPower Advanced capsules (n = 47) or placebo (n = 51), using a 5-point memory questionnaire (1 = no/slight, 5 = severe). Objective memory function was evaluated using 3 subtests of visual/audio memory, abstraction, and memory recall that gave a combined total score. The BrainPower Advanced group had more cases of severe SML (severity ⩾ 3) (44/47) and severe SAD (43/47) than the placebo group (39/51 and 37/51, < 0.05, < 0.05, resp.) before the treatment. BrainPower Advanced intervention, however, improved a greater proportion of the severe SML (29.5%)(13/44) (P < 0.01) and SAD (34.9%)(15/43)(P < 0.01) than placebo (5.1% (2/39) and 13.5% (5/37), resp.). Thus, 3-month BrainPower Advanced supplementation appears to be beneficial to older adults with SMCs. PMID:27190539

  15. The Relieving Effects of BrainPower Advanced, a Dietary Supplement, in Older Adults with Subjective Memory Complaints: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingfen; Shi, Rong; Chen, Su; Dai, Lihua; Shen, Tian; Feng, Yi; Gu, Pingping; Shariff, Mina; Nguyen, Tuong; Ye, Yeats; Rao, Jianyu; Xing, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are common in older adults that can often predict further cognitive impairment. No proven effective agents are available for SMCs. The effect of BrainPower Advanced, a dietary supplement consisting of herbal extracts, nutrients, and vitamins, was evaluated in 98 volunteers with SMCs, averaging 67 years of age (47-88), in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective hypomnesis/memory loss (SML) and attention/concentration deficits (SAD) were evaluated before and after 12-week supplementation of BrainPower Advanced capsules (n = 47) or placebo (n = 51), using a 5-point memory questionnaire (1 = no/slight, 5 = severe). Objective memory function was evaluated using 3 subtests of visual/audio memory, abstraction, and memory recall that gave a combined total score. The BrainPower Advanced group had more cases of severe SML (severity ⩾ 3) (44/47) and severe SAD (43/47) than the placebo group (39/51 and 37/51, < 0.05, < 0.05, resp.) before the treatment. BrainPower Advanced intervention, however, improved a greater proportion of the severe SML (29.5%)(13/44) (P < 0.01) and SAD (34.9%)(15/43)(P < 0.01) than placebo (5.1% (2/39) and 13.5% (5/37), resp.). Thus, 3-month BrainPower Advanced supplementation appears to be beneficial to older adults with SMCs. PMID:27190539

  16. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  17. Active Flash: Out-of-core Data Analytics on Flash Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Boboila, Simona; Kim, Youngjae; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Desnoyers, Peter; Shipman, Galen M

    2012-01-01

    Next generation science will increasingly come to rely on the ability to perform efficient, on-the-fly analytics of data generated by high-performance computing (HPC) simulations, modeling complex physical phenomena. Scientific computing workflows are stymied by the traditional chaining of simulation and data analysis, creating multiple rounds of redundant reads and writes to the storage system, which grows in cost with the ever-increasing gap between compute and storage speeds in HPC clusters. Recent HPC acquisitions have introduced compute node-local flash storage as a means to alleviate this I/O bottleneck. We propose a novel approach, Active Flash, to expedite data analysis pipelines by migrating to the location of the data, the flash device itself. We argue that Active Flash has the potential to enable true out-of-core data analytics by freeing up both the compute core and the associated main memory. By performing analysis locally, dependence on limited bandwidth to a central storage system is reduced, while allowing this analysis to proceed in parallel with the main application. In addition, offloading work from the host to the more power-efficient controller reduces peak system power usage, which is already in the megawatt range and poses a major barrier to HPC system scalability. We propose an architecture for Active Flash, explore energy and performance trade-offs in moving computation from host to storage, demonstrate the ability of appropriate embedded controllers to perform data analysis and reduction tasks at speeds sufficient for this application, and present a simulation study of Active Flash scheduling policies. These results show the viability of the Active Flash model, and its capability to potentially have a transformative impact on scientific data analysis.

  18. Improving the performance of physiologic hot flash measures with support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Thurston, Rebecca C; Matthews, Karen A; Hernandez, Javier; De La Torre, Fernando

    2009-03-01

    Hot flashes are experienced by over 70% of menopausal women. Criteria to classify hot flashes from physiologic signals show variable performance. The primary aim was to compare conventional criteria to Support Vector Machines (SVMs), an advanced machine learning method, to classify hot flashes from sternal skin conductance. Thirty women with > or =4 hot flashes/day underwent laboratory hot flash testing with skin conductance measurement. Hot flashes were quantified with conventional (> or =2 micromho, 30 s) and SVM methods. Conventional methods had poor sensitivity (sensitivity=0.41, specificity=1, positive predictive value (PPV)=0.94, negative predictive value (NPV)=0.85) in classifying hot flashes, with poorest performance among women with high body mass index or anxiety. SVM models showed improved performance (sensitivity=0.89, specificity=0.96, PPV=0.85, NPV=0.96). SVM may improve the performance of skin conductance measures of hot flashes. PMID:19170952

  19. Flash fire propensity of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flash fire test results on 86 materials, evaluated using the USF flash fire screening test, are presented. The materials which appear least prone to flash fires are PVC, polyphenylene oxide and sulfide, and polyether and polyaryl sulfone; these did not produce flash fires under these particular test conditions. The principal value of these screening tests at the present time is in identifying materials which appear prone to flash fires, and in identifying which formulations of a generic material are more or less prone to flash fires.

  20. 14. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF TRIMMED FLASH; FLASH IS EXCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF TRIMMED FLASH; FLASH IS EXCESS METAL EXTRUDED BETWEEN THE DIES USED TO FORGE THE BLADE END OF THE POST HOLE DIGGER - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  1. Responsive Biomaterials: Advances in Materials Based on Shape-Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Hardy, John G; Palma, Matteo; Wind, Shalom J; Biggs, Manus J

    2016-07-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are morphologically responsive materials with potential for a variety of biomedical applications, particularly as devices for minimally invasive surgery and the delivery of therapeutics and cells for tissue engineering. A brief introduction to SMPs is followed by a discussion of the current progress toward the development of SMP-based biomaterials for clinically relevant biomedical applications. PMID:27120512

  2. Advances in Early Memory Development Research: Insights about the Dark Side of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courage, Mary L.; Howe, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past three decades impressive progress has been made in documenting the development of encoding, storage, and retrieval processes in preverbal infants and children. This literature includes an extensive and diverse database as well as theoretical conjecture about the underlying processes that drive early memory development. A selective…

  3. Constructing Patriotism: Teaching History and Memories in Global Worlds. Advances in Cultural Psychology: Constructing Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carretero, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Memory construction and national identity are key issues in our societies, as well as it is patriotism. How can we nowadays believe and give sense to traditional narrations that explain the origins of nations and communities? How do these narrations function in a process of globalization? How should we remember the recent past? In the construction…

  4. Assessment of vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design storms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il

    2011-07-01

    There has been an increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration caused by heavy or excessive rainfall intensity over a small area, which presents the greatest potential danger threat to the natural environment, human life, public health and property, etc. Such flash floods have rapid runoff and debris flow that rises quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood damage. This study develops a flash flood index through the average of the same scale relative severity factors quantifying characteristics of hydrographs generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the long-term observed rainfall data in a small ungauged study basin, and presents regression equations between rainfall characteristics and the flash flood index. The aim of this study is to develop flash flood index-duration-frequency relation curves by combining the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relation and the flash flood index from probability rainfall data in order to evaluate vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design storms. This study is an initial effort to quantify the flash flood severity of design storms for both existing and planned flood control facilities to cope with residual flood risks due to extreme flash floods that have ocurred frequently in recent years. PMID:21845165

  5. Theory of optical flashes

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.

    1983-09-30

    The theory of optical flashes created by x- and ..gamma..-ray burst heating of stars in binaries is reviewed. Calculations of spectra due to steady-state x-ray reprocessing and estimates of the fundamental time scales for the non-steady case are discussed. The results are applied to the extant optical data from x-ray and ..gamma..-ray bursters. Finally, I review predictions of flashes from ..gamma..-ray bursters detectable by a state of the art all-sky optical monitor.

  6. Analog Nonvolatile Computer Memory Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd

    2007-01-01

    In nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) circuits of a proposed type, digital data would be stored in analog form in ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FFETs). This type of memory circuit would offer advantages over prior volatile and nonvolatile types: In a conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor static RAM, six transistors must be used to store one bit, and storage is volatile in that data are lost when power is turned off. In a conventional dynamic RAM, three transistors must be used to store one bit, and the stored bit must be refreshed every few milliseconds. In contrast, in a RAM according to the proposal, data would be retained when power was turned off, each memory cell would contain only two FFETs, and the cell could store multiple bits (the exact number of bits depending on the specific design). Conventional flash memory circuits afford nonvolatile storage, but they operate at reading and writing times of the order of thousands of conventional computer memory reading and writing times and, hence, are suitable for use only as off-line storage devices. In addition, flash memories cease to function after limited numbers of writing cycles. The proposed memory circuits would not be subject to either of these limitations. Prior developmental nonvolatile ferroelectric memories are limited to one bit per cell, whereas, as stated above, the proposed memories would not be so limited. The design of a memory circuit according to the proposal must reflect the fact that FFET storage is only partly nonvolatile, in that the signal stored in an FFET decays gradually over time. (Retention times of some advanced FFETs exceed ten years.) Instead of storing a single bit of data as either a positively or negatively saturated state in a ferroelectric device, each memory cell according to the proposal would store two values. The two FFETs in each cell would be denoted the storage FFET and the control FFET. The storage FFET would store an analog signal value

  7. EDITORIAL: Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-10-01

    sufficiently close to any corrugated—and/or any smooth—surface and thus enforce a strong vdW-type adhesion; it exploits what is then essentially a contact force (dominated by the attraction exerted in the near-surface regions) to defy the pull of gravity on its own bulk. This Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter special issue is dedicated to the memory of David C Langreth. David is a dearly missed friend and mentor who inspired many of us. He was an outstanding condensed matter theorist and a scholar who greatly influenced us through his many-particle-physics based insights into density functional theory (DFT), surface science and related areas. His seminal works range from conserving formulations of interacting nonequilibrium transport [1] and formal-scattering theory [2] to an explicit formulation [3] of the exact DFT exchange-correlation energy in the adiabatic connection formula (ACF), the latter also being derived independently by Gunnarsson and Lundqvist [4]. David's portfolio also includes an analysis [5] that helped catalyze and guide the development of DFT from the local-density approximation (LDA) to the formulations of generalized gradient approximations (GGAs). Another salient contribution of David's is in the area of vdW interactions in materials. He was a key architect of the vdW density functional (vdW-DF) method [6, 7]. This method was developed in a long-standing Rutgers-Chalmers collaboration between David's group and that of Bengt I Lundqvist, later extending to a wider group of researchers on both sides of the Atlantic. Plasmons are collective excitations that depend on electron-density variation. The plasmon response can be seen as defining the nature of the LDA [4] and their description can thus also be seen as contributing to the success of GGA. The vdW-DF method is a regular constraint-based density functional (for ground-state DFT) which is derived within the ACF framework and which emphasizes the electrodynamical nature of the coupling between

  8. Flashing anomalous color contrast.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2004-01-01

    A new visual phenomenon that we call flashing anomalous color contrast is described. This phenomenon arises from the interaction between a gray central disk and a chromatic annulus surrounded by black radial lines. In an array of such figures, the central gray disk no longer appears gray, but assumes a color complementary to that of the surrounding annulus. The induced color appears: (1) vivid and saturated; (2) self-luminous, not a surface property; (3) flashing with eye or stimulus movement; (4) floating out of its confines; and (5) stronger in extrafoveal than in foveal vision. The strength of the effect depends on the number, length, width, and luminance contrast of the radial lines. The results suggest that the chromatic ring bounding the inner tips of the black radial lines induces simultaneous color contrast, whereas the radial lines elicit, in conjunction with the gray disk and the ring, the flashing, vividness, and high saturation of the effect. The stimulus properties inducing the illusion suggest that flashing anomalous color contrast may be based on asynchronous interactions among multiple visual pathways. PMID:15518215

  9. Probabilistic Flash Flood Forecasting using Stormscale Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J.; Gourley, J. J.; Kain, J. S.; Clark, A.; Novak, D.; Hong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Flash flooding is one of the most costly and deadly natural hazards in the US and across the globe. The loss of life and property from flash floods could be mitigated with better guidance from hydrological models, but these models have limitations. For example, they are commonly initialized using rainfall estimates derived from weather radars, but the time interval between observations of heavy rainfall and a flash flood can be on the order of minutes, particularly for small basins in urban settings. Increasing the lead time for these events is critical for protecting life and property. Therefore, this study advances the use of quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) from a stormscale NWP ensemble system into a distributed hydrological model setting to yield basin-specific, probabilistic flash flood forecasts (PFFFs). Rainfall error characteristics of the individual members are first diagnosed and quantified in terms of structure, amplitude, and location (SAL; Wernli et al., 2008). Amplitude and structure errors are readily correctable due to their diurnal nature, and the fine scales represented by the CAPS QPF members are consistent with radar-observed rainfall, mainly showing larger errors with afternoon convection. To account for the spatial uncertainty of the QPFs, we use an elliptic smoother, as in Marsh et al. (2012), to produce probabilistic QPFs (PQPFs). The elliptic smoother takes into consideration underdispersion, which is notoriously associated with stormscale ensembles, and thus, is good for targeting the approximate regions that may receive heavy rainfall. However, stormscale details contained in individual members are still needed to yield reasonable flash flood simulations. Therefore, on a case study basis, QPFs from individual members are then run through the hydrological model with their predicted structure and corrected amplitudes, but the locations of individual rainfall elements are perturbed within the PQPF elliptical regions using Monte

  10. An Advanced NAND-Structure Cell Technology for Reliable 3.3 V 64 Mb Electrically Erasable and Programmable Read Only Memories (EEPROMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aritome, Seiichi; Hatakeyama, Ikuo; Endoh, Tetsuo; Yamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shuto, Susumu; Iizuka, Hirohisa; Maruyama, Tooru; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hemink, Gertjan; Sakui, Koji; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Momodomi, Masaki; Shirota, Riichiro

    1994-01-01

    An extremely small NAND-structure cell of 1.13 µm2 per bit, 80% of the smallest Flash memory cell reported so far [H. Kume et al.: IEEE Tech. Dig. IEDM (1992) p. 991], has been developed in 0.4 µm technology. The chip size of a 64 Mb NAND electrically erasable and programmable read only memory (EEPROM) using this cell is estimated to be 120 mm2, which is 60% that of a 64 Mb DRAM. In order to realize the small cell size, a 0.8 µm field isolation is used. A negative bias of -0.5 V to the P-well of the memory cell is applied during writing. In addition, a bit-by-bit intelligent writing technology allows a 3.3 V data sensing scheme which can suppress read disturb to 1/1000 in comparison with the conventional 5 V scheme. As a result, it is expected that with this technology, 106 write and erase cycles can be achieved and that the tunnel oxide can be scaled down from 10 nm to 8 nm.

  11. Advances in the behavioural testing and network imaging of rodent recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Kinnavane, Lisa; Albasser, Mathieu M; Aggleton, John P

    2015-05-15

    Research into object recognition memory has been galvanised by the introduction of spontaneous preference tests for rodents. The standard task, however, contains a number of inherent shortcomings that reduce its power. Particular issues include the problem that individual trials are time consuming, so limiting the total number of trials in any condition. In addition, the spontaneous nature of the behaviour and the variability between test objects add unwanted noise. To combat these issues, the 'bow-tie maze' was introduced. Although still based on the spontaneous preference of novel over familiar stimuli, the ability to give multiple trials within a session without handling the rodents, as well as using the same objects as both novel and familiar samples on different trials, overcomes key limitations in the standard task. Giving multiple trials within a single session also creates new opportunities for functional imaging of object recognition memory. A series of studies are described that examine the expression of the immediate-early gene, c-fos. Object recognition memory is associated with increases in perirhinal cortex and area Te2 c-fos activity. When rats explore novel objects the pathway from the perirhinal cortex to lateral entorhinal cortex, and then to the dentate gyrus and CA3, is engaged. In contrast, when familiar objects are explored the pathway from the perirhinal cortex to lateral entorhinal cortex, and then to CA1, takes precedence. The switch to the perforant pathway (novel stimuli) from the temporoammonic pathway (familiar stimuli) may assist the enhanced associative learning promoted by novel stimuli. PMID:25106740

  12. Advances in the behavioural testing and network imaging of rodent recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Kinnavane, Lisa; Albasser, Mathieu M.; Aggleton, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Research into object recognition memory has been galvanised by the introduction of spontaneous preference tests for rodents. The standard task, however, contains a number of inherent shortcomings that reduce its power. Particular issues include the problem that individual trials are time consuming, so limiting the total number of trials in any condition. In addition, the spontaneous nature of the behaviour and the variability between test objects add unwanted noise. To combat these issues, the ‘bow-tie maze’ was introduced. Although still based on the spontaneous preference of novel over familiar stimuli, the ability to give multiple trials within a session without handling the rodents, as well as using the same objects as both novel and familiar samples on different trials, overcomes key limitations in the standard task. Giving multiple trials within a single session also creates new opportunities for functional imaging of object recognition memory. A series of studies are described that examine the expression of the immediate-early gene, c-fos. Object recognition memory is associated with increases in perirhinal cortex and area Te2 c-fos activity. When rats explore novel objects the pathway from the perirhinal cortex to lateral entorhinal cortex, and then to the dentate gyrus and CA3, is engaged. In contrast, when familiar objects are explored the pathway from the perirhinal cortex to lateral entorhinal cortex, and then to CA1, takes precedence. The switch to the perforant pathway (novel stimuli) from the temporoammonic pathway (familiar stimuli) may assist the enhanced associative learning promoted by novel stimuli. PMID:25106740

  13. The future of memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinella, M.

    In the not too distant future, the traditional memory and storage hierarchy of may be replaced by a single Storage Class Memory (SCM) device integrated on or near the logic processor. Traditional magnetic hard drives, NAND flash, DRAM, and higher level caches (L2 and up) will be replaced with a single high performance memory device. The Storage Class Memory paradigm will require high speed (< 100 ns read/write), excellent endurance (> 1012), nonvolatility (retention > 10 years), and low switching energies (< 10 pJ per switch). The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) has recently evaluated several potential candidates SCM technologies, including Resistive (or Redox) RAM, Spin Torque Transfer RAM (STT-MRAM), and phase change memory (PCM). All of these devices show potential well beyond that of current flash technologies and research efforts are underway to improve the endurance, write speeds, and scalabilities to be on-par with DRAM. This progress has interesting implications for space electronics: each of these emerging device technologies show excellent resistance to the types of radiation typically found in space applications. Commercially developed, high density storage class memory-based systems may include a memory that is physically radiation hard, and suitable for space applications without major shielding efforts. This paper reviews the Storage Class Memory concept, emerging memory devices, and possible applicability to radiation hardened electronics for space.

  14. Preliminary design of the BPM electronics memory scanner/dual boxcar averager for the advanced photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votaw, A. J.

    1992-07-01

    The memory scanner/dual boxcar averager are VXI modules that are part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) data acquisition system. Each pair of modules is designed to gather and process digital data from up to nine digital channels transmitting the BPM data from the storage ring (360 locations) and the synchrotron (80 locations). They store beam history in a buffer, store the latest scan of all channels, and provide boxcar averaged X and Y position data for the global orbit feedback system, provide boxcar average X and Y position data for beam diagnostics, and a buffered output of SCDU data as it is scanned for the beam abort interlock system. The system's capability to support single pass, closed orbit, and tune measurement functions is also be briefly described.

  15. Preliminary design of the BPM electronics memory scanner/dual boxcar averager for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The memory scanner/dual boxcar averager are VXI modules that are part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) data acquisition system. Each pair of modules is designed to gather and process digital data from up to nine digital channels transmitting the BPM data from the storage ring (360 locations) and the synchrotron (80 locations). They store beam history in a buffer, store the latest scan of all channels, and provide boxcar averaged X and Y position data for the global orbit feedback system, provide boxcar average X and Y position data for beam diagnostics, and a buffered output of SCDU data as it is scanned for the beam abort interlock system. The system's capability to support single pass, closed orbit and tune measurement functions will also be briefly described.

  16. Preliminary design of the BPM electronics memory scanner/dual boxcar averager for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, A.J.

    1992-12-31

    The memory scanner/dual boxcar averager are VXI modules that are part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) data acquisition system. Each pair of modules is designed to gather and process digital data from up to nine digital channels transmitting the BPM data from the storage ring (360 locations) and the synchrotron (80 locations). They store beam history in a buffer, store the latest scan of all channels, and provide boxcar averaged X and Y position data for the global orbit feedback system, provide boxcar average X and Y position data for beam diagnostics, and a buffered output of SCDU data as it is scanned for the beam abort interlock system. The system`s capability to support single pass, closed orbit and tune measurement functions will also be briefly described.

  17. Flash Lidar Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergkoetter, M. D.; Ruppert, L.; Weimer, C. S.; Ramond, T.; Lefsky, M. A.; Burke, I. C.; Hu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Late last year, a prototype Flash LIDAR instrument flew on a series of airborne tests to demonstrate its potential for improved vegetation measurements. The prototype is a precursor to the Electronically Steerable Flash LIDAR (ESFL) currently under development at Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp. with funding from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office. ESFL may soon significantly expand our ability to measure vegetation and forests and better understand the extent of their role in global climate change and the carbon cycle - all critical science questions relating to the upcoming NASA DESDynI and ESA BIOMASS missions. In order to more efficiently exploit data returned from the experimental Flash Lidar system and plan for data exploitation from future flights, Ball funded a graduate student project (through the Ball Summer Intern Program, summer 2009) to develop and implement algorithms for post-processing of the 3-Dimensional Flash Lidar data. This effort included developing autonomous algorithms to resample the data to a uniform rectangular grid, geolocation of the data, and visual display of large swaths of data. The resampling, geolocation, surface hit detection, and aggregation of frame data are implemented with new MATLAB code, and the efficient visual display is achieved with free commercial viewing software. These efforts directly support additional tests flights planned as early as October 2009, including possible flights over Niwot Ridge, CO, for which there is ICESat data, and a sea-level coastal area in California to test the effect of higher altitude (above ground level) on the divergence of the beams and the beam spot sizes.

  18. Optimal flash rate and duty cycle for flashing visual indicators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, J.

    1971-01-01

    This experiment examined the ability of observers to determine, as quickly as possible, whether a visual indicator was steadily on or flashing. Six flash rates (periods) were combined factorially with three duty cycles (on-off ratios) to define 18 ?types' of intermittent signals. Experimental sessions were divided into six runs of 100 trials, each run utilizing one of the six flash rates. On any given trial in a run, the probability of a steady signal occurring was 0.5 and the probability of a flashing signal occurring was 0.5. A different duty cycle was employed daily for each experimental session. In all, 400 trials were devoted to each of the flash rates at each duty cycle. Accuracy and latency of response were the dependent variables of interest. The results show that the observers view the light for an interval of time appropriate to the expected flash rate and duty cycle; whether they judge the light to be steady or intermittent depends upon whether the light is extinguished during the predetermined waiting period. Adoption of this temporal criterion delays responding in comparison to those tasks involving responses to light onset. The decision or response criteria held by the observers are also sensitive to the parameters of the flashing light: observers become increasingly willing to call a flashing light ?steady' as flash duration increases.

  19. Gun muzzle blast and flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingenberg, Guenter; Heimerl, Joseph M.

    A repository of fundamental experimental and analytical data concerning the complex phenomena associated with gun-muzzle blast and flash effects is presented, proceeding from gun muzzle signatures to modern gun-propulsion concepts, interior and transitional ballistics, and characterizations of blast-wave research and muzzle flash. Data are presented in support of a novel hypothesis which explains the ignition of secondary flash and elucidates the means for its suppression. Both chemical and mechanical (often competing) methods of flash suppression are treated. The historical work of Kesslau and Ladenburg is noted, together with French, British, Japanese and American research efforts and current techniques of experimental characterization for gun muzzle phenomena.

  20. Advanced compilation techniques in the PARADIGM compiler for distributed-memory multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ernesto; Lain, Antonio; Ramaswamy, Shankar; Palermo, Daniel J.; Hodges, Eugene W., IV; Banerjee, Prithviraj

    1995-01-01

    The PARADIGM compiler project provides an automated means to parallelize programs, written in a serial programming model, for efficient execution on distributed-memory multicomputers. .A previous implementation of the compiler based on the PTD representation allowed symbolic array sizes, affine loop bounds and array subscripts, and variable number of processors, provided that arrays were single or multi-dimensionally block distributed. The techniques presented here extend the compiler to also accept multidimensional cyclic and block-cyclic distributions within a uniform symbolic framework. These extensions demand more sophisticated symbolic manipulation capabilities. A novel aspect of our approach is to meet this demand by interfacing PARADIGM with a powerful off-the-shelf symbolic package, Mathematica. This paper describes some of the Mathematica routines that performs various transformations, shows how they are invoked and used by the compiler to overcome the new challenges, and presents experimental results for code involving cyclic and block-cyclic arrays as evidence of the feasibility of the approach.

  1. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  2. Memory-efficient table look-up optimized algorithm for context-based adaptive variable length decoding in H.264/advanced video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Cheng, Lianglun; Wang, Tao; Peng, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    Table look-up operation plays a very important role during the decoding processing of context-based adaptive variable length decoding (CAVLD) in H.264/advanced video coding (AVC). However, frequent table look-up operation can result in big table memory access, and then lead to high table power consumption. Aiming to solve the problem of big table memory access of current methods, and then reduce high power consumption, a memory-efficient table look-up optimized algorithm is presented for CAVLD. The contribution of this paper lies that index search technology is introduced to reduce big memory access for table look-up, and then reduce high table power consumption. Specifically, in our schemes, we use index search technology to reduce memory access by reducing the searching and matching operations for code_word on the basis of taking advantage of the internal relationship among length of zero in code_prefix, value of code_suffix and code_lengh, thus saving the power consumption of table look-up. The experimental results show that our proposed table look-up algorithm based on index search can lower about 60% memory access consumption compared with table look-up by sequential search scheme, and then save much power consumption for CAVLD in H.264/AVC.

  3. Methods of flash sintering

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Cologna, Marco; Francis, John S.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure provides methods of flash sintering and compositions created by these methods. Methods for sintering multilayered bodies are provided in which a sintered body is produced in less than one minute. In one aspect, each layer is of a different composition, and may be constituted wholly from a ceramic or from a combination of ceramic and metallic particles. When the body includes a layer of an anode composition, a layer of an electrolyte composition and a layer of a cathode composition, the sintered body can be used to produce a solid oxide fuel cell.

  4. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  5. Laboratory prototype flash evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory prototype flash evaporator that is being developed as a candidate for the space shuttle environmental control system expendable heat sink is described. The single evaporator configuration uses water as an evaporant to accommodate reentry and on-orbit peak heat loads, and Freon 22 for terrestrial flight phases below 120,000 feet altitude. The design features, fabrication techniques used for the prototype unit, redundancy considerations, and the fluid temperature control arrangement are reported in detail. The results of an extensive test program to determine the evaporator operational characteristics under a wide variety of conditions are presented.

  6. Quick-low-density parity check and dynamic threshold voltage optimization in 1X nm triple-level cell NAND flash memory with comprehensive analysis of endurance, retention-time, and temperature variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Masafumi; Tokutomi, Tsukasa; Hachiya, Shogo; Kobayashi, Atsuro; Tanakamaru, Shuhei; Ning, Sheyang; Ogura Iwasaki, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Ken

    2016-08-01

    NAND flash memory’s reliability degrades with increasing endurance, retention-time and/or temperature. After a comprehensive evaluation of 1X nm triple-level cell (TLC) NAND flash, two highly reliable techniques are proposed. The first proposal, quick low-density parity check (Quick-LDPC), requires only one cell read in order to accurately estimate a bit-error rate (BER) that includes the effects of temperature, write and erase (W/E) cycles and retention-time. As a result, 83% read latency reduction is achieved compared to conventional AEP-LDPC. Also, W/E cycling is extended by 100% compared with conventional Bose–Chaudhuri–Hocquenghem (BCH) error-correcting code (ECC). The second proposal, dynamic threshold voltage optimization (DVO) has two parts, adaptive V Ref shift (AVS) and V TH space control (VSC). AVS reduces read error and latency by adaptively optimizing the reference voltage (V Ref) based on temperature, W/E cycles and retention-time. AVS stores the optimal V Ref’s in a table in order to enable one cell read. VSC further improves AVS by optimizing the voltage margins between V TH states. DVO reduces BER by 80%.

  7. Effects of advanced aging on the neural correlates of successful recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tracy H.; Kruggel, Frithjof; Rugg, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have reported that the neural correlates of retrieval success (old>new effects) are larger and more widespread in older than in young adults. In the present study we investigated whether this pattern of age-related ‘over-recruitment’ continues into advanced age. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), retrieval-related activity from two groups (N = 18 per group) of older adults aged 84–96 yrs (‘old-old’) and 64–77 yrs (‘young-old’) was contrasted. Subjects studied a series of pictures, half of which were presented once, and half twice. At test, subjects indicated whether each presented picture was old or new. Recognition performance of the old-old subjects for twice-studied items was equivalent to that of the young-old subjects for once-studied items. Old>new effects common to the two groups were identified in several cortical regions, including medial and lateral parietal and prefrontal cortex. There were no regions where these effects were of greater magnitude in the old-old group, and thus no evidence of over-recruitment in this group relative to the young-old individuals. In one region of medial parietal cortex, effects were greater (and only significant) in the young-old group. The failure to find evidence of over-recruitment in the old-old subjects relative to the young-old group, despite their markedly poorer cognitive performance, suggests that age-related over-recruitment effects plateau in advanced age. The findings for the medial parietal cortex underscore the sensitivity of this cortical region to increasing age. PMID:19428399

  8. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  9. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  10. Flash pyrolysis of coal with reactive and non-reactive gases. [Methanolysis and flash pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to perform a systematic study of the yield and distribution of products on the flash or rapid pyrolysis of various ranks of coal with non-reactive (N/sub 2/, Ar, He) and with reactive gases (H/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O) in an entrained flow reactor. A body of information has been obtained on the flash hydropyrolysis of coals with the use of H/sub 2/ gas. Data is in the process of being obtained with the other gases. The use of methane as a pyrolyzing gas has indicated a reaction with coal and has led to developing the process of flash methanolysis of coal. The addition of steam leads to the flash hydrolysis of coal. In addition to obtaining a better understanding of the gasification of coal, the developed process chemistry data can be used to design and evaluate advanced gasification processes. 7 figs.

  11. Flash on disk for low-power multimedia computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Leo; Nathuji, Ripal; Schwan, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    Mobile multimedia computers require large amounts of data storage, yet must consume low power in order to prolong battery life. Solid-state storage offers low power consumption, but its capacity is an order of magnitude smaller than the hard disks needed for high-resolution photos and digital video. In order to create a device with the space of a hard drive, yet the low power consumption of solid-state storage, hardware manufacturers have proposed using flash memory as a write buffer on mobile systems. This paper evaluates the power savings of such an approach and also considers other possible flash allocation algorithms, using both hardware- and software-level flash management. Its contributions also include a set of typical multimedia-rich workloads for mobile systems and power models based upon current disk and flash technology. Based on these workloads, we demonstrate an average power savings of 267 mW (53% of disk power) using hardware-only approaches. Next, we propose another algorithm, termed Energy-efficient Virtual Storage using Application-Level Framing (EVS-ALF), which uses both hardware and software for power management. By collecting information from the applications and using this metadata to perform intelligent flash allocation and prefetching, EVS-ALF achieves an average power savings of 307 mW (61%), another 8% improvement over hardware-only techniques.

  12. An energy-efficient SIMD DSP with multiple VLIW configurations and an advanced memory access unit for LTE-A modem LSIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomono, Mitsuru; Ito, Makiko; Nomura, Yoshitaka; Mouri, Makoto; Hirose, Yoshio

    2015-12-01

    Energy efficiency is the most important factor in the design of wireless modem LSIs for mobile handset systems. We have developed an energy-efficient SIMD DSP for LTE-A modem LSIs. Our DSP has mainly two hardware features in order to reduce energy consumption. The first one is multiple VLIW configurations to minimize accesses to instruction memories. The second one is an advanced memory access unit to realize complex memory accesses required for wireless baseband processing. With these features, performance of our DSP is about 1.7 times faster than a base DSP on average for standard LTE-A Libraries. Our DSP achieves about 20% improvement in energy efficiency compared to a base DSP for LTE-A modem LSIs.

  13. Advanced Engine Cycles Analyzed for Turbofans With Variable-Area Fan Nozzles Actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced, large commercial turbofan engines using low-fan-pressure-ratio, very high bypass ratio thermodynamic cycles can offer significant fuel savings over engines currently in operation. Several technological challenges must be addressed, however, before these engines can be designed. To name a few, the high-diameter fans associated with these engines pose a significant packaging and aircraft installation challenge, and a large, heavy gearbox is often necessary to address the differences in ideal operating speeds between the fan and the low-pressure turbine. Also, the large nacelles contribute aerodynamic drag penalties and require long, heavy landing gear when mounted on conventional, low wing aircraft. Nevertheless, the reduced fuel consumption rates of these engines are a compelling economic incentive, and fans designed with low pressure ratios and low tip speeds offer attractive noise-reduction benefits. Another complication associated with low-pressure-ratio fans is their need for variable flow-path geometry. As the design fan pressure ratio is reduced below about 1.4, an operational disparity is set up in the fan between high and low flight speeds. In other words, between takeoff and cruise there is too large a swing in several key fan parameters-- such as speed, flow, and pressure--for a fan to accommodate. One solution to this problem is to make use of a variable-area fan nozzle (VAFN). However, conventional, hydraulically actuated variable nozzles have weight, cost, maintenance, and reliability issues that discourage their use with low-fan-pressure-ratio engine cycles. United Technologies Research, in cooperation with NASA, is developing a revolutionary, lightweight, and reliable shape memory alloy actuator system that can change the on-demand nozzle exit area by up to 20 percent. This "smart material" actuation technology, being studied under NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program and Revolutionary Concepts in Aeronautics (Rev

  14. The Management of Advanced Germ Cell Tumors in 2016: The Memorial Sloan Kettering Approach.

    PubMed

    Funt, Samuel A; Feldman, Darren R; Bosl, George J

    2016-07-01

    The high cure rate of patients with advanced germ cell tumors is the result of effective cisplatin-based chemotherapy; both previously untreated and relapsing patients can be cured. Risk stratification is particularly important in previously untreated patients. While retrospective salvage therapy analyses suggest that a number of clinical factors are associated with outcome, the appropriate selection of patients for, and the sequencing of, conventional- and high-dose regimens are subjects of debate because of the introduction of paclitaxel and different approaches to the administration of high-dose chemotherapy. This therapeutic landscape has been molded in part by our current understanding of treatment-associated toxicity. In this paper, we review the use of serum tumor markers in risk assignment and response evaluation; the treatment of previously untreated and relapsing patients; the role of surgical resection of residual disease, including retroperitoneal node dissection; and the importance of clinical trials for addressing unanswered questions and testing new therapies. Management controversies and possible future treatment enhancements that incorporate serum tumor marker decline and tumor genomics will also be discussed. PMID:27422113

  15. FLASH LIDAR Based Relative Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Clark, Fred; Milenkovic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Relative navigation remains the most challenging part of spacecraft rendezvous and docking. In recent years, flash LIDARs, have been increasingly selected as the go-to sensors for proximity operations and docking. Flash LIDARS are generally lighter and require less power that scanning Lidars. Flash LIDARs do not have moving parts, and they are capable of tracking multiple targets as well as generating a 3D map of a given target. However, there are some significant drawbacks of Flash Lidars that must be resolved if their use is to be of long-term significance. Overcoming the challenges of Flash LIDARs for navigation-namely, low technology readiness level, lack of historical performance data, target identification, existence of false positives, and performance of vision processing algorithms as intermediaries between the raw sensor data and the Kalman filter-requires a world-class testing facility, such as the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC). Ground-based testing is a critical step for maturing the next-generation flash LIDAR-based spacecraft relative navigation. This paper will focus on the tests of an integrated relative navigation system conducted at the SOSC in January 2014. The intent of the tests was to characterize and then improve the performance of relative navigation, while addressing many of the flash LIDAR challenges mentioned above. A section on navigation performance and future recommendation completes the discussion.

  16. Evaporant feed device facilitates flash vapor deposition process in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, W. A.; Stirn, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanism using a helix sequentially feeds prescribed amounts of metal charges into an evaporation boat used for flash vapor deposition of the evaporants onto a substrate in a vacuum chamber. The helix is advanced by external manual controls extending through sealed feed- through devices into the chamber wall.

  17. Compact 3D flash lidar video cameras and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettner, Roger

    2010-04-01

    The theory and operation of Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc.'s (ASC) latest compact 3D Flash LIDAR Video Cameras (3D FLVCs) and a growing number of technical problems and solutions are discussed. The solutions range from space shuttle docking, planetary entry, decent and landing, surveillance, autonomous and manned ground vehicle navigation and 3D imaging through particle obscurants.

  18. Nonvolatile Memory Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Irom, Farokh; Friendlich, Mark; Nguyen, Duc; Kim, Hak; Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews several forms of nonvolatile memory for use in space applications. The intent is to: (1) Determine inherent radiation tolerance and sensitivities, (2) Identify challenges for future radiation hardening efforts, (3) Investigate new failure modes and effects, and technology modeling programs. Testing includes total dose, single event (proton, laser, heavy ion), and proton damage (where appropriate). Test vehicles are expected to be a variety of non-volatile memory devices as available including Flash (NAND and NOR), Charge Trap, Nanocrystal Flash, Magnetic Memory (MRAM), Phase Change--Chalcogenide, (CRAM), Ferroelectric (FRAM), CNT, and Resistive RAM.

  19. Corrosion testing in flash tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-07-01

    As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  20. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27463140

  1. Novel approach for low-cost muzzle flash detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboinik, Asher

    2008-04-01

    A low-cost muzzle flash detection based on CMOS sensor technology is proposed. This low-cost technology makes it possible to detect various transient events with characteristic times between dozens of microseconds up to dozens of milliseconds while sophisticated algorithms successfully separate them from false alarms by utilizing differences in geometrical characteristics and/or temporal signatures. The proposed system consists of off-the-shelf smart CMOS cameras with built-in signal and image processing capabilities for pre-processing together with allocated memory for storing a buffer of images for further post-processing. Such a sensor does not require sending giant amounts of raw data to a real-time processing unit but provides all calculations in-situ where processing results are the output of the sensor. This patented CMOS muzzle flash detection concept exhibits high-performance detection capability with very low false-alarm rates. It was found that most false-alarms due to sun glints are from sources at distances of 500-700 meters from the sensor and can be distinguished by time examination techniques from muzzle flash signals. This will enable to eliminate up to 80% of falsealarms due to sun specular reflections in the battle field. Additional effort to distinguish sun glints from suspected muzzle flash signal is made by optimization of the spectral band in Near-IR region. The proposed system can be used for muzzle detection of small arms, missiles and rockets and other military applications.

  2. Towards the development of flexible non-volatile memories.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Roy, V A L

    2013-10-11

    Flexible non-volatile memories have attracted tremendous attentions for data storage for future electronics application. From device perspective, the advantages of flexible memory devices include thin, lightweight, printable, foldable and stretchable. The flash memories, resistive random access memories (RRAM) and ferroelectric random access memory/ferroelectric field-effect transistor memories (FeRAM/FeFET) are considered as promising candidates for next generation non-volatile memory device. Here, we review the general background knowledge on device structure, working principle, materials, challenges and recent progress with the emphasis on the flexibility of above three categories of non-volatile memories. PMID:24038631

  3. Menopausal hot flashes: Randomness or rhythmicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Fredi

    1991-10-01

    Menopausal hot flashes are episodes of flushing, increased heart rate, skin blood flow and skin temperature, and a sensation of heat. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular concomitants of hot flashes are associated with peaks in the levels of various hormones and neurotransmitters in the peripheral circulation. Although hot flashes affect about 75% of women, and are the primary reason that women at menopause seek medical attention, the mechanism of hot flashes is still not understood. Hot flashes vary in frequency and intensity both within and between individuals, and have been thought of as occurring randomly. Yet, some women report that their hot flashes are worse at a particular time of day or year. Initial examination of subjects' recordings of their hot flashes showed diurnal patterns of hot flash occurrence. There also seems to be a diurnal rhythm of hot flash intensity. Continuous physiological monitoring of hot flashes is facilitating the analysis of these patterns, which is revealing circadian and ultradian periodicities. The occurrence of hot flashes can be modulated by external and internal factors, including ambient temperature and fever. Rhythms of thermoregulatory and endocrine functions also may influence hot flash patterns. Examination of the interrelationships between the various systems of the body involved in hot flashes, and a multidisciplinary approach to the analysis of hot flash patterns, will aid our understanding of this complex phenomenon.

  4. Electronic Flash In Data Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. E.

    1982-02-01

    Photographic acquisition of data often may be simplified, or the data quality improved upon by employing electronic flash sources with traditional equipment or techniques. The relatively short flash duration compared to movie camera shutters, or to the long integration time of video camera provides improved spatial resolution through blur reduction, particularly important as image movement becomes a significant fraction of film format dimension. Greater accuracy typically is achieved in velocity and acceleration determinations by using a stroboscopic light source rather than a movie camera frame-rate control as a time standard. Electrical efficiency often is an important advantage of electronic flash sources since almost any necessary light level for exposure may be produced, yet the source typically is "off" most of the time. Various synchronization techniques greatly expand the precise control of exposure. Biomechanical and sports equipment studies may involve velocities up to 200 feet-per-second, and often will have associated very rapid actions of interest. The need for brief exposures increases H.s one "ZOOMS in on the action." In golf, for example, the swing may be examined using 100 microsecond (Us) flashes at rates of 60 or 120 flashes-per-second (FPS). Accurate determination of linear and rotational velocity of the ball requires 10 Us flashes at 500-1,000 FPS, while sub-Us flashes at 20,000-50,000 FPS are required to resolve the interaction of the ball and the club, head. Some seldom. used techniques involving streak photography are described, with enhanced results obtained by combining strobe with the usual continuous light source. The combination of strobe and a fast electro-mechanical shutter is considered for Us photography under daylight conditions.

  5. Review of Emerging New Solid-State Non-Volatile Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Yoshihisa

    2013-04-01

    The integration limit of flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional flash memories have been proposed. Unlike flash memories, new nonvolatile memories do not require storage of electric charges. The possibility of phase-change random-access memories (PCRAMs) or resistive-change RAMs (ReRAMs) replacing ultrahigh-density NAND flash memories has been investigated; however, many issues remain to be overcome, making the replacement difficult. Nonetheless, ferroelectric RAMs (FeRAMs) and magnetoresistive RAMs (MRAMs) are gradually penetrating into fields where the shortcomings of flash memories, such as high operating voltage, slow rewriting speed, and limited number of rewrites, make their use inconvenient. For instance, FeRAMs are widely used in ICs that require low power consumption such as smart cards and wireless tags. MRAMs are used in many kinds of controllers in industrial equipment that require high speed and unlimited rewrite operations. For successful application of new non-volatile semiconductor memories, such memories must be practically utilized in new fields in which flash memories are not applicable, and their technologies must be further developed.

  6. Nonvolatile memory devices based on self-assembled nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang-Sik

    2013-06-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices are one of the most important components in modern electronic devices. Many efforts have been made to fabricate high-density, low-cost, nonvolatile solid-state memory devices for use in portable/mobile electronic devices such as laptop computers, tablet devices, smart phones, etc. Among the many available nonvolatile memory devices, flash memory devices are of great interest to the electronics industry owing to their simple device structure, enabling high-density memory applications. Flash memory devices in which nanoparticles or nanocrystals are used as the charge-trapping elements have advantages over conventional flash memory devices because the charge-trapping layer and memory performance of the former can be readily optimized. Active research has recently been conducted to fabricate and characterize self-assembled-nanocrystal-based nonvolatile memory devices. We reviewed various strategies for fabricating nanocrystal-based nonvolatile memory devices and discussed the programmable memory properties and the device reliability characteristics of nanocrystal-based memory devices to possibly apply nanocrystal-based memory devices to those used in portable/mobile electronic devices. Finally, novel device applications such as printed/flexible/transparent electronic devices were explored based on nanocrystal-based memory devices.

  7. Flashing light in microalgae biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghosh, Said; Fixler, Dror; Dubinsky, Zvy; Iluz, David

    2016-03-01

    Flashing light can enhance photosynthesis and improve the quality and quantity of microalgal biomass, as it can increase the products of interest by magnitudes. Therefore, the integration of flashing light effect into microalgal cultivation systems should be considered. However, microalgae require a balanced mix of the light/dark cycle for higher growth rates, and respond to light intensity differently according to the pigments acquired or lost during the growth. This review highlights recently published results on flashing light effect on microalgae and its applications in biotechnology, as well as the recently developed bioreactors designed to fulfill this effect. It also discusses how this knowledge can be applied in selecting the optimal light frequencies and intensities with specific technical properties for increasing biomass production and/or the yield of the chemicals of interest by microalgae belonging to different genera. PMID:26747205

  8. New developments in flash radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Arne

    2007-01-01

    The paper will review some of the latest developments in flash radiography. A series of multi anode tubes has been developed. These are tubes with several x-ray sources within the same vacuum enclosure. The x-ray sources are closely spaced, to come as close as possible to a single source. The x-ray sources are sequentially pulsed, at times that can be independently chosen. Tubes for voltages in the range 150 - 500 kV, with up to eight x-ray sources, will be described. Combining a multi anode tube with an intensified CCD camera, will make it possible to generate short "x-ray movies". A new flash x-ray control system has been developed. The system is operated from a PC or Laptop. All parameters of a multi channel flash x-ray system can be remotely set and monitored. The system will automatically store important operation parameters.

  9. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when your body suddenly feels ... In some cases, hot flashes can make you sweat. Night sweats are hot flashes with sweating at ...

  10. Radiation Issues and Applications of Floating Gate Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheick, L. Z.; Nguyen, D. N.

    2000-01-01

    The radiation effects that affect various systems that comprise floating gate memories are presented. The wear-out degradation results of unirradiated flash memories are compared to irradiated flash memories. The procedure analyzes the failure to write and erase caused by wear-out and degradation of internal charge pump circuits. A method is described for characterizing the radiation effects of the floating gate itself. The rate dependence, stopping power dependence, SEU susceptibility and applications of floating gate in radiation environment are presented. The ramifications for dosimetry and cell failure are discussed as well as for the long term use aspects of non-volatile memories.

  11. Visual light flash observations on Skylab 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Pinsky, L. S.; Osborne, W. Z.; Bailey, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of light flashes observed in earth orbit establishes: (1) a strong correlation of very high flash rates with passage through the South Atlantic anomaly; (2) evidence for a predicted latitude effect; and (3) an increased flash rate outside the anomaly during a second observation period. Event rates and flash descriptions during South Atlantic anomaly passes indicate that there may be particles heavier than protons in the inner belt of trapped radiation.

  12. From Secure Memories to Smart Card Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handschuh, Helena; Trichina, Elena

    Non-volatile memory is essential in most embedded security applications. It will store the key and other sensitive materials for cryptographic and security applications. In this chapter, first an overview is given of current flash memory architectures. Next the standard security features which form the basis of so-called secure memories are described in more detail. Smart cards are a typical embedded application that is very vulnerable to attacks and that at the same time has a high need for secure non-volatile memory. In the next part of this chapter, the secure memories of so-called flash-based high-density smart cards are described. It is followed by a detailed analysis of what the new security challenges for such objects are.

  13. Undergraduate Separations Utilizing Flash Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, G.

    2000-02-01

    This article describes the procedures used to carry out four flash chromatography experiments: the isolation of the carotenes, chlorophylls and xanthophylls from a spinach extract; the separation of ß-carotene from tetraphenyl cyclopentadienone; the isolation of (+) and (-) carvone from caraway and spearmint oil; and the purification of benzil from benzoin. Apparatus used is nonbreakable, easy to use, and inexpensive.

  14. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, P.M.

    1980-06-26

    A multi-stage flash degaser is incorporated in an energy conversion system having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger in order that the heat exchanger and a turbine and condenser of the system can operate at optimal efficiency.

  15. Portable flash lamp reflectance analyzer system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, James Edward (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The system and method allow spectroscopic analysis of vegetation or the like without effects from changing sun and cloud conditions, undesired portions of the area of interest or atmospheric disturbances. The system (1) includes a light source (5) such as a xenon flash lamp, a telescope (7), a spectrometer (9), an analog/digital converter (11), a memory (13), a display (15), and an on-board microprocessor (17) or a port (19) for attachment to a laptop computer. The system is taken to an area of interest in the woods (step 41), the vegetation is illuminated from below (step 43) and data are taken (step 45).

  16. [Fragment of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Improves Memory State in a Model of Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Volpina, O M; Koroev, D O; Volkova, T D; Kamynina, A V; Filatova, M P; Zaporozhskayva, Y V; Samokhin, A N; Aleksandrova, I J; Bobkova, N V

    2015-01-01

    A number of synthetic peptides corresponding to potentially important regions in the sequence of the four membrane proteins known as beta-amyloid cell receptors have been investigated on their ability to improve memory state in experimental model of Alzheimer's disease. Nine fragments repeating all the exposed nonstructural regions of the RAGE protein according to X-ray data, have been synthesized. The activity of these peptides and synthesized earlier immunoprotective fragments of other three proteins (acetylcholine receptor alpha7-type, prion protein and neurotrophin receptor p75) has been investigated under intranasal administration, without immune response to the peptide. Only one fragment RAGE (60-76) was shown to have a therapeutic activity improving the memory state of bulbectomized mice and leads to decreasing in the level of brain beta-amyloid. PMID:27125025

  17. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, Pascal M.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-stage flash degaser (18) is incorporated in an energy conversion system (10) having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger (22) in order that the heat exchanger (22) and a turbine (48) and condenser (32) of the system (10) can operate at optimal efficiency.

  18. Vertically Integrated Nanowire-Based Unified Memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Kang, Min-Ho; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-09-14

    A vertically integrated nanowire-based device for multifunctional unified memory that combine dynamic random access memory (DRAM) and flash memory in a single transistor is demonstrated for the first time. The device utilizes a gate-all-around (GAA) structure that completely surrounds the nanowire; the structure is built on a bulk silicon wafer. A vertically integrated unified memory (VIUM) device composed of five-story channels was fabricated via the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP) with reliable reproducibility, stiction-free stability, and high uniformity. In each DRAM and flash memory operation, the five-story VIUM showed a remarkably enhanced sensing current drivability compared with one-story unified memory (UM) characteristics. In addition to each independent memory mode, the switching endurance of the VIUM was evaluated in the unified mode, which alternatively activates two memory modes, resulting in an even higher sensing memory window than that of the UM. In addition to our previous work on a logic transistor joining high performance with good scalability, this work describes a novel memory hierarchy design with high functionality for system-on-chip (SoC) architectures, demonstrating the practicality and versatility of the vertically integrated nanowire configuration for use in various applications. PMID:27579769

  19. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy.

  20. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  1. SONOS Nonvolatile Memory Cell Programming Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Phillips, Thomas A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile memory is gaining favor over conventional EEPROM FLASH memory technology. This paper characterizes the SONOS write operation using a nonquasi-static MOSFET model. This includes floating gate charge and voltage characteristics as well as tunneling current, voltage threshold and drain current characterization. The characterization of the SONOS memory cell predicted by the model closely agrees with experimental data obtained from actual SONOS memory cells. The tunnel current, drain current, threshold voltage and read drain current all closely agreed with empirical data.

  2. The vertical lobe of cephalopods: an attractive brain structure for understanding the evolution of advanced learning and memory systems.

    PubMed

    Shomrat, T; Turchetti-Maia, A L; Stern-Mentch, N; Basil, J A; Hochner, B

    2015-09-01

    In this review we show that the cephalopod vertical lobe (VL) provides a good system for assessing the level of evolutionary convergence of the function and organization of neuronal circuitry for mediating learning and memory in animals with complex behavior. The pioneering work of JZ Young described the morphological convergence of the VL with the mammalian hippocampus, cerebellum and the insect mushroom body. Studies in octopus and cuttlefish VL networks suggest evolutionary convergence into a universal organization of connectivity as a divergence-convergence ('fan-out fan-in') network with activity-dependent long-term plasticity mechanisms. Yet, these studies also show that the properties of the neurons, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and mechanisms of long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and maintenance are highly variable among different species. This suggests that complex networks may have evolved independently multiple times and that even though memory and learning networks share similar organization and cellular processes, there are many molecular ways of constructing them. PMID:26113381

  3. Endurance-write-speed tradeoffs in nonvolatile memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strukov, Dmitri B.

    2016-04-01

    We derive phenomenological model for endurance-write time switching tradeoff for nonvolatile memories with thermally activated switching mechanisms. The model predicts linear to cubic dependence of endurance on write time for metal oxide memristors and flash memories, which is partially supported by experimental data for the breakdown of metal oxide thin films.

  4. FLASH fly-by-light flight control demonstration results overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halski, Don J.

    1996-10-01

    The Fly-By-Light Advanced Systems Hardware (FLASH) program developed Fly-By-Light (FBL) and Power-By-Wire (PBW) technologies for military and commercial aircraft. FLASH consists of three tasks. Task 1 developed the fiber optic cable, connectors, testers and installation and maintenance procedures. Task 3 developed advanced smart, rotary thin wing and electro-hydrostatic (EHA) actuators. Task 2, which is the subject of this paper,l focused on integration of fiber optic sensors and data buses with cable plant components from Task 1 and actuators from Task 3 into centralized and distributed flight control systems. Both open loop and piloted hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations were conducted with centralized and distributed flight control architectures incorporating the AS-1773A optical bus, active hand controllers, optical sensors, optimal flight control laws in high speed 32-bit processors, and neural networks for EHA monitoring and fault diagnosis. This paper overviews the systems level testing conducted under the FLASH Flight Control task. Preliminary results are summarized. Companion papers provide additional information.

  5. Flash Galaxy Cluster Merger, Simulated using the Flash Code, Mass Ratio 1:1

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Since structure in the universe forms in a bottom-up fashion, with smaller structures merging to form larger ones, modeling the merging process in detail is crucial to our understanding of cosmology. At the current epoch, we observe clusters of galaxies undergoing mergers. It is seen that the two major components of galaxy clusters, the hot intracluster gas and the dark matter, behave very differently during the course of a merger. Using the N-body and hydrodynamics capabilities in the FLASH code, we have simulated a suite of representative galaxy cluster mergers, including the dynamics of both the dark matter, which is collisionless, and the gas, which has the properties of a fluid. 3-D visualizations such as these demonstrate clearly the different behavior of these two components over time. Credits: Science: John Zuhone (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Visualization: Jonathan Gallagher (Flash Center, University of Chicago)

 This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Academic Strategic Alliance Program (ASAP).

  6. Flash Galaxy Cluster Merger, Simulated using the Flash Code, Mass Ratio 1:1

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    Since structure in the universe forms in a bottom-up fashion, with smaller structures merging to form larger ones, modeling the merging process in detail is crucial to our understanding of cosmology. At the current epoch, we observe clusters of galaxies undergoing mergers. It is seen that the two major components of galaxy clusters, the hot intracluster gas and the dark matter, behave very differently during the course of a merger. Using the N-body and hydrodynamics capabilities in the FLASH code, we have simulated a suite of representative galaxy cluster mergers, including the dynamics of both the dark matter, which is collisionless, and the gas, which has the properties of a fluid. 3-D visualizations such as these demonstrate clearly the different behavior of these two components over time. Credits: Science: John Zuhone (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Visualization: Jonathan Gallagher (Flash Center, University of Chicago)

 This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Academic Strategic Alliance Program (ASAP).

  7. Mitochondrial flashes: new insights into mitochondrial ROS signalling and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingting; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory mitochondria undergo stochastic, intermittent bursts of superoxide production accompanied by transient depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential and reversible opening of the membrane permeability transition pore. These discrete events were named 'superoxide flashes' for the reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal involved, and 'mitochondrial flashes' (mitoflashes) for the entirety of the multifaceted and intertwined mitochondrial processes. In contrast to the flashless basal ROS production of 'homeostatic ROS' for redox regulation, bursting ROS production during mitoflashes may provide 'signalling ROS' at the organelle level, fulfilling distinctly different cell functions. Mounting evidence indicates that mitoflash frequency is richly regulated over a broad range, and represents a novel, universal, and 'digital' readout of mitochondrial functional status and of the mitochondrial stress response. An emerging view is that mitoflashes participate in vital processes including metabolism, cell differentiation, the stress response and ageing. These recent advances shed new light on the role of mitochondrial functional dynamics in health and disease. PMID:25038239

  8. Visual light flash phenomenon. [Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, L. S.; Osborne, W. Z.; Bailey, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    Light flash phenomenon observed by crewmen on Apollo 14, 15, 16, and 17 are analyzed. The passage of cosmic rays through the crewman's head and eyes was recorded by the Apollo light flash moving emulsion detector. Events of all the light flash observations are tabulated. It is suggested that the most probable explanation of the phenomenon is that it is caused by cosmic rays penetrating the eyes and retinas of the observers.

  9. Selection of a fiber optic data bus for the FLASH program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Samuel I.

    1995-05-01

    The Fly-by-Light Advanced Systems Hardware (FLASH) program is developing Fly-by-Light technologies for flight control and vehicle management of military and commercial aircraft. Fiber optics offers greatly improved data transfer rate, very low susceptibility to electromagnetic interference (EMI), lower on-board weight, and lower operating and maintenance costs. FLASH will result in demonstrations needed to gain confidence in using Fly-by-Light for flight control and vehicle management. This paper reviews the requirements and the trade study leading to selection of the dual-rate 1773A fiber optic data bus to interconnect fly-by-light advanced system hardware.

  10. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-08-15

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  11. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-05-16

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  12. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000826.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats To use the sharing ... JavaScript. Certain types of cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when ...

  13. Nanographene charge trapping memory with a large memory window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jianling; Yang, Rong; Zhao, Jing; He, Congli; Wang, Guole; Shi, Dongxia; Zhang, Guangyu

    2015-11-01

    Nanographene is a promising alternative to metal nanoparticles or semiconductor nanocrystals for charge trapping memory. In general, a high density of nanographene is required in order to achieve high charge trapping capacity. Here, we demonstrate a strategy of fabrication for a high density of nanographene for charge trapping memory with a large memory window. The fabrication includes two steps: (1) direct growth of continuous nanographene film; and (2) isolation of the as-grown film into high-density nanographene by plasma etching. Compared with directly grown isolated nanographene islands, abundant defects and edges are formed in nanographene under argon or oxygen plasma etching, i.e. more isolated nanographene islands are obtained, which provides more charge trapping sites. As-fabricated nanographene charge trapping memory shows outstanding memory properties with a memory window as wide as ∼9 V at a relative low sweep voltage of ±8 V, program/erase speed of ∼1 ms and robust endurance of >1000 cycles. The high-density nanographene charge trapping memory provides an outstanding alternative for downscaling technology beyond the current flash memory.

  14. Nanographene charge trapping memory with a large memory window.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianling; Yang, Rong; Zhao, Jing; He, Congli; Wang, Guole; Shi, Dongxia; Zhang, Guangyu

    2015-11-13

    Nanographene is a promising alternative to metal nanoparticles or semiconductor nanocrystals for charge trapping memory. In general, a high density of nanographene is required in order to achieve high charge trapping capacity. Here, we demonstrate a strategy of fabrication for a high density of nanographene for charge trapping memory with a large memory window. The fabrication includes two steps: (1) direct growth of continuous nanographene film; and (2) isolation of the as-grown film into high-density nanographene by plasma etching. Compared with directly grown isolated nanographene islands, abundant defects and edges are formed in nanographene under argon or oxygen plasma etching, i.e. more isolated nanographene islands are obtained, which provides more charge trapping sites. As-fabricated nanographene charge trapping memory shows outstanding memory properties with a memory window as wide as ∼9 V at a relative low sweep voltage of ±8 V, program/erase speed of ∼1 ms and robust endurance of >1000 cycles. The high-density nanographene charge trapping memory provides an outstanding alternative for downscaling technology beyond the current flash memory. PMID:26489448

  15. Flash Expansion Threshold in Whirligig Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Romey, William L.; Lamb, Alicia R.

    2015-01-01

    In the selfish herd hypothesis, prey animals move toward each other to avoid the likelihood of being selected by a predator. However, many grouped animals move away from each other the moment before a predator attacks. Very little is known about this phenomenon, called flash expansion, such as whether it is triggered by one individual or a threshold and how information is transferred between group members. We performed a controlled experiment with whirligig beetles in which the ratio of sighted to unsighted individuals was systematically varied and emergent flash expansion was measured. Specifically, we examined: the percentage of individuals in a group that startled, the resulting group area, and the longevity of the flash expansion. We found that one or two sighted beetles in a group of 24 was not enough to cause a flash expansion after a predator stimulus, but four sighted beetles usually initiated a flash expansion. Also, the more beetles that were sighted the larger the resulting group area and the longer duration of the flash expansion. We conclude that flash expansion is best described as a threshold event whose adaptive value is to prevent energetically costly false alarms while quickly mobilizing an emergent predator avoidance response. This is one of the first controlled experiments of flash expansion, an important emergent property that has applications to understanding collective motion in swarms, schools, flocks, and human crowds. Also, our study is a convincing demonstration of social contagion, how the actions of one individual can pass through a group. PMID:26301958

  16. Sun characteristics of flashed photochromic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zyabnev, A.M.; Mashir, Yu.I.; Kraevskii, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    The energy coefficients of attenuation of solar radiation were calculated for several types of windows, including for flashed photochromic heat-absorbing glass, which has the highest efficiency of protection from intense solar radiation. The dynamics of the change in the characteristics of flashed photochromic glass in different conditions of use were calculated with specially developed programs.

  17. Au Contraire: Gifted in a Flash (Mob)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A "flash mob" is defined by Wikipedia as "a large group of people who assemble suddenly in a public place, perform an unusual and pointless act for a brief time, then disperse." Fueled by social media and Smartphones, flash mobs have been used, primarily, as entertaining diversions by addicted techies with (apparently) tons of time on their hands.…

  18. MemFlash device: floating gate transistors as memristive devices for neuromorphic computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggert, C.; Ziegler, M.; Schroeder, D.; Krautschneider, W. H.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2014-10-01

    Memristive devices are promising candidates for future non-volatile memory applications and mixed-signal circuits. In the field of neuromorphic engineering these devices are especially interesting to emulate neuronal functionality. Therefore, new materials and material combinations are currently investigated, which are often not compatible with Si-technology processes. The underlying mechanisms of the device often remain unclear and are paired with low device endurance and yield. These facts define the current most challenging development tasks towards a reliable memristive device technology. In this respect, the MemFlash concept is of particular interest. A MemFlash device results from a diode configuration wiring scheme of a floating gate transistor, which enables the persistent device resistance to be varied according to the history of the charge flow through the device. In this study, we investigate the scaling conditions of the floating gate oxide thickness with respect to possible applications in the field of neuromorphic engineering. We show that MemFlash cells exhibit essential features with respect to neuromorphic applications. In particular, cells with thin floating gate oxides show a limited synaptic weight growth together with low energy dissipation. MemFlash cells present an attractive alternative for state-of-art memresitive devices. The emulation of associative learning is discussed by implementing a single MemFlash cell in an analogue circuit.

  19. Organic flash cycles for efficient power production

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Tony; Mao, Samuel S.; Greif, Ralph

    2016-03-15

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to an Organic Flash Cycle (OFC). In one aspect, a modified OFC system includes a pump, a heat exchanger, a flash evaporator, a high pressure turbine, a throttling valve, a mixer, a low pressure turbine, and a condenser. The heat exchanger is coupled to an outlet of the pump. The flash evaporator is coupled to an outlet of the heat exchanger. The high pressure turbine is coupled to a vapor outlet of the flash evaporator. The throttling valve is coupled to a liquid outlet of the flash evaporator. The mixer is coupled to an outlet of the throttling valve and to an outlet of the high pressure turbine. The low pressure turbine is coupled to an outlet of the mixer. The condenser is coupled to an outlet of the low pressure turbine and to an inlet of the pump.

  20. Necessary Clearance to Prevent Side Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Takatoshi; Asakawa, Akira; Honda, Hideki; Sakae, Maki; Tanaka, Shuusaku

    Side flashes often occur when lightning strikes a tree and cause injury or death of human beings staying nearby the tree. Necessary clearance to prevent the side flash has been said to be 2 m, but the physical meaning of the value is unclear. In this paper, we have proposed a model of side flashes based on the physics of discharges and necessary clearance has been calculated. Furthermore, we have carried out model experiments of the side flash using real trees of a heights of 3.5 m and a naturally growing tree of a height of more than 10 m. The results of the model experiments have verified the proposed theory and it is concluded that clearance of more than 3 m from a tree is necessary to prevent side flashes from the tree.

  1. Real-time flash flood prediction system in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Jonathan; Flamig, Zachary; Vergara, Humberto; Clark, Robert; Kirstetter, Pierre; Terti, Galatia; Hong, Yang; Howard, Kenneth

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the Flooded Locations and Simulated Hydrographs (FLASH) project in the U.S. that has been designed to develop, evaluate, and transition the latest rainfall-driven flash flood prediction tools to the National Weather Service (NWS). The FLASH system is based on radar-based rainfall estimates from the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) system, providing mosaicked rainfall rates at 1-km/2-min resolution across the conterminous U.S. Products include rainfall average recurrence intervals (ARIs), ratios of rainfall to flash flood guidance (FFG) values, and simulated streamflow ARIs from a distributed hydrologic modeling framework. NWS forecasters evaluated each of these experimental tools during the inaugural Hazardous Weather Testbed Hydrology experiment (HWT-Hydro) in the summer of 2014. In additional to a subjective evaluation from HWT-Hydro, we present findings from an objective evaluation of the distributed hydrologic modeling approaches that incorporate recent developments in a-priori parameter estimation, improvements in channel routing and model physics, model reanalysis leveraging datasets from the Multi-Year Reanalysis Of Remotely-Sensed Storms (MYRORSS) project, and error models developed for output products. FLASH skill is assessed using a very large dataset of observed flooding as measured by US Geologic Survey (USGS) stream gauges. In addition to the evaluation, this presentation will provide an overview of the latest advances in the FLASH project including forthcoming impact-specific products, probabilistic forecasts, and forcing from short-term precipitation forecasts.

  2. Computational Models of Human Performance: Validation of Memory and Procedural Representation in Advanced Air/Ground Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Labacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Man-Machine Interaction Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) under joint U.S. Army and NASA cooperative is intended to assist designers of complex human/automation systems in successfully incorporating human performance capabilities and limitations into decision and action support systems. MIDAS is a computational representation of multiple human operators, selected perceptual, cognitive, and physical functions of those operators, and the physical/functional representation of the equipment with which they operate. MIDAS has been used as an integrated predictive framework for the investigation of human/machine systems, particularly in situations with high demands on the operators. We have extended the human performance models to include representation of both human operators and intelligent aiding systems in flight management, and air traffic service. The focus of this development is to predict human performance in response to aiding system developed to identify aircraft conflict and to assist in the shared authority for resolution. The demands of this application requires representation of many intelligent agents sharing world-models, coordinating action/intention, and cooperative scheduling of goals and action in an somewhat unpredictable world of operations. In recent applications to airborne systems development, MIDAS has demonstrated an ability to predict flight crew decision-making and procedural behavior when interacting with automated flight management systems and Air Traffic Control. In this paper, we describe two enhancements to MIDAS. The first involves the addition of working memory in the form of an articulatory buffer for verbal communication protocols and a visuo-spatial buffer for communications via digital datalink. The second enhancement is a representation of multiple operators working as a team. This enhanced model was used to predict the performance of human flight crews and their level of compliance with commercial aviation communication

  3. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures (Muzzle Flash)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2014-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet and infrared spectra of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. We are currently employing quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication to optimize molecular geometries, compute vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase molecules and radicals of interest. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A comparison of computational results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess the affect of basis set and functional choice on calculation accuracy. The current status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, and USMA.

  4. Statistical Evolution of the Lightning Flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Cohen, M.; Said, R.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Natural lightning is one of the most fascinating and powerful electrical processes on Earth. To date, the physics behind this natural phenomenon are not fully understood, due primarily to the difficulty of obtaining measurements inside thunderstorms and to the wide range of timescales involved (from nanoseconds to seconds). Our aim is to use accurate lightning geo-location data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) to study statistical patterns in lightning, taking advantage of the fact that millions of lightning flashes occur around the globe every day. We present two sets of results, one involving the patterns of flashes in a storm, and a second involving the patterns of strokes in a flash. These patterns can provide a surrogate measure of the timescales and the spatial extents of the underlying physical processes. First, we study the timescales of charge buildup inside thunderstorms. We find that, following a lightning flash, the probability of another neighboring flash decreases and takes tens of seconds to recover. We find that this suppression effect is a function of flash type, stroke peak current, cloud-to-ground (CG) stroke multiplicity, and other lightning and geographical parameters. We find that the probabilities of subsequent flashes are more suppressed following oceanic lightning, or following flashes with higher peak currents and/or higher multiplicities (for CG flashes). Second, we use NLDN data to study the evolution of the strokes within a CG flash. A CG flash typically includes multiple return strokes, which can occur in the same channel or in multiple channels within a few kilometers. We cluster NLDN stroke data into flashes and produce the probability density function of subsequent strokes as a function of distance and time-delays relative to the previous stroke. Using this technique, we investigate processes which occur during the CG lightning flash with nanosecond to millisecond timescales. For instance, our results suggest

  5. Guidelines for the treatment of adults abused or possibly abused as children (with attention to issues of delayed/recovered memory). NATO Advanced Study Institute.

    PubMed

    Courtois, C A

    1997-01-01

    These guidelines provide practicing clinicians with information regarding psychotherapy with adults who (1) disclose an abuse history (physical, sexual, emotional) at the beginning of therapy; (2) do not disclose abuse despite having knowledge and memory about such events in their past; (3) report new (delayed or recovered) memories of abuse during the course of therapy; and/or (4) suspect past abuse but have no clear memories of having been abused. The more common clinical scenario involves an individual who has retained memory for past abuse but recalls additional events or details during therapy. The less common scenario is for an individual to have totally absent memory of abuse and to later develop highly detailed memory. Practitioners should expect a range of memory presentations and must work to neither suggest nor suppress abuse-related issues that arise in the course of therapy. PMID:9470957

  6. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions. PMID:23307357

  7. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  8. Non-volatile memory for checkpoint storage

    SciTech Connect

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Cipolla, Thomas M.; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Ohmacht, Martin; Takken, Todd E.

    2014-07-22

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in high performance parallel computing systems and storing of checkpoint data to a non-volatile memory storage device. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity. In one embodiment, the non-volatile memory is a pluggable flash memory card.

  9. Radiation Test Challenges for Scaled Commerical Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Ray L.; Cohn, Lewis M.; Oldham, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    As sub-100nm CMOS technologies gather interest, the radiation effects performance of these technologies provide a significant challenge. In this talk, we shall discuss the radiation testing challenges as related to commercial memory devices. The focus will be on complex test and failure modes emerging in state-of-the-art Flash non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs), which are volatile. Due to their very high bit density, these device types are highly desirable for use in the natural space environment. In this presentation, we shall discuss these devices with emphasis on considerations for test and qualification methods required.

  10. Small SWAP 3D imaging flash ladar for small tactical unmanned air systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Alan; Anderson, Scott A.; Wojcik, Michael; Budge, Scott E.

    2015-05-01

    The Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL), working with Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and industry leaders Advanced Scientific Concepts (ASC) and Hood Technology Corporation, has developed a small SWAP (size, weight, and power) 3D imaging flash ladar (LAser Detection And Ranging) sensor system concept design for small tactical unmanned air systems (STUAS). The design utilizes an ASC 3D flash ladar camera and laser in a Hood Technology gyro-stabilized gimbal system. The design is an autonomous, intelligent, geo-aware sensor system that supplies real-time 3D terrain and target images. Flash ladar and visible camera data are processed at the sensor using a custom digitizer/frame grabber with compression. Mounted in the aft housing are power, controls, processing computers, and GPS/INS. The onboard processor controls pointing and handles image data, detection algorithms and queuing. The small SWAP 3D imaging flash ladar sensor system generates georeferenced terrain and target images with a low probability of false return and <10 cm range accuracy through foliage in real-time. The 3D imaging flash ladar is designed for a STUAS with a complete system SWAP estimate of <9 kg, <0.2 m3 and <350 W power. The system is modeled using LadarSIM, a MATLAB® and Simulink®- based ladar system simulator designed and developed by the Center for Advanced Imaging Ladar (CAIL) at Utah State University. We will present the concept design and modeled performance predictions.

  11. Inadvertently programmed bits in Samsung 128 Mbit flash devices: a flaky investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, G.

    2002-01-01

    JPL's X2000 avionics design pioneers new territory by specifying a non-volatile memory (NVM) board based on flash memories. The Samsung 128Mb device chosen was found to demonstrate bit errors (mostly program disturbs) and block-erase failures that increase with cycling. Low temperature, certain pseudo- random patterns, and, probably, higher bias increase the observable bit errors. An experiment was conducted to determine the wearout dependence of the bit errors to 100k cycles at cold temperature using flight-lot devices (some pre-irradiated). The results show an exponential growth rate, a wide part-to-part variation, and some annealing behavior.

  12. Flash Droughts over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmaier, D. P.; Mo, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    Flash drought refers to relatively short periods of warm surface temperature and anomalously low and rapid decreasing soil moisture (SM). Based on the physical mechanisms associated with flash droughts, we classify them into two categories: heat wave and precipitation (P) deficit flash droughts. We analyze the flash droughts based on the observations and the land surface model reconstructed soil moisture (SM) and evaporation (ET) from 1916 to 2013. Heat wave flash droughts are most likely to occur over the Midwest and the Pacific Northwest during the growing season. They do not occur often. The maximum frequency of occurrence is only 4%. Heat wave flash drought is temperature driven. High temperatures increase the transpiration and drive down soil moisture and cause drought to occur. The P deficit flash droughts are more common than the heat wave droughts and the maximum frequency of occurrence is about 8- 10 %. They are most likely to occur over the southern United States with a maximum over the Southern Plains. They are P driven. Heat waves are caused by P deficits. P deficits drive down SM and cause ET to decreases and temperature to increase.

  13. Further consideration of Advanced Clinical Solutions Word Choice: comparison to the Recognition Memory Test-words and classification accuracy in a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeremy J

    2014-01-01

    Word Choice (WC), a test in the Advanced Clinical Solutions package for Wechsler measures, was examined in two studies. The first study compared WC to the Recognition Memory Test-Words (RMT-W) in a clinical sample (N = 46). WC scores were significantly higher than RMT-W scores overall and in sample subsets grouped by separate validity indicators. In item-level analyses, WC items demonstrated lower frequency, greater imageability, and higher concreteness than RMT-W items. The second study explored WC classification accuracy in a different clinical sample grouped by separate validity indicators into Pass (n = 54), Fail-1 (n = 17), and Fail-2 (n = 8) groups. WC scores were significantly higher in the Pass group (M = 49.1, SD = 1.9) than in the Fail-1 (M = 46.0, SD = 5.3) and Fail-2 (M = 44.1, SD = 4.8) groups. WC demonstrated area under the curve of .81 in classifying Pass and Fail-2 participants. Using the test manual cutoff associated with a 10% false positive rate, sensitivity was 38% and specificity was 96% in Pass and Fail-2 groups with 24% of Fail-1 participants scoring below cutoff. WC may be optimally used in combination with other measures given observed sensitivity. PMID:25372961

  14. Light flash phenomena induced by HzE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Pease, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Astronauts and Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes are closed and adapted to darkness. These phenomena have been collectively labelled as light flashes. Visual phenomena which are similar in appearance to those observed in space have been demonstrated at the number of accelerator facilities by expressing the eyes of human subjects to beams of various types of radiation. In some laboratory experiments Cerenkov radiation was found to be the basis for the flashes observed while in other experiments Cerenkov radiation could apparently be ruled out. Experiments that differentiate between Cerenkov radiation and other possible mechanisms for inducing visual phenomena was then compared. The phenomena obtained in the presence and absence of Cerenkov radiation were designed and conducted. A new mechanism proposed to explain the visual phenomena observed by Skylab astronauts as they passed through the South Atlantic Anomaly, namely nuclear interactions in and near the sensitive layer of the retina, is covered. Also some studies to search for similar transient effects of space radiation on sensors and microcomputer memories are described.

  15. 49 CFR 234.217 - Flashing light units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flashing light units. 234.217 Section 234.217..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.217 Flashing light units. (a) Each flashing light unit.... (b) Each flashing light unit shall be maintained to prevent dust and moisture from entering...

  16. 49 CFR 234.217 - Flashing light units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flashing light units. 234.217 Section 234.217..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.217 Flashing light units. (a) Each flashing light unit.... (b) Each flashing light unit shall be maintained to prevent dust and moisture from entering...

  17. Memory Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... different parts. Some of them are important for memory. The hippocampus (say: hih-puh-KAM-pus) is one of the more important parts of the brain that processes memories. Old information and new information, or memories, are ...

  18. Determining the state of non-volatile memory cells with floating gate using scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzii, D.; Kelm, E.; Luapunov, N.; Milovanov, R.; Molodcova, G.; Yanul, M.; Zubov, D.

    2013-01-01

    During a failure analysis of integrated circuits, containing non-volatile memory, it is often necessary to determine its contents while Standard memory reading procedures are not applicable. This article considers how the state of NVM cells with floating gate can be determined using scanning probe microscopy. Samples preparation and measuring procedure are described with the example of Microchip microcontrollers with the EPROM memory (PIC12C508) and flash-EEPROM memory (PIC16F876A).

  19. Physical principles and current status of emerging non-volatile solid state memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Yang, C.-H.; Wen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Today the influence of non-volatile solid-state memories on persons' lives has become more prominent because of their non-volatility, low data latency, and high robustness. As a pioneering technology that is representative of non-volatile solidstate memories, flash memory has recently seen widespread application in many areas ranging from electronic appliances, such as cell phones and digital cameras, to external storage devices such as universal serial bus (USB) memory. Moreover, owing to its large storage capacity, it is expected that in the near future, flash memory will replace hard-disk drives as a dominant technology in the mass storage market, especially because of recently emerging solid-state drives. However, the rapid growth of the global digital data has led to the need for flash memories to have larger storage capacity, thus requiring a further downscaling of the cell size. Such a miniaturization is expected to be extremely difficult because of the well-known scaling limit of flash memories. It is therefore necessary to either explore innovative technologies that can extend the areal density of flash memories beyond the scaling limits, or to vigorously develop alternative non-volatile solid-state memories including ferroelectric random-access memory, magnetoresistive random-access memory, phase-change random-access memory, and resistive random-access memory. In this paper, we review the physical principles of flash memories and their technical challenges that affect our ability to enhance the storage capacity. We then present a detailed discussion of novel technologies that can extend the storage density of flash memories beyond the commonly accepted limits. In each case, we subsequently discuss the physical principles of these new types of non-volatile solid-state memories as well as their respective merits and weakness when utilized for data storage applications. Finally, we predict the future prospects for the aforementioned solid-state memories for

  20. An Inexpensive, Foolproof Apparatus for Flash Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Wayne J.; Hanson, Bryan A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a new, modified "flash chromatography" apparatus which overcomes difficulties found in conventional apparatus. For example, an expensive teflon pressure valve is not necessary in the modified version. The apparatus is suitable as an instructional tool in undergraduate courses. (JN)

  1. Quality control in the "flash" process.

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    This article has briefly discussed the three basic types of sterilization monitoring systems--mechanical, chemical, and biological. Mechanical indicators help tell you that the sterilizer is working. Chemical indicators provide you with immediate information in each "flash" load that the conditions necessary for steam sterilization were present. Biological indicators tell you that microorganisms were killed. For maximum assurance that the conditions necessary for steam sterilization are present and that non-sterile instruments are not inadvertently used, each "flash" sterilizer should be monitored daily with biological indicators and each "flash" load with chemical indicators. This quality control monitoring program should give the O.R. staff confidence that their "flash" sterilization process is working. PMID:10271096

  2. A Simple Lightning Flash Polarity Discriminating Counter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devan, K. R. S.; Jayaratne, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    Described are the apparatus and procedures needed for a demonstration of a determination of the polarity of charges carried by individual ground flashes of lightning. Discussed are materials, apparatus construction, and experimental results. (CW)

  3. A global flash flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugh, Calum; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Hewson, Tim; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-04-01

    The sudden and devastating nature of flash flood events means it is imperative to provide early warnings such as those derived from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) forecasts. Currently such systems exist on basin, national and continental scales in Europe, North America and Australia but rely on high resolution NWP forecasts or rainfall-radar nowcasting, neither of which have global coverage. To produce global flash flood forecasts this work investigates the possibility of using forecasts from a global NWP system. In particular we: (i) discuss how global NWP can be used for flash flood forecasting and discuss strengths and weaknesses; (ii) demonstrate how a robust evaluation can be performed given the rarity of the event; (iii) highlight the challenges and opportunities in communicating flash flood uncertainty to decision makers; and (iv) explore future developments which would significantly improve global flash flood forecasting. The proposed forecast system uses ensemble surface runoff forecasts from the ECMWF H-TESSEL land surface scheme. A flash flood index is generated using the ERIC (Enhanced Runoff Index based on Climatology) methodology [Raynaud et al., 2014]. This global methodology is applied to a series of flash floods across southern Europe. Results from the system are compared against warnings produced using the higher resolution COSMO-LEPS limited area model. The global system is evaluated by comparing forecasted warning locations against a flash flood database of media reports created in partnership with floodlist.com. To deal with the lack of objectivity in media reports we carefully assess the suitability of different skill scores and apply spatial uncertainty thresholds to the observations. To communicate the uncertainties of the flash flood system output we experiment with a dynamic region-growing algorithm. This automatically clusters regions of similar return period exceedence probabilities, thus presenting the at-risk areas at a spatial

  4. Super-resolution for flash LADAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuowen; Young, S. Susan; Hong, Tsai; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Krapels, Keith; Miller, Brian; Thomas, Jim; Nguyen, Oanh

    2009-05-01

    Flash laser detection and ranging (LADAR) systems are increasingly used in robotics applications for autonomous navigation and obstacle avoidance. Their compact size, high frame rate, wide field of view, and low cost are key advantages over traditional scanning LADAR devices. However, these benefits are achieved at the cost of spatial resolution. Super-resolution enhancement can be applied to improve the resolution of flash LADAR devices, making them ideal for small robotics applications. Previous work by Rosenbush et al. applied the super-resolution algorithm of Vandewalle et al. to flash LADAR data, and observed quantitative improvement in image quality in terms of number of edges detected. This study uses the super-resolution algorithm of Young et al. to enhance the resolution of range data acquired with a SwissRanger SR-3000 flash LADAR camera. To improve the accuracy of sub-pixel shift estimation, a wavelet preprocessing stage was developed and applied to flash LADAR imagery. The authors used the triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) methodology for a subjective evaluation of the performance improvement (measured in terms of probability of target discrimination and subject response times) achieved with super-resolution. Super-resolution of flash LADAR imagery resulted in superior probabilities of target discrimination at the all investigated ranges while reducing subject response times.

  5. [Memory systems and memory disorders].

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, Martial; Juillerat, Anne-Claude

    2003-02-15

    Recent cognitive models suggest that memory has a complex structure, composed of several independent systems (working memory, and four long-term memory systems: episodic memory, semantic memory, perceptual representation system, and procedural memory). Furthermore, neuropsychological studies show that a brain lesion can selectively impair some systems or some particular process in a system, while others are spared. In this theoretical context, the objective of assessment is to detect the impaired memory systems and processes as well as those, which remain intact. To do this, the clinician has to use various-tests specifically designed to assess the integrity of each memory system and process. PMID:12708274

  6. Analysis of Flash Lidar Field Test Data for Safe Lunar Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew E.; Keim, Jason A.; Ivanov, Tonislav

    2010-01-01

    In May 2008, the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) Project conducted a helicopter field test of a commercial flash lidar to assess its applicability to safe lunar landing. The helicopter flew several flights, which covered a variety of slant ranges and viewing angles, over man-made and natural lunar-like terrains. The collected data were analyzed to assess the performance of the sensor and the performance of two algorithms: Hazard Detection (HD) and Hazard Relative Navigation (HRN). The collected flash lidar data were also used to validate a high fidelity flash lidar software model used in ALHAT Monte Carlo simulations. The field test results, combined with prior simulation results, advanced the technology readiness level of the HD algorithm to TRL 5 and the HRN algorithm to TRL 4.

  7. Use of Linear Induction Accelerators for Flash Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporaso, George

    1998-04-01

    Induction accelerators have been used for over a decade as flash x-ray sources for radiography. A new machine is presently under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a second machine is under design for installation adjacent to the first one to form the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility. This second accelerator will provide a 2 microsecond pulse which will be subdivided by a fast kicker system to provide a sequence of four or more 70 ns pulses along a single line of sight. An advanced system to provide multiple pulses over a longer time interval and over many lines of sight will be discussed along with the technological advances in solid-state pulsed power, fast kickers and target systems necessary to make the concept a reality. *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No.W-7405-Eng-48.

  8. Memory Palaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a lesson called Memory Palaces. A memory palace is a memory tool used to remember information, usually as visual images, in a sequence that is logical to the person remembering it. In his book, "In the Palaces of Memory", George Johnson calls them "...structure(s) for arranging knowledge. Lots of connections to language arts,…

  9. Imaging Flash Lidar for Safe Landing on Solar System Bodies and Spacecraft Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Roback, Vincent E.; Bulyshev, Alexander E.; Brewster, Paul F.; Carrion, William A; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Noe, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been pursuing flash lidar technology for autonomous, safe landing on solar system bodies and for automated rendezvous and docking. During the final stages of the landing from about 1 kilometer to 500 meters above the ground, the flash lidar can generate 3-Dimensional images of the terrain to identify hazardous features such as craters, rocks, and steep slopes. The onboard flight computer can then use the 3-D map of terrain to guide the vehicle to a safe location. As an automated rendezvous and docking sensor, the flash lidar can provide relative range, velocity, and bearing from an approaching spacecraft to another spacecraft or a space station. NASA Langley Research Center has developed and demonstrated a flash lidar sensor system capable of generating 16,000 pixels range images with 7 centimeters precision, at 20 Hertz frame rate, from a maximum slant range of 1800 m from the target area. This paper describes the lidar instrument and presents the results of recent flight tests onboard a rocket-propelled free-flyer vehicle (Morpheus) built by NASA Johnson Space Center. The flights were conducted at a simulated lunar terrain site, consisting of realistic hazard features and designated landing areas, built at NASA Kennedy Space Center specifically for this demonstration test. This paper also provides an overview of the plan for continued advancement of the flash lidar technology aimed at enhancing its performance to meet both landing and automated rendezvous and docking applications.

  10. Word line program disturbance based data retention error recovery strategy for MLC NAND Flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haozhi; Pan, Liyang; Song, Changlai; Gao, Zhongyi; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jun

    2015-07-01

    NAND Flash has been widely used as storage solutions for portable system due to improvement on data throughput, power consumption and mechanical reliability. However, NAND Flash presents inevitable decline in reliability due to scaling down and multi-level cell (MLC) technology. High data retention error rate in highly stressed blocks causes a trend of stronger ECC deployed in system, with higher hardware overhead and spare bits cost. In this paper, a word line program disturbance (WPD) based data retention error recovery strategy, which induces extra electron injection to compensate floating gate electron leakage during long retention time, is proposed to reduce the data retention error rate and improve the retention reliability of highly scaled MLC NAND Flash memories. The proposed strategy is applied on 2×-nm MLC NAND Flash and the device one-year retention error rate after 3 K, 4 K, 5 K and 6 K P/E cycled decreases by 75.7%, 79.3%, 82.3% and 83.3%, respectively.

  11. Lightning channel length and flash energy determined from moments of the flash area distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, Eric C.; Thomas, Ronald J.

    2015-09-01

    A widely used approach in observational and modeling studies of NOx produced by lightning is to relate NOx production to the number of flashes, without regard for the distribution of lightning flash sizes. Recent studies have begun to consider channel length and flash size, which is now observable with VHF Lightning Mapping Array data. This study uses a capacitor model for flash energy based on the flash coverage area, which defines a size scale. This flash area is then filled with channel using a fractal method and compared to other methods that estimate length directly from the VHF source locations. In the presence of instrument measurement errors, area- and fractal-based estimates are shown to be more stable estimators of flash length than connect-the-dots approaches and therefore are better suited for comparison to NOx production. A geometric interpretation of using vertical profiles of VHF source density to weight the altitude distribution of total channel length is developed. An example of the time series of moments of the lightning flash size distribution is shown for an example case, and some meteorological interpretation is given.

  12. Single Particle Difraction at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M.; Boutet, S.; Starodub, Dmitri; Decorwin-Martin, Philippe; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Schulz, J.; Hajdu, Janos; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Marchesini, Stefano; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Woods, Bruce; Rohner, Urs; /Tofwerk AG, Thun

    2010-06-11

    Single-pulse coherent diffraction patterns have been collected from randomly injected single particles with a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL). The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of the object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. A diffraction pattern of a single particle will only be recorded when the particle arrival into the FEL interaction region coincides with FEL pulse arrival and detector integration. The properties of the experimental apparatus coinciding with these three events set the data acquisition rate. For our single particle FLASH diffraction imaging experiments: (1) an aerodynamic lens stack prepared a particle beam that consisted of particles moving at 150-200 m/s positioned randomly in space and time, (2) the 10 fs long FEL pulses were delivered at a fixed rate, and (3) the detector was set to integrate and readout once every two seconds. The effect of these experimental parameters on the rate of data acquisition using randomly injected particles will be discussed. Overall, the ultrashort FEL pulses do not set the limit of the data acquisition, more important is the effective interaction time of the particle crossing the FEL focus, the pulse sequence structure and the detector readout rate. Example diffraction patterns of randomly injected ellipsoidal iron oxide nanoparticles in different orientations are presented. This is the first single particle diffraction data set of identical particles in different orientations collected on a shot-to-shot basis. This data set will be used to test algorithms for recovering 3D structure from single particle diffraction.

  13. Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2001: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh; Daud, Taher; Strauss, Karl

    2001-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings for the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2001 that was held on November 7-8, 2001 in San Diego, CA. The proceedings contains a a wide range of papers that cover current and new memory technologies including Flash memories, Magnetic Random Access Memories (MRAM and GMRAM), Ferro-electric RAM (FeRAM), and Chalcogenide RAM (CRAM). The papers presented in the proceedings address the use of these technologies for space applications as well as radiation effects and packaging issues.

  14. What quenches the helium shell flashes. [thermonuclear reactions in stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackmann, I.-J.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of a typical stellar helium shell flash cycle. A sequence of 12 flashes for a population I star is considered. The changes taking place at a constant mass layer in the helium-burning shell are studied as the flash develops. A highly simplified mathematical description is presented, taking into account the three necessary conditions for the occurrence of the flash and the pressure-density and temperature-density relationships. Quantities which are helpful in explaining what triggers the flash are found to be useful in explaining what quenches the flash.

  15. Daily Physical Activity and Hot Flashes in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation FLASHES Study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Carolyn; Matthews, Karen; Thurston, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of physical activity in menopausal hot flashes. Competing models conceptualize physical activity as a risk or protective factor for hot flashes. Few studies have examined this relationship prospectively using physiologic measures of hot flashes and physical activity. Design Over two 48 hour-periods, 51 participants wore a physiologic hot flash monitor and activity monitor, and reported their hot flashes in an electronic diary. Physiologic hot flashes, reported hot flashes and reported hot flashes without physiological corroboration were related to activity changes using hierarchical generalized linear modeling, adjusting for potential confounders. Setting Community. Patients Midlife women. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Physiologically-detected hot flashes and reported hot flashes with and without physiologic corroboration. Results Hot flash reports without physiologic corroboration were more likely after activity increases (OR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00-1.10, p=.01), particularly among women with higher levels of depressive symptoms (interaction p=.02). No other types of hot flashes were related to physical activity. Conclusion Acute increases in physical activity were associated with increased reporting of hot flashes lacking physiologic corroboration, particularly among women with depressive symptoms. Clinicians should consider the role of symptom perception and reporting in relations between physical activity and hot flashes. PMID:24491454

  16. Firefly Light Flashing: Oxygen Supply Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yueh-Lin; Li, Chia-Wei; Hong, Tzay-Ming; Ho, Jen-Zon; Yang, En-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Yen; Margaritondo, G.; Hsu, Su-Ting; Ong, Edwin B. L.; Hwu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Firefly luminescence is an intriguing phenomenon with potential technological applications, whose biochemistry background was only recently established. The physics side of this phenomenon, however, was still unclear, specifically as far as the oxygen supply mechanism for light flashing is concerned. This uncertainty is due to the complex microscopic structure of the tracheal system: without fully knowing its geometry, one cannot reliably test the proposed mechanisms. We solved this problem using synchrotron phase contrast microtomography and transmission x-ray microscopy, finding that the oxygen consumption corresponding to mitochondria functions exceeds the maximum rate of oxygen diffusion from the tracheal system to the photocytes. Furthermore, the flashing mechanism uses a large portion of this maximum rate. Thus, the flashing control requires passivation of the mitochondria functions, e.g., by nitric oxide, and switching of the oxygen supply from them to photoluminescence.

  17. Process for energy reduction with flash fusing

    SciTech Connect

    Berkes, J.S.

    1987-10-06

    This patent describes a process for affecting a reduction in the energy needed for accomplishing the flash fusing of a developed image which comprises (1) providing a toner composition with resin particles, pigment articles, and wax. The wax possesses a lower melting temperature than the resin particles and is selected from the group consisting of polyethylene and polypropylene with a molecular weight of less than about 6,000; (2) introducing the aforementioned toner composition into a xerographic imaging apparatus having incorporated therein a flash fusing device; (3) generating an electrostatic latent image in the imaging apparatus, and subsequently developing this image with the toner composition; (4) transferring the image to a supporting substrate; and (5) permanently attaching the image to the substrate with energy emitted from a flash fusing device, and wherein there is formed between the supporting substrate and the toner composition during fusing a wax layer.

  18. Multidimensional flash diffusivity measurements of orthotropic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.; McDowell, D.L.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

    1999-03-01

    A generalization of the radial flash technique is presented whereby the thermal diffusivity of an orthotropic solid is measured in directions parallel and perpendicular to the flash source. The theoretical formulation is based on a Green`s function approach which assumes a general orthotropic solid with three mutually orthogonal thermal diffusivities (or conductivities). Using this approach, a solution to this problem is presented which can be used to develop solutions for arbitrary pulse waveforms and incident geometries. Analytical and numerical results are presented for two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases of finite and semiinfinite solids. Characteristic equations which describe the ratio of the temperatures at two points along a principal axis are given. The equations show excellent agreement with numerical predictions as well as experimental results. A parameter estimation approach is given which improves on the accuracy of the radial flash technique in the determination of thermal diffusivity from experimental data.

  19. A void distribution model-flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new model for flashing flow based on wall nucleations is proposed here and the model predictions are compared with some experimental data. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites was used. Thus it was possible to avoid the usual assumption of a constant bubble number density. Comparisons of the model with the data shows that the model based on the nucleation site density correlation appears to be acceptable to describe the vapor generation in the flashing flow. For the limited data examined, the comparisons show rather satisfactory agreement without using a floating parameter to adjust the model. This result indicated that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic predictions of the flashing phenomenon is possible on the present wall nucleation based model.

  20. ACOUSTIC SIGNATURES OF THE HELIUM CORE FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Moore, Kevin; Macias, Phillip J.

    2012-01-15

    All evolved stars with masses M {approx}< 2 M{sub Sun} undergo an initiating off-center helium core flash in their M{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 0.48 M{sub Sun} He core as they ascend the red giant branch (RGB). This off-center flash is the first of a few successive helium shell subflashes that remove the core electron degeneracy over 2 Myr, converting the object into a He-burning star. Though characterized by Thomas over 40 years ago, this core flash phase has yet to be observationally probed. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) code, we show that red giant asteroseismology enabled by space-based photometry (i.e., Kepler and CoRoT) can probe these stars during the flash. The rapid ({approx}< 10{sup 5} yr) contraction of the red giant envelope after the initiating flash dramatically improves the coupling of the p-modes to the core g-modes, making the detection of l = 1 mixed modes possible for these 2 Myr. This duration implies that 1 in 35 stars near the red clump in the H-R diagram will be in their core flash phase. During this time, the star has a g-mode period spacing of {Delta}P{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 70-100 s, lower than the {Delta}P{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 250 s of He-burning stars in the red clump, but higher than the RGB stars at the same luminosity. This places them in an underpopulated part of the large frequency spacing ({Delta}{nu}) versus {Delta}P{sub g} diagram that should ease their identification among the thousands of observed red giants.

  1. Flash photolysis and triplet states and free radicals in solution.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Maurice W

    2003-05-01

    A personal account is given of the development of microsecond flash photolysis in George Porter's laboratory at Cambridge in the early 1950s. This made possible, for the first time, the observation of the absorption spectra of the lowest triplet states of many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fluid solutions. The T-T transitions were found to be very intense with oscillator strengths approaching unity in many cases. Detailed kinetic studies showed that triplet state decay was first order and viscosity dependent and strongly quenched by dissolved oxygen. Several aromatic free radicals such as benzyl were also observed in liquid solution for the first time. The advent of the laser in the early 1960s made it possible to extend flash photolysis studies to the ns and ps and eventually the fs time range. Such studies have revolutionized the study of excited states and free radicals and have made possible advances in the understanding of the dynamics of chemical and biological systems that would have been unimaginable 60 years ago. PMID:12803067

  2. OTD Observations of Continental US Ground and Cloud Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William

    2007-01-01

    Lightning optical flash parameters (e.g., radiance, area, duration, number of optical groups, and number of optical events) derived from almost five years of Optical Transient Detector (OTD) data are analyzed. Hundreds of thousands of OTD flashes occurring over the continental US are categorized according to flash type (ground or cloud flash) using US National Lightning Detection Network TM (NLDN) data. The statistics of the optical characteristics of the ground and cloud flashes are inter-compared on an overall basis, and as a function of ground flash polarity. A standard two-distribution hypothesis test is used to inter-compare the population means of a given lightning parameter for the two flash types. Given the differences in the statistics of the optical characteristics, it is suggested that statistical analyses (e.g., Bayesian Inference) of the space-based optical measurements might make it possible to successfully discriminate ground and cloud flashes a reasonable percentage of the time.

  3. Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157996.html Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients Italian trial finds ... News) -- Acupuncture can help alleviate the often-debilitating hot flashes that afflict many breast cancer patients, new ...

  4. Memory systems.

    PubMed

    Wolk, David A; Budson, Andrew E

    2010-08-01

    Converging evidence from patient and neuroimaging studies suggests that memory is a collection of abilities that use different neuroanatomic systems. Neurologic injury may impair one or more of these memory systems. Episodic memory allows us to mentally travel back in time and relive an episode of our life. Episodic memory depends on the hippocampus, other medial temporal lobe structures, the limbic system, and the frontal lobes, as well as several other brain regions. Semantic memory provides our general knowledge about the world and is unconnected to any specific episode of our life. Although semantic memory likely involves much of the neocortex, the inferolateral temporal lobes (particularly the left) are most important. Procedural memory enables us to learn cognitive and behavioral skills and algorithms that operate at an automatic, unconscious level. Damage to the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor area often impair procedural memory. PMID:22810510

  5. Cognitive memory.

    PubMed

    Widrow, Bernard; Aragon, Juan Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Regarding the workings of the human mind, memory and pattern recognition seem to be intertwined. You generally do not have one without the other. Taking inspiration from life experience, a new form of computer memory has been devised. Certain conjectures about human memory are keys to the central idea. The design of a practical and useful "cognitive" memory system is contemplated, a memory system that may also serve as a model for many aspects of human memory. The new memory does not function like a computer memory where specific data is stored in specific numbered registers and retrieval is done by reading the contents of the specified memory register, or done by matching key words as with a document search. Incoming sensory data would be stored at the next available empty memory location, and indeed could be stored redundantly at several empty locations. The stored sensory data would neither have key words nor would it be located in known or specified memory locations. Sensory inputs concerning a single object or subject are stored together as patterns in a single "file folder" or "memory folder". When the contents of the folder are retrieved, sights, sounds, tactile feel, smell, etc., are obtained all at the same time. Retrieval would be initiated by a query or a prompt signal from a current set of sensory inputs or patterns. A search through the memory would be made to locate stored data that correlates with or relates to the prompt input. The search would be done by a retrieval system whose first stage makes use of autoassociative artificial neural networks and whose second stage relies on exhaustive search. Applications of cognitive memory systems have been made to visual aircraft identification, aircraft navigation, and human facial recognition. Concerning human memory, reasons are given why it is unlikely that long-term memory is stored in the synapses of the brain's neural networks. Reasons are given suggesting that long-term memory is stored in DNA or RNA

  6. Modular, Microprocessor-Controlled Flash Lighting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Dwayne; Gray, Elizabeth; Skupinski, Robert; Stachowicz, Arthur; Birchenough, William

    2006-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled lighting system generates brief, precisely timed, high-intensity flashes of light for scientific imaging at frame rates up to about 1 kHz. The system includes an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are driven in synchronism with an externally generated timing signal (for example, a timing signal generated by a video camera). The light output can be varied in peak intensity, pulse duration, pulse delay, and pulse rate, all depending on the timing signal and associated externally generated control signals. The array of LEDs comprises as many as 16 LED panels that can be attached together. Each LED panel is a module consisting of a rectangular subarray of 10 by 20 LEDs of advanced design on a printed-circuit board in a mounting frame with a power/control connector. The LED panels are controlled by an LED control module that contains an AC-to-DC power supply, a control board, and 8 LED-panel driver boards. In prior LED panels, the LEDs are packaged at less than maximum areal densities in bulky metal housings that reduce effective active areas. In contrast, in the present LED panels, the LEDs are packed at maximum areal density so as to afford 100-percent active area and so that when panels are joined side by side to form the array, there are no visible seams between them and the proportion of active area is still 100 percent. Each panel produces an illuminance of .5 x 10( exp 4) lux at a distance of 5.8 in. (approx.1.6 cm). The LEDs are driven according to a pulse-width-modulation control scheme that makes it safe to drive the LEDs beyond their rated steady-state currents in order to generate additional light during short periods. The drive current and the pulse-width modulation for each LED panel can be controlled independently of those of the other 15 panels. The maximum allowable duration of each pulse of drive current is a function of the amount of overdrive, the total time to be spent in overdrive operation, and the limitations

  7. Photorealistic rendering application to the design of LED flash lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jyh-Long

    2012-10-01

    LED flash module becomes popular in current mobile communication devices, such as for the smart phones and tablet. As a lighting apparatus for image taking, photo rendering performance is crucial. We explore the LED flash lens design with a stress of photorealistic rendering application toward a high-performance LED flash illumination.

  8. 49 CFR 234.217 - Flashing light units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flashing light units. 234.217 Section 234.217... light units. (a) Each flashing light unit shall be properly positioned and aligned and shall be visible to a highway user approaching the crossing. (b) Each flashing light unit shall be maintained...

  9. Improving Memory Characteristics of Hydrogenated Nanocrystalline Silicon Germanium Nonvolatile Memory Devices by Controlling Germanium Contents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiwoong; Jang, Kyungsoo; Phu, Nguyen Thi Cam; Trinh, Thanh Thuy; Raja, Jayapal; Kim, Taeyong; Cho, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangho; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) with silicon dioxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxynitride (ONO(n)) charge trap structure is a promising flash memory technology duo that will fulfill process compatibility for system-on-panel displays, down-scaling cell size and low operation voltage. In this research, charge trap flash devices were fabricated with ONO(n) stack gate insulators and an active layer using hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon germanium (nc-SiGe:H) films at a low temperature. In this study, the effect of the interface trap density on the performance of devices, including memory window and retention, was investigated. The electrical characteristics of NVM devices were studied controlling Ge content from 0% to 28% in the nc-SiGe:H channel layer. The optimal Ge content in the channel layer was found to be around 16%. For nc-SiGe:H NVM with 16% Ge content, the memory window was 3.13 V and the retention data exceeded 77% after 10 years under the programming condition of 15 V for 1 msec. This showed that the memory window increased by 42% and the retention increased by 12% compared to the nc-Si:H NVM that does not contain Ge. However, when the Ge content was more than 16%, the memory window and retention property decreased. Finally, this research showed that the Ge content has an effect on the interface trap density and this enabled us to determine the optimal Ge content. PMID:27483856

  10. Towards Terabit Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Memories have been the major yardstick for the continuing validity of Moore's law. In single-transistor-per-Bit dynamic random-access memories (DRAM), the number of bits per chip pretty much gives us the number of transistors. For decades, DRAM's have offered the largest storage capacity per chip. However, DRAM does not scale any longer, both in density and voltage, severely limiting its power efficiency to 10 fJ/b. A differential DRAM would gain four-times in density and eight-times in energy. Static CMOS RAM (SRAM) with its six transistors/cell is gaining in reputation because it scales well in cell size and operating voltage so that its fundamental advantage of speed, non-destructive read-out and low-power standby could lead to just 2.5 electrons/bit in standby and to a dynamic power efficiency of 2aJ/b. With a projected 2020 density of 16 Gb/cm², the SRAM would be as dense as normal DRAM and vastly better in power efficiency, which would mean a major change in the architecture and market scenario for DRAM versus SRAM. Non-volatile Flash memory have seen two quantum jumps in density well beyond the roadmap: Multi-Bit storage per transistor and high-density TSV (through-silicon via) technology. The number of electrons required per Bit on the storage gate has been reduced since their first realization in 1996 by more than an order of magnitude to 400 electrons/Bit in 2010 for a complexity of 32Gbit per chip at the 32 nm node. Chip stacking of eight chips with TSV has produced a 32GByte solid-state drive (SSD). A stack of 32 chips with 2 b/cell at the 16 nm node will reach a density of 2.5 Terabit/cm². Non-volatile memory with a density of 10 × 10 nm²/Bit is the target for widespread development. Phase-change memory (PCM) and resistive memory (RRAM) lead in cell density, and they will reach 20 Gb/cm² in 2D and higher with 3D chip stacking. This is still almost an order-of-magnitude less than Flash. However, their read-out speed is ~10-times faster, with as yet

  11. Assessment of flash flood warning procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lynn E.

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of four alternate flash flood warning procedures was conducted to ascertain their suitability for forecast operations using radar-rainfall imagery. The procedures include (1) areal mean basin effective rainfall, (2) unit hydrograph, (3) time-area, and (4) 2-D numerical modeling. The Buffalo Creek flash flood of July 12, 1996, was used as a case study for application of each of the procedures. A significant feature of the Buffalo Creek event was a forest fire that occurred a few months before the flood and significantly affected watershed runoff characteristics. Objectives were to assess the applicability of the procedures for watersheds having spatial and temporal scale similarities to Buffalo Creek, to compare their technical characteristics, and to consider forecaster usability. Geographic information system techniques for hydrologic database development and flash flood potential computations are illustrated. Generalizations of the case study results are offered relative to their suitability for flash flood forecasting operations. Although all four methods have relative advantages, their application to the Buffalo Creek event resulted in mixed performance. Failure of any method was due primarily to uncertainties of the land surface response (i.e., burn area imperviousness). Results underscore the need for model calibration; a difficult requirement for real-time forecasting.

  12. Flash threshold of shocked aluminum silicofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, G.H.

    1987-11-01

    For a 0.5-mm polycarbonate flier striking a 0.5-mm polycarbonate target, we found that a velocity of 1.42 km/s was necessary to cause aluminum silicofluoride sprayed on the far surface to flash. We calculated that the pressure in the polycarbonate was 2.93 GPa. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Flash Cards and Animation Software for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a software program for DOS/Windows manages a collection of pictures such as photographic slides, overheads, or computer images in one or more databases. Explains how it transforms image files to raw binary files that can then be displayed like flash cards, or as an animated series of images. (Author/LRW)

  14. High-Fidelity Flash Lidar Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Glenn D.; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technologies (ALHAT) project is currently developing the critical technologies to safely and precisely navigate and land crew, cargo and robotic spacecraft vehicles on and around planetary bodies. One key element of this project is a high-fidelity Flash Lidar sensor that can generate three-dimensional (3-D) images of the planetary surface. These images are processed with hazard detection and avoidance and hazard relative navigation algorithms, and then are subsequently used by the Guidance, Navigation and Control subsystem to generate an optimal navigation solution. A complex, high-fidelity model of the Flash Lidar was developed in order to evaluate the performance of the sensor and its interaction with the interfacing ALHAT components on vehicles with different configurations and under different flight trajectories. The model contains a parameterized, general approach to Flash Lidar detection and reflects physical attributes such as range and electronic noise sources, and laser pulse temporal and spatial profiles. It also provides the realistic interaction of the laser pulse with terrain features that include varying albedo, boulders, craters slopes and shadows. This paper gives a description of the Flash Lidar model and presents results from the Lidar operating under different scenarios.

  15. Sight-Word Practice in a Flash!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Robin W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    For learners who need sight-word practice, including young students and struggling readers, digital flash cards may promote automatic word recognition when used as a supplemental activity to regular reading instruction. A novel use of common presentation software efficiently supports this practice strategy.

  16. A polychromatic flash photolysis apparatus (PFPA).

    PubMed

    Uhl, R; Meyer, B; Desel, H

    1984-11-01

    A wide variety of biologically relevant chemical intermediates have been identified and characterised by their spectral properties. When rapid kinetics, i.e. rapid changes in these spectral properties are studied, the equipment designed for these studies (flash photolysis-, T-jump apparatus) usually allows only the registration of intensity changes of the monitoring light beam at one particular wavelength. Quite frequently, however, particularly in biological systems, the reactions of interest are too complex to be fully understood using single wavelength techniques. We have therefore designed and built a flash photolysis apparatus which permits the simultaneous recording of absorbance changes at 32 wavelengths, freely selectable between 300 and 1000 nm, as well as changes in fluorescence, luminescence, birefringence and light scattering. The apparatus, which we have called Polychromatic Flash Photolysis Apparatus (PFPA), acquires up to 8000 difference spectra per second with an amplitude resolution of better than 0.0001 absorbance unit. Data acquisition and activation of an actinic xenon flash unit occurs under computer control. The same computer is responsible for data storage, handling and graphic display. This communication describes the PFPA, its performance, and, as a demonstration of its potential usefulness, its application to the measurement of the light driven photocycle of bacterial rhodopsin, the proton pumping protein of Halobacterium halobium. PMID:6520324

  17. High-fidelity flash lidar model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Glenn D.; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2014-06-01

    NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technologies (ALHAT) project is currently developing the critical technologies to safely and precisely navigate and land crew, cargo and robotic spacecraft vehicles on and around planetary bodies. One key element of this project is a high-fidelity Flash Lidar sensor that can generate three-dimensional (3-D) images of the planetary surface. These images are processed with hazard detection and avoidance and hazard relative navigation algorithms, and then are subsequently used by the Guidance, Navigation and Control subsystem to generate an optimal navigation solution. A complex, high-fidelity model of the Flash Lidar was developed in order to evaluate the performance of the sensor and its interaction with the interfacing ALHAT components on vehicles with different configurations and under different flight trajectories. The model contains a parameterized, general approach to Flash Lidar detection and reflects physical attributes such as range and electronic noise sources, and laser pulse temporal and spatial profiles. It also provides the realistic interaction of the laser pulse with terrain features that include varying albedo, boulders, craters slopes and shadows. This paper gives a description of the Flash Lidar model and presents results from the Lidar operating under different scenarios.

  18. Flash Cards: Common Chinese-Cantonese Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This set of flash cards is designed to accompany the Defense Language Institute's instructional programs in Cantonese Chinese. Each card displays six Chinese characters, for a total of 1500 characters. Each character is printed two inches tall. Above each character are transcriptions of the Chinese words represented by the character (marked for…

  19. Characterization measurements of ASC FLASH 3D ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Håkan; Gustafsson, Frank; Johnson, Bruce; Richmond, Richard; Armstrong, Ernest

    2009-09-01

    As a part of the project agreement between the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) and the United States of American's Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), a joint field trial was performed in Sweden during two weeks in January 2009. The main purpose for this trial was to characterize AFRL's latest version of the ASC (Advanced Scientific Concepts [1]) FLASH 3D LADAR sensor. The measurements were performed essentially in FOI´s optical hall whose 100 m indoor range offers measurements under controlled conditions minimizing effects such as atmospheric turbulence. Data were also acquired outdoor in both forest and urban scenarios, using vehicles and humans as targets, with the purpose of acquiring data from more dynamic platforms to assist in further algorithm development. This paper shows examples of the acquired data and presents initial results.

  20. Memory protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Accidental overwriting of files or of memory regions belonging to other programs, browsing of personal files by superusers, Trojan horses, and viruses are examples of breakdowns in workstations and personal computers that would be significantly reduced by memory protection. Memory protection is the capability of an operating system and supporting hardware to delimit segments of memory, to control whether segments can be read from or written into, and to confine accesses of a program to its segments alone. The absence of memory protection in many operating systems today is the result of a bias toward a narrow definition of performance as maximum instruction-execution rate. A broader definition, including the time to get the job done, makes clear that cost of recovery from memory interference errors reduces expected performance. The mechanisms of memory protection are well understood, powerful, efficient, and elegant. They add to performance in the broad sense without reducing instruction execution rate.

  1. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  2. Flash Diffusivity Technique Applied to Individual Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Yowell, Leonard; Wang, Hsin

    2007-01-01

    A variant of the flash diffusivity technique has been devised for determining the thermal diffusivities, and thus the thermal conductivities, of individual aligned fibers. The technique is intended especially for application to nanocomposite fibers, made from narrower fibers of polyphenylene benzobisthiazole (PBZT) and carbon nanotubes. These highly aligned nanocomposite fibers could exploit the high thermal conductivities of carbon nanotubes for thermal-management applications. In the flash diffusivity technique as practiced heretofore, one or more heat pulse(s) is (are) applied to the front face of a plate or disk material specimen and the resulting time-varying temperature on the rear face is measured. Usually, the heat pulse is generated by use of a xenon flash lamp, and the variation of temperature on the rear face is measured by use of an infrared detector. The flash energy is made large enough to produce a usefully high temperature rise on the rear face, but not so large as to significantly alter the specimen material. Once the measurement has been completed, the thermal diffusivity of the specimen is computed from the thickness of the specimen and the time dependence of the temperature variation on the rear face. Heretofore, the infrared detector used in the flash diffusivity technique has been a single-point detector, which responds to a spatial average of the thermal radiation from the rear specimen surface. Such a detector cannot distinguish among regions of differing diffusivity within the specimen. Moreover, two basic assumptions of the thermaldiffusivity technique as practiced heretofore are that the specimen is homogeneous and that heat flows one-dimensionally from the front to the rear face. These assumptions are not valid for an inhomogeneous (composite) material.

  3. Declarative memory.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Wim J; Blokland, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Declarative Memory consists of memory for events (episodic memory) and facts (semantic memory). Methods to test declarative memory are key in investigating effects of potential cognition-enhancing substances--medicinal drugs or nutrients. A number of cognitive performance tests assessing declarative episodic memory tapping verbal learning, logical memory, pattern recognition memory, and paired associates learning are described. These tests have been used as outcome variables in 34 studies in humans that have been described in the literature in the past 10 years. Also, the use of episodic tests in animal research is discussed also in relation to the drug effects in these tasks. The results show that nutritional supplementation of polyunsaturated fatty acids has been investigated most abundantly and, in a number of cases, but not all, show indications of positive effects on declarative memory, more so in elderly than in young subjects. Studies investigating effects of registered anti-Alzheimer drugs, cholinesterase inhibitors in mild cognitive impairment, show positive and negative effects on declarative memory. Studies mainly carried out in healthy volunteers investigating the effects of acute dopamine stimulation indicate enhanced memory consolidation as manifested specifically by better delayed recall, especially at time points long after learning and more so when drug is administered after learning and if word lists are longer. The animal studies reveal a different picture with respect to the effects of different drugs on memory performance. This suggests that at least for episodic memory tasks, the translational value is rather poor. For the human studies, detailed parameters of the compositions of word lists for declarative memory tests are discussed and it is concluded that tailored adaptations of tests to fit the hypothesis under study, rather than "off-the-shelf" use of existing tests, are recommended. PMID:25977084

  4. Global optical lightning flash rates determined with the Forte satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Light, T.; Davis, S. M.; Boeck, W. L.; Jacobson, A. R.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Using FORTE photodiode detector (PDD) observations of lightning, we have determined the geographic distribution of nighttime flash rate density. We estimate the PDD flash detection efficiency to be 62% for total lightning through comparison to lightning observations by the TRMM satellite's Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), using cases in which FORTE and TRMM viewed the same storm. We present here both seasonal and l,ot,al flash rate maps. We examine some characteristics of the optical emissions of lightning in both high and low flash rate environments, and find that while lightning occurs less frequently over ocean, oceanic lightning flashes are somewhat more powerful, on average, than those over land.

  5. Shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  6. Utilization of 3D imaging flash lidar technology for autonomous safe landing on planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Vanek, Michael; Petway, Larry; Pierrottet, Diego; Busch, George; Bulyshev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    NASA considers Flash Lidar a critical technology for enabling autonomous safe landing of future large robotic and crewed vehicles on the surface of the Moon and Mars. Flash Lidar can generate 3-Dimensional images of the terrain to identify hazardous features such as craters, rocks, and steep slopes during the final stages of descent and landing. The onboard flight comptuer can use the 3-D map of terain to guide the vehicle to a safe site. The capabilities of Flash Lidar technology were evaluated through a series of static tests using a calibrated target and through dynamic tests aboard a helicopter and a fixed wing airctarft. The aircraft flight tests were perfomed over Moonlike terrain in the California and Nevada deserts. This paper briefly describes the Flash Lidar static and aircraft flight test results. These test results are analyzed against the landing application requirements to identify the areas of technology improvement. The ongoing technology advancement activities are then explained and their goals are described.

  7. Utilization of 3-D Imaging Flash Lidar Technology for Autonomous Safe Landing on Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Vanek, Michael; Petway, Larry; Pierrotter, Diego; Busch, George; Bulyshev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    NASA considers Flash Lidar a critical technology for enabling autonomous safe landing of future large robotic and crewed vehicles on the surface of the Moon and Mars. Flash Lidar can generate 3-Dimensional images of the terrain to identify hazardous features such as craters, rocks, and steep slopes during the final stages of descent and landing. The onboard flight computer can use the 3-D map of terrain to guide the vehicle to a safe site. The capabilities of Flash Lidar technology were evaluated through a series of static tests using a calibrated target and through dynamic tests aboard a helicopter and a fixed wing aircraft. The aircraft flight tests were performed over Moon-like terrain in the California and Nevada deserts. This paper briefly describes the Flash Lidar static and aircraft flight test results. These test results are analyzed against the landing application requirements to identify the areas of technology improvement. The ongoing technology advancement activities are then explained and their goals are described.

  8. Non-volatile memory based on the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; You, Lu; Zhou, Yang; Shiuh Lim, Zhi; Zou, Xi; Chen, Lang; Ramesh, R.; Wang, Junling

    2013-01-01

    The quest for a solid state universal memory with high-storage density, high read/write speed, random access and non-volatility has triggered intense research into new materials and novel device architectures. Though the non-volatile memory market is dominated by flash memory now, it has very low operation speed with ~10 μs programming and ~10 ms erasing time. Furthermore, it can only withstand ~105 rewriting cycles, which prevents it from becoming the universal memory. Here we demonstrate that the significant photovoltaic effect of a ferroelectric material, such as BiFeO3 with a band gap in the visible range, can be used to sense the polarization direction non-destructively in a ferroelectric memory. A prototype 16-cell memory based on the cross-bar architecture has been prepared and tested, demonstrating the feasibility of this technique. PMID:23756366

  9. Matter Flashed at Ultra Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    "REM observations of GRB060418 and GRB060607A: the onset of the afterglow and the initial fireball Lorentz factor determination", by E. Molinari, S. D. Vergani, D. Malesani, S. Covino, et al. The paper is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:20077388 (A&A, 469, L13-L16, 2007). The REM team is formed by G. Chincarini, E. Molinari, F.M. Zerbi, L.A. Antonelli, S. Covino, P. Conconi, L. Nicastro, E. Palazzi, M. Stefanon, V. Testa, G. Tosti, F. Vitali, A. Monfardini, F. D'Alessio, P. D'Avanzo, D. Fugazza, G. Malaspina, S. Piranomonte, S.D. Vergani, P.A. Ward, S. Campana, P. Goldoni, D. Guetta, D. Malesani, N. Masetti, E.J.A. Meurs, L. Norci, E. Pian, A. Fernandez-Soto, L. Stella, G. Tagliaferri, G. Ihle, L. Gonzalez, A. Pizarro, P. Sinclair, and J. Valenzuela. Notes Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. They come in two different flavours, long and short ones. Over the past few years, international efforts have convincingly shown that long gamma-ray bursts are linked with the ultimate explosion of massive stars (hypernovae; see e.g. ESO PR 16/03) while the short ones most likely originate from the violent collision of neutron stars and/or black holes (see e.g. ESO PR 26/05 and 32/05). Irrespective of the original source of the GRB energy, the injection of so much energy into a confined volume will cause a fireball to form. Gamma-ray photons have nearly a million times more energy than the 'visual' photons the eye can see. Strictly speaking, the Lorentz factor is the ratio between the total and rest-mass energy of the fireball. REM (Rapid Eye Mount) is a small (60 cm mirror diameter) rapid reaction automatic telescope dedicated to monitor the prompt afterglow of Gamma Ray Burst events. It is located at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. For more information, see

  10. Virtual memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Virtual memory was conceived as a way to automate overlaying of program segments. Modern computers have very large main memories, but need automatic solutions to the relocation and protection problems. Virtual memory serves this need as well and is thus useful in computers of all sizes. The history of the idea is traced, showing how it has become a widespread, little noticed feature of computers today.

  11. Ferroelectric memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorotilov, K. A.; Sigov, A. S.

    2012-05-01

    The current status of developments in the field of ferroelectric memory devices has been considered. The rapidly growing market of non-volatile memory devices has been analyzed, and the current state of the art and prospects for the scaling of parameters of non-volatile memory devices of different types have been considered. The basic constructive and technological solutions in the field of the design of ferroelectric memory devices, as well as the "roadmaps" of the development of this technology, have been discussed.

  12. Characterizing flash-radiography source spots.

    PubMed

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2011-12-01

    Flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a venerable diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories. The size of the radiographic source spot is often quoted as an indication of the resolving power of a particular flash-radiography machine. A variety of techniques for measuring spot size have evolved at the different laboratories, as well as different definitions of spot size. Some definitions are highly dependent on the source spot intensity distributions, and not necessarily well correlated with resolution. The concept of limiting resolution based on bar target measurements is introduced, and shown to be equivalent to the spatial wavenumber at a modulation transfer function value of 5%. This resolution is shown to be better correlated with the full width at half-maximum of the spot intensity distribution than it is with other definitions of spot size. PMID:22193263

  13. Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protections

    SciTech Connect

    R. Camp

    2008-03-04

    Over the past four years, the Electrical Safety Program at PPPL has evolved in addressing changing regulatory requirements and lessons learned from accident events, particularly in regards to arc flash hazards and implementing NFPA 70E requirements. This presentation will discuss PPPL's approaches to the areas of electrical hazards evaluation, both shock and arc flash; engineered solutions for hazards mitigation such as remote racking of medium voltage breakers, operational changes for hazards avoidance, targeted personnel training and hazard appropriate personal protective equipment. Practical solutions for nominal voltage identification and zero voltage checks for lockout/tagout will also be covered. Finally, we will review the value of a comprehensive electrical drawing program, employee attitudes expressed as a personal safety work ethic, integrated safety management, and sustained management support for continuous safety improvement.

  14. Continuous flash suppression reduces negative afterimages.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Koch, Christof

    2005-08-01

    Illusions that produce perceptual suppression despite constant retinal input are used to manipulate visual consciousness. Here we report on a powerful variant of existing techniques, continuous flash suppression. Distinct images flashed successively at approximately 10 Hz into one eye reliably suppress an image presented to the other eye. The duration of perceptual suppression is at least ten times greater than that produced by binocular rivalry. Using this tool we show that the strength of the negative afterimage of an adaptor was reduced by half when it was perceptually suppressed by input from the other eye. The more completely the adaptor was suppressed, the more strongly the afterimage intensity was reduced. Paradoxically, trial-to-trial visibility of the adaptor did not correlate with the degree of reduction. Our results imply that formation of afterimages involves neuronal structures that access input from both eyes but that do not correspond directly to the neuronal correlates of perceptual awareness. PMID:15995700

  15. TsunaFLASH Benchmark and Its Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranowo, Widodo; Behrens, Joern

    2010-05-01

    In the end of year 2008 TsunAWI (Tsunami unstructured mesh finite element model developed at Alfred Wegener Institute) by Behrens et al. (2006 - 2008) [Behrens, 2008], had been launched as an operational model in the German - Indonesian Tsunami EarlyWarning System (GITEWS) framework. This model has been benchmarked and verified with 2004 Sumatra-Andaman mega tsunami event [Harig et al., 2008]. A new development uses adaptive mesh refinement to improve computational efficiency and accuracy, this approach is called TsunaFLASH [Pranowo et al., 2008]. After the initial development and verification phase with stabilization efforts, and study of refinement criteria, the code is now mature enough to be validated with data. This presentation will demonstrate results of TsunaFLASH for the experiments with diverse mesh refinement criteria, and benchmarks; in particular the problem set-1 of IWLRM, and field data of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 event.

  16. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Darab, John G.; Gross, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer.

  17. Optical spectra of FLASH generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stránský, M.; Rohlena, Karel

    2014-05-01

    Time integrated measurements of optical spectra of the plasma generated by pulses of the free electron laser facility FLASH on a solid target at DESY Hamburg are interpreted in terms of plasma hydrodynamics. It is shown that the main contribution to the optical range comes from the expanding stage of the plasma evolution on a ns scale, whereas the UV part is partially obscured by the optically dense outstreaming plasma near the ablated hole.

  18. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Darab, J.G.; Gross, M.E.

    1999-05-11

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer. 3 figs.

  19. Thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of X-ray bursts from binary pulsars and globular clusters are reviewed. The previously proposed hypothesis is considered that such X-ray bursts result from thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars. A general scenario for this mechanism is outlined, and numerical computations of the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. The relation of these calculations to X-ray bursts and other phenomena is examined. Possible improvements in the numerical calculations are suggested.

  20. Synchronized Flashing Lights For Approach And Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Michael L.; Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Bell, Joseph L.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optoelectronic system for guiding vehicle in approaching and docking with another vehicle includes active optical targets (flashing lights) on approached vehicle synchronized with sensor and image-processing circuitry on approaching vehicle. Conceived for use in automated approach and docking of two spacecraft. Also applicable on Earth to manually controlled and automated approach and docking of land vehicles, aircraft, boats, and submersible vehicles, using GPS or terrestrial broadcast time signals for synchronization. Principal advantage: optical power reduced, with consequent enhancement of safety.

  1. The Mars Rover Spirit FLASH anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, Glenn E.; Neilson, Tracy C.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover 'Spirit' suffered a debilitating anomaly that prevented communication with Earth for several anxious days. With the eyes of the world upon us, the anomaly team used each scrap of information, our knowledge of the system, and sheer determination to analyze and fix the problem, then return the vehicle to normal operation. This paper will discuss the Spirit FLASH anomaly, including the drama of the investigation, the root cause and the lessons learned from the experience.

  2. FILTR: Flash Isotope Library and Training Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D; Trombino, D

    2007-07-26

    The subject of radiation detection is replete with complex concepts and challenging nomenclature. Furthermore, a daunting variety of radioactive isotopes may be encountered during the routine operation of a radiation detector. Individuals tasked with searching for illicit sources of radiation must remain vigilant while navigating through more frequently encountered mundane and legitimate radioactive sources. The Flash Isotope Library and Training Resource (FILTR) is being developed as an easily accessible and intuitive reference tool to manage the high volume of complex information required for this task. FILTR is an extended version of the Primary Utility for Nuclear Terminology (PUNT) software developed by the Counter Measures Test Beds group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the United States Secret Service. Authored in the Flash multimedia development environment, FILTR contains detailed information on potentially encountered isotopes as well as training on radiation and operational procedures. Reference material is organized to present critical information quickly while facilitating more in-depth investigation through an intuitive interface and engaging content. FILTR is being developed for a diverse audience of law enforcement organizations and government agencies and a wide range of skill sets from expert analysts to officers whose primary role is not radiation detection. Additionally, the wide compatibility of Flash content will allow FILTR to be readily accessible through the growing number of multi-media enabled electronic devices, including PDAs and cellular phones.

  3. Versatile LLRF platform for FLASH laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzałkowski, Paweł; Koprek, Waldemar; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2008-01-01

    Research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material research and in other branches more and more frequently use free electron lasers as a source of very intense, pulsed and coherent radiation spanning from optical, via UV to X-ray EM beams. The paper presents FLASH laser, which now generates VUV radiation in the range of 10-50nm. The role of low level radio frequency (LLRF) control system is shown in a superconductive linear accelerator. The electron beam from accelerator is injected to the undulator, where it is "converted" to a photon beam. The used LLRF system is based on FPGA circuits integrated directly with a number of analog RF channels. Main part of the work describes an original authors' solution of a universal LLRF control module for superconductive, resonant cavities of FLASH accelerator and laser. A modular construction of the module was debated. The module consists of a digital part residing on the base platform and exchangeable analog part positioned on a number of daughter-boards. The functional structure of the module was presented and in particular the FPGA implementation with configuration and extension block for RF mezzanine boards. The construction and chosen technological details of the backbone PCB were presented. The paper concludes with a number of application examples of the constructed and debugged module in the LLRF system of FLASH accelerator and laser. There are presented exemplary results of quality assessment measurements of the new system board.

  4. Flash floods in Catalonia: a recurrent situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasat, M. C.; Llasat-Botija, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Lindbergh, S.

    2010-09-01

    This work focuses on the analysis and characterization of the flash flood events occurring during summer in Catalonia. To this aim, a database with information about the social impact produced by all flood events recorded in Catalonia between 1982 and 2007 has been built. The social impact was obtained systematically on the basis of news press data and, occasionally, on the basis of insurance data. Flood events have been classified into ordinary, extraordinary and catastrophic floods, following the proposal of Llasat et al.~(2005). However, bearing in mind flash flood effects, some new categories concerning casualties and car damage have also been introduced. The spatial and temporal distribution of these flood events has been analyzed and, in an effort to better estimate the social impact and vulnerability, some indicators have been defined and analyzed for a specific region. These indicators allow an analysis of spacial and temporal trends as well as characterization of the events. Results show a flash-flood increase in summer and early autumn, mainly due to inter-annual and intra-annual changes in population density.

  5. Natural lightning flashes: from observation to modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defer, E.; Farges, T.; Barthe, C.; Bovalo, C.; Pinty, J.-P.; Chong, M.; Soula, S.; Ortéga, P.

    2011-12-01

    Different ground-based and space-based sensors are currently used to characterize and locate Earth lightning flashes like VHF mappers, VLF systems with short or long baseline, optical CCD camera and more recently microphone arrays. Concurrent observations with such equipments offer a unique description of the different processes occurring during the life of a lightning flash (triggering phase, leader development and junction phase). While the detection of lightning flashes becomes mature, more challenging investigations are still needed on i{)} Lightning Nitrogen Oxide (LINOx) production and on ii{)} the modeling of natural lightning discharges, even if ''engineer'' lightning schemes combined with electrification schemes are already implemented in numerical cloud resolving models. The PEACH project, the Atmospheric Electricity component of the upcoming field experiment HyMeX, will offer a unique opportunity for the European community to document and characterize the Mediterranean lightning activity with observations and modeling from the lightning scale to the regional scale and to gather the French community in preparation for the validation of future space-based missions like TARANIS and MTG-LI and for the interpretation of their lightning observations.

  6. The 20 February 2010 Madeira flash flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. M. A.; Tomé, R.; Azevedo, E. B.; Cardoso, R. M.

    2010-09-01

    On February 20, 2010, Madeira Island was struck by a violent rain storm, which led to a major flash flood leading to more than 50 casualties and an estimated property loss above 1G€. The storm was not well forecasted by the Institute of Meteorology, based on the global ECMWF forecast. However, the operational forecasts made by our group at the University of Lisbon, with MM5 and WRF at 2 km resolution, consistently indicated heavy precipitation for that day, starting on the 72h from 18 February at 00 UTC, and including all intermediate forecasts, issued every 12h, until the day of the event. At the same time, many important details of the forecasts, concerning in particular the timing of precipitation in low level stations, have discrepancies with observations. In the present study we analyze not only the quality of the high resolution forecasts of the rain storm, with the two models at different resolutions, but also review the MM5 model performance in all forecasts from 2006 to 2010, where other important orographic precipitation events have occurred, but no flash flood was triggered. The analysis emphasizes the relative importance of the state of the terrain, due to accumulated precipitation in days and weeks before a major rain storm, in the occurrence of flash floods.

  7. Flash LIDAR Emulator for HIL Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project is building a system for detecting hazards and automatically landing controlled vehicles safely anywhere on the Moon. The Flash Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) sensor is used to create on-the-fly a 3D map of the unknown terrain for hazard detection. As part of the ALHAT project, a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation testbed was developed to test the data processing, guidance, and navigation algorithms in real-time to prove their feasibility for flight. Replacing the Flash LIDAR camera with an emulator in the testbed provided a cheaper, safer, more feasible way to test the algorithms in a controlled environment. This emulator must have the same hardware interfaces as the LIDAR camera, have the same performance characteristics, and produce images similar in quality to the camera. This presentation describes the issues involved and the techniques used to create a real-time flash LIDAR emulator to support HIL simulation.

  8. A fast and low-power microelectromechanical system-based non-volatile memory device

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Wook; Park, Seung Joo; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.; Park, Yung Woo

    2011-01-01

    Several new generation memory devices have been developed to overcome the low performance of conventional silicon-based flash memory. In this study, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile memory design based on the electromechanical motion of a cantilever to provide fast charging and discharging of a floating-gate electrode. The operation is demonstrated by using an electromechanical metal cantilever to charge a floating gate that controls the charge transport through a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. The set and reset currents are unchanged after more than 11 h constant operation. Over 500 repeated programming and erasing cycles were demonstrated under atmospheric conditions at room temperature without degradation. Multinary bit programming can be achieved by varying the voltage on the cantilever. The operation speed of the device is faster than a conventional flash memory and the power consumption is lower than other memory devices. PMID:21364559

  9. A fast and low-power microelectromechanical system-based non-volatile memory device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Wook; Park, Seung Joo; Campbell, Eleanor E B; Park, Yung Woo

    2011-01-01

    Several new generation memory devices have been developed to overcome the low performance of conventional silicon-based flash memory. In this study, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile memory design based on the electromechanical motion of a cantilever to provide fast charging and discharging of a floating-gate electrode. The operation is demonstrated by using an electromechanical metal cantilever to charge a floating gate that controls the charge transport through a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. The set and reset currents are unchanged after more than 11 h constant operation. Over 500 repeated programming and erasing cycles were demonstrated under atmospheric conditions at room temperature without degradation. Multinary bit programming can be achieved by varying the voltage on the cantilever. The operation speed of the device is faster than a conventional flash memory and the power consumption is lower than other memory devices. PMID:21364559

  10. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  11. Childhood Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Kathy Everts

    1989-01-01

    Provides numerous ideas for helping students write about special memories in the following categories: growing up--future dreams; authors and illustrators; family history; special places; and special memories. Describes how to write a "bio poem," and includes a bibliography of children's books that enhance and enrich student learning and writing.…

  12. Memory Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Thomas G.; Nowak, Norman

    This paper outlines several "tricks" that aid students in improving their memories. The distinctions between operational and figural thought processes are noted. Operational memory is described as something that allows adults to make generalizations about numbers and the rules by which they may be combined, thus leading to easier memorization.…

  13. Collaging Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  14. Episodic Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    An account of episodic memories is developed that focuses on the types of knowledge they represent, their properties, and the functions they might serve. It is proposed that episodic memories consist of "episodic elements," summary records of experience often in the form of visual images, associated to a "conceptual frame" that provides a…

  15. A Quantitative Approach to Flash Flood Prediction in Southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Gibson, C. V.; Jackson, M.; McInerney, B.

    2005-05-01

    Flash flood monitoring and prediction is considered to be a critical part of National Weather Service (NWS) severe weather operations in the semi-arid western United States. The complex terrain and steep slopes in this area, combined with impervious rock and soils, can induce flash flooding with relatively light rainfall. This reduces the value of using the more common conceptual flash flood models developed for the central and eastern United States. Thus, forecasters at the NWS Weather Forecast Office in Salt Lake City, Utah, have relied on a locally developed conceptual model to predict the likelihood of flash flooding on a given day. Until this study, common practice was to assume that humid and unstable air combined with low wind speeds in the lower troposphere would yield rainfall conductive to flash flooding. A new approach to flash flood prediction, exploring the connection between atmospheric variables and flash flood reports, will increase situational awareness and provide forecasters with quantitative flash flood guidance. A record of historical flash floods in southern Utah was compiled to determine the frequency of events from 1959 to 2003. A complete data set, consisting of both historical flash flooding days and non-event days, was assembled. A trial of the 2003 three-month flash flood season assessed which variables and which dataset to use in studying the eight flash flood seasons from 1996 to 2003; the trial concluded that the best source of atmospheric data was a set of soundings from Flagstaff, Arizona, a location close to and generally upstream of southern Utah. Neural networks were used to determine the relationship between the atmospheric state and a particular day's flash flood severity. The final neural network used six input variables and a discretized output variable. Precipitable water, low-level relative humidity, convective available potential energy, the 500hPa height change between 12Z and 0Z the following day, and the previous day

  16. Hydrogeomorphic response to extreme rainfall in headwater systems: Flash floods and debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borga, Marco; Stoffel, Markus; Marchi, Lorenzo; Marra, Francesco; Jakob, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Flash floods and debris flows develop at space and time scales that conventional observation systems for rainfall, streamflow and sediment discharge are not able to monitor. Consequently, the atmospheric, hydrological and geomorphic controls on these hydrogeomorphic processes are poorly understood, leading to highly uncertain warning and risk management. On the other hand, remote sensing of precipitation and numerical weather predictions have become the basis of several flood forecasting systems, enabling increasingly accurate detection of hazardous events. The objective of this paper is to provide a review on current European and international research on early warning systems for flash floods and debris flows. We expand upon these themes by identifying: (a) the state of the art; (b) knowledge gaps; and (c) suggested research directions to advance warning capabilities for extreme hydrogeomorphic processes. We also suggest three areas in which advancements in science will have immediate and important practical consequence, namely development of rainfall estimation and nowcasting schemes suited to the specific space-time scales, consolidating physical, engineering and social datasets of flash floods and debris-flows, integration of methods for multiple hydrogeomorphic hazard warning.

  17. Effect of motion smoothness on the flash-lag illusion.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Jacques K; Chappell, Mark; Hine, Trevor J

    2009-08-01

    Two flash-lag experiments were performed in which the moving object was flashed in a succession of locations creating apparent motion and the inter-stimulus distance (ISD) between those locations was varied. In the first (n=10), the size of the flash-lag illusion was a declining non-linear function of the ISD and the largest reduction in its magnitude corresponded closely to the value where observers judged the continuity of optimal apparent motion to be lost. In the second (n=11) with large ISDs, we found the largest illusions when the flash initiated the movement, and no effect was observed when the flash terminated the movement. The data support motion position biasing or temporal integration accounts of the illusion with processing predominantly based on motion after the flash. PMID:19531367

  18. Arc Flash Boundary Calculations Using Computer Software Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, M.D.

    2005-01-07

    Arc Flash Protection boundary calculations have become easier to perform with the availability of personal computer software. These programs incorporate arc flash protection boundary formulas for different voltage and current levels, calculate the bolted fault current at each bus, and use built in time-current coordination curves to determine the clearing time of protective devices in the system. Results of the arc flash protection boundary calculations can be presented in several different forms--as an annotation to the one-line diagram, as a table of arc flash protection boundary distances, and as printed placards to be attached to the appropriate equipment. Basic arc flash protection boundary principles are presented in this paper along with several helpful suggestions for performing arc flash protection boundary calculations.

  19. An FPGA-Based Test-Bed for Reliability and Endurance Characterization of Non-Volatile Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Vikram; Patel, Jagdish; Patel, Janak; Namkung, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Memory technologies are divided into two categories. The first category, nonvolatile memories, are traditionally used in read-only or read-mostly applications because of limited write endurance and slow write speed. These memories are derivatives of read only memory (ROM) technology, which includes erasable programmable ROM (EPROM), electrically-erasable programmable ROM (EEPROM), Flash, and more recent ferroelectric non-volatile memory technology. Nonvolatile memories are able to retain data in the absence of power. The second category, volatile memories, are random access memory (RAM) devices including SRAM and DRAM. Writing to these memories is fast and write endurance is unlimited, so they are most often used to store data that change frequently, but they cannot store data in the absence of power. Nonvolatile memory technologies with better future potential are FRAM, Chalcogenide, GMRAM, Tunneling MRAM, and Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) EEPROM.

  20. Sensitivity and kinetics of mouse rod flash responses determined in vivo from paired-flash electroretinograms

    PubMed Central

    Hetling, John R; Pepperberg, David R

    1999-01-01

    Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded corneally from C57BL/6J mice using a paired-flash procedure in which a brief test flash at time zero was followed at time tprobe by a bright probe flash of fixed strength, and in which the probe response amplitude was determined at time t=tprobe+ 6 ms. Probe responses obtained in a series of paired-flash trials were analysed to derive A(t), a family of amplitudes that putatively represents the massed response of the rod photoreceptors to the test flash. A central aim was to obtain a mathematical description of the normalized derived response A(t)/Amo as a function of Itest, the test flash strength. With fixed tprobe (80 ≤tprobe≤ 1200 ms), A(t)/Amo was described by the saturating exponential function [1 - exp(-ktItest)], where kt is a time-dependent sensitivity parameter. For t= 86 ms, a time near the peak of A(t), k86 was 7·0 ± 1·2 (scotopic cd s m−2)−1 (mean ± s.d.; n= 4). A(t)/Amo data were analysed in relation to the equation below, a time-generalized form of the above exponential function in which (k86Itest) is replaced by the product [k86Itestu(t)], and where u(t) is independent of the test flash strength. The function u(t) was modelled as the product of a scaling factor γ, an activation term 1 - exp[-α(t - td)2]}, and a decay term exp(-t/τω):where td is a brief delay, τω is an exponential time constant, and α characterizes the acceleration of the activation term. For Itest up to ∼2·57 scotopic cd s m−2, the overall time course of A(t) was well described by the above equation with γ= 2·21, td= 3·1 ms, τω= 132 ms and α= 2·32 × 10−4 ms−2. An approximate halving of α improved the fit of the above equation to ERG a-wave and A(t)/Amo data obtained at t about 0-20 ms. Kinetic and sensitivity properties of A(t) suggest that it approximates the in vivo massed photocurrent response of the rods to a test flash, and imply that u(t) in the above equation is the approximate kinetic description of

  1. Susceptibility to the Flash-Beep Illusion Is Increased in Children Compared to Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innes-Brown, Hamish; Barutchu, Ayla; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Crewther, David P.; Grayden, David B.; Paolini, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Audio-visual integration was studied in children aged 8-17 (N = 30) and adults (N = 22) using the "flash-beep illusion" paradigm, where the presentation of two beeps causes a single flash to be perceived as two flashes ("fission" illusion), and a single beep causes two flashes to be perceived as one flash ("fusion" illusion). Children reported…

  2. Neural correlates of conceptual implicit memory and their contamination of putative neural correlates of explicit memory.

    PubMed

    Voss, Joel L; Paller, Ken A

    2007-04-01

    During episodic recognition tests, meaningful stimuli such as words can engender both conscious retrieval (explicit memory) and facilitated access to meaning that is distinct from the awareness of remembering (conceptual implicit memory). Neuroimaging investigations of one type of memory are frequently subject to the confounding influence of the other type of memory, thus posing a serious impediment to theoretical advances in this area. We used minimalist visual shapes (squiggles) to attempt to overcome this problem. Subjective ratings of squiggle meaningfulness varied idiosyncratically, and behavioral indications of conceptual implicit memory were evident only for stimuli given higher ratings. These effects did not result from perceptual-based fluency or from explicit remembering. Distinct event-related brain potentials were associated with conceptual implicit memory and with explicit memory by virtue of contrasts based on meaningfulness ratings and memory judgments, respectively. Frontal potentials from 300 to 500 msec after the onset of repeated squiggles varied systematically with perceived meaningfulness. Explicit memory was held constant in this contrast, so these potentials were taken as neural correlates of conceptual implicit memory. Such potentials can contaminate putative neural correlates of explicit memory, in that they are frequently attributed to the expression of explicit memory known as familiarity. These findings provide the first neural dissociation of these two memory phenomena during recognition testing and underscore the necessity of taking both types of memory into account in order to obtain valid neural correlates of specific memory functions. PMID:17412965

  3. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Storm Integrated Lightning Flash Extent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Peterson, Harold S.; Schultz, Elise V.; Matthee, Retha; Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A,; Bain, Lamont

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in thunderstorms, such as flash rate, type (intracloud [IC] vs. cloud-to-ground [CG] ) and extent. Data and Methodology: a) NASA MSFC Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. b) LNOM provides estimates of flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles (Koshak et al. 2012). c) LNOM lightning characteristics are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler (DD) and polarimetric radar analyses of UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, Cband, polarimetric) and KHTX (S-band, Doppler).

  4. Front-flash thermal imaging characterization of continuous fiber ceramic composites.

    SciTech Connect

    Deemer, C.

    1999-04-23

    Infrared thermal imaging has become increasingly popular as a nondestructive evaluation method for characterizing materials and detecting defects. One technique, which was utilized in this study, is front-flash thermal imaging. We have developed a thermal imaging system that uses this technique to characterize advanced material systems, including continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) components. In a front-flash test, pulsed heat energy is applied to the surface of a sample, and decay of the surface temperature is then measured by the thermal imaging system. CFCC samples with drilled flat-bottom holes at the back surface (to serve as ''flaws'') were examined. The surface-temperature/time relationship was analyzed to determine the depths of the flaws from the front surface of the CFCC material. Experimental results on carbon/carbon and CFCC samples are presented and discussed.

  5. Memory and Self–Neuroscientific Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Markowitsch, Hans J.

    2013-01-01

    Relations between memory and the self are framed from a number of perspectives—developmental aspects, forms of memory, interrelations between memory and the brain, and interactions between the environment and memory. The self is seen as dividable into more rudimentary and more advanced aspects. Special emphasis is laid on memory systems and within them on episodic autobiographical memory which is seen as a pure human form of memory that is dependent on a proper ontogenetic development and shaped by the social environment, including culture. Self and episodic autobiographical memory are seen as interlocked in their development and later manifestation. Aside from content-based aspects of memory, time-based aspects are seen along two lines—the division between short-term and long-term memory and anterograde—future-oriented—and retrograde—past-oriented memory. The state dependency of episodic autobiographical is stressed and implications of it—for example, with respect to the occurrence of false memories and forensic aspects—are outlined. For the brain level, structural networks for encoding, consolidation, storage, and retrieval are discussed both by referring to patient data and to data obtained in normal participants with functional brain imaging methods. It is elaborated why descriptions from patients with functional or dissociative amnesia are particularly apt to demonstrate the facets in which memory, self, and personal temporality are interwoven. PMID:24967303

  6. Measuring hot flashes: summary of a National Institutes of Health workshop.

    PubMed

    Miller, Heather G; Li, Rose Maria

    2004-06-01

    to moving this area forward. Scientific advances are being made increasingly at the interfaces of traditional disciplines, and approaches to science are becoming more integrative. Finding appropriate collaborators from other disciplines is not necessarily easy, and meeting a collaborator from another discipline is only the first step in building a multidisciplinary research team. Effective teams begin with compelling reasons for their existence, but further incentives must be developed to ensure full realization of their potential. The success of team science depends on individuals who are comfortable with boundary-crossing activities. Working as part of a team that is seeking solutions to complex problems requires a willingness to work in an interdisciplinary environment, to collaborate with different types of organizations, and to recognize the importance of a variety of roles in the project. It is likely that a multidisciplinary approach to hot flash research would be helpful given the number of physiologic, clinical, and behavioral factors involved. For example, psychologists and sociologists could contribute to identifying factors that may influence the placebo effect, such as pill color; developing and validating questionnaire items and diary formats; ascertaining the effect of mode of data collection on the quality of the resulting data; and determining the best ways to provide information to subjects. However, if they were part of a multidisciplinary team that included basic scientists, clinicians, and bioengineers, different questions might be asked, and better tools might be developed to collect both subjective and objective data on hot flashes. The increasing emphasis on collaborative science is also embraced at the NIH level. Since May 2002, the NIH has been engaged in a series of activities collectively known as the "NIH Roadmap," whose goal, in keeping with the NIH mission of uncovering new knowledge about the prevention, detection, diagnosis, and

  7. A study of falling-jet flash evaporators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Olson, D. A.; Bharathan, D.; Green, H. J.

    1982-11-01

    Experimental results of flash evaporation from sheets of water, 3.2 mm and 6.3 mm thick and 27.9 cm wide, falling freely in the presence of their own vapor, are reported. With no flashing the jets fall in coherent sheets, but with flashing the jets were observed to spread and break up into droplets. Flashing was characterized by an effectiveness parameter, which increased with increasing water temperature and jet length. Variations in water flow rate and heat flux did not influence the effectiveness appreciably.

  8. An Improved B+ Tree for Flash File Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havasi, Ferenc

    Nowadays mobile devices such as mobile phones, mp3 players and PDAs are becoming evermore common. Most of them use flash chips as storage. To store data efficiently on flash, it is necessary to adapt ordinary file systems because they are designed for use on hard disks. Most of the file systems use some kind of search tree to store index information, which is very important from a performance aspect. Here we improved the B+ search tree algorithm so as to make flash devices more efficient. Our implementation of this solution saves 98%-99% of the flash operations, and is now the part of the Linux kernel.

  9. RAT FLASH EVOKED POTENTIAL PEAK N160 AMPLITUDE: MODULATION BY RELATIVE FLASH INTENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flash evoked potential (FEP) of rats has a large negative (N160) approximately 160 msec following stimulation. his peak has been reported to be modulated by the subject's state of behavioral arousal and influenced by several test parameters. hese experiments bind the influenc...

  10. Sn whiskers removed by energy photo flashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, N.; Yang, M.; Novak, J.; Igor, P.; Osterman, M.

    2012-10-01

    Sn whiskers have been known to be the major issue resulting in electronic circuit shorts. In this study, we present a novel energy photo flashing approach (photosintering) to shorten and eliminate Sn whiskers. It has been found that photosintering is very effective to modify and remove Sn whiskers; only a sub-millisecond duration photosintering can amazingly get rid of over 90 vol.% of Sn whiskers. Moreover, this photosintering approach has also been proved to cause no damages to electronic devices, suggesting it is a potentially promising way to improve Sn-based electronic surface termination.

  11. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observation of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes (TGFs) by Gamma-Ray Telescopes. These were: (1) BATSE /Compton Observatory, (2) Solar Spectroscopic Imager, (3) AGILE Gamma-ray Telescope, and (4) Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It contains charts which display the counts over time, a map or the TGFs observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). and a map showing the latitude and longitude of 85 of the TGFs observed by the Fermi GBM.

  12. Flash floods in Catalonia: a recurrent situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasat, M. C.; Lindbergh, S.; Llasat-Botija, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Zaragoza, A.

    2009-09-01

    A database with information about the social impact produced by all the flood events recorded in Catalonia between 1982 and 2007 has been built. Original information comes from the INUNGAMA database (1900-2000) presented by Barnolas and Llasat (2007), the PRESSGAMA database (1982-2007) (Llasat et al., in rev.) and information from different published works (Barriendos et al, 2003; Barriendos and Pomés, 1993). Social impact has been obtained systematically in basis to news press data and, occasionally, in basis to insurance data. Flood events have been classified in ordinary floods, extraordinary floods and catastrophic ones, following the proposal of Llasat et al (2005). However, having in mind the flash floods effects, some new categories concerning casualties and car damages have also been introduced. The spatial and temporal distribution of these flood events has been analysed. Results have been compared with those obtained for the period 1900-2000 (Barnolas and Llasat, 2007) and 1350-2000 (Barrera et al, 2006). In order to better estimate the social impact and vulnerability some indicators have been defined and analyzed for some specific cases and a specific region. Besides the indicators applied in the INUNCAT Plan to obtain a cartography of flood risk in Catalonia, other ones like the number of cars affected or the number of request received by the meteorological service, has been also taken into account. These indicators allow analyzing global and temporal trends as well as characterizing the events. The selected region has been the Maresme, which is a flood prone region with a great density of population and that experiences every year one or more flash floods. The annual number of floods shows a positive trend that cannot be justified by the rainfall trend. Both vulnerability and hazard components have been considered and a discussion about the flood prevention measures is presented. The third part of this work has been centred in the analysis and

  13. Apollo-Soyuz light-flash observations.

    PubMed

    Budinger, T F; Tobias, C A; Huesman, R H; Upham, F T; Wieskamp, T F; Hoffman, R A

    1977-01-01

    While dark adapted, two Apollo-Soyuz astronauts saw eighty-two light flash events during a complete 51 degrees orbit which passed near the north magnetic pole and through the South Atlantic Anomaly. The frequency of events at the polar parts of the orbit is 25 times that noted in equatorial latitudes and no increased frequency was noted in the South Atlantic Anomaly at the 225-km altitude. The expected flux of heavy particles at the northern and southern points is 1-2 min-1 per eye, and the efficiency for seeing HZE particles which were below the Cerenkov threshold is 50%. PMID:11958208

  14. Flash evaporation from turbulent water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Penney, T.

    1983-02-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of flash evaporation from turbulent planar and axisymmetric water jets are reported. In the range of jet thicknesses tested, for planar jets, due to shattering, evaporation is found to be nearly independent of the jet thickness. Evaporation from the planar jets was found to be dependent on the initial level of turbulence in the water supply manifold. An approximate analysis to model the evaporation process based on the physical phenomena and experimental observations is outlined. Comparisons between the experimental data and analytical predictions of the liquid temperature variation along the jet are included. Use of screens in the water jet are shown to be effective for enhancing evaporation.

  15. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed 79 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds.

  16. Potential Use of a Bayesian Network for Discriminating Flash Type from Future GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solakiewiz, Richard; Koshak, William

    2008-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of the ratio of cloud flashes to ground flashes may provide a better understanding of thunderstorm dynamics, intensification, and evolution, and it may be useful in severe weather warning. The National Lighting Detection Network TM (NLDN) senses ground flashes with exceptional detection efficiency and accuracy over most of the continental United States. A proposed Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) aboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) will look at the western hemisphere, and among the lightning data products to be made available will be the fundamental optical flash parameters for both cloud and ground flashes: radiance, area, duration, number of optical groups, and number of optical events. Previous studies have demonstrated that the optical flash parameter statistics of ground and cloud lightning, which are observable from space, are significantly different. This study investigates a Bayesian network methodology for discriminating lightning flash type (ground or cloud) using the lightning optical data and ancillary GOES-R data. A Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) is set up with lightning as a "root" and data observed by GLM as the "leaves." This allows for a direct calculation of the joint probability distribution function for the lighting type and radiance, area, etc. Initially, the conditional probabilities that will be required can be estimated from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) together with NLDN data. Directly manipulating the joint distribution will yield the conditional probability that a lightning flash is a ground flash given the evidence, which consists of the observed lightning optical data [and possibly cloud data retrieved from the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) in a more mature Bayesian network configuration]. Later, actual GLM and NLDN data can be used to refine the estimates of the conditional probabilities used in the model; i.e., the Bayesian

  17. What Can You Do for Hot Flashes and Other Menopausal Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a Change What Can You Do for Hot Flashes and Other Menopausal Symptoms Check with your ... you still need to treat your menopausal symptoms. HOT FLASHES AND NIGHT SWEATS If hot flashes and/ ...

  18. Memory loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually include asking questions of family members and friends. For this reason, they should come to the appointment. Medical history questions may include: Type of memory loss, such as short-term or long-term ...

  19. Characteristics of flash initiations in a supercell cluster with tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong; MacGorman, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Flash initiations within a supercell cluster during 10-11 May 2010 in Oklahoma were investigated based on observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array and the Norman, Oklahoma, polarimetric radar (KOUN). The flash initiations at positions dominated by graupel, dry snow, small hail and crystals accounted for 44.3%, 44.1%, 8.0% and 3.0% of the total flashes, respectively. During the tornadic stage of the southern supercell in the cluster, flash initiations associated with graupel occupied the main body, the right flank and the forward flank of the supercell, while those associated with dry snow dominated the outskirts of the adjacent forward anvil, right anvil and rear anvil. The flash initiations associated with small hail were concentrated around the main updraft, particularly toward its front side. Highly dense flash initiations were located in the regions overlying the differential reflectivity (ZDR) arc and right anvil. The average initial height of the flashes decreased gradually from the rear to the front and from the right to the left flanks, while the height range over which initiations occurred reached a maximum at the front of the updraft. The flashes that were initiated in the adjacent forward anvils were largest on average, followed by those in the regions ahead of the updraft and near the ZDR arc. This study supports the concept of charge pockets and further deduces that the pockets in the right anvil are the most abundant and compact due to the frequent flash initiations, small-sized flashes and thin layers including flash initiations.

  20. Solution processed silver sulfide thin films for filament memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shong

    Filament Memories based on resistive switching have been attracting attention in recent years as a potential replacement for flash memory in CMOS technology and as a potential candidate memory for low-cost, large-area electronics. These memories operate at low voltages with fast switching speeds. These devices are based on ionic conduction through an electrolyte layer and differ fundamentally in operation from conventional flash memory, which is based on the field effect transistor. To facilitate development of this technology, effects of film structure on ionic and electronic conducting properties and the filament formation processes must be studied. In this work, silver sulfide, a mixed ionic-electronic conductor, is used as a model material for studying the solution processing of filament memories, and to study the impact of film structure on conducting and switching properties. Three different solution processing methods are investigated for depositing silver sulfide: sulfidation of elemental silver films, and sintering of two types of silver sulfide nanoparticles. Effects of nanoparticle sintering conditions on electrolyte structured and mixed conducting properties are investigated by a combination of X-ray diffraction, electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Impact of forming voltage and time on filament morphology is examined to provide an overall view of the impact of electrical and material parameters on device operation.

  1. Flash Infrared Thermography Contrast Data Analysis Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast versus time evolutions from the flash thermography inspection infrared video data. The analysis calculates thermal measurement features from the contrast evolution. In addition, simulation of the contrast evolution is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat-bottom holes in the subject material. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography data in order to characterize delamination-like anomalies. The thermal measurement features relate to the anomaly characteristics. The contrast evolution simulation is matched to the measured contrast evolution over an anomaly to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width which correspond to the depth and diameter of the equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) similar to that used as input to the simulation. A similar analysis, in terms of diameter and depth of an equivalent uniform gap (EUG) providing a best match with the measured contrast evolution, is also provided. An edge detection technique called the half-max is used to measure width and length of the anomaly. Results of the half-max width and the EFBH/EUG diameter are compared to evaluate the anomaly. The information provided here is geared towards explaining the IR Contrast technique. Results from a limited amount of validation data on reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) hardware are included in this paper.

  2. Case studies of selected Project "Flash" events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, K. A.; Michaelides, S. C.; Savvidou, K.; Orphanou, A.; Constantinides, P.; Charalambous, M.; Michaelides, M.

    2009-03-01

    Flooding is a consequence of the prevailing meteorological situation, the intensity and duration of precipitation, geomorphology, human activities over a geographical region and other factors. Floods result in damage and destruction of infrastructure and private property and, in some cases, in fatalities. Flash floods are sudden and quite localized in extend, characterized by excessive amounts of rainfall within a short period of time and are distinguished from other floods by their degree of severity. The broader knowledge concerning flash floods is useful for the better understanding of the underlying thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms, as well as the associated physical processes. The wider understanding of flashfloods can form part of an integrated system for short and very short forecasting of these events. In the present study, the synoptic, dynamic and thermodynamic conditions during the development of a baroclinic depression which affected the area of Cyprus on 6 November 2005 are studied. The depression was associated with extreme weather phenomena, such as thunderstorms, a water spout and high precipitation accumulations. The results indicate the importance of the dynamic parameters in the system's development and the thermodynamic analysis has shown the convective potential of the atmosphere.

  3. Ultrafast Spectroscopy on Solids at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, David; Acremann, Yves; Scherz, Andreas; Beye, Martin; Föhlisch, Alexander; Schlotter, William; Beeck, Torbin; Sorgenfrei, Florian; Pietzsch, Annette; Wurth, Wilfried; Stöhr, Joachim

    2009-03-01

    X-ray/VUV free electron laser (FEL) facilities such as FLASH, LCLS, and the European X-FEL open the door to a wide variety of exciting experiments in x-ray physics. Due to the random stochastic processes governing FEL radiation and the difficulties in tuning an FEL, it has not been clear whether spectroscopy could be done using such sources. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of doing near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids. Samples consisting of LaMnO and Al films, respectively, were lithographically fabricated on thin silicon nitride membranes. Ultrafast femtosecond pulses of radiation from the FLASH FEL were dispersed by the monochromator grating at beamline PG2 and impinged upon the samples. Absorption was measured in transmission using a Ce:YAG crystal and imaged by an intensified CCD. The incident intensity was measured through a blank nitride membrane next to the sample. By tuning the FEL to the La N-edge (˜102eV) and the Al L-edge (˜72eV), respectively, we take an entire NEXAFS absorption spectrum in each shot. Spectra are calculated using many shots in order to reduce statistical uncertainties.

  4. Flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, M.J.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-03-01

    Despite the extensive research into the pyrolysis of lignin, the underlying chemical reactions that lead to product formation are poorly understood. Detailed mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of biomass and lignin under conditions relevant to current process conditions could provide insight into utilizing this renewable resource for the production of chemicals and fuel. Currently, flash or fast pyrolysis is the most promising process to maximize the yields of liquid products (up to 80 wt %) from biomass by rapidly heating the substrate to moderate temperatures, typically 500{degrees}C, for short residence times, typically less than two seconds. To provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds that contain a {beta}-ether. linkage and {alpha}- or {gamma}-alcohol, which are key structural elements in lignin. The dominant products from the FVP of PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh (PPE), PhC(OH)HCH{sub 2}OPh, and PhCH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 2}OH)OPh at 500{degrees}C can be attributed to homolysis of the weakest bond in the molecule (C-O bond) or 1,2-elimination. Surprisingly, the hydroxy-substituent dramatically increases the decomposition of PPE. It is proposed that internal hydrogen bonding is accelerating the reaction.

  5. Macromedia Flash as a Tool for Mathematics Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Joe; Summers, Tim

    2004-01-01

    Macromedia Flash is a powerful and robust development tool. Because of its graphical, sound, and animation capabilities (and ubiquitous browser plug-in), major companies employ it in their website development (see www.nike.com or www.espn.com). These same features also make Flash a valuable environment for building multi-representational "movies"…

  6. Treatment of Menopausal Hot Flashes with 5-Hydroxytryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Much recent research has focused on nonhormonal treatments for menopausal hot flashes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of 5-Hydroxytroptophan (5-HTP), the immediate precursor of serotonin, upon menopausal hot flashes. Selective, serotonergic, reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s), which increase the amount of serotonin in the synaptic gap, have shown some promise in the amelioration of hot flashes. Methods We administered 5-HTP or placebo, in double-blind fashion, to 24 postmenopausal women reporting frequent hot flashes. Treatment outcome was measured using a miniature, electronic, hot flash recorder. Results No significant effects of 150 mg/day 5-HTP upon hot flash frequency were found. The 5-HTP group had 23.8 ± 5.7 (SD) hot flashes/24 hours prior to treatment and 18.5 ± 9.6 at the end of treatment. The placebo group had 18.5 ± 9.6 before treatment and 22.6 ± 12.4 at treatment completion. Conclusions At the dose given, 5-HTP does not significantly ameliorate frequency of menopausal hot flashes, as measured objectively with an electronic recorder. Given the small size, this study must be considered preliminary in nature. PMID:20031347

  7. On the proportion of upward flashes to lightning research towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorgonskiy, Alexander; Rachidi, Farhad; Rubinstein, Marcos; Diendorfer, Gerhard; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    We compare in this paper direct measurements obtained on the towers on San Salvatore Mountain (Switzerland) and on the Gaisberg Mountain (Austria). They are situated in similar topographical environments but in different lightning activity zones. Direct measurements of lightning currents on these towers have revealed a major difference in terms of the number of downward flashes. While measurements made by Berger and co-workers revealed a significant number of downward flashes on the two towers on San Salvatore Mountain, more recent observations on the Gaisberg and Peissenberg towers were essentially composed of upward flashes. We use in this paper a new method to estimate the proportion of upward/downward flashes to a given tower, based on the data from lightning location systems. The analysis using the proposed method explains the discrepancy in terms of the measured number of downward flashes in the Gaisberg and San Salvatore towers. The analysis presented reveals also that in the evaluation of the percentage of upward flashes initiated from a tall structure, different parameters should be carefully examined, namely (i) the value of the ground flash density, (ii) the topographical conditions, and (iii) the presence of other tall structures in the region from which upward flashes might be initiated.

  8. Algorithms for Lunar Flash Video Search, Measurement, and Archiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley; Suggs, Robert; Cooke, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Lunar meteoroid impact flashes provide a method to estimate the flux of the large meteoroid flux and thus their hazard to spacecraft. Although meteoroid impacts on the Moon have been detected using video methods for over a decade, the difficulty of manually searching hours of video for the rare, extremely brief impact flashes has discouraged the technique's systematic implementation. A prototype has been developed for the purpose of automatically searching lunar video records for impact flashes, eliminating false detections, editing the returned possible flashes, Z and archiving and documenting the results. The theory and organization of the program is discussed with emphasis on the filtering out of several classes of false detections and retaining the brief portions of the raw video necessary for in depth analysis of the flashes detected. Several utilities for measurement, analysis, and location of the flashes on the moon included in the program are demonstrated. Application of the program to a year's worth of lunar observations is discussed along with examples of impact flashes as well as several classes of false impact flashes.

  9. Two probable optical flashes from gamma-ray bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, B. E.; Bradt, H. V.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Cline, T. L.; Desai, U.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two images on archival photographic plates which are most likely records of optical flashes from gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) were examined. One of these images appears on a 1901 plate in the field of the Nov. 5, 1979 GRB, while the other is in the field of the Jan. 13, 1979 GRB on a plate exposed in 1944. The 1901 optical transient image is circular in shape, while all normal star images are trailed by 8 in. No optical transients are found in a control region which is 34.3 times larger than the GRB error regions examined. Independent limits on the optical flash rate from the sky yield a probability of less than 0.0001 that any one of the optical transients is due to a background flash. A total exposure of 2.7 years was examined for GRB flashes at known GRB locations on the Harvard plates and a total of three GRB flashes were seen, that the average recurrence time scale for optical flashes is roughly one year. The optical fluence of these optical flashes was measured. For the three currently known GRB optical flashes, the ratio of gamma-ray fluence (from a modern burst) to the optical fluence (from a archival burst) were measured to be 800, 900, and 900.

  10. Two probable optical flashes from gamma-ray bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, B. E.; Bradt, H. V.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two images on archival photographic plates which are most likely records of optical flashes from gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) were examined. One of these images appears on a 1901 plate in the field of the 5 Nov. 1979 GRB, while the other is in the field of the 13 Jan. 1979 GRB on a plate exposed in 1944. The 1901 optical transient image is circular in shape, while all normal star images are trailed by 8 in. No optical transients are found in a control region which is 34.3 times larger than the GRB error regions examined. Independent limits on the optical flash rate from the sky yield a probability of less than 0.0001 that any one of the optical transients is due to a background flash. A total exposure of 2.7 years was examined for GRB flashes at known GRB locations on the Harvard plates and a total of three GRB flashes were seen, that the average recurrence time scale for optical flashes is roughly one year. The optical fluence of these optical flashes was measured. For the three currently known GRB optical flashes, the ratio of gamma-ray fluence (from a modern burst) to the optical fluence (from a archival burst) were measured to be 800, 900, and 900.

  11. Algorithms for Lunar Flash Video Search, Measurement, and Archiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley; Suggs, Robert; Cooke, William

    2007-01-01

    Lunar meteoroid impact flashes provide a method to estimate the flux of the large meteoroid flux and thus their hazard to spacecraft. Although meteoroid impacts on the Moon have been detected using video methods for over a decade, the difficulty of manually searching hours of video for the rare, extremely brief impact flashes has discouraged the technique's systematic implementation. A prototype has been developed for the purpose of automatically searching Lunar video records for impact flashes, eliminating false detections, editing the returned possible flashes, and archiving and documenting the results. The theory and organization of the program is discussed with emphasis on the filtering out of several classes of false detections and retaining the brief portions of the raw video necessary for in depth analysis of the flashes detected. Several utilities for measurement, analysis, and location of the flashes on the moon included in the program are demonstrated. Application of the program to a year's worth of Lunar observations is discussed along with examples of impact flashes as well as several classes of false impact flashes.

  12. Behavioral Treatment of Menopausal Hot Flashes: Evaluation by Objective Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germaine, Leonard M.; Freedman, Robert R.

    1984-01-01

    Used latency to hot flash onset under heat stress to evaluate the effects of relaxation treatment or a control procedure in 14 menopausal women. Following treatment, the latency to hot flash onset during heat stress was increased in relaxation subjects. Reported symptom frequency was significantly reduced in relaxation subjects. (BH)

  13. Kinetics of Reactions of Monomeric Nitrosomethane Induced by Flash Photolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubek, H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the kinetics of dimerization of nitrosamine induced by a flash of light is measured. The experiment can be performed with a commercial ultraviolet-VIS spetrophotometer with easy to make modifications. The experiment demonstrates a flash photolysis system not always available in university chemistry laboratories.…

  14. Acceleration of electrons during the flash phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the electron acceleration process operating during the flash phase of solar flares are deduced from the high time resolution observations of impulsive solar X rays greater than or equal to 10 keV and other flash phase emissions from small solar flares, and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharudin, Z. A.; Ahmad, Noor Azlinda; Mäkelä, J. S.; Fernando, Mahendra; Cooray, Vernon

    2014-02-01

    The characteristics of the negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in Malaysia are studied by analyzing the electric fields generated by the whole flash in nanosecond resolution. A total of 405 strokes obtained from 100 successive negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were analyzed, which were recorded from seven convective thunderstorms during the southwest monsoon period, i.e. from April to June 2009. It was found that the total number of interstroke intervals has an arithmetic mean value of 86 ms, a geometric mean value of 67 ms and does not depend on the return stroke order. Of the 100 negative ground flashes, 38 flashes (38%) have at least one subsequent return-stroke (SRS) whose electric field peak was greater than that of the first return-stroke (RS). Furthermore, 58 (19%) out of 305 SRS have electric field peak larger than those of the first RS. The arithmetic and geometric mean ratio between the peak electric field of the SRS and the peak electric field of the first RS are 0.7 and 0.6, respectively. The percentage of single-stroke flashes was 16% while the mean number of strokes per flash and maximum number of stroke per flash were 4 and 14, respectively.

  16. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Storm Integrated Lightning Flash Extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, L. D.; Koshak, W. J.; Peterson, H. S.; Schultz, E. V.; Matthee, R.; Schultz, C. J.; Petersen, W. A.; Bain, L.

    2012-12-01

    (non-severe multi-cell) over Northern Alabama. The LNOM lightning characteristics are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar analyses applied to observations from a nearby Doppler radar network, including the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band, polarimetric). The LNOM estimated SAD and lightning NOx production profiles are placed in the context of radar derived profiles of vertical motion, precipitation types and amounts. Finally, these analyses are used to determine if storm integrated flash channel extent is as well correlated to volumetric updraft and precipitation ice characteristics in the mixed phase region as flash rate for these individual convective cells.

  17. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Storm Integrated Lightning Flash Extent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Koshak, William; Petersen, Harold; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Matthee, Retha; Bain, Lamont

    2012-01-01

    (non-severe multi-cell) over Northern Alabama. The LNOM lightning characteristics are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar analyses applied to observations from a nearby Doppler radar network, including the UA Huntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band, polarimetric). The LNOM estimated SAD and lightning NOx production profiles are placed in the context of radar derived profiles of vertical motion, precipitation types and amounts. Finally, these analyses are used to determine if storm integrated flash channel extent is as well correlated to volumetric updraft and precipitation ice characteristics in the mixed phase region as flash rate for these individual convective cells.

  18. Studying the hydro-meteorological extremes. The benefits from the European Flash Flood research oriented HYDRATE project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsanis, Ioannis K.; Koutroulis, Aristeidis G.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Grillakis, Emmanouil G.

    2010-05-01

    The present paper summarizes the advances of flash flood research for the Greek case study, within the frame of HYDRATE EC funded project. As a first step, a collation of homogenous primary data on flash floods occurred in Greece based on various data sources resulted in 21 documented events, enriching the HYDRATE database. Specific major events were selected for further detailed data collation and analysis. A common intensive post event field survey was conducted by various researchers with different skills and experience, in order to document the 18th of September 2007, Western Slovenia flash flood event. The observation strategy and the lessons learned during this campaign were applied successfully for surveying an event in Crete. Two flash flood events occurred in Crete were selected for detailed analysis, the 13th of January 1994 event occurred in Giofiros basin and the 17th of October 2006 event occurred in Almirida basin. Several techniques, like distributed rainfall-runoff modelling, hydraulic modelling, indirect and empirical peak discharge estimation, were applied for the understanding of the dominant flash flood processes and the effect of initial conditions on peak discharge. In a more general framework, the seasonality of the hydrometeorologic characteristics of floods that occurred in Crete during the period 1990-2007 and the atmospheric circulation conditions during the flood events were examined. During the three and a half years research period, many lessons have learnt from a fruitful collaboration among the project partners. HYDRATE project improved the scientific basis of flash flood research and provided research knowledge on flood risk management.

  19. Corrosion testing in flash tanks of kraft pulp mills

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion observed in the first flash tanks in kraft pulp mills with modified cooking practices was characterized. Coupons of carbon steel (CS), several stainless steels (SS), and Ti were exposed at two mills. At one mill, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the No. 1 and No. 2 flash tank. At the other mill, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank No. 1. The results of the exposures showed that both CS and Ti suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the SS suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the corrosion resistance in the flash tank was the same that would be expected in a reducing acid environment. Attack by organic acids was concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  20. Updating memories--the role of prediction errors in memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Exton-McGuinness, Marc T J; Lee, Jonathan L C; Reichelt, Amy C

    2015-02-01

    Memories are not static imprints of past experience, but rather are dynamic entities which enable us to predict outcomes of future situations and inform appropriate behaviours. In order to maintain the relevance of existing memories to our daily lives, memories can be updated with new information via a process of reconsolidation. In this review we describe recent experimental advances in the reconsolidation of both appetitive and aversive memory, and explore the neuronal mechanisms that underpin the conditions under which reconsolidation will occur. We propose that a prediction error signal, originating from dopaminergic midbrain neurons, is necessary for destabilisation and subsequent reconsolidation of a memory. PMID:25453746

  1. Estimation of the relative severity of floods in small ungauged catchments for preliminary observations on flash flood preparedness: a case study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il

    2012-04-01

    An increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration has caused significant danger and loss of life and property in Korea as well as many other parts of the World. Since such floods usually accompanied by rapid runoff and debris flow rise quite quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood damage, this study presents a new flash flood indexing methodology to promptly provide preliminary observations regarding emergency preparedness and response to flash flood disasters in small ungauged catchments. Flood runoff hydrographs are generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the annual maximum rainfall series of long-term observed data in the two selected small ungauged catchments. The relative flood severity factors quantifying characteristics of flood runoff hydrographs are standardized by the highest recorded maximum value, and then averaged to obtain the flash flood index only for flash flood events in each study catchment. It is expected that the regression equations between the proposed flash flood index and rainfall characteristics can provide the basis database of the preliminary information for forecasting the local flood severity in order to facilitate flash flood preparedness in small ungauged catchments. PMID:22690208

  2. Additions and Improvements to the FLASH Code for Simulating High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2015-11-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic high energy density physics (HEDP) community. We summarize these capabilities, with particular emphasis on recent additions and improvements. These include advancements in the optical ray tracing laser package, with methods such as bi-cubic 2D and tri-cubic 3D interpolation of electron number density, adaptive stepping and 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration methods. Moreover, we showcase the simulated magnetic field diagnostic capabilities of the code, including induction coils, Faraday rotation, and proton radiography. We also describe several collaborations with the National Laboratories and the academic community in which FLASH has been used to simulate HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under grant PHY-0903997.

  3. Experimental evaluation of a solar fired flash pyrolysis of biomass reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Edwards, W.E.; Steenblik, R.A.; Brown, C.T.; Knight, J.A.; Elston, L.W.; Hurst, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    A Princeton-Georgia Institute of Technology flash pyrolysis of biomass test program was conducted at the DOE Advanced Components Test Facility (CTF) at Georgia Tech in August 1980. The 400 kWth solar thermal facility was used to provide a source of highly concentrated radiant energy for the flash pyrolysis of four types of biomass in a steam counterflow quartz reactor. The biomass materials were microcrystalline cellulose, hardwood sawdust, ground corn cob, and Kraft lignin. The experiments at Princeton and Georgia Tech suggest the use of concentrated radiant energy as a selective means for the production of either a hydrocarbon rich synthesis gas or sugar related syrups from biomass by flash pyrolysis. Experiments at Princeton have indicated that sugar related syrups are selectively produced when the biomass particles are rapidly heated by radiation in a cool gaseous environment. The gas temperatures in the reactor during the test program at Georgia Tech were relatively high, which selectively turned the chemistry toward the production of hydrocarbon rich synthesis gases.

  4. Flood hazard assessment in areas prone to flash flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvočka, Davor; Falconer, Roger A.; Bray, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Contemporary climate projections suggest that there will be an increase in the occurrence of high-intensity rainfall events in the future. These precipitation extremes are usually the main cause for the emergence of extreme flooding, such as flash flooding. Flash floods are among the most unpredictable, violent and fatal natural hazards in the world. Furthermore, it is expected that flash flooding will occur even more frequently in the future due to more frequent development of extreme weather events, which will greatly increase the danger to people caused by flash flooding. This being the case, there will be a need for high resolution flood hazard maps in areas susceptible to flash flooding. This study investigates what type of flood hazard assessment methods should be used for assessing the flood hazard to people caused by flash flooding. Two different types of flood hazard assessment methods were tested: (i) a widely used method based on an empirical analysis, and (ii) a new, physically based and experimentally calibrated method. Two flash flood events were considered herein, namely: the 2004 Boscastle flash flood and the 2007 Železniki flash flood. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the areas susceptible to extreme flooding, the flood hazard assessment should be conducted using methods based on a mechanics-based analysis. In comparison to standard flood hazard assessment methods, these physically based methods: (i) take into account all of the physical forces, which act on a human body in floodwater, (ii) successfully adapt to abrupt changes in the flow regime, which often occur for flash flood events, and (iii) rapidly assess a flood hazard index in a relatively short period of time.

  5. Mapping Flash Flood Severity in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharia, M.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Gourley, J. J.; Hong, Y.; Vergara, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    Flash floods have been a major natural hazard in terms of both fatalities and property damage. In the United States, flash floods have only been characterized on a case study basis due to the lack of a comprehensive database matching flood characteristics with geospatial and geomorphologic information. To characterize the ability of a basin to produce flash floods, a new variable called "Flashiness" is derived from the slope of the rising limb in hydrograph time series. It is the basis to document and predict the flash flood potential and severity over the U.S. First a representative and long archive of flood events spanning 78 years is used to analyze the spatial and temporal variability of observed flashiness. The areas and seasons prone to flash floods are documented, highlighting the flash flood alley in Texas, Appalachians, West Coast, and North American monsoon in Arizona etc. Then the flashiness is linked to geomorphologic and climatologic attributes to identify the basin characteristics driving the ability to produce flash floods. The significant impact of characteristics such as slope, precipitation, and basin area are quantified. Next the model is used to predict flashiness all over the continental U.S., specifically over regions poorly covered by hydrological observations. It highlights ungauged areas prone to flash floods such as parts of Florida, Southern Wisconsin, Montana and South Dakota etc. Finally these findings are validated using the National Weather Service storm reports and a historical flood fatalities database. This analysis framework will serve as a baseline for evaluating distributed hydrologic model simulations such as the Flooded Locations And Simulated Hydrographs Project (FLASH) (http://flash.ou.edu).

  6. Features of positive ground flashes observed in Kathmandu Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Pitri Bhakta; Sharma, Shriram; Baral, Kedarnath

    2016-07-01

    Lightning vertical electric fields pertinent to the subtropical thunderstorms occurring over the rugged terrain have been measured and recorded at a hilly station Kathmandu, Nepal. In the present work, waveforms of the positive ground flashes have been selected from all the records and were analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that fine structure of electric field signature pertinent to the positive return stroke; have been analyzed and presented from Nepal. One hundred and thirty three (133) of the total of four hundred twenty-five (425) flashes were selected from seven thunderstorm days and analyzed. Of the data recorded for seven days, 133 flashes (31.3%) were positive flashes and 276 flashes (64.9%) were cloud flashes. Majority of the positive ground flashes were found to be single stroke ones, whereas, the average number of strokes per flash is found to be 1.1 with a maximum value of 4. Majority of the positive ground flashes were found either lacking the initial breakdown process and the leader stage or these processes could not be detected. The return strokes are found to be succeeded by large in cloud activity in the continuing current portion of the flash. The average zero-crossing time of the positive return strokes was found to be 60.45 μs with a range of 447.81 μs and the average rise time was found to be 9.44 μs with a range of 42.56 μs.

  7. Memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Squire, Larry R; Genzel, Lisa; Wixted, John T; Morris, Richard G

    2015-08-01

    Conscious memory for a new experience is initially dependent on information stored in both the hippocampus and neocortex. Systems consolidation is the process by which the hippocampus guides the reorganization of the information stored in the neocortex such that it eventually becomes independent of the hippocampus. Early evidence for systems consolidation was provided by studies of retrograde amnesia, which found that damage to the hippocampus-impaired memories formed in the recent past, but typically spared memories formed in the more remote past. Systems consolidation has been found to occur for both episodic and semantic memories and for both spatial and nonspatial memories, although empirical inconsistencies and theoretical disagreements remain about these issues. Recent work has begun to characterize the neural mechanisms that underlie the dialogue between the hippocampus and neocortex (e.g., "neural replay," which occurs during sharp wave ripple activity). New work has also identified variables, such as the amount of preexisting knowledge, that affect the rate of consolidation. The increasing use of molecular genetic tools (e.g., optogenetics) can be expected to further improve understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying consolidation. PMID:26238360

  8. Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Ivan; Furini, Cristiane R G; Myskiw, Jociane C

    2016-04-01

    Fear memory is the best-studied form of memory. It was thoroughly investigated in the past 60 years mostly using two classical conditioning procedures (contextual fear conditioning and fear conditioning to a tone) and one instrumental procedure (one-trial inhibitory avoidance). Fear memory is formed in the hippocampus (contextual conditioning and inhibitory avoidance), in the basolateral amygdala (inhibitory avoidance), and in the lateral amygdala (conditioning to a tone). The circuitry involves, in addition, the pre- and infralimbic ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the central amygdala subnuclei, and the dentate gyrus. Fear learning models, notably inhibitory avoidance, have also been very useful for the analysis of the biochemical mechanisms of memory consolidation as a whole. These studies have capitalized on in vitro observations on long-term potentiation and other kinds of plasticity. The effect of a very large number of drugs on fear learning has been intensively studied, often as a prelude to the investigation of effects on anxiety. The extinction of fear learning involves to an extent a reversal of the flow of information in the mentioned structures and is used in the therapy of posttraumatic stress disorder and fear memories in general. PMID:26983799

  9. Immunological memory to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Slifka, Mark K

    2004-08-01

    Immunological memory is defined by the ability of a host to remember a past encounter with a specific pathogen and to respond to it in an effective manner upon re-exposure. How long immunological memory can be maintained in the absence of re-infection continues to be a subject of great controversy. Recent studies on immunity following smallpox vaccination demonstrate that T-cell memory declines steadily with a half-life of 8-15 years, whereas antiviral antibody responses are maintained for up to 75 years without appreciable decline. By combining recent advances in quantitative immunology with historical accounts of protection against smallpox dating back to the time of Edward Jenner, we are gaining a better understanding of the duration and magnitude of immunological memory and how it relates to protective immunity. PMID:15245737

  10. Investigating of Memory - Colours of Intellectually Disabled Children and Virtual Game Addict Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sik Lányi, Cecília

    We describe an investigation of memory colours. For this investigation Flash test software was developed. 75 observers used this test software in 4 groups: average elementary school children (aged: 8-9 years), intellectually disabled children (age: 9-15), virtual game addict university students (average age: 20) and university students who play with VR games rarely or never (average age: 20). In this pilot test we investigated the difference of memory colours of these 4 groups.

  11. A Developmental Psychopathology Model of Overgeneral Autobiographical Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentino, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM) is a phenomenon that refers to difficulty retrieving specific autobiographical memories. The tendency to be overgeneral in autobiographical memory recall has been commonly observed among individuals with emotional disorders compared to those without emotional disorders. Despite significant advances in identifying…

  12. Resistive switching memory devices based on electrical conductance tuning in poly(4-vinyl phenol)-oxadiazole composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanmei; Miao, Fengjuan; Li, Rui; Wen, Dianzhong

    2015-11-28

    Nonvolatile memory devices, based on electrical conductance tuning in thin films of poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) and 2-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-5-(4-biphenylyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) composites, are fabricated. The current-voltage characteristics of the fabricated devices show different electrical conductance behaviors, such as the write-once read-many-times (WORM) memory effect, the rewritable flash memory effect and insulator behavior, which depend on the content of PBD in the PVP + PBD composites. The OFF and ON states of the WORM and rewritable flash memory devices are stable under a constant voltage stress or a continuous pulse voltage stress at a read voltage. The memory mechanism is deduced from the modeling of the nature of currents in both states in the devices. PMID:26490192

  13. Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Lightning Flash Rate over Northern Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Bain, Anthony L.; Matthee, Retha; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Deierling, Wiebke; Petersen, Walter A.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to examine the relationship between deep convection and the production of nitrogen oxides (NO (sub x)) via lightning (LNO (sub x)). A critical step in estimating LNO (sub x) production in a cloud-resolving model (CRM) without explicit lightning is to estimate the flash rate from available model parameters that are statistically and physically correlated. As such, the objective of this study is to develop, improve and evaluate lightning flash rate parameterizations in a variety of meteorological environments and storm types using radar and lightning mapping array (LMA) observations taken over Northern Alabama from 2005-2012, including during DC3. UAH's Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) and the Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler (WSR 88D) located at Hytop (KHTX) comprises the dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar network, which has been in operation since 2004. The northern Alabama LMA (NA LMA) in conjunction with Vaisala's National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) allow for a detailed depiction of total lightning during this period. This study will integrate ARMOR-KHTX dual Doppler/polarimetric radar and NA LMA lightning observations from past and ongoing studies, including the more recent DC3 results, over northern Alabama to form a large data set of 15-20 case days and over 20 individual storms, including both ordinary multicell and supercell convection. Several flash rate parameterizations will be developed and tested, including those based on 1) graupel/small hail volume; 2) graupel/small hail mass, and 3) convective updraft volume. Sensitivity of the flash rate parameterizations to storm intensity, storm morphology and environmental conditions will be explored.

  14. Luminosity with Intracloud-Type Initial Breakdown Pulses and Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Marshall, Thomas; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Orville, Richard

    2016-04-01

    High-speed video data for three hybrid lightning flashes show luminosity increases at visible wavelengths that are time-correlated with large, intracloud (IC) type initial breakdown (IB) pulses in electric field change (E-change) data. In one case, a diffuse luminosity increase is visible for 280-300 us, apparently centered near 9 km altitude. At the same time, locations of VHF sources and E-change pulses indicate breakdown activity occurring at altitudes of 9.2-10.2 km altitude, and the initial leader was developing rapidly upward. The second case has a diffuse luminosity increase at the time of three large IC-type IB pulses, while the initial leader is advancing upward from about 7 km altitude. In the third example, a series of luminosity bursts are visible at the times of several large-amplitude IC-type IB pulses, although the center of the activity is apparently above the video frame. In all three hybrid flashes, the luminous IC-type IB pulses are relatively complicated and large in E-change amplitude, and most have distinct electrostatic offset at horizontal distances of 20-25 km from a sensor. Such large amplitude IB pulses have been associated with the production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) in prior work [Marshall et al., 2013, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50866]. No satellite or ground-based TGF observations were available for these events, hence it is not known if these TGF candidates produced gammas or other high energy radiation. This presentation describes the video and E-change observations during the intracloud and cloud-to-ground initial breakdown periods of these flashes and implications for TGF production.

  15. EDITORIAL: Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei; Yang, J. Joshua; Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Non-volatile memory refers to the crucial ability of computers to store information once the power source has been removed. Traditionally this has been achieved through flash, magnetic computer storage and optical discs, and in the case of very early computers paper tape and punched cards. While computers have advanced considerably from paper and punched card memory devices, there are still limits to current non-volatile memory devices that restrict them to use as secondary storage from which data must be loaded and carefully saved when power is shut off. Denser, faster, low-energy non-volatile memory is highly desired and nanostructures are the critical enabler. This special issue on non-volatile memory based on nanostructures describes some of the new physics and technology that may revolutionise future computers. Phase change random access memory, which exploits the reversible phase change between crystalline and amorphous states, also holds potential for future memory devices. The chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a promising material in this field because it combines a high activation energy for crystallization and a relatively low crystallization temperature, as well as a low melting temperature and low conductivity, which accommodates localized heating. Doping is often used to lower the current required to activate the phase change or 'reset' GST but this often aggravates other problems. Now researchers in Korea report in-depth studies of SiO2-doped GST and identify ways of optimising the material's properties for phase-change random access memory [1]. Resistance switching is an area that has attracted a particularly high level of interest for non-volatile memory technology, and a great deal of research has focused on the potential of TiO2 as a model system in this respect. Researchers at HP labs in the US have made notable progress in this field, and among the work reported in this special issue they describe means to control the switch resistance and show

  16. Future Development of Dense Ferroelectric Memories for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpy, Stephen C.; Derbenwick, Gary F.

    2001-01-01

    The availability of high density, radiation tolerant, nonvolatile memories is critical for space applications. Ferroelectric memories, when fabricated with radiation hardened complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS), can be manufactured and packaged to provide high density replacements for Flash memory, which is not radiation tolerant. Previous work showed ferroelectric memory cells to be resistant to single event upsets and proton irradiation, and ferroelectric storage capacitors to be resistant to neutron exposure. In addition to radiation hardness, the fast programming times, virtually unlimited endurance, and low voltage, low power operation make ferroelectric memories ideal for space missions. Previously, a commercial double level metal 64-kilobit ferroelectric memory was presented. Although the capabilities of radiation hardened wafer fabrication facilities lag behind those of the most modern commercial wafer fabrication facilities, several paths to achieving radiation tolerant, dense ferroelectric memories are emerging. Both short and long term solutions are presented in this paper. Although worldwide major semiconductor companies are introducing commercial ferroelectric memories, funding limitations must be overcome to proceed with the development of high density, radiation tolerant ferroelectric memories.

  17. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  18. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-08-01

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds. PMID:21725305

  19. Memory clinics

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, D; Benbow, S M; Grizzell, M

    2006-01-01

    Memory clinics were first described in the 1980s. They have become accepted worldwide as useful vehicles for improving practice in the identification, investigation, and treatment of memory disorders, including dementia. They are provided in various settings, the setting determining clientele and practice. All aim to facilitate referral from GPs, other specialists, or by self referral, in the early stages of impairment, and to avoid the stigma associated with psychiatric services. They bring together professionals with a range of skills for the benefit of patients, carers, and colleagues, and contribute to health promotion, health education, audit, and research, as well as service to patients. PMID:16517802

  20. Characterization of the self magnetic pinch diode at high voltages for flash radiography.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova, Steve Ray; Portillo, Salvador; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Threadgold, James R.; Crotch, Ian; Ziska, Derek Raymond

    2008-10-01

    The Sandia Laboratories Advanced Radiographic Technologies Department, in collaboration with the United Kingdom Atomic Weapons Establishment, has been conducting research into the development of the Self-Magnetic-Pinched diode as an x-ray source suitable for flash radiographic experiments. We have demonstrated that this source is capable of meeting and exceeding the initial requirements of 250 rads (measured at one meter) with a 2.75 mm source spot-size. Recent experiments conducted on the RITS-6 accelerator have demonstrated the ability of this diode to meet intermediate requirements with a sub 3 mm source spot size and a dose in excess of 400 rads at one meter.

  1. Phonological and Sensory Short-Term Memory Are Correlates and Both Affected in Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laasonen, Marja; Virsu, Veijo; Oinonen, Suvi; Sandbacka, Mirja; Salakari, Anita; Service, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether poor short-term memory (STM) in developmental dyslexia affects the processing of sensory stimulus sequences in addition to phonological material. STM for brief binary non-verbal stimuli (light flashes, tone bursts, finger touches, and their crossmodal combinations) was studied in 20 Finnish adults with dyslexia and 24…

  2. Working Memory Capacity and the Antisaccade Task: Individual Differences in Voluntary Saccade Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; Schrock, Josef C.; Engle, Randall W.

    2004-01-01

    Performance on antisaccade trials requires the inhibition of a prepotent response (i.e., don't look at the flashing cue) and the generation and execution of a correct saccade in the opposite direction. The authors attempted to further specify the role of working memory (WM) span differences in the antisaccade task. They tested high- and low-span…

  3. Collaborative Memory: Cognitive Research and Theory.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Suparna; Pereira-Pasarin, Luciane P

    2010-11-01

    People often form and retrieve memories in the company of others. Yet, nearly 125 years of cognitive research on learning and memory has mainly focused on individuals working in isolation. Although important topics such as eyewitness memory and autobiographical memory have evaluated social influences, a study of group memory has progressed mainly within the provinces of history, anthropology, sociology, and social psychology. In this context, the recent surge in research on the cognitive basis of collaborative memory marks an important conceptual departure. As a first aim, we review these empirical and theoretical advances on the nature and influence of collaborative memory. Effects of collaboration are counterintuitive because individuals remember less when recalling in groups. Collaboration can also lead to forgetting and increase memory errors. Conversely, collaboration can also improve memory under proper conditions. As a second aim, we propose an overarching theoretical framework that specifies the cognitive mechanisms associated with the costs and benefits of collaboration on memory. A study of the reciprocal influences of the group and the individual on memory processes naturally draws upon several disciplines. Our aim is to elucidate the cognitive components of this complex phenomenon and situate this analysis within a broader interdisciplinary perspective. PMID:26161882

  4. Simulation, fabrication and characterization of a 3.3 V flash ZE 2PROM array implemented in a 0.8 μm CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaweera, J.; Ng, W. T.; Salama, C. A. T.

    1999-02-01

    This paper describes a Zener based flash memory cell (ZE 2PROM), programmed from hot electrons generated by a heavily doped reverse biased p +n + junction attached to the drain. The cell can be implemented in a NOR type memory array. It uses an orthogonal write technique to achieve fast programming with low power dissipation and reduced drain disturbance. The modeling of the charge transfer behavior of the flash ZE 2PROM cell is also done to describe the charging and discharging of the floating gate during programming and erasing. The flash ZE 2PROM arrays were implemented in a 0.8 μm lithography CMOS process flow in which the n-LDD step was replaced with a one sided p + boron implant with a doping level of ˜10 19 cm -3. This minor change to a standard CMOS process, makes the concept highly attractive for embedded memory applications. A programming time of 850 ns at 3.3 V supply was achieved on fabricated test devices.

  5. Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sandusky, John V.; Pitts, Todd Alan

    2008-09-02

    Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

  6. Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sandusky, John V.; Pitts, Todd Alan

    2009-02-24

    Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

  7. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.V.

    1993-12-01

    Even though this project in the past has concentrated on the measurement of thermal bimolecular reactions of atomic species with stable molecules by the flash or laser photolysis-shock tube (FP- or LP-ST) method using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) as the diagnostic technique, during the past year the authors have concentrated on studies of the thermal decompositions of selected chlorocarbon molecules. These studies are necessary if the degradation of chlorine containing organic molecules by incineration are to be understood at the molecular level. Clearly, destruction of these molecules will not only involve abstraction reactions, when possible, but also thermal decomposition followed by secondary reactions of the initially formed atoms and radicals. Studies on the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}Cl are complete, and the curve-of-growth for Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption has been determined. The new thermal decomposition studies are similar to those already reported for CH{sub 3}Cl.

  8. Correlated observations of three triggered lightning flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.; Hubert, P.; Barret, L.; Eybert-Berard, A.

    1984-01-01

    Three triggered lightning flashes, initiated during the Thunderstorm Research International Program (1981) at Langmuir Laboratory, New Mexico, are examined on the basis of three-dimensional return stroke propagation speeds and peak currents. Nonlinear relationships result between return stroke propagation speed and stroke peak current for 56 strokes, and between return stroke propagation speed and dart leader propagation speed for 32 strokes. Calculated linear correlation coefficients include dart leader propagation speed and ensuing return stroke peak current (32 strokes; r = 0.84); and stroke peak current and interstroke interval (69 strokes; r = 0.57). Earlier natural lightning data do not concur with the weak positive correlation between dart leader propagation speed and interstroke interval. Therefore, application of triggered lightning results to natural lightning phenomena must be made with certain caveats. Mean values are included for the three-dimensional return stroke propagation speed and for the three-dimensional dart leader propagation speed.

  9. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

  10. EUV resist processing with flash-lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, Julius Joseph; Kaneyama, Koji; Morita, Akihiko; Fuse, Kazuhiko; Kiyama, Hiroki; Asai, Masaya; Itani, Toshiro

    2012-03-01

    The reduction of line width roughness (LWR) remains a difficult issue for very fine patterns obtained with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Thus, the investigation of LWR-reduction from the viewpoint of resist processing has become necessary. Alternative bake processes, such as the flash-lamp (FL) has been proven feasible as for application in EUV resists. This work focuses on initial investigations for its use in post-development bake (post bake or PB). A polyhydroxystyrene-acryl hybrid EUV model resist was utilized and comparisons with 'no bake' and conventional hot-plate PB conditions were made. As a result, relatively improved LWR was obtained with FL PB with minimal effect on lithographic performance. Moreover, in the course of these experiments, two types of resist reflow mechanisms assumed to be the primary basis for the LWR improvement achieved, are discussed.

  11. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; von Kienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed more than 77 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds. The energy spectra of some TGFs have strong 511 keV positron annihilation lines, indicating that these TGFs contain a large fraction of positrons

  12. Dual analyte detection using tandem flash luminescence.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Maciej; Moore, Jeffrey A; Shreder, Kevin

    2002-02-11

    A heterogeneous, dual analyte-binding assay which makes use of the flash luminescence from both aequorin and an acridinium-9-carboxamide label is presented. The signal generating species were triggered both differentially and sequentially using Ca(2+) followed by basic peroxide. Both signals were resolved readily using a single photomultiplier tube without the need for multiwavelength detection. To demonstrate the tandem luminescence concept in a model assay system, dose-response curves for two analytes, biotinylated BSA and myoglobin, were generated using a competitive binding format. Because of the relatively short assay time and the well-resolved signals, this format will be useful in the development of dual analyte high-throughput assays. PMID:11814805

  13. An 'Anomalous' Triggered Lightning Flash in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T.; Jordan, D. M.; Mata, C.; Mata, A.

    2012-12-01

    Classical (grounded wire) rocket-and-wire triggered lightning flashes whose leaders do not traverse the path of the wire remnants are sometimes referred to as 'anomalous'. We present high-speed video images captured at 10 kilo-frames per second (kfps), with supporting data, to characterize an 'anomalous' rocket-triggered lightning flash that occurred on 15 May 2012 at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) in north-central Florida. The event begins as a classical rocket-triggered lightning flash with an upward positive leader (UPL) initiating from the tip of the wire at a height of about 280 m above ground level. The top 259 m of the trailing wire explodes 2.7 s after the rocket exits the launch tube, while the bottom 17 m of the wire does not explode (does not become luminous). Approximately 1.4 ms after wire explosion, a stepped leader initiates a few meters above the top of the wire remnants and propagates downward, attaching to the top of a grounded utility pole 2.1 ms after initiation and 117 m southwest of the launching facility. Beginning 600 μs prior to this sustained stepped leader development, attempted stepped leaders (luminous steps emanating from the UPL channel above the wire remnants) are observed in three locations: 20 m and 5 m above the top of the wire remnants and at the top of the wire remnants. Correlated electric field derivative (dE/dt), channel-base current, and high-speed video captured at 300 kfps reveal an electrical discharge of peak current 365 A initiating from about 17 m above the launching facility, apparently the top of the unexploded triggering wire, when the stepped leader is no more than 60 m above ground level. There are significant differences between the 'anomalous' triggered lightning flash described here and those observed in New Mexico and in France in the late 1970s and early 1980s: First, the time duration between explosion of our wire and the sustained stepped leader development a few meters

  14. MENOPAUSAL HOT FLASHES: MECHANISMS, ENDOCRINOLOGY, TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Hot flashes (HFs) are a rapid and exaggerated heat dissipation response, consisting of profuse sweating, peripheral vasodilation, and feelings of intense, internal heat. They are triggered by small elevations in core body temperature (Tc) acting within a greatly reduced thermoneutral zone, i.e., the Tc region between the upper (sweating) and lower (shivering) thresholds. This is due in part, but not entirely, to estrogen depletion at menopause. Elevated central sympathetic activation, mediated through α2-adrenergic receptors, is one factor responsible for narrowing of the thermoneutral zone. Procedures which reduce this activation, such as paced respiration and clonidine administration, ameliorate HFs as will peripheral cooling. HFs are responsible for some, but not all, of the sleep disturbance reported during menopause. Recent work calls into question the role of serotonin in HFs. PMID:24012626

  15. Measurement of g Using a Flashing LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzella, T.; Sundermier, J.; Sinacore, J.; Owen, C.; Takai, H.

    2008-10-01

    In one of the classic free-fall experiments, a small mass is attached to a strip of paper tape and both are allowed to fall through a spark timer, where sparks are generated at regular time intervals. Students analyze marks (dots) left on the tape by the timer, thereby generating distance-versus-time data, which they analyze to extract the acceleration due to gravity g with good results. The apparatus, however, is cumbersome and often frustrating for students. High-tech versions of this experiment are done with an object dropped and followed by a motion sensor connected to a computer. The sensor relies on ultrasonic ranging to record distance and time data, which may then be displayed graphically. Students inspect the graphs to determine the value of g. Although the results are excellent, the emphasis on the computer's ability to collect and analyze data leaves little analysis for the students to perform.2 Furthermore, neither technique gives an intuitive display of what is happening. The motivation for our work was to overcome these issues by developing an innovative method for measuring g. In our version of the experiment, students drop a flashing LED at a known frequency and record its trajectory using long exposure photography with a digital camera. Proper choice of flashing LED timing parameters produces an image that allows for an accurate measurement of g and at the same time helps to explain what happens during free fall. The experiment remains high-tech in the sense that students learn to use updated equipment to record data and to carry out the analysis.

  16. Flash ionization signature in coherent cyclotron emission from brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorgul, I.; Helling, Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Brown dwarfs (BDs) form mineral clouds in their atmospheres, where charged particles can produce large-scale discharges in the form of lightning resulting in substantial sudden increase of local ionization. BDs are observed to emit cyclotron radio emission. We show that signatures of strong transient atmospheric ionization events (flash ionization) can be imprinted on a pre-existing radiation. Detection of such flash ionization events will open investigations into the ionization state and atmospheric dynamics. Such events can also result from explosion shock waves, material outbursts or (volcanic) eruptions. We present an analytical model that describes the modulation of a pre-existing electromagnetic radiation by a time-dependent (flash) conductivity that is characteristic for flash ionization events like lightning. Our conductivity model reproduces the conductivity function derived from observations of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, and is applicable to astrophysical objects with strong temporal variations in the local ionization, as in planetary atmospheres and protoplanetary discs. We show that the field responds with a characteristic flash-shaped pulse to a conductivity flash of intermediate intensity. More powerful ionization events result in smaller variations of the initial radiation, or in its damping. We show that the characteristic damping of the response field for high-power initial radiation carries information about the ionization flash magnitude and duration. The duration of the pulse amplification or the damping is consistently shorter for larger conductivity variations and can be used to evaluate the intensity of the flash ionization. Our work suggests that cyclotron emission could be probe signals for electrification processes inside BD atmosphere.

  17. Weak positive cloud-to-ground flashes in Northeastern Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Raul E.; Maier, Michael W.; Garcia-Miguel, Juan A.; Holle, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    The frequency distributions of the peak magnetic field associated with the first detected return stroke of positive and negative cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes were studied using lightning data from northeastern Colorado. These data were obtained during 1985 with a medium-to-high gain network of three direction finders (DF's). The median signal strength of positive flashes was almost two times that of the negatives for flashes within 300 km of the DF's, which have an inherent detection-threshold bias that tends to discriminate against weak signals. This bias increases with range, and affects the detection of positive and negative flashes in different ways, because of the differing character of their distributions. Positive flashes appear to have a large percentage of signals clustered around very weak values that are lost to the medium-to-high gain Colorado Detection System very quickly with increasing range. The resulting median for positive signals could thus appear to be much larger than the median for negative signals, which are more clustered around intermediate values. When only flashes very close to the DF's are considered, however, the two distributions have almost identical medians. The large percentage of weak positive signals detected close to the DF's has not been explored previously. They have been suggested to come from intracloud discharges and thus are improperly classified as CG flashes. Evidence in hand, points to their being real positive, albeit weak CG flashes. Whether or not they are real positive ground flashes, it is important to be aware of their presence in data from magnetic DF networks.

  18. Memory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Amici, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Memory is the cognitive ability that allows to acquire, store and recall information; its dysfunction is called amnesia and can be a presentation of unilateral ischemic stroke in the territory of the posterior cerebral and anterior choroidal artery as well as subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22377863

  19. Retracing Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David L.

    2005-01-01

    There are plenty of paths to poetry but few are as accessible as retracing ones own memories. When students are asked to write about something they remember, they are given them the gift of choosing from events that are important enough to recall. They remember because what happened was funny or scary or embarrassing or heartbreaking or silly.…

  20. Memory Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassebaum, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In four decades of teaching college English, the author has watched many good teaching jobs morph into second-class ones. Worse, she has seen the memory and then the expectation of teaching jobs with decent status, security, and salary depart along with principles and collegiality. To help reverse this downward spiral, she contends that what is…

  1. Fueling Memories

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jonathan D.; Pollizzi, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of the adaptive immune response is rapid and robust activation upon rechallenge. In the current issue of Immunity van der Windt et al. (2012) provide an important link between mitochondrial respiratory capacity and the development of CD8+ T cell memory. PMID:22284413

  2. X-ray bursts and neutron-star thermonuclear flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a model concerning the production of X-ray bursts by thermonuclear flashes in the freshly accreted matter near the surface of an accreting neutron star. An investigation is conducted regarding the physical processes relevant to such thermonuclear flashes. It is concluded that thermonuclear flashes may account for some, but not all, of the observed X-ray burst sources. Attention is given to a neutron star undergoing accretion of mass from a binary stellar companion, aspects of energetics, nuclear reactions, and heat transport mechanisms.

  3. Gamma ray flashes add to mystery of upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmospheric electricity research has come a long way since Benjamin Franklin's kite-flying days. But what researchers have been learning lately about above-thunderstorm electricity has wrought a whole new era of mysteries.For a start, last summer a Colorado meteorologist sparked interest in a terrestrial phenomenon that the community first observed more than 100 years ago: optical flashes that occur above thunderstorms—at least 30 km above Earth. Walter Lyons with the Ft. Collins-based Mission Research Corporation, demonstrated that such flashes are not anomalies, as conventional scientific wisdom had held. He filmed hundreds of flashes during a 2-week period.

  4. FLASH is an essential component of Cajal bodies

    PubMed Central

    Barcaroli, D.; Dinsdale, D.; Neale, M. H.; Bongiorno-Borbone, L.; Ranalli, M.; Munarriz, E.; Sayan, A. E.; McWilliam, J. M.; Smith, T. M.; Fava, E.; Knight, R. A.; Melino, G.; De Laurenzi, V.

    2006-01-01

    Cajal bodies are small nuclear organelles with a number of nuclear functions. Here we show that FLICE-associated huge protein (FLASH), originally described as a component of the apoptosis signaling pathway, is mainly localized in Cajal bodies and is essential for their structure. Reduction in FLASH expression by short hairpin RNA results in disruption of the normal architecture of the Cajal body and relocalization of its components. Because the function of FLASH in the apoptosis receptor signaling pathway has been strongly questioned, we have now identified a clear function for this protein. PMID:17003126

  5. Approximate flash calculations for equation-of-state compositional models

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, L.X.; Li, Y.K.

    1985-02-01

    An approximate method for flash calculations (AFC) with an equation of state is presented. The equations for AFC are obtained by linearizing the thermodynamic equilibrium equations at an equilibrium condition termed reference condition. The AFC equations are much simpler than the actual equations for flash calculations and yet give almost the same results. A procedure for generating new reference conditions to keep the AFC results close to the true flash calculation (TFC) results is described. AFC is compared to TFC in the calculation of standard laboratory tests and in the simulation of gas injection processes with a composition model. Excellent results are obtained with AFC in less than half the original execution time.

  6. On the spatial interaction of visual working memory and attention: evidence for a global effect from memory-guided saccades.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Arvid; Beisert, Miriam; Schneider, Werner X

    2010-01-01

    Recent work indicates that covert visual attention and eye movements on the one hand, and covert visual attention and visual working memory on the other hand are closely interrelated. Two experiments address the question whether all three processes draw on the same spatial representations. Participants had to memorize a target location for a subsequent memory-guided saccade. During the memory interval, task-irrelevant distractors were briefly flashed on some trials either near or remote to the memory target. Results showed that the previously flashed distractors attract the saccade's landing position. However, attraction was only found, if the distractor was presented within a sector of +/-20 degrees around the target axis, but not if the distractor was presented outside this sector. This effect strongly resembles the global effect in which saccades are directed to intermediate locations between a target and a simultaneously presented neighboring distractor stimulus. It is argued that covert visual attention, eye movements, and visual working memory recruit the same spatial mechanisms that can probably be ascribed to attentional priority maps. PMID:20616119

  7. Priming analogical reasoning with false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Threadgold, Emma; Ball, Linden J

    2015-08-01

    Like true memories, false memories are capable of priming answers to insight-based problems. Recent research has attempted to extend this paradigm to more advanced problem-solving tasks, including those involving verbal analogical reasoning. However, these experiments are constrained inasmuch as problem solutions could be generated via spreading activation mechanisms (much like false memories themselves) rather than using complex reasoning processes. In three experiments we examined false memory priming of complex analogical reasoning tasks in the absence of simple semantic associations. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated the robustness of false memory priming in analogical reasoning when backward associative strength among the problem terms was eliminated. In Experiments 2a and 2b, we extended these findings by demonstrating priming on newly created homonym analogies that can only be solved by inhibiting semantic associations within the analogy. Overall, the findings of the present experiments provide evidence that the efficacy of false memory priming extends to complex analogical reasoning problems. PMID:25784574

  8. Roll-to-roll nanopatterning using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sean; Ganapathisubramanian, Maha; Miller, Mike; Yang, Jack; Choi, Jin; Xu, Frank; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to pattern materials at the nanoscale can enable a variety of applications ranging from high density data storage, displays, photonic devices and CMOS integrated circuits to emerging applications in the biomedical and energy sectors. These applications require varying levels of pattern control, short and long range order, and have varying cost tolerances. Extremely large area R2R manufacturing on flexible substrates is ubiquitous for applications such as paper and plastic processing. It combines the benefits of high speed and inexpensive substrates to deliver a commodity product at low cost. The challenge is to extend this approach to the realm of nanopatterning and realize similar benefits. The cost of manufacturing is typically driven by speed (or throughput), tool complexity, cost of consumables (materials used, mold or master cost, etc.), substrate cost, and the downstream processing required (annealing, deposition, etching, etc.). In order to achieve low cost nanopatterning, it is imperative to move towards high speed imprinting, less complex tools, near zero waste of consumables and low cost substrates. The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. In this paper we address the key challenges for roll based nanopatterning by introducing a novel concept: Ink Jet based Roll-to-Roll Nanopatterning. To address this challenge, we have introduced a J-FIL based demonstrator product, the LithoFlex 100. Topics that are discussed in the paper include tool design and process performance. In addition, we have used the LithoFlex 100 to fabricate high performance wire grid polarizers on flexible polycarbonate (PC) films. Transmission of better than 80% and extinction ratios on the order of

  9. Dielectric elastomer memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas G.; Xie, Sheng Q.; Calius, Emilio P.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2011-04-01

    Life shows us that the distribution of intelligence throughout flexible muscular networks is a highly successful solution to a wide range of challenges, for example: human hearts, octopi, or even starfish. Recreating this success in engineered systems requires soft actuator technologies with embedded sensing and intelligence. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator(s) (DEA) are promising due to their large stresses and strains, as well as quiet flexible multimodal operation. Recently dielectric elastomer devices were presented with built in sensor, driver, and logic capability enabled by a new concept called the Dielectric Elastomer Switch(es) (DES). DES use electrode piezoresistivity to control the charge on DEA and enable the distribution of intelligence throughout a DEA device. In this paper we advance the capabilities of DES further to form volatile memory elements. A set reset flip-flop with inverted reset line was developed based on DES and DEA. With a 3200V supply the flip-flop behaved appropriately and demonstrated the creation of dielectric elastomer memory capable of changing state in response to 1 second long set and reset pulses. This memory opens up applications such as oscillator, de-bounce, timing, and sequential logic circuits; all of which could be distributed throughout biomimetic actuator arrays. Future work will include miniaturisation to improve response speed, implementation into more complex circuits, and investigation of longer lasting and more sensitive switching materials.

  10. Advance Organizers: Concret Versus Abstract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkill, Alice J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relative effects of concrete and abstract advance organizers on students' memory for subsequent prose. Results of the experiments are discussed in terms of the memorability, familiarity, and visualizability of concrete and abstract verbal materials. (JD)

  11. Heavy rainfall induced flash flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus; Steinbrich, Andreas; Stölzle, Michael; Leistert, Hannes

    2016-04-01

    Heavy rain induced flash floods are still a serious hazard. In context of climate change even a rise of threat potential of flash flood must be suspected. To improve prediction of endangered areas hydraulic models was developed in the past that implement topography information in heigh resolution, gathered by laser scan applications. To run such models it is crucial to estimate the runoff input spatial distributed. However, this information is usually derived with relatively simple models lacking the process rigour that is required for prediction in engaged basins. Though available rain runoff models are able to model runoff response integral for measured catchments they do not indicate the spatial distribution of processes. Moreover they are commonly calibrated to measured runoff data and not applicable in other environments. Since runoff generation is commonly not measured, a calibration on it is hardly possible. In this study, we present a new approach for quantification of runoff generation in height spatial and temporal resolution. A suited model needs to work without calibration in every given environment under any given conditions. It is possible to develop such a model by combining spatial distributed input data of land surface properties (e.g. soil, geology, land use, …) with worldwide findings of runoff generation research. We developed such a model for the state of Baden-Württemberg, what has an extensive pool of spatial data. E.g. a digital elevation model of 1*1m² resolution, degree of sealing of the earth surface in 1*1m² resolution, soil properties (1:50.000) and geology (1:200.000). Within the state of Baden-Württemberg different regions are situated, with distinct environmental characteristics concerning as well climate, soil properties, land use, topography and geology. The model was tested and validated by modelling 36 observed flood events in 13 mesoscale catchments representing the different regions of Baden-Württemberg as well as by

  12. Quantitative observation of light flash sensations experiment MA-106

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.; Tobias, C. A.; Schopper, E.; Schott, J. U.; Huesman, R. H.; Upham, F. T.; Wieskamp, T. F.; Kucala, J. M.; Goulding, F. S.; Landis, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Light flashes caused by the interaction of cosmic particles with the visual apparatus have been observed by astronauts on all space missions since Apollo 11. This Apollo Soyuz Test Project experiment compared measurements of the observer's visual sensitivity with measurements of the ambient radiation environment and with the frequency and character of the flashes observed. The data obtained reveal a latitude dependence of the frequency of observed flashes. This distribution of flashes is correlated with the distribution of cosmic particles with stopping power greater than 15 keV/ micrometers in the eye. The interaction of dark adaptation, specific ionization, and range of particles in the retina as factors in the visualization of particle passage is discussed.

  13. Thermonuclear-flash models for X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models for X-ray burst sources that invoke thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the studies by Joss (1978) and Joss and Li (1979) on the evolution of the helium-burning shell. Numerical calculations with regard to the mass accretion rate, core temperature of the neutron star and the sensitivity of the flash properties to the assumed mass and radius of the neutron star are considered. Attention is also given to the behavior of the surface luminosity following a thermonuclear flash, the decline from maximum X-ray luminosity, structure of the surface layers prior to and during the first helium-burning flash and the temporal evolution of the first X-ray burst.

  14. 41. A TYPICAL OVERFLOW WEIR WITHOUT FLASH BOARDS. THE SALT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. A TYPICAL OVERFLOW WEIR WITHOUT FLASH BOARDS. THE SALT RIVER CAN BE SEEN IN THE BACKGROUND Photographer: Mark Durben, 1984 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  15. Quasi-steady-state analysis of coupled flashing ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levien, Ethan; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2015-10-01

    We perform a quasi-steady-state (QSS) reduction of a flashing ratchet to obtain a Brownian particle in an effective potential. The resulting system is analytically tractable and yet preserves essential dynamical features of the full model. We first use the QSS reduction to derive an explicit expression for the velocity of a simple two-state flashing ratchet. In particular, we determine the relationship between perturbations from detailed balance, which are encoded in the transitions rates of the flashing ratchet, and a tilted-periodic potential. We then perform a QSS analysis of a pair of elastically coupled flashing ratchets, which reduces to a Brownian particle moving in a two-dimensional vector field. We suggest that the fixed points of this vector field accurately approximate the metastable spatial locations of the coupled ratchets, which are, in general, impossible to identify from the full system.

  16. KETAMINE ALTERS RAT FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discovering the neurotransmitters involved in the generation of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) would enhance the use of FEPs in screening for and assessment of neurological damage. Recent evidence suggests that the excitatory amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, may be transmitt...

  17. A Grobner Basis Solution for Lightning Ground Flash Fraction Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solakiewicz, Richard; Attele, Rohan; Koshak, William

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian inversion method was previously introduced for retrieving the fraction of ground flashes in a set of flashes observed from a (low earth orbiting or geostationary) satellite lightning imager. The method employed a constrained mixed exponential distribution model to describe the lightning optical measurements. To obtain the optimum model parameters, a scalar function was minimized by a numerical method. In order to improve this optimization, we introduce a Grobner basis solution to obtain analytic representations of the model parameters that serve as a refined initialization scheme to the numerical optimization. Using the Grobner basis, we show that there are exactly 2 solutions involving the first 3 moments of the (exponentially distributed) data. When the mean of the ground flash optical characteristic (e.g., such as the Maximum Group Area, MGA) is larger than that for cloud flashes, then a unique solution can be obtained.

  18. Impact of rainfall spatial variability on Flash Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douinot, Audrey; Roux, Hélène; Garambois, Pierre-André; Larnier, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    According to the United States National Hazard Statistics database, flooding and flash flooding have caused the largest number of deaths of any weather-related phenomenon over the last 30 years (Flash Flood Guidance Improvement Team, 2003). Like the storms that cause them, flash floods are very variable and non-linear phenomena in time and space, with the result that understanding and anticipating flash flood genesis is far from straightforward. In the U.S., the Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) estimates the average number of inches of rainfall for given durations required to produce flash flooding in the indicated county. In Europe, flash flood often occurred on small catchments (approximately 100 km2) and it has been shown that the spatial variability of rainfall has a great impact on the catchment response (Le Lay and Saulnier, 2007). Therefore, in this study, based on the Flash flood Guidance method, rainfall spatial variability information is introduced in the threshold estimation. As for FFG, the threshold is the number of millimeters of rainfall required to produce a discharge higher than the discharge corresponding to the first level (yellow) warning of the French flood warning service (SCHAPI: Service Central d'Hydrométéorologie et d'Appui à la Prévision des Inondations). The indexes δ1 and δ2 of Zoccatelli et al. (2010), based on the spatial moments of catchment rainfall, are used to characterize the rainfall spatial distribution. Rainfall spatial variability impacts on warning threshold and on hydrological processes are then studied. The spatially distributed hydrological model MARINE (Roux et al., 2011), dedicated to flash flood prediction is forced with synthetic rainfall patterns of different spatial distributions. This allows the determination of a warning threshold diagram: knowing the spatial distribution of the rainfall forecast and therefore the 2 indexes δ1 and δ2, the threshold value is read on the diagram. A warning threshold diagram is

  19. Wedge Heat-Flux Indicators for Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2003-01-01

    Wedge indicators have been proposed for measuring thermal radiation that impinges on specimens illuminated by flash lamps for thermographic inspection. Heat fluxes measured by use of these indicators would be used, along with known thermal, radiative, and geometric properties of the specimens, to estimate peak flash temperatures on the specimen surfaces. These indicators would be inexpensive alternatives to high-speed infrared pyrometers, which would otherwise be needed for measuring peak flash surface temperatures. The wedge is made from any suitable homogenous material such as plastic. The choice of material is governed by the equation given. One side of the wedge is covered by a temperature sensitive compound that decomposes irreversibly when its temperature exceeds a rated temperature (T-rated). The uncoated side would be positioned alongside or in place of the specimen and exposed to the flash, then the wedge thickness at the boundary between the white and blackened portions measured.

  20. Menopause: Not All Hot Flashes Are Created Equal

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160027.html Menopause: Not All Hot Flashes Are Created Equal Weight, race, education and lifestyle all affect timing, duration of symptoms, research indicates To ...

  1. Experimental Investigation of Flash Weakening in Limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, G.; Tisato, N.; Quaresimin, M.; de Rossi, N.

    2010-12-01

    Frictional properties of limestone and dolostone are crucial to understand earthquake mechanics where seismic ruptures nucleate and propagate in carbonate rocks (e.g., Mw 6.3 L’Aquila 2009 earthquake). We performed 27 rock friction experiments in a compression-torsion apparatus on ring-shaped (50/60 and 70/80 mm int/ext diameter) 100% CaCO3-samples at sub-seismic to seismic slip rates (0.05 to 350 mm/s), small displacements (50-60 mm) and under normal stresses of 3-8 MPa. The experiments involved four steps: 1) loading step to apply the normal stress, 2) “low-speed” step to verify the low-speed behavior, 3) “high-speed” step to determine the velocity dependence and, 4) final deceleration step to stop the experiment. The friction coefficient gradually increased during the low-speed step (0.05 mm/s and 7 mm displacement) from 0 to 0.7-0.8, a typical value for friction in limestone. During the high-speed step, slip rate was abruptly (< 0.04 s) increased in about 5 mm of slip to 250 mm/s (for 30 mm displacement, samples 50/60 mm in diameter) and to 350 mm/s (for 40 mm displacement, samples 70/80 mm in diameter). All experiments show a dramatic decrease, up to 60%, in friction for slip rates > 100 mm/s. During the final deceleration step (< 7 mm of slip in < 0.04 s), the friction coefficient recovered its initial value (0.7). A possible weakening mechanism is flash heating-induced thermal decomposition of calcite (CaCO3 -> CaO + CO2) at asperity contacts. In the experiments, weakening was contemporaneous with a peripheral temperature increase of 60-170°C measured with an infrared camera. This temperature range yields a lower limit to the temperature achieved in the slipping zone and at the asperity contacts. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy equipped with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), X-Ray powder diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy analyses did not detect decarbonation products (CaO, Ca(OH)2) in the slipping zone. Instead, FE

  2. Enhanced ethylene production via flash methanolysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

    1984-01-01

    In an on-going pyrolysis research project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the methods to increase the yield of ethylene through flash methanolysis of coal is being investigated. Flash methanolysis is defined as pyrolysis of coal under pressure in an atmosphere of methane. This study attempts to identify the influence of important process variables such as reaction temperature, gas pressure, solids residence time, gas/solids ratio etc. on the production characteristics of ethylene and other pyrolysis products.

  3. Enhanced ethylene production via flash methanolysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Fallon, P.; Steinberg, M.

    1984-04-01

    In an on-going pyrolysis research project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the methods to increase the yield of ethylene through flash methanolysis of coal is being investigated. Flash methanolysis is defined as pyrolysis of coal under pressure in an atmosphere of methane. This study attempts to identify the influence of important process variables such as reaction temperature, gas pressure, solids residence time, gas/solids ratio etc. on the production characteristics of ethylene and other pyrolysis products.

  4. Prospective Evaluation of Hot Flashes during Pregnancy and Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Luther, James F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Eng, Heather; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, course, and risk factors for hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum. Study Design Women (N=429) were assessed prospectively during pregnancy (weeks 20, 30, 36) and up to a year after delivery (weeks 2, 12, 26, 52). A clinical interview, physical measurements, and questionnaires were administered at each visit. Results Thirty-five percent of women reported hot flashes during pregnancy and 29% reported hot flashes after delivery. In multivariable binomial mixed effects models, women who were younger (per year: OR(95%CI): 0.94(0.88–0.99)), had a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI; per unit increase: OR(95%CI): 1.05(1.01–1.10)), and had less than a college education (OR(95%CI): 2.58(1.19–5.60); vs. college) were more likely to report hot flashes during pregnancy. Higher depressive symptoms were associated with hot flashes during pregnancy (per unit increase: OR(95%CI): 1.08(1.04–1.13)) and after birth (OR(95%CI): 1.19(1.14–1.25), multivariable models). Conclusion Hot flashes, typically considered a menopausal symptom, were reported by over a third of women during pregnancy and/or postpartum. Predictors of hot flashes during this reproductive transition, including depressive symptoms, low education, and higher BMI are similar to those experienced during menopause. Future work should investigate the role of hormonal and affective factors in hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum. PMID:24035604

  5. Use of positron emission tomography scan response to guide treatment change for locally advanced gastric cancer: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Won, Elizabeth; Shah, Manish A.; Schöder, Heiko; Strong, Vivian E.; Coit, Daniel G.; Brennan, Murray F.; Kelsen, David P.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Tang, Laura H.; Capanu, Marinela; Rizk, Nabil P.; Allen, Peter J.; Bains, Manjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early metabolic response on 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy is PET non-responders have poor outcomes whether continuing chemotherapy or proceeding directly to surgery. Use of PET may identify early treatment failure, sparing patients from inactive therapy and allowing for crossover to alternative therapies. We examined the effectiveness of PET directed switching to salvage chemotherapy in the PET non-responders. Methods Patients with locally advanced resectable FDG-avid gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma received bevacizumab 15 mg/kg, epirubicin 50 mg/m2, cisplatin 60 mg/m2 day 1, and capecitabine 625 mg/m2 bid (ECX) every 21 days. PET scan was obtained at baseline and after cycle 1. PET responders, (i.e., ≥35% reduction in FDG uptake at the primary tumor) continued ECX + bev. Non-responders switched to docetaxel 30 mg/m2, irinotecan 50 mg/mg2 day 1 and 8 plus bevacizumab every 21 days for 2 cycles. Patients then underwent surgery. The primary objective was to improve the 2-year disease free survival (DFS) from 30% (historical control) to 53% in the non-responders. Results Twenty evaluable patients enrolled before the study closed for poor accrual. Eleven were PET responders and the 9 non-responders switched to the salvage regimen. With a median follow-up of 38.2 months, the 2-year DFS was 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 30–85%] in responders compared with 56% in the non-responder group (95% CI, 20–80%, P=0.93). Conclusions The results suggest that changing chemotherapy regimens in PET non-responding patients may improve outcomes. Results from this pilot trial are hypothesis generating and suggest that PET directed neoadjuvant therapy merits evaluation in a larger trial. PMID:27563439

  6. CoMPASs: IOn programme (Care Of Memory Problems in Advanced Stages of dementia: Improving Our Knowledge): protocol for a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Louise; Harrington, Jane; Scott, Sharon; Davis, Sarah; Lord, Kathryn; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Round, Jeff; Candy, Bridget; Sampson, Elizabeth L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 700 000 people in the UK have dementia, rising to 1.2 million by 2050; one-third of people aged over 65 will die with dementia. Good end-of-life care is often neglected, and detailed UK-based research on symptom burden and needs is lacking. Our project examines these issues from multiple perspectives using a rigorous and innovative design, collecting data which will inform the development of pragmatic interventions to improve care. Methods and analysis To define in detail symptom burden, service provision and factors affecting care pathways we shall use mixed methods: prospective cohort studies of people with advanced dementia and their carers; workshops and interactive interviews with health professionals and carers, and a workshop with people with early stage dementia. Interim analyses of cohort data will inform new scenarios for workshops and interviews. Final analysis will include cohort demographics, the symptom burden and health service use over the follow-up period. We shall explore the level and nature of unmet needs, describing how comfort and quality of life change over time and differences between those living in care homes and those remaining in their own homes. Data from workshops and interviews will be analysed for thematic content assisted by textual grouping software. Findings will inform the development of a complex intervention in the next phase of the research programme. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was granted by National Health Service ethical committees for studies involving people with dementia and carers (REC refs. 12/EE/0003; 12/LO/0346), and by university ethics committee for work with healthcare professionals (REC ref. 3578/001). We shall present our findings at conferences, and in peer-reviewed journals, prepare detailed reports for organisations involved with end-of-life care and dementia, publicising results on the Marie Curie website. A summary of the research will be provided to participants

  7. Establishment of the NIST flashing-light photometric unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yoshihiro; Zong, Yuqin

    1997-09-01

    There is a need for accurate measurement of flashing lights for the proper maintenance of aircraft anticollision lights. A large variation in the measured intensities of anticollision lights has been a problem, and thus, NIST has undertaken the task to establish flashing-light photometric standards to provide calibration services in this area. A flashing-light photometric unit [lux second, (lx (DOT) s)] has been realized based on the NIST detector-based candela, using four standard photometers equipped with current integrators. Two different approaches have been taken to calibrate these standard photometers: one based on electrical calibration of the current integrator, and the other based on electronic pulsing of a steady-state photometric standard. The units realized using these two independent methods agreed to within 0.2%. The relative expanded uncertainty (k equals 2) of the standard photometers, in the measurement of the white xenon flash, is estimated to be 0.6%. The standard photometers are characterized for temporal response, linearity, and spectral responsivity, to be used for measurement of xenon flash sources of various waveforms and colors. Calibration services have been established at NIST for flashing-light photometers with white and red anticollision lights.

  8. Flash floods in the Tatra Mountain streams: frequency and triggers.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Cánovas, J A; Czajka, B; Janecka, K; Lempa, M; Kaczka, R J; Stoffel, M

    2015-04-01

    Flash floods represent a frequently recurring natural phenomenon in the Tatra Mountains. On the northern slopes of the mountain chain, located in Poland, ongoing and expected future changes in climate are thought to further increase the adverse impacts of flash floods. Despite the repeat occurrence of major floods in the densely populated foothills of the Polish Tatras, the headwaters have been characterized by a surprising lack of data, such that any analysis of process variability or hydrometeorological triggers has been largely hampered so far. In this study, dendrogeomorphic techniques have been employed in four poorly-gauged torrential streams of the northern slope of the Tatra Mountains to reconstruct temporal and spatial patterns of past events. Using more than 1100 increment cores of trees injured by past flash floods, we reconstruct 47 events covering the last 148 years and discuss synoptic situations leading to the triggering of flash floods with the existing meteorological and flow gauge data. Tree-ring analyses have allowed highlighting the seasonality of events, providing new insights about potential hydrometeorological triggers as well as a differentiating flash flood activity between catchments. Results of this study could be useful to design future strategies to deal with flash flood risks at the foothills of the Polish Tatras and in the Vistula River catchment. PMID:25594906

  9. NOAA/USGS Demonstration Flash-Flood and Debris-Flow Early-Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, P.; Cannon, S.; Laber, J.; Jorgensen, D.; Werner, K.

    2009-04-01

    Flash floods and debris flows are common following wildfires in southern California. On 25 December 2003, sixteen people were swept to their deaths by debris flows generated from basins in the San Bernardino Mountains that burned the previous fall. In an effort to reduce loss of life by floods and debris flows, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) established a prototype flash flood and debris flow early warning system for recently burned areas located in eight counties of southern California in the fall of 2005. This prototype system combines the existing NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction (FFMP) system and USGS rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for debris flow and flash flood occurrence. Separate sets of thresholds are defined for the occurrence of debris flows and flash floods in response to storms during 1) the first winter after a fire, and 2) following a year of vegetative recovery. The FFMP was modified to identify when both flash floods and debris flows are likely to occur based on comparisons between precipitation (including radar estimates, in situ measurements, and short-term forecasts) and the rainfall intensity-duration thresholds developed specifically for burned areas. Advisory outlooks, watches, and warnings are disseminated to emergency management personnel through NOAA's Advanced Weather Information Processing System (AWIPS). The FFMP provides a cost-effective and efficient approach to implement a warning system on a 24-hour, 7-day-a-week basis. In 2004 the system was advanced to incorporate a web-based procedure developed by the NWS Weather Forecast Office (WFO) in Oxnard, CA that provides information about each fire to forecasters, and displays hazard maps generated by the USGS that show those basins most likely to produce the largest debris flow events within recently burned areas. During four years of operation, the WFOs in Oxnard

  10. Flash microwave synthesis of trevorite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bousquet-Berthelin, C. Chaumont, D.; Stuerga, D.

    2008-03-15

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles have several possible applications as cathode materials for rechargeable batteries, named 'lithium-ion' batteries. In this study, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was prepared by microwave induced thermohydrolysis. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET method, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). All the results show that the microwave one-step flash synthesis leads in a very short time to NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with elementary particles size close to 4-5 nm, and high specific surfaces (close to 240 m{sup 2}/g). Thus, microwave heating appears as an efficient source of energy to produce quickly nanoparticles with complex composition as ferrite. - Graphical abstract: At the end of the 20th century, a new concept of battery was introduced, named 'Li ion', where electrodes are both lithium-storage materials. Compounds with a spinel structure are so investigated and microwave heating appears as an efficient source of energy to produce nanoparticles in a very short time and at low temperature, with controlled size (4-5 nm) and high specific area (240 m{sup 2}/g). Legend: Pictogram represents our original microwave reactor, the RAMO (French acronym of Reacteur Autoclave Micro-Onde), containing the reactants and submitted to the microwave irradiation. Multicolor candy represents obtained material.

  11. The FLASH thick-target experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Belov, K.; Belz, J.; Bergman, D. R.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F. Y.; Chen, C.-C.; Chen, C. W.; Chen, P.; Dalton, M.; Fedorova, Y.; Field, C.; Hast, C.; Huang, M. A.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Hwang, W.-Y. P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E. C.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J. N.; Maestas, M.; Ng, J. S. T.; Odian, A.; Reil, K.; Rodriguez, D.; Smith, J.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, S.; Thomson, G.; Walz, D.; Zech, A.; Flash Collaboration

    2008-11-01

    A key assumption in the reconstruction of extensive air showers using the air fluorescence technique is that fluorescence is proportional to energy deposition at all depths in the shower. This ansatz, along with the supposition that particle distribution and energy loss can be well modeled by modern shower simulation software, must be thoroughly verified. We report here the results of the first direct measurement of air fluorescence yield as a function of shower depth, as performed in the thick-target phase of the FLASH (FLuorescence in Air from SHowers) experimental program at the SLAC Final-Focus Test Beam facility. We compare observed fluorescence light yields as a function of shower depth to concurrently measured charged particle yields, to the energy deposition predictions of the EGS and GEANT software packages, and to empirical energy-deposition models. We also examine the extent to which the relative yield versus shower depth is independent of wavelength within the fluorescence spectrum. We find the proportionality hypothesis to be well supported by the data, validating the use of fluorescence profiles in the study of ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  12. Inertial effects in adiabatically driven flashing ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Makhnovskii, Yurii A.; Shapochkina, Irina V.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-05-01

    We study analytically the effect of a small inertial correction on the properties of adiabatically driven flashing ratchets. Parrondo's lemma [J. M. R. Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevE.57.7297] is generalized to include the inertial term so as to establish the symmetry conditions allowing directed motion (other than in the overdamped massless case) and to obtain a high-temperature expansion of the motion velocity for arbitrary potential profiles. The inertial correction is thus shown to enhance the ratchet effect at all temperatures for sawtooth potentials and at high temperatures for simple potentials described by the first two harmonics. With the special choice of potentials represented by at least the first three harmonics, the correction gives rise to the motion reversal in the high-temperature region. In the low-temperature region, inertia weakens the ratchet effect, with the exception of the on-off model, where diffusion is important. The directed motion adiabatically driven by potential sign fluctuations, though forbidden in the overdamped limit, becomes possible due to purely inertial effects in neither symmetric nor antisymmetric potentials, i.e., not for commonly used sawtooth and two-sinusoid profiles.

  13. A competitive aggregation model for flash nanoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Janine Chungyin; Vigil, R D; Fox, R O

    2010-11-15

    Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP) is a novel approach for producing functional nanoparticles stabilized by amphiphilic block copolymers. FNP involves the rapid mixing of a hydrophobic active (organic) and an amphiphilic di-block copolymer with a non-solvent (water) and subsequent co-precipitation of nanoparticles composed of both the organic and copolymer. During this process, the particle size distribution (PSD) is frozen and stabilized by the hydrophilic portion of the amphiphilic di-block copolymer residing on the particle surface. That is, the particle growth is kinetically arrested and thus a narrow PSD can be attained. To model the co-precipitation process, a bivariate population balance equation (PBE) has been formulated to account for the competitive aggregation of the organic and copolymer versus pure organic-organic or copolymer-copolymer aggregation. Aggregation rate kernels have been derived to account for the major aggregation events: free coupling, unimer insertion, and aggregate fusion. The resulting PBE is solved both by direct integration and by using the conditional quadrature method of moments (CQMOM). By solving the competitive aggregation model under well-mixed conditions, it is demonstrated that the PSD is controlled primarily by the copolymer-copolymer aggregation process and that the energy barrier to aggregate fusion plays a key role in determining the PSD. It is also shown that the characteristic aggregation times are smaller than the turbulent mixing time so that the FNP process is always mixing limited. PMID:20800847

  14. Flash Nanoprecipitation: Particle Structure and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pustulka, Kevin M.; Wohl, Adam R.; Lee, Han Seung; Michel, Andrew R.; Han, Jing; Hoye, Thomas R.; McCormick, Alon V.; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) is a process that, through rapid mixing, stabilizes an insoluble low molecular weight compound in a nano-sized, polymer-stabilized delivery vehicle. The polymeric components are typically amphiphilic diblock copolymers (BCPs). In order to fully exploit the potential of FNP, factors affecting particle structure, size, and stability must be understood. Here we show that polymer type, hydrophobicity and crystallinity of the small molecule, and small molecule loading levels all affect particle size and stability. Of the four block copolymers (BCP) that we have studied here, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PEG-b-PLGA) was most suitable for potential drug delivery applications due to its ability to give rise to stable nanoparticles, its biocompatibility, and its degradability. We found little difference in particle size when using PLGA block sizes over the range of 5 to 15kDa. The choice of hydrophobic small molecule was important, as molecules with a calculated water-octanol partition coefficient (clogP) below 6 gave rise to particles that were unstable and underwent rapid Ostwald ripening. Studies probing the internal structure of nanoparticles were also performed. Analysis of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and 1H-NMR experiments support a three-layer core-shell-corona nanoparticle structure. PMID:24053447

  15. Injury pattern of the Flash-Ball, a less-lethal weapon used for law enforcement: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Peter; Schreyer, Nicolas; Yersin, Bertrand

    2006-10-01

    Less-lethal weapons are used in law enforcement to neutralize combative individuals and to disperse riot crowds. Local police recently used such an impact weapon, the Flash-Ball, in two different situations. This gun fires large rubber bullets with kinetic energies around 200 J. Although it is designed to avoid skin penetration, impacts at such energies may still create major trauma with associated severe injuries to internal organs. This is a report of 2 patients shot with the Flash-Ball who required medical attention. One could be discharged quickly, but the other required hospitalization for heart and lung contusion. Both patients required advanced investigations including computed tomography (CT) scan. The medical literature on injuries induced by less-lethal impact weapons is reviewed. Impacts from the Flash-Ball can cause significant injury to internal organs, even without penetration. Investigations as for other high-energy blunt traumas are called for in these cases. PMID:16982375

  16. "Know What to Do If You Encounter a Flash Flood": Mental Models Analysis for Improving Flash Flood Risk Communication and Public Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Lazrus, Heather; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how people view flash flood risks can help improve risk communication, ultimately improving outcomes. This article analyzes data from 26 mental models interviews about flash floods with members of the public in Boulder, Colorado, to understand their perspectives on flash flood risks and mitigation. The analysis includes a comparison between public and professional perspectives by referencing a companion mental models study of Boulder-area professionals. A mental models approach can help to diagnose what people already know about flash flood risks and responses, as well as any critical gaps in their knowledge that might be addressed through improved risk communication. A few public interviewees mentioned most of the key concepts discussed by professionals as important for flash flood warning decision making. However, most interviewees exhibited some incomplete understandings and misconceptions about aspects of flash flood development and exposure, effects, or mitigation that may lead to ineffective warning decisions when a flash flood threatens. These include important misunderstandings about the rapid evolution of flash floods, the speed of water in flash floods, the locations and times that pose the greatest flash flood risk in Boulder, the value of situational awareness and environmental cues, and the most appropriate responses when a flash flood threatens. The findings point to recommendations for ways to improve risk communication, over the long term and when an event threatens, to help people quickly recognize and understand threats, obtain needed information, and make informed decisions in complex, rapidly evolving extreme weather events such as flash floods. PMID:26369521

  17. Mechanisms of Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Larry R.

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on the brain processes and brain systems involved in learning and memory from a neuropsychological perspective of analysis. Reports findings related to the locus of memory storage, types of memory and knowledge, and memory consolidation. Models of animal memory are also examined. An extensive reference list is included. (ML)

  18. [Skin memory: the clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Gaide, Olivier

    2016-03-30

    Activated T lymphocytes give rise to daughter cells that can persist for decades in our body, while retaining their ability to provide a strong immune response. Recent advances have highlighted the fact that a significant portion of these memory cells are found directly in peripheral tissues and lack the capacity to migrate to the blood. We have recently shown that these cells, called Tissue Resident Memory T cells (T(RM)), play a major role in the immune response, regardless of the antigenic challenge. They have a backup of circulating central memory T cells (T(CM)) that bear the exact same T cell receptor. For the clinician, this knowledge is very useful as it allows a better understanding and better choice of therapeutics for several cutaneous diseases, such as contact dermatitis and cutaneous T cell lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides vs Sezary). PMID:27172692

  19. Mean LIS flash properties and their relation to TRMM cloud and rain characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In a recent study, mean LIS flash properties (like the number of "events" per flash or the flash radiance), which can be associated with the flash "strength", have been analyzed (Beirle et al., NHESS, 2014). The resulting maps show consistent spatial patterns; most strikingly, oceanic flashes show higher values than continental flashes for all properties observed by LIS. Over land, regions with high (eastern US) and low (India) flash strength can be clearly identified. Several possible reasons for the differences in flash properties have been discussed, but a clear explanation, in particular of the land-ocean contrast, is still missing. Here we analyse how far mean LIS flash properties are related to cloud and rain characteristics as derived from TRMM instruments (PR2a23 algorithm). This additional data, coincident to but independent from the LIS measurements, will be an important step towards infering the driving physical mechanisms.

  20. CTE characterization with post-flashed darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay

    2013-10-01

    This internal-orbit calibration program will take a combination of short {100s} and long {800s} darks with various levels of post-flash in order to re-calibrate the WFC3/UVIS CTE model. When a similar set of these images was taken in mid-2012, there were not as many warm pixels as there are now and CTE losses were lower. Furthermore, this program will explore a finer spacing of charge injection to help us understand exactly what happens above the "sweet-spot" background of 12 electrons. Once the model is recalibrated using this data set {which should be taken in early 2014}, we can feel confident in making the pixel-based correction part of the pipeline.The observations will be straightforward. We will take short 100s darks with PF levels of: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 100, 115, and 130, and 150 electrons -- 30 levels in all. We will also take 800s darks {can't fit longer} with a PF level of about 100e. We should be able to take two shorts and one deep in each orbit, this will take a total of 15 orbits. This will give us 15 long darks, which can be averaged together to get the noise down.It would be best if this program could be scheduled to be executed over the course of only a few days, since I would prefer not to have much change in the dark during acquisition of the data set.

  1. Memory effects in turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, J. O.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the wake flow of a hemisphere and cylinder show that such memory effects can be substantial and have a significant influence on momentum transport. Memory effects are described in terms of suitable memory functions.

  2. Hybrid Flexible Resistive Random Access Memory-Gated Transistor for Novel Nonvolatile Data Storage.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Chen, Bo; Wang, Chundong; Zhou, Li; Yan, Yan; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sun, Qijun; Zhang, Hua; Roy, V A L

    2016-01-20

    Here, a single-device demonstration of novel hybrid architecture is reported to achieve programmable transistor nodes which have analogies to flash memory by incorporating a resistive switching random access memory (RRAM) device as a resistive switch gate for field effect transistor (FET) on a flexible substrate. A high performance flexible RRAM with a three-layered structure is fabricated by utilizing solution-processed MoS2 nanosheets sandwiched between poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer layers. Gate coupling with the pentacene-based transistor can be controlled by the RRAM memory state to produce a nonprogrammed state (inactive) and a programmed state (active) with a well-defined memory window. Compared to the reference flash memory device based on the MoS2 floating gate, the hybrid device presents robust access speed and retention ability. Furthermore, the hybrid RRAM-gated FET is used to build an integrated logic circuit and a wide logic window in inverter logic is achieved. The controllable, well-defined memory window, long retention time, and fast access speed of this novel hybrid device may open up new possibilities of realizing fully functional nonvolatile memory for high-performance flexible electronics. PMID:26578160

  3. Transcriptional 'memory' of a stress: transient chromatin and memory (epigenetic) marks at stress-response genes.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Zoya

    2015-07-01

    Drought, salinity, extreme temperature variations, pathogen and herbivory attacks are recurring environmental stresses experienced by plants throughout their life. To survive repeated stresses, plants provide responses that may be different from their response during the first encounter with the stress. A different response to a similar stress represents the concept of 'stress memory'. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular and gene/genome levels is thought to increase survival chances by improving the plant's tolerance/avoidance abilities. Ultimately, stress memory may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. At the molecular level, the concept of stress memory indicates that the mechanisms responsible for memory-type transcription during repeated stresses are not based on repetitive activation of the same response pathways activated by the first stress. Some recent advances in the search for transcription 'memory factors' are discussed with an emphasis on super-induced dehydration stress memory response genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:25788029

  4. Identification and optogenetic manipulation of memory engrams in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Steve; Tonegawa, Susumu; Liu, Xu

    2014-01-01

    With the accumulation of our knowledge about how memories are formed, consolidated, retrieved, and updated, neuroscience is now reaching a point where discrete memories can be identified and manipulated at rapid timescales. Here, we start with historical studies that lead to the modern memory engram theory. Then, we will review recent advances in memory engram research that combine transgenic and optogenetic approaches to reveal the underlying neuronal substrates sufficient for activating mnemonic processes. We will focus on three concepts: (1) isolating memory engrams at the level of single cells to tag them for subsequent manipulation; (2) testing the sufficiency of these engrams for memory recall by artificially activating them; and (3) presenting new stimuli during the artificial activation of these engrams to induce an association between the two to form a false memory. We propose that hippocampal cells that show activity-dependent changes during learning construct a cellular basis for contextual memory engrams. PMID:24478647

  5. Advanced real-time dynamic scene generation techniques for improved performance and fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mark H.; Buford, James A.; Mayhall, Anthony J.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in real-time synthetic scene generation for Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) improve both performance and fidelity. Modeling ground target scenarios requires tradeoffs because of limited texture memory for imagery and limited main memory for elevation data. High- resolution insets have been used in the past to provide better fidelity in specific areas, such as in the neighborhood of a target. Improvements for ground scenarios include smooth transitions for high-resolution insets to reduce high spatial frequency artifacts at the borders of the inset regions and dynamic terrain paging to support large area databases. Transport lag through the scene generation system, including sensor emulation and interface components, has been dealt with in the past through the use of sub-window extraction from oversize scenes. This compensates for spatial effects of transport lag but not temporal effects. A new system has been developed and used successfully to compensate for a flashing coded beacon in the scene. Other techniques have been developed to synchronize the scene generator with the seeker under test (SUT) and to model atmospheric effects, sensor optic and electronics, and angular emissivity attenuation.

  6. Lunar Impact Flash Locations from NASA's Lunar Impact Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Meteoroids are small, natural bodies traveling through space, fragments from comets, asteroids, and impact debris from planets. Unlike the Earth, which has an atmosphere that slows, ablates, and disintegrates most meteoroids before they reach the ground, the Moon has little-to-no atmosphere to prevent meteoroids from impacting the lunar surface. Upon impact, the meteoroid's kinetic energy is partitioned into crater excavation, seismic wave production, and the generation of a debris plume. A flash of light associated with the plume is detectable by instruments on Earth. Following the initial observation of a probable Taurid impact flash on the Moon in November 2005,1 the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) began a routine monitoring program to observe the Moon for meteoroid impact flashes in early 2006, resulting in the observation of over 330 impacts to date. The main objective of the MEO is to characterize the meteoroid environment for application to spacecraft engineering and operations. The Lunar Impact Monitoring Program provides information about the meteoroid flux in near-Earth space in a size range-tens of grams to a few kilograms-difficult to measure with statistical significance by other means. A bright impact flash detected by the program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash location. Prior to this time, the location was estimated to the nearest half-degree by visually comparing the impact imagery to maps of the Moon. Better accuracy was not needed because meteoroid flux calculations did not require high-accuracy impact locations. But such a bright event was thought to have produced a fresh crater detectable from lunar orbit by the NASA spacecraft Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The idea of linking the observation of an impact flash with its crater was an appealing one, as it would validate NASA photometric calculations and crater scaling laws developed from hypervelocity gun testing. This idea was

  7. Looking for the best flash floods indicators in Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasat, Maria-Carmen; Llasat-Botija, Montserrat; Turco, Marco

    2010-05-01

    Flash floods are a recurrent hazard in Mediterranean Region. From a global point of view, a distinction between two kinds of floods can be made (Llasat, 2009): a) Short-lived and strongly convective events (<3 h) of very intense precipitation (peaks above 3 mm/min) and total rainfall <100 mm, that usually appear during summer and early autumn and produce local flash-floods in small catchments; b) Moderate convective events that last less than 24 hours and the maximum precipitation is usually recorded in less than 6 hours, with accumulated rainfall above 200 mm, although in some occasions they can be produced in the context of a longest event; they can produce catastrophic flash floods, and are usually recorded in autumn and end of summer. First ones are more frequent and have an important social impact, due to the great urbanization of some areas in which ephemeral channels are present; they can bring road traffic to a standstill, give rise to power cuts, and sweep away cars parked in the littoral water courses or in adjoining streets, but lose of lives are usually the result of the imprudent behaviour of people. The second type of flash-flood has produced the highest number of casualties when they have affected flood-prone areas with high concentrations of people, and catastrophic damages. However, there is not an agreement about the criteria of damages evaluation, in the same sense that there are notable discrepancies between authors in the criteria used to estimate the vulnerability. A number above 185 flood events have been recorded between 1990 and 2006 in Mediterranean region (Llasat et al, in press). A great part of them have been flash-floods, but, in order to make a good characterization of them, it is needed to recur to the most suitable indicators (Gruntfest, 1997, Messner and Meyer, 2006). The presentation is based on the research developed in the framework of the European Project FLASH (http://flash-eu.tau.ac.il/index.php), and particularly in the

  8. Central Flash Analysis of the 29 June 2015 Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, Michael J.; Bosh, A. S.; Sickafoose, A. A.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Levine, S. E.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Dunham, E. W.; McLean, I.; Wolf, J.; Abe, F.; Becklin, E.; Bida, T. A.; Bright, L. P.; Brothers, T. C.; Christie, G.; Collins, P. L.; Durst, R. F.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hamilton, R.; Harris, H. C.; Johnson, C.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kosiarek, M. R.; Leppik, K.; Logsdon, S. E.; Lucas, R.; Mathers, S.; Morley, C. J. K.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, P.; Ngan, H.; Pfueller, E.; Roeser, H.-P.; Sallum, S.; Savage, M.; Seeger, C. H.; Siu, H.; Stockdale, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thanathibodee, T.; Tilleman, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Van Cleeve, J.; Varughese, C.; Weisenbach, L. W.; Widen, E.; Wiedemann, M.

    2015-11-01

    After an extensive prediction effort, the 29 June 2015 occultation by Pluto was observed from both airborne (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy - SOFIA) and numerous ground-based telescopes (Bosh et al. - this meeting). Real-time prediction updates allowed placement of the SOFIA telescope with its four detectors deep within the central-flash region of the atmospheric occultation. Fortuitously, the Mount John University Observatory (Lake Tekapo, New Zealand) was also within the central-flash region (Pasachoff et al. - this meeting). This happenstance resulted in multiple central-flash detections in several colors from each facility allowing direct comparison of different areas of the central-flash evolute.Here we examine and discuss the central-flash signatures from the highest signal-to-noise light curves from each facility. The relative orientations and asymmetries in the central flashes allow us to use them to tightly constrain the lower atmospheric ellipticity and orientation of likely winds with respect to Pluto’s figure. The ratio of the two separate central flashes is also a strong constraint on the geometric solution for the full occultation data set, and the absolute height of the central flashes with respect to those expected for a clear isothermal atmosphere places constraints on haze densities and thermal gradients in Pluto’s lower atmosphere. We can also compare the central-flash signatures in several colors (similar to Sickafoose et. al - this meeting) to establish bounds on haze-particle sizes in the lower atmosphere.SOFIA is jointly operated by the Universities Space Research Association, Inc. (USRA), under NASA contract NAS2-97001, and the Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) under DLR contract 50 OK 0901 to the University of Stuttgart. Support for this work was provided, in part, by NASA grants SSO NNX15AJ82G (Lowell Observatory), PA NNX10AB27G (MIT), and PA NNX12AJ29G (Williams College), as well as the National Research Foundation of

  9. Expression of the nos gene and firefly flashing: a test of the nitric-oxide-mediated flash control model.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-01-01

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence. PMID:25373203

  10. Sparse distributed memory and related models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1992-01-01

    Described here is sparse distributed memory (SDM) as a neural-net associative memory. It is characterized by two weight matrices and by a large internal dimension - the number of hidden units is much larger than the number of input or output units. The first matrix, A, is fixed and possibly random, and the second matrix, C, is modifiable. The SDM is compared and contrasted to (1) computer memory, (2) correlation-matrix memory, (3) feet-forward artificial neural network, (4) cortex of the cerebellum, (5) Marr and Albus models of the cerebellum, and (6) Albus' cerebellar model arithmetic computer (CMAC). Several variations of the basic SDM design are discussed: the selected-coordinate and hyperplane designs of Jaeckel, the pseudorandom associative neural memory of Hassoun, and SDM with real-valued input variables by Prager and Fallside. SDM research conducted mainly at the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) in 1986-1991 is highlighted.

  11. (U) Computation acceleration using dynamic memory

    SciTech Connect

    Hakel, Peter

    2014-10-24

    Many computational applications require the repeated use of quantities, whose calculations can be expensive. In order to speed up the overall execution of the program, it is often advantageous to replace computation with extra memory usage. In this approach, computed values are stored and then, when they are needed again, they are quickly retrieved from memory rather than being calculated again at great cost. Sometimes, however, the precise amount of memory needed to store such a collection is not known in advance, and only emerges in the course of running the calculation. One problem accompanying such a situation is wasted memory space in overdimensioned (and possibly sparse) arrays. Another issue is the overhead of copying existing values to a new, larger memory space, if the original allocation turns out to be insufficient. In order to handle these runtime problems, the programmer therefore has the extra task of addressing them in the code.

  12. Flash pyrolysis of oil shale with various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

    1983-10-01

    The flash pyrolysis of Colorado Oil Shale with methane at a temperature of 800/sup 0/C and pressure of 500 psi appears to give the highest yield of hydrocarbon gas and liquid followed by hydrogen and lowest with helium. In the methane pyrolysis over 54.5% of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to ethylene and benzene. The flash pyrolysis with hydrogen (flash hydropyrolysis) of the oil shale at increasing temperatures showed a rapidly increasing amount of methane formed and a decrease in ethane formation, while the BTX (benzene mainly) yield remained at approximately 10%. At 950/sup 0/C and 500 psi almost all (97.0%) of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Experiments with a mixture of a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal and oil shale under flash hydropyrolysis and methane pyrolysis conditions indicated higher yields of methane and ethylene and slightly lower yields of benzene than predicted by partial additive calculations. These exploratory experiments appear to be of sufficient interest to warrant a fuller investigation of the interaction of the natural resources, oil shale, coal and natural gas under flash pyrolysis conditions.

  13. Risk Factors, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Hot Flashes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, William I.; Johnson, Aimee K.; Elkins, Gary R.; Otte, Julie L.; Burns, Debra S.; Yu, Menggang; Carpenter, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Hot flashes are prevalent and severe symptoms that can interfere with mood, sleep, and quality of life for women and men with cancer. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on the risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of hot flashes in persons with cancer. Electronic searches were conducted to identify relevant, English-language literature published through June 15, 2012. Results indicated that risk factors for hot flashes in cancer include patient-related factors (eg, age, race/ethnicity, educational level, smoking history, cardiovascular risk including BMI, and genetics) and disease-related factors (eg, cancer diagnosis, and dose/type of treatment). In addition, although the pathophysiology of hot flashes has remained elusive, these symptoms are likely attributable to disruptions in thermoregulation and neurochemicals. Therapies that have been offered or tested fall into 4 broad categories: pharmacological, nutraceutical, surgical, and complementary/behavioral strategies. The evidence base for this broad range of therapies varies, with some treatments not yet having been fully tested or showing equivocal results. The evidence base surrounding all therapies is evaluated to enhance hot flash treatment decision making by clinicians and patients. PMID:23355109

  14. Dendrogeomorphic reconstruction of flash floods in the Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteller, Alejandro; Stoffel, Markus; Crespo, Sebastián; Villalba, Ricardo; Corona, Christophe; Bianchi, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Flash floods represent a significant natural hazard in small mountainous catchments of the Patagonian Andes and have repeatedly caused loss to life and infrastructure. At the same time, however, documentary records of past events remain fairly scarce and highly fragmentary in most cases. In this study, we therefore reconstruct the spatiotemporal patterns of past flash flood activity along the Los Cipreses torrent (Neuquén, Argentina) using dendrogeomorphic methods. Based on samples from Austrocedrus chilensis, Pseudotsuga menziesii, and Nothofagus dombeyi, we document 21 flash flood events covering the period A.D. 1890-2009 and reconstruct mean recurrence intervals of events at the level of individual trees being impacted, which varies from 4 to 93 years. Results show that trees tend to be older (younger) in sectors of the torrent with gentler (steeper) slope gradients. Potential triggers of flash floods were analyzed using daily temperature and precipitation data from a nearby weather station. Weather conditions leading to flash floods are abundant precipitations during one to three consecutive days, combined with temperatures above the rain/snow threshold (2 °C) in the whole watershed.

  15. A Study of Small EUV Flashes around Coronal Hole Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, Laura E.; Valluri, Meghala; McAteer, James

    2016-05-01

    Coronal holes (CHs) are theorized to have magnetically open magnetic flux lines and are the source of high-speed solar wind. It is hypothesized that there will be small scale reconnection events at the CH boundary due to interaction between open fields of the CH and closed fields of the quiet and active sun. These reconnection events are expected to manifest themselves as spatially small and temporally short increases in extreme ultraviolet intensity at the CH boundary. We investigate an automated detection of small flashes near the CH boundary and present statistics on the characteristics of these flashes, including lifetime, size, and brightness. We compare these characteristics to those of flashes occurring away from the CH boundary. The application of active contours without edges (ACWE) allows for the automated detection of CHs without dependence on a fixed threshold value. ACWE employs an energy-minimization in which CHs are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than surrounding active and quiet Sun. The CHs segmented with ACWE tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. Detection of flashes around the CH boundary serve as additional evidence of correct CH segmentation and provides further evidence supporting the hypothesis of reconnection events at CH boundaries, while the ACWE now provides a tool to study these flashes further in large datasets.

  16. A Unified Flash Flood Database across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gourley, Jonathan J.; Hong, Yang; Flamig, Zachary L.; Arthur, Ami; Clark, Robert; Calianno, Martin; Ruin, Isabelle; Ortel, Terry W.; Wieczorek, Michael E.; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Clark, Edward; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite flash flooding being one of the most deadly and costly weather-related natural hazards worldwide, individual datasets to characterize them in the United States are hampered by limited documentation and can be difficult to access. This study is the first of its kind to assemble, reprocess, describe, and disseminate a georeferenced U.S. database providing a long-term, detailed characterization of flash flooding in terms of spatiotemporal behavior and specificity of impacts. The database is composed of three primary sources: 1) the entire archive of automated discharge observations from the U.S. Geological Survey that has been reprocessed to describe individual flooding events, 2) flash-flooding reports collected by the National Weather Service from 2006 to the present, and 3) witness reports obtained directly from the public in the Severe Hazards Analysis and Verification Experiment during the summers 2008–10. Each observational data source has limitations; a major asset of the unified flash flood database is its collation of relevant information from a variety of sources that is now readily available to the community in common formats. It is anticipated that this database will be used for many diverse purposes, such as evaluating tools to predict flash flooding, characterizing seasonal and regional trends, and improving understanding of dominant flood-producing processes. We envision the initiation of this community database effort will attract and encompass future datasets.

  17. Kinematics of illumination patterns and light echoes from flashes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Flash-induced light echoes-the observation of light reflected from a burst-have been observed in astronomical settings for more than a century and have been observed in the laboratory recently. Because of the flight time of light, perceived light echoes are different from real light illumination patterns on a scattering plane, neglecting interreflections and non-opaque scattering effects. The shape and motion of real illumination patterns are studied from a spherical flash. Then, ellipsoids of constant time delay for a specifically chosen coordinate system are applied. Generally, perceived light echoes are elliptical annular rings and the center of a light echo will not start at the flash, which leads to light echoes moving angularly toward the flash instead of away from it, a phenomenon actually recorded by other groups. The brightness of perceived light echoes was studied, and maximum brightness occurred close to the flash's projective point on the scattering plane. Two specific examples are given and a magnification effect between perceived echoes and real illumination patterns is proposed. PMID:27607505

  18. X-ray flashes in ROSAT PSPC data

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X.; Li, H.; Fenimore, E.E.; Wang, Q.D.

    1998-12-01

    The authors find 24 short (200--2,500s) X-ray flashes from all the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations above galactic latitude 30 degrees ({approximately} 9.6 Msec) and some observations toward low latitudes ({approximately} 2.4 Msec). The brightest flash is quite extraordinary. Its flux rises from nondetection by a factor of > 200 in less than 100 sec. Its spectrum can be fitted either by a thermal plasma model with kT {ge} 2.4 keV, or by a single power-law with the photon number index of {approx} {minus}1.7. Photon statistics are not sufficient to obtain spectra for other flashes. The flash event fields can vary from optically crowded regions to blank fields. Although eight flashes are found from observations from nearby galaxies, and three of them are within the optical extent of their corresponding galaxies, they could not statistically establish that there are two different populations between nearby galaxies and control fields.

  19. Study of Beijiang catchment flash-flood forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Huang, S.; Dong, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Beijiang catchment is a small catchment in southern China locating in the centre of the storm areas of the Pearl River Basin. Flash flooding in Beijiang catchment is a frequently observed disaster that caused direct damages to human beings and their properties. Flood forecasting is the most effective method for mitigating flash floods, the goal of this paper is to develop the flash flood forecasting model for Beijiang catchment. The catchment property data, including DEM, land cover types and soil types, which will be used for model construction and parameter determination, are downloaded from the website freely. Based on the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model, a model for flash flood forecasting of Beijiang catchment is set up. The model derives the model parameters from the terrain properties, and further optimized with the observed flooding process, which improves the model performance. The model is validated with a few observed floods occurred in recent years, and the results show that the model is reliable and is promising for flash flood forecasting.

  20. An Evaluation of Flash Cells Used in Critical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard B.; Flowers, David; Bergevin, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Due to the common use of Flash technology in many commercial and industrial Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) such as FPGAs and mixed-signal microcontrollers, flash technology is being utilized in fuzed munition applications. This presents a long-term reliability issue for both DoD and NASA safety- and mission-critical applications. A thorough understanding of the data retention failure modes and statistics associated with Flash data retention is of vital concern to the fuze safety community. A key retention parameter for a flash cell is the threshold voltage (VTH), which is an indirect indicator of the amount of charge stored on the cells floating gate. Initial test results based on a study of charge loss in flash cells in an FPGA device is presented. Statistical data taken from a small sample set indicates quantifiable charge loss for devices stored at both room temperature and 150 C. Initial evaluation of the distribution of threshold voltage in a large sample set (800 devices) is presented. The magnitude of charge loss from exposure to electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic fields is measured and presented. Simulated data (and measured data as available) resultant from harsh-environment testing (neutron, heavy ion, EMP) is presented.

  1. Desorption of deuterium from beryllium codeposits using flash heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. H.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Pitts, R. A.; Smirnov, R. D.; Xu, H. W.

    2013-07-01

    As a result of safety concerns, limits will be placed on the allowable tritium inventory retained inside the ITER vacuum vessel. The primary motivation for the present work is to test the proposed method of removing tritium from main chamber codeposits using radiative heat flashing from controlled ITER plasma shutdowns. Detritiation of Be codeposits is studied in the PISCES-B facility using flash-heating by a 10 ms laser with up to 2 MJ/m2 of absorbed energy density. Three types of codeposits are flash-heated with layer thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.2 μm. Less than 25% of the D in the Be layer escapes at ITER-relevant flash energy densities and with peak surface temperature up to ˜900 °C. Repetitive flashing with peak surface temperature of 400-500 °C results in an increased population of higher energy trap sites, implying that transient heating which causes appropriate surface temperature excursion redistributes D among codeposit trap sites.

  2. On the characteristics of positive lightning ground flashes in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharudin, Zikri Abadi; Cooray, Vernon; Rahman, Mahbubur; Hettiarachchi, Pasan; Ahmad, Noor Azlinda

    2016-02-01

    In this study the stroke characteristics of positive cloud-to-ground flashes in Sweden were obtained from the electric field records measured from 14 thunderstorms. The electric fields were measured with nanosecond resolution. Together with the fast and the slow electric field records, the narrowband radiation field at 3 and 30 MHz signals were also measured simultaneously. Out of a total of 107 flashes, 30 flashes had two strokes, 7 had three strokes and 3 flashes had four strokes. The arithmetic and geometric means of the interstroke intervals were found to be 116 and 70 ms, respectively. The arithmetic and geometric mean ratio between the peak electric field of the Subsequent Return Stroke (SRS) and the first Return Stroke (RS) were 0.48 and 0.36, respectively. Of the 40 positive multiple-stroke ground flashes, 5% have at least one SRS with field peak higher than the first RS. The percentage of SRS with field peaks greater than the first RS was 6%. In our best of our knowledge, this is the first time a large sample of positive return strokes in Sweden was analysed. It was found to be statistically more significant than the previous studies.

  3. Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2000: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings for the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2000 that was held on November 15-16, 2000 in Arlington, Virginia. The proceedings contains a wide range of papers that cover the presentations of myriad advances in the nonvolatile memory technology during the recent past including memory cell design, simulations, radiation environment, and emerging memory technologies. The papers presented in the proceedings address the design challenges and applications and deals with newer, emerging memory technologies as well as related issues of radiation environment and die packaging.

  4. Characterization of an Autonomous Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Memory Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Caroline S.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Evans, Joe; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the electrical characterization of an autonomous non-volatile ferroelectric memory latch using the principle that when an electric field is applied to a ferroelectriccapacitor,the positive and negative remnant polarization charge states of the capacitor are denoted as either data 0 or data 1. The properties of the ferroelectric material to store an electric polarization in the absence of an electric field make the device non-volatile. Further the memory latch is autonomous as it operates with the ground, power and output node connections, without any externally clocked control line. The unique quality of this latch circuit is that it can be written when powered off. The advantages of this latch over flash memories are: a) It offers unlimited reads/writes b) works on symmetrical read/write cycles. c) The latch is asynchronous. The circuit was initially developed by Radiant Technologies Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  5. A Beginner's Guide to Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Elizabeth M.

    1981-01-01

    This article is designed to equip the reader with the information needed to deal with questions of computer memory. Discussed are core memory; semiconductor memory; size of memory; expanding memory; charge-coupled device memories; magnetic bubble memory; and read-only and read-mostly memories. (KC)

  6. EDITORIAL: Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei; Yang, J. Joshua; Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Non-volatile memory refers to the crucial ability of computers to store information once the power source has been removed. Traditionally this has been achieved through flash, magnetic computer storage and optical discs, and in the case of very early computers paper tape and punched cards. While computers have advanced considerably from paper and punched card memory devices, there are still limits to current non-volatile memory devices that restrict them to use as secondary storage from which data must be loaded and carefully saved when power is shut off. Denser, faster, low-energy non-volatile memory is highly desired and nanostructures are the critical enabler. This special issue on non-volatile memory based on nanostructures describes some of the new physics and technology that may revolutionise future computers. Phase change random access memory, which exploits the reversible phase change between crystalline and amorphous states, also holds potential for future memory devices. The chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a promising material in this field because it combines a high activation energy for crystallization and a relatively low crystallization temperature, as well as a low melting temperature and low conductivity, which accommodates localized heating. Doping is often used to lower the current required to activate the phase change or 'reset' GST but this often aggravates other problems. Now researchers in Korea report in-depth studies of SiO2-doped GST and identify ways of optimising the material's properties for phase-change random access memory [1]. Resistance switching is an area that has attracted a particularly high level of interest for non-volatile memory technology, and a great deal of research has focused on the potential of TiO2 as a model system in this respect. Researchers at HP labs in the US have made notable progress in this field, and among the work reported in this special issue they describe means to control the switch resistance and show

  7. Mechanisms of epigenetic memory and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Tuesta, Luis M; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of cellular identity and function is at least partly achieved through changes in covalent modifications on DNA and histones. Much progress has been made in recent years to understand how these covalent modifications affect cell identity and function. Despite the advances, whether and how epigenetic factors contribute to memory formation is still poorly understood. In this review, we discuss recent progress in elucidating epigenetic mechanisms of learning and memory, primarily at the DNA level, and look ahead to discuss their potential implications in reward memory and development of drug addiction. PMID:24778453

  8. [Sleep-wake cycle and memory consolidation].

    PubMed

    Baratti, Carlos M; Boccia, Mariano M; Blake, Mariano G; Acosta, Gabriela B

    2007-01-01

    Although several hypothesis and theories have been advanced as explanations for the functions of sleep, a unified theory of sleep function remains elusive. Sleep has been implicated in the plastic cerebral changes that underlie learning and memory, in particular those related to memory consolidation of recently acquired new information. Despite steady accumulations of positive findings over the last ten years, the precise role of sleep in memory and brain plasticity is unproven at all. This situation might be solved by more integrated approaches that combine behavioral and neurophysiological measurements in well described in vivo models of neuronal activity and brain plasticity. PMID:18219403

  9. Design of a Multi-Level/Analog Ferroelectric Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Phillips, Thomas A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing the memory density and utilizing the dove1 characteristics of ferroelectric devices is important in making ferroelectric memory devices more desirable to the consumer. This paper describes a design that allows multiple levels to be stored in a ferroelectric based memory cell. It can be used to store multiple bits or analog values in a high speed nonvolatile memory. The design utilizes the hysteresis characteristic of ferroelectric transistors to store an analog value in the memory cell. The design also compensates for the decay of the polarization of the ferroelectric material over time. This is done by utilizing a pair of ferroelectric transistors to store the data. One transistor is used as a reference to determine the amount of decay that has occurred since the pair was programmed. The second transistor stores the analog value as a polarization value between zero and saturated. The design allows digital data to be stored as multiple bits in each memory cell. The number of bits per cell that can be stored will vary with the decay rate of the ferroelectric transistors and the repeatability of polarization between transistors. It is predicted that each memory cell may be able to store 8 bits or more. The design is based on data taken from actual ferroelectric transistors. Although the circuit has not been fabricated, a prototype circuit is now under construction. The design of this circuit is different than multi-level FLASH or silicon transistor circuits. The differences between these types of circuits are described in this paper. This memory design will be useful because it allows higher memory density, compensates for the environmental and ferroelectric aging processes, allows analog values to be directly stored in memory, compensates for the thermal and radiation environments associated with space operations, and relies only on existing technologies.

  10. Memory Retrieval and Interference: Working Memory Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Copeland, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Working memory capacity has been suggested as a factor that is involved in long-term memory retrieval, particularly when that retrieval involves a need to overcome some sort of interference (Bunting, Conway, & Heitz, 2004; Cantor & Engle, 1993). Previous work has suggested that working memory is related to the acquisition of information during…

  11. Recent Flash X-Ray Injector Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Blackfield, D; Burke, J; Chen, Y; Javedani, J; Paul, A C

    2004-11-10

    The injector of the Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator has a significantly larger than expected beam emittance. A computer modeling effort involving three different injector design codes was undertaken to characterize the FXR injector and determine the cause of the large emittance. There were some variations between the codes, but in general the simulations were consistent and pointed towards a much smaller normalized, rms emittance (36 cm-mr) than what was measured (193 cm-mr) at the exit of the injector using a pepperpot technique. The simulations also indicated that the present diode design was robust with respect to perturbations to the nominal design. Easily detected mechanical alignment/position errors and magnet errors did not lead to appreciable increase in the simulated emittance. The physics of electron emission was not modeled by any of the codes and could be the source of increased emittance. The nominal simulation assumed uniform Child-Langmuir Law emission from the velvet cathode and no shroud emission. Simulations that looked at extreme non-uniform cathode and shroud emission scenarios resulted in doubling of the emittance. An alternative approach was to question the pepperpot measurement. Simulations of the measurement showed that the pepperpot aperture foil could double the emittance with respect to the non-disturbed beam. This leads to a diplomatic explanation of the discrepancy between predicted and measured emittance where the fault is shared. The measured value is too high due to the effect of the diagnostic on the beam and the simulations are too low because of unaccounted cathode and/or shroud emission physics. Fortunately there is a relatively simple experiment that can resolve the emittance discrepancy. If the large measured emittance value is correct, the beam envelope is emittance dominated at modest values of focusing field and beam radius. Measurements of the beam envelope on an imaging foil at the exit of the injector would lead to an

  12. Modeling midwave infrared muzzle flash spectra from unsuppressed and flash-suppressed large caliber munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, Bryan J.; Perram, Glen P.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2012-07-01

    Time-resolved infrared spectra of firings from a 152 mm howitzer were acquired over an 1800-6000 cm-1 spectral range using a Fourier-transform spectrometer. The instrument collected primarily at 32 cm-1 spectral and 100 Hz temporal resolutions. Munitions included unsuppressed and chemically flash suppressed propellants. Secondary combustion occurred with unsuppressed propellants resulting in flash emissions lasting ˜100 ms and dominated by H2O and CO2 spectral structure. Non-combusting plume emissions were one-tenth as intense and approached background levels within 20-40 ms. A low-dimensional phenomenological model was used to reduce the data to temperatures, soot absorbances, and column densities of H2O, CO2, CH4, and CO. The combusting plumes exhibit peak temperatures of ˜1400 K, areas of greater than 32 m2, low soot emissivity of ˜0.04, with nearly all the CO converted to CO2. The non-combusting plumes exhibit lower temperatures of ˜1000 K, areas of ˜5 m2, soot emissivity of greater than 0.38 and CO as the primary product. Maximum fit residual relative to peak intensity are 14% and 8.9% for combusting and non-combusting plumes, respectively. The model was generalized to account for turbulence-induced variations in the muzzle plumes. Distributions of temperature and concentration in 1-2 spatial regions demonstrate a reduction in maximum residuals by 40%. A two-region model of combusting plumes provides a plausible interpretation as a ˜1550 K, optically thick plume core and ˜2550 K, thin, surface-layer flame-front. Temperature rate of change was used to characterize timescales and energy release for plume emissions. Heat of combustion was estimated to be ˜5 MJ/kg.

  13. Optical memory

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  14. Flash trajectory imaging of target 3D motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan; Fan, Songtao; He, Jun; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-03-01

    We present a flash trajectory imaging technique which can directly obtain target trajectory and realize non-contact measurement of motion parameters by range-gated imaging and time delay integration. Range-gated imaging gives the range of targets and realizes silhouette detection which can directly extract targets from complex background and decrease the complexity of moving target image processing. Time delay integration increases information of one single frame of image so that one can directly gain the moving trajectory. In this paper, we have studied the algorithm about flash trajectory imaging and performed initial experiments which successfully obtained the trajectory of a falling badminton. Our research demonstrates that flash trajectory imaging is an effective approach to imaging target trajectory and can give motion parameters of moving targets.

  15. A simple experiment that demonstrates the ``green flash''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtial, Johannes

    2012-11-01

    The green flash occurs when, under certain atmospheric conditions, the top segment of the low sun is visibly green. It is surrounded—in at least a few minds—by an air of mystery. I describe a simple experiment that demonstrates different aspects of the green flash. The experiment uses an odd-shaped, water-filled, fish tank to simulate the refractive properties of the atmosphere; milk powder added to the water mimicks the atmosphere's scattering properties. A circular white-light source is viewed through the fish tank and the combination of refraction and scattering makes one end of the light source look green. The setup also allows experimentation with mirage effects, thereby drawing attention to their often neglected contribution to the green flash.

  16. FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations of shock-generated magnetic field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of benchmark FLASH magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. We first outline the implementation of 2D cylindrical geometry in the unsplit MHD solver in FLASH and present results of verification tests. We then describe the results of benchmark 2D cylindrical MHD simulations of the LULI experiments using FLASH that explore the impact of external fields along with the possibility of magnetic field amplification by turbulence that is associated with the shock waves and that is induced by a grid placed in the gas-filled chamber.

  17. A search for the radio occultation flash at Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M.; Tyler, G. L.; Eshleman, V. R.; Wood, G. E.; Lindal, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    A focusing effect, the evolute flash, on Jupiter was sought in radio data obtained by Voyager 1 using a modified matched-filter technique. Several peaks at the 8 standard deviation level were present in the filter output, although they were separated by times up to 3.3 s and could not be identified as the flash. A lower bound on the absorption along a ray with periapsis near the 4 bar level was established at 25 dB. It is estimated that the flash would have been detected if the distance behind the planet where the spacecraft trajectory crossed the evolute were at least 20 Jupiter radii, as compared to near 7 radii in the experiment.

  18. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  19. PNNL 331 Building Arc Flash Team Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Deichman, Mark L.; Drewrey, John C.; Hodges, Hurtis; Madson, Vernon J.; Minton, Allen L.; Montgomery, Daniel M.; Olson, Marvin E.; Rojas, Pedro H.; Sanan, Sanjay K.; Sharp, Reed D.; Sparks, Bobby R.; Swearingen, Gary L.

    2006-06-06

    On Friday, April 21, 2006, a PNNL electrician was performing repair of an electrical system for the 331 Building chilled water pump (CHWP) No.2, when an electrical arc flash occurred inside a 480V combination motor starter. The electrician was taken to the on-site medical provider for evaluation and was released for return to work without restriction. The electrician was not shocked, but did receive a minor, superficial (first degree) burn on the left wrist. This report, the result of a thorough review by the 331 Building Arc Flash Assessment Team, provides an in-depth look at the steps leading up to the arc-flash and recommendations and opportunities for improvement.

  20. Approximate flash calculations for equation-of-state compositional models--

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, L.X.; Li, Y.K. )

    1990-02-01

    An approximate flash-calculation (AFC) method with an equation of state (EOS) is presented. The equations for AFC are obtained by linearizing the thermodynamic equilibrium equations at an equilibrium condition called the reference condition. The AFC equations are much simpler than the actual equations for flash calculations and yet give almost the same results. A procedure for generating new reference conditions to keep the AFC results close to the true flash-calculation (TFC) results is described. AFC is compared with TFC in the calculation of standard laboratory tests and in the simulation of gas-injection processes with a compositional model. Excellent results are obtained with AFC in less than half the original execution time.