Science.gov

Sample records for advanced flexible reusable

  1. A Flexible Reusable Space Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrobon, S. S.

    A crewless reusable vertical take-off horizontal landing space transportation system is investigated. The single stage launch vehicle goes into a very low orbit around the Earth. At burnout, the payload is deployed. At apogee, the upper stage fires to put the payload into its desired orbit. The launch vehicle continues in a single orbit of the Earth, re-entering the atmosphere and returning to the launch site. We call this near single stage to orbit (NSTO). For satellite payloads, the satellite and upper stage are carried in a reusable pod attached to the top of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, the pod is replaced by a small winged vehicle which can be used for crew transfer and rescue from the International Space Station. This allows the launch vehicle to use a common bulkhead between the fuel and oxidiser tanks, further reducing launch vehicle mass. A number of propellant combinations are investigated. Computer simulations indicate that liquid oxygen with quadricyclene promises to give the largest payload mass for similar size vehicles. The launch vehicle can also be modified to be a fly- back booster for a heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV). In this case the upper stage and payload are replaced with jet engines and kerosene fuel tanks. A pod is used to recover the second stage engines for reuse.

  2. Systems integration and demonstration of advanced reusable structure for ALS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbins, Martin N.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the potential of advanced material to achieve life cycle cost (LCC) benefits for reusable structure on the advanced launch system. Three structural elements were investigated - all components of an Advanced Launch System reusable propulsion/avionics module. Leading aeroshell configurations included sandwich structure using titanium, graphite/polyimide (Gr/PI), or high-temperature aluminum (HTA) face sheets. Thrust structure truss concepts used titanium, graphite/epoxy, or silicon carbide/aluminum struts. Leading aft bulkhead concepts employed graphite epoxy and aluminum. The technical effort focused on the aeroshell because the greatest benefits were expected there. Thermal analyses show the structural temperature profiles during operation. Finite element analyses show stresses during splash-down. Weight statements and manufacturing cost estimates were prepared for calculation of LCC for each design. The Gr/PI aeroshell showed the lowest potential LCC, but the HTA aeroshell was judged to be lower risk. A technology development plan was prepared to validate the applicable structural technology.

  3. Russian aluminum-lithium alloys for advanced reusable spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charette, Ray O.; Leonard, Bruce G.; Bozich, William F.; Deamer, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Cryotanks that are cost-affordable, robust, fuel-compatible, and lighter weight than current aluminum design are needed to support next-generation launch system performance and operability goals. The Boeing (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-MDA) and NASA's Delta Clipper-Experimental Program (DC-XA) flight demonstrator test bed vehicle provided the opportunity for technology transfer of Russia's extensive experience base with weight-efficient, highly weldable aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys for cryogenic tank usage. As part of NASA's overall reusable launch vehicle (RLV) program to help provide technology and operations data for use in advanced RLVs, MDA contracted with the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS/IMASH) for design, test, and delivery of 1460 Al-Li alloy liquid oxygen (LO2) cryotanks: one for development, one for ground tests, and one for DC-XA flight tests. This paper describes the development of Al-Li 1460 alloy for reusable LO2 tanks, including alloy composition tailoring, mechanical properties database, forming, welding, chemical milling, dissimilar metal joining, corrosion protection, completed tanks proof, and qualification testing. Mechanical properties of the parent and welded materials exceeded expectations, particularly the fracture toughness, which promise excellent reuse potential. The LO2 cryotank was successfully demonstrated in DC-XA flight tests.

  4. Advanced TSTO VTOHL reusable rocket launcher - Study status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriat, E.; Bombled, J. P.; Rezette, J. P.; Lacaze, H.

    1992-08-01

    Results of current investigations of an advanced TSTO, vertical-takeoff-and-horizontal landing, reusable rocket launcher are presented. Cost reduction and safety considerations, which require abort capabilities of the future manned launcher throughout the flight regime, are addressed. Recovery scenarios are investigated to determine when the stages could execute return-to-launch-site, transatlantic-abort-landing, or abort-to-orbit abort modes. It is shown that the appropriate combination of powered and gliding phases with limited relaxation on nominal constraints enables the intact stages to recover throughout the flight regime, from takeoff to orbital insertion. The results of a trade-off study performed to obtain a lightweight thermostructural concept are also presented.

  5. Moon-Based Advanced Reusable Transportation Architecture: The MARTA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, R.; Bechtel, R.; Chen, T.; Cormier, T.; Kalaver, S.; Kirtas, M.; Lewe, J.-H.; Marcus, L.; Marshall, D.; Medlin, M.; McIntire, J.; Nelson, D.; Remolina, D.; Scott, A.; Weglian, J.; Olds, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Moon-based Advanced Reusable Transportation Architecture (MARTA) Project conducted an in-depth investigation of possible Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to lunar surface transportation systems capable of sending both astronauts and large masses of cargo to the Moon and back. This investigation was conducted from the perspective of a private company operating the transportation system for a profit. The goal of this company was to provide an Internal Rate of Return (IRR) of 25% to its shareholders. The technical aspect of the study began with a wide open design space that included nuclear rockets and tether systems as possible propulsion systems. Based on technical, political, and business considerations, the architecture was quickly narrowed down to a traditional chemical rocket using liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. However, three additional technologies were identified for further investigation: aerobraking, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and a mass driver on the lunar surface. These three technologies were identified because they reduce the mass of propellant used. Operational costs are the largest expense with propellant cost the largest contributor. ISRU, the production of materials using resources on the Moon, was considered because an Earth to Orbit (ETO) launch cost of 1600 per kilogram made taking propellant from the Earth's surface an expensive proposition. The use of an aerobrake to circularize the orbit of a vehicle coming from the Moon towards Earth eliminated 3, 100 meters per second of velocity change (Delta V), eliminating almost 30% of the 11,200 m/s required for one complete round trip. The use of a mass driver on the lunar surface, in conjunction with an ISRU production facility, would reduce the amount of propellant required by eliminating using propellant to take additional propellant from the lunar surface to Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). However, developing and operating such a system required further study to identify if it was cost effective. The

  6. Advanced aviation technology for reusable launch vehicle improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatyev, Alexander S.; Buzuluk, Valentin; Yanova, Olga; Ryabukha, Nikolay; Petrov, Andrey

    2014-07-01

    The new project of a spacecraft launcher (SL) with reusable winged 1st stage boosters (RWB) developed by Khrunichev Space Center is considered. Since SL is operated in the atmosphere only, it makes sense to employ technologies which may be new for the space industry but have been applied in aviation. Particular attention is given to RWB power-off reentry to a suitable airfield along the ascent lane instead of direct flying back to the launch site after staging, as well as a profound controlled RWB reconfiguration before reentry. The paper talks about results of integrated analysis of aerodynamics, through-optimized trajectories and masses of the RWB and SL, as well as an expert assessment of the maintenance costs sufficient to substantiate effectiveness of the recovery airfields solution in terms of the payload mass, launch reliability, and operational costs reduction. Four RWB layouts are considered, including ones with a delta- and unswept tilting wing, with and without subsonic air-breathing engines, and the original RWB-transformer. Objective peculiarities of the RWB recovery are highlighted for Russian and Kourou cosmodromes.

  7. Reduced turnover times make flexible optical reusable scope with EndoSheath(®) Technology significantly cost-effective.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak; Srirajakalidindi, Arvind; Wang, Hong

    2012-07-01

    EndoSheath bronchoscopy (Vision Sciences, Inc.) uses a sterile, disposable microbial barrier that may meet the growing needs for safe, efficient, and cost effective flexible bronchoscopy. The purpose of this open-label comparative study was to compare and calculate the costs-per-airway-procedure of the reusable fiberscope when used with and without EndoSheath(®) Technology; and to record the turnover time from the completion of the use of each scope until its readiness again for the next use. Seventy-five new patients' airways requiring airway maneuvers and manipulations with Vision Sciences, Inc., reusable fiberscope with EndoSheath(®) Technology were evaluated for the costs comparisons with reassessed historical costs data for Olympus scope assisted tracheal intubations. As compared to costs of an intubation ($158.50) with Olympus scope at our institute, the intubation costs with Vision Sciences, Inc., reusable fiberscope with EndoSheath technology was $81.50 (P < 0.001). The mean turnover time was 5.44 min with EndoSheath technology as compared to previously reported 30 min with Olympus fiberscope (P < 0.001). Based on our institutional experience, Vision Sciences, Inc., reusable fiberscope with EndoSheath technology is significantly cost effective as compared to the Olympus scope with significantly improved turnover times.

  8. Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART): An alternative manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewerenz, T.; Kosha, M.; Magazu, H.

    1991-01-01

    Although the current U.S. Space Transportation System (STS) has proven successful in many applications, the truth remains that the space shuttle is not as reliable or economical as was once hoped. In fact, the Augustine Commission on the future of the U.S. Space Program has recommended that the space shuttle only be used on missions directly requiring human capabilities on-orbit and that the shuttle program should eventually be phased out. This poses a great dilemma since the shuttle provides the only current or planned U.S. means for human access to space at the same time that NASA is building toward a permanent manned presence. As a possible solution to this dilemma, it is proposed that the U.S. begin development of an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS). This spacecraft would not only provide follow-on capability for maintaining human space flight, but would also provide redundancy and enhanced capability in the near future. Design requirements for the AMS studied include: (1) capability of launching on one of the current or planned U.S. expendable launch vehicles (baseline McDonnell Douglas Delta II model 7920 expendable booster); (2) application to a wide variety of missions including autonomous operations, space station support, and access to orbits and inclinations beyond those of the space shuttle; (3) low enough costing to fly regularly in augmentation of space shuttle capabilities; (4) production surge capabilities to replace the shuttle if events require it; (5) intact abort capability in all flight regimes since the planned launch vehicles are not man-rated; (6) technology cut-off date of 1990; and (7) initial operational capability in 1995. In addition, the design of the AMS would take advantage of scientific advances made in the 20 years since the space shuttle was first conceived. These advances are in such technologies as composite materials, propulsion systems, avionics, and hypersonics.

  9. Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART): An alternative manned spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewerenz, T.; Kosha, M.; Magazu, H.

    Although the current U.S. Space Transportation System (STS) has proven successful in many applications, the truth remains that the space shuttle is not as reliable or economical as was once hoped. In fact, the Augustine Commission on the future of the U.S. Space Program has recommended that the space shuttle only be used on missions directly requiring human capabilities on-orbit and that the shuttle program should eventually be phased out. This poses a great dilemma since the shuttle provides the only current or planned U.S. means for human access to space at the same time that NASA is building toward a permanent manned presence. As a possible solution to this dilemma, it is proposed that the U.S. begin development of an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS). This spacecraft would not only provide follow-on capability for maintaining human space flight, but would also provide redundancy and enhanced capability in the near future. Design requirements for the AMS studied include: (1) capability of launching on one of the current or planned U.S. expendable launch vehicles (baseline McDonnell Douglas Delta II model 7920 expendable booster); (2) application to a wide variety of missions including autonomous operations, space station support, and access to orbits and inclinations beyond those of the space shuttle; (3) low enough costing to fly regularly in augmentation of space shuttle capabilities; (4) production surge capabilities to replace the shuttle if events require it; (5) intact abort capability in all flight regimes since the planned launch vehicles are not man-rated; (6) technology cut-off date of 1990; and (7) initial operational capability in 1995. In addition, the design of the AMS would take advantage of scientific advances made in the 20 years since the space shuttle was first conceived. These advances are in such technologies as composite materials, propulsion systems, avionics, and hypersonics.

  10. Progress toward an advanced condition monitoring system for reusable rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maram, J.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1987-01-01

    A new generation of advanced sensor technologies will allow the direct measurement of critical/degradable rocket engine components' health and the detection of degraded conditions before component deterioration affects engine performance, leading to substantial improvements in reusable engines' operation and maintenance. When combined with a computer-based engine condition-monitoring system, these sensors can furnish a continuously updated data base for the prediction of engine availability and advanced warning of emergent maintenance requirements. Attention is given to the case of a practical turbopump and combustion device diagnostic/prognostic health-monitoring system.

  11. Reusable Rocket Engine Advanced Health Management System. Architecture and Technology Evaluation: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, C. D.; Barkhoudarian, S.; Daumann, A. G., Jr.; Provan, G. M.; ElFattah, Y. M.; Glover, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we proposed an Advanced Health Management System (AHMS) functional architecture and conducted a technology assessment for liquid propellant rocket engine lifecycle health management. The purpose of the AHMS is to improve reusable rocket engine safety and to reduce between-flight maintenance. During the study, past and current reusable rocket engine health management-related projects were reviewed, data structures and health management processes of current rocket engine programs were assessed, and in-depth interviews with rocket engine lifecycle and system experts were conducted. A generic AHMS functional architecture, with primary focus on real-time health monitoring, was developed. Fourteen categories of technology tasks and development needs for implementation of the AHMS were identified, based on the functional architecture and our assessment of current rocket engine programs. Five key technology areas were recommended for immediate development, which (1) would provide immediate benefits to current engine programs, and (2) could be implemented with minimal impact on the current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) engine controllers.

  12. Reusable launch vehicles, enabling technology for the development of advanced upper stages and payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, John D.

    1998-01-01

    In the near future there will be classes of upper stages and payloads that will require initial operation at a high-earth orbit to reduce the probability of an inadvertent reentry that could result in a detrimental impact on humans and the biosphere. A nuclear propulsion system, such as was being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program, is an example of such a potential payload. This paper uses the results of a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) study to demonstrate the potential importance of a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) to test and implement an advanced upper stage (AUS) or payload in a safe orbit and in a cost effective and reliable manner. The RLV is a horizontal takeoff and horizontal landing (HTHL), two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) vehicle. The results of the study shows that an HTHL is cost effective because it implements airplane-like operation, infrastructure, and flight operations. The first stage of the TSTO is powered by Rocket-Based-Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines, the second stage is powered by a LOX/LH rocket engine. The TSTO is used since it most effectively utilizes the capability of the RBCC engine. The analysis uses the NASA code POST (Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories) to determine trajectories and weight in high-earth orbit for AUS/advanced payloads. Cost and reliability of an RLV versus current generation expandable launch vehicles are presented.

  13. Reusable launch vehicles, enabling technology for the development of advanced upper stages and payloads

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, John D.

    1998-01-15

    In the near future there will be classes of upper stages and payloads that will require initial operation at a high-earth orbit to reduce the probability of an inadvertent reentry that could result in a detrimental impact on humans and the biosphere. A nuclear propulsion system, such as was being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program, is an example of such a potential payload. This paper uses the results of a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) study to demonstrate the potential importance of a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) to test and implement an advanced upper stage (AUS) or payload in a safe orbit and in a cost effective and reliable manner. The RLV is a horizontal takeoff and horizontal landing (HTHL), two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) vehicle. The results of the study shows that an HTHL is cost effective because it implements airplane-like operation, infrastructure, and flight operations. The first stage of the TSTO is powered by Rocket-Based-Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines, the second stage is powered by a LOX/LH rocket engine. The TSTO is used since it most effectively utilizes the capability of the RBCC engine. The analysis uses the NASA code POST (Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories) to determine trajectories and weight in high-earth orbit for AUS/advanced payloads. Cost and reliability of an RLV versus current generation expandable launch vehicles are presented.

  14. 'Booster Recovery Module' - A reusability concept for the advanced launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedillo, Mark J.

    1990-07-01

    The aerospace industry is looking at different approaches to achieve a recurring cost goal of 300 $/lb to low earth orbit for the Advanced Launch System. A booster recovery module concept has been defined that takes advantage of a partial propulsion system reusability approach. An overview of a cost-effective, low risk propulsion system concept is presented. Booster engine recovery and reuse have been shown to be a viable option to reduce the engine system costs that result from both vehicle performance and operational requirements. A flight experiment is outlined to conduct a subscale booster recovery demonstration. This Atlas E flight experiment will also serve to determine cost-effective main engine options, such as: modularity, sea water effects/isolation, environmental limitations, assessment of existing margins and factors of safety, and selection of material.

  15. DART: Delta Advanced Reusable Transport. An alternate manned space system proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART) craft is being developed to add, multiple, rapid, and cost effective space access to the U.S. capability and to further the efforts towards a permanent space presence. The DART craft provides an augmentative and an alternative system to the Shuttle. As a supplement launch vehicle, the DART adds low cost and easily accessible transport of crew and cargo to specific space destinations to the U.S. program. This adds significant opportunities for manned rated missions that do not require Shuttle capabilities. In its alternative role, the DART can provide emergency space access and satellite repair, the continuation of scientific research, and the furthering of U.S. manned efforts in the event of Shuttle incapabilities. In addition, the DART is being designed for Space Station Freedom compatibility, including its use as a 'lifeboat' emergency reentry craft for Freedom astronauts, as well as the transport of crew and cargo for station resupply.

  16. A Plan for Advanced Guidance and Control Technology for 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.; Fogle, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Advanced guidance and control (AG&C) technologies are critical for meeting safety/reliability and cost requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV). This becomes clear upon examining the number of expendable launch vehicle failures in the recent past where AG&C technologies would have saved a RLV with the same failure mode, the additional vehicle problems where this technology applies, and the costs associated with mission design with or without all these failure issues. The state-of-the-art in guidance and control technology, as well as in computing technology, is at the point where we can took to the possibility of being able to safely return a RLV in any situation where it can physically be recovered. This paper outlines reasons for AG&C, current technology efforts, and the additional work needed for making this goal a reality.

  17. SCASim: A Flexible and Reusable Detector Simulator for the MIRI instrument of the JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, S.; Morin, J.; Gastaud, R.; Azzollini, R.; Bouchet, P.; Chaintreuil, S.; Lahuis, F.; Littlejohns, O.; Nehme, C.; Pye, J.

    2012-09-01

    The JWST Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) operates in the 5-28μm wavelength range and can be configured for imaging, coronographic imaging, long-slit, low-resolution spectroscopy or medium resolution spectroscopy with an integral field unit. SCASim is one of a suite of simulators which operate together to simulate all the different modes of the instrument. These simulators are essential for the efficient operation of MIRI; allowing more accurate planning of MIRI observations on sky or during the pre-launch testing of the instrument. The data generated by the simulators are essential for testing the data pipeline software. The simulators not only need to reproduce the behaviour of the instrument faithfully, they also need to be adaptable so that information learned about the instrument during the pre-launch testing and in-orbit commissioning can be fed back into the simulation. SCASim simulates the behaviour of the MIRI detectors, taking into account cosmetic effects, quantum efficiency, shot noise, dark current, read noise, amplifier layout, cosmic ray hits, etc... The software has benefited from three major design choices. First, the development of a suite of MIRI simulators, rather than single simulator, has allowed MIRI simulators to be developed in parallel by different teams, with each simulator able to concentrate on one particular area. SCASim provides a facility common to all the other simulators and saves duplication of effort. Second, SCASim has a Python-based object-oriented design which makes it easier to adapt as new information about the instrument is learned during testing. Third, all simulator parameters are maintained in external files, rather than being hard coded in the software. These design choices have made SCASim highly reusable. In its present form it can be used to simulate any JWST detector, and it can be adapted for future instruments with similar, photon-counting detectors.

  18. NASA's Advanced Propulsion Technology Activities for Third Generation Fully Reusable Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (OASTT) established the following three major goals, referred to as "The Three Pillars for Success": Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps, and Access to Space. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. focuses on future space transportation technologies under the "Access to Space" pillar. The Propulsion Projects within ASTP under the investment area of Spaceliner100, focus on the earth-to-orbit (ETO) third generation reusable launch vehicle technologies. The goals of Spaceliner 100 is to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The ETO Propulsion Projects in ASTP, are actively developing combination/combined-cycle propulsion technologies that utilized airbreathing propulsion during a major portion of the trajectory. System integration, components, materials and advanced rocket technologies are also being pursued. Over the last several years, one of the main thrusts has been to develop rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) technologies. The focus has been on conducting ground tests of several engine designs to establish the RBCC flowpaths performance. Flowpath testing of three different RBCC engine designs is progressing. Additionally, vehicle system studies are being conducted to assess potential operational space access vehicles utilizing combined-cycle propulsion systems. The design, manufacturing, and ground testing of a scale flight-type engine are planned. The first flight demonstration of an airbreathing combined cycle propulsion system is envisioned around 2005. The paper will describe the advanced propulsion technologies that are being being developed under the ETO activities in the ASTP program. Progress, findings, and future activities for the propulsion technologies will be discussed.

  19. Propulsion system advances that enable a reusable Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, E. L.; Rothschild, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the booster propulsion system for the Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB). This includes, system requirements, design approach, concept of operations, reliability, safety and cost assumptions. The paper summarizes the findings of the Boeing propulsion team that has been studying the LFBB feasibility as a booster replacement for the Space Shuttle. This paper will discuss recent advances including a new generation of kerosene and oxygen rich pre-burner staged combustion cycle main rocket engines. The engine reliability and safety is expected to be much higher than current standards by adding extra operating margins into the design and normally operating the engines at 75% of engine rated power. This allows for engine out capability. The new generation of main engines operates at significantly higher chamber pressure than the prior generation of gas generator cycle engines. The oxygen rich pre-burner engine cycle, unlike the fuel rich gas generator cycle, results in internally self-cleaning firings which facilitates reusability. Maintenance is further enhanced with integrated health monitoring to improve safety and turn-around efficiency. The maintainability of the LFBB LOX/kerosene engines is being improved by designing the vehicle/engine interfaces for easy access to key engine components.

  20. Propulsion System Advances that Enable a Reusable Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Edward L.; Rothschild, William J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the booster propulsion system for the Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB). This includes, system requirements, design approach, concept of operations, reliability, safety and cost assumptions. The paper summarizes the findings of the Boeing propulsion team that has been studying the LFBB feasibility as a booster replacement for the Space Shuttle. This paper will discuss recent advances including a new generation of kerosene and oxygen rich pre-burner staged combustion cycle main rocket engines. The engine reliability and safety is expected to be much higher than current standards by adding extra operating margins into the design and normally operating the engines at 75% of engine rated power. This allows for engine out capability. The new generation of main engines operates at significantly higher chamber pressure than the prior generation of gas generator cycle engines. The oxygen rich pre-burner engine cycle, unlike the fuel rich gas generator cycle, results in internally self-cleaning firings which facilitates reusability. Maintenance is further enhanced with integrated health monitoring to improve safety and turn-around efficiency. The maintainability of the LFBB LOX / kerosene engines is being improved by designing the vehicle/engine interfaces for easy access to key engine components.

  1. Project of Ariane 5 LV family advancement by use of reusable fly-back boosters (named “Bargouzine”)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumin, Yu.; Bonnal, Ch.; Kostromin, S.; Panichkin, N.

    2007-12-01

    The paper concerns possible concept variants of a partially reusable Heavy-Lift Launch Vehicle derived from the advanced basic launcher (Ariane-2010) by means of substitution of the EAP Solid Rocket Boosters for a Reusable Starting Stage consisting two Liquid-propellant Reusable Fly-Back Boosters called "Bargouzin". This paper describes the status of the presently studied RFBB concepts during its three phases. The first project phase was dedicated to feasibility expertise of liquid-rocket reusable fly-back boosters ("Baikal" type) utilization for heavy-lift space launch vehicle. The design features and main conclusions are presented. The second phase has been performed with the purpose of selection of preferable concept among the alternative ones for the future Ariane LV modernization by using RFBB instead of EAP Boosters. The main requirements, logic of work, possible configuration and conclusion are presented. Initial aerodynamic, ballistic, thermoloading, dynamic loading, trade-off and comparison analysis have been performed on these concepts. The third phase consists in performing a more detailed expertise of the chosen LV concept. This part summarizes some of the more detailed results related to flight performance, system mass, thermoprotection system, aspects of technologies, ground complex modification, comparison analyses and conclusion.

  2. Reusable Surface Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation, developed by Ames Research Center, protects the Space Shuttle from the searing heat that engulfs it on reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. Initially integrated into the Space Shuttle by Rockwell International, production was transferred to Hi-Temp Insulation Inc. in 1974. Over the years, Hi-Temp has created many new technologies to meet the requirements of the Space Shuttle program. This expertise is also used commercially, including insulation blankets to cover aircrafts parts, fire barrier material to protect aircraft engine cowlings and aircraft rescue fire fighter suits. A Fire Protection Division has also been established, offering the first suit designed exclusively by and for aircraft rescue fire fighters. Hi-Temp is a supplier to the Los Angeles City Fire Department as well as other major U.S. civil and military fire departments.

  3. Orbital Debris Impact Damage to Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Jennifer H.

    1998-01-01

    In an effort by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), hypervelocity impact tests were performed on thermal protection systems (TPS) applied on the external surfaces of reusable launch vehicles (RLV) to determine the potential damage from orbital debris impacts. Three TPS types were tested, bonded to composite structures representing RLV fuel tank walls. The three heat shield materials tested were Alumina-Enhanced Thermal Barrier-12 (AETB-12), Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI), and Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI). Using this test data, predictor equations were developed for the entry hole diameters in the three TPS materials, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.69 to 0.86. Possible methods are proposed for approximating damage occurring at expected orbital impact velocities higher than tested, with references to other published work.

  4. Evaluation of Advanced Thermal Protection Techniques for Future Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Cowart, Kris

    2001-01-01

    A method for integrating Aeroheating analysis into conceptual reusable launch vehicle RLV design is presented in this thesis. This process allows for faster turn-around time to converge a RLV design through the advent of designing an optimized thermal protection system (TPS). It consists of the coupling and automation of four computer software packages: MINIVER, TPSX, TCAT and ADS. MINIVER is an Aeroheating code that produces centerline radiation equilibrium temperatures, convective heating rates, and heat loads over simplified vehicle geometries. These include flat plates and swept cylinders that model wings and leading edges, respectively. TPSX is a NASA Ames material properties database that is available on the World Wide Web. The newly developed Thermal Calculation Analysis Tool (TCAT) uses finite difference methods to carry out a transient in-depth I-D conduction analysis over the center mold line of the vehicle. This is used along with the Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) code to correctly size the vehicle's thermal protection system JPS). The numerical optimizer ADS uses algorithms that solve constrained and unconstrained design problems. The resulting outputs for this process are TPS material types, unit thicknesses, and acreage percentages. TCAT was developed for several purposes. First, it provides a means to calculate the transient in-depth conduction seen by the surface of the TPS material that protects a vehicle during ascent and reentry. Along with the in-depth conduction, radiation from the surface of the material is calculated along with the temperatures at the backface and interior parts of the TPS material. Secondly, TCAT contributes added speed and automation to the overall design process. Another motivation in the development of TCAT is optimization.

  5. Advanced control of a flexible spherical wrist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgenyi, Louis Alexander

    1993-07-01

    A flexible spherical wrist, susceptible to nonlinear torsional vibrations, was developed which utilizes controllers to provide position control and vibration rejection. The issue of robust performance and stability for this robot wrist is examined while adhearing to practical implementation limits. System identification techniques are used to obtain linear models of the dynamic equations of motion. These models contain physical information such as friction and cable drag, and several different parametric forms are presented. Asymptotic stability of the wrist under proportional derivative control is proven using a linearized set of dynamical equations. Experimental results show only stability rather than asymptotic stability due to friction and unmodeled dynamics. In addition, poor robustness of this control methodology is demonstrated when the orientation and payload are varied. One- and two-parameter Hardy space controllers are designed to address the robustness and implementation issues. Variations in wrist orientation and payload are modeled as multiplicative uncertainties. Simulation and experimental results are presented and compared to those of a tracking controller. The Hardy space controllers are shown to have superior robustness properties but poorer performance.

  6. Recent advances in flexible low power cholesteric LCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asad; Shiyanovskaya, Irina; Montbach, Erica; Schneider, Tod; Nicholson, Forrest; Miller, Nick; Marhefka, Duane; Ernst, Todd; Doane, J. W.

    2006-05-01

    Bistable reflective cholesteric displays are a liquid crystal display technology developed to fill a market need for very low power displays. Their unique look, high reflectivity, bistability, and simple structure make them an ideal flat panel display choice for handheld or other portable devices where small lightweight batteries with long lifetimes are important. Applications ranging from low resolution large signs to ultra high resolution electronic books can utilize cholesteric displays to not only benefit from the numerous features, but also create enabling features that other flat panel display technologies cannot. Flexible displays are the focus of attention of numerous research groups and corporations worldwide. Cholesteric displays have been demonstrated to be highly amenable to flexible substrates. This paper will review recent advances in flexible cholesteric displays including both phase separation and emulsification approaches to encapsulation. Both approaches provide unique benefits to various aspects of manufacturability, processes, flexibility, and conformability.

  7. A Method of Integrating Aeroheating into Conceptual Reusable Launch Vehicle Design: Evaluation of Advanced Thermal Protection Techniques for Future Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Cowart, Kris

    2001-01-01

    A method for integrating Aeroheating analysis into conceptual reusable launch vehicle (RLV) design is presented in this thesis. This process allows for faster turn-around time to converge a RLV design through the advent of designing an optimized thermal protection system (TPS). It consists of the coupling and automation of four computer software packages: MINIVER, TPSX, TCAT, and ADS. MINIVER is an Aeroheating code that produces centerline radiation equilibrium temperatures, convective heating rates, and heat loads over simplified vehicle geometries. These include flat plates and swept cylinders that model wings and leading edges, respectively. TPSX is a NASA Ames material properties database that is available on the World Wide Web. The newly developed Thermal Calculation Analysis Tool (TCAT) uses finite difference methods to carry out a transient in-depth 1-D conduction analysis over the center mold line of the vehicle. This is used along with the Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) code to correctly size the vehicle's thermal protection system (TPS). The numerical optimizer ADS uses algorithms that solve constrained and unconstrained design problems. The resulting outputs for this process are TPS material types, unit thicknesses, and acreage percentages. TCAT was developed for several purposes. First, it provides a means to calculate the transient in-depth conduction seen by the surface of the TPS material that protects a vehicle during ascent and reentry. Along with the in-depth conduction, radiation from the surface of the material is calculated along with the temperatures at the backface and interior parts of the TPS material. Secondly, TCAT contributes added speed and automation to the overall design process. Another motivation in the development of TCAT is optimization. In some vehicles, the TPS accounts for a high percentage of the overall vehicle dry weight. Optimizing the weight of the TPS will thereby lower the percentage of the dry weight accounted for by

  8. Reusable Autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Currently, spacecraft ground systems have a well defined and somewhat standard architecture and operations concept. Based on domain analysis studies of various control centers conducted over the years it is clear that ground systems have core capabilities and functionality that are common across all ground systems. This observation alone supports the realization of reuse. Additionally, spacecraft ground systems are increasing in their ability to do things autonomously. They are being engineered using advanced expert systems technology to provide automated support for operators. A clearer understanding of the possible roles of agent technology is advancing the prospects of greater autonomy for these systems. Many of their functional and management tasks are or could be supported by applied agent technology, the dynamics of the ground system's infrastructure could be monitored by agents, there are intelligent agent-based approaches to user-interfaces, etc. The premise of this paper is that the concepts associated with software reuse, applicable in consideration of classically-engineered ground systems, can be updated to address their application in highly agent-based realizations of future ground systems. As a somewhat simplified example consider the following situation, involving human agents in a ground system context. Let Group A of controllers be working on Mission X. They are responsible for the command, control and health and safety of the Mission X spacecraft. Let us suppose that mission X successfully completes it mission and is turned off. Group A could be dispersed or perhaps move to another Mission Y. In this case there would be reuse of the human agents from Mission X to Mission Y. The Group A agents perform their well-understood functions in a somewhat but related context. There will be a learning or familiarization process that the group A agents go through to make the new context, determined by the new Mission Y, understood. This simplified scenario

  9. Design optimization for a space based, reusable orbit transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L.

    1985-01-01

    Future NASA and DOD missions will benefit from high performance, reusable orbit transfer vehicles. With the advent of a space station, advanced engine technology, and various new vehicle concepts, reusable orbit transfer vehicles that provide significant economic benefits and mission capability improvements will be realized. Engine and vehicle design criteria previously have lacked definition with regard to issues such as space basing and servicing, man-rating and reliability, performance, mission flexibility, and life cycle cost for a reusable vehicle. The design study described here has resulted in the definition of a reusable orbit transfer vehicle concept and subsequent recommendations for the design criteria of an advanced LO2/LH2 engine. These design criteria include number of engines per vehicle, nozzle design, etc. The major characteristics of the vehicle preliminary design include low lift to drag aerocapture capability, a main propulsion system failure criteria of fail operational/fail safe, and either two main engines with a high performance attitude control system for back-up or three main engines with which to meet this failure criteria. In addition, a maintenance approach has been established for the advanced vehicle concept.

  10. Feasibility and process scale-up low cost alumina fibers for advanced Re-usable Surface Insulation (RSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this program was to establish feasibility of a process to produce low cost aluminum oxide fibers having sufficient strength, flexibility, and thermal stability for multiple re-use at temperatures to 1480 C in advanced RSI type heat shields for reentry vehicles. Using bench-scale processing apparatus, the Alcoa 'Saphiber' process was successfully modified to produce nominally 8 microns diameter polycrystalline alpha-alumina fiber. Thermal stability was demonstrated in vacuum reheating tests to 1371 C and in atmospheric reheating to 1483 C. Individual fiber properties of strength, modulus, and flexibility were not determined because of friability and short length of the fiber. Rigidized tile produced from fiber of nominally 8, 20 and 40 micron diameter had thermal conductivities significantly higher than those of RSI SiO2 or mullite at relatively low temperature but became comparable above about 1000 C. Tile densities were high due to short fiber length, especially in the coarser diameter fiber. No significant effect of fiber diameter on thermal properties could be determined form the data. Mechanical properties of tiles deteriorated as fiber diameter increased.

  11. A New Way of Doing Business: Reusable Launch Vehicle Advanced Thermal Protection Systems Technology Development: NASA Ames and Rockwell International Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Carol W.; Fleming, Mary; Hogenson, Pete; Green, Michael J.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and Rockwell International are partners in a Cooperative Agreement (CA) for the development of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Technology Program. This Cooperative Agreement is a 30 month effort focused on transferring NASA innovations to Rockwell and working as partners to advance the state-of-the-art in several TPS areas. The use of a Cooperative Agreement is a new way of doing business for NASA and Industry which eliminates the traditional customer/contractor relationship and replaces it with a NASA/Industry partnership.

  12. Specimens and Reusable Fixturing for Testing Advanced Aeropropulsion Materials Under In-Plane Biaxial Loading. Part 1; Results of Conceptual Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.; Sandlass, G. S.; Bayyari, M.

    2001-01-01

    A design study was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using simple specimen designs and reusable fixturing for in-plane biaxial tests planned for advanced aeropropulsion materials. Materials of interest in this work include: advanced metallics, polymeric matrix composites, metal and intermetallic matrix composites, and ceramic matrix composites. Early experience with advanced metallics showed that the cruciform specimen design typically used in this type of testing was impractical for these materials, primarily because of concerns regarding complexity and cost. The objective of this research was to develop specimen designs, fixturing, and procedures which would allow in-plane biaxial tests to be conducted on a wide range of aeropropulsion materials while at the same time keeping costs within acceptable limits. With this goal in mind. a conceptual design was developed centered on a specimen incorporating a relatively simple arrangement of slots and fingers for attachment and loading purposes. The ANSYS finite element code was used to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and also to develop a number of optimized specimen designs. The same computer code was used to develop the reusable fixturing needed to position and grip the specimens in the load frame. The design adopted uses an assembly of slotted fingers which can be reconfigured as necessary to obtain optimum biaxial stress states in the specimen gage area. Most recently, prototype fixturing was manufactured and is being evaluated over a range of uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions.

  13. A flexible architecture for advanced process control solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faron, Kamyar; Iourovitski, Ilia

    2005-05-01

    Advanced Process Control (APC) is now mainstream practice in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Over the past decade and a half APC has evolved from a "good idea", and "wouldn"t it be great" concept to mandatory manufacturing practice. APC developments have primarily dealt with two major thrusts, algorithms and infrastructure, and often the line between them has been blurred. The algorithms have evolved from very simple single variable solutions to sophisticated and cutting edge adaptive multivariable (input and output) solutions. Spending patterns in recent times have demanded that the economics of a comprehensive APC infrastructure be completely justified for any and all cost conscious manufacturers. There are studies suggesting integration costs as high as 60% of the total APC solution costs. Such cost prohibitive figures clearly diminish the return on APC investments. This has limited the acceptance and development of pure APC infrastructure solutions for many fabs. Modern APC solution architectures must satisfy the wide array of requirements from very manual R&D environments to very advanced and automated "lights out" manufacturing facilities. A majority of commercially available control solutions and most in house developed solutions lack important attributes of scalability, flexibility, and adaptability and hence require significant resources for integration, deployment, and maintenance. Many APC improvement efforts have been abandoned and delayed due to legacy systems and inadequate architectural design. Recent advancements (Service Oriented Architectures) in the software industry have delivered ideal technologies for delivering scalable, flexible, and reliable solutions that can seamlessly integrate into any fabs" existing system and business practices. In this publication we shall evaluate the various attributes of the architectures required by fabs and illustrate the benefits of a Service Oriented Architecture to satisfy these requirements. Blue

  14. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Pitsch, Heinz

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  15. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz Pitsch

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  16. System For Retrieving Reusable Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Warren, Lloyd; Beckman, Brian C.

    1993-01-01

    Encyclopedia of Software Components (ESC) is information-retrieval system of computer hardware and software providing access to generic reusable software tools and parts. Core of ESC is central tool base, which is repository of reusable software. It receives queries and submissions from user through local browser subsystem and receives authorized updates from maintenance subsystem. Sends retrievals to local browser subsystem and user's submissions to maintenance subsystem. Future versions will provide for advanced media, including voice and video, and will link system to database-management system. Programmers will not only retrieve software, but also modify, execute, and cross-link with other software.

  17. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  18. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 2: Detailed test plan for thermal seals. Thermal seals evaluation, improvement and test. CAN8-1, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), advanced technology demonstrator: X-33. Leading edge and seals thermal protection system technology demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Lu, Tina

    1995-05-01

    The objective is to develop the advanced thermal seals to a technology readiness level (TRL) of 6 to support the rapid turnaround time and low maintenance requirements of the X-33 and the future reusable launch vehicle (RLV). This program is divided into three subtasks: (1) orbiter thermal seals operation history review; (2) material, process, and design improvement; and (3) fabrication and evaluation of the advanced thermal seals.

  19. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 2: Detailed test plan for thermal seals. Thermal seals evaluation, improvement and test. CAN8-1, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), advanced technology demonstrator: X-33. Leading edge and seals thermal protection system technology demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Lu, Tina

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop the advanced thermal seals to a technology readiness level (TRL) of 6 to support the rapid turnaround time and low maintenance requirements of the X-33 and the future reusable launch vehicle (RLV). This program is divided into three subtasks: (1) orbiter thermal seals operation history review; (2) material, process, and design improvement; and (3) fabrication and evaluation of the advanced thermal seals.

  20. Advancing System Flexibility for High Penetration Renewable Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, Michael; Frew, Bethany; Zhou, Ella; Arent, Douglas J.

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes some of the issues discussed during the engagement on power system flexibility. By design, the focus is on flexibility options used in the United States. Exploration of whether and how U.S. experiences can inform Chinese energy planning will be part of the continuing project, and will benefit from the knowledge base provided by this report. We believe the initial stage of collaboration represented in this report has successfully started a process of mutual understanding, helping Chinese researchers to begin evaluating how lessons learned in other countries might translate to China's unique geographic, economic, social, and political contexts.

  1. Knowledge-based reusable software synthesis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, Cammie

    1989-01-01

    The Eli system, a knowledge-based reusable software synthesis system, is being developed for NASA Langley under a Phase 2 SBIR contract. Named after Eli Whitney, the inventor of interchangeable parts, Eli assists engineers of large-scale software systems in reusing components while they are composing their software specifications or designs. Eli will identify reuse potential, search for components, select component variants, and synthesize components into the developer's specifications. The Eli project began as a Phase 1 SBIR to define a reusable software synthesis methodology that integrates reusabilityinto the top-down development process and to develop an approach for an expert system to promote and accomplish reuse. The objectives of the Eli Phase 2 work are to integrate advanced technologies to automate the development of reusable components within the context of large system developments, to integrate with user development methodologies without significant changes in method or learning of special languages, and to make reuse the easiest operation to perform. Eli will try to address a number of reuse problems including developing software with reusable components, managing reusable components, identifying reusable components, and transitioning reuse technology. Eli is both a library facility for classifying, storing, and retrieving reusable components and a design environment that emphasizes, encourages, and supports reuse.

  2. Advancing System Flexibility for High Penetration Renewable Integration (Chinese Translation)

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, Michael; Frew, Bethany; Zhou, Ella; Arent, Douglas J.

    2015-10-01

    This is a Chinese translation of NREL/TP-6A20-64864. This report summarizes some of the issues discussed during the engagement on power system flexibility. By design, the focus is on flexibility options used in the United States. Exploration of whether and how U.S. experiences can inform Chinese energy planning will be part of the continuing project, and will benefit from the knowledge base provided by this report. We believe the initial stage of collaboration represented in this report has successfully started a process of mutual understanding, helping Chinese researchers to begin evaluating how lessons learned in other countries might translate to China's unique geographic, economic, social, and political contexts.

  3. Reusable Software Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Timothy E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Reusable Software System (RSS) is to provide NASA Langley Research Center and its contractor personnel with a reusable software technology through the Internet. The RSS is easily accessible, provides information that is extractable, and the capability to submit information or data for the purpose of scientific research at NASA Langley Research Center within the Atmospheric Science Division.

  4. Advanced High-Temperature Flexible TPS for Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Bruce, Walter E., III; Hughes, Stephen J.; Calomino, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Typical entry vehicle aeroshells are limited in size by the launch vehicle shroud. Inflatable aerodynamic decelerators allow larger aeroshell diameters for entry vehicles because they are not constrained to the launch vehicle shroud diameter. During launch, the hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD) is packed in a stowed configuration. Prior to atmospheric entry, the HIAD is deployed to produce a drag device many times larger than the launch shroud diameter. The large surface area of the inflatable aeroshell provides deceleration of high-mass entry vehicles at relatively low ballistic coefficients. Even for these low ballistic coefficients there is still appreciable heating, requiring the HIAD to employ a thermal protection system (TPS). This TPS must be capable of surviving the heat pulse, and the rigors of fabrication handling, high density packing, deployment, and aerodynamic loading. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of flexible TPS tests and results, conducted over the last three years. This paper also includes an overview of each test facility, the general approach for testing flexible TPS, the thermal analysis methodology and results, and a comparison with 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel, Laser-Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory, and Panel Test Facility test data. Results are presented for a baseline TPS layup that can withstand a 20 W/cm2 heat flux, silicon carbide (SiC) based TPS layup, and polyimide insulator TPS layup. Recent work has focused on developing material layups expected to survive heat flux loads up to 50 W/cm2 (which is adequate for many potential applications), future work will consider concepts capable of withstanding more than 100 W/cm2 incident radiant heat flux. This paper provides an overview of the experimental setup, material layup configurations, facility conditions, and planned future flexible TPS activities.

  5. Flexible Fabrics with High Thermal Conductivity for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kesterson, Matt; Connel, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Southward, Robin E.; Working, Dennis; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effort and accomplishments for developing flexible fabrics with high thermal conductivity (FFHTC) for spacesuits to improve thermal performance, lower weight and reduce complexity. Commercial and additional space exploration applications that require substantial performance enhancements in removal and transport of heat away from equipment as well as from the human body can benefit from this technology. Improvements in thermal conductivity were achieved through the use of modified polymers containing thermally conductive additives. The objective of the FFHTC effort is to significantly improve the thermal conductivity of the liquid cooled ventilation garment by improving the thermal conductivity of the subcomponents (i.e., fabric and plastic tubes). This paper presents the initial system modeling studies, including a detailed liquid cooling garment model incorporated into the Wissler human thermal regulatory model, to quantify the necessary improvements in thermal conductivity and garment geometries needed to affect system performance. In addition, preliminary results of thermal conductivity improvements of the polymer components of the liquid cooled ventilation garment are presented. By improving thermal garment performance, major technology drivers will be addressed for lightweight, high thermal conductivity, flexible materials for spacesuits that are strategic technical challenges of the Exploration

  6. Advanced shape tracking to improve flexible endoscopic diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Caroline G. L.; Wong, Peter Y.; Lilge, Lothar; Gavalis, Robb M.; Xing, Hua; Zamarripa, Nate

    2008-03-01

    Colonoscopy is the gold standard for screening for inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. Flexible endoscopes are difficult to manipulate, especially in the distensible and tortuous colon, sometimes leading to disorientation during the procedure and missed diagnosis of lesions. Our goal is to design a navigational aid to guide colonoscopies, presenting a three dimensional representation of the endoscope in real-time. Therefore, a flexible sensor that can track the position and shape of the entire length of the endoscope is needed. We describe a novel shape-tracking technology utilizing a single modified optical fiber. By embedding fluorophores in the buffer of the fiber, we demonstrated a relationship between fluorescence intensity and fiber curvature. As much as a 40% increase in fluorescence intensity was achieved when the fiber's local bend radius decreased from 58 mm to 11 mm. This approach allows for the construction of a three-dimensional shape tracker that is small enough to be easily inserted into the biopsy channel of current endoscopes.

  7. Reusable thermal protection system development: A prospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Howard

    1992-01-01

    The state of the art in passive reusable thermal protection system materials is described. Development of the Space Shuttle Orbiter, which was the first reusable vehicle, is discussed. The thermal protection materials and given concepts and some of the shuttle development and manufacturing problems are described. Evolution of a family of grid and flexible ceramic external insulation materials from the initial shuttle concept in the early 1970's to the present time is described. The important properties and their evolution are documented. Application of these materials to vehicles currently being developed and plans for research to meet the space programs future needs are summarized.

  8. Using reusable learning objects.

    PubMed

    Billings, Diane M

    2010-02-01

    Reusable learning objects (RLOs) are predeveloped digital learning activities that can be integrated into lessons, modules, and courses. Several repositories have nursing-specific RLOs waiting to be used by nurse educators.

  9. Silica reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Smith, M.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A reusable silica surface insulation material is provided by bonding amorphous silica fibers with colloidal silica at an elevated temperature. The surface insulation is ordinarily manufactured in the form of blocks (i.e., tiles).

  10. Advances in Current Rating Techniques for Flexible Printed Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Twist Capsule Assemblies are power transfer devices commonly used in spacecraft mechanisms that require electrical signals to be passed across a rotating interface. Flexible printed circuits (flex tapes, see Figure 2) are used to carry the electrical signals in these devices. Determining the current rating for a given trace (conductor) size can be challenging. Because of the thermal conditions present in this environment the most appropriate approach is to assume that the only means by which heat is removed from the trace is thru the conductor itself, so that when the flex tape is long the temperature rise in the trace can be extreme. While this technique represents a worst-case thermal situation that yields conservative current ratings, this conservatism may lead to overly cautious designs when not all traces are used at their full rated capacity. A better understanding of how individual traces behave when they are not all in use is the goal of this research. In the testing done in support of this paper, a representative flex tape used for a flight Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) application was tested by energizing individual traces (conductors in the tape) in a vacuum chamber and the temperatures of the tape measured using both fine-gauge thermocouples and infrared thermographic imaging. We find that traditional derating schemes used for bundles of wires do not apply for the configuration tested. We also determine that single active traces located in the center of a flex tape operate at lower temperatures than those on the outside edges.

  11. Strength and flexibility properties of advanced ceramic fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Tran, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of four advanced ceramic fabrics are measured at a temperature range of 23 C to 1200 C. The fabrics evaluated are silica, high-and low-boria content aluminoborosilicate, and silicon carbide. Properties studied include fabric break strengths from room temperature to 1200 C, and bending durability after temperature conditioning at 1200 C and 1400 C. The interaction of the fabric and ceramic insulation is also studied for shrinkage, appearance, bend resistance, and fabric-to-insulation bonding. Based on these tests, the low-boria content aluminoborosilicate fabric retains more strength and fabric durability than the other fabrics studied at high temperature.

  12. Reusable launch vehicle development research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA has generated a program approach for a SSTO reusable launch vehicle technology (RLV) development which includes a follow-on to the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization's (BMDO) successful DC-X program, the DC-XA (Advanced). Also, a separate sub-scale flight demonstrator, designated the X-33, will be built and flight tested along with numerous ground based technologies programs. For this to be a successful effort, a balance between technical, schedule, and budgetary risks must be attained. The adoption of BMDO's 'fast track' management practices will be a key element in the eventual success of NASA's effort.

  13. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME), a reusable space propulsion system, is discussed. The advances in high pressure oxygen hydrogen rocket technology are reported to establish the basic technology and to develop new analytical tools for the evaluation in reusable rocket systems.

  14. The Impact of Utilizing a Flexible Work Schedule on the Perceived Career Advancement Potential of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogier, Sara A.; Padgett, Margaret Y.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined whether a woman working a flexible schedule would be perceived as having less career advancement potential than a woman on a regular schedule. Participants reviewed a packet of materials simulating the personnel file of a female employee in an accounting firm who was seeking promotion from manager to senior manager. Results…

  15. Boron Nitride Nanosheets Improve Sensitivity and Reusability of Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiran; Mateti, Srikanth; Yang, Wenrong; Jones, Rob; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Huang, Shaoming; Chen, Ying; Li, Lu Hua

    2016-07-11

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a useful multidisciplinary analytic technique. However, it is still a challenge to produce SERS substrates that are highly sensitive, reproducible, stable, reusable, and scalable. Herein, we demonstrate that atomically thin boron nitride (BN) nanosheets have many unique and desirable properties to help solve this challenge. The synergic effect of the atomic thickness, high flexibility, stronger surface adsorption capability, electrical insulation, impermeability, high thermal and chemical stability of BN nanosheets can increase the Raman sensitivity by up to two orders, and in the meantime attain long-term stability and extraordinary reusability not achievable by other materials. These advances will greatly facilitate the wider use of SERS in many fields. PMID:27112577

  16. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  17. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, John P.; Emin, David

    1986-01-01

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  18. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  19. Earth-to-orbit reusable launch vehicles: A comparative assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A representative set of space systems, functions, and missions for NASA and DoD from which launch vehicle requirements and characteristics was established as well as a set of air-breathing launch vehicles based on graduated technology capabilities corresponding to increasingly higher staging Mach numbers. The utility of the air-breathing launch vehicle candidates based on lift-off weight, performance, technology needs, and risk was assessed and costs were compared to alternative concepts. The results indicate that a fully reusable launch vehicle, whether two stage or one stage, could potentially reduce the cost per flight 60-80% compared to that for a partially reusable vehicle but would require advances in thermal protection system technology. A two-stage-to-orbit, parallel-lift vehicle with an air-breathing booster would cost approximately the same as a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle, but the former would have greater flexibility and a significantly reduced developmental risk. A twin-booster, subsonic-staged, parallel-lift vehicle represents the lowest system cost and developmental risk. However, if a large supersonic turbojet engine in the 350,000-N thrust class were available, supersonic staging would be preferred, and the investment in development would be returned in reduced program cost.

  20. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  1. Reusable Release Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, J. W.; Ritchie, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Slider release mechanism reusable. Bears heavy loads while latched, yet gives smooth release motion. Release effected by explosively driving perpendicular slider out of engagement with load-bearing shank. Device has potential industrial applications such as emergency release of lifting cables from helicopters, cranes and hoists.

  2. Reusable thermal cycling clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Fripp, A. L.; Crouch, R. K. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A reusable metal clamp for retaining a fused quartz ampoule during temperature cycling in the range of 20 deg C to 1000 deg C is described. A compressible graphite foil having a high radial coefficient of thermal expansion is interposed between the fused quartz ampoule and metal clamp to maintain a snug fit between these components at all temperature levels in the cycle.

  3. Resistive switching behavior in Lu2O3 thin film for advanced flexible memory applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the resistive switching (RS) behaviors in Lu2O3 thin film for advanced flexible nonvolatile memory applications are investigated. Amorphous Lu2O3 thin films with a thickness of 20 nm were deposited at room temperature by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering on flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate. The structural and morphological changes of the Lu2O3 thin film were characterized by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The Ru/Lu2O3/ITO flexible memory device shows promising RS behavior with low-voltage operation and small distribution of switching parameters. The dominant switching current conduction mechanism in the Lu2O3 thin film was determined as bulk-controlled space-charge-limited-current with activation energy of traps of 0.33 eV. The oxygen vacancies assisted filament conduction model was described for RS behavior in Lu2O3 thin film. The memory reliability characteristics of switching endurance, data retention, good flexibility, and mechanical endurance show promising applications in future advanced memory. PMID:24387704

  4. Recent Advances in Flexible and Stretchable Bio-Electronic Devices Integrated with Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Suji; Lee, Hyunjae; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable electronics and optoelectronics configured in soft, water resistant formats uniquely address seminal challenges in biomedicine. Over the past decade, there has been enormous progress in the materials, designs, and manufacturing processes for flexible/stretchable system subcomponents, including transistors, amplifiers, bio-sensors, actuators, light emitting diodes, photodetector arrays, photovoltaics, energy storage elements, and bare die integrated circuits. Nanomaterials prepared using top-down processing approaches and synthesis-based bottom-up methods have helped resolve the intrinsic mechanical mismatch between rigid/planar devices and soft/curvilinear biological structures, thereby enabling a broad range of non-invasive, minimally invasive, and implantable systems to address challenges in biomedicine. Integration of therapeutic functional nanomaterials with soft bioelectronics demonstrates therapeutics in combination with unconventional diagnostics capabilities. Recent advances in soft materials, devices, and integrated systems are reviewes, with representative examples that highlight the utility of soft bioelectronics for advanced medical diagnostics and therapies.

  5. Recent Advances in Flexible and Stretchable Bio-Electronic Devices Integrated with Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Suji; Lee, Hyunjae; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable electronics and optoelectronics configured in soft, water resistant formats uniquely address seminal challenges in biomedicine. Over the past decade, there has been enormous progress in the materials, designs, and manufacturing processes for flexible/stretchable system subcomponents, including transistors, amplifiers, bio-sensors, actuators, light emitting diodes, photodetector arrays, photovoltaics, energy storage elements, and bare die integrated circuits. Nanomaterials prepared using top-down processing approaches and synthesis-based bottom-up methods have helped resolve the intrinsic mechanical mismatch between rigid/planar devices and soft/curvilinear biological structures, thereby enabling a broad range of non-invasive, minimally invasive, and implantable systems to address challenges in biomedicine. Integration of therapeutic functional nanomaterials with soft bioelectronics demonstrates therapeutics in combination with unconventional diagnostics capabilities. Recent advances in soft materials, devices, and integrated systems are reviewes, with representative examples that highlight the utility of soft bioelectronics for advanced medical diagnostics and therapies. PMID:26779680

  6. Reusable ultralight personnel carrier (RUPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. C., III; McCandless, B., II

    1992-08-01

    Attention is given to a personnel-carrying space vehicle concept developed to minimize the cost of access to LEO. The RUPC could provide alternate access to Space Station Freedom (SSF) for six passengers per flight. It can also bring and return small amounts of cargo, up to and including one SSF double rack. These capabilities are ideal for utilization flights during man-tended operations at SSF and for crew rotation during permanently manned periods. The RUPC is a reusable conical reentry vehicle and disposable adapter with propulsion and power subsystems. Avionics subsystem benefit from advanced low-power high-performance microelectronics developed for both the civilian and military space sectors. The RUPC core cabin concept has growth potential for other applications, including assured crew return, ground-launched crew rescue, delivery and retrieval of SSF cargo, and crew cabin for flights to the moon.

  7. Summary of the British Thoracic Society guidelines for advanced diagnostic and therapeutic flexible bronchoscopy in adults.

    PubMed

    Du Rand, I A; Barber, P V; Goldring, J; Lewis, R A; Mandal, S; Munavvar, M; Rintoul, R C; Shah, P L; Singh, S; Slade, M G; Woolley, A

    2011-11-01

    This new guideline covers the rapidly advancing field of interventional bronchoscopy using flexible bronchoscopy. It includes the use of more complex diagnostic procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound, interventions for the relief of central airway obstruction due to malignancy and the recent development of endobronchial therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. The guideline aims to help all those who undertake flexible bronchoscopy to understand more about this important area. It also aims to inform respiratory physicians and other specialists dealing with lung cancer of the procedures possible in the management and palliation of central airway obstruction. The guideline covers transbronchial needle aspiration and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, electrocautery/diathermy, argon plasma coagulation and thermal laser, cryotherapy, cryoextraction, photodynamic therapy, brachytherapy, tracheobronchial stenting, electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy, endobronchial valves for emphysema and bronchial thermoplasty for asthma.

  8. Development Status of Reusable Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takada, Satoshi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Niu, Kenichi

    A 30-kN rocket engine, a pilot engine, is being developed in Japan. Development of this pilot engine has been initiated in relation to a reusable sounding rocket, which is also being developed in Japan. This rocket takes off vertically, reaches an altitude of 100 km, lands vertically at the launch site, and is launched again within several days. Due to advantage of reusability, successful development of this rocket will mean that observation missions can be carried out more frequently and economically. In order to realize this rocket concept, the engines installed on the rocket should be characterized by reusability, long life, deep throttling and health monitoring, features which have not yet been established in Japanese rocket engines. To solve the engineering factors entitled by those features, a new design methodology, advanced engine simulations and engineering testing are being focused on in the pilot engine development stage. Especially in engineering testing, limit condition data is acquired to facilitate development of new diagnostic techniques, which can be applied by utilizing the mobility of small-size hardware. In this paper, the development status of the pilot engine is described, including fundamental design and engineering tests of the turbopump bearing and seal, turbine rig, injector and combustion chamber, and operation and maintenance concepts for one hundred flights by a reusable rocket are examined.

  9. The Venture Star Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This artist's concept is of the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator, a subscale prototype Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), in its 1997 configuration. Named the Venture Star, this vehicle manufactured by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, is shown in orbit with a deployed payload. The Venture Star was one of the earliest versions of the RLV's developed in attempt to replace the aging shuttle fleet. The X-33 program has been discontinued.

  10. Advantages of reusable accessories.

    PubMed

    Wolfsen, H C

    2000-04-01

    Despite scant evidence supporting the use of disposable accessories, these devices have been widely disseminated. Manufacturers and governmental regulators, the most devout proponents of one-time use accessories, have framed the issue in economic terms-parsimonious practitioners reusing disposable accessories at the risk of cross-contamination, mechanical failure and product liability. This simplistic view represents revisionist history and ignores the long tradition of reusing these devices. This article reviews the numerous studies that support the safe and cost effective reuse of disposable and reusable accessories.

  11. Saenger - European reusability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoegenauer, E.

    1988-06-01

    An account is given of the design features and performance capabilities of the Saenger two-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle. Saenger, in addition to employing a novel, airbreathing lower-stage propulsion system, is unique in its alternative employment of either a manned, reentry-capable upper stage or an expendable, unmanned cargo-carrying one. This configuration is also noted to offer the use of the lower stage as a hypersonic-cruise passenger aircraft. It is in the choice of a propulsion system configuration that Saenger's designers face the most critical challenge.

  12. Control of the flexible modes of an advanced technology geostationary platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewalt, Diane V.

    1988-01-01

    A controls analysis is conducted on an advanced technology geostationary platform. This spacecraft is a large flexible structure with a payload of Earth-sensing instruments which will collect data from Earth's oceans, land, and atmosphere as a part of the bold initiative mission to Planet Earth proposed by NASA. This program will provide a collection of data from a family of spacecraft in both low-Earth orbit and geostationary orbit, which will afford a global definition of the Earth as a system with the capability to predict future events resulting from human and natural forces. The platform concept studied here is a large flexible structure with a payload of eighteen instruments. Because the platform is in geostationary orbit, these instruments have sensitive pointing accuracy requirements, in the range of 0.1 to 0.0001 degrees, which must be satisfied. The structure housing the instruments is large and flexible with characteristic low natural frequencies, so active control is necessary for vibration suppression.

  13. Advanced ensemble modelling of flexible macromolecules using X-ray solution scattering.

    PubMed

    Tria, Giancarlo; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic ensembles of macromolecules mediate essential processes in biology. Understanding the mechanisms driving the function and molecular interactions of 'unstructured' and flexible molecules requires alternative approaches to those traditionally employed in structural biology. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an established method for structural characterization of biological macromolecules in solution, and is directly applicable to the study of flexible systems such as intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins with unstructured regions. The Ensemble Optimization Method (EOM) [Bernadó et al. (2007 ▶). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 5656-5664] was the first approach introducing the concept of ensemble fitting of the SAXS data from flexible systems. In this approach, a large pool of macromolecules covering the available conformational space is generated and a sub-ensemble of conformers coexisting in solution is selected guided by the fit to the experimental SAXS data. This paper presents a series of new developments and advancements to the method, including significantly enhanced functionality and also quantitative metrics for the characterization of the results. Building on the original concept of ensemble optimization, the algorithms for pool generation have been redesigned to allow for the construction of partially or completely symmetric oligomeric models, and the selection procedure was improved to refine the size of the ensemble. Quantitative measures of the flexibility of the system studied, based on the characteristic integral parameters of the selected ensemble, are introduced. These improvements are implemented in the new EOM version 2.0, and the capabilities as well as inherent limitations of the ensemble approach in SAXS, and of EOM 2.0 in particular, are discussed.

  14. Reusable rocket engine intelligent control system framework design, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, ED; Anderson, Ron; Ols, Joe; Olsasky, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Elements of an advanced functional framework for reusable rocket engine propulsion system control are presented for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) demonstration case. Functional elements of the baseline functional framework are defined in detail. The SSME failure modes are evaluated and specific failure modes identified for inclusion in the advanced functional framework diagnostic system. Active control of the SSME start transient is investigated, leading to the identification of a promising approach to mitigating start transient excursions. Key elements of the functional framework are simulated and demonstration cases are provided. Finally, the advanced function framework for control of reusable rocket engines is presented.

  15. Advanced optical sensing and processing technologies for the distributed control of large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. M.; Fraser, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to examine state-of-the-art optical sensing and processing technology applied to control the motion of flexible spacecraft. Proposed large flexible space systems, such an optical telescopes and antennas, will require control over vast surfaces. Most likely distributed control will be necessary involving many sensors to accurately measure the surface. A similarly large number of actuators must act upon the system. The used technical approach included reviewing proposed NASA missions to assess system needs and requirements. A candidate mission was chosen as a baseline study spacecraft for comparison of conventional and optical control components. Control system requirements of the baseline system were used for designing both a control system containing current off-the-shelf components and a system utilizing electro-optical devices for sensing and processing. State-of-the-art surveys of conventional sensor, actuator, and processor technologies were performed. A technology development plan is presented that presents a logical, effective way to develop and integrate advancing technologies.

  16. Syntactic flexibility and planning scope: the effect of verb bias on advance planning during sentence recall.

    PubMed

    van de Velde, Maartje; Meyer, Antje S

    2014-01-01

    In sentence production, grammatical advance planning scope depends on contextual factors (e.g., time pressure), linguistic factors (e.g., ease of structural processing), and cognitive factors (e.g., production speed). The present study tests the influence of the availability of multiple syntactic alternatives (i.e., syntactic flexibility) on the scope of advance planning during the recall of Dutch dative phrases. We manipulated syntactic flexibility by using verbs with a strong bias or a weak bias toward one structural alternative in sentence frames accepting both verbs (e.g., strong/weak bias: De ober schotelt/serveert de klant de maaltijd [voor] "The waiter dishes out/serves the customer the meal"). To assess lexical planning scope, we varied the frequency of the first post-verbal noun (N1, Experiment 1) or the second post-verbal noun (N2, Experiment 2). In each experiment, 36 speakers produced the verb phrases in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm. On each trial, they read a sentence presented one word at a time, performed a short distractor task, and then saw a sentence preamble (e.g., De ober…) which they had to complete to form the presented sentence. Onset latencies were compared using linear mixed effects models. N1 frequency did not produce any effects. N2 frequency only affected sentence onsets in the weak verb bias condition and especially in slow speakers. These findings highlight the dependency of planning scope during sentence recall on the grammatical properties of the verb and the frequency of post-verbal nouns. Implications for utterance planning in everyday speech are discussed.

  17. Syntactic flexibility and planning scope: the effect of verb bias on advance planning during sentence recall.

    PubMed

    van de Velde, Maartje; Meyer, Antje S

    2014-01-01

    In sentence production, grammatical advance planning scope depends on contextual factors (e.g., time pressure), linguistic factors (e.g., ease of structural processing), and cognitive factors (e.g., production speed). The present study tests the influence of the availability of multiple syntactic alternatives (i.e., syntactic flexibility) on the scope of advance planning during the recall of Dutch dative phrases. We manipulated syntactic flexibility by using verbs with a strong bias or a weak bias toward one structural alternative in sentence frames accepting both verbs (e.g., strong/weak bias: De ober schotelt/serveert de klant de maaltijd [voor] "The waiter dishes out/serves the customer the meal"). To assess lexical planning scope, we varied the frequency of the first post-verbal noun (N1, Experiment 1) or the second post-verbal noun (N2, Experiment 2). In each experiment, 36 speakers produced the verb phrases in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm. On each trial, they read a sentence presented one word at a time, performed a short distractor task, and then saw a sentence preamble (e.g., De ober…) which they had to complete to form the presented sentence. Onset latencies were compared using linear mixed effects models. N1 frequency did not produce any effects. N2 frequency only affected sentence onsets in the weak verb bias condition and especially in slow speakers. These findings highlight the dependency of planning scope during sentence recall on the grammatical properties of the verb and the frequency of post-verbal nouns. Implications for utterance planning in everyday speech are discussed. PMID:25368592

  18. Viability of a Reusable In-Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, Sharon A.; McCleskey, Carey M.; Nufer, Brian M.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Merrill, Raymond G.; North, David D.; Martin, John G.; Komar, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing options for an Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) that expands human presence from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) into the solar system and to the surface of Mars. The Hybrid in-space transportation architecture is one option being investigated within the EMC. The architecture enables return of the entire in-space propulsion stage and habitat to cis-lunar space after a round trip to Mars. This concept of operations opens the door for a fully reusable Mars transportation system from cis-lunar space to a Mars parking orbit and back. This paper explores the reuse of in-space transportation systems, with a focus on the propulsion systems. It begins by examining why reusability should be pursued and defines reusability in space-flight context. A range of functions and enablers associated with preparing a system for reuse are identified and a vision for reusability is proposed that can be advanced and implemented as new capabilities are developed. Following this, past reusable spacecraft and servicing capabilities, as well as those currently in development are discussed. Using the Hybrid transportation architecture as an example, an assessment of the degree of reusability that can be incorporated into the architecture with current capabilities is provided and areas for development are identified that will enable greater levels of reuse in the future. Implications and implementation challenges specific to the architecture are also presented.

  19. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOEpatents

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  20. Reusable launch vehicle technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Delma C.; Talay, Theodore A.; Austin, R. Eugene

    Industry/NASA reusable launch vehicle (RLV) technology program efforts are underway to design, test, and develop technologies and concepts for viable commercial launch systems that also satisfy national needs at acceptable recurring costs. Significant progress has been made in understanding the technical challenges of fully reusable launch systems and the accompanying management and operational approaches for achieving a low-cost program. This paper reviews the current status of the RLV technology program including the DC-XA, X-33 and X-34 flight systems and associated technology programs. It addresses the specific technologies being tested that address the technical and operability challenges of reusable launch systems including reusable cryogenic propellant tanks, composite structures, thermal protection systems, improved propulsion, and subsystem operability enhancements. The recently concluded DC-XA test program demonstrated some of these technologies in ground and flight tests. Contracts were awarded recently for both the X-33 and X-34 flight demonstrator systems. The Orbital Sciences Corporation X-34 flight test vehicle will demonstrate an air-launched reusable vehicle capable of flight to speeds of Mach 8. The Lockheed-Martin X-33 flight test vehicle will expand the test envelope for critical technologies to flight speeds of Mach 15. A propulsion program to test the X-33 linear aerospike rocket engine using a NASA SR-71 high speed aircraft as a test bed is also discussed. The paper also describes the management and operational approaches that address the challenge of new cost-effective, reusable launch vehicle systems.

  1. On the Flexibility of Grammatical Advance Planning during Sentence Production: Effects of Cognitive Load on Multiple Lexical Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Valentin; Jescheniak, Jorg D.; Schriefers, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Three picture-word interference experiments addressed the question of whether the scope of grammatical advance planning in sentence production corresponds to some fixed unit or rather is flexible. Subjects produced sentences of different formats under varying amounts of cognitive load. When speakers described 2-object displays with simple…

  2. Highly Flexible Graphene/Mn3O4 Nanocomposite Membrane as Advanced Anodes for Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Gan; Jin, Dandan; Zhou, Rui; Li, Xu; Liu, Xing-Rui; Shen, Chao; Xie, Keyu; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu; Wei, Bingqing

    2016-06-28

    Advanced electrode design is crucial in the rapid development of flexible energy storage devices for emerging flexible electronics. Herein, we report a rational synthesis of graphene/Mn3O4 nanocomposite membranes with excellent mechanical flexibility and Li-ion storage properties. The strong interaction between the large-area graphene nanosheets and long Mn3O4 nanowires not only enables the membrane to endure various mechanical deformations but also produces a strong synergistic effect of enhanced reaction kinetics by providing enlarged electrode/electrolyte contact area and reduced electron/ion transport resistance. The mechanically robust membrane is explored as a freestanding anode for Li-ion batteries, which delivers a high specific capacity of ∼800 mAh g(-1) based on the total electrode mass, along with superior high-rate capability and excellent cycling stability. A flexible full Li-ion battery is fabricated with excellent electrochemical properties and high flexibility, demonstrating its great potential for high-performance flexible energy storage devices.

  3. Technology demonstration for reusable launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocco, P.; Bonnal, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Reusable launchers have been studied under CNES contracts for more than 30 years, with early concepts such as STS-2000 or Oriflamme, more recently with very significant efforts devoted to Liquid Fly Back Boosters as with the Bargouzin project led with Tsniimash, TSTO with the Everest concept studied by Airbus-DS as prime contractor or the RFS Reusable First Stage concept of a large first stage associated to a cryotechnic second stage. These investigations, summarized in the first part of the paper, enabled CNES to identify clearly the technology requirements associated to reusability, as well as cost efficiency through detailed non-recurring costs and mission costs analysis. In parallel, CNES set in place development logic for sub-systems and equipment based on demonstrators, hardware test benches enabling maturation of technologies up to a TRL such that an actual development can be decided with limited risk. This philosophy has been applied so far to a large number of cases, such as TPTech and TPX for Hydrogen turbo pump, GGPX as demonstrator of innovative gas generator, HX demonstrator of modern cryotechnic upper stage with a dozen of different objectives (Thermal Protection, 20K Helium storage, measurements …). This virtuous approach, "learn as you test", is currently applied in the phased approach towards scaled down reusable booster stage, whose possibility to be used as first stage of a microlaunch vehicle is under investigation. The selected technologies allow paving the way towards reusable booster stages for Ariane 6 evolutions or main reusable stage for a further generation of heavy launchers. The paper describes the logic behind this project, together with the demonstration objectives set for the various sub-systems as well as operations.

  4. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The development of an expendable second stage for use with a reusable space shuttle booster is discussed. The configuration of a low-cost, reusable multipurpose space transportation system for the 1980 time period is presented. A system capable of economically placing payloads in earth orbit which are larger and heavier than can be carried in the shuttle orbiter cargo bay is defined. The ESS/reusable shuttle system is complementary to the space shuttle system and provides mission flexibility to permit economical expansion of the overall space program.

  5. Reusable launch vehicle facts and fantasies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Marshall H.

    2002-01-01

    Many people refuse to address many of the realities of reusable launch vehicle systems, technologies, operations and economics. Basic principles of physics, space flight operations, and business limitations are applied to the creation of a practical vision of future expectations. While reusable launcher concepts have been proposed for several decades, serious review of potential designs began in the mid-1990s, when NASA decided that a Space Shuttle replacement had to be pursued. A great deal of excitement and interest was quickly generated by the prospect of ``orders-of-magnitude'' reduction in launch costs. The potential for a vastly expanded space program motivated the entire space community. By the late-1990s, and after over one billion dollars were spent on the technology development and privately-funded concepts, it had become clear that there would be no new, near-term operational reusable vehicle. Many factors contributed to a very expensive and disappointing effort to create a new generation of launch vehicles. It began with overly optimistic projections of technology advancements and the belief that a greatly increased demand for satellite launches would be realized early in the 21st century. Contractors contributed to the perception of quickly reachable technology and business goals, thus, accelerating the enthusiasm and helping to create a ``gold rush'' euphoria. Cost, schedule and performance margins were all highly optimistic. Several entrepreneurs launched start up companies to take advantage of the excitement and the availability of investor capital. Millions were raised from private investors and venture capitalists, based on little more than flashy presentations and animations. Well over $500 million were raised by little-known start up groups to create reusable systems, which might complete for the coming market in launch services. By 1999, it was clear that market projections, made just two years earlier, were not going to be realized. Investors

  6. Results of tests of advanced flexible insulation vortex and flow environments in the North American Aerodynamics Laboratory lowspeed wind tunnel using 0.0405-scale Space Shuttle Orbiter model 16-0 (test OA-309)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, B. A.; Nichols, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation (Test OA-309) was conducted using 0.0405-scale Space Shuttle Orbiter Model 16-0 in the North American Aerodynamics Laboratory 7.75 x 11.00-foot Lowspeed Wind Tunnel. The primary purpose was to locate and study any flow conditions or vortices that might have caused damage to the Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) during the Space Transportation System STS-6 mission. A secondary objective was to evaluate vortex generators to be used for Wind Tunnel Test OS-314. Flowfield visualization was obtained by means of smoke, tufts, and oil flow. The test was conducted at Mach numbers between 0.07 and 0.23 and at dynamic pressures between 7 and 35 pounds per square foot. The angle-of-attack range of the model was -5 degrees through 35 degrees at 0 or 2 degrees of sideslip, while roll angle was held constant at zero degrees. The vortex generators were studied at angles of 0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees.

  7. Advances in maskless and mask-based optical lithography on plastic flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Ionut; Ivan, Marius G.; Giesen, Peter; Van de Moosdijk, Michel; Meinders, Erwin R.

    2009-12-01

    Organic flexible electronics is an emerging technology with huge potential growth in the future which is likely to open up a complete new series of potential applications such as flexible OLED-based displays, urban commercial signage, and flexible electronic paper. The transistor is the fundamental building block of all these applications. A key challenge in patterning transistors on flexible plastic substrates stems from the in-plane nonlinear deformations as a consequence of foil expansion/shrinkage, moisture uptake, baking etc. during various processing steps. Optical maskless lithography is one of the potential candidates for compensating for these foil distortions by in-situ adjustment prior to exposure of the new layer image with respect to the already patterned layers. Maskless lithography also brings the added value of reducing the cost-of-ownership related to traditional mask-based tools by eliminating the need for expensive masks. For the purpose of this paper, single-layer maskless exposures at 355 nm were performed on gold-coated poly(ethylenenaphthalate) (PEN) flexible substrates temporarily attached to rigid carriers to ensure dimensional stability during processing. Two positive photoresists were employed for this study and the results on plastic foils were benchmarked against maskless as well as mask-based (ASML PAS 5500/100D stepper) exposures on silicon wafers.

  8. Work/Life Satisfaction Policy in ADVANCE Universities: Assessing Levels of Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tower, Leslie E.; Dilks, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Work/life satisfaction policies are seen as key to recruiting, retaining, and advancing high quality faculty. This article explores the work/life policies prevalent at NSF ADVANCE institutions (PAID, Catalyst, and IT). We systematically review ADVANCE university websites (N = 124) and rank 9 categories of work/life policy including dual career…

  9. Reusable sounding-rocket design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Dick L. Y.; Martin, James A.

    1995-03-01

    As a result of the reduction of budgets for flights, the ideas of reusability and cost-effectiveness in launch vehicles are becoming more and more important. One class of rockets, in particular the sounding rockets operating in a less demanding environment, has many potentials for many more flights. By augmenting the basic rocket configuration with wings, landing gear, flight controls and guidance systems, the vehicle can be made to glide and land back at the launch site or at a specific recovery site. In this paper, the design of such a reusable rocket is presented. This design can be extended and adapted to larger vehicles, thus attaining higher altitudes required in some of the applications of sounding rockets.

  10. Reusable Metallic Thermal Protection Systems Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.; Martin, Carl J.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Poteet, Carl C.

    1998-01-01

    Metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) are being developed to help meet the ambitious goals of future reusable launch vehicles. Recent metallic TPS development efforts at NASA Langley Research Center are described. Foil-gage metallic honeycomb coupons, representative of the outer surface of metallic TPS were subjected to low speed impact, hypervelocity impact, rain erosion, and subsequent arcjet exposure. TPS panels were subjected to thermal vacuum, acoustic, and hot gas flow testing. Results of the coupon and panel tests are presented. Experimental and analytical tools are being developed to characterize and improve internal insulations. Masses of metallic TPS and advanced ceramic tile and blanket TPS concepts are compared for a wide range of parameters.

  11. Project SPARC: Space-Based Aeroassisted Reusable Craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Future United States' space facilities include a Space Station in low Earth orbit (LEO) and a Geosynchronous Operations Support Center, or GeoShack, in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). One possible mode of transfer between the two orbits is an aerobraking vehicle. When traveling from GEO to LEO, the Earth's atmosphere can be used to aerodynamically reduce the velocity of the vehicle, which reduces the amount of propulsive change in velocity required for the mission. An aerobrake is added to the vehicle for this purpose, but the additional mass increases propellant requirements. This increase must not exceed the amount of propellant saved during the aeropass. The design and development of an aerobraking vehicle that will transfer crew and cargo between the Space Station and GeoShack is examined. The vehicle is referred to as Project SPARC, a SPace-based Aeroassisted Reusable Craft. SPARC consists of a removable 45 ft diameter aerobrake, two modified Pratt and Whitney Advanced Expander Engines with a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen propellant, a removable crew module with a maximum capacity of five, and standard sized payload bays providing a maximum payload capacity of 28,000 lbm. The aerobrake, a rigid, ellipsoidally blunted elliptical cone, provides lift at zero angle-of-attack due to a 73 deg rake angle, and is covered with a flexible multi-layer thermal protection system. Maximum dry mass of the vehicle without payload is 20,535 lbm, and the maximum propellant requirement is 79,753 lbm at an oxidizer to fuel ratio of 6/1. Key advantages of SPARC include its capability to meet mission changes, and its removable aerobrake and crew module.

  12. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S.; Olson, Arthur J.; Sanner, Michel F.

    2015-01-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR–AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 –a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 –a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that

  13. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S; Olson, Arthur J; Sanner, Michel F

    2015-12-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR-AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 -a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 -a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that down

  14. NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle Technologies: A Composite Materials Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Cook, Steve; Effinger, Mike; Smith, Dennis; Swint, Shayne

    1999-01-01

    A materials overview of the NASA's Earth-to-Orbit Space Transportation Program is presented. The topics discussed are: Earth-to-Orbit Goals and Challenges; Space Transportation Program Structure; Generations of Reusable Launch Vehicles; Space Transportation Derived Requirements; X 34 Demonstrator; Fastrac Engine System; Airframe Systems; Propulsion Systems; Cryotank Structures; Advanced Materials, Fabrication, Manufacturing, & Assembly; Hot and Cooled Airframe Structures; Ceramic Matrix Composites; Ultra-High Temp Polymer Matrix Composites; Metal Matrix Composites; and PMC Lines Ducts and Valves.

  15. Future reusable space launcher systems - A European view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Rudi G.

    Plans for future, reusable space launcher systems in Europe, beyond Ariane V/Hermes, are discussed. A family of launch vehicles, known as the European Advanced Rocket Launchers (EARLs), is presented. Technical and performance data for the EARL concept are given and the cost of development and operating the launchers is estimated. Also, the EARL concept is compared with other planned and existing concepts, including the Saenger launcher.

  16. Developing an Advanced Life Support System for the Flexible Path into Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Kliss, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Long duration human missions beyond low Earth orbit, such as a permanent lunar base, an asteroid rendezvous, or exploring Mars, will use recycling life support systems to preclude supplying large amounts of metabolic consumables. The International Space Station (ISS) life support design provides a historic guiding basis for future systems, but both its system architecture and the subsystem technologies should be reconsidered. Different technologies for the functional subsystems have been investigated and some past alternates appear better for flexible path destinations beyond low Earth orbit. There is a need to develop more capable technologies that provide lower mass, increased closure, and higher reliability. A major objective of redesigning the life support system for the flexible path is achieving the maintainability and ultra-reliability necessary for deep space operations.

  17. Conceptual Design of an APT Reusable Spaceplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpino, S.; Viola, N.

    This paper concerns the conceptual design of an Aerial Propellant Transfer reusable spaceplane carried out during our PhD course under the supervision of prof. Chiesa. The new conceptual design methodology employed in order to develop the APT concept and the main characteristics of the spaceplane itself will be presented and discussed. The methodology for conceptual design has been worked out during the last three years. It was originally thought for atmospheric vehicle design but, thanks to its modular structure which makes it very flexible, it has been possible to convert it to space transportation systems design by adding and/or modifying a few modules. One of the major improvements has been for example the conception and development of the mission simulation and trajectory optimisation module. The methodology includes as main characteristics and innovations the latest techniques of geometric modelling and logistic, operational and cost aspects since the first stages of the project. Computer aided design techniques are used to obtain a better definition of the product at the end of the conceptual design phase and virtual reality concepts are employed to visualise three-dimensional installation and operational aspects, at least in part replacing full-scale mock- ups. The introduction of parametric three-dimensional CAD software integrated into the conceptual design methodology represents a great improvement because it allows to carry out different layouts and to assess them immediately. It is also possible to link the CAD system to a digital prototyping software which combines 3D visualisation and assembly analysis, useful to define the so-called Digital Mock-Up at Conceptual Level (DMUCL) which studies the integration between the on board systems, sized with simulation algorithms, and the airframe. DMUCL represents a very good means to integrate the conceptual design with a methodology turned towards dealing with Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and

  18. Flexible camera applications of an advanced uncooled microbolometer thermal imaging core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Roy N.; Pongratz, Simon; Breen, Tom; Wickman, Heather; Klug, Ron; Gess, Aaron; Hays, John; Bastian, Jonathan; Hall, Greg; Arion, Tim; Owens, John; Siviter, David

    2004-04-01

    Since its introduction less than a year ago, many camera products and end-user applications have benefited from upgrading to the revolutionary BAE Systems MicroIRTM SCC500TM Standard Camera Core. This flexible, multi-resolution, uncooled, vanadium oxide (VOx) microbolometer based imaging engine is delivering higher performance at a lower price to diverse applications with more unique requirements than previous generations of engines. These applications include firefighting, surveillance, security, navigarion, weapon sight, missile, space, automotive and many others. This paper highlights several cameras, systems, and their applictiaons to illustrate some of the real-world uses and benefits of these products.

  19. Advances in all-sputtered CdTe solar cells on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Kristopher; Mahabaduge, Hasitha; Vasko, Anthony; Compaan, Alvin

    2010-03-01

    The University of Toledo II-VI semiconductor group has developed magnetron sputtering (MS) for the deposition of thin films of CdS, CdTe, and related materials for photovoltaic applications. On glass superstrates, we have reached air mass 1.5 efficiencies of 14%.[1] Recently we have studied the use of MS for the fabrication of thin-film CdS/CdTe cells on flexible polyimide superstrates. This takes advantage of the high film quality that can be achieved at substrate temperatures below 300 C when RF MS is used. Our recent CdS/CdTe solar cells have reached 10.5% on flexible polyimide substrates. [2] This all-sputtered cell (except for back contact) has a structure of polyimide/ZnO:Al/ZnO/CdS/CdTe/Cu/Au. The physics of this device will be discussed through the use of spectral quantum efficiency and current-voltage measurements as a function of CdTe layer thickness. Pathways toward further increases in device efficiencies will also be discussed. [1] Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 684 (2004) [2] Phys. Stat. Sol. (B) 241, No. 3, 779--782 (2004)

  20. Recent advances in the evaluation of the strength and deformation properties of flexible pavements using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosti, Fabio; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Benedetto, Andrea; Alani, Amir M.; Loizos, Andreas; D'Amico, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    Even though there is plenty of literature contributions related to the non-destructive evaluation of road pavements using ground-penetrating radar (GPR), with several purposes spanning from the layer thicknesses evaluation to the detection of highly wet spots in the subsurface, there is still a lack of highly-reliable results concerning the mechanical assessment of road pavements, by using this technology. This work endeavours to face this topic and proposes a semi-empirical model for predicting the elastic modulus of a flexible pavement, by employing GPR. Data were collected over three different road sections within the districts of Madrid and Guadalajara, Spain. In particular, GPR surveys were carried out at the speed of traffic over the roads N320 and N211 in the district of Gadalajara and the road N320 in the district of Madrid, for a total of 39 kilometers, approximately. In particular, air-coupled radar systems with a 1000 MHz center frequency antenna and two different 2000 MHz center frequency antennas, mounted onto an instrumented vehicle, were here employed. The calibration of the model was then performed by exploiting ground-truth data coming from other non-destructive technologies. In more details, an instrumented lorry equipped with a curviameter, namely, a deflection tool capable to collect and process continuously and in real time the mechanical response of the flexible pavement, was used in the above road sections. Promising results are here presented, and the potential of GPR for monitoring the mechanical performances of a road network is also proved. Acknowledgement The Authors thank COST, for funding the Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar."

  1. Operational considerations for reusable launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Adelgren, R.G.; Ray, D.; Lashinski, P.

    1997-01-01

    The reusable launch vehicle single stage to orbit concept is a long term goal of the space program. With the reusable concept, government and industry hope to reduce the cost of spacelift and provide fast reliable access to space. For a viable reusable concept, certain operational areas should be well thought out and considered. For instance, {open_quotes}aircraft like{close_quotes} operations should be a goal of the reusable launch vehicle concept. This paper outlines some initial operational considerations for a reusable launch vehicle. The operational areas considered are viewed from the standpoint of operationally testing the system in the areas of effectiveness and suitability. This paper represents thoughts and ideas of the authors and does not represent official Air Force or Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center policies, positions, or direction. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Assessment of the Feasibility of Innovative Reusable Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, S.; Corpino, S.; Viola, N.

    The demand for getting access to space, in particular to Low Earth Orbit, is increasing and fully reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) are likely to play a key role in the development of future space activities. Up until now this kind of space systems has not been successfully carried out: in fact today only the Space Shuttle, which belongs to the old generation of launchers, is operative and furthermore it is not a fully reusable system. In the nineties many studies regarding advanced transatmospheric planes were started, but no one was accomplished because of the technological problems encountered and the high financial resources required with the corresponding industrial risk. One of the most promising project was the Lockheed Venture Star, which seemed to have serious chances to be carried out. Anyway, if this ever happens, it will take quite a long time thus the operative life of Space Shuttle will have to be extended for the International Space Station support. The purpose of the present work is to assess the feasibility of different kinds of advanced reusable launch vehicles to gain access to space and to meet the requirements of today space flight needs, which are mainly safety and affordability. Single stage to orbit (SSTO), two stage to orbit (TSTO) and the so called "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicles are here taken into account to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicle takes off and climbs to meet a tanker aircraft to be aerially refuelled and then, after disconnecting from the tanker, it flies to reach the orbit. In this case, apart from the space vehicle, also the tanker aircraft needs a dedicated study to examine the problems related to the refuelling at high subsonic speeds and at a height near the tropopause. Only winged vehicles which take off and land horizontally are considered but different architectural layouts and propulsive configurations are hypothesised. Unlike the Venture Star, which

  3. Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems for a Flexible Space Exploration Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Smith, Leigh M.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems (AAPS) project, formerly known as the Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project, endeavors to develop advanced avionic and processor technologies anticipated to be used by NASA s currently evolving space exploration architectures. The AAPS project is a part of the Exploration Technology Development Program, which funds an entire suite of technologies that are aimed at enabling NASA s ability to explore beyond low earth orbit. NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) manages the AAPS project. AAPS uses a broad-scoped approach to developing avionic and processor systems. Investment areas include advanced electronic designs and technologies capable of providing environmental hardness, reconfigurable computing techniques, software tools for radiation effects assessment, and radiation environment modeling tools. Near-term emphasis within the multiple AAPS tasks focuses on developing prototype components using semiconductor processes and materials (such as Silicon-Germanium (SiGe)) to enhance a device s tolerance to radiation events and low temperature environments. As the SiGe technology will culminate in a delivered prototype this fiscal year, the project emphasis shifts its focus to developing low-power, high efficiency total processor hardening techniques. In addition to processor development, the project endeavors to demonstrate techniques applicable to reconfigurable computing and partially reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). This capability enables avionic architectures the ability to develop FPGA-based, radiation tolerant processor boards that can serve in multiple physical locations throughout the spacecraft and perform multiple functions during the course of the mission. The individual tasks that comprise AAPS are diverse, yet united in the common endeavor to develop electronics capable of operating within the harsh environment of space. Specifically, the AAPS tasks for

  4. Advanced interlocking systems to improve heavy-load-bearing characteristics of flexible intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Leopold; Eichler, Johannes; Ryll, E Jonathan S; Fischerauer, Stefan; Raschke, Michael J; Kolbitsch, Andreas; Castellani, Christoph; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2016-11-01

    Flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) is a minimally invasive and widespread standard method for osteosynthesis of pediatric long bone fractures. In the case of unstable fractures of the lower extremity, interlocking systems need to be used to prevent axial shortening and subsequent perforation of the nail at its insertion site. In the present study, four different screw-fixed interlocking systems for FINs (Hofer TwinPlug with two 3-mm titanium interlocking screws, Hofer FixPlug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw, Hofer Plug with 3.5-mm titanium interlocking screw, and Hofer Plug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw) in comparison with the commonly used Ender stainless steel nails (locked with 3.5-mm screw) were experimentally investigated in cadaveric lamb tibiae, regarding their load characteristics and failure modes in the case of heavy loading. The specimens were subjected to sequential axial cyclic loading of 5000cycles with stepwise increase of the load amplitude until failure. Migration of locking screws and internal damage of bone tissue was quantified by micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Ender nails failed on average at a peak load of 800 N, TwinPlugs at 1367 N, FixPlugs at 1222 N, Plugs 3.5mm at 1225 N and Plugs 3.0mm at 971 N. TwinPlugs, FixPlugs, and Plugs 3.5mm failed in a slow manner over several hundred loading cycles, whereas Ender nails and Plugs 3.0mm exhibited abrupt failure without any prior indication. Our results confirm that axial stability of FIN can be further improved by screw-fixed plugs by simultaneously avoiding shortcomings of an eye-locked system, which the Ender nails are. Considering biomechanical results, plug interlocking systems with 3.5-mm screws should be favored over conventional Ender nails and plugs with 3-mm screws.

  5. Advanced interlocking systems to improve heavy-load-bearing characteristics of flexible intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Leopold; Eichler, Johannes; Ryll, E Jonathan S; Fischerauer, Stefan; Raschke, Michael J; Kolbitsch, Andreas; Castellani, Christoph; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2016-11-01

    Flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) is a minimally invasive and widespread standard method for osteosynthesis of pediatric long bone fractures. In the case of unstable fractures of the lower extremity, interlocking systems need to be used to prevent axial shortening and subsequent perforation of the nail at its insertion site. In the present study, four different screw-fixed interlocking systems for FINs (Hofer TwinPlug with two 3-mm titanium interlocking screws, Hofer FixPlug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw, Hofer Plug with 3.5-mm titanium interlocking screw, and Hofer Plug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw) in comparison with the commonly used Ender stainless steel nails (locked with 3.5-mm screw) were experimentally investigated in cadaveric lamb tibiae, regarding their load characteristics and failure modes in the case of heavy loading. The specimens were subjected to sequential axial cyclic loading of 5000cycles with stepwise increase of the load amplitude until failure. Migration of locking screws and internal damage of bone tissue was quantified by micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Ender nails failed on average at a peak load of 800 N, TwinPlugs at 1367 N, FixPlugs at 1222 N, Plugs 3.5mm at 1225 N and Plugs 3.0mm at 971 N. TwinPlugs, FixPlugs, and Plugs 3.5mm failed in a slow manner over several hundred loading cycles, whereas Ender nails and Plugs 3.0mm exhibited abrupt failure without any prior indication. Our results confirm that axial stability of FIN can be further improved by screw-fixed plugs by simultaneously avoiding shortcomings of an eye-locked system, which the Ender nails are. Considering biomechanical results, plug interlocking systems with 3.5-mm screws should be favored over conventional Ender nails and plugs with 3-mm screws. PMID:27524031

  6. Operations Analysis of the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noneman, Steven R.; Smith, C. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program is developing a second-generation reusable launch vehicle. The program goals include lowering the risk of loss of crew to 1 in 10,000 and reducing annual operations cost to one third of the cost of the Space Shuttle. The SLI missions include NASA, military and commercial satellite launches and crew and cargo launches to the space station. The SLI operations analyses provide an assessment of the operational support and infrastructure needed to operate candidate system architectures. Measures of the operability are estimated (i.e. system dependability, responsiveness, and efficiency). Operations analysis is used to determine the impact of specific technologies on operations. A conceptual path to reducing annual operations costs by two thirds is based on key design characteristics, such as reusability, and improved processes lowering labor costs. New operations risks can be expected to emerge. They can be mitigated with effective risk management with careful identification, assignment, tracking, and closure. SLI design characteristics such as nearly full reusability, high reliability, advanced automation, and lowered maintenance and servicing coupled with improved processes are contributors to operability and large operating cost reductions.

  7. Thermal degradation study of silicon carbide threads developed for advanced flexible thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy Kim; Sawko, Paul M.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fiber is a material that may be used in advanced thermal protection systems (TPS) for future aerospace vehicles. SiC fiber's mechanical properties depend greatly on the presence or absence of sizing and its microstructure. In this research, silicon dioxide is found to be present on the surface of the fiber. Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) show that a thin oxide layer (SiO2) exists on the as-received fibers, and the oxide thickness increases when the fibers are exposed to high temperature. ESCA also reveals no evidence of Si-C bonding on the fiber surface on both as-received and heat treated fibers. The silicon oxide layer is thought to signal the decomposition of SiC bonds and may be partially responsible for the degradation in the breaking strength observed at temperatures above 400 C. The variation in electrical resistivity of the fibers with increasing temperature indicates a transition to a higher band gap material at 350 to 600 C. This is consistent with a decomposition of SiC involving silicon oxide formation.

  8. Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) Material Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    Test specimen data sheets are presented for 48 high temperature and 40 low temperature reusable surface insulation tiles. Tabular data show dimensions, density, coating weight, and final tile weight. Codes indicate basic material, surface coating, and hydrophobic treatment.

  9. Reusable, tamper-indicating seal

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1978-01-01

    A reusable, tamper-indicating seal comprises a drum confined within a fixed body and rotatable in one direction therewithin, the top of the drum constituting a tray carrying a large number of small balls of several different colors. The fixed body contains parallel holes for looping a seal wire therethrough. The base of the drums carries cams adapted to coact with cam followers to lock the wire within the seal at one angular position of the drum. A channel in the fixed body -- visible from outside the seal -- adjacent the tray constitutes a segregated location for a small plurality of the colored balls. A spring in the tray forces colored balls into the segregated location at one angular position of the drum, further rotation securing the balls in position and the wires in the seal. A wedge-shaped plough removes the balls from the segregated location, at a different angular position of the drum, the wire being unlocked at the same position. A new pattern of colored balls will appear in the segregated location when the seal is relocked.

  10. Double layered tailorable advanced blanket insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falstrup, D.

    1983-01-01

    An advanced flexible reusable surface insulation material for future space shuttle flights was investigated. A conventional fly shuttle loom with special modifications to weave an integral double layer triangular core fabric from quartz yarn was used. Two types of insulating material were inserted into the cells of the fabric, and a procedure to accomplish this was developed. The program is follow up of a program in which single layer rectangular cell core fabrics are woven and a single type of insulating material was inserted into the cells.

  11. Reusable experiment controllers, case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brian A.; Gaasbeck, Jim Van

    1996-03-01

    Congress has given NASA and the science community a reality check. The tight and ever shrinking budgets are trimming the fat from many space science programs. No longer can a Principal Investigator (PI) afford to waste development dollars on re-inventing spacecraft controllers, experiment/payload controllers, ground control systems, or test sets. Inheritance of the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) from one program to another is not a significant re-use of technology to develop a science mission in these times. Reduction of operational staff and highly autonomous experiments are needed to reduce the sustaining cost of a mission. The re-use of an infrastructure from one program to another is needed to truly attain the cost and time savings required. Interface and Control Systems, Inc. (ICS) has a long history of re-usable software. Navy, Air Force, and NASA programs have benefited from the re-use of a common control system from program to program. Several standardization efforts in the AIAA have adopted the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) architecture as a point solution to satisfy requirements for re-use and autonomy. The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) has been a long-standing customer of ICS and are working on their 4th generation system using SCL. Much of the hardware and software infrastructure has been re-used from mission to mission with little cost for re-hosting a new experiment. The same software infrastructure has successfully been used on Clementine, and an end-to-end system is being deployed for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) for Johns Hopkins University. A case study of the ERIM programs, Clementine and FUSE will be detailed in this paper.

  12. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  13. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27568535

  14. TPS Materials and Costs for Future Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Dan J.; Milos, Frank S.; Squire, Tom H.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing new reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) for reducing the cost of transporting payload to and from orbit. This work reviews thirteen candidate thermal protection system (TPS) options currently available for RLVs. It is useful to begin with the current Shuttle TPS layout as a reference. The nose cap and wing leading edge , which reach the highest temperatures, are made of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) that is protected from oxidation by an external coating (about 0.020" thick) of silicon-carbide. Most of the windward surface is 9 lb/cubic ft ceramic tiles (LI-900) with a thin (about 0.012") coating of Reaction Cured Glass (RCG). The leeward side of the vehicle is covered largely by AFRSI, a quilted ceramic blanket, and FRSI, a polyamide felt. These four materials can be considered first generation reusable TPS. Since the time of the Shuttle design, considerable progress has been made advancing TPS technologies in terms of thermal performance, robustness, and cost. For each of the major systems, a second generation ceramic TPS has been developed, tested, and characterized. Metallic-based systems have also been developed. For applications requiring RCC in the past, advanced carbon-carbon (ACC) is now available. This material has better mechanical properties, somewhat higher temperature capability to 2900F and greatly increased oxidation resistance. New carbon fiber reinforced silicon-carbide matrix composites (C/SiCs) have shown additional improvement in properties over ACC with use temperatures to 3000F and above. For rigid tiles, NASA Ames has made two significant advancements. The first is a tile substrate called Alumina Enhanced Thermal Barrier, or AETB, that incorporates alumina fibers for improved dimensional stability at high temperatures, to 2600F and above. This material can be made to densities as low as 8 lb/cubic ft. The second is a coating preparation called Toughened Uni-piece Fibrous Insulation, or TUFT, that

  15. Dynamic reusable workflows for ocean science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard; Fernandez, Filipe; Wilcox, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Digital catalogs of ocean data have been available for decades, but advances in standardized services and software for catalog search and data access make it now possible to create catalog-driven workflows that automate — end-to-end — data search, analysis and visualization of data from multiple distributed sources. Further, these workflows may be shared, reused and adapted with ease. Here we describe a workflow developed within the US Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) which automates the skill-assessment of water temperature forecasts from multiple ocean forecast models, allowing improved forecast products to be delivered for an open water swim event. A series of Jupyter Notebooks are used to capture and document the end-to-end workflow using a collection of Python tools that facilitate working with standardized catalog and data services. The workflow first searches a catalog of metadata using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalog Service for the Web (CSW), then accesses data service endpoints found in the metadata records using the OGC Sensor Observation Service (SOS) for in situ sensor data and OPeNDAP services for remotely-sensed and model data. Skill metrics are computed and time series comparisons of forecast model and observed data are displayed interactively, leveraging the capabilities of modern web browsers. The resulting workflow not only solves a challenging specific problem, but highlights the benefits of dynamic, reusable workflows in general. These workflows adapt as new data enters the data system, facilitate reproducible science, provide templates from which new scientific workflows can be developed, and encourage data providers to use standardized services. As applied to the ocean swim event, the workflow exposed problems with two of the ocean forecast products which led to improved regional forecasts once errors were corrected. While the example is specific, the approach is general, and we hope to see increased use of dynamic

  16. Dynamic Reusable Workflows for Ocean Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard; Fernandez, Filipe; Wilcox, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Digital catalogs of ocean data have been available for decades, but advances in standardized services and software for catalog search and data access make it now possible to create catalog-driven workflows that automate — end-to-end — data search, analysis and visualization of data from multiple distributed sources. Further, these workflows may be shared, reused and adapted with ease. Here we describe a workflow developed within the US Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) which automates the skill-assessment of water temperature forecasts from multiple ocean forecast models, allowing improved forecast products to be delivered for an open water swim event. A series of Jupyter Notebooks are used to capture and document the end-to-end workflow using a collection of Python tools that facilitate working with standardized catalog and data services. The workflow first searches a catalog of metadata using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalog Service for the Web (CSW), then accesses data service endpoints found in the metadata records using the OGC Sensor Observation Service (SOS) for in situ sensor data and OPeNDAP services for remotely-sensed and model data. Skill metrics are computed and time series comparisons of forecast model and observed data are displayed interactively, leveraging the capabilities of modern web browsers. The resulting workflow not only solves a challenging specific problem, but highlights the benefits of dynamic, reusable workflows in general. These workflows adapt as new data enters the data system, facilitate reproducible science, provide templates from which new scientific workflows can be developed, and encourage data providers to use standardized services. As applied to the ocean swim event, the workflow exposed problems with two of the ocean forecast products which led to improved regional forecasts once errors were corrected. While the example is specific, the approach is general, and we hope to see increased use of dynamic

  17. Entry Guidance for the Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1999-01-01

    The X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator is a half-scale prototype developed to test the key technologies needed for a full-scale single-stage reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The X-33 is a suborbital vehicle that will be launched vertically, and land horizontally. The goals of this research were to develop an alternate entry guidance scheme for the X-33 in parallel to the actual X-33 entry guidance algorithms, provide comparative and complementary study, and identify potential new ways to improve entry guidance performance. Toward these goals, the nominal entry trajectory is defined by a piecewise linear drag-acceleration-versus-energy profile, which is in turn obtained by the solution of a semi-analytical parameter optimization problem. The closed-loop guidance is accomplished by tracking the nominal drag profile with primarily bank-angle modulation on-board. The bank-angle is commanded by a single full-envelope nonlinear trajectory control law. Near the end of the entry flight, the guidance logic is switched to heading control in order to meet strict conditions at the terminal area energy management interface. Two methods, one on ground-track control and the other on heading control, were proposed and examined for this phase of entry guidance where lateral control is emphasized. Trajectory dispersion studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the entry guidance algorithms against a number of uncertainties including those in propulsion system, atmospheric properties, winds, aerodynamics, and propellant loading. Finally, a new trajectory-regulation method is introduced at the end as a promising precision entry guidance method. The guidance principle is very different and preliminary application in X-33 entry guidance simulation showed high precision that is difficult to achieve by existing methods.

  18. Venturestar{trademark} single stage to orbit reusable launch vehicle program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, R.I.

    1997-01-01

    Lockheed Martin is developing the VentureStar{trademark} Single Stage To Orbit Reusable Launch Vehicle system. The VentureStar{trademark} launch system will drastically reduce the cost to place payloads in orbit. This paper describes the VentureStar{trademark} Single Stage To Orbit Reusable Launch Vehicle Program, system and technology. The technology to achieve VentureStar{trademark} will be demonstrated in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration X-33 Phase II Advanced Technology Demonstration Program. The X-33 program, vehicle, and technology are described herein. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. A Non Rigid Reusable Surface Insulation Concept for the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    A reusable thermal protection system concept was developed for the space shuttle that utilizes a flexible, woven ceramic mat insulation beneath an aerodynamic skin and moisture barrier consisting of either a dense ceramic coating or a super alloy metallic foil. The resulting heat shield material has unique structural characteristics. The shear modulus of the woven mat is very low such that bending and membrane loads introduced into the underlying structural panel remain isolated from the surface skin.

  20. Reusable Agena study. Volume 2: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. K.; Piper, J. E.; Douglass, D. A.; Waller, E. W.; Hopkins, C. V.; Fitzgerald, E. T.; Sagawa, S. S.; Carter, S. A.; Jensen, H. L.

    1974-01-01

    The application of the existing Agena vehicle as a reusable upper stage for the space shuttle is discussed. The primary objective of the study is to define those changes to the Agena required for it to function in the reusable mode in the 100 percent capture of the NASA-DOD mission model. This 100 percent capture is achieved without use of kick motors or stages by simply increasing the Agena propellant load by using optional strap-on-tanks. The required shuttle support equipment, launch and flight operations techniques, development program, and cost package are also defined.

  1. A reusable rocket engine intelligent control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter C.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1988-01-01

    An intelligent control system for reusable space propulsion systems for future launch vehicles is described. The system description includes a framework for the design. The framework consists of an execution level with high-speed control and diagnostics, and a coordination level which marries expert system concepts with traditional control. A comparison is made between air breathing and rocket engine control concepts to assess the relative levels of development and to determine the applicability of air breathing control concepts ot future reusable rocket engine systems.

  2. Flexible-Path Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.; Adler, M.; Alkalai, L.; Burdick, G.; Coulter, D.; Jordan, F.; Naderi, F.; Graham, L.; Landis, R.; Drake, B.; Hoffman, S.; Grunsfeld, J.; Seery, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    In the fourth quarter of 2009 an in-house, multi-center NASA study team briefly examined "Flexible Path" concepts to begin understanding characteristics, content, and roles of potential missions consistent with the strategy proposed by the Augustine Committee. We present an overview of the study findings. Three illustrative human/robotic mission concepts not requiring planet surface operations are described: assembly of very large in-space telescopes in cis-lunar space; exploration of near Earth objects (NEOs); exploration of Mars' moon Phobos. For each, a representative mission is described, technology and science objectives are outlined, and a basic mission operations concept is quantified. A fourth type of mission, using the lunar surface as preparation for Mars, is also described. Each mission's "capability legacy" is summarized. All four illustrative missions could achieve NASA's stated human space exploration objectives and advance human space flight toward Mars surface exploration. Telescope assembly missions would require the fewest new system developments. NEO missions would offer a wide range of deep-space trip times between several months and two years. Phobos exploration would retire several Marsclass risks, leaving another large remainder set (associated with entry, descent, surface operations, and ascent) for retirement by subsequent missions. And extended lunar surface operations would build confidence for Mars surface missions by addressing a complementary set of risks. Six enabling developments (robotic precursors, ISS exploration testbed, heavy-lift launch, deep-space-capable crew capsule, deep-space habitat, and reusable in-space propulsion stage) would apply across multiple program sequence options, and thus could be started even without committing to a specific mission sequence now. Flexible Path appears to be a viable strategy, with meaningful and worthy mission content.

  3. FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GACH, PENELOPE J.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMICAL FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS IS DESCRIBED. THREE PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS WERE DEVELOPED--(1) A METAL FOIL ACTIVATING AN ELECTRICAL PROBE, (2) A METAL FOIL REACTING WITH A MAGNETIC PROBE, AND (3) INVISIBLE FLUORESCENT INK REVEALED BY THE APPLICATION OF LONGWAVE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT. (MS)

  4. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Launch tradeoff study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A goal of the Phase B study is to define the launch system interfaces for the reusable reentry satellite (RRS) program. The focus of the launch tradeoff study, documented in this report, is to determine which expendable launch vehicles (ELV's) are best suited for the RRS application by understanding the impact of all viable launch systems on RRS design and operation.

  5. System specification for the reusable reentry satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The RRS design shall provide a relatively inexpensive method of access to micro and fractional gravity space environments for an extended period of time, with eventual intact recovery on the surface of the Earth. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system.

  6. The Venture Star Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this artist's concept, the X-33 Venture Star, a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), manufactured by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, is shown in orbit with a deployed payload. The Venture Star was one of the earliest versions of the RLV's developed to replace the aging shuttle fleet. The X-33 program was cancelled in 2001.

  7. X-33 Venture Star - Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this artist's concept, the X-33 Venture Star, a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), manufactured by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, is shown in orbit with a deployed payload. The Venture Star was one of the earliest versions of the RLV's developed to replace the aging shuttle fleet. The X-33 program was cancelled in 2001.

  8. A Three-Cent Reusable Craig Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Thomas J.

    1998-07-01

    A rugged three-cent reusable Craig tube is easily made from a cotton swab and disposable pipet tip. The tube costs three cents or less and can be reused. Craig tubes made of glass cost as much as $15 and are very fragile.

  9. 14 CFR 437.67 - Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket. 437... a reusable suborbital rocket. A permittee must— (a) During permitted flight, measure in real time the position and velocity of its reusable suborbital rocket; and (b) Provide position and...

  10. 14 CFR 437.67 - Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket. 437... a reusable suborbital rocket. A permittee must— (a) During permitted flight, measure in real time the position and velocity of its reusable suborbital rocket; and (b) Provide position and...

  11. 14 CFR 437.67 - Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket. 437... a reusable suborbital rocket. A permittee must— (a) During permitted flight, measure in real time the position and velocity of its reusable suborbital rocket; and (b) Provide position and...

  12. 14 CFR 437.67 - Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket. 437... a reusable suborbital rocket. A permittee must— (a) During permitted flight, measure in real time the position and velocity of its reusable suborbital rocket; and (b) Provide position and...

  13. Reusable launch vehicle: Technology development and test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) requested that the National Research Council (NRC) assess the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology development and test programs in the most critical component technologies. At a time when discretionary government spending is under close scrutiny, the RLV program is designed to reduce the cost of access to space through a combination of robust vehicles and a streamlined infrastructure. Routine access to space has obvious benefits for space science, national security, commercial technologies, and the further exploration of space. Because of technological challenges, knowledgeable people disagree about the feasibility of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle. The purpose of the RLV program proposed by NASA and industry contractors is to investigate the status of existing technology and to identify and advance key technology areas required for development and validation of an SSTO vehicle. This report does not address the feasibility of an SSTO vehicle, nor does it revisit the roles and responsibilities assigned to NASA by the National Transportation Policy. Instead, the report sets forth the NRC committee's findings and recommendations regarding the RLV technology development and test program in the critical areas of propulsion, a reusable cryogenic tank system (RCTS), primary vehicle structure, and a thermal protection system (TPS).

  14. Structures for the 3rd Generation Reusable Concept Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.

    2001-01-01

    A major goal of NASA is to create an advance space transportation system that provides a safe, affordable highway through the air and into space. The long-term plans are to reduce the risk of crew loss to 1 in 1,000,000 missions and reduce the cost of Low-Earth Orbit by a factor of 100 from today's costs. A third generation reusable concept vehicle (RCV) was developed to assess technologies required to meet NASA's space access goals. The vehicle will launch from Cape Kennedy carrying a 25,000 lb. payload to the International Space Station (ISS). The system is an air breathing launch vehicle (ABLV) hypersonic lifting body with rockets and uses triple point hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellant. The focus of this paper is on the structural concepts and analysis methods used in developing the third generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Member sizes, concepts and material selections will be discussed as well as analysis methods used in optimizing the structure. Analysis based on the HyperSizer structural sizing software will be discussed. Design trades required to optimize structural weight will be presented.

  15. Reusable Rocket Engine Maintenance Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 85,000 liquid rocket engine failure reports, obtained from 30 years of developing and delivering major pump feed engines, were reviewed and screened and reduced to 1771. These were categorized into 16 different failure modes. Failure propagation diagrams were established. The state of the art of engine condition monitoring for in-flight sensors and between flight inspection technology was determined. For the 16 failure modes, the potential measurands and diagnostic requirements were identified, assessed and ranked. Eight areas are identified requiring advanced technology development.

  16. Suborbital Research and Education Missions with Commercial Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodway, K.; Nelson, A.; Voigt, J.

    2012-12-01

    Suborbital reusable launch vehicles (sRLV) will provide low-cost, flexible, and frequent access to space. In the case of XCOR's Lynx, the vehicle design and capabilities work well for hosting specially designed experiments that can be flown with a human-tended researcher or alone with the pilot on a unique mission on a customized flight trajectory. This new manned, reusable commercial platform will allow for repeated observations with a single instrument, but without the need to refurbish the vehicle between flights. In addition, the short turn-around means a researcher can do multiple observations, measurements, or targets. The vehicle is designed for multi-mission primary and secondary payload capabilities, including: in-cockpit experiments and instrumentation testing, externally mounted experiments, upper atmospheric sampling, and microsatellite launch. This vehicle takes off horizontally from a runway and will go into a powered ascent attaining Mach 2.9 maximum airspeed. After about three minutes and at approximately 58 km (190,000 ft) the engines are shutdown and the RLV then coasts upwards. The low gravity period (at or below 0.001go) begins soon after at 3.35 minutes and the microgravity period (at or below 10-6go) starts at 4.25 minutes. At approximately four and half minutes the vehicle reaches apogee of 100 km (328, 000 ft). After reentry and a Max-G force pullout of 4 g, the Lynx touches down on the takeoff runway after approximately 30 minutes.Typical Lynx Mark II flight profile

  17. Reusable space systems (Eugen Saenger Lecture, 1987)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    The history and current status of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) development are surveyed, with emphases on the contributions of Eugen Saenger and ongoing NASA projects. Topics addressed include the capabilities and achievements of the Space Shuttle, the need to maintain a fleet with both ELVs and RLVs to meet different mission requirements, the X-30 testbed aircraft for the National Aerospace Plane program, current design concepts for Shuttle II (a 1000-ton fully reusable two-stage rocket-powered spacecraft capable of carrying 11,000 kg to Space Station orbit), proposals for dual-fuel-propulsion SSTO RLVs, and the Space Station Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle and Orbital Transfer Vehicle. The importance of RLVs and of international cooperation in establishing the LEO infrastructure needed for planetary exploration missions is stressed.

  18. The reusable launch vehicle technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, S.

    1995-01-01

    Today's launch systems have major shortcomings that will increase in significance in the future, and thus are principal drivers for seeking major improvements in space transportation. They are too costly; insufficiently reliable, safe, and operable; and increasingly losing market share to international competition. For the United States to continue its leadership in the human exploration and wide ranging utilization of space, the first order of business must be to achieve low cost, reliable transportatin to Earth orbit. NASA's Access to Space Study, in 1993, recommended the development of a fully reusable single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) rocket vehicle as an Agency goal. The goal of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology program is to mature the technologies essential for a next-generation reusable launch system capable of reliably serving National space transportation needs at substantially reduced costs. The primary objectives of the RLV technology program are to (1) mature the technologies required for the next-generation system, (2) demonstrate the capability to achieve low development and operational cost, and rapid launch turnaround times and (3) reduce business and technical risks to encourage significant private investment in the commercial development and operation of the next-generation system. Developing and demonstrating the technologies required for a Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) rocket is a focus of the program becuase past studies indicate that it has the best potential for achieving the lowest space access cost while acting as an RLV technology driver (since it also encompasses the technology requirements of reusable rocket vehicles in general).

  19. Self-unloading, reusable, lunar lander project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arseculeratne, Ruwan; Cavazos, Melissa; Euker, John; Ghavidel, Fred; Hinkel, Todd J.; Hitzfelder, John; Leitner, Jesse; Nevik, James; Paynter, Scott; Zolondek, Allen

    1990-01-01

    In the early 21st century, NASA will return to the Moon and establish a permanent base. To achieve this goal safely and economically, B&T Engineering has designed an unmanned, reusable, self-unloading lunar lander. The lander is designed to deliver 15,000 kg payloads from an orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) in a low lunar polar orbit and an altitude of 200 km to any location on the lunar surface.

  20. Improvement of reusable surface insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a program to improve the reusable surface insulation (RSI) system through the improvement of the LI-1500 material properties and the simplification of the RSI system. The improvements made include: 2500 F-capability RSI systems, water-impervious surface coatings, establishment of a high-emittance coating constituent, development of a secondary water-reduction system, and achievement of a lower density (9 pcf) RSI material.

  1. Australia and the new reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalker, R. J.

    The new generation of reusable launch vehicles represented by ESA's Hermes and HOTOL, NASA's National Aerospace Plane, and the DFVLR's Saenger, promises to radically alter the economic basis of space flight by allowing such operations as the on-orbit servicing of satellites. Attention is presently drawn to the opportunities that arise for Australia's aerospace industry from the availability in Australia of two wind tunnel facilities capable of furnishing the requisite hypersonic aerothermodynamics testing capabilities for these vehicles' development.

  2. 24 Inch Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A scaled-down 24-inch version of the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor was successfully fired for 21 seconds at a Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Test Stand. The motor was tested to ensure a replacement material called Lycocel would meet the criteria set by the Shuttle's Solid Motor Project Office. The current material is a heat-resistant, rayon-based, carbon-cloth phenolic used as an insulating material for the motor's nozzle. Lycocel, a brand name for Tencel, is a cousin to rayon and is an exceptionally strong fiber made of wood pulp produced by a special 'solvent-spirning' process using a nontoxic solvent. It will also be impregnated with a phenolic resin. This new material is expected to perform better under the high temperatures experienced during launch. The next step will be to test the material on a 48-inch solid rocket motor. The test, which replicates launch conditions, is part of Shuttle's ongoing verification of components, materials, and manufacturing processes required by MSFC, which oversees the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor project. Manufactured by the ATK Thiokol Propulsion Division in Promontory, California, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor measures 126 feet (38.4 meters) long and 12 feet (3.6 meters) in diameter. It is the largest solid rocket motor ever flown and the first designed for reuse. During its two-minute burn at liftoff, each motor generates an average thrust of 2.6 million pounds (1.2 million kilograms).

  3. A re-usable wave bioreactor for protein production in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Scholz, J; Suppmann, S

    2016-01-01

    Wave-mixed bioreactors have increasingly replaced stainless steel stirred tank reactors in seed inoculum productions and mammalian cell-based process developments. Pre-sterilized, single-use plastic bags are used for cultivation, eliminating the risk of cross-contamination and cleaning procedures. However, these advantages come with high consumable costs which is the main barrier to more uptakes of the technology by academic institutions. As an academic Core Facility that faces high demand in protein production from insect cells, we have therefore developed a cost-effective alternative to disposable wave bags. In our study we identified: •A re-usable wave shaken polycarbonate bioreactor for protein production in insect cells achieves protein yields comparable to disposable bags.•The advantages of this re-usable bioreactor are low costs, long life cycle, flexible configuration of accessories and convenient handling due to its rigid shape.

  4. A re-usable wave bioreactor for protein production in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Scholz, J; Suppmann, S

    2016-01-01

    Wave-mixed bioreactors have increasingly replaced stainless steel stirred tank reactors in seed inoculum productions and mammalian cell-based process developments. Pre-sterilized, single-use plastic bags are used for cultivation, eliminating the risk of cross-contamination and cleaning procedures. However, these advantages come with high consumable costs which is the main barrier to more uptakes of the technology by academic institutions. As an academic Core Facility that faces high demand in protein production from insect cells, we have therefore developed a cost-effective alternative to disposable wave bags. In our study we identified: •A re-usable wave shaken polycarbonate bioreactor for protein production in insect cells achieves protein yields comparable to disposable bags.•The advantages of this re-usable bioreactor are low costs, long life cycle, flexible configuration of accessories and convenient handling due to its rigid shape. PMID:27556015

  5. Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings for Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius; Carroll, Carol; Smith, Dane; Guzinski, Mike; Marschall, Jochen; Pallix, Joan; Ridge, Jerry; Tran, Duoc

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the evaluation and testing of high emissivity protective coatings applied to flexible insulations for the Reusable Launch Vehicle technology program. Ceramic coatings were evaluated for their thermal properties, durability, and potential for reuse. One of the major goals was to determine the mechanism by which these coated blanket surfaces become brittle and try to modify the coatings to reduce or eliminate embrittlement. Coatings were prepared from colloidal silica with a small percentage of either SiC or SiB6 as the emissivity agent. These coatings are referred to as gray C-9 and protective ceramic coating (PCC), respectively. The colloidal solutions were either brushed or sprayed onto advanced flexible reusable surface insulation blankets. The blankets were instrumented with thermocouples and exposed to reentry heating conditions in the Ames Aeroheating Arc Jet Facility. Post-test samples were then characterized through impact testing, emissivity measurements, chemical analysis, and observation of changes in surface morphology. The results show that both coatings performed well in arc jet tests with backface temperatures slightly lower for the PCC coating than with gray C-9. Impact testing showed that the least extensive surface destruction was experienced on blankets with lower areal density coatings.

  6. Highly reusable space transportation system study

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    To significantly increase demand for launch services by stimulating existing and planned markets as well as enabling new markets, the cost to orbit needs to be reduced a factor of ten below projected Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) goals. This will place the recurring operations cost around {dollar_sign}200 per payload pound to low earth orbit (LEO). Methods for reducing the cost include: increasing relative vehicle performance, increasing vehicle reusability, and decreasing recurring operations. A study was conducted for NASA in support of its Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) initiative to identify for further assessment and development, those launch strategies that hold the greatest potential with respect to meeting this goal. During this study a number of candidate strategies were evaluated associated with access to space. Both technical and cost trades were performed, and concluded that there are two airbreathing propulsion concepts utilizing launch assist that appear promising in achieving the HRST-cost goals. These concepts employ both turbine based combine cycle (TBCC) and rocket based combine cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems. The launch assist selected uses electromagnetic propulsion and a guideway to provide both delta velocity and altitude. A first order investigation of system level requirements associated with HRST launch assist for a magnetically launched vehicle including guideway concept and requirements as well as magnetic levitation and propulsion concepts and requirements were also conducted. This study concluded that the HRST goals of total recurring operations cost of {dollar_sign}200 per payload pound to Low Earth Orbit based on a ten year operational period were feasible if the required technology was matured. The most promising concept to achieve these goals is based on a RBCC powered vehicle with electromagnetic launch assist. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Highly reusable space transportation system study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    To significantly increase demand for launch services by stimulating existing and planned markets as well as enabling new markets, the cost to orbit needs to be reduced a factor of ten below projected Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) goals. This will place the recurring operations cost around 200 per payload pound to low earth orbit (LEO). Methods for reducing the cost include: increasing relative vehicle performance, increasing vehicle reusability, and decreasing recurring operations. A study was conducted for NASA in support of its Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) initiative to identify for further assessment and development, those launch strategies that hold the greatest potential with respect to meeting this goal. During this study a number of candidate strategies were evaluated associated with access to space. Both technical and cost trades were performed, and concluded that there are two airbreathing propulsion concepts utilizing launch assist that appear promising in achieving the HRST-cost goals. These concepts employ both turbine based combine cycle (TBCC) and rocket based combine cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems. The launch assist selected uses electromagnetic propulsion and a guideway to provide both delta velocity and altitude. A first order investigation of system level requirements associated with HRST launch assist for a magnetically launched vehicle including guideway concept and requirements as well as magnetic levitation and propulsion concepts and requirements were also conducted. This study concluded that the HRST goals of total recurring operations cost of 200 per payload pound to Low Earth Orbit based on a ten year operational period were feasible if the required technology was matured. The most promising concept to achieve these goals is based on a RBCC powered vehicle with electromagnetic launch assist.

  8. Reusable Hybrid Propellant Modules for Outer-Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Mankins, John C.

    2005-01-01

    A report summarizes the concept of reusable hybrid propellant modules (HPMs), which would be used in outer space for long-term cryogenic storage of liquefied spacecraft-propellant gases, including for example, oxygen and hydrogen for combustion-based chemical rocket engines and xenon for electric thrusters. The HPM concept would provide the fundamental building block for an efficient, reusable in-space transportation system for both crewed and uncrewed missions. Each HPM would be equipped to implement an advanced zero-boil-off method of managing cryogenic fluids, and would include a fluid-transfer interface comprising standardized fittings that would be compatible with fittings on all supply facilities and on spacecraft to be supplied. The HPM, combined with a chemical or electric orbital transfer spacecraft, would provide an integrated propulsion system. HPMs would supply chemical propellant for time-critical transfers such as crewed missions, and utilize the more efficient electric-propulsion transfer vehicles to transport filled HPMs to the destinations and to return empty HPMs back to near-Earth orbits or other intermediate locations for replenishment and reuse. The HPM prepositioned using electric propulsion would provide the chemical propellant for the crew s return trip in a much more efficient manner than a chemical-only approach. The propellants to fill the HPMs would be delivered from the Earth or other initial supply locations to the intermediate locations by use of automated, compatible spacecraft designed specifically for that purpose. Additionally, multiple HPMs could be aggregated and positioned in orbits and on planets, moons, and asteroids to supply fluids to orbiting and interplanetary spacecraft.

  9. Facile graphene transfer directly to target substrates with a reusable metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafra, D. L.; Ming, T.; Kong, J.

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput, roll-to-roll growth and transferring of high-quality, large-area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene directly onto a target substrate with a reusable metal catalyst is an enabling technology for flexible optoelectronics. We explore the direct transfer via hot lamination of CVD graphene onto a flexible substrate, followed by electrochemical delamination (bubble transfer) of the graphene. The transfer method investigated here does not require any intermediate transfer layer and allows the copper to be reused, which will reduce the production cost and avoid the generation of chemical waste. Such integration is one necessary step forward toward the economical and industrial scale production of graphene. Our method bares promise in various applications. As an example, we fabricated flexible solution-gated graphene field-effect-transistors, which exhibited transconductance as high as 200 μS.High-throughput, roll-to-roll growth and transferring of high-quality, large-area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene directly onto a target substrate with a reusable metal catalyst is an enabling technology for flexible optoelectronics. We explore the direct transfer via hot lamination of CVD graphene onto a flexible substrate, followed by electrochemical delamination (bubble transfer) of the graphene. The transfer method investigated here does not require any intermediate transfer layer and allows the copper to be reused, which will reduce the production cost and avoid the generation of chemical waste. Such integration is one necessary step forward toward the economical and industrial scale production of graphene. Our method bares promise in various applications. As an example, we fabricated flexible solution-gated graphene field-effect-transistors, which exhibited transconductance as high as 200 μS. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03892h

  10. Reusable crucible for containing corrosive liquids

    DOEpatents

    Pruneda, J.A.H. de.

    1995-01-24

    A reusable, non-wetting, corrosion-resistant material suitable for containment of corrosive liquids is formed of a tantalum or tantalum alloy substrate that is permeated with carbon atoms. The substrate is carburized to form surface layers of TaC and Ta[sub 2]C, and then is heated at high temperature under vacuum until the carbon atoms in the carbide layers diffuse throughout the substrate to form a solid solution of carbon atoms randomly interspersed in the tantalum or tantalum alloy lattice. 10 figures.

  11. Reusable crucible for containing corrosive liquids

    DOEpatents

    de Pruneda, Jean A. H.

    1995-01-01

    A reusable, non-wetting, corrosion-resistant material suitable for containment of corrosive liquids is formed of a tantalum or tantalum alloy substrate that is permeated with carbon atoms. The substrate is carburized to form surface layers of TaC and Ta.sub.2 C, and then is heated at high temperature under vacuum until the carbon atoms in the carbide layers diffuse throughout the substrate to form a solid solution of carbon atoms randomly interspersed in the tantalum or tantalum alloy lattice.

  12. Military applications of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponable, Jess M.

    1996-03-01

    With the development and operational fielding of fully reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) becoming imminent, coupled with the ``end of the Cold War'' and fractionalization of the former ``bi-polar'' world into a ``multi-polar'' one, the need and potential for military versions of RLVs are being recognized by the military strategic planner. Recognizing the instability of the world order, especially with the potential for terrorism from all quarters, planning for the development of systems capable of defending our critical space based assests is becoming more essential. This paper presents some of the potential military applications of RLVs to support the Nation's defense and security interests world-wide.

  13. Flexible modeling improves assessment of prognostic value of C-reactive protein in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, B; Abrahamowicz, M; Xiao, Y; Beauchamp, M-E; MacDonald, N; Kasymjanova, G; Kreisman, H; Small, D

    2010-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is gaining credibility as a prognostic factor in different cancers. Cox's proportional hazard (PH) model is usually used to assess prognostic factors. However, this model imposes a priori assumptions, which are rarely tested, that (1) the hazard ratio associated with each prognostic factor remains constant across the follow-up (PH assumption) and (2) the relationship between a continuous predictor and the logarithm of the mortality hazard is linear (linearity assumption). Methods: We tested these two assumptions of the Cox's PH model for CRP, using a flexible statistical model, while adjusting for other known prognostic factors, in a cohort of 269 patients newly diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results: In the Cox's PH model, high CRP increased the risk of death (HR=1.11 per each doubling of CRP value, 95% CI: 1.03–1.20, P=0.008). However, both the PH assumption (P=0.033) and the linearity assumption (P=0.015) were rejected for CRP, measured at the initiation of chemotherapy, which kept its prognostic value for approximately 18 months. Conclusion: Our analysis shows that flexible modeling provides new insights regarding the value of CRP as a prognostic factor in NSCLC and that Cox's PH model underestimates early risks associated with high CRP. PMID:20234363

  14. Research on systematization and advancement of shipbuilding production management for flexible and agile response for high value offshore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Joo; Woo, Jong-Hun; Shin, Jong-Gye

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the speed of change related with enterprise management is getting faster than ever owing to the competition among companies, technique diffusion, shortening of product lifecycle, excessive supply of market. For the example, the compliance condition (such as delivery date, product quality, etc.) from the ship owner is getting complicated and the needs for the new product such as FPSO, FSRU are coming to fore. This paradigm shift emphasize the rapid response rather than the competitive price, flexibility and agility rather than effective and optimal perspective for the domestic shipbuilding company. So, domestic shipbuilding companies have to secure agile and flexible ship production environment that could respond change of market and requirements of customers in order to continue a competitive edge in the world market. In this paper, I'm going to define a standard shipbuilding production management system by investigating the environment of domestic major shipbuilding companies. Also, I'm going to propose a unified ship production management and system for the operation of unified management through detail analysis of the activities and the data flow of ship production management. And, the system functions for the strategic approach of ship production management are investigated through the business administration tools such as performance pyramid, VDT and BSC. Lastly, the research of applying strategic KPI to the digital shipyard as virtual execution platform is conducted.

  15. 14 CFR 437.67 - Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket. 437.67 Section 437.67 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... a reusable suborbital rocket. A permittee must— (a) During permitted flight, measure in real...

  16. Methodology for Evaluating Quality and Reusability of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Bireniene, Virginija; Serikoviene, Silvija

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the scientific model and several methods for the expert evaluation of quality of learning objects (LOs) paying especial attention to LOs reusability level. The activities of eQNet Quality Network for a European Learning Resource Exchange (LRE) aimed to improve reusability of LOs of European Schoolnet's LRE…

  17. In-flight load testing of advanced shuttle thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, B. M.; Meyer, R., Jr.; Sawko, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has conducted in-flight airload testing of some advanced thermal protection systems (TPS) at the Dryden Flight Research Center. The two flexible TPS materials tested, felt reusable surface insulation (FRSI) and advanced flexible reusable surface insulation (AFRSI), are currently certified for use on the Shuttle orbiter. The objectives of the flight tests were to evaluate the performance of FRSI and AFRSI at simulated launch airloads and to provide a data base for future advanced TPS flight tests. Five TPS configurations were evaluated in a flow field which was representative of relatively flat areas without secondary flows. The TPS materials were placed on a fin, the Flight Test fixture (FTF), that is attached to the underside of the fuselage of an F-104 aircraft. This paper describes the test approach and techniques used and presents the results of the advanced TPS flight test. There were no failures noted during post-flight inspections of the TPS materials which were exposed to airloads 40 percent higher than the design launch airloads.

  18. Reusable Rocket Engine Turbopump Health Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surko, Pamela

    1994-01-01

    A health monitoring expert system software architecture has been developed to support condition-based health monitoring of rocket engines. Its first application is in the diagnosis decisions relating to the health of the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The post test diagnostic system runs off-line, using as input the data recorded from hundreds of sensors, each running typically at rates of 25, 50, or .1 Hz. The system is invoked after a test has been completed, and produces an analysis and an organized graphical presentation of the data with important effects highlighted. The overall expert system architecture has been developed and documented so that expert modules analyzing other line replaceable units may easily be added. The architecture emphasizes modularity, reusability, and open system interfaces so that it may be used to analyze other engines as well.

  19. Reusable Rocket Engine Operability Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, R. L.; Komar, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology, model, input data, and analysis results of a reusable launch vehicle engine operability study conducted with the goal of supporting design from an operations perspective. Paralleling performance analyses in schedule and method, this requires the use of metrics in a validated operations model useful for design, sensitivity, and trade studies. Operations analysis in this view is one of several design functions. An operations concept was developed given an engine concept and the predicted operations and maintenance processes incorporated into simulation models. Historical operations data at a level of detail suitable to model objectives were collected, analyzed, and formatted for use with the models, the simulations were run, and results collected and presented. The input data used included scheduled and unscheduled timeline and resource information collected into a Space Transportation System (STS) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) historical launch operations database. Results reflect upon the importance not only of reliable hardware but upon operations and corrective maintenance process improvements.

  20. A flexible state-space approach for the modeling of metabolic networks II: advanced interrogation of hybridoma metabolism.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Adam C; Sharfstein, Susan T; Martin, Lealon L

    2011-03-01

    Having previously introduced the mathematical framework of topological metabolic analysis (TMA) - a novel optimization-based technique for modeling metabolic networks of arbitrary size and complexity - we demonstrate how TMA facilitates unique methods of metabolic interrogation. With the aid of several hybridoma metabolic investigations as case-studies (Bonarius et al., 1995, 1996, 2001), we first establish that the TMA framework identifies biologically important aspects of the metabolic network under investigation. We also show that the use of a structured weighting approach within our objective provides a substantial modeling benefit over an unstructured, uniform, weighting approach. We then illustrate the strength of TAM as an advanced interrogation technique, first by using TMA to prove the existence of (and to quantitatively describe) multiple topologically distinct configurations of a metabolic network that each optimally model a given set of experimental observations. We further show that such alternate topologies are indistinguishable using existing stoichiometric modeling techniques, and we explain the biological significance of the topological variables appearing within our model. By leveraging the manner in which TMA implements metabolite inputs and outputs, we also show that metabolites whose possible metabolic fates are inadequately described by a given network reconstruction can be quickly identified. Lastly, we show how the use of the TMA aggregate objective function (AOF) permits the identification of modeling solutions that can simultaneously consider experimental observations, underlying biological motivations, or even purely engineering- or design-based goals.

  1. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control In Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. Overall stability of a two-loop control system is addressed. An optimal control allocation algorithm is designed that allocates torque commands into end-effector deflection commands, which are executed by the actuators. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. Simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. This is a significant advancement in performance over that achieved with linear, gain scheduled control systems currently being used for launch vehicles.

  2. Reusable high-temperature heat pipes and heat pipe panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A reusable, durable heat pipe which is capable of operating at temperatures up to about 3000 F in an oxidizing environment and at temperatures above 3000 F in an inert or vacuum environment is produced by embedding a refractory metal pipe within a carbon-carbon composite structure. A reusable, durable heat pipe panel is made from an array of refractory-metal pipes spaced from each other. The reusable, durable, heat-pipe is employed to fabricate a hypersonic vehicle leading edge and nose cap.

  3. Operational Issues in the Development of a Cost-Effective Reusable LOX/LH2 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) was initiated in early 2001 to conduct technology development and to reduce the business and technical risk associated with developing the next-generation reusable launch system. In the field of main propulsion, two LOXLH2 rocket engine systems, the Pratt & Whitney / Aerojet Joint Venture (JV) COBRA and the Rocketdyne RS-83, were funded to develop a safe, economical, and reusable propulsion system. Given that a large-thrust reusable rocket engine program had not been started in the U.S. since 1971, with the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), this provided an opportunity to build on the experience developed on the SSME system, while exploiting advances in technology that had occurred in the intervening 30 years. One facet of engine development that was identified as being especially vital in order to produce an optimal system was in the areas of operability and maintainability. In order to achieve the high levels of performance required by the Space Shuttle, the SSME system is highly complex with very tight tolerances and detailed requirements. Over the lifetime of the SSME program, the engine has required a high level of manpower to support the performance of inspections, maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) and operations (prelaunch and post-flight). As a consequence, the labor- intensive needs of the SSME provide a significant impact to the overall cost efficiency of the Space Transportation System (STS). One of the strategic goals of the SLI is to reduce cost by requiring the engine(s) to be easier (Le. less expensive) to operate and maintain. The most effective means of accomplishing this goal is to infuse the operability and maintainability features into the engine design from the start. This paper discusses some of the operational issues relevant to a reusable LOx/LH2 main engine, and the means by which their impact is mitigated in the design phase.

  4. 14 CFR 431.79 - Reusable launch vehicle mission reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reusable launch vehicle mission reporting... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Post-Licensing Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.79 Reusable...

  5. 14 CFR 431.79 - Reusable launch vehicle mission reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reusable launch vehicle mission reporting... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Post-Licensing Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.79 Reusable...

  6. 14 CFR 431.79 - Reusable launch vehicle mission reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reusable launch vehicle mission reporting... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Post-Licensing Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.79 Reusable...

  7. 14 CFR 431.79 - Reusable launch vehicle mission reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reusable launch vehicle mission reporting... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Post-Licensing Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.79 Reusable...

  8. Reusable Component Model Development Approach for Parallel and Distributed Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Feng; Yao, Yiping; Chen, Huilong; Yao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Model reuse is a key issue to be resolved in parallel and distributed simulation at present. However, component models built by different domain experts usually have diversiform interfaces, couple tightly, and bind with simulation platforms closely. As a result, they are difficult to be reused across different simulation platforms and applications. To address the problem, this paper first proposed a reusable component model framework. Based on this framework, then our reusable model development approach is elaborated, which contains two phases: (1) domain experts create simulation computational modules observing three principles to achieve their independence; (2) model developer encapsulates these simulation computational modules with six standard service interfaces to improve their reusability. The case study of a radar model indicates that the model developed using our approach has good reusability and it is easy to be used in different simulation platforms and applications. PMID:24729751

  9. Coatings and Surface Treatments for Reusable Entry Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2016-01-01

    This talk outlines work in coatings for TPS done at NASA Ames. coatings and surface treatments on reusable TPS are critical for controlling the behavior of the materials. coatings discussed include RCG, TUFI and HETC. TUFROc is also discussed.

  10. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Configuration trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The overall Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Phase B Study objective is to design a relatively inexpensive satellite to access space for extended periods of time, with eventual recovery of experiments on Earth. The expected principal use for such a system is research on the effects of variable gravity (0-1.5 g) and radiation on small animals, plants, lower life forms, tissue samples, and materials processes. The RRS will be capable of: (1) being launched by a variety of expendable launch vehicles; (2) operating in low earth orbit as a free flying unmanned laboratory; and (3) executing independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing. The RRS will be designed to be refurbished and reused up to three times a year for a period of 10 years. The information provided in this report describes the process involved in the evolution of the RRS overall configuration. This process considered reentry aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, internal equipment layout, and vehicle mass properties. This report delineates the baseline design decisions that were used to initiate the RRS design effort. As a result, there will be deviations between this report and the RRS Final Report. In those instances, the RRS Final Report shall be considered to be the definitive reference.

  11. A reusable knowledge acquisition shell: KASH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Christopher; Williams, Stephen; Keech, Virginia

    1991-01-01

    KASH (Knowledge Acquisition SHell) is proposed to assist a knowledge engineer by providing a set of utilities for constructing knowledge acquisition sessions based on interviewing techniques. The information elicited from domain experts during the sessions is guided by a question dependency graph (QDG). The QDG defined by the knowledge engineer, consists of a series of control questions about the domain that are used to organize the knowledge of an expert. The content information supplies by the expert, in response to the questions, is represented in the form of a concept map. These maps can be constructed in a top-down or bottom-up manner by the QDG and used by KASH to generate the rules for a large class of expert system domains. Additionally, the concept maps can support the representation of temporal knowledge. The high degree of reusability encountered in the QDG and concept maps can vastly reduce the development times and costs associated with producing intelligent decision aids, training programs, and process control functions.

  12. Improvement of Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blome, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The mullite fiber based hardened compacted fibers (HCF) type of reusable surface insulation was further developed for use in the Space Shuttle Program. Two hundred fifty formulations of fiber mixtures, fillers, binders, and organic processing aids were made using mullite fibers as the basic ingredient. Most of the work was accomplished on 15-lb/cu ft material. It was established that higher density materials are stronger with strength values as high as 250 lb/sq in. in tension. New measurement techniques and equipment were developed for accurate determination of strength and strain to failure. Room temperature to 2300 F stress-strain relationships were made. The room temperature tensile modulus of elasticity is 61,700 lb/sq in. and the strain at failure is 0.165 percent, typically, when measured longitudinally parallel to the long axes of the fibers. Thermal insulating effectiveness was increased 20 percent by reducing the diameter of some of the fibers in the material. Improvements were made in density uniformity and strength uniformity in a block of HCF by mixing improvements and by the use of organic additives. Specifications were established on the materials and processes used in making the insulation.

  13. Lightweight Reusable Solar Array For Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, K.; Tensor, P.; Nock, K.; Wyszkowski, C.

    We will discuss a new lightweight reusable solar array system, dubbed HighPower, which is being developed for the Ultra-Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) program using NASA/SBIR funding, but which is also applicable to other balloon systems. The system uses a vertically deployed stack of panels suspended from their corners by cables. The stack act likes a two-dimensional Venetian blind. By raising and lowering opposite corners, the array of parallel panels can be pointed over most of the upper hemisphere. This allows the panels to remain normal to the sun despite the slow rotation of the gondola and without requiring rotation of the system (no slip rings) or heavy cantilevered rotation joints. The system is sized to generate 2000 W using six 2m x 2m panels. The modularity of the system allows panels to be added or removed to tailored the power to the needs of the mission. Prior to cut -down of the balloon, the panels can be retracted and stowed compactly in the lower part of the gondola. This will protect the array during landing, allowing the array to be reused on subsequent flights.

  14. Prospects for advanced rocket-powered launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, C. H.; Talay, T. A.

    1986-10-01

    The potential for advanced rocket-powered launch vehicles to meet the challenging cost, operational, and performance demands of space transportation in the early 21st century is examined. Space transportation requirements from recent studies underscoring the need for growth in capacity in support of an increasing diversity of space activities and the need for significant reductions in operational and life-cycle costs are reviewed. Fully reusable rocket powered concepts based on moderate levels of evolutionary advanced technology are described. These vehicles provide a broad range of attractive concept alternatives with the potential to meet demanding operational and cost goals and the flexibility to satisfy a variety of vehicle architecture, mission, vehicle concept, and technology options.

  15. Prospects for advanced rocket-powered launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Charles H.; Talay, Theodore A.

    The potential for advanced rocket-powered launch vehicles to meet the challenging cost, operational, and performance demands of space transportation in the early 21st century is examined. Space transportation requirements from recent studies underscoring the need for growth in capacity in support of an increasing diversity of space activities and the need for significant reductions in operational and life-cycle costs are reviewed. Fully reusable rocket powered concepts based on moderate levels of evolutionary advanced technology are described. These vehicles provide a broad range of attractive concept alternatives with the potential to meet demanding operational and cost goals and the flexibility to satisfy a variety of vehicle architecture, mission, vehicle concept, and technology options.

  16. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is intended to provide investigators in several biological disciplines with a relatively inexpensive method to access space for up to 60 days with eventual recovery on Earth. The RRS will permit totally intact, relatively soft, recovery of the vehicle, system refurbishment, and reflight with new and varied payloads. The RRS is to be capable of three reflights per year over a 10-year program lifetime. The RRS vehicle will have a large and readily accessible volume near the vehicle center of gravity for the Payload Module (PM) containing the experiment hardware. The vehicle is configured to permit the experimenter late access to the PM prior to launch and rapid access following recovery. The RRS will operate in one of two modes: (1) as a free-flying spacecraft in orbit, and will be allowed to drift in attitude to provide an acceleration environment of less than 10(exp -5) g. the acceleration environment during orbital trim maneuvers will be less than 10(exp -3) g; and (2) as an artificial gravity system which spins at controlled rates to provide an artificial gravity of up to 1.5 Earth g. The RRS system will be designed to be rugged, easily maintained, and economically refurbishable for the next flight. Some systems may be designed to be replaced rather than refurbished, if cost effective and capable of meeting the specified turnaround time. The minimum time between recovery and reflight will be approximately 60 days. The PMs will be designed to be relatively autonomous, with experiments that require few commands and limited telemetry. Mass data storage will be accommodated in the PM. The hardware development and implementation phase is currently expected to start in 1991 with a first launch in late 1993.

  17. Flexible electronics: Sophisticated skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Siegfried

    2013-10-01

    Advances in materials science and layout design have enabled the realization of flexible and multifunctional electronic devices. Two demonstrations of electronic skins, which combine temperature and pressure sensing with integrated thermal actuators and organic displays, unveil the potential of these devices for robotics and clinical applications.

  18. Future Launch Vehicle Structures - Expendable and Reusable Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obersteiner, M. H.; Borriello, G.

    2002-01-01

    Further evolution of existing expendable launch vehicles will be an obvious element influencing the future of space transportation. Besides this reusability might be the change with highest potential for essential improvement. The expected cost reduction and finally contributing to this, the improvement of reliability including safe mission abort capability are driving this idea. Although there are ideas of semi-reusable launch vehicles, typically two stages vehicles - reusable first stage or booster(s) and expendable second or upper stage - it should be kept in mind that the benefit of reusability will only overwhelm if there is a big enough share influencing the cost calculation. Today there is the understanding that additional technology preparation and verification will be necessary to master reusability and get enough benefits compared with existing launch vehicles. This understanding is based on several technology and system concepts preparation and verification programmes mainly done in the US but partially also in Europe and Japan. The major areas of necessary further activities are: - System concepts including business plan considerations - Sub-system or component technologies refinement - System design and operation know-how and capabilities - Verification and demonstration oriented towards future mission mastering: One of the most important aspects for the creation of those coming programmes and activities will be the iterative process of requirements definition derived from concepts analyses including economical considerations and the results achieved and verified within technology and verification programmes. It is the intention of this paper to provide major trends for those requirements focused on future launch vehicles structures. This will include the aspects of requirements only valid for reusable launch vehicles and those common for expendable, semi-reusable and reusable launch vehicles. Structures and materials is and will be one of the

  19. Flexible Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harold S.; Bechard, Joseph E.

    A flexible schedule allows teachers to change group size, group composition, and class length according to the purpose of the lesson. This pamphlet presents various "master" schedules for flexible scheduling: (1) Simple block schedules, (2) back-to-back schedules, (3) interdisciplinary schedules, (4) school-wide block schedules, (5) open-lab…

  20. Flexibility Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    These brief guidelines for a muscular flexibility program state that the purpose of such a program is to increase the range of motion in order to avoid injuries and eliminate awkwardness in physical activities. A flexibility program is described as an extension of the warm-up period and should be an ongoing, permanent effort to lengthen muscles. A…

  1. Reusable, Extensible High-Level Data-Distribution Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark; Zima, Hans; Diaconescua, Roxana

    2007-01-01

    A framework for high-level specification of data distributions in data-parallel application programs has been conceived. [As used here, distributions signifies means to express locality (more specifically, locations of specified pieces of data) in a computing system composed of many processor and memory components connected by a network.] Inasmuch as distributions exert a great effect on the performances of application programs, it is important that a distribution strategy be flexible, so that distributions can be adapted to the requirements of those programs. At the same time, for the sake of productivity in programming and execution, it is desirable that users be shielded from such error-prone, tedious details as those of communication and synchronization. As desired, the present framework enables a user to refine a distribution type and adjust it to optimize the performance of an application program and conceals, from the user, the low-level details of communication and synchronization. The framework provides for a reusable, extensible, data-distribution design, denoted the design pattern, that is independent of a concrete implementation. The design pattern abstracts over coding patterns that have been found to be commonly encountered in both manually and automatically generated distributed parallel programs. The following description of the present framework is necessarily oversimplified to fit within the space available for this article. Distributions are among the elements of a conceptual data-distribution machinery, some of the other elements being denoted domains, index sets, and data collections (see figure). Associated with each domain is one index set and one distribution. A distribution class interface (where "class" is used in the object-oriented-programming sense) includes operations that enable specification of the mapping of an index to a unit of locality. Thus, "Map(Index)" specifies a unit, while "LocalLayout(Index)" specifies the local address

  2. The Road from the NASA Access to Space Study to a Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard W.; Cook, Stephen A.; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    1998-01-01

    NASA is cooperating with the aerospace industry to develop a space transportation system that provides reliable access-to-space at a much lower cost than is possible with today's launch vehicles. While this quest has been on-going for many years it received a major impetus when the U.S. Congress mandated as part of the 1993 NASA appropriations bill that: "In view of budget difficulties, present and future..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall ... recommend improvements in space transportation." NASA, working with other organizations, including the Department of Transportation, and the Department of Defense identified three major transportation architecture options that were to be evaluated in the areas of reliability, operability and cost. These architectural options were: (1) retain and upgrade the Space Shuttle and the current expendable launch vehicles; (2) develop new expendable launch vehicles using conventional technologies and transition to these new vehicles beginning in 2005; and (3) develop new reusable vehicles using advanced technology, and transition to these vehicles beginning in 2008. The launch needs mission model was based on 1993 projections of civil, defense, and commercial payload requirements. This "Access to Space" study concluded that the option that provided the greatest potential for meeting the cost, operability, and reliability goals was a rocket-powered single-stage-to-orbit fully reusable launch vehicle (RLV) fleet designed with advanced technologies.

  3. Single stage and thrust augmented reusable launch vehicle stability and performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanck, Pamela A.; Steadman, Kimberly B.

    1998-01-01

    The requirement for routine, reliable, inexpensive launch service drives the interest in the development of a fully reusable launch vehicle (RLV). In theory, single-stage vehicle operations would resemble aircraft operations where high initial development costs are offset by relatively low recurring costs. However, the large size of a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle and the advanced engine and structural technology requirements could overshadow advantages gained through streamlined operations. This analysis explores the feasibility of using thrust augmentation on a fully reusable core vehicle in order to lessen the disadvantages of a fully single-stage vehicle. Advanced technology systems and two 86,000 kg solid strapon motors are incorporated into a vehicle designed to deliver an Atlas-class payload. This study shows that thrust augmentation significantly decreases vehicle size, decreases development risk and improves longitudinal stability characteristics. The thrust augmentation reduces vehicle insertion mass by 40% and reduces the vehicle's sensitivity to the increases in dry mass growth often experienced during development, thus reducing development risk. Thrust augmentation also moves the center of gravity location forward, thus improving longitudinal stability characteristics and maximizing the vehicle's reentry cross range capability.

  4. Reusable nanostencils for creating multiple biofunctional molecular nanopatterns on polymer substrate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Galarreta, Betty C; Artar, Alp; Adato, Ronen; Aksu, Serap; Altug, Hatice

    2012-09-12

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel method for high throughput patterning of bioprobes with nanoscale features on biocompatible polymer substrate. Our technique, based on nanostencil lithography, employs high resolution and robust masks integrated with array of reservoirs. We show that the smallest pattern size can reach down to 100 nm. We also show that different types of biomolecules can be patterned on the same substrate simultaneously. Furthermore, the stencil can be reused multiple times to generate a series of identical patterns at low cost. Finally, we demonstrate that biomolecules can be covalently patterned on the surface while retaining their biofunctionalities. By offering the flexibility on the nanopattern design and enabling the reusability of the stencil, our approach significantly simplifies the bionanopatterning process and therefore could have profound implications in diverse biological and medical applications. PMID:22839211

  5. Template-guided interstitial implants: Cs-137 reusable sources as a substitute for Ir-192

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J.F.; Seminoff, T.

    1987-10-01

    Template-guided implantation of rigid steel or plastic guide needles for afterloading of radioactive sources is widely used in the treatment of gynecologic, rectal, and urologic malignant neoplasms. Iridium-192 is used almost universally, despite the high cost per implant, due to its short half-life and limited need for a flexible, trimmable source. A reusable afterloading system containing cesium-137 was developed. Each source has an effective active length of 6.8 cm and is encapsulated at the distal end of a 21-cm-long stainless steel tube. The sources can be afterloaded into the same plastic guide needles normally used for Ir-192 ribbons. Physical and dosimetric aspects of these sources are compared with those of Ir-192, and radiation protection and cost effectiveness are also discussed.

  6. 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Potential Commercial Development Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Stephen D.; Rogacki, John R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The presentation will discuss potential commercial development scenarios for a Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle. The analysis of potential scenarios will include commercial rates of return, government return on investment, and market considerations. The presentation will include policy considerations in addition to analysis of Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle economics. The data discussed is being developed as a part of NASA's Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program, for consideration as potential scenarios for enabling a next generation system. Material will include potential scenarios not previously considered by NASA or presented at other conferences. Candidate paper has not been presented at a previous meeting, and conference attendance of the author has been approved by NASA.

  7. Benefits of Government Incentives for Reusable Launch Vehicle Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.; Hamaker, Joseph W.; Prince, Frank A.

    1998-01-01

    Many exciting new opportunities in space, both government missions and business ventures, could be realized by a reduction in launch prices. Reusable launch vehicle (RLV) designs have the potential to lower launch costs dramatically from those of today's expendable and partially-expendable vehicles. Unfortunately, governments must budget to support existing launch capability, and so lack the resources necessary to completely fund development of new reusable systems. In addition, the new commercial space markets are too immature and uncertain to motivate the launch industry to undertake a project of this magnitude and risk. Low-cost launch vehicles will not be developed without a mature market to service; however, launch prices must be reduced in order for a commercial launch market to mature. This paper estimates and discusses the various benefits that may be reaped from government incentives for a commercial reusable launch vehicle program.

  8. New Approaches in Reusable Booster System Life Cycle Cost Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a 2012 life cycle cost (LCC) study of hybrid Reusable Booster Systems (RBS) conducted by NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The work included the creation of a new cost estimating model and an LCC analysis, building on past work where applicable, but emphasizing the integration of new approaches in life cycle cost estimation. Specifically, the inclusion of industry processes/practices and indirect costs were a new and significant part of the analysis. The focus of LCC estimation has traditionally been from the perspective of technology, design characteristics, and related factors such as reliability. Technology has informed the cost related support to decision makers interested in risk and budget insight. This traditional emphasis on technology occurs even though it is well established that complex aerospace systems costs are mostly about indirect costs, with likely only partial influence in these indirect costs being due to the more visible technology products. Organizational considerations, processes/practices, and indirect costs are traditionally derived ("wrapped") only by relationship to tangible product characteristics. This traditional approach works well as long as it is understood that no significant changes, and by relation no significant improvements, are being pursued in the area of either the government acquisition or industry?s indirect costs. In this sense then, most launch systems cost models ignore most costs. The alternative was implemented in this LCC study, whereby the approach considered technology and process/practices in balance, with as much detail for one as the other. This RBS LCC study has avoided point-designs, for now, instead emphasizing exploring the trade-space of potential technology advances joined with potential process/practice advances. Given the range of decisions, and all their combinations, it was necessary to create a model of the original model

  9. Legislative and regulatory issues related to reusable launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinemann, Manfred K. A.

    1996-03-01

    The development of reusable launch systems with private investment funds for primarily commercial launch services raises a number of novel legal and regulatory issues. The issues discussed include requirements for a whole new spectrum of safety and environmental issues; new certification rules, procedures and oversight organizations; liability and jurisdiction definitions, taxation treatments; government commitments and/or participation in commercial enterprises; and international legal and business issues. The satisfactory solution to all of these issues is a necessary condition for the development and operation of reusable launch vehicles to be a viable commercial enterprise.

  10. Reusable Hot-Wire Cable Cutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauken, Michael T.; Steinkraus, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    During the early development stage of balloon deployment systems for missions, nichrome wire cable cutters were often used in place of pyro-actuated cutters. Typically, a nichrome wire is wrapped around a bundle of polymer cables with a low melting point and connected to a relay-actuated electric circuit. The heat from the nichrome reduces the strength of the cable bundle, which quickly breaks under a mechanical load and can thus be used as a release mechanism for a deployment system. However, the use of hand-made heated nichrome wire for cutters is not very reliable. Often, the wrapped nichrome wire does not cut through the cable because it either pulls away from its power source or does not stay in contact with the cable being cut. Because nichrome is not readily soldered to copper wire, unreliable mechanical crimps are often made to connect the nichrome to an electric circuit. A self-contained device that is reusable and reliable was developed to sever cables for device release or deployment. The nichrome wire in this new device is housed within an enclosure to prevent it from being damaged by handling. The electric power leads are internally connected within the unit to the nichrome wire using a screw terminal connection. A bayonet plug, a quick and secure method of connecting the cutter to the power source, is used to connect the cutter to the power leads similar to those used in pyro-cutter devices. A small ceramic tube [0.25-in. wide 0.5-in. long (.6.4-mm wide 13-mm long)] houses a spiraled nichrome wire that is heated when a cable release action is required. The wire is formed into a spiral coil by wrapping it around a mandrel. It is then laid inside the ceramic tube so that it fits closely to the inner surface of the tube. The ceramic tube provides some thermal and electrical insulation so that most of the heat generated by the wire is directed toward the cable bundle in the center of the spiral. The ceramic tube is cemented into an aluminum block, which

  11. Interconnecting Carbon Fibers with the In-situ Electrochemically Exfoliated Graphene as Advanced Binder-free Electrode Materials for Flexible Supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Shuangyin

    2015-01-01

    Flexible energy storage devices are highly demanded for various applications. Carbon cloth (CC) woven by carbon fibers (CFs) is typically used as electrode or current collector for flexible devices. The low surface area of CC and the presence of big gaps (ca. micro-size) between individual CFs lead to poor performance. Herein, we interconnect individual CFs through the in-situ exfoliated graphene with high surface area by the electrochemical intercalation method. The interconnected CFs are used as both current collector and electrode materials for flexible supercapacitors, in which the in-situ exfoliated graphene act as active materials and conductive “binders”. The in-situ electrochemical intercalation technique ensures the low contact resistance between electrode (graphene) and current collector (carbon cloth) with enhanced conductivity. The as-prepared electrode materials show significantly improved performance for flexible supercapacitors. PMID:26149290

  12. Interconnecting Carbon Fibers with the In-situ Electrochemically Exfoliated Graphene as Advanced Binder-free Electrode Materials for Flexible Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Shuangyin

    2015-07-07

    Flexible energy storage devices are highly demanded for various applications. Carbon cloth (CC) woven by carbon fibers (CFs) is typically used as electrode or current collector for flexible devices. The low surface area of CC and the presence of big gaps (ca. micro-size) between individual CFs lead to poor performance. Herein, we interconnect individual CFs through the in-situ exfoliated graphene with high surface area by the electrochemical intercalation method. The interconnected CFs are used as both current collector and electrode materials for flexible supercapacitors, in which the in-situ exfoliated graphene act as active materials and conductive "binders". The in-situ electrochemical intercalation technique ensures the low contact resistance between electrode (graphene) and current collector (carbon cloth) with enhanced conductivity. The as-prepared electrode materials show significantly improved performance for flexible supercapacitors.

  13. X-33 Demonstrates Reusable Launch Vehicle Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced technologies that will revolutionize America's space launch capabilities and unleash the commercial potential of space. The challenge is to develop advanced technologies for affordable reusble launch vehicles. NASA's goal is to reduce the payload cost of access to space by an order of magnitude, from $10,000 to $1,000 per pound, within 10 years, and by an additional order of magnitude, to $100's per pound within 25 years. This research is part of NASA's Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (ASTT) Enterprise's strategy to sustain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space. The Enterprise has set bold goals that are grouped into Three Pillars: Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps and Access to Space.

  14. 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle NASA Led Propulsion Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Design, development and test of a 2nd generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) is presented. This current paper discusses the following: 2nd Generation RLV Propulsion Project, Overview of NASA Led Tasks in Propulsion, Gen2 Turbo Machinery Technology Demonstrator, and Combustion Devices Test Bed, GRCop-84 Sheet For Combustion Chambers, Nozzles and Large Actively Cooled Structures

  15. Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Mission/Market Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Frank A.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this model was to assess the Reusable Launch Vehicle's (RLV) capability to support the International Space Station (ISS) servicing, determine the potential to leverage the commercial marketplace to reduce NASA's cost, and to evaluate the RLV's ability to expand the space economy. The presentation is in view-graph format.

  16. Mobile Authoring of Open Educational Resources as Reusable Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinshuk; Jesse, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    E-learning technologies have allowed authoring and playback of standardized reusable learning objects (RLO) for several years. Effective mobile learning requires similar functionality at both design time and runtime. Mobile devices can play RLO using applications like SMILE, mobile access to a learning management system (LMS), or other systems…

  17. A Re-Usable Algorithm for Teaching Procedural Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Mark K.; And Others

    The design of a re-usable instructional algorithm for computer based instruction (CBI) is described. The prototype is implemented on IBM PC compatibles running the Windows(TM) graphical environment, using the prototyping tool ToolBook(TM). The algorithm is designed to reduce development and life cycle costs for CBI by providing an authoring…

  18. 76 FR 24495 - Reprocessing of Reusable Medical Devices; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Conference Center, Bldg. 31, Rm. 1503, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993. Contact Person: Carol Krueger, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, Rm. 5437, Silver Spring... in the retention of blood, tissue, and other biological debris (soil) in reusable medical...

  19. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Thermal control trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Clark

    1990-01-01

    The design and assessment work performed in defining the on-orbit Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) requirements for the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is discussed. Specifically, it describes the hardware and design measures necessary for maintaining the Payload Module (PM) Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS) heat exchanger, the hydrazine propellant, and PM water supply within their required temperature limits.

  20. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on May 12 and 13, 1987, at the NASA Lewis research Center. Aerothermodynamic loads; instrumentation; fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and structural dynamics were discussed.

  1. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  2. 14 CFR 431.3 - Types of reusable launch vehicle mission licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Types of reusable launch vehicle mission licenses. 431.3 Section 431.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.3 Types of reusable...

  3. 14 CFR 431.3 - Types of reusable launch vehicle mission licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Types of reusable launch vehicle mission licenses. 431.3 Section 431.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.3 Types of reusable...

  4. 14 CFR 431.3 - Types of reusable launch vehicle mission licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Types of reusable launch vehicle mission licenses. 431.3 Section 431.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.3 Types of reusable...

  5. 14 CFR 431.3 - Types of reusable launch vehicle mission licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Types of reusable launch vehicle mission licenses. 431.3 Section 431.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.3 Types of reusable...

  6. Reusability Studies for Ares I and Ares V Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Thomas J.; Priskos, Alex S.; Schorr, Andrew A.; Barrett, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    With a mission to continue to support the goals of the International Space Station (ISS) and explore beyond Earth orbit, the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is in the process of launching an entirely new space exploration initiative, the Constellation Program. Even as the Space Shuttle moves toward its final voyage, Constellation is building from nearly half a century of NASA spaceflight experience, and technological advances, including the legacy of Shuttle and earlier programs such as Apollo and the Saturn V rocket. Out of Constellation will come two new launch vehicles: the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. With the initial goal to seamlessly continue where the Space Shuttle leaves off, Ares will firstly service the Space Station. Ultimately, however, the intent is to push further: to establish an outpost on the Moon, and then to explore other destinations. With significant experience and a strong foundation in aerospace, NASA is now progressing toward the final design of the First Stage propulsion system for the Ares I. The new launch vehicle design will considerably increase safety and reliability, reduce the cost of accessing space, and provide a viable growth path for human space exploration. To achieve these goals, NASA is taking advantage of Space Shuttle hardware, safety, reliability, and experience. With efforts to minimize technical risk and life-cycle costs, the First Stage office is again pulling from NASA's strong legacy in aerospace exploration and development, most specifically the Space Shuttle Program. Trade studies have been conducted to evaluate lifecycle costs, expendability, and risk reduction. While many first stage features have already been determined, these trade studies are helping to resolve the operational requisites and configuration of the first stage element. This paper first presents an overview of the Ares missions and the genesis of the Ares vehicle design. It then

  7. Reusability Studies for Ares I and Ares V Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Thomas J.; Priskos, Alex S.; Schorr, Andrew A.; Barrett, Greg

    2008-01-01

    With a mission to continue to support the goals of the International Space Station (ISS) and explore beyond Earth orbit, the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is in the process of launching an entirely new space exploration initiative, the Constellation Program. Even as the Space Shuttle moves toward its final voyage, Constellation is building from nearly half a century of NASA spaceflight experience, and technological advances, including the legacy of Shuttle and earlier programs such as Apollo and the Saturn V rocket. Out of Constellation will come two new launch vehicles: the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. With the initial goal to seamlessly continue where the Space Shuttle leaves off, Ares will firstly service the Space Station. Ultimately, however, the intent is to push further: to establish an outpost on the Moon, and then to explore other destinations. With significant experience and a strong foundation in aerospace, NASA is now progressing toward the final design of the First Stage propulsion system for the Ares I. The new launch vehicle design will considerably increase safety and reliability, reduce the cost of accessing space, and provide a viable growth path for human space exploration. To achieve these goals, NASA is taking advantage of Space Shuttle hardware, safety, reliability, and experience. With efforts to minimize technical risk and life-cycle costs, the First Stage office is again pulling from NASA s strong legacy in aerospace exploration and development, most specifically the Space Shuttle Program. Trade studies have been conducted to evaluate life-cycle costs, expendability, and risk reduction. While many first stage features have already been determined, these trade studies are helping to resolve the operational requisites and configuration of the first stage element. This paper first presents an overview of the Ares missions and the genesis of the Ares vehicle design. It then

  8. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishment, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. R.; Phelps, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) represents the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) ever flown and the only human-rated solid motor. High reliability of the RSRM has been the result of challenges addressed and lessons learned. Advancements have resulted by applying attention to process control, testing, and postflight through timely and thorough communication in dealing with all issues. A structured and disciplined approach was taken to identify and disposition all concerns. Careful consideration and application of alternate opinions was embraced. Focus was placed on process control, ground test programs, and postflight assessment. Process control is mandatory for an SRM, because an acceptance test of the delivered product is not feasible. The RSRM maintained both full-scale and subscale test articles, which enabled continuous improvement of design and evaluation of process control and material behavior. Additionally RSRM reliability was achieved through attention to detail in post flight assessment to observe any shift in performance. The postflight analysis and inspections provided invaluable reliability data as it enables observation of actual flight performance, most of which would not be available if the motors were not recovered. RSRM reusability offered unique opportunities to learn about the hardware. NASA is moving forward with the Space Launch System that incorporates propulsion systems that takes advantage of the heritage Shuttle and Ares solid motor programs. These unique challenges, features of the RSRM, materials and manufacturing issues, and design improvements will be discussed in the paper.

  9. Advances in dynamics and control of flexible spacecraft and space-based manipulations; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX, Nov. 25-30, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Alberts, Thomas E.; Kakad, Yogendra P.

    Consideration is given to control formulations for vibration suppression of an active structure in slewing motions, the use if distributed sensing in control of large flexible spacecraft, an improved shooting method for solving minimum-time maneuver problems, and nonlinear slew maneuver dynamics of large flexible spacecrafts. Attention is also given to initial experiments in trusterless locomotion control of a free-flying robot, dynamic analysis to evaluate viscoelastic passive damping augmentation for the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, initial experiments in cooperative manipulation from a moving platform, and intelligent pipelined control architecture for remote robotic applications.

  10. Reusable rocket engine turbopump condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, M. E.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1985-01-01

    Significant improvements in engine readiness with attendant reductions in maintenance costs and turnaround times can be achieved with an engine condition monitoring system (CMS). The CMS provides real time health status of critical engine components, without disassembly, through component monitoring with advanced sensor technologies. Three technologies were selected to monitor the rotor bearings and turbine blades: the isotope wear detector and fiber optic deflectometer (bearings), and the fiber optic pyrometer (blades). Signal processing algorithms were evaluated and ranked for their utility in providing useful component health data to unskilled maintenance personnel. Design modifications to current configuration Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure turbopumps and the MK48-F turbopump were developed to incorporate the sensors.

  11. Natural Atmospheric Environment Model Development for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Leahy, Frank; Overbey, Glenn; Batts, Glen W.; Parker, Nelson (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently began development of a new reusable launch vehicle. The program office is located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and is called the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2GRLV). The purpose of the program is to improve upon the safety and reliability of the first generation reusable launch vehicle, the Space Shuttle. Specifically, the goals are to reduce the risk of crew loss to less than 1-in-10,000 missions and decreased costs by a factor of 10 to approximately $1,000 per pound of payload launched to low Earth orbit. The program is currently in the very early stages of development and many two-stage vehicle concepts will be evaluated. Risk reduction activities are also taking place. These activities include developing new technologies and advancing current technologies to be used by the vehicle. The Environments Group at MSFC is tasked by the 2GRLV Program to develop and maintain an extensive series of analytical tools and environmental databases which enable it to provide detailed atmospheric studies in support of structural, guidance, navigation and control, and operation of the 2GRLV.

  12. Reusable Rack Interface Controller Common Software for Various Science Research Racks on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, George C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the EXPRESS (Expedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station) rack project is to provide a set of predefined interfaces for scientific payloads which allow rapid integration into a payload rack on International Space Station (ISS). VxWorks' was selected as the operating system for the rack and payload resource controller, primarily based on the proliferation of VME (Versa Module Eurocard) products. These products provide needed flexibility for future hardware upgrades to meet everchanging science research rack configuration requirements. On the International Space Station, there are multiple science research rack configurations, including: 1) Human Research Facility (HRF); 2) EXPRESS ARIS (Active Rack Isolation System); 3) WORF (Window Observational Research Facility); and 4) HHR (Habitat Holding Rack). The RIC (Rack Interface Controller) connects payloads to the ISS bus architecture for data transfer between the payload and ground control. The RIC is a general purpose embedded computer which supports multiple communication protocols, including fiber optic communication buses, Ethernet buses, EIA-422, Mil-Std-1553 buses, SMPTE (Society Motion Picture Television Engineers)-170M video, and audio interfaces to payloads and the ISS. As a cost saving and software reliability strategy, the Boeing Payload Software Organization developed reusable common software where appropriate. These reusable modules included a set of low-level driver software interfaces to 1553B. RS232, RS422, Ethernet buses, HRDL (High Rate Data Link), video switch functionality, telemetry processing, and executive software hosted on the FUC computer. These drivers formed the basis for software development of the HRF, EXPRESS, EXPRESS ARIS, WORF, and HHR RIC executable modules. The reusable RIC common software has provided extensive benefits, including: 1) Significant reduction in development flow time; 2) Minimal rework and maintenance; 3) Improved reliability; and 4) Overall

  13. Structures and materials technology issues for reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S. C.; Tenney, D. R.; Rummler, D. R.; Wieting, A. R.; Bader, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Projected space missions for both civil and defense needs require significant improvements in structures and materials technology for reusable launch vehicles: reductions in structural weight compared to the Space Shuttle Orbiter of up to 25% or more, a possible factor of 5 or more increase in mission life, increases in maximum use temperature of the external surface, reusable containment of cryogenic hydrogen and oxygen, significant reductions in operational costs, and possibly less lead time between technology readiness and initial operational capability. In addition, there is increasing interest in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion for launch and transmospheric vehicles, and such systems require regeneratively cooled structure. The technology issues are addressed, giving brief assessments of the state-of-the-art and proposed activities to meet the technology requirements in a timely manner.

  14. Towards automated support for extraction of reusable components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abd-El-hafiz, S. K.; Basili, Victor R.; Caldiera, Gianluigi

    1992-01-01

    A cost effective introduction of software reuse techniques requires the reuse of existing software developed in many cases without aiming at reusability. This paper discusses the problems related to the analysis and reengineering of existing software in order to reuse it. We introduce a process model for component extraction and focus on the problem of analyzing and qualifying software components which are candidates for reuse. A prototype tool for supporting the extraction of reusable components is presented. One of the components of this tool aids in understanding programs and is based on the functional model of correctness. It can assist software engineers in the process of finding correct formal specifications for programs. A detailed description of this component and an example to demonstrate a possible operational scenario are given.

  15. Towards automated support for extraction of reusable components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abd-El-hafiz, S. K.; Basili, V. R.; Caldier, G.

    1991-01-01

    A cost effective introduction of software reuse techniques requires the reuse of existing software developed in many cases without aiming at reusability. This paper discusses the problems related to the analysis and reengineering of existing software in order to reuse it. We introduce a process model for component extraction and focus on the problem of analyzing and qualifying software components which are candidates for reuse. A prototype tool for supporting the extraction of reusable components is presented. One of the components of this tool aids in understanding programs and is based on the functional model of correctness. It can assist software engineers in the process of finding correct formal specifications for programs. A detailed description of this component and an example to demonstrate a possible operational scenario are given.

  16. Reusable solid rocket motor case - Optimum probabilistic fracture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1979-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed in this paper. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis can be used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects on failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions can also be considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure that has been discussed in this paper can easily be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different fracture control plans.

  17. Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Overlay Coatings for GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liners for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Barrett, C.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B.; Robinson,; Thorn, G.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center, and designated as GRCop-84, is currently being considered for use as combustor chamber liners and nozzle ramps in NASA s future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). However, past experience has shown that unprotected copper alloys undergo an environmental attack called "blanching" in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Potential for sulfidation attack of the liners in hydrocarbon-fueled engines is also of concern. Protective overlay coatings alloys are being developed for GRCop-84. The development of this coatings technology has involved a combination of modeling, coatings development and characterization, and process optimization. Coatings have been low pressure plasma sprayed on GRCop-84 substrates of various geometries and shapes. Microstructural, mechanical property data and thermophysical results on the coated substrates are presented and discussed.

  18. A reusable, low-profile, cryogenic wire seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Koutroulakis, G.; Kalechofsky, N.; Mitrović, V. F.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design of a reusable indium wire seal which has a small profile and is leak tight to better than 1×10-10 std. cc/s from room temperature down to ≈ 50mK. The pressure necessary to deform the indium wire o-ring is provided by a screw-cap mating to threads on the outside of the cylindrical volume to be sealed.

  19. Analyses of Noise from Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Kent L.; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Jerome, Trevor W.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Hobbs, Christopher M.; James, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Space Launch Vehicle (SLS) program has chosen the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor V (RSRMV) as the booster system for initial flights. Lift off acoustics continue to be a consideration in overall vehicle vibroacoustic evaluations and launch pad modifications. Work started with the Ares program to understand solid rocket noise mechanisms is continuing through SLS program in conjunction with BYU/Blue Ridge Research Consulting.

  20. Self-unloading, unmanned, reusable lunar lander project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, Kevin; Lewis, Ron; Mislinski, Philip; Rivers, Donna; Smith, Solar; Vasicek, Clifford; Verona, Matt

    1991-01-01

    A payload delivery system will be required to support the buildup and operation of a manned lunar base. In response, a self-unloading, unmanned, reusable lunar lander was conceptually designed. The lander will deliver a 7000 kg payload, with the same dimensions as a space station logistics module, from low lunar orbit to any location on the surface of the moon. The technical aspects of the design is introduced as well as the management structure and project cost.

  1. X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle Demonstrator, Spaceport and Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Gary F.

    2011-01-01

    The X-33 was a suborbital reusable spaceplane demonstrator, in development from 1996 to early 2001. The intent of the demonstrator was to lower the risk of building and operating a full-scale reusable vehicle fleet. Reusable spaceplanes offered the potential to lower the cost of access to space by an order of magnitude, compared with conventional expendable launch vehicles. Although a cryogenic tank failure during testing ultimately led to the end of the effort, the X-33 team celebrated many successes during the development. This paper summarizes some of the accomplishments and milestones of this X-vehicle program, from the perspective of an engineer who was a member of the team throughout the development. X-33 Program accomplishments include rapid, flight hardware design, subsystem testing and fabrication, aerospike engine development and testing, Flight Operations Center and Operations Control Center ground systems design and construction, rapid Environmental Impact Statement NEPA process approval, Range development and flight plan approval for test flights, and full-scale system concept design and refinement. Lessons from the X-33 Program may have potential application to new RLV and other aerospace systems being developed a decade later.

  2. Flexible sensors for biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Diana; Romeo, Agostino; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    Flexible sensing devices have gained a great deal of attention among the scientific community in recent years. The application of flexible sensors spans over several fields, including medicine, industrial automation, robotics, security, and human-machine interfacing. In particular, non-invasive health-monitoring devices are expected to play a key role in the improvement of patient life and in reducing costs associated with clinical and biomedical diagnostic procedures. Here, we focus on recent advances achieved in flexible devices applied on the human skin for biomedical and healthcare purposes. PMID:26675174

  3. Flexible sensors for biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Diana; Romeo, Agostino; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    Flexible sensing devices have gained a great deal of attention among the scientific community in recent years. The application of flexible sensors spans over several fields, including medicine, industrial automation, robotics, security, and human-machine interfacing. In particular, non-invasive health-monitoring devices are expected to play a key role in the improvement of patient life and in reducing costs associated with clinical and biomedical diagnostic procedures. Here, we focus on recent advances achieved in flexible devices applied on the human skin for biomedical and healthcare purposes.

  4. Reusable space tug concept and mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresto Aleina, Sara; Viola, Nicole; Stesina, Fabrizio; Viscio, Maria Antonietta; Ferraris, Simona

    2016-11-01

    Advanced Project Excellence in Research and Enterprise), supported by Italian Ministry of Research and University (MIUR), and specifically in its STRONG sub-project (Systems Technology and Research National Global Operations) and related to the theme of space exploration and access to space.

  5. Re-usable quick-release interconnect for characterization of microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Jothimuthu, Preetha; Pais, Andrea; Papautsky, Ian

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we present a simple method for establishing re-usable quick-release compression-based fluidic connections for characterization of microfluidic systems. Our interconnect scheme uses O-rings to form a compression seal against the upper surface of the microfluidic device and around the inlet/outlet tubing, thus establishing connections to the macroworld and preventing any leaks at the ports. With this approach, fabrication is inexpensive and easy, not requiring time-consuming or specialized fabrication procedures. The connections to the real world can be established and removed numerous times without damaging the microfluidic device, and since the approach is adhesive-free there is no danger of microchannel blockage. The demonstrated interconnect is also flexible enough to permit tube bending parallel to the device and makes it possible to place input ports close together to minimize dimensions of complex microfluidic systems. In leakage tests, the interconnect was measured to withstand pressures up to 1.7 MPa, which is enough for most microfluidic applications, and probably nanofluidic applications. This interconnect makes connecting inlets and outlets faster and easier, saving hours of processing time. It can be quickly and easily reconfigured to match device port positions, and is compatible with microfluidic systems fabricated in polymer, plastic, glass or silicon. Further, the flexible nature of the developed compression-based interconnect, both with regard to tubing flexibility and the ability to re-use numerous times, makes it ideal for rapid prototyping of research systems and potentially for quality control in large-scale production.

  6. Self-supported Zn3P2 nanowire arrays grafted on carbon fabrics as an advanced integrated anode for flexible lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenwu; Gan, Lin; Guo, Kai; Ke, Linbo; Wei, Yaqing; Li, Huiqiao; Shen, Guozhen; Zhai, Tianyou

    2016-04-01

    We, for the first time, successfully grafted well-aligned binary lithium-reactive zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) nanowire arrays on carbon fabric cloth by a facile CVD method. When applied as a novel self-supported binder-free anode for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) integrated anode shows excellent electrochemical performances: a highly reversible initial lithium storage capacity of ca. 1200 mA h g-1 with a coulombic efficiency of up to 88%, a long lifespan of over 200 cycles without obvious decay, and a high rate capability of ca. 400 mA h g-1 capacity retention at an ultrahigh rate of 15 A g-1. More interestingly, a flexible LIB full cell is assembled based on the as-synthesized integrated anode and the commercial LiFePO4 cathode, and shows striking lithium storage performances very close to the half cells: a large reversible capacity over 1000 mA h g-1, a long cycle life of over 200 cycles without obvious decay, and an ultrahigh rate performance of ca. 300 mA h g-1 even at 20 A g-1. Considering the excellent lithium storage performances of coin-type half cells as well as flexible full cells, the as-prepared carbon cloth grafted well-aligned Zn3P2 nanowire arrays would be a promising integrated anode for flexible LIB full cell devices.We, for the first time, successfully grafted well-aligned binary lithium-reactive zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) nanowire arrays on carbon fabric cloth by a facile CVD method. When applied as a novel self-supported binder-free anode for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) integrated anode shows excellent electrochemical performances: a highly reversible initial lithium storage capacity of ca. 1200 mA h g-1 with a coulombic efficiency of up to 88%, a long lifespan of over 200 cycles without obvious decay, and a high rate capability of ca. 400 mA h g-1 capacity retention at an ultrahigh rate of 15 A g-1. More interestingly, a flexible LIB full cell is assembled based on the as

  7. A general method of fabricating flexible spinel-type oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite aerogels as advanced anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guobo; Shi, Nan; Hess, Michael; Chen, Xi; Cheng, Wei; Fan, Tongxiang; Niederberger, Markus

    2015-04-28

    High-capacity anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), such as spinel-type metal oxides, generally suffer from poor Li(+) and e(-) conductivities. Their drastic crystal structure and volume changes, as a result of the conversion reaction mechanism with Li, severely impede the high-rate and cyclability performance toward their practical application. In this article, we present a general and facile approach to fabricate flexible spinel-type oxide/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite aerogels as binder-free anodes where the spinel nanoparticles (NPs) are integrated in an interconnected rGO network. Benefiting from the hierarchical porosity, conductive network and mechanical stability constructed by interpenetrated rGO layers, and from the pillar effect of NPs in between rGO sheets, the hybrid system synergistically enhances the intrinsic properties of each component, yet is robust and flexible. Consequently, the spinel/rGO composite aerogels demonstrate greatly enhanced rate capability and long-term stability without obvious capacity fading for 1000 cycles at high rates of up to 4.5 A g(-1) in the case of CoFe2O4. This electrode design can successfully be applied to several other spinel ferrites such as MnFe2O4, Fe3O4, NiFe2O4 or Co3O4, all of which lead to excellent electrochemical performances.

  8. Reusable Software and Open Data Incorporate Ecological Understanding To Optimize Agriculture and Improveme Crops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBauer, D.

    2015-12-01

    Humans need a secure and sustainable food supply, and science can help. We have an opportunity to transform agriculture by combining knowledge of organisms and ecosystems to engineer ecosystems that sustainably produce food, fuel, and other services. The challenge is that the information we have. Measurements, theories, and laws found in publications, notebooks, measurements, software, and human brains are difficult to combine. We homogenize, encode, and automate the synthesis of data and mechanistic understanding in a way that links understanding at different scales and across domains. This allows extrapolation, prediction, and assessment. Reusable components allow automated construction of new knowledge that can be used to assess, predict, and optimize agro-ecosystems. Developing reusable software and open-access databases is hard, and examples will illustrate how we use the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn, pecanproject.org), the Biofuel Ecophysiological Traits and Yields database (BETYdb, betydb.org), and ecophysiological crop models to predict crop yield, decide which crops to plant, and which traits can be selected for the next generation of data driven crop improvement. A next step is to automate the use of sensors mounted on robots, drones, and tractors to assess plants in the field. The TERRA Reference Phenotyping Platform (TERRA-Ref, terraref.github.io) will provide an open access database and computing platform on which researchers can use and develop tools that use sensor data to assess and manage agricultural and other terrestrial ecosystems. TERRA-Ref will adopt existing standards and develop modular software components and common interfaces, in collaboration with researchers from iPlant, NEON, AgMIP, USDA, rOpenSci, ARPA-E, many scientists and industry partners. Our goal is to advance science by enabling efficient use, reuse, exchange, and creation of knowledge.

  9. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on 14 to 15 May 1991 at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Presentations were made by industry, university, and government researchers organized into four sessions: (1) aerothermodynamic loads; (2) instrumentation; (3) fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and (4) structural dynamics. The principle objectives were to disseminate research results and future plans in each of four areas. This publication contains extended abstracts and the visual material presented during the conference. Particular emphasis is placed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the SSME turbopump.

  10. A reusable suture anchor for arthroscopy psychomotor skills training.

    PubMed

    Tillett, Edward D; Rogers, Rainie; Nyland, John

    2003-03-01

    For residents to adequately develop the early arthroscopy psychomotor skills required to better learn how to manage the improvisational situations they will encounter during actual patient cases, they need to experience sufficient practice repetitions within a contextually relevant environment. Unfortunately, the cost of suture anchors can be a practice repetition-limiting factor in learning arthroscopic knot-tying techniques. We describe a technique for creating inexpensive reusable suture anchors and provide an example of their application to repair the anterior glenoid labrum during an arthroscopy psychomotor skills laboratory training session.

  11. Reusable orbital transfer vehicle spacelift concepts study results

    SciTech Connect

    Feuchter, C.A.; Grobman, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports on the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of expendable and reusable orbital transfer vehicle concepts utilizing innovative low thrust, high specific impulse electric and thermal propulsion technologies. Comparisons are made to launch systems using current chemical upper stages. These innovative technologies often produce significant savings over chemical upper-stages when used with the current fleet of expendable launch vehicles, and evolved expendable launch vehicles. Savings are driven by the ability of the innovative technologies to lower combined payload and upper stage mass, allowing payloads to be launched on smaller, less expensive launch vehicles. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of potential reusable thrust chamber concepts is studied. Propellant condidates were examined and analytically combined with potential cooling schemes. A data base of engine data which would assist in a configuration selection was produced. The data base verification was performed by the demonstration of a thrust chamber of a selected coolant scheme design. A full scale insulated columbium thrust chamber was used for propellant coolant configurations. Combustion stability of the injectors and a reduced size thrust chamber were experimentally verified as proof of concept demonstrations of the design and study results.

  13. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  14. Flexible Transparent Electronic Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Yunlong; Wan, Pengbo; Zhang, Han; Chen, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors capable of real-time, sensitive, and selective analysis at room-temperature, have gained immense popularity in recent years for their potential to be integrated into various smart wearable electronics and display devices. Here, recent advances in flexible transparent sensors constructed from semiconducting oxides, carbon materials, conducting polymers, and their nanocomposites are presented. The sensing material selection, sensor device construction, and sensing mechanism of flexible transparent sensors are discussed in detail. The critical challenges and future development associated with flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors are presented. Smart wearable gas sensors are believed to have great potential in environmental monitoring and noninvasive health monitoring based on disease biomarkers in exhaled gas.

  15. Flexible Transparent Electronic Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Yunlong; Wan, Pengbo; Zhang, Han; Chen, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors capable of real-time, sensitive, and selective analysis at room-temperature, have gained immense popularity in recent years for their potential to be integrated into various smart wearable electronics and display devices. Here, recent advances in flexible transparent sensors constructed from semiconducting oxides, carbon materials, conducting polymers, and their nanocomposites are presented. The sensing material selection, sensor device construction, and sensing mechanism of flexible transparent sensors are discussed in detail. The critical challenges and future development associated with flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors are presented. Smart wearable gas sensors are believed to have great potential in environmental monitoring and noninvasive health monitoring based on disease biomarkers in exhaled gas. PMID:27276698

  16. Advanced intrarenal ureteroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Monga, Manoj; Beeman, William W

    2004-02-01

    The role of flexible ureteroscopy in the management of intrarenal pathology has undergone a dramatic evolution, powered by improvements in flexible ureteroscope design; deflection and image quality; diversification of small, disposable instrumentation; and the use of holmium laser lithotripsy. This article reviews the application of flexible ureteroscopy for advanced intrarenal procedures.

  17. Automated microfluidic DNA/RNA extraction with both disposable and reusable components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Johnson, Michael; Hill, Parker; Sonkul, Rahul S.; Kim, Jongwon; Gale, Bruce K.

    2012-01-01

    An automated microfluidic nucleic extraction system was fabricated with a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) structure that consists of sample wells, microvalves, a micropump and a disposable microfluidic silica cartridge. Both the microvalves and micropump structures were fabricated in a single layer and are operated pneumatically using a 100 µm PDMS membrane. To fabricate the disposable microfluidic silica cartridge, two-cavity structures were made in a PDMS replica to fit the stacked silica membranes. A handheld controller for the microvalves and pumps was developed to enable system automation. With purified ribonucleic acid (RNA), whole blood and E. coli samples, the automated microfluidic nucleic acid extraction system was validated with a guanidine-based solid phase extraction procedure. An extraction efficiency of ~90% for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ~54% for RNA was obtained in 12 min from whole blood and E. coli samples, respectively. In addition, the same quantity and quality of extracted DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR also presented the appropriate amplification and melting profiles. Automated, programmable fluid control and physical separation of the reusable components and the disposable components significantly decrease the assay time and manufacturing cost and increase the flexibility and compatibility of the system with downstream components.

  18. BiOCl nanosheets immobilized on electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers with high photocatalytic activity and reusable property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yuechen; Shao, Changlu; Li, Xinghua; Su, Chunyan; Xu, Hongchuan; Zhang, Mingyi; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yichun

    2013-11-01

    One-dimensional BiOCl/PAN composite nanofibers which are composed of bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl) nanosheets on electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers were fabricated by combining electrospinning technique and solvothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance, Fourier transform infrared spectrum, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, were used to characterize the as-fabricated BiOCl/PAN composite nanofibers. The results revealed that BiOCl nanosheets were successfully immobilized on electrospun PAN nanofibers. The contents of the BiOCl nanosheets were controlled by adjusting the precursor concentrations for the fabrication of BiOCl/PAN composite nanofibers during the solvothermal synthesis processes. It was found that some interactions might exist between BiOCl and PAN molecules of BiOCl/PAN composite nanofibers. The obtained BiOCl/PAN composite nanofibers exhibited high photocatalytic activity for degradation of rhodamine B under ultraviolet light irradiation. The trapping experiments confirmed that the main active species for photocatalysis was hydroxyl radicals, which was produced by both the oxidative pathway and reductive pathway. Notably, the BiOCl/PAN composite nanofibers photocatalysts not only had good reusable property because of their one-dimensional structure and flexibility but also retained high photocatalytic stabilities after several cycles due to the interaction between BiOCl and PAN molecules.

  19. Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. F.; Figueroa, F.; Politopoulos, T.; Oonk, S.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to correctly detect and identify any possible failure in the systems, subsystems, or sensors within a reusable liquid rocket engine is a major goal at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). A health management (HM) system is required to provide an on-ground operation crew with an integrated awareness of the condition of every element of interest by determining anomalies, examining their causes, and making predictive statements. However, the complexity associated with relevant systems, and the large amount of data typically necessary for proper interpretation and analysis, presents difficulties in implementing complete failure detection, identification, and prognostics (FDI&P). As such, this paper presents a Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines as a solution to these problems through the use of highly intelligent algorithms for real-time FDI&P, and efficient and embedded processing at multiple levels. The end result is the ability to successfully incorporate a comprehensive HM platform despite the complexity of the systems under consideration.

  20. Linear quadratic servo control of a reusable rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    A design method for a servo compensator is developed in the frequency domain using singular values. The method is applied to a reusable rocket engine. An intelligent control system for reusable rocket engines was proposed which includes a diagnostic system, a control system, and an intelligent coordinator which determines engine control strategies based on the identified failure modes. The method provides a means of generating various linear multivariable controllers capable of meeting performance and robustness specifications and accommodating failure modes identified by the diagnostic system. Command following with set point control is necessary for engine operation. A Kalman filter reconstructs the state while loop transfer recovery recovers the required degree of robustness while maintaining satisfactory rejection of sensor noise from the command error. The approach is applied to the design of a controller for a rocket engine satisfying performance constraints in the frequency domain. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the linear design on a nonlinear engine model over all power levels during mainstage operation.

  1. Reusable hose fittings emerge as source of apprehension over safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    This paper reports that while the area of hose care and maintenance may not warrant the same degree of vigilance that is called for in other propane safety-related areas, it has become apparent that marketers should start paying close attention to the subject of properly installed hose-end fittings or risk the consequences of a potentially disastrous mismatch. Indeed, if there is any topic in which the seemingly ho-hum subject of propane hose generates a difference of opinion or debate, it is the subject of reusable end-fittings. Currently there are opposing schools of thought on whether this particular hardware should be used at all. The reusable ends for LPG transfer hose (commonly called the boss type) consist of two segments that grip the hose in a clamp-like fashion. A mismatched boss coupling will probably result in improper or inadequate compression of the hose. This could lead in turn to the hose separating from the hose end.

  2. Reusable, robust, and accurate laser-generated photonic nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Montelongo, Yunuen; da Cruz Vasconcellos, Fernando; Martinez-Hurtado, J L; Neupane, Sankalpa; Butt, Haider; Qasim, Malik M; Blyth, Jeffrey; Burling, Keith; Carmody, J Bryan; Evans, Mark; Wilkinson, Timothy D; Kubota, Lauro T; Monteiro, Michael J; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-06-11

    Developing noninvasive and accurate diagnostics that are easily manufactured, robust, and reusable will provide monitoring of high-risk individuals in any clinical or point-of-care environment. We have developed a clinically relevant optical glucose nanosensor that can be reused at least 400 times without a compromise in accuracy. The use of a single 6 ns laser (λ = 532 nm, 200 mJ) pulse rapidly produced off-axis Bragg diffraction gratings consisting of ordered silver nanoparticles embedded within a phenylboronic acid-functionalized hydrogel. This sensor exhibited reversible large wavelength shifts and diffracted the spectrum of narrow-band light over the wavelength range λpeak ≈ 510-1100 nm. The experimental sensitivity of the sensor permits diagnosis of glucosuria in the urine samples of diabetic patients with an improved performance compared to commercial high-throughput urinalysis devices. The sensor response was achieved within 5 min, reset to baseline in ∼10 s. It is anticipated that this sensing platform will have implications for the development of reusable, equipment-free colorimetric point-of-care diagnostic devices for diabetes screening. PMID:24844116

  3. Reducing the Cost of Laparoscopy: Reusable versus Disposable Laparoscopic Instruments.

    PubMed

    Manatakis, Dimitrios K; Georgopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness in health care management is critical. The situation in debt-stricken Greece is further aggravated by the financial crisis and constant National Health System expense cut-downs. In an effort to minimize the cost of laparoscopy, our department introduced reusable laparoscopic instruments in December 2011. The aim of this study was to assess potential cost reduction of laparoscopic operations in the field of general surgery. Hospital records, invoice lists, and operative notes between January 2012 and December 2013, were retrospectively reviewed and data were collected on laparoscopic procedures, instrument failures, and replacement needs. Initial acquisition cost of 5 basic instrument sets was €21,422. Over the following 24 months, they were used in 623 operations, with a total maintenance cost of €11,487. Based on an average retail price of €490 per set, projected cost with disposable instruments would amount to €305,270, creating savings of €272,361 over the two-year period under study. Despite the seemingly high purchase price, each set amortized its acquisition cost after only 9 procedures and instrument cost depreciated to less than €55 per case. Disposable instruments cost 9 times more than reusable ones, and their high price would almost equal the total hospital reimbursement by social security funds for many common laparoscopic procedures. PMID:25152814

  4. Reducing the Cost of Laparoscopy: Reusable versus Disposable Laparoscopic Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Manatakis, Dimitrios K.; Georgopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness in health care management is critical. The situation in debt-stricken Greece is further aggravated by the financial crisis and constant National Health System expense cut-downs. In an effort to minimize the cost of laparoscopy, our department introduced reusable laparoscopic instruments in December 2011. The aim of this study was to assess potential cost reduction of laparoscopic operations in the field of general surgery. Hospital records, invoice lists, and operative notes between January 2012 and December 2013, were retrospectively reviewed and data were collected on laparoscopic procedures, instrument failures, and replacement needs. Initial acquisition cost of 5 basic instrument sets was €21,422. Over the following 24 months, they were used in 623 operations, with a total maintenance cost of €11,487. Based on an average retail price of €490 per set, projected cost with disposable instruments would amount to €305,270, creating savings of €272,361 over the two-year period under study. Despite the seemingly high purchase price, each set amortized its acquisition cost after only 9 procedures and instrument cost depreciated to less than €55 per case. Disposable instruments cost 9 times more than reusable ones, and their high price would almost equal the total hospital reimbursement by social security funds for many common laparoscopic procedures. PMID:25152814

  5. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishments, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Dennis R.; Phelps, Willie J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor represents the largest solid rocket motor ever flown and the only human rated solid motor. Each Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) provides approximately 3-million lb of thrust to lift the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle from the launch pad. The motors burn out approximately 2 minutes later, separate from the vehicle and are recovered and refurbished. The size of the motor and the need for high reliability were challenges. Thrust shaping, via shaping of the propellant grain, was needed to limit structural loads during ascent. The motor design evolved through several block upgrades to increase performance and to increase safety and reliability. A major redesign occurred after STS-51L with the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor. Significant improvements in the joint sealing systems were added. Design improvements continued throughout the Program via block changes with a number of innovations including development of low temperature o-ring materials and incorporation of a unique carbon fiber rope thermal barrier material. Recovery of the motors and post flight inspection improved understanding of hardware performance, and led to key design improvements. Because of the multidecade program duration material obsolescence was addressed, and requalification of materials and vendors was sometimes needed. Thermal protection systems and ablatives were used to protect the motor cases and nozzle structures. Significant understanding of design and manufacturing features of the ablatives was developed during the program resulting in optimization of design features and processing parameters. The project advanced technology in eliminating ozone-depleting materials in manufacturing processes and the development of an asbestos-free case insulation. Manufacturing processes for the large motor components were unique and safety in the manufacturing environment was a special concern. Transportation and handling approaches were also needed for the large

  6. NiAl Coatings Investigated for Use in Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Barrett, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    As part of its major investment in the area of advanced space transportation, NASA is developing new technologies for use in the second- and third-generation designs of reusable launch vehicles. Among the prototype rocket engines being considered for these launch vehicles are those designed to use liquid hydrogen as the fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Advanced copper alloys, such as copper-chromium-niobium (Cu-8(at.%)Cr- 4(at.%)Nb, also referred to as GRCop-84), which was invented at the NASA Glenn Research Center, are being considered for use as liner materials in the combustion chambers and nozzle ramps of these engines. However, previous experience has shown that, in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, copper alloys are subject to a process called blanching, where the material undergoes environmental attack under the action of the combustion gases. In addition, the copper alloy liners undergo thermomechanical fatigue, which often results in an initially square cooling channel deforming into a dog-house shape. Clearly, there is an urgent need to develop new coatings to protect copper liners from environmental attack inside rocket chambers and to lower the temperature of the liners to reduce the probability of deformation and failure by thermomechanical fatigue.

  7. Understanding Reusability as a Key Factor for Open Education: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappe, Andres; Arias, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    This article describes both the process and the results of an extensive literature review on "reusability" as one of the key factors for the creation of open content in the context of open and distance learning. Qualitative analysis of texts was made from 1992 to early 2014 in order to identify meanings associated with reusability and…

  8. 14 CFR 437.95 - Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... suborbital rockets. 437.95 Section 437.95 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... of an Experimental Permit § 437.95 Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets. A permittee may launch or reenter additional reusable suborbital rockets of the same design under the permit...

  9. 14 CFR 437.95 - Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... suborbital rockets. 437.95 Section 437.95 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... of an Experimental Permit § 437.95 Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets. A permittee may launch or reenter additional reusable suborbital rockets of the same design under the permit...

  10. 14 CFR 437.95 - Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... suborbital rockets. 437.95 Section 437.95 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... of an Experimental Permit § 437.95 Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets. A permittee may launch or reenter additional reusable suborbital rockets of the same design under the permit...

  11. 14 CFR 437.95 - Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... suborbital rockets. 437.95 Section 437.95 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... of an Experimental Permit § 437.95 Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets. A permittee may launch or reenter additional reusable suborbital rockets of the same design under the permit...

  12. 14 CFR 437.95 - Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... suborbital rockets. 437.95 Section 437.95 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... of an Experimental Permit § 437.95 Inspection of additional reusable suborbital rockets. A permittee may launch or reenter additional reusable suborbital rockets of the same design under the permit...

  13. New Pedagogies and Re-Usable Learning Objects: Toward a Different Role for an LMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; Strijker, Allard

    While the idea of reusing objects in digital learning environments is not new, continual strides are being made toward improving the prospects of reusability. A major trend in company training settings is to think of reusability in terms of a LMS (learning management system), but instructor use and pedagogies are little considered. This paper…

  14. A bioinspired, reusable, paper-based system for high-performance large-scale evaporation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanming; Yu, Shengtao; Feng, Rui; Bernard, Antoine; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Shang, Wen; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-05-01

    A bioinspired, reusable, paper-based gold-nanoparticle film is fabricated by depositing an as-prepared gold-nanoparticle thin film on airlaid paper. This paper-based system with enhanced surface roughness and low thermal conductivity exhibits increased efficiency of evaporation, scale-up potential, and proven reusability. It is also demonstrated to be potentially useful in seawater desalination.

  15. Performance and Cost of Disposable Biopsy Forceps in Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Comparison with Reusable Biopsy Forceps

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Won Chul; Kim, Jin Soo; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Kyu Yong; Chung, In-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims It is believed that disposable biopsy forceps are more costly than reusable biopsy forceps. In this study, we evaluated performance and cost of disposable forceps versus reusable forceps in esophagogastroduodenoscopic biopsy. Methods Between October 2009 and July 2010, we enrolled 200 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopic biopsy at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. Biopsies were performed with 100 disposable or 5 reusable forceps by random assignment. Seventy-five additional patients were studied to estimate durability of reusable forceps. The assisting nurses estimated the performance of the forceps. The evaluation of costs included purchase prices and reprocessing costs. The adequacy of the sample was estimated according to the diameter of the obtained tissue. Results Performance of disposable forceps was estimated as excellent in 97.0%, good in 2.0% and adequate in 1.0%. Reusable forceps were estimated as excellent in 36.0%, good in 36.0%, adequate in 25.1% and inadequate in 2.9%. The performance of reusable forceps declined with the number of uses. The reprocessing cost of reusable forceps for one biopsy session was calculated as ₩8,021. The adequacy of the sample was excellent for both forceps. Conclusions Disposable forceps showed excellent performance. Considering the reprocessing costs of reusable forceps, usage of disposable forceps with a low price should be considered. PMID:22741133

  16. 14 CFR 431.15 - Rights not conferred by a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rights not conferred by a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.15 Section 431.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.15...

  17. 14 CFR 431.13 - Transfer of a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.13 Section 431.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.13 Transfer of...

  18. 14 CFR 431.13 - Transfer of a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.13 Section 431.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.13 Transfer of...

  19. 14 CFR 431.13 - Transfer of a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.13 Section 431.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.13 Transfer of...

  20. 14 CFR 431.15 - Rights not conferred by a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rights not conferred by a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.15 Section 431.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.15...

  1. 14 CFR 431.9 - Issuance of a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Issuance of a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.9 Section 431.9 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.9 Issuance of...

  2. 14 CFR 431.15 - Rights not conferred by a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rights not conferred by a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.15 Section 431.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.15...

  3. 14 CFR 431.9 - Issuance of a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Issuance of a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.9 Section 431.9 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.9 Issuance of...

  4. 14 CFR 431.9 - Issuance of a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Issuance of a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.9 Section 431.9 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.9 Issuance of...

  5. 14 CFR 431.9 - Issuance of a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Issuance of a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.9 Section 431.9 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.9 Issuance of...

  6. 14 CFR 431.15 - Rights not conferred by a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rights not conferred by a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.15 Section 431.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.15...

  7. 14 CFR 431.13 - Transfer of a reusable launch vehicle mission license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer of a reusable launch vehicle mission license. 431.13 Section 431.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.13 Transfer of...

  8. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 2: Theme summary. 6: Advanced transportation systems. A: Theme statement. B. 26 April 1976 presentation. C. Theme summary. D. Initiative actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technology requirements for an integrated space transportation system capability which will allow the nation to use space efficiently, reliably, and routinely in the years between 1985 and 2000 with a significant return on invested resources will build on the currently defined space transportation system using shuttle, the IUS, and the advanced upper stage such as the solar electric propulsion system. Contributing technologies should include those which support (1) total reusability with minimal refurbishment; (2) responsiveness to high launch rate requirements when operation and energy are the predominant recurring costs; and (3) maximum flexibility in operation between earth and LEO and between LEO and GEO. Initiatives undertaken to advance the heavy lift to launch vehicles, single stage to orbit vehicles, and orbit transfer vehicles are listed.

  9. Advanced and flexible multi-carrier receiver architecture for high-count multi-core fiber based space division multiplexed applications

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Rameez

    2016-01-01

    Space division multiplexing (SDM), incorporating multi-core fibers (MCFs), has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the data capacity in an impending capacity crunch. To achieve high spectral-density through multi-carrier encoding while simultaneously maintaining transmission reach, benefits from inter-core crosstalk (XT) and non-linear compensation must be utilized. In this report, we propose a proof-of-concept unified receiver architecture that jointly compensates optical Kerr effects, intra- and inter-core XT in MCFs. The architecture is analysed in multi-channel 512 Gbit/s dual-carrier DP-16QAM system over 800 km 19-core MCF to validate the digital compensation of inter-core XT. Through this architecture: (a) we efficiently compensates the inter-core XT improving Q-factor by 4.82 dB and (b) achieve a momentous gain in transmission reach, increasing the maximum achievable distance from 480 km to 1208 km, via analytical analysis. Simulation results confirm that inter-core XT distortions are more relentless for cores fabricated around the central axis of cladding. Predominantly, XT induced Q-penalty can be suppressed to be less than 1 dB up-to −11.56 dB of inter-core XT over 800 km MCF, offering flexibility to fabricate dense core structures with same cladding diameter. Moreover, this report outlines the relationship between core pitch and forward-error correction (FEC). PMID:27270381

  10. Advanced and flexible multi-carrier receiver architecture for high-count multi-core fiber based space division multiplexed applications.

    PubMed

    Asif, Rameez

    2016-01-01

    Space division multiplexing (SDM), incorporating multi-core fibers (MCFs), has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the data capacity in an impending capacity crunch. To achieve high spectral-density through multi-carrier encoding while simultaneously maintaining transmission reach, benefits from inter-core crosstalk (XT) and non-linear compensation must be utilized. In this report, we propose a proof-of-concept unified receiver architecture that jointly compensates optical Kerr effects, intra- and inter-core XT in MCFs. The architecture is analysed in multi-channel 512 Gbit/s dual-carrier DP-16QAM system over 800 km 19-core MCF to validate the digital compensation of inter-core XT. Through this architecture: (a) we efficiently compensates the inter-core XT improving Q-factor by 4.82 dB and (b) achieve a momentous gain in transmission reach, increasing the maximum achievable distance from 480 km to 1208 km, via analytical analysis. Simulation results confirm that inter-core XT distortions are more relentless for cores fabricated around the central axis of cladding. Predominantly, XT induced Q-penalty can be suppressed to be less than 1 dB up-to -11.56 dB of inter-core XT over 800 km MCF, offering flexibility to fabricate dense core structures with same cladding diameter. Moreover, this report outlines the relationship between core pitch and forward-error correction (FEC). PMID:27270381

  11. Advanced and flexible multi-carrier receiver architecture for high-count multi-core fiber based space division multiplexed applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, Rameez

    2016-06-01

    Space division multiplexing (SDM), incorporating multi-core fibers (MCFs), has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the data capacity in an impending capacity crunch. To achieve high spectral-density through multi-carrier encoding while simultaneously maintaining transmission reach, benefits from inter-core crosstalk (XT) and non-linear compensation must be utilized. In this report, we propose a proof-of-concept unified receiver architecture that jointly compensates optical Kerr effects, intra- and inter-core XT in MCFs. The architecture is analysed in multi-channel 512 Gbit/s dual-carrier DP-16QAM system over 800 km 19-core MCF to validate the digital compensation of inter-core XT. Through this architecture: (a) we efficiently compensates the inter-core XT improving Q-factor by 4.82 dB and (b) achieve a momentous gain in transmission reach, increasing the maximum achievable distance from 480 km to 1208 km, via analytical analysis. Simulation results confirm that inter-core XT distortions are more relentless for cores fabricated around the central axis of cladding. Predominantly, XT induced Q-penalty can be suppressed to be less than 1 dB up-to ‑11.56 dB of inter-core XT over 800 km MCF, offering flexibility to fabricate dense core structures with same cladding diameter. Moreover, this report outlines the relationship between core pitch and forward-error correction (FEC).

  12. Informed maintenance for next generation reusable launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jack J.; Gormley, Thomas J.

    2001-03-01

    Perhaps the most substantial single obstacle to progress of space exploration and utilization of space for human benefit is the safety & reliability and the inherent cost of launching to, and returning from, space. The primary influence in the high costs of current launch systems (the same is true for commercial and military aircraft and most other reusable systems) is the operations, maintenance and infrastructure portion of the program's total life cycle costs. Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) maintenance and design have traditionally been two separate engineering disciplines with often conflicting objectives - maximizing ease of maintenance versus optimizing performance, size and cost. Testability analysis, an element of Informed Maintenance (IM), has been an ad hoc, manual effort, in which maintenance engineers attempt to identify an efficient method of troubleshooting for the given product, with little or no control over product design. Therefore, testability deficiencies in the design cannot be rectified. It is now widely recognized that IM must be engineered into the product at the design stage itself, so that an optimal compromise is achieved between system maintainability and performance. The elements of IM include testability analysis, diagnostics/prognostics, automated maintenance scheduling, automated logistics coordination, paperless documentation and data mining. IM derives its heritage from complimentary NASA science, space and aeronautic enterprises such as the on-board autonomous Remote Agent Architecture recently flown on NASA's Deep Space 1 Probe as well as commercial industries that employ quick turnaround operations. Commercial technologies and processes supporting NASA's IM initiatives include condition based maintenance technologies from Boeing's Commercial 777 Aircraft and Lockheed-Martin's F-22 Fighter, automotive computer diagnostics and autonomous controllers that enable 100,000 mile maintenance free operations, and locomotive monitoring

  13. Solar thermal OTV—Applications to reusable and expendable launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassler, Thomas L.; Frye, Patrick; Partch, Russ

    2000-07-01

    The Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicle (SOTV) program being sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is developing technology that will engender revolutionary benefits to satellites and orbitto-orbit transfer systems. Solar thermal propulsion offers significant advantages for near-term expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) such as Delta IV, mid- to farterm reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) and ultimately to manned exploration of the Moon and Mars. Solar thermal propulsion uses a relatively large mirrored concentrator to focus solar energy onto a compact absorber, which is in turn heated to > 2200 K. This heat can then be used in two major ways. By flowing hydrogen or another working fluid through the absorber, high efficiency thrust can be generated with 800 sec or more specific impulse (Isp), almost twice that of conventional cryogenic stages and comparable with typical solid-core nuclear thermal stages. Within a decade, advances in materials and fabrication processes hold the promise of the Isp ranging up to 1,100 sec. In addition, attached thermionic or alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) power converters can be used to generate 20 to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity. The SOTV Space Experiment (SOTV-SE), planned to be flown in 2003, will demonstrate both hydrogen propulsion and thermionic power generation, including advanced lightweight deployable concentrators suitable for large-scale applications. Evolutionary geosynchronous-transfer orbit/ geosynchronous-Earth orbit (GTO/GEO) payload lift capability improvements of 50% or more to the Delta IV launch vehicles could be implemented as part of the Delta IV P4I plan shortly thereafter. Beyond that, SOTV technology should allow long-term storage of stages in orbits up to GEO with tremendous maneuvering capability, potentially 4 to 5 km/sec or more. Servicing of low-Earth orbit (LEO) and GEO assets and reusable (ROTVs) are other possible applications. Offering a combination of high Isp and high

  14. Cryogenic Insulation Bondline Studies for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. F.; Weiser, E. S.; Duong, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    Cryogenic insulations bonded to metallic substrates were characterized under simulated mission conditions representative for a reusable launch vehicle. The combined thermal and mechanical test consisted of 50 to a 100 cycles. These combined thermal and mechanical cycles simulated flight missions with temperatures ranging from -423 F to 450 F and a maximum mechanical tension load ranging from 20,000 lbs. to 97,650 lbs. The combined thermal and mechanical (uniaxial tension) test apparatus (1 ft. by 2 ft. Test Apparatus) developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, was used to perform cyclic tests on cryogenic insulations bonded to tank wall substrates. No visual delamination or degradation was observed in the cryogenic insulation-to-metallic substrate bondline or butt joints between cryogenic insulation panels. In addition, after cyclic testing was performed, residual property results from tension-pull and closed-cell content tests of the cryogenic insulations indicated a decrease in the bondline strength and closed-cell content.

  15. Investigation of next generation engine for reusable launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Kishimoto, Kenji; Atsumi, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    A new investigation on next generation engines for fully Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) is under way in Japan. The RLV requires not only high specific impulse of the propulsion but also significant improvements in thrust-to weight ratio at liftoff, life cycle capability and operability. This paper will describe the conceptual outline on a new engine research program for RLV based on the main component characteristics of the LE-7A engine. This engine will be driven with tap off cycle or gas generator cycle, not staged combustion, in order to increase sea level thrust-to-weight ratio. Extendible nozzle will be also installed to enhance the vacuum specific impulse. In addition, this paper will present a new concept of Liquefied Air Cycle Engine (LACE) to boost air breathing spaceplane. The LACE engine has significantly higher specific impulse and sea level thrust-to weight ratio than rocket engine.

  16. Reusable antifouling viscoelastic adhesive with an elastic skin.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sandip; Malasi, Abhinav; Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-01-10

    Although the viscoelasticity or tackiness of a pressure-sensitive adhesive gives it strength owing to energy dissipation during peeling, it also renders it nonreusable because of structural changes such as the formation of fibrils, cohesive failure, and fouling. However, an elastic layer has good structural integrity and cohesive strength but low adhesive energy. We demonstrate an effective composite adhesive in which a soft viscoelastic bulk layer is imbedded in a largely elastic thin skin layer. The composite layer is able to meet the conflicting demands of the high peel strength comparable to the viscoelastic core and the structural integrity, reusability, and antifouling properties of the elastic skin. Our model adhesive is made of poly(dimethylsiloxane), where its core and skin are created by varying the cross-linking percentage from 2 to 10%. PMID:22201420

  17. What If Annotations Were Reusable: A Preliminary Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manouselis, Nikos; Vuorikari, Riina

    This paper discusses the rationale for the representation of user feedback in a structured and reusable format so that it can be reused by different recommender systems. We emphasize how information about the context can be included in such a representation. This work-in-progress takes place in the context of two large European initiatives that set up collections of digital educational resources in distributed repositories to serve the needs of different user communities, and to collect user feedback such as ratings, bookmarks and tags related to the resources. The overall aim is to facilitate the exchange and reuse of their data sets in order to support recommendation of appropriate resources to the end users.

  18. Reusable, flyback liquid rocket booster for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, Mark G.

    1989-08-01

    This paper outlines a preliminary design for an unmanned, reusable, flyback liquid rocket booster (LRB) as an evolutionary follow-on to the Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB). Previous Shuttle liquid-propellant booster concepts are reviewed in order to gain insight into these designs. The operating costs, environmental impacts, and abort options of the SRB are discussed. The LRB flight profile and advantages of LRB use are discussed. The preliminary design for the LRB is outlined in detail using calculations and drawings. This design maximizes the use of existing hardware and proven technology to minimize cost and development time. The LRB design is presented as a more capable, more environmentally acceptable, and safer Shuttle booster.

  19. Reusable antifouling viscoelastic adhesive with an elastic skin.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sandip; Malasi, Abhinav; Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-01-10

    Although the viscoelasticity or tackiness of a pressure-sensitive adhesive gives it strength owing to energy dissipation during peeling, it also renders it nonreusable because of structural changes such as the formation of fibrils, cohesive failure, and fouling. However, an elastic layer has good structural integrity and cohesive strength but low adhesive energy. We demonstrate an effective composite adhesive in which a soft viscoelastic bulk layer is imbedded in a largely elastic thin skin layer. The composite layer is able to meet the conflicting demands of the high peel strength comparable to the viscoelastic core and the structural integrity, reusability, and antifouling properties of the elastic skin. Our model adhesive is made of poly(dimethylsiloxane), where its core and skin are created by varying the cross-linking percentage from 2 to 10%.

  20. Large Composite Structures Processing Technologies for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Vickers, J. H.; McMahon, W. M.; Hulcher, A. B.; Johnston, N. J.; Cano, R. J.; Belvin, H. L.; McIver, K.; Franklin, W.; Sidwell, D.

    2001-01-01

    Significant efforts have been devoted to establishing the technology foundation to enable the progression to large scale composite structures fabrication. We are not capable today of fabricating many of the composite structures envisioned for the second generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Conventional 'aerospace' manufacturing and processing methodologies (fiber placement, autoclave, tooling) will require substantial investment and lead time to scale-up. Out-of-autoclave process techniques will require aggressive efforts to mature the selected technologies and to scale up. Focused composite processing technology development and demonstration programs utilizing the building block approach are required to enable envisioned second generation RLV large composite structures applications. Government/industry partnerships have demonstrated success in this area and represent best combination of skills and capabilities to achieve this goal.

  1. Optimal technology investment strategies for a reusable launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. A.; Braun, R. D.; Powell, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    Within the present budgetary environment, developing the technology that leads to an operationally efficient space transportation system with the required performance is a challenge. The present research focuses on a methodology to determine high payoff technology investment strategies. Research has been conducted at Langley Research Center in which design codes for the conceptual analysis of space transportation systems have been integrated in a multidisciplinary design optimization approach. The current study integrates trajectory, propulsion, weights and sizing, and cost disciplines where the effect of technology maturation on the development cost of a single stage to orbit reusable launch vehicle is examined. Results show that the technology investment prior to full-scale development has a significant economic payoff. The design optimization process is used to determine strategic allocations of limited technology funding to maximize the economic payoff.

  2. Controls for Reusable Launch Vehicles During Terminal Area Energy Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driessen, Brian J.

    2005-01-01

    During the terminal energy management phase of flight (last of three phases) for a reusable launch vehicle, it is common for the controller to receive guidance commands specifying desired values for (i) the roll angle roll q(sub roll), (ii) the acceleration a(sub n) in the body negative z direction, -k(sub A)-bar, and (iii) omega(sub 3), the projection of onto the body-fixed axis k(sub A)-bar, is always indicated by guidance to be zero. The objective of the controller is to regulate the actual values of these three quantities, i.e make them close to the commanded values, while maintaining system stability.

  3. Macroeconomic Benefits of Low-Cost Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.; Greenberg, Joel

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) initiated its Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Technology Program to provide information on the technical and commercial feasibility of single-stage to orbit (SSTO), fully-reusable launchers. Because RLVs would not depend on expendable hardware to achieve orbit, they could take better advantage of economies of scale than expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) that discard costly hardware on ascent. The X-33 experimental vehicle, a sub-orbital, 60%-scale prototype of Lockheed Martin's VentureStar SSTO RLV concept, is being built by Skunk Works for a 1999 first flight. If RLVs achieve prices to low-earth orbit of less than $1000 US per pound, they could hold promise for eliciting an elastic response from the launch services market. As opposed to the capture of existing market, this elastic market would represent new space-based industry businesses. These new opportunities would be created from the next tier of business concepts, such as space manufacturing and satellite servicing, that cannot earn a profit at today's launch prices but could when enabled by lower launch costs. New business creation contributes benefits to the US Government (USG) and the US economy through increases in tax revenues and employment. Assumptions about the costs and revenues of these new ventures, based on existing space-based and aeronautics sector businesses, can be used to estimate the macroeconomic benefits provided by new businesses. This paper examines these benefits and the flight prices and rates that may be required to enable these new space industries.

  4. Synergistically Enhanced Polysulfide Chemisorption Using a Flexible Hybrid Separator with N and S Dual-Doped Mesoporous Carbon Coating for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Balach, Juan; Singh, Harish K; Gomoll, Selina; Jaumann, Tony; Klose, Markus; Oswald, Steffen; Richter, Manuel; Eckert, Jürgen; Giebeler, Lars

    2016-06-15

    Because of the outstanding high theoretical specific energy density of 2600 Wh kg(-1), the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is regarded as a promising candidate for post lithium-ion battery systems eligible to meet the forthcoming market requirements. However, its commercialization on large scale is thwarted by fast capacity fading caused by the Achilles' heel of Li-S systems: the polysulfide shuttle. Here, we merge the physical features of carbon-coated separators and the unique chemical properties of N and S codoped mesoporous carbon to create a functional hybrid separator with superior polysulfide affinity and electrochemical benefits. DFT calculations revealed that carbon materials with N and S codoping possess a strong binding energy to high-order polysulfide species, which is essential to keep the active material in the cathode side. As a result of the synergistic effect of N, S dual-doping, an advanced Li-S cell with high specific capacity and ultralow capacity degradation of 0.041% per cycle is achieved. Pushing our simple-designed and scalable cathode to a highly increased sulfur loading of 5.4 mg cm(-2), the Li-S cell with the functional hybrid separator can deliver a remarkable areal capacity of 5.9 mAh cm(-2), which is highly favorable for practical applications.

  5. Synergistically Enhanced Polysulfide Chemisorption Using a Flexible Hybrid Separator with N and S Dual-Doped Mesoporous Carbon Coating for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Balach, Juan; Singh, Harish K; Gomoll, Selina; Jaumann, Tony; Klose, Markus; Oswald, Steffen; Richter, Manuel; Eckert, Jürgen; Giebeler, Lars

    2016-06-15

    Because of the outstanding high theoretical specific energy density of 2600 Wh kg(-1), the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is regarded as a promising candidate for post lithium-ion battery systems eligible to meet the forthcoming market requirements. However, its commercialization on large scale is thwarted by fast capacity fading caused by the Achilles' heel of Li-S systems: the polysulfide shuttle. Here, we merge the physical features of carbon-coated separators and the unique chemical properties of N and S codoped mesoporous carbon to create a functional hybrid separator with superior polysulfide affinity and electrochemical benefits. DFT calculations revealed that carbon materials with N and S codoping possess a strong binding energy to high-order polysulfide species, which is essential to keep the active material in the cathode side. As a result of the synergistic effect of N, S dual-doping, an advanced Li-S cell with high specific capacity and ultralow capacity degradation of 0.041% per cycle is achieved. Pushing our simple-designed and scalable cathode to a highly increased sulfur loading of 5.4 mg cm(-2), the Li-S cell with the functional hybrid separator can deliver a remarkable areal capacity of 5.9 mAh cm(-2), which is highly favorable for practical applications. PMID:27225061

  6. The paradox of cognitive flexibility in autism.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Hilde M; Corbett, Blythe; Solomon, Marjorie

    2009-02-01

    We present an overview of current literature addressing cognitive flexibility in autism spectrum disorders. Based on recent studies at multiple sites, using diverse methods and participants of different autism subtypes, ages and cognitive levels, no consistent evidence for cognitive flexibility deficits was found. Researchers and clinicians assume that inflexible everyday behaviors in autism are directly related to cognitive flexibility deficits as assessed by clinical and experimental measures. However, there is a large gap between the day-to-day behavioral flexibility and that measured with these cognitive flexibility tasks. To advance the field, experimental measures must evolve to reflect mechanistic models of flexibility deficits. Moreover, ecologically valid measures are required to be able to resolve the paradox between cognitive and behavioral inflexibility.

  7. Noctilucent Cloud Imaging and Tomography using a Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimuller, J. D.; Fritts, D. C.; Thomas, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs) are the highest clouds in the Earth's atmosphere, residing at a mean altitude of 83 km. They have been observed since 1885 around the summer solstice and are considered to be very sensitive indicators for what is going on in the atmosphere at higher altitudes. They have been observed to both increase in brightness and frequency as well as extend to lower latitudes and it has been hypothesized that the anthropogenic causes of climatic change may be directly related to NLC presence. An experiment is currently supported through NASA's Flight Opportunities program to use a Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (SRLV) to fly a manned, stabilized imager suite through an NLC layer to obtain imagery and topography data of unprecedented resolution. The campaign is targeted for July 2014 and will involve a series of flights from a high-latitude spaceport when NLC activity is observed. These data should advance our understanding of energy and momentum deposition to the upper atmosphere through enhanced observations of gravity wave perturbations, instability dynamics, and turbulent regions.

  8. Arcjet Testing and Thermal Model Development for Multilayer Felt Reusable Surface Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Scott, Carl Douglas; Papa, Steven V.

    2012-01-01

    Felt Reusable Surface Insulation was used extensively on leeward external surfaces of the Shuttle Orbiter, where the material is reusable for temperatures up to 670 K. For application on leeward surfaces of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, where predicted temperatures reach 1620 K, the material functions as a pyrolyzing conformal ablator. An arcjet test series was conducted to assess the performance of multilayer Felt Reusable Surface Insulation at high temperatures, and a thermal-response, pyrolysis, and ablation model was developed. Model predictions compare favorably with the arcjet test data

  9. Launch cost analyses for reusable space transportation systems (Sänger II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, Dietrich E.

    With the revival of studies for more economic fully reusable launch vehicles on both sides of the Atlantic, cost estimation analyses become of major importance. This is due to the fact that the essential cost reduction expected by fully reusable launch systems need to be substantiated for the justification of the development effort. The TRANSCOST model developed in the 1970-1983 period for launch vehicle cost analyses dealt mainly with expendable launch vehicles. This paper shows updated material and CERs for launch cost including fabrication and operations cost for future reusable and winged systems, such as Sänger II with the ETHV hypersonic manned winged upper stage.

  10. Self-Healing Nanocomposites for Reusable Composite Cryotanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberly, Daniel; Ou, Runqing; Karcz, Adam; Skandan, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Composite cryotanks, or composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), offer advantages over currently used aluminum-lithium cryotanks, particularly with respect to weight savings. Future NASA missions are expected to use COPVs in spaceflight propellant tanks to store fuels, oxidizers, and other liquids for launch and space exploration vehicles. However, reliability, reparability, and reusability of the COPVs are still being addressed, especially in cryogenic temperature applications; this has limited the adoption of COPVs in reusable vehicle designs. The major problem with composites is the inherent brittleness of the epoxy matrix, which is prone to microcrack formation, either from exposure to cryogenic conditions or from impact from different sources. If not prevented, the microcracks increase gas permeation and leakage. Accordingly, materials innovations are needed to mitigate microcrack damage, and prevent damage in the first place, in composite cryotanks. The self-healing technology being developed is capable of healing the microcracks through the use of a novel engineered nanocomposite, where a uniquely designed nanoparticle additive is incorporated into the epoxy matrix. In particular, this results in an enhancement in the burst pressure after cryogenic cycling of the nanocomposite COPVs, relative to the control COPVs. Incorporating a novel, self-healing, epoxy-based resin into the manufacture of COPVs allows repeatable self-healing of microcracks to be performed through the simple application of a low-temperature heat source. This permits COPVs to be reparable and reusable with a high degree of reliability, as microcracks will be remediated. The unique phase-separated morphology that was imparted during COPV manufacture allows for multiple self-healing cycles. Unlike single-target approaches where one material property is often improved at the expense of another, robustness has been introduced to a COPV by a combination of a modified resin and

  11. Reusable plasmonic aptasensors: using a single nanoparticle to establish a calibration curve and to detect analytes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Longhua; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate plasmonic aptasensors that allow a single nanoparticle (NP) to generate a calibration curve and to detect analytes. The proposed reusable aptasensors have significant advantages over conventional single-NP based assays in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility.

  12. Segment Specification for the Payload Segment of the Reusable Reentry Satellite: Rodent Module Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) System is composed of the payload segment (PS), vehicle segment (VS), and mission support (MS) segments. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the RRS Rodent Module (RM).

  13. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint-4 Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    This study provides for development and test verification of a thermal model used for prediction of joint heating environments, structural temperatures and seal erosions in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Nozzle Joint-4. The heating environments are a result of rapid pressurization of the joint free volume assuming a leak path has occurred in the filler material used for assembly gap close out. Combustion gases flow along the leak path from nozzle environment to joint O-ring gland resulting in local heating to the metal housing and erosion of seal materials. Analysis of this condition was based on usage of the NASA Joint Pressurization Routine (JPR) for environment determination and the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) for structural temperature prediction. Model generated temperatures, pressures and seal erosions are compared to hot fire test data for several different leak path situations. Investigated in the hot fire test program were nozzle joint-4 O-ring erosion sensitivities to leak path width in both open and confined joint geometries. Model predictions were in generally good agreement with the test data for the confined leak path cases. Worst case flight predictions are provided using the test-calibrated model. Analysis issues are discussed based on model calibration procedures.

  14. Multiple Changes to Reusable Solid Rocket Motors, Identifying Hidden Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.; McCann, Bradley Q.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) baseline is subject to various changes. Changes are necessary due to safety and quality improvements, environmental considerations, vendor changes, obsolescence issues, etc. The RSRM program has a goal to test changes on full-scale static test motors prior to flight due to the unique RSRM operating environment. Each static test motor incorporates several significant changes and numerous minor changes. Flight motors often implement multiple changes simultaneously. While each change is individually verified and assessed, the potential for changes to interact constitutes additional hidden risk. Mitigating this risk depends upon identification of potential interactions. Therefore, the ATK Thiokol Propulsion System Safety organization initiated the use of a risk interaction matrix to identify potential interactions that compound risk. Identifying risk interactions supports flight and test motor decisions. Uncovering hidden risks of a full-scale static test motor gives a broader perspective of the changes being tested. This broader perspective compels the program to focus on solutions for implementing RSRM changes with minimal/mitigated risk. This paper discusses use of a change risk interaction matrix to identify test challenges and uncover hidden risks to the RSRM program.

  15. Orbiting Depot and Reusable Lander for Lunar Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    A document describes a conceptual transportation system that would support exploratory visits by humans to locations dispersed across the surface of the Moon and provide transport of humans and cargo to sustain one or more permanent Lunar outpost. The system architecture reflects requirements to (1) minimize the amount of vehicle hardware that must be expended while maintaining high performance margins and (2) take advantage of emerging capabilities to produce propellants on the Moon while also enabling efficient operation using propellants transported from Earth. The system would include reusable single- stage lander spacecraft and a depot in a low orbit around the Moon. Each lander would have descent, landing, and ascent capabilities. A crew-taxi version of the lander would carry a pressurized crew module; a cargo version could carry a variety of cargo containers. The depot would serve as a facility for storage and for refueling with propellants delivered from Earth or propellants produced on the Moon. The depot could receive propellants and cargo sent from Earth on a variety of spacecraft. The depot could provide power and orbit maintenance for crew vehicles from Earth and could serve as a safe haven for lunar crews pending transport back to Earth.

  16. Note: Reliable and reusable ultrahigh vacuum optical viewports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, P.; Gupta, A. Sen

    2012-04-01

    We report a simple technique for the realization of ultrahigh vacuum optical viewports. The technique relies on using specially designed thin copper knife-edges and using a thin layer of Vacseal® on tip of the knife-edges between the optical flat and the ConFlat® (CF) flange. The design of the windows is such that it gives uniform pressure on the flat without breaking it. The assembled window is a complete unit, which can be mounted directly onto a CF flange of the vacuum chamber. It can be removed and reused without breaking the window seal. The design is reliable as more than a dozen such windows have survived several bake out and cooling cycles and have been leak tested up to 10-11 Torr l/s level with a commercial Helium leak detector. The advantages of this technique are ease of assembly and leak proof sealing that survives multiple temperature cycling making the windows reliable and reusable.

  17. Dynamics sensor validation for reusable launch vehicle propulsion.

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, J. P.

    1998-05-27

    Expert Microsystems teamed with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a DOE contractor, to develop an innovative dynamics sensor validation system under a Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase I contract with NASA. The project improves launch vehicle mission safety and system dependability by enabling rapid development and cost effective maintenance of embeddable real-time software to reliably detect process-critical sensor failures. The project focused on verifying the feasibility of two innovative software methods developed by ANL to provide high fidelity sensor data validation for nuclear power generating stations, the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) algorithm and the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) algorithm, as core elements of a commercial Dynamics Sensor Validation System (DSVS). The research verified that ANL algorithms enable highly reliable data validation for high frequency Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) dynamics sensors, such as accelerometers and strain gauges. Phase I culminated in production of a prototype run-time module which validates SSME flight accelerometer data with very high reliability. The resulting sensor validation development system is widely applicable to reusable launch vehicle (RLV) and ground support control and monitoring systems.

  18. Robust adaptive backstepping control for reentry reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Zhong; Du, Yijiang

    2016-09-01

    During the reentry process of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), the large range of flight envelope will not only result in high nonlinearities, strong coupling and fast time-varying characteristics of the attitude dynamics, but also result in great uncertainties in the atmospheric density, aerodynamic coefficients and environmental disturbances, etc. In order to attenuate the effects of these problems on the control performance of the reentry process, a robust adaptive backstepping control (RABC) strategy is proposed for RLV in this paper. This strategy consists of two-loop controllers designed via backstepping method. Both the outer and the inner loop adopt a robust adaptive controller, which can deal with the disturbances and uncertainties by the variable-structure term with the estimation of their bounds. The outer loop can track the desired attitude by the design of virtual control-the desired angular velocity, while the inner one can track the desired angular velocity by the design of control torque. Theoretical analysis indicates that the closed-loop system under the proposed control strategy is globally asymptotically stable. Even if the boundaries of the disturbances and uncertainties are unknown, the attitude can track the desired value accurately. Simulation results of a certain RLV demonstrate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  19. Aeroheating Design Issues for Reusable Launch Vehicles: A Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. Vincent; Thompson, Richard A.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of basic aeroheating design issues for Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV), which addresses the application of hypersonic ground-based testing, and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and engineering codes, is presented. Challenges inherent to the prediction of aeroheating environments required for the successful design of the RLV Thermal Protection System (TPS) are discussed in conjunction with the importance of employing appropriate experimental/computational tools. The impact of the information garnered by using these tools in the resulting analyses, ultimately enhancing the RLV TPS design is illustrated. A wide range of topics is presented in this overview; e.g. the impact of flow physics issues such as boundary-layer transition, including effects of distributed and discrete roughness, shock-shock interactions, and flow separation/reattachment. Also, the benefit of integrating experimental and computational studies to gain an improved understanding of flow phenomena is illustrated. From computational studies, the effect of low-density conditions and of uncertainties in material surface properties on the computed heating rates a r e highlighted as well as the significant role of CFD in improving the Outer Mold Line (OML) definition to reduce aeroheating while maintaining aerodynamic performance. Appropriate selection of the TPS design trajectories and trajectory shaping to mitigate aeroheating levels and loads are discussed. Lastly, an illustration of an aeroheating design process is presented whereby data from hypersonic wind-tunnel tests are integrated with predictions from CFD codes and engineering methods to provide heating environments along an entry trajectory as required for TPS design.

  20. Aeroheating Design Issues for Reusable Launch Vehicles: A Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. Vincent; Thompson, Richard A.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of basic aeroheating design issues for Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV), which addresses the application of hypersonic ground-based testing, and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and engineering codes, is presented. Challenges inherent to the prediction of aeroheating environments required for the successful design of the RLV Thermal Protection System (TPS) are discussed in conjunction with the importance of employing appropriate experimental/computational tools. The impact of the information garnered by using these tools in the resulting analyses, ultimately enhancing the RLV TPS design is illustrated. A wide range of topics is presented in this overview; e.g. the impact of flow physics issues such as boundary-layer transition, including effects of distributed and discrete roughness, shockshock interactions, and flow separation/reattachment. Also, the benefit of integrating experimental and computational studies to gain an improved understanding of flow phenomena is illustrated. From computational studies, the effect of low-density conditions and of uncertainties in material surface properties on the computed heating rates are highlighted as well as the significant role of CFD in improving the Outer Mold Line (OML) definition to reduce aeroheating while maintaining aerodynamic performance. Appropriate selection of the TPS design trajectories and trajectory shaping to mitigate aeroheating levels and loads are discussed. Lastly, an illustration of an aeroheating design process is presented whereby data from hypersonic wind-tunnel tests are integrated with predictions from CFD codes and engineering methods to provide heating environments along an entry trajectory as required for TPS design.

  1. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Reusable thrust chamber and injector concepts were evaluated for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine (OME). Parametric engine calculations were carried out by computer program for N2O4/amine, LOX/amine and LOX/hydrocarbon propellant combinations for engines incorporating regenerative cooled and insulated columbium thrust chambers. The calculation methods are described including the fuel vortex film cooling method of combustion gas temperature control, and performance prediction. A method of acceptance of a regeneratively cooled heat rejection reduction using a silicone oil additive was also demonstrated by heated tube heat transfer testing. Regeneratively cooled thrust chamber operation was also demonstrated where the injector was characterized for the OME application with a channel wall regenerative thrust chamber. Bomb stability testing of the demonstration chambers/injectors demonstrated recovery for the nominal design of acoustic cavities. Cavity geometry changes were also evaluated to assess their damping margin. Performance and combustion stability was demonstrated of the originally developed 10 inch diameter combustion pattern operating in an 8 inch diameter thrust chamber.

  2. Predictor-Corrector Entry Guidance for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youssef, Hussein; Chowdhry, Rajiv; Lee, Howard; Zimmerman, Curtis; Brandon, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An online entry guidance algorithm has been developed using a predictor-corrector approach. The algorithm is designed for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) and is demonstrated by using, the X-33 model. The objective of the design is to handle widely dispersed entry conditions and deliver the vehicle at the Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) interface box within an acceptable tolerance and without violating any of the vehicle physical constraints. Combination of several control variables is used in testing the performance and computational requirement of the algorithm. The control variables are the bank angle, angle-of-attack and the time for roll reversal. The bank angle and angle-of-attack profiles are the nominal profiles plus the perturbations in each direction. The initial guess of the bank profile is a 45 degrees bank angle with reversal at 360 seconds from liftoff. A six-element state vector is propagated to the TAEM interface box through the integration of the equations of motion (EOM). Altitude, heading and range errors are computed between the desired and the achieved state at the TAEM interface. These errors are used to correct the initial guess of the control variables. This process is repeated until the errors meet an acceptable level at the TAEM interface. Several numerical optimization methods are used to evaluate the convergent property of the predictor-predictor methodology. Successful results are demonstrated using the X-33 model.

  3. Characterization of a reusable PRESAGE® 3D dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, T.; Adamovics, J.; Oldham, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates a reusable PRESAGE® 3D dosimeter (Presage-RU), which would improve cost-effectiveness and facilitate wider implementation of comprehensive, high resolution 3D dosimetry. Small (1x1x4.5 cm) and large (8 cm diameter, 4.5 cm length) sample dosimeters were irradiated multiple times to characterize dose response (i.e. radiation-induced change in optical density (ΔOD)), optical clearing rate, and dose distribution stability. Presage- RU exhibited an initial dose response sensitivity of 0.0119 ΔOD/(cm-Gy), a reduction in response with subsequent irradiations, and a small, permanent ΔOD (~1-6% of initial signal) following each irradiation. Dosimeters optically cleared at an exponential rate (average T1/2 = 24.8±3.6 h), and were effectively cleared after ~5-8 days. 3D gamma analysis (3%/3mm, 10% dose threshold) of a 4-field box plan applied to the large dosimeter showed good agreement following initial irradiation (96.6% passing), but a reduction in passing rate (89.1% passing) with subsequent irradiation. Further study is warranted to fully assess and quantify the performance of Presage-RU for repeat irradiations.

  4. Reusable fiber optic immunofluorosensor for rapid detection of pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Nabil A.; Valdes, James J.; Thompson, Roy G.; Menking, Darrell E.; Wong, Rosie B.; Eldefrawi, Mohyee E.

    1993-05-01

    Quartz fibers coated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or antibody (Ab) are used as biosensors utilizing total reflectance fluorescence for the rapid detection of pesticides. The enzyme biosensor was constructed by immobilizing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-tagged eel electric organ AChE on quartz fibers. The fluorescent signal was generated by hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh) that is present in the perfusate. Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate anticholinesterase (AntiChE) insecticides inhibited AChE and reduced the fluorescent quenching resulting from AChE hydrolysis. A parathion biosensor was constructed by immobilizing casein-parathion on the quartz fibers, that bound rabbit antiparathion antibody. The optical signal was generated by perfusing the fibers with fluorescein-labeled goat antirabbit IgG. Free parathion inhibited the binding of antiparathion Abs and reduced the optical signal and provided the basis for detection of parathion. Another immunosensor developed detected the herbicide PursuitR by utilizing the reversible binding of a fluorescein-Pursuit derivative to antiPursuit Abs immobilized on the fiber. Unlabeled Pursuit competed effectively and displaced the bound fluorescent compound in a dose-dependent manner. The sensor discriminated effectively between Pursuit-like and structurally unrelated herbicides. The immunosensor offers the advantage of continuous monitoring, ease of operation, speed of detection, low cost, stability, specificity, matrix transparency, and reusability.

  5. Nonlinear Control of a Reusable Rocket Engine for Life Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Holmes, Michael S.; Ray, Asok

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual development of a life-extending control system where the objective is to achieve high performance and structural durability of the plant. A life-extending controller is designed for a reusable rocket engine via damage mitigation in both the fuel (H2) and oxidizer (O2) turbines while achieving high performance for transient responses of the combustion chamber pressure and the O2/H2 mixture ratio. The design procedure makes use of a combination of linear and nonlinear controller synthesis techniques and also allows adaptation of the life-extending controller module to augment a conventional performance controller of the rocket engine. The nonlinear aspect of the design is achieved using non-linear parameter optimization of a prescribed control structure. Fatigue damage in fuel and oxidizer turbine blades is primarily caused by stress cycling during start-up, shutdown, and transient operations of a rocket engine. Fatigue damage in the turbine blades is one of the most serious causes for engine failure.

  6. Reusability study with organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridges

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.; Kissane, R.

    1997-11-01

    The question often arises about the reusability of organic vapor adsorption beds, such as air- purifying respirator cartridges, after periods of storage without use (airflow). The extremes of practice are: (1) use once and discard or (2) reuse multiple times assuming the protection is still afforded. The goal is to develop data and a model to provide guidance to decide when reuse is acceptable. They have studied the loss of protection of a commercial organic vapor cartridge after storage for varying periods of time. Three vapors (ethyl acetate, methylene chloride, and hexane) were individually loaded onto test cartridges using a breathing pump. Extents of loading, times of loading, and vapor concentrations were varied. After selected periods of storage the cartridges were again challenged with the same vapor concentration. The increases in concentration of a vapor in the effluent air (simulated breaths) from a cartridge immediately upon reuse depended on the storage period, the extent of loading during initial use, the volatility of the vapor, and the water vapor adsorbed, but not much on the vapor concentration.

  7. Estimating reusability of organic air-purifying respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Wood, Gerry O; Snyder, Jay L

    2011-10-01

    Reuse of organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridges after a job or shift can provide economy and energy savings. However, standards and manufacturers' guidance discourage reuse, presumably due to a lack of quantitative objective exposure and use information. Storage and simulated reuse laboratory studies and modeling have been done to provide such information. Two important parameters of breakthrough curves, midpoint time (related to adsorption capacity) and midpoint slope (related to adsorption rate), have been shown to be unchanged during storage for reuse. Extrapolations to smaller breakthrough concentrations and times can be made from this reference breakthrough and time. Significant step increases in breakthrough concentration upon cartridge reuse have been observed in some cases. Values of immediate breakthrough concentrations upon reuse (IBURs) have been measured and correlated. The Dubinin/Radushkevich adsorption isotherm equation has been used to estimate maximum IBURs, which depend on many factors, including conditions and duration of first use. An empirical equation describing rate of approach to maximum IBUR as a function of storage time has been developed to provide intermediate IBUR estimates, which are also very dependent on the vapor identity and extent of first-use loading. Using these equations, IBUR estimates with appropriate safety factors can be compared with the allowable breakthrough concentration to help the Industrial Hygienist make reusability decisions. PMID:21936700

  8. First Stage of a Highly Reliable Reusable Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloesel, Kurt J.; Pickrel, Jonathan B.; Sayles, Emily L.; Wright, Michael; Marriott, Darin; Holland, Leo; Kuznetsov, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic launch assist has the potential to provide a highly reliable reusable first stage to a space access system infrastructure at a lower overall cost. This paper explores the benefits of a smaller system that adds the advantages of a high specific impulse air-breathing stage and supersonic launch speeds. The method of virtual specific impulse is introduced as a tool to emphasize the gains afforded by launch assist. Analysis shows launch assist can provide a 278-s virtual specific impulse for a first-stage solid rocket. Additional trajectory analysis demonstrates that a system composed of a launch-assisted first-stage ramjet plus a bipropellant second stage can provide a 48-percent gross lift-off weight reduction versus an all-rocket system. The combination of high-speed linear induction motors and ramjets is identified, as the enabling technologies and benchtop prototypes are investigated. The high-speed response of a standard 60 Hz linear induction motor was tested with a pulse width modulated variable frequency drive to 150 Hz using a 10-lb load, achieving 150 mph. A 300-Hz stator-compensated linear induction motor was constructed and static-tested to 1900 lbf average. A matching ramjet design was developed for use on the 300-Hz linear induction motor.

  9. A generalized reusable guidance algorithm for optimal aerobraking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukeman, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    A practical real-time guidance algorithm was developed for guiding aerobraking vehicles in such a way that the maximum heating rate, the maximum structural loads, and the post-aeropass delta-V requirements (for post-aeropass orbit insertion) are all minimized. The algorithm is general and reusable in the sense that a minimum of assumptions are made, thus minimizing the number of gains and mission-dependent parameters that must be laboriously determined prior to a particular mission. A particularly interesting feature is that inplane guidance performance is tuned by simply adjusting one mission-dependent parameter, the bank margin; similarly, the out-of-plane guidance performance is turned by simply adjusting a plane controller time constant. Other objectives in the algorithm development are simplicity, efficiency, and ease of use. The algorithm is developed for, but not necessarily restricted to, a single pass mission and a trimmed vehicle with a bank angle modulation as the method of trajectory control. Guidance performance is demonstrated via results obtained using this algorithm integrated into an aerobraking test-bed program. Comparisons are made with numerical results from a version of the aerobraking guidance algorithm that was to be flown onboard NASA's aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) vehicle. Promising results are obtained with a minimum of development effort.

  10. A microfabricated gecko-inspired controllable and reusable dry adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Sathya; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Geckos utilize a robust reversible adhesive to repeatedly attach and detach from a variety of vertical and inverted surfaces, using structurally anisotropic micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures. These fibers, when suitably articulated, are able to control the real area of contact and thereby generate high-to-low van der Waals forces. Key characteristics of the natural system include highly anisotropic adhesion and shear forces for controllable attachment, a high adhesion to initial preload force ratio (μ‧) of 8-16, lack of inter-fiber self-adhesion, and operation over more than 30 000 cycles without loss of adhesion performance. A highly reusable synthetic adhesive has been developed using tilted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) half-cylinder micron-scale fibers, retaining up to 77% of the initial value over 10 000 repeated test cycles against a flat glass puck. In comparison with other gecko-inspired adhesives tested over 10 000 cycles or more thus far, this paper reports the highest value of μ‧, along with a large shear force of ˜78 kPa, approaching the 88-226 kPa range of gecko toes. The anisotropic adhesion forces are close to theoretical estimates from the Kendall peel model, quantitatively showing how lateral shearing articulation in a manner similar to the gecko may be used to obtain adhesion anisotropy with synthetic fibers using a combination of tilt angle and anisotropic fiber geometry.

  11. Aspect-Oriented Design with Reusable Aspect Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzle, Jörg; Al Abed, Wisam; Fleurey, Franck; Jézéquel, Jean-Marc; Klein, Jacques

    The idea behind Aspect-Oriented Modeling (AOM) is to apply aspect-oriented techniques to (software) models with the aim of modularizing crosscutting concerns. This can be done within different modeling notations, at different levels of abstraction, and at different moments during the software development process. This paper demonstrates the applicability of AOM during the software design phase by presenting parts of an aspect-oriented design of a crisis management system. The design solution proposed in this paper is based on the Reusable Aspect Models (RAM) approach, which allows a modeler to express the structure and behavior of a complex system using class, state and sequence diagrams encapsulated in several aspect models. The paper describes how the model of the "create mission" functionality of the server backend can be decomposed into 23 inter-dependent aspect models. The presentation of the design is followed by a discussion on the lessons learned from the case study. Next, RAM is compared to 8 other AOM approaches according to 6 criteria: language, concern composition, asymmetric and symmetric composition, maturity, and tool support. To conclude the paper, a discussion section points out the features of RAM that specifically support reuse.

  12. Chemical switch based reusable dual optoelectronic sensor for nitrite.

    PubMed

    Vishnuvardhan, V; Kala, R; Prasada Rao, T

    2008-08-01

    An optical sensor was developed for sensing of nitrite based on the monotonous decrease in absorbance of Rhodamine 6G at 525 nm (the absorbance maximum of dye) with increasing concentration of nitrite. This sensor also permits naked eye detection. Various parameters like concentrations of sulphuric acid and Rhodamine 6G, response time and stability were varied and optimal conditions are reported. Under these conditions, the developed sensor enables the determination of nitrite in the concentration range 0-12.18 micromol L(-1). The nitrite response is selective as 60-2.5x10(5) fold amounts of several anions and cations have no deleterious effect. The addition of nitrite to Rhodamine 6G dye causes hypsochromic shift from 525 to 385 nm while several other anions like I(-), SCN(-), ClO(4)(-), [HgI(4)](2-) and [Zn (SCN)(4)](2-) showed a bathochromatic shift from 525 to 575 nm. The sequential addition of nitrite and sulphamic to Rhodamine 6G in 0.75 mol L(-1) sulphuric acid solution results in switching of "ON" and "OFF" absorbance. The time elapse and concentration of sulphamic acid required for chemical switching was also established. Similar "ON" and "OFF" switching behaviour was observed in fluorescence studies also. This enabled the design and development of reusable chemical switch based dual optoelectronic sensor, for monitoring of traces of nitrite in environmental and food samples. The plausible mechanism for above switching behaviour is also proposed.

  13. Lockheed Martin approach to a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvin, John D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper discusses Lockheed Martin's perspective on the development of a cost effective Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Critical to a successful Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) program are; an economic development plan sensitive to fiscal constraints; a vehicle concept satisfying present and future US launch needs; and an operations concept commensurate with a market driven program. Participation in the economic plan by government, industry, and the commercial sector is a key element of integrating our development plan and funding profile. The RLV baseline concept design, development evolution and several critical trade studies illustrate the superior performance achieved by our innovative approach to the problem of SSTO. Findings from initial aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic wind tunnel tests and trajectory analyses on this concept confirm the superior characteristics of the lifting body shape combined with the Linear Aerospike rocket engine. This Aero Ballistic Rocket (ABR) concept captures the essence of The Skunk Works approach to SSTO RLV technology integration and system engineering. These programmatic and concept development topics chronicle the key elements to implementing an innovative market driven next generation RLV.

  14. Reusable, adhesiveless and arrayed in-plane microfluidic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, R.; Meng, E.

    2011-05-01

    A reusable, arrayed interconnect capable of providing multiple simultaneous connections to and from a microfluidic device in an in-plane manner without the use of adhesives is presented. This method uses a 'pin-and-socket' design in which an SU-8 anchor houses multiple polydimethysiloxane septa (the socket) that each receive a syringe needle (the pin). A needle array containing multiple commercially available 33G (203 µm outer diameter) needles (up to eight) spaced either 2.54 or 1 mm (center-to-center) pierces the septa to access the microfluidic device interior. Finite element modeling and photoelastic stress experiments were used to determine the stress distribution during needle insertion; these results guided the SU-8 septa housing and septa design. The impact of needle diameter, needle tip style, insertion rate and number of needles on pre-puncture, post-puncture and removal forces was characterized. Pressurized connections to SU-8 channel systems withstood up to 62 kPa of pressurized water and maintained 25 kPa of pressurized water for over 24 h. The successful integration and functionality of the interconnect design with surface micromachined Parylene C microchannels was verified using Rhodamine B dye. Dual septa systems to access a single microchannel were demonstrated. Arrayed interconnects were compatible with integrated microfluidic systems featuring electrochemical sensors and actuators.

  15. Air liquefaction and enrichment system propulsion in reusable launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W.H.; Yi, A.C.

    1994-07-01

    A concept is shown for a fully reusable, Earth-to-orbit launch vehicle with horizontal takeoff and landing, employing an air-turborocket for low speed and a rocket for high-speed acceleration, both using liquid hydrogen for fuel. The turborocket employs a modified liquid air cycle to supply the oxidizer. The rocket uses 90% pure liquid oxygen as its oxidizer that is collected from the atmosphere, separated, and stored during operation of the turborocket from about Mach 2 to 5 or 6. The takeoff weight and the thrust required at takeoff are markedly reduced by collecting the rocket oxidizer in-flight. This article shows an approach and the corresponding technology needs for using air liquefaction and enrichment system propulsion in a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle. Reducing the trajectory altitude at the end of collection reduces the wing area and increases payload. The use of state-of-the-art materials, such as graphite polyimide, in a direct substitution for aluminum or aluminum-lithium alloy, is critical to meet the structure weight objective for SSTO. Configurations that utilize `waverider` aerodynamics show great promise to reduce the vehicle weight. 5 refs.

  16. Advanced manned earth-to-orbit vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Charles H.

    1986-10-01

    Advanced manned launch vehicle concepts which are designed to meet the space transportation architecture and mission needs for the early 21st century are described. Concepts are described which are based both on modest (evolutionary) and revolutionary advancements in performance technologies but with emphasis on defining operations cost. Design options feature fully reusable, vertical-takeoff, horizontal-landing, rocket-powered concepts and include a variety of possible staging arrangements depending on the desired mission emphasis and the available technologies.

  17. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  18. Artist concept of X-33 and Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This artist's rendering depicts the NASA/Lockheed Martin X-33 technology demonstrator alongside the Venturestar, a Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The X-33, a half-scale prototype for the Venturestar, is scheduled to be flight tested in 1999. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, plays a key role in the development and flight testing of the X-33. The RLV technology program is a cooperative agreement between NASA and industry. The goal of the RLV technology program is to enable signifigant reductions in the cost of access to space, and to promote the creation and delivery of new space services and other activities that will improve U.S. economic competitiveness. NASA Headquarter's Office of Space Access and Technology is overseeing the RLV program, which is being managed by the RLV Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located in Huntsville, Alabama. The X-33 was a wedged-shaped subscale technology demonstrator prototype of a potential future Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) that Lockheed Martin had dubbed VentureStar. The company had hoped to develop VentureStar early this century. Through demonstration flight and ground research, NASA's X-33 program was to provide the information needed for industry representatives such as Lockheed Martin to decide whether to proceed with the development of a full-scale, commercial RLV program. A full-scale, single-stage-to-orbit RLV was to dramatically increase reliability and lower costs of putting a pound of payload into space, from the current figure of $10,000 to $1,000. Reducing the cost associated with transporting payloads in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by using a commercial RLV was to create new opportunities for space access and significantly improve U.S. economic competitiveness in the world-wide launch marketplace. NASA expected to be a customer, not the operator, of the commercial RLV. The X-33 design was based on a lifting body shape with two revolutionary 'linear

  19. Simple and reusable picoinjector for liquid delivery via nanofluidics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shunbo; Cao, Wenbin; Hui, Yu Sanna; Wen, Weijia

    2014-03-01

    Precise control of sample volume is one of the most important functions in lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems, especially for chemical and biological reactions. The common approach used for liquid delivery involves the employment of capillaries and microstructures for generating a droplet which has a volume in the nanoliter or picoliter range. Here, we report a novel approach for constructing a picoinjector which is based on well-controlled electroosmotic (EO) flow to electrokinetically drive sample solutions. This picoinjector comprises an array of interconnected nanochannels for liquid delivery. Such technique for liquid delivery has the advantages of well-controlled sample volume and reusable nanofluidic chip, and it was reported for the first time. In the study of the pumping process for this picoinjector, the EO flow rate was determined by the intensity of the fluorescent probe. The influence of ion concentration in electrolyte solutions over the EO flow rate was also investigated and discussed. The application of this EO-driven picoinjector for chemical reactions was demonstrated by the reaction between Fluo-4 and calcium chloride with the reaction cycle controlled by the applied square waves of different duty cycles. The precision of our device can reach down to picoliter per second, which is much smaller than that of most existing technologies. This new approach, thus, opens further possibilities of adopting nanofluidics for well-controlled chemical reactions with particular applications in nanoparticle synthesis, bimolecular synthesis, drug delivery, and diagnostic testing. PACS: 85.85.+ j; 87.15.hj; 82.39.Wj

  20. Optimization of Turbine Blade Design for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei

    1998-01-01

    To facilitate design optimization of turbine blade shape for reusable launching vehicles, appropriate techniques need to be developed to process and estimate the characteristics of the design variables and the response of the output with respect to the variations of the design variables. The purpose of this report is to offer insight into developing appropriate techniques for supporting such design and optimization needs. Neural network and polynomial-based techniques are applied to process aerodynamic data obtained from computational simulations for flows around a two-dimensional airfoil and a generic three- dimensional wing/blade. For the two-dimensional airfoil, a two-layered radial-basis network is designed and trained. The performances of two different design functions for radial-basis networks, one based on the accuracy requirement, whereas the other one based on the limit on the network size. While the number of neurons needed to satisfactorily reproduce the information depends on the size of the data, the neural network technique is shown to be more accurate for large data set (up to 765 simulations have been used) than the polynomial-based response surface method. For the three-dimensional wing/blade case, smaller aerodynamic data sets (between 9 to 25 simulations) are considered, and both the neural network and the polynomial-based response surface techniques improve their performance as the data size increases. It is found while the relative performance of two different network types, a radial-basis network and a back-propagation network, depends on the number of input data, the number of iterations required for radial-basis network is less than that for the back-propagation network.

  1. Mars Conjunction Crewed Missions With a Reusable Hybrid Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Raymond G.; Strange, Nathan J.; Qu, Min; Hatten, Noble

    2015-01-01

    A new crew Mars architecture has been developed that provides many potential benefits for NASA-led human Mars moons and surface missions beginning in the 2030s or 2040s. By using both chemical and electric propulsion systems where they are most beneficial and maintaining as much orbital energy as possible, the Hybrid spaceship that carries crew round trip to Mars is pre-integrated before launch and can be delivered to orbit by a single launch. After check-out on the way to cis-lunar space, it is refueled and can travel round trip to Mars in less than 1100 days, with a minimum of 300 days in Mars vicinity (opportunity dependent). The entire spaceship is recaptured into cis-lunar space and can be reused. The spaceship consists of a habitat for 4 crew attached to the Hybrid propulsion stage which uses long duration electric and chemical in-space propulsion technologies that are in use today. The hybrid architecture's con-ops has no in-space assembly of the crew transfer vehicle and requires only rendezvous of crew in a highly elliptical Earth orbit for arrival at and departure from the spaceship. The crew transfer vehicle does not travel to Mars so it only needs be able to last in space for weeks and re-enter at lunar velocities. The spaceship can be refueled and resupplied for multiple trips to Mars (every other opportunity). The hybrid propulsion stage for crewed transits can also be utilized for cargo delivery to Mars every other opportunity in a reusable manner to pre-deploy infrastructure required for Mars vicinity operations. Finally, the Hybrid architecture provides evolution options for mitigating key long-duration space exploration risks, including crew microgravity and radiation exposure.

  2. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 2: Technical summary. Book 1: Expendable second stage/reusable booster system definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A systems analysis of the expendable second stage/reusable booster system is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) mission/system requirements, (2) spacecraft performance, (3) trajectories, (4) aerodynamics, (5) stability and control, (6) loads, (7) heating, and (8) acoustic environment.

  3. Rigid and flexible OLEDs: prototypes to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monz, Stefan; Wolf, Konrad; Möbius, Hildegard; Blankenbach, Karlheinz

    2011-03-01

    Major achievements of this research project on rigid and flexible OLEDs are: lifetime enhancement by advanced constant luminance (L) operation, integration into textiles and furthermore, the prototype production on flexible PET/ITO substrates of polymer OLEDs. Our OLEDs were manufactured with spin-coating assisted by ink-jet printing. We introduced constant luminance operation (instead of the usual constant current) which was implemented in order to extend the overall lifetime of OLEDs. A threefold lifetime improvement was achieved by maintaining 50% luminance using an advanced microcontroller-based lifetime(LT) model. Various approaches to textile integration and evaluation of environmental issues in clothes (e.g. moisture) were investigated.

  4. Project UM-HAUL: A self-unloading reusable lunar lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a lunar base is technologically and financially challenging. Given the necessary resources and political support, it can be done. In addition to the geopolitical obstacles, however, there are logistical problems involved in establishing such bases that can only be overcome with the acquisition of a significant transportation and communications network in the Earth-Moon spatial region. Considering the significant number of payloads that will be required in this process, the mass-specific cost of launching these payloads, and the added risk and cost of human presence in space, it is clearly desirable to automate major parts of such an operation. One very costly and time-consuming factor in this picture is the delivery of payloads to the Moon. Foreseeable payloads would include atmospheric modules, inflatable habitat kits, energy and oxygen plant elements, ground vehicles, laboratory modules, crew supplies, etc. The duration of high-risk human presence on the Moon could be greatly reduced if all such payloads were delivered to the prospective base site in advance of crew arrival. In this view, the idea of a 'Self-Unloading Reusable Lunar Lander' (SURLL) arises naturally. The general scenario depicts the lander being brought to low lunar orbit (LLO) from Earth atop a generic Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). From LLO, the lander shuttles payloads down to the lunar surface, where, by means of some resident, detachable unloading device, it deploys the payloads and returns to orbit. The general goal is for the system to perform with maximum payload capability, automation, and reliability, while also minimizing environmental hazards, servicing needs, and mission costs. Our response to this demand is UM-HAUL, or the UnManned Heavy pAyload Unloader and Lander. The complete study includes a system description, along with a preliminary cost analysis and a design status assessment.

  5. Payload Performance Analysis for a Reusable Two-Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Beaty, James R.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a unique approach in the development of a reusable launch vehicle where, instead of designing the vehicle to be reusable from its inception, as was done for the Space Shuttle, an expendable two stage launch vehicle is evolved over time into a reusable launch vehicle. To accomplish this objective, each stage is made reusable by adding the systems necessary to perform functions such as thermal protection and landing, without significantly altering the primary subsystems and outer mold line of the original expendable vehicle. In addition, some of the propellant normally used for ascent is used instead for additional propulsive maneuvers after staging in order to return both stages to the launch site, keep loads within acceptable limits and perform a soft landing. This paper presents a performance analysis that was performed to investigate the feasibility of this approach by quantifying the reduction in payload capability of the original expendable launch vehicle after accounting for the mass additions, trajectory changes and increased propellant requirements necessary for reusability. Results show that it is feasible to return both stages to the launch site with a positive payload capability equal to approximately 50 percent of an equivalent expendable launch vehicle. Further discussion examines the ability to return a crew/cargo capsule to the launch site and presents technical challenges that would have to be overcome.

  6. Weight trends for a fully reusable advanced single-stage shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, I. O.; Lemessurier, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The rate at which subsystem weights grow with vehicle gross weight is assessed and is shown to be critical to the efficiency of large Earth to orbit transports. The overall trend, however, is a reduction in the inerts as a percentage of gross weight as the vehicle size is increased. For this reason, the larger the vehicle, the greater the payload weight delivered per pound of vehicle manufactured. Other critical issues addressed include the effects of wing loading and wing size on wing weight, the effect of entry planform loading on thermal protection system weight, the impact of power demand on cooling system and prime power weight, and tank fineness ratio on insulation weight. The effects of body shape and various internal packaging arrangements on weight and balance are also discussed. The greatest impact on overall vehicle weight is body shape and internal packaging, and could account for weight savings of up to 30 percent in body structure. Other subsystems are important, but the savings are much smaller in relation to overall vehicle weight--individually less than one percent.

  7. Recent Advances in LOX / LH2 Propulsion System for Reusable Vehicle Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokudome, Shinichiro; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Yagishita, Tsuyoshi; Nonaka, Satoshi; Shida, Maki; Mori, Hatsuo; Nakamura, Takeshi

    The third-generation vehicle RVT#3 equipped with a pressure-fed engine, which had upgraded in terms of durability enhancement and a LH2 tank of composite material, successfully performed in repeated flight operation tests; and the vehicle reached its maximum flying altitude of 42m in October 2003. The next step for demonstrating entire sequence of full-scale operation is to put a turbopump-fed system into propulsion system. From a result of primary system analysis, we decided to build an expander-cycle engine by diverting a pair of turbopumps, which had built for another research program, to the present study. A combustion chamber with long cylindrical portion adapted to the engine cycle was also newly made. Two captive firing tests have been conducted with two different thrust control methods, following the component tests of combustor and turbopumps separately conducted. A considerable technical issues recognized in the tests were the robustness enhancement of shaft seal design, the adjustment of shaft stiffness, and start-up operation adapted to the specific engine system. Experimental study of GOX/GH2 RCS thrusters have also been started as a part of a conceptual study of the integration of the propulsion system associated with simplification and reliability improvement of the vehicle system.

  8. Magnetically-refreshable receptor platform structures for reusable nano-biosensor chips.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Haneul; Lee, Dong Jun; Cho, Dong-guk; Park, Juhun; Nam, Ki Wan; Cho, Young Tak; Park, Jae Yeol; Chen, Xing; Hong, Seunghun

    2016-01-29

    We developed a magnetically-refreshable receptor platform structure which can be integrated with quite versatile nano-biosensor structures to build reusable nano-biosensor chips. This structure allows one to easily remove used receptor molecules from a biosensor surface and reuse the biosensor for repeated sensing operations. Using this structure, we demonstrated reusable immunofluorescence biosensors. Significantly, since our method allows one to place receptor molecules very close to a nano-biosensor surface, it can be utilized to build reusable carbon nanotube transistor-based biosensors which require receptor molecules within a Debye length from the sensor surface. Furthermore, we also show that a single sensor chip can be utilized to detect two different target molecules simply by replacing receptor molecules using our method. Since this method does not rely on any chemical reaction to refresh sensor chips, it can be utilized for versatile biosensor structures and virtually-general receptor molecular species.

  9. Magnetically-refreshable receptor platform structures for reusable nano-biosensor chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Haneul; Lee, Dong Jun; Cho, Dong-guk; Park, Juhun; Nam, Ki Wan; Tak Cho, Young; Park, Jae Yeol; Chen, Xing; Hong, Seunghun

    2016-01-01

    We developed a magnetically-refreshable receptor platform structure which can be integrated with quite versatile nano-biosensor structures to build reusable nano-biosensor chips. This structure allows one to easily remove used receptor molecules from a biosensor surface and reuse the biosensor for repeated sensing operations. Using this structure, we demonstrated reusable immunofluorescence biosensors. Significantly, since our method allows one to place receptor molecules very close to a nano-biosensor surface, it can be utilized to build reusable carbon nanotube transistor-based biosensors which require receptor molecules within a Debye length from the sensor surface. Furthermore, we also show that a single sensor chip can be utilized to detect two different target molecules simply by replacing receptor molecules using our method. Since this method does not rely on any chemical reaction to refresh sensor chips, it can be utilized for versatile biosensor structures and virtually-general receptor molecular species.

  10. REUSABLE PROPULSION ARCHITECTURE FOR SUSTAINABLE LOW-COST ACCESS TO SPACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Dankanich, J. W.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    The primary obstacle to any space-based mission is, and has always been, the cost of access to space. Even with impressive efforts toward reusability, no system has come close to lowering the cost a significant amount. It is postulated here, that architectural innovation is necessary to make reusability feasible, not incremental subsystem changes. This paper shows two architectural approaches of reusability that merit further study investments. Both #inherently# have performance increases and cost advantages to make affordable access to space a near term reality. A rocket launched from a subsonic aircraft (specifically the Crossbow methodology) and a momentum exchange tether, reboosted by electrodynamics, offer possibilities of substantial reductions in the total transportation architecture mass - making access-to-space cost-effective. They also offer intangible benefits that reduce risk or offer large growth potential. The cost analysis indicates that approximately a 50% savings is obtained using today#s aerospace materials and practices.

  11. Influence of disposable ('Conchapak') and reusable humidifying systems on the incidence of ventilation pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Daschner, F; Kappstein, I; Schuster, F; Scholz, R; Bauer, E; Joossens, D; Just, H

    1988-02-01

    The contamination of disposable ('Conchapak') and reusable humidifying systems and their influence on the incidence of pneumonia was studied in 116 patients requiring continuous mechanical ventilation therapy. The water reservoirs of 11 (15.9%) of the 69 disposable systems became colonized, but all reusable systems were found to be sterile. In four of the 11 samples, the organisms isolated corresponded with those cultured from tracheal secretions several days before. Ventilator-associated pneumonia occurred in 36 (31.0%) of the patients, but there was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of pneumonia between the patients treated with the disposable or the reusable humidifying systems. Gram-negative bacteria were the predominant organisms isolated from tracheal aspirates of patients who developed ventilator-associated pneumonia. These results suggest that disposable humidifying systems do not influence the rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail. PMID:26264684

  13. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  15. Hub flexibility effects on propfan vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Michael A.; Lawrence, Charles

    1987-01-01

    The significance of hub flexibility in the nonlinear static and dynamic analyses of advanced turboprop blades is assessed. The chosen blade is the 0.175 scale model of the GE-A7-B4 unducted fan blade. A procedure for coupling the effective hub stiffness matrix to an MSC/NASTRAN finite element model is defined and verified. A series of nonlinear static and dynamic analyses are conducted on the blade for both rigid and flexible hug configurations. Results indicate that hub flexibility is significant in the nonlinear static and dynamic analyses of the GE-A7-B4. In order to insure accuracy in analyses of other blades, hub flexibility should always be considered.

  16. Optimal three-dimensional reusable tug trajectories for planetary missions including correction for nodal precession

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsody, J.

    1976-01-01

    Equations are derived by using the maximum principle to maximize the payload of a reusable tug for planetary missions. The analysis includes a correction for precession of the space shuttle orbit. The tug returns to this precessed orbit (within a specified time) and makes the required nodal correction. A sample case is analyzed that represents an inner planet mission as specified by a fixed declination and right ascension of the outgoing asymptote and the mission energy. The reusable stage performance corresponds to that of a typical cryogenic tug. Effects of space shuttle orbital inclination, several trajectory parameters, and tug thrust on payload are also investigated.

  17. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  18. Performance and technical feasibility comparison of reusable launch systems: A synthesis of the ESA winged launcher studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, W.; Grallert, H.

    1996-02-01

    The paper presents a synthesis of the performance and technical feasibility assessment of 7 reusable launcher types, comprising 13 different vehicles, studied by European Industry for ESA in the ESA Winged Launcher Study in the period January 1988 to May 1994. The vehicles comprised single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) and two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) vehicles, propelled by either air-breathing/rocket propulsion or entirely by rocket propulsion. The results showed that an SSTO vehicle of the HOTOL-type, propelled by subsonic combustion air-breathing/rocket engines could barely deliver the specified payload mass and was aerodynamically unstable; that a TSTO vehicle of the Saenger type, employing subsonic combustion airbreathing propulsion in its first stage and rocket propulsion in its second stage, could readily deliver the specified payload mass and was found to be technically feasible and versatile; that an SSTO vehicle of the NASP type, propelled by supersonic combustion airbreathing/rocket propulsion was able to deliver a reduced payload mass, was very complex and required very advanced technologies; that an air-launched rocket propelled vehicle of the Interim HOTOL type, although technically feasible, could deliver only a reduced payload mass, being constrained by the lifting capability of the carrier airplane; that three different, entirely rocket-propelled vehicles could deliver the specified payload mass, were technically feasible but required relatively advanced technologies.

  19. An Architecture for Web-Based E-Learning Promoting Re-Usable Adaptive Educational E-Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios; Karagiannidis, Charalampos; Cardinali, Fabrizio

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the issue of reusability in personalized Web-based learning environments, focusing on the work of the European IST Project KOD (Knowledge on Demand), including the definition of an architecture and the implementation of a system that promotes re-usable adaptive educational e-content. (Author/LRW)

  20. An ECD Approach to Designing for Reusability in Innovative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David M.; Bauer, Malcolm; Mislevy, Robert J.; Behrens, John T.

    The current pace of technological advance has provided an unprecedented opportunity to use innovative simulated tasks in computerized assessment. A primary challenge for the successful use of innovation in assessment rests with the application of sound principles of design to produce a valid assessment. An additional challenge is to maximize the…

  1. Flexible Animation Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1990-01-01

    FLEXAN (Flexible Animation), computer program animating structural dynamics on Evans and Sutherland PS300-series graphics workstation with VAX/VMS host computer. Typical application is animation of spacecraft undergoing structural stresses caused by thermal and vibrational effects. Displays distortions in shape of spacecraft. Program displays single natural mode of vibration, mode history, or any general deformation of flexible structure. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. TOWARDS AN ECONOMICAL FLEXIBILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUDILL, WILLIAM W.; RICHARDSON, L.S.

    AN ARCHITECT AND A SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS COLLABORATED ON THE DESIGN FOR A HIGH SCHOOL, WHICH STRESSED ECONOMY AND FLEXIBILITY. THEY CONSIDERED THREE ASPECTS OF FLEXIBILITY--(1) EXPANDABILITY, (2) CONVERTIBILITY, AND (3) VERSATILITY. EXPANDABILITY IS DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF SITE SELECTION AND PLANNING. CONVERTIBILITY FEATURES IDENTIFIED INCLUDE…

  3. Flexibility within Fidelity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Philip C.; Gosch, Elizabeth; Furr, Jami M.; Sood, Erica

    2008-01-01

    The authors address concerns regarding manual-based treatments, highlighting the role of flexibility and creativity. A cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth anxiety called the Coping Cat program demonstrates the flexible application of manuals and emphasizes the importance of a child-centered, personalized approach that involves the child in the…

  4. Flexibility, Is That All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renes, Wim M.

    This paper discusses the design of flexible and intelligent library buildings. The first section addresses how flexibility, as one of the requirements of a library building, that has high priority in the planning process. Intelligent libraries are considered in the second section, and functionality is stressed. The third section examines…

  5. Flexible Learning Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    One way for colleges to meet the demand for a wider range of learning opportunities for adults in Great Britain is to provide more flexibility within the further education system. The concept of flexible learning involves the modification of delivery systems, specific providing agencies, target populations, specific determinants such as geographic…

  6. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-10-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity--the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice--but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals.

  7. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-01-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity—the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice—but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals. PMID:27734829

  8. Development of design allowables data for adhesives for attaching reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. P.; Carroll, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented from tests to establish design allowables data for the following room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber based adhesives: (1) General Electric's RTV-560; (2) Dow Corning's 93-046; and (3) Martin Marietta's SLA-561. These adhesives are being evaluated for attaching reusable surface insulation to space shuttle structure.

  9. Sound absorption of low-temperature reusable surface insulation candidate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorption data from tests of four candidate low-temperature reusable surface insulation materials are presented. Limitations on the use of the data are discussed, conclusions concerning the effective absorption of the materials are drawn, and the relative significance to Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility test planning of the absorption of each material is assessed.

  10. 14 CFR 431.35 - Acceptable reusable launch vehicle mission risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... launch flight through orbital insertion of an RLV or vehicle stage or flight to outer space, whichever is... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptable reusable launch vehicle mission risk. 431.35 Section 431.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL...

  11. 14 CFR 431.35 - Acceptable reusable launch vehicle mission risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... launch flight through orbital insertion of an RLV or vehicle stage or flight to outer space, whichever is... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptable reusable launch vehicle mission risk. 431.35 Section 431.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL...

  12. 14 CFR 431.35 - Acceptable reusable launch vehicle mission risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... launch flight through orbital insertion of an RLV or vehicle stage or flight to outer space, whichever is... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptable reusable launch vehicle mission risk. 431.35 Section 431.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL...

  13. 14 CFR 431.35 - Acceptable reusable launch vehicle mission risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... launch flight through orbital insertion of an RLV or vehicle stage or flight to outer space, whichever is... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptable reusable launch vehicle mission risk. 431.35 Section 431.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL...

  14. Method of reusably sealing a silicone rubber vacuum bag to a mold for composite manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbach, John (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A silicone rubber vacuum bag for use in composite article manufacture is reusably sealed to a mold, without mechanical clamping means. The mold-mating portion of the bag is primed with a silicone rubber adhesive, which is cured thereto, and a layer of semiadhesive sealer is applied between the primed mold-mating portion of the bag and the mold.

  15. A Framework for Adaptive E-Learning Based on Distributed Re-Usable Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusilovsky, Peter; Nijhavan, Hemanta

    This paper suggests that a way to the new generation of powerful E-learning systems starts on the crossroads of two emerging fields: courseware re-use and adaptive educational systems. The paper presents the KnowledgeTree, a framework for adaptive E-learning based on distributed re-usable learning activities currently under development. The goal…

  16. A literature review on business process modelling: new frontiers of reusability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldin, Laden; de Cesare, Sergio

    2011-08-01

    Business process modelling (BPM) has become fundamental for modern enterprises due to the increasing rate of organisational change. As a consequence, business processes need to be continuously (re-)designed as well as subsequently aligned with the corresponding enterprise information systems. One major problem associated with the design of business processes is reusability. Reuse of business process models has the potential of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of BPM. This article critically surveys the existing literature on the problem of BPM reusability and more specifically on that State-of-the-Art research that can provide or suggest the 'elements' required for the development of a methodology aimed at discovering reusable conceptual artefacts in the form of patterns. The article initially clarifies the definitions of business process and business process model; then, it sets out to explore the previous research conducted in areas that have an impact on reusability in BPM. The article concludes by distilling directions for future research towards the development of apatterns-based approach to BPM; an approach that brings together the contributions made by the research community in the areas of process mining and discovery, declarative approaches and ontologies.

  17. The Role of a Reusable Assessment Framework in Designing Computer-Based Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Young; Bauer, Malcolm

    This paper introduces the concept of a reusable assessment framework (RAF). An RAF contains a library of linked assessment design objects that express: (1) specific set of proficiencies (i.e. the knowledge, skills, and abilities of students for a given content or skill area); (2) the types of evidence that can be used to estimate those…

  18. The effects of environmental exposure on reusable surface insulation for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, P. O.; Morrison, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Coated specimens of reusable surface insulation (RSI) were exposed to alternate radiant heating and atmospheric exposure cycles to study the effects of surface contamination on the RSI coating. Different methods of heating were employed on clean and artificially contaminated specimens to determine the contributions of heating conditions to coating devitrification.

  19. Four Scenarios for Determining the Size and Reusability of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoonenboom, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The best method for determining the size of learning objects (LOs) so as to optimise their reusability has been a topic of debate for years now. Although there appears to be agreement on basic assumptions, developed guidelines and principles are often in conflict. This study shows that this confusion stems from the fact that in the literature,…

  20. In an Economy for Reusable Learning Objects, Who Pulls the Strings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsey, Tim; Tompsett, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    It seems a foregone conclusion that repositories for reusable learning objects (RLOs), based on common standards and supported by suitable search facilities, will foster a global economic market in the production of RLOs. Actual reuse will support producers of high-quality RLOs, and other producers will be unable to compete, i.e. competition…

  1. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 5: Operations and resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The operations and resources required to support the expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster are analyzed. The subjects discussed are: (1) operations plan, (2) facilities utilization and manufacturing plan, (3) engineering and development plan, (4) test plan, (5) logistics and maintenance plan, and (6) program management plan.

  2. A prospective comparison of the costs of reusable and limited-reuse laparoscopic instruments

    PubMed Central

    DesCôteaux, Jean-Gaston; Blackmore, Kay; Parsons, Louise

    1998-01-01

    Objective To compare the cost and performance of 2 types of laparoscopic instrumentation: reusable laparoscopic hook cautery instruments and curved scissors, or limited-reuse laparoscopic hook cautery instruments and curved scissors. Design A randomized trial. Setting The operating room of a tertiary care hospital. Method All general surgeons performing laparoscopic procedures at the hospital were randomized to be supplied with either reusable or limited-reuse hook cautery and curved scissors. Instrument use was recorded, together with principal outcome measures. Outcome measures Life expectancy of the instruments, the number of cases for which they were used, the number, nature and cost of repairs, their purchase cost and surgeon satisfaction. Results Reusable hook cautery instruments were less expensive than their limited-reuse counterparts. Excellent surgeon satisfaction was reported with the use of this type of instrument. The limited-reuse curved scissors arm of the study was terminated early because of a breach in study protocol. Conclusions Reusable hook cautery instruments were better than their limited-reuse counterparts. Rigorous attempts to compare the cost of laparoscopic instruments may be limited by their rapid evolution in design and the availability of many types of instruments on the market. PMID:9575997

  3. Experiences Gained Using a Set of SCORM Compliant Reusable Learning Objects for Teaching Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costelloe, Eileen; Sherry, Elizabeth; Magee, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    A collaboration between three higher education institutions in Ireland and two European partners has resulted in the design and development of reusable learning objects for undergraduate programming students that would assist in their learning. This international project conducted extensive research of over 600 students' examination scripts in…

  4. Fast Flexible Transistors with a Nanotrench Structure

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Ling, Tao; Gong, Shaoqin; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Alice L.; Guo, L. Jay; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-01-01

    The simplification of fabrication processes that can define very fine patterns for large-area flexible radio-frequency (RF) applications is very desirable because it is generally very challenging to realize submicron scale patterns on flexible substrates. Conventional nanoscale patterning methods, such as e-beam lithography, cannot be easily applied to such applications. On the other hand, recent advances in nanoimprinting lithography (NIL) may enable the fabrication of large-area nanoelectronics, especially flexible RF electronics with finely defined patterns, thereby significantly broadening RF applications. Here we report a generic strategy for fabricating high-performance flexible Si nanomembrane (NM)-based RF thin-film transistors (TFTs), capable of over 100 GHz operation in theory, with NIL patterned deep-submicron-scale channel lengths. A unique 3-dimensional etched-trench-channel configuration was used to allow for TFT fabrication compatible with flexible substrates. Optimal device parameters were obtained through device simulation to understand the underlying device physics and to enhance device controllability. Experimentally, a record-breaking 38 GHz maximum oscillation frequency fmax value has been successfully demonstrated from TFTs with a 2 μm gate length built with flexible Si NM on plastic substrates. PMID:27094686

  5. Fast Flexible Transistors with a Nanotrench Structure.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Ling, Tao; Gong, Shaoqin; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Alice L; Guo, L Jay; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-01-01

    The simplification of fabrication processes that can define very fine patterns for large-area flexible radio-frequency (RF) applications is very desirable because it is generally very challenging to realize submicron scale patterns on flexible substrates. Conventional nanoscale patterning methods, such as e-beam lithography, cannot be easily applied to such applications. On the other hand, recent advances in nanoimprinting lithography (NIL) may enable the fabrication of large-area nanoelectronics, especially flexible RF electronics with finely defined patterns, thereby significantly broadening RF applications. Here we report a generic strategy for fabricating high-performance flexible Si nanomembrane (NM)-based RF thin-film transistors (TFTs), capable of over 100 GHz operation in theory, with NIL patterned deep-submicron-scale channel lengths. A unique 3-dimensional etched-trench-channel configuration was used to allow for TFT fabrication compatible with flexible substrates. Optimal device parameters were obtained through device simulation to understand the underlying device physics and to enhance device controllability. Experimentally, a record-breaking 38 GHz maximum oscillation frequency fmax value has been successfully demonstrated from TFTs with a 2 μm gate length built with flexible Si NM on plastic substrates. PMID:27094686

  6. Fast Flexible Transistors with a Nanotrench Structure.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Ling, Tao; Gong, Shaoqin; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Alice L; Guo, L Jay; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-04-20

    The simplification of fabrication processes that can define very fine patterns for large-area flexible radio-frequency (RF) applications is very desirable because it is generally very challenging to realize submicron scale patterns on flexible substrates. Conventional nanoscale patterning methods, such as e-beam lithography, cannot be easily applied to such applications. On the other hand, recent advances in nanoimprinting lithography (NIL) may enable the fabrication of large-area nanoelectronics, especially flexible RF electronics with finely defined patterns, thereby significantly broadening RF applications. Here we report a generic strategy for fabricating high-performance flexible Si nanomembrane (NM)-based RF thin-film transistors (TFTs), capable of over 100 GHz operation in theory, with NIL patterned deep-submicron-scale channel lengths. A unique 3-dimensional etched-trench-channel configuration was used to allow for TFT fabrication compatible with flexible substrates. Optimal device parameters were obtained through device simulation to understand the underlying device physics and to enhance device controllability. Experimentally, a record-breaking 38 GHz maximum oscillation frequency fmax value has been successfully demonstrated from TFTs with a 2 μm gate length built with flexible Si NM on plastic substrates.

  7. Fast Flexible Transistors with a Nanotrench Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Ling, Tao; Gong, Shaoqin; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Alice L.; Guo, L. Jay; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-04-01

    The simplification of fabrication processes that can define very fine patterns for large-area flexible radio-frequency (RF) applications is very desirable because it is generally very challenging to realize submicron scale patterns on flexible substrates. Conventional nanoscale patterning methods, such as e-beam lithography, cannot be easily applied to such applications. On the other hand, recent advances in nanoimprinting lithography (NIL) may enable the fabrication of large-area nanoelectronics, especially flexible RF electronics with finely defined patterns, thereby significantly broadening RF applications. Here we report a generic strategy for fabricating high-performance flexible Si nanomembrane (NM)-based RF thin-film transistors (TFTs), capable of over 100 GHz operation in theory, with NIL patterned deep-submicron-scale channel lengths. A unique 3-dimensional etched-trench-channel configuration was used to allow for TFT fabrication compatible with flexible substrates. Optimal device parameters were obtained through device simulation to understand the underlying device physics and to enhance device controllability. Experimentally, a record-breaking 38 GHz maximum oscillation frequency fmax value has been successfully demonstrated from TFTs with a 2 μm gate length built with flexible Si NM on plastic substrates.

  8. Painful Flexible Flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Sheikh Taha, Abdel Majid; Feldman, David S

    2015-12-01

    Flatfoot is commonly encountered by pediatric orthopedic surgeons and pediatricians. A paucity of literature exists on how to define a flatfoot. The absence of the medial arch with a valgus hindfoot is the hallmark of this pathology. Flatfoot can be flexible or rigid. This review focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of the flexible flatfoot. Most flatfeet are flexible and clinically asymptomatic, and warrant little intervention. If feet are symptomatic, treatment is needed. Most patients who require treatment improve with foot orthotics and exercises. Only feet resistant to conservative modalities are deemed surgical candidates. The presence of a tight heel cord is often found in patients who fail conservative management.

  9. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  10. Flexible energy-storage devices: design consideration and recent progress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianfu; Lu, Xihong; Liu, Bin; Chen, Di; Tong, Yexiang; Shen, Guozhen

    2014-07-23

    Flexible energy-storage devices are attracting increasing attention as they show unique promising advantages, such as flexibility, shape diversity, light weight, and so on; these properties enable applications in portable, flexible, and even wearable electronic devices, including soft electronic products, roll-up displays, and wearable devices. Consequently, considerable effort has been made in recent years to fulfill the requirements of future flexible energy-storage devices, and much progress has been witnessed. This review describes the most recent advances in flexible energy-storage devices, including flexible lithium-ion batteries and flexible supercapacitors. The latest successful examples in flexible lithium-ion batteries and their technological innovations and challenges are reviewed first. This is followed by a detailed overview of the recent progress in flexible supercapacitors based on carbon materials and a number of composites and flexible micro-supercapacitors. Some of the latest achievements regarding interesting integrated energy-storage systems are also reviewed. Further research direction is also proposed to surpass existing technological bottle-necks and realize idealized flexible energy-storage devices. PMID:24913891

  11. Flexible energy-storage devices: design consideration and recent progress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianfu; Lu, Xihong; Liu, Bin; Chen, Di; Tong, Yexiang; Shen, Guozhen

    2014-07-23

    Flexible energy-storage devices are attracting increasing attention as they show unique promising advantages, such as flexibility, shape diversity, light weight, and so on; these properties enable applications in portable, flexible, and even wearable electronic devices, including soft electronic products, roll-up displays, and wearable devices. Consequently, considerable effort has been made in recent years to fulfill the requirements of future flexible energy-storage devices, and much progress has been witnessed. This review describes the most recent advances in flexible energy-storage devices, including flexible lithium-ion batteries and flexible supercapacitors. The latest successful examples in flexible lithium-ion batteries and their technological innovations and challenges are reviewed first. This is followed by a detailed overview of the recent progress in flexible supercapacitors based on carbon materials and a number of composites and flexible micro-supercapacitors. Some of the latest achievements regarding interesting integrated energy-storage systems are also reviewed. Further research direction is also proposed to surpass existing technological bottle-necks and realize idealized flexible energy-storage devices.

  12. Ultrahigh-mobility graphene devices from chemical vapor deposition on reusable copper

    PubMed Central

    Banszerus, Luca; Schmitz, Michael; Engels, Stephan; Dauber, Jan; Oellers, Martin; Haupt, Federica; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Beschoten, Bernd; Stampfer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Graphene research has prospered impressively in the past few years, and promising applications such as high-frequency transistors, magnetic field sensors, and flexible optoelectronics are just waiting for a scalable and cost-efficient fabrication technology to produce high-mobility graphene. Although significant progress has been made in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and epitaxial growth of graphene, the carrier mobility obtained with these techniques is still significantly lower than what is achieved using exfoliated graphene. We show that the quality of CVD-grown graphene depends critically on the used transfer process, and we report on an advanced transfer technique that allows both reusing the copper substrate of the CVD growth and making devices with mobilities as high as 350,000 cm2 V–1 s–1, thus rivaling exfoliated graphene. PMID:26601221

  13. Technical Institute Stresses Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    At the Waukesha County Technical Institute in Wisconsin students benefit from individualized instruction and open entry/open exit system. The key to this flexibility is a series of audio-visual modules to support lecture presentations and demonstrations. (HD)

  14. Composite flexible blanket insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An improved composite flexible blanket insulation is presented comprising top silicon carbide having an interlock design, wherein the reflective shield is composed of single or double aluminized polyimide and wherein the polyimide film has a honeycomb pattern.

  15. CliniProteus: A flexible clinical trials information management system

    PubMed Central

    Mathura, Venkatarajan S; Rangareddy, Mahendiranath; Gupta, Pankaj; Mullan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials involve multi-site heterogeneous data generation with complex data input-formats and forms. The data should be captured and queried in an integrated fashion to facilitate further analysis. Electronic case-report forms (eCRF) are gaining popularity since it allows capture of clinical information in a rapid manner. We have designed and developed an XML based flexible clinical trials data management framework in .NET environment that can be used for efficient design and deployment of eCRFs to efficiently collate data and analyze information from multi-site clinical trials. The main components of our system include an XML form designer, a Patient registration eForm, reusable eForms, multiple-visit data capture and consolidated reports. A unique id is used for tracking the trial, site of occurrence, the patient and the year of recruitment. Availability http://www.rfdn.org/bioinfo/CTMS/ctms.html. PMID:21670796

  16. Configurable technology development for reusable control and monitor ground systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhrlaub, David R.

    1994-01-01

    The control monitor unit (CMU) uses configurable software technology for real-time mission command and control, telemetry processing, simulation, data acquisition, data archiving, and ground operations automation. The base technology is currently planned for the following control and monitor systems: portable Space Station checkout systems; ecological life support systems; Space Station logistics carrier system; and the ground system of the Delta Clipper (SX-2) in the Single-Stage Rocket Technology program. The CMU makes extensive use of commercial technology to increase capability and reduce development and life-cycle costs. The concepts and technology are being developed by McDonnell Douglas Space and Defense Systems for the Real-Time Systems Laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center under the Payload Ground Operations Contract. A second function of the Real-Time Systems Laboratory is development and utilization of advanced software development practices.

  17. Virtual Engineering and Science Team - Reusable Autonomy for Spacecraft Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Rilee, Michael L.; Truszkowski, Walt; Thompson, Bryan; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we address the design, development, and evaluation of the Virtual Engineering and Science Team (VEST) tool - a revolutionary way to achieve onboard subsystem/instrument autonomy. VEST directly addresses the technology needed for advanced autonomy enablers for spacecraft subsystems. It will significantly support the efficient and cost effective realization of on-board autonomy and contribute directly to realizing the concept of an intelligent autonomous spacecraft. VEST will support the evolution of a subsystem/instrument model that is probably correct and from that model the automatic generation of the code needed to support the autonomous operation of what was modeled. VEST will directly support the integration of the efforts of engineers, scientists, and software technologists. This integration of efforts will be a significant advancement over the way things are currently accomplished. The model, developed through the use of VEST, will be the basis for the physical construction of the subsystem/instrument and the generated code will support its autonomous operation once in space. The close coupling between the model and the code, in the same tool environment, will help ensure that correct and reliable operational control of the subsystem/instrument is achieved.VEST will provide a thoroughly modern interface that will allow users to easily and intuitively input subsystem/instrument requirements and visually get back the system's reaction to the correctness and compatibility of the inputs as the model evolves. User interface/interaction, logic, theorem proving, rule-based and model-based reasoning, and automatic code generation are some of the basic technologies that will be brought into play in realizing VEST.

  18. Air Force Reusable Booster System: A Quick-look, Design Focused Modeling and Cost Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method and an initial analysis of the costs of a reusable booster system (RBS) as envisioned by the US Department of Defense (DoD) and numerous initiatives that form the concept of Operationally Responsive Space (ORS). This paper leverages the knowledge gained from decades of experience with the semi-reusable NASA Space Shuttle to understand how the costs of a military next generation semi-reusable space transport might behave in the real world - and how it might be made as affordable as desired. The NASA Space Shuttle had a semi-expendable booster, that being the reusable Solid Rocket MotorslBoosters (SRMlSRB) and the expendable cryogenic External Tank (ET), with a reusable cargo and crew capable orbiter. This paper will explore DoD concepts that invert this architectural arrangement, using a reusable booster plane that flies back to base soon after launch, with the in-space elements of the launch system being the expendable portions. Cost estimating in the earliest stages of any potential, large scale program has limited usefulness. As a result, the emphasis here is on developing an approach, a structure, and the basic concepts that could continue to be matured as the program gains knowledge. Where cost estimates are provided, these results by necessity carry many caveats and assumptions, and this analysis becomes more about ways in which drivers of costs for diverse scenarios can be better understood. The paper is informed throughout with a design-for-cost philosophy whereby the design and technology features of the proposed RBS (who and what, the "architecture") are taken as linked at the hip to a desire to perform a certain mission (where and when), and together these inform the cost, responsiveness, performance and sustainability (how) of the system. Concepts for developing, acquiring, producing or operating the system will be shown for their inextricable relationship to the "architecture" of the system, and how these too relate to costs

  19. The financial and environmental costs of reusable and single-use plastic anaesthetic drug trays.

    PubMed

    McGain, F; McAlister, S; McGavin, A; Story, D

    2010-05-01

    We modelled the financial and environmental costs of two commonly used anaesthetic plastic drug trays. We proposed that, compared with single-use trays, reusable trays are less expensive, consume less water and produce less carbon dioxide, and that routinely adding cotton and paper increases financial and environmental costs. We used life cycle assessment to model the financial and environmental costs of reusable and single-use trays. From our life cycle assessment modelling, the reusable tray cost (Australian dollars) $0.23 (95% confidence interval [CI] $0.21 to $0.25) while the single-use tray alone cost $0.47 (price range of $0.42 to $0.52) and the single-use tray with cotton and gauze added was $0.90 (no price range in Melbourne). Production of CO2 was 110 g CO2 (95% CI 98 to 122 g CO2) for the reusable tray, 126 g (95% CI 104 to 151 g) for single-use trays alone (mean difference of 16 g, 95% CI -8 to 40 g) and 204 g CO2 (95% CI 166 to 268 g CO2) for the single-use trays with cotton and paper Water use was 3.1 l (95% CI 2.5 to 3.7 l) for the reusable tray, 10.4 l (95% CI 8.2 to 12.7 l) for the single-use tray and 26.7 l (95% CI 20.5 to 35.4 l) for the single-use tray with cotton and paper Compared with reusable plastic trays, single-use trays alone cost twice as much, produced 15% more CO2 and consumed three times the amount of water Packaging cotton gauze and paper with single-use trays markedly increased the financial, energy and water costs. On both financial and environmental grounds it appears difficult to justify the use of single-use drug trays. PMID:20514965

  20. Flexible Organic Electronics in Biology: Materials and Devices.

    PubMed

    Liao, Caizhi; Zhang, Meng; Yao, Mei Yu; Hua, Tao; Li, Li; Yan, Feng

    2015-12-01

    At the convergence of organic electronics and biology, organic bioelectronics attracts great scientific interest. The potential applications of organic semiconductors to reversibly transmit biological signals or stimulate biological tissues inspires many research groups to explore the use of organic electronics in biological systems. Considering the surfaces of movable living tissues being arbitrarily curved at physiological environments, the flexibility of organic bioelectronic devices is of paramount importance in enabling stable and reliable performances by improving the contact and interaction of the devices with biological systems. Significant advances in flexible organic bio-electronics have been achieved in the areas of flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), polymer electrodes, smart textiles, organic electrochemical ion pumps (OEIPs), ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs) and chemiresistors. This review will firstly discuss the materials used in flexible organic bioelectronics, which is followed by an overview on various types of flexible organic bioelectronic devices. The versatility of flexible organic bioelectronics promises a bright future for this emerging area.

  1. Flexible Organic Electronics in Biology: Materials and Devices.

    PubMed

    Liao, Caizhi; Zhang, Meng; Yao, Mei Yu; Hua, Tao; Li, Li; Yan, Feng

    2015-12-01

    At the convergence of organic electronics and biology, organic bioelectronics attracts great scientific interest. The potential applications of organic semiconductors to reversibly transmit biological signals or stimulate biological tissues inspires many research groups to explore the use of organic electronics in biological systems. Considering the surfaces of movable living tissues being arbitrarily curved at physiological environments, the flexibility of organic bioelectronic devices is of paramount importance in enabling stable and reliable performances by improving the contact and interaction of the devices with biological systems. Significant advances in flexible organic bio-electronics have been achieved in the areas of flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), polymer electrodes, smart textiles, organic electrochemical ion pumps (OEIPs), ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs) and chemiresistors. This review will firstly discuss the materials used in flexible organic bioelectronics, which is followed by an overview on various types of flexible organic bioelectronic devices. The versatility of flexible organic bioelectronics promises a bright future for this emerging area. PMID:25393596

  2. Robonaut's Flexible Information Technology Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, Scott; Bluethmann, William; Alder, Ken; Ambrose, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Robonaut, NASA's humanoid robot, is designed to work as both an astronaut assistant and, in certain situations, an astronaut surrogate. This highly dexterous robot performs complex tasks under telepresence control that could previously only be carried out directly by humans. Currently with 47 degrees of freedom (DOF), Robonaut is a state-of-the-art human size telemanipulator system. while many of Robonaut's embedded components have been custom designed to meet packaging or environmental requirements, the primary computing systems used in Robonaut are currently commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) products which have some correlation to flight qualified computer systems. This loose coupling of information technology (IT) resources allows Robonaut to exploit cost effective solutions while floating the technology base to take advantage of the rapid pace of IT advances. These IT systems utilize a software development environment, which is both compatible with COTS hardware as well as flight proven computing systems, preserving the majority of software development for a flight system. The ability to use highly integrated and flexible COTS software development tools improves productivity while minimizing redesign for a space flight system. Further, the flexibility of Robonaut's software and communication architecture has allowed it to become a widely used distributed development testbed for integrating new capabilities and furthering experimental research.

  3. Rehabilitation: strategic, proactive, flexible, risky?

    PubMed

    Green, R H

    2000-12-01

    Rehabilitation after armed conflict is a direct intellectual descendant of thinking about rehabilitation after natural calamity. It is related, generally, to poverty reduction and, operationally, to associated action at the micro level. This history has limited its strategic conceptualisation and, in particular, its links with reconciliation and state re-legitimation and also with macro-economic stabilisation and renewed growth. In post-war--or more generally, a lull in conflict with the potential to become permanent--a country's rapid, focused, prioritised action within a strategic framework is urgent. It is not risk-free for political and natural disasters as well as for those with economic and social bases. Flexibility, learning from initial experience and asking intended household beneficiaries about their needs in advance can reduce risk as can pre-positioning of contingency or standby resources to avert post-war calamities (for example, drought, flood) and catastrophes (renewed violence) from delaying and discrediting rehabilitation efforts.

  4. The K-1 reusable aerospace vehicle: managing to achieve low cost.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller (HM), George E.; Lepore, Debra Facktor

    2000-03-01

    Kistler Aerospace Corporation is developing the world's first privately funded, fully reusable aerospace vehicle, the K-1. This vehicle represents a new implementation of proven technologies, designed by an elite, experienced team of engineers and managers and implemented by the best manufacturing capability in the United States. Kistler Aerospace expects to begin commercial operations of the K-1 in 2000. Market researchers predict that during the next decade telecommunications satellite ventures will require launch services for over 1,400 payloads to LEO. This prediction greatly exceeds the current available industry capacity. The K-1 was designed primarily to meet this anticipated growth in demand. Significant progress has been made in constructing the K-1 vehicle fleet. The fully reusable K-1 vehicle is designed to lower the cost of access to space, increase launch reliability, and reduce lead-time-to-launch requirements. The K-1 will offer significant cost benefits and aircraft type reliability based on a proven flight record.

  5. Architecture and systems design of a reusable Martian twin rotor tailsitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, Jason L.; Lappas, Vaios J.

    2012-11-01

    A rapidly developing field is that of tailsitters, aircraft capable of transitioning between horizontal and vertical flight, a premise that supports a diverse range of applications. Tailsitters can effortlessly land and hover at will, yet can also move at high speed between destinations making them ideal in undertaking 'multiple missions to land at multiple destinations far apart'. This paper considers how the concept of twin helicopter rotor tailsitters, such as QinetiQ's Eye-OnTM, can be adapted for use in a Martian environment. The mission architecture and system requirements for both reusable and single-use tailsitters are considered and 12 disparate subsystems or fields (including propulsion, power and aerodynamics) are designed using a high-level systems approach. The resulting tailsitter is capable of covering 100km and 450km in reusable and single-use architectures respectively. A docking station is also designed utilising a four stage process for deployment of the tailsitter.

  6. Oil sorbents with high sorption capacity, oil/water selectivity and reusability for oil spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daxiong; Fang, Linlin; Qin, Yanmin; Wu, Wenjuan; Mao, Changming; Zhu, Haitao

    2014-07-15

    A sorbent for oil spill cleanup was prepared through a novel strategy by treating polyurethane sponges with silica sol and gasoline successively. The oil sorption capacity, oil/water selectivity, reusability and sorption mechanism of prepared sorbent were studied. The results showed that the prepared sorbent exhibited high sorption capacity and excellent oil/water selectivity. 1g of the prepared sorbent could adsorb more than 100 g of motor oil, while it only picks up less than 0.1 g of water from an oil-water interface under both static and dynamic conditions. More than 70% of the sorption capacity remained after 15 successive sorption-squeezing cycles, which suggests an extraordinary high reusability. The prepared sorbent is a better alternative of the commercial polypropylene sorbent which are being used nowadays.

  7. A recyclable and reusable supported Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne click polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiqiang; Li, Hongkun; Kwok, Ryan T. K.; Zhao, Engui; Sun, Jing Zhi; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The azide–alkyne click polymerization (AACP) has emerged as a powerful tool for the synthesis of functional polytriazoles. While, for the Cu(I)-catalyzed AACP, the removal of the catalytic Cu(I) species from the resulting polytriazoles is difficult, and the research on the recyclability and reusability of the catalyst remains intact. Herein, we reported the first example of using recyclable and reusable supported Cu(I) catalyst of CuI@A-21 for the AACP. CuI@A-21 could not only efficiently catalyze the AACP but also be reused for at least 4 cycles. Moreover, pronounced reduction of copper residues in the products was achieved. Apart from being a green and cost-effective polymer synthesis strategy, this method will also broaden the application of AACP in material and biological sciences and provide guidelines for other polymerizations with metal catalysts. PMID:24875854

  8. Oil sorbents with high sorption capacity, oil/water selectivity and reusability for oil spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daxiong; Fang, Linlin; Qin, Yanmin; Wu, Wenjuan; Mao, Changming; Zhu, Haitao

    2014-07-15

    A sorbent for oil spill cleanup was prepared through a novel strategy by treating polyurethane sponges with silica sol and gasoline successively. The oil sorption capacity, oil/water selectivity, reusability and sorption mechanism of prepared sorbent were studied. The results showed that the prepared sorbent exhibited high sorption capacity and excellent oil/water selectivity. 1g of the prepared sorbent could adsorb more than 100 g of motor oil, while it only picks up less than 0.1 g of water from an oil-water interface under both static and dynamic conditions. More than 70% of the sorption capacity remained after 15 successive sorption-squeezing cycles, which suggests an extraordinary high reusability. The prepared sorbent is a better alternative of the commercial polypropylene sorbent which are being used nowadays. PMID:24856092

  9. Damage detection in reusable launch vehicle components using guided ultrasonic waves and 3D laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnoncel, David; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Schell, Jochen; Peres, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles are often used in space applications to guarantee space exploration with reduced costs. These structures often use components from newly developed materials. It is inevitable that reliable inspection methods will be required for quality control and maintenance of such structures to avoid potential damage. This paper describes some initial results from evaluation tests based on Lamb waves for damage detection of Reusable Launch Vehicle composite components. Low-profile, surface-bonded piezoceramic transducers were used for Lamb wave generation. Non-contact measurements of Lamb wave responses were taken by a laser vibrometer. The results presented in this paper demonstrate the great potential of the method for quality inspection and structural damage detection of space composite structures.

  10. Quantification of epistemic uncertainty in re-usable launch vehicle aero-elastic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jason M.; Grandhi, Ramana V.; Benanzer, Todd W.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the inherent natural variability of parameters with re-usable launch vehicles, design without consideration of reliability measures may be unreliable and vulnerable to failure. Generally, in preliminary air vehicle design little information is known regarding design variable uncertainties, therefore requiring a technique that can quantify epistemic uncertainties. Evidence theory is employed to accomplish this task resulting in a reliability bound of belief and plausibility. Due to the discontinuous nature of the belief and plausibility function it is necessary to implement a continuous function known as plausibility decision to be used to calculate sensitivities that can be implemented in a gradient-based reliability-based design optimization algorithm. This research develops a new plausibility decision approximation that calculates sensitivities with respect to uncertain variables without introducing extra computational cost or numerical integration. This new metric was demonstrated in a sensitivity analysis of the aero-elastic flutter reliability of a re-usable launch vehicle's wing.

  11. Heat Transfer Measurement and Modeling in Rigid High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Knutson, Jeffrey R.; Cunnington, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Heat transfer in rigid reusable surface insulations was investigated. Steady-state thermal conductivity measurements in a vacuum were used to determine the combined contribution of radiation and solid conduction components of heat transfer. Thermal conductivity measurements at higher pressures were then used to estimate the effective insulation characteristic length for gas conduction modeling. The thermal conductivity of the insulation can then be estimated at any temperature and pressure in any gaseous media. The methodology was validated by comparing estimated thermal conductivities with published data on a rigid high-temperature silica reusable surface insulation tile. The methodology was also applied to the alumina enhanced thermal barrier tiles. Thermal contact resistance for thermal conductivity measurements on rigid tiles was also investigated. A technique was developed to effectively eliminate thermal contact resistance on the rigid tile s cold-side surface for the thermal conductivity measurements.

  12. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics and Optimum Fracture Control Analytical Procedures for a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis is used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects of failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions are also considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different failure prevention plans.

  13. DSMC Grid Methodologies for Computing Low-Density, Hypersonic Flows About Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.; Carlson, Ann B.

    1996-01-01

    Two different grid methodologies are studied for application to DSMC simulations about reusable launch vehicles. One method uses an unstructured, tetrahedral grid while the other uses a structured, variable-resolution Cartesian grid. The relative merits of each method are discussed in terms of accuracy, computational efficiency, and overall ease of use. Both methods are applied to the computation of a low-density, hypersonic flow about a winged single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle concept at conditions corresponding to an altitude of 120 km. Both methods are shown to give comparable results for both surface and flowfield quantities as well as for the overall aerodynamic behavior. For the conditions simulated, the flowfield about the vehicle is very rarefied but the DSMC simulations show significant departure from free-molecular predictions for the surface friction and heat transfer as well as certain aerodynamic quantities.

  14. Flexible sucker rod unit

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.F.

    1987-02-03

    This patent describes a deep well having: a. an education tube with an inside diameter extending from the surface of the earth to far below the surface, b. a reciprocating pump housing attached to the bottom of the education tube, c. pump jack means at the surface for reciprocating the pump, d. a light sucker rod connected to the pump jack means and extending into the education tube, and e. a series of heavy sinker bars having a large cross sectional area in the education tube connecting the light sucker rod to the pump; f. an improved integral metal flexible rod unit interconnecting the sinker bars comprising in combination with the above: g. a coupling on each end of the integral metal flexible rod unit connecting the flexible rod unit to the contiguous sinker bar, h. a segment which is flexible as compared to the sinker bars connecting one of the couplings to i. an integral metal bearing adjacent to the other of the couplings, the bearing having j. a cylindrical surface with k. a diameter i. only slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the education tube thereby forming a sliding fit therewith, and ii. greater than the diameter of any other portion of the flexible rod unit and the sinker bar, and l. grooves in the cylindrical surface for the passage of fluid between in the education tube around the bearing.

  15. Printed Microinductors for Flexible Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik; Whitacre, Jay; Wesseling, Emily

    2005-01-01

    A method of fabricating planar, flexible microinductors that exhibit a relatively high quality factor (Q) between 1 and 10 MHz has been devised. These inductors are targeted for use in flexible, low-profile power-converter circuits. They could also be incorporated into electronic circuits integrated into flexible structures, including flexible antenna and solar-sail structures that are deployable.

  16. Design data book phase A/B study for a pressure fed engine on a reusable space shuttle booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary engineering definition information is presented for a liquid pressure-fed reusable booster engine. The material is reported in three separate sections which include: (1) program and baseline data, (2) critical trade studies summary, and (3) methodology.

  17. General and selective C-3 alkylation of indoles with primary alcohols by a reusable Pt nanocluster catalyst.

    PubMed

    Siddiki, S M A Hakim; Kon, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ken-Ichi

    2013-10-18

    The platinum rule: Heterogeneous, additive-free C-3 selective alkylation of indoles by aliphatic and aromatic alcohols proceeded under transfer hydrogenation conditions with the reusable Pt/θ-Al2 O3 catalyst (see scheme; TON=turnover number).

  18. Unmanned, space-based, reusable orbital transfer vehicle, DARVES. Volume 1: Trade analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The design of an unmanned, space-based, reusable Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is presented. This OTV will be utilized for the delivery and retrieval of satellites from geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) in conjunction with a space station assumed to be in existence in low Earth orbit (LEO). The trade analysis used to determine the vehicle design is presented, and from this study a vehicle definition is given.

  19. A magnetic double-shell microsphere as a highly efficient reusable catalyst for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenting; Liu, Baocang; Wang, Qin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yongxin; Jing, Peng; Yu, Shengli; Liu, Lixia; Zhang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    A novel magnetic double-shell Fe3O4@TiO2/Au@Pd@TiO2 microsphere composed of a Fe3O4 core and double TiO2 shells with Au and Pd nanoparticles encapsulated is created. The microsphere can be used as a highly efficient reusable catalyst with superior catalytic activity and stability and magnetic separable capability in reduction of 4-nitrophenol. PMID:23875186

  20. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays: electrochemical etching and electrode reusability

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rakesh K.; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers in the form of nanoelectrode arrays were grown on nine individual electrodes, arranged in a 3 × 3 array geometry, in a 2.5 cm2 chip. Electrochemical etching of the carbon nanofibers was employed for electrode activation and enhancing the electrode kinetics. Here, we report the effects of electrochemical etching on the fiber height and electrochemical properties. Electrode regeneration by amide hydrolysis and electrochemical etching is also investigated for electrode reusability. PMID:25089188

  1. Transonic aerodynamic characteristics of a proposed wing-body reusable launch vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    A proposed wing-body reusable launch vehicle was tested in the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's 14 x 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel during the winter of 1994. This test resulted in the vehicle's subsonic and transonic, Mach 0.3 to 1.96, longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics. The effects of control surface deflections on the basic vehicle's aerodynamics, including a body flap, elevons, ailerons, and tip fins, are presented.

  2. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Proposed Wing Body Reusable Launch Vehicle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A proposed wing body reusable launch vehicle was tested in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) 14 x 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel during the winter of 1994. this test resulted in the vehicle's subsonic and transonic (Mach 03 to 1.96) longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics. The effects of control surface deflections on the basic vehicle aerodynamics including a body flap, elevons, ailerons, and tip fins are presented.

  3. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  4. Flexible magnetoimpedance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bodong; Kavaldzhiev, Mincho N.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    Flexible magnetoimpedance (MI) sensors fabricated using a NiFe/Cu/NiFe tri-layer on Kapton substrate have been studied. A customized flexible microstrip transmission line was employed to investigate the MI sensors's magnetic field and frequency responses and their dependence on the sensors's deflection. For the first time, the impedance characteristic is obtained through reflection coefficient analysis over a wide range of frequencies from 0.1 MHz to 3 GHz and for deflections ranging from zero curvature to a radius of 7.2 cm. The sensor element maintains a high MI ratio of up to 90% and magnetic sensitivity of up to 9.2%/Oe over different bending curvatures. The relationship between the curvature and material composition is discussed based on the magnetostriction effect and stress simulations. The sensor's large frequency range, simple fabrication process and high sensitivity provide a great potential for flexible electronics and wireless applications.

  5. Natural flexible dermal armor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H; Gludovatz, Bernd; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Fish, reptiles, and mammals can possess flexible dermal armor for protection. Here we seek to find the means by which Nature derives its protection by examining the scales from several fish (Atractosteus spatula, Arapaima gigas, Polypterus senegalus, Morone saxatilis, Cyprinius carpio), and osteoderms from armadillos, alligators, and leatherback turtles. Dermal armor has clearly been developed by convergent evolution in these different species. In general, it has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining more rigid units (scales or osteoderms), thereby increasing flexibility without significantly sacrificing strength, in contrast to rigid monolithic mineral composites. These dermal structures are also multifunctional, with hydrodynamic drag (in fish), coloration for camouflage or intraspecies recognition, temperature and fluid regulation being other important functions. The understanding of such flexible dermal armor is important as it may provide a basis for new synthetic, yet bioinspired, armor materials. PMID:23161399

  6. Highly Reusable Space Transportation System Concept Evaluation (The Argus Launch Vehicle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Bellini, Peter X.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual design study that was performed in support of NASA's recent Highly Reusable Space Transportation study. The Argus concept uses a Maglifter magnetic-levitation sled launch assist system to accelerate it to a takeoff ground speed of 800 fps on its way to delivering a payload of 20,000 lb. to low earth orbit. Main propulsion is provided by two supercharged ejector rocket engines. The vehicle is autonomous and is fully reusable. A conceptual design exercise determined the vehicle gross weight to be approximately 597,250 lb. and the dry weight to be 75,500 lb. Aggressive weight and operations cost assumptions were used throughout the design process consistent with a second-generation reusable system that might be deployed in 10-15 years. Drawings, geometry, and weight of the concept are included. Preliminary development, production, and operations costs along with a business scenario assuming a price-elastic payload market are also included. A fleet of three Argus launch vehicles flying a total of 149 flights per year is shown to have a financial internal rate of return of 28%. At $169/lb., the recurring cost of Argus is shown to meet the study goal of $100/lb.-$200/lb., but optimum market price results in only a factor of two to five reduction compared to today's launch systems.

  7. The foundations of reusability: Successful experience and important conclusions from planning and scheduling of space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Willoughby, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Communications is sponsoring a combined technical and management initiative to dramatically decrease the cost of preparing for and conducting space operations. The authors present their successful experience and important conclusions from producing generalized and readily reusable solutions and systems for planning and scheduling applications. While generality by itself should enable reuse, generality alone may not produce the desired cost savings. Generality achieved by accumulating numerous special cases within a software system often increases the complexity of the software to the extent that maintenance costs overtake development savings. Because of this phenomenon, the authors have insisted on simplicity, as well as generality, to achieve cost-effective operation reusability. Simplicity and generality can be accomplished simultaneously when the basic 'Building Blocks' for a problem domain, in this paper, planning and scheduling, are discovered and implemented with reuse in mind. The Building Blocks for planning and scheduling are described. The authors also present examples of how these Building Blocks have accommodated various scenarios that were previously treated as mission-peculiar. Two case histories are presented to demonstrate operational reusability and cost effectiveness.

  8. Poorly processed reusable surface disinfection tissue dispensers may be a source of infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reusable surface disinfectant tissue dispensers are used in hospitals in many countries because they allow immediate access to pre-soaked tissues for targeted surface decontamination. On the other hand disinfectant solutions with some active ingredients may get contaminated and cause outbreaks. We determined the frequency of contaminated surface disinfectant solutions in reusable dispensers and the ability of isolates to multiply in different formulations. Methods Reusable tissue dispensers with different surface disinfectants were randomly collected from healthcare facilities. Solutions were investigated for bacterial contamination. The efficacy of two surface disinfectants was determined in suspension tests against two isolated species directly from a contaminated solution or after 5 passages without selection pressure in triplicate. Freshly prepared use solutions were contaminated to determine survival of isolates. Results 66 dispensers containing disinfectant solutions with surface-active ingredients were collected in 15 healthcare facilities. 28 dispensers from nine healthcare facilities were contaminated with approximately 107 cells per mL of Achromobacter species 3 (9 hospitals), Achromobacter xylosoxidans or Serratia marcescens (1 hospital each). In none of the hospitals dispenser processing had been adequately performed. Isolates regained susceptibility to the disinfectants after five passages without selection pressure but were still able to multiply in different formulations from different manufacturers at room temperature within 7 days. Conclusions Neglecting adequate processing of surface disinfectant dispensers has contributed to frequent and heavy contamination of use-solutions based on surface active ingredients. Tissue dispenser processing should be taken seriously in clinical practice. PMID:24447780

  9. Sustaining Human Presence on Mars Using ISRU and a Reusable Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arney, Dale C.; Jones, Christopher A.; Klovstad, Jordan J.; Komar, D.R.; Earle, Kevin; Moses, Robert; Shyface, Hilary R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the impact of ISRU (In-Site Resource Utilization), reusability, and automation on sustaining a human presence on Mars, requiring a transition from Earth dependence to Earth independence. The study analyzes the surface and transportation architectures and compared campaigns that revealed the importance of ISRU and reusability. A reusable Mars lander, Hercules, eliminates the need to deliver a new descent and ascent stage with each cargo and crew delivery to Mars, reducing the mass delivered from Earth. As part of an evolvable transportation architecture, this investment is key to enabling continuous human presence on Mars. The extensive use of ISRU reduces the logistics supply chain from Earth in order to support population growth at Mars. Reliable and autonomous systems, in conjunction with robotics, are required to enable ISRU architectures as systems must operate and maintain themselves while the crew is not present. A comparison of Mars campaigns is presented to show the impact of adding these investments and their ability to contribute to sustaining a human presence on Mars.

  10. Using Selection Pressure as an Asset to Develop Reusable, Adaptable Software Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrick, Stephen; Lynnes, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) at NASA has over the years developed and honed several reusable architectural components for supporting large-scale data centers with a large customer base. These include a processing system (S4PM) and an archive system (S4PA) based upon a workflow engine called the Simple Scalable Script based Science Processor (S4P) and an online data visualization and analysis system (Giovanni). These subsystems are currently reused internally in a variety of combinations to implement customized data management on behalf of instrument science teams and other science investigators. Some of these subsystems (S4P and S4PM) have also been reused by other data centers for operational science processing. Our experience has been that development and utilization of robust interoperable and reusable software systems can actually flourish in environments defined by heterogeneous commodity hardware systems the emphasis on value-added customer service and the continual goal for achieving higher cost efficiencies. The repeated internal reuse that is fostered by such an environment encourages and even forces changes to the software that make it more reusable and adaptable. Allowing and even encouraging such selective pressures to software development has been a key factor In the success of S4P and S4PM which are now available to the open source community under the NASA Open source Agreement

  11. Reusable Centaur study. Volume 1: Executive summary. [development costs of Centaur launch vehicle as upper stage for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the Reusable Centaur for use as an initial upper stage with the space shuttle was conducted. The currently operative Centaur stage, with modifications for space shuttle orbiter compatibility and for improved performance, represents a cost effective development solution. The performance needs and available development funds are discussed. The main features of three Reusable Centaur configurations with increasing capability at increasing development costs are summarized.

  12. Flexible radiator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The soft tube radiator subsystem is described including applicable system requirements, the design and limitations of the subsystem components, and the panel manufacturing method. The soft tube radiator subsystem is applicable to payloads requiring 1 to 12 kW of heat rejection for orbital lifetimes per mission of 30 days or less. The flexible radiator stowage volume required is about 60% and the system weight is about 40% of an equivalent heat rejection rigid panel. The cost should also be considerably less. The flexible radiator is particularly suited to shuttle orbiter sortie payloads and also whose mission lengths do not exceed the 30 day design life.

  13. Economic Metrics for Commercial Reusable Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.; Hamaker, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The success of any effort depends upon the effective initial definition of its purpose, in terms of the needs to be satisfied and the goals to be fulfilled. If the desired product is "A System" that is well-characterized, these high-level need and goal statements can be transformed into system requirements by traditional systems engineering techniques. The satisfaction of well-designed requirements can be tracked by fairly straightforward cost, schedule, and technical performance metrics. Unfortunately, some types of efforts, including those that NASA terms "Programs," tend to resist application of traditional systems engineering practices. In the NASA hierarchy of efforts, a "Program" is often an ongoing effort with broad, high-level goals and objectives. A NASA "project" is a finite effort, in terms of budget and schedule, that usually produces or involves one System. Programs usually contain more than one project and thus more than one System. Special care must be taken in the formulation of NASA Programs and their projects, to ensure that lower-level project requirements are traceable to top-level Program goals, feasible with the given cost and schedule constraints, and measurable against top-level goals. NASA Programs and projects are tasked to identify the advancement of technology as an explicit goal, which introduces more complicating factors. The justification for funding of technology development may be based on the technology's applicability to more than one System, Systems outside that Program or even external to NASA. Application of systems engineering to broad-based technology development, leading to effective measurement of the benefits, can be valid, but it requires that potential beneficiary Systems be organized into a hierarchical structure, creating a "system of Systems." In addition, these Systems evolve with the successful application of the technology, which creates the necessity for evolution of the benefit metrics to reflect the changing

  14. Spaceliner Class Operability Gains Via Combined Airbreathing/ Rocket Propulsion: Summarizing an Operational Assessment of Highly Reusable Space Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, Michael B.; Escher, William J. d.

    1999-01-01

    In discussing a new NASA initiative in advanced space transportation systems and technologies, the Director of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Arthur G. Stephenson, noted that, "It would use new propulsion technology, air-breathing engine so you don't have to carry liquid oxygen, at least while your flying through the atmosphere. We are calling it Spaceliner 100 because it would be 100 times cheaper, costing $ 100 dollars a pound to orbit." While airbreathing propulsion is directly named, rocket propulsion is also implied by, "... while you are flying through the atmosphere." In-space final acceleration to orbital speed mandates rocket capabilities. Thus, in this informed view, Spaceliner 100 will be predicated on combined airbreathing/rocket propulsion, the technical subject of this paper. Interestingly, NASA's recently concluded Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) study focused on the same affordability goal as that of the Spaceliner 100 initiative and reflected the decisive contribution of combined propulsion as a way of expanding operability and increasing the design robustness of future space transports, toward "aircraft like" capabilities. The HRST study built on the Access to Space Study and the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) development activities to identify and characterize space transportation concepts, infrastructure and technologies that have the greatest potential for reducing delivery cost by another order of magnitude, from $1,000 to $100-$200 per pound for 20,000 lb. - 40.000 lb. payloads to low earth orbit (LEO). The HRST study investigated a number of near-term, far-term, and very far-term launch vehicle concepts including all-rocket single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) concepts, two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) concepts, concepts with launch assist, rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) concepts, advanced expendable vehicles, and more far term ground-based laser powered launchers. The HRST study consisted of preliminary concept studies, assessments

  15. Flexible Classroom Furniture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim Hassell,

    2011-01-01

    Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

  16. ESEA Flexibility. Updated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In order to move forward with State and local reforms designed to improve academic achievement and increase the quality of instruction for all students in a manner that was not originally contemplated by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), a State educational agency (SEA) may request flexibility, on its own behalf and on behalf of its…

  17. Diversity and Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasi, Anne

    1990-01-01

    Responds to five major articles by Duckworth, Goldman, Healy, Sampson, and Goodyear on issues pertaining to testing and assessment in counseling psychology. Suggests that such a diversity of approaches leads to a more comprehensive and flexible model of counseling, adaptable to differences in clients, context, and counselor personalities. (TE)

  18. Designing Flexible Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Clark R.; Kaff, Marilyn S.; Anderson, Mary Jo; Knackendoffel, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Principals and teachers need a framework that will allow school personnel to reach and teach all students within the general education setting. One such framework is universal design for learning (UDL). UDL is achieved by means of flexible curricular materials and activities that provide alternatives for students with disparities in abilities and…

  19. Flexible Mental Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, John

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that strategy choice is a misleading characterization of efficient mental calculation and that teaching mental calculation methods as a whole is not conducive to flexibility. Proposes an alternative in which calculation is thought of as an interaction between noticing and knowledge. Presents an associated teaching approach to promote…

  20. Control of nonlinear flexible space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianjun

    With the advances made in computer technology and efficiency of numerical algorithms over last decade, the MPC strategies have become quite popular among control community. However, application of MPC or GPC to flexible space structure control has not been explored adequately in the literature. The work presented in this thesis primarily focuses on application of GPC to control of nonlinear flexible space structures. This thesis is particularly devoted to the development of various approximate dynamic models, design and assessment of candidate controllers, and extensive numerical simulations for a realistic multibody flexible spacecraft, namely, Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)---a Prometheus class of spacecraft proposed by NASA for deep space exploratory missions. A stable GPC algorithm is developed for Multi-Input-Multi-Output (MIMO) systems. An end-point weighting (penalty) is used in the GPC cost function to guarantee the nominal stability of the closed-loop system. A method is given to compute the desired end-point state from the desired output trajectory. The methodologies based on Fake Algebraic Riccati Equation (FARE) and constrained nonlinear optimization, are developed for synthesis of state weighting matrix. This makes this formulation more practical. A stable reconfigurable GPC architecture is presented and its effectiveness is demonstrated on both aircraft as well as spacecraft model. A representative in-orbit maneuver is used for assessing the performance of various control strategies using various design models. Different approximate dynamic models used for analysis include linear single body flexible structure, nonlinear single body flexible structure, and nonlinear multibody flexible structure. The control laws evaluated include traditional GPC, feedback linearization-based GPC (FLGPC), reconfigurable GPC, and nonlinear dissipative control. These various control schemes are evaluated for robust stability and robust performance in the presence of

  1. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Wines, Robin Renee; Takacs, James Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament.

  2. Flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to analyze the general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of a bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. The effects of rotor material mechanical hysteresis, rotor torsion flexibility, transverse effects of rotor axial and torsional loading and the anisotropic, in-phase and out-of-phase bearing stiffness and damping force and moment coefficients were included in the program to broaden its capability. An optimum solution method was found and incorporated in the computer program. Computer simulation of experimental data was made and qualitative agreements observed. The mathematical formulations, computer program verification, test data simulation, and user instruction was presented and discussed.

  3. FLEXIBLE GEIGER COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Richter, H.G.; Gillespie, A.S. Jr.

    1963-11-12

    A flexible Geiger counter constructed from materials composed of vinyl chloride polymerized with plasticizers or co-polymers is presented. The counter can be made either by attaching short segments of corrugated plastic sleeving together, or by starting with a length of vacuum cleaner hose composed of the above materials. The anode is maintained substantially axial Within the sleeving or hose during tube flexing by means of polystyrene spacer disks or an easily assembled polyethylene flexible cage assembly. The cathode is a wire spiraled on the outside of the counter. The sleeving or hose is fitted with glass end-pieces or any other good insulator to maintain the anode wire taut and to admit a counting gas mixture into the counter. Having the cathode wire on the outside of the counter substantially eliminates the objectional sheath effect of prior counters and permits counting rates up to 300,000 counts per minute. (AEC)

  4. Ginga: Flexible FITS viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Ginga is a viewer for astronomical data FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) files; the viewer centers around a FITS display widget which supports zooming and panning, color and intensity mapping, a choice of several automatic cut levels algorithms and canvases for plotting scalable geometric forms. In addition to this widget, the FITS viewer provides a flexible plugin framework for extending the viewer with many different features. A fairly complete set of "standard" plugins are provided for expected features of a modern viewer: panning and zooming windows, star catalog access, cuts, star pick/fwhm, thumbnails, and others. This viewer was written by software engineers at Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and is in use at that facility.

  5. Flexible Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, Catherine; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Wesfreid, José. Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    Hydrodynamic tunnel experiments with flexible flapping foils of 4:1 span-to-chord aspect ratio are used in the present work to study the effect of foil compliance in the dynamical features of a propulsive wake. The average thrust force produced by the foil is estimated from 2D PIV measurements and the regime transitions in the wake are characterized according to a flapping frequency-amplitude phase diagram as in Godoy-Diana et al. (Phys. Rev. E 77, 016308, 2008). We show that the thrust production regime occurs on a broader region of the parameter space for flexible foils, with propulsive forces up to 3 times greater than for the rigid case. We examine in detail the vortex generation at the trailing edge of the foils, and propose a mechanism to explain how foil deformation leads to an optimization of propulsion.

  6. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  7. Defining Earth Data Batch Processing Tasks by Means of a Flexible Workflowdescription Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandra, Constantin; Gorgan, Dorian

    2016-06-01

    This paper aims to present some of the main features of the Workflow Description Language (WorDeL) and demonstrate their usage in defining Earth Data processing tasks. This description language is based on the flexible description of processing tasks as workflows, composed of basic processing operators. This approach allows the language to offer an intuitive way of representing processing tasks, without requiring programming expertise from its users. It also allows its users to employ and integrate existing functionality into their design, thereby reducing the design complexity and development effort of newly defined processing workflows. WorDeL supports the transparent adaptive parallelization of the processing tasks over high performance computation architectures, such as cloud-based solutions. Throughout the paper, we will exemplify this language's use in creating flexible, reusable and easy-to-understand earth data processing descriptions, with an emphasis on satellite image processing.

  8. Flexible multiply towpreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzzy, John D. (Inventor); Varughese, Babu (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved flexible towpreg and a method of production therefor. The improved flexible towpreg comprises a plurality of towpreg plies which comprise reinforcing filaments and matrix forming material; the reinforcing filaments being substantially wetout by the matrix forming material such that the towpreg plies are substantially void-free composite articles, and the towpreg plies having an average thickness less than about 100 microns. The method of production for the improved flexible towpreg comprises the steps of spreading the reinforcing filaments to expose individually substantially all of the reinforcing filaments; coating the reinforcing filaments with the matrix forming material in a manner causing interfacial adhesion of the matrix forming material to the reinforcing filaments; forming the towpreg plies by heating the matrix forming material contacting the reinforcing filaments until the matrix forming material liquifies and coats the reinforcing filaments; and cooling the towpreg plies in a manner such that substantial cohesion between neighboring towpreg plies is prevented until the matrix forming material solidifies.

  9. Computer graphic of Lockheed Martin X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) mounted on NASA 747 ferry air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is an artist's conception of the NASA/Lockheed Martin X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator being carried on the back of the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. This was a concept for moving the X-33 from its landing site back to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The X-33 was a technology demonstrator vehicle for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The RLV technology program was a cooperative agreement between NASA and industry. The goal of the RLV technology program was to enable significant reductions in the cost of access to space, and to promote the creation and delivery of new space services and other activities that will improve U.S. economic competitiveness. NASA Headquarter's Office of Space Access and Technology oversaw the RLV program, which was being managed by the RLV Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located in Huntsville, Alabama. Responsibilities of other NASA Centers included: Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, guidance navigation and control technology, manned space systems, and health technology; Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA., thermal protection system testing; Langley Research Center, Langley, Virginia, wind tunnel testing and aerodynamic analysis; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida, RLV operations and health management. Lockheed Martin's industry partners in the X-33 program are: Astronautics, Inc., Denver, Colorado, and Huntsville, Alabama; Engineering & Science Services, Houston, Texas; Manned Space Systems, New Orleans, LA; Sanders, Nashua, NH; and Space Operations, Titusville, Florida. Other industry partners are: Rocketdyne, Canoga Park, California; Allied Signal Aerospace, Teterboro, NJ; Rohr, Inc., Chula Vista, California; and Sverdrup Inc., St. Louis, Missouri.

  10. Flexible ureteroscopy for kidney stones in children.

    PubMed

    Defidio, Lorenzo; De Dominicis, Mauro

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic evaluation and management of different pathological conditions involving the upper urinary tract using rigid or flexible endoscopes, is now readily feasible and has been shown to be safe and efficacious even in the smallest children. Paediatric ureteroscopic procedures are similar to their adult counterparts, so that basic endoscopic principles should be observed. Aims of the management should be complete clearance of stones, preservation of renal function and prevention of stone recurrence. In order to select the most appropriate surgical treatment, location, composition, and size of the stone(s), the anatomy of the collecting system, and the presence of obstruction along with the presence of infection of the urinary tract should be considered. Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is still the most important procedure for treating urinary stones, advances in flexible endoscopes, intracorporeal lithotripsy, and extraction instruments have led to a shift in the range of indications. According to the location of the stone the treatment can be done with the rigid or flexible ureteroscope. To obtain stone fragments is essentialfor biochemical analysis. The stone composition may give significant information to prevent the high rate of recurrence, with dietary modification and specific therapy. Successful outcomes for the retrograde treatment of renal calculi are similar to the ones obtained in the adult population (stone free rate 91-98%). The retrograde semirigid and flexible ureteropyeloscopy, using a small calibre ureteroscope, are a valuable technique for kidney stones treatment in children. With excellent technique and meticulous attention to details, the significant complications are rare.

  11. Flexible ureteroscopy for kidney stones in children.

    PubMed

    Defidio, Lorenzo; De Dominicis, Mauro

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic evaluation and management of different pathological conditions involving the upper urinary tract using rigid or flexible endoscopes, is now readily feasible and has been shown to be safe and efficacious even in the smallest children. Paediatric ureteroscopic procedures are similar to their adult counterparts, so that basic endoscopic principles should be observed. Aims of the management should be complete clearance of stones, preservation of renal function and prevention of stone recurrence. In order to select the most appropriate surgical treatment, location, composition, and size of the stone(s), the anatomy of the collecting system, and the presence of obstruction along with the presence of infection of the urinary tract should be considered. Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is still the most important procedure for treating urinary stones, advances in flexible endoscopes, intracorporeal lithotripsy, and extraction instruments have led to a shift in the range of indications. According to the location of the stone the treatment can be done with the rigid or flexible ureteroscope. To obtain stone fragments is essentialfor biochemical analysis. The stone composition may give significant information to prevent the high rate of recurrence, with dietary modification and specific therapy. Successful outcomes for the retrograde treatment of renal calculi are similar to the ones obtained in the adult population (stone free rate 91-98%). The retrograde semirigid and flexible ureteropyeloscopy, using a small calibre ureteroscope, are a valuable technique for kidney stones treatment in children. With excellent technique and meticulous attention to details, the significant complications are rare. PMID:20593723

  12. Assessment of bisphenol A released from reusable plastic, aluminium and stainless steel water bottles.

    PubMed

    Cooper, James E; Kendig, Eric L; Belcher, Scott M

    2011-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous high volume industrial chemical that is an estrogen and an environmental endocrine disrupting chemical. Bisphenol A is used extensively in the production of consumer goods, polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins and coatings used to line metallic food and beverage cans. There is great concern regarding the possible harmful effects from exposures that result from BPA leaching into foods and beverages from packaging or storage containers. The objective of this study was to independently assess whether BPA contamination of water was occurring from different types of reusable drinking bottles marketed as alternatives to BPA-containing polycarbonate plastics. Using a sensitive and quantitative BPA-specific competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we evaluated whether BPA migrated into water stored in polycarbonate or copolyester plastic bottles, and different lined or unlined metallic reusable water bottles. At room temperature the concentration of BPA migrating from polycarbonate bottles ranged from 0.2 to 0.3 mg L⁻¹. Under identical conditions BPA migration from aluminium bottles lined with epoxy-based resins was variable depending on manufacturer ranging from 0.08 to 1.9 mg L⁻¹. Boiling water significantly increased migration of BPA from the epoxy lined bottles. No detectable BPA contamination was observed in water stored in bottles made from Tritan™ copolyester plastic, uncoated stainless steel, or aluminium lined with EcoCare™. The results from this study demonstrate that when used according to manufacturers' recommendations reusable water bottles constructed from "BPA-free" alternative materials are suitable for consumption of beverages free of BPA contamination.

  13. Assessment of Bisphenol A Released from Reusable Plastic, Aluminium and Stainless Steel Water Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, James E.; Kendig, Eric L.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Bisphenol A(BPA) is a ubiquitous high volume industrial chemical that is an estrogen and an environmental endocrine disrupting chemical. Bisphenol A is used extensively in the production of consumer goods, polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins, coating used to line metallic food and beverage cans, and other products.There is great concern regarding the possible harmful effects from exposures that result from BPAleaching into foods and beverages from packaging or storage containers. The objective of this study was to independently assesswhether BPA contamination of water was occurring from different types of reusable drinking bottlesmarketed as alternatives to BPA-containing polycarbonate plastics. Using a sensitive and quantitative BPA-specific competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assaywe evaluated whether BPA migrated into water stored inpolycarbonateor copolyester plastic bottles, and different lined or unlined metallic reusable water bottles. At room temperature the concentration of BPA migrating from polycarbonate bottles ranged from 0.2–0.3 mg/L. Under identical conditions BPA migration from aluminium bottles lined with epoxy-based resins was variable depending on manufacturer ranging from 0.08 to 1.9 mg/L.Boiling water significantly increased migration of BPA from the epoxy lined bottles. No detectable BPA contamination was observed in water stored in bottles made from Tritan™ copolyester plastic, uncoated stainless steel, or aluminium lined with EcoCare™. The results from this study demonstrate that when used according to manufactures’ recommendations reusable water bottles constructed from “BPA-free” alternative materials are suitable for consumption of beverages free of BPA contamination. PMID:21741673

  14. Non-Toxic Reaction Control System for the Reusable First Stage Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, E. L.; Rothschild, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the Boeing Reusable Space Systems vision of a Reaction Control System (RCS) for the Reusable First Stage (RFS) being considered as a replacement for the Solid Rocket Booster for the Space Shuttle. The requirement is to achieve reliable vehicle control during the upper atmospheric portion of the RFS trajectory while enabling more efficient ground operations, unhindered by constraints caused by operating with highly toxic RCS propellants. Boeing's objective for this effort is to develop a safer, more efficient and environmentally friendly RCS design approach that is suitable for the RFS concept of operations, including a low cost, efficient turnaround cycle. The Boeing RCS concept utilizes ethanol and liquid oxygen in place of the highly toxic, suspected carcinogen, ozone-depleting mono-methyl-hydrazine and highly toxic nitrogen tetroxide. The Space Shuttle Upgrade program, under the leadership of the NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, is currently developing liquid oxygen and ethanol (ethyl alcohol) technology for use as non-toxic orbital maneuvering system (OMS) and RCS. The development of this liquid oxygen and ethanol technology for the Space Shuttle offers a significant leverage to select much of the same technology for the RFS program. There are significant design and development issues involved with bringing this liquid oxygen and ethanol technology to a state of maturity suitable for an operational RCS. The risks associated with a new LOX and Ethanol RCS are mitigated by maintaining kerosene and hydrogen peroxide RCS technology as an alternative. These issues, presented within this paper, include managing the oxygen supply and achieving reliable ignition in the short pulse mode of engine operation. Performance, reliability and operations requirements are presented along with a specific RCS design concept to satisfying these requirements. The work reported in this paper was performed under NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Contract Number

  15. Modelling informally collected quantities of bulky waste and reusable items in Austria

    SciTech Connect

    Ramusch, R. Pertl, A.; Scherhaufer, S.; Schmied, E.; Obersteiner, G.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Informal collectors from Hungary collect bulky waste and reusable items in Austria. • Two methodologies were applied to estimate the informally collected quantities. • Both approaches lead to an estimation of roughly 100,000 t p.a. informally collected. • The formal Austrian system collects 72 kg/cap/yr of bulky waste, WEE & scrap metal. • Informal collection amounts to approx. 12 kg/cap/yr. - Abstract: Disparities in earnings between Western and Eastern European countries are the reason for a well-established informal sector actively involved in collection and transboundary shipment activities from Austria to Hungary. The preferred objects are reusable items and wastes within the categories bulky waste, WEEE and metals, intended to be sold on flea markets. Despite leading to a loss of recyclable resources for Austrian waste management, these informal activities may contribute to the extension of the lifetime of certain goods when they are reused in Hungary; nevertheless they are discussed rather controversially. The aim of this paper is to provide objective data on the quantities informally collected and transhipped. The unique activities of informal collectors required the development and implementation of a new set of methodologies. The concept of triangulation was used to verify results obtained by field visits, interviews and a traffic counting campaign. Both approaches lead to an estimation of approx. 100,000 t per year of reusable items informally collected in Austria. This means that in addition to the approx. 72 kg/cap/yr formally collected bulky waste, bulky waste wood, household scrap (excluding packaging) and WEEE, up to a further 12 kg/cap/yr might, in the case that informal collection is abandoned, end up as waste or in the second-hand sector.

  16. A Community-Developed Measurement of the Reusability of Software Through Reuse Readiness Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. J.; Berrick, S. W.; Bertolli, A.; Burrows, H.; Delnore, V. E.; Downs, R. R.; Enloe, Y.; Falke, S.; Folk, M.; Gerard, N.; Gerard, R.; Hunter, M.; Jasmin, T.; McComas, D.; Samadi, S.; Sherman, M.; Swick, R.; Tilmes, C.; Wolfe, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    When software is developed with reuse purposes in mind from the start, the resulting product will often be more mature, in a reuse sense, than products which are modified for reuse purposes after they have been developed. But it can be difficult to assess the maturity level of a software product due to the variety of factors that influence its reusability. If these factors could be measured, assessed, and combined into a single scale measuring the maturity of the software in terms of reusability, it would be of great benefit to developers. They will more easily be able to determine how ready the software is for their purposes, and how much modification may be necessary before it can fill their needs. The NASA Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Software Reuse Working Group is in the process of developing a set of Reuse Readiness Levels (RRLs) for the purpose of determining the reuse maturity of software assets. These levels are modeled after NASA's Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs), which have been used for many years, particularly for assessing hardware's readiness for spaceflight purposes. To assess the reuse maturity of software, a number of factors are included in the Working Group's development of the RRL scale including portability, extensibility, documentation, support, packaging, intellectual property and licensing issues, standards compliance, verification and testing, and modularity. Members of the working group have described the levels reusable software goes through as it becomes more mature in each of these areas. These individual levels will be combined into a single RRL scale that will allow a single number to describe the reuse maturity of software. This presentation will describe the Working Group's efforts in the creation of the Reuse Readiness Level (RRL) scale.

  17. Non-Toxic Reaction Control System for the Reusable First Stage Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, E. L.; Rothschild, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the Boeing Reusable Space Systems vision of a Reaction Control System (RCS) for the Reusable First Stage (RFS) being considered as a replacement for the Solid Rocket Booster for the Space Shuttle. The requirement is to,achieve reliable vehicle control during the upper atmospheric portion of the RFS trajectory while enabling more efficient ground operations, unhindered by constraints caused by operating with highly toxic RCS propellants. Boeing's objective for this effort is to develop a safer, more efficient and environmentally friendly RCS design approach that is suitable for the RFS concept of operations, including a low cost, efficient turnaround cycle. The Boeing RCS concept utilizes ethanol and liquid oxygen in place of the highly toxic, suspected carcinogen, ozone- depleting mono-methyl-hydrazine and highly toxic nitrogen tetroxide. The Space Shuttle Upgrade program, under the leadership of the NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, is currently developing liquid oxygen and ethanol (ethyl alcohol) technology for use as non-toxic orbital maneuvering system (OMS) and RCS. The development of this liquid oxygen and ethanol technology for the Space Shuffle offers a significant leverage to select much of the same technology for the RFS program. There are significant design and development issues involved with bringing this liquid oxygen and ethanol technology to a state of maturity suitable for an operational RCS, The risks associated with a new LOX and Ethanol RCS are mitigated by maintaining kerosene and hydrogen peroxide RCS technology as an alternative. These issues, presented within this paper, include managing the oxygen supply and achieving reliable ignition in the short pulse mode of engine operation. Performance, reliability and operations requirements are presented along with a specific RCS design concept to satisfying these requirements. The work reported in this paper was performed under NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Contract to

  18. Pydpiper: a flexible toolkit for constructing novel registration pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, Miriam; van Eede, Matthijs C.; Pipitone, Jon; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Lerch, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    Using neuroimaging technologies to elucidate the relationship between genotype and phenotype and brain and behavior will be a key contribution to biomedical research in the twenty-first century. Among the many methods for analyzing neuroimaging data, image registration deserves particular attention due to its wide range of applications. Finding strategies to register together many images and analyze the differences between them can be a challenge, particularly given that different experimental designs require different registration strategies. Moreover, writing software that can handle different types of image registration pipelines in a flexible, reusable and extensible way can be challenging. In response to this challenge, we have created Pydpiper, a neuroimaging registration toolkit written in Python. Pydpiper is an open-source, freely available software package that provides multiple modules for various image registration applications. Pydpiper offers five key innovations. Specifically: (1) a robust file handling class that allows access to outputs from all stages of registration at any point in the pipeline; (2) the ability of the framework to eliminate duplicate stages; (3) reusable, easy to subclass modules; (4) a development toolkit written for non-developers; (5) four complete applications that run complex image registration pipelines “out-of-the-box.” In this paper, we will discuss both the general Pydpiper framework and the various ways in which component modules can be pieced together to easily create new registration pipelines. This will include a discussion of the core principles motivating code development and a comparison of Pydpiper with other available toolkits. We also provide a comprehensive, line-by-line example to orient users with limited programming knowledge and highlight some of the most useful features of Pydpiper. In addition, we will present the four current applications of the code. PMID:25126069

  19. Current Issues in Flexibility Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane V.; Magnusson, Peter; McHugh, Malachy

    2000-01-01

    Physical activity is extremely important in maintaining good health. Activity is not possible without a certain amount of flexibility. This report discusses issues related to flexibility fitness. Flexibility is a property of the musculoskeletal system that determines the range of motion achievable without injury to the joints. Static flexibility…

  20. Flexible Scheduling: Making the Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creighton, Peggy Milam

    2008-01-01

    Citing literature that supports the benefits of flexible scheduling on student achievement, the author exhorts readers to campaign for flexible scheduling in their library media centers. She suggests tips drawn from the work of Graziano (2002), McGregor (2006) and Stripling (1997) for making a smooth transition from fixed to flexible scheduling:…

  1. N-alkyl-4-boronopyridinium salts as thermally stable and reusable amide condensation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Maki, Toshikatsu; Ishihara, Kazuaki; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2005-10-27

    [reaction: see text] N-Alkyl-4-boronopyridinium salts are highly effective and reusable catalysts for the dehydrative amide condensation reaction between equimolar mixtures of carboxylic acids and amines. N-Alkylboronopyridinium salts are thermally stabilized in the order N-alkyl-2-boronopyridinium salt < N-alkyl-3-boronopyridinium salt < N-alkyl-4-boronopyridinium salt. Homogeneous catalysts, such as 4-borono-N-methylpyridinium iodide, are more effective in the presence of ionic liquid and can be recovered by extraction with ionic liquid. In contrast, heterogeneous catalysts, such as polystyrene-bound 4-boronopyridinium salts, are effective even in the absence of ionic liquid and can be recovered by filtration.

  2. Technical and Economical study of New Technologies and Reusable Space Vehicles promoting Space Tourism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastav, Deepanshu; Malhotra, Sahil

    2012-07-01

    For many of us space tourism is an extremely fascinating and attractive idea. But in order for these to start we need vehicles that will take us to orbit and bring us back. Current space vehicles clearly cannot. Only the Space Shuttle survives past one use, and that's only if we ignore the various parts that fall off on the way up. So we need reusable launch vehicles. Launch of these vehicles to orbit requires accelerating to Mach 26, and therefore it uses a lot of propellant - about 10 tons per passenger. But there is no technical reason why reusable launch vehicles couldn't come to be operated routinely, just like aircraft. The main problem about space is how much it costs to get there, it's too expensive. And that's mainly because launch vehicles are expendable - either entirely, like satellite launchers, or partly, like the space shuttle. The trouble is that these will not only reduce the cost of launch - they'll also put the makers out of business, unless there's more to launch than just a few satellites a year, as there are today. Fortunately there's a market that will generate far more launch business than satellites ever well - passenger travel. This paper assesses this emerging market as well as technology that will make space tourism feasible. The main conclusion is that space vehicles can reduce the cost of human transport to orbit sufficiently for large new commercial markets to develop. Combining the reusability of space vehicles with the high traffic levels of space tourism offers the prospect of a thousandfold reduction in the cost per seat to orbit. The result will be airline operations to orbit involving dozens of space vehicles, each capable of more than one flight per day. These low costs will make possible a rapid expansion of space science and exploration. Luckily research aimed at developing low-cost reusable launch vehicles has increased recently. Already there are various projects like Spaceshipone, Spaceshiptwo, Spacebus, X-33 NASA etc. The

  3. Approximation Model Building for Reliability & Maintainability Characteristics of Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Morris, W. Douglas; White, Nancy H.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Brown, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the development of parametric models for estimating operational reliability and maintainability (R&M) characteristics for reusable vehicle concepts, based on vehicle size and technology support level. A R&M analysis tool (RMAT) and response surface methods are utilized to build parametric approximation models for rapidly estimating operational R&M characteristics such as mission completion reliability. These models that approximate RMAT, can then be utilized for fast analysis of operational requirements, for lifecycle cost estimating and for multidisciplinary sign optimization.

  4. Effects of soft foam insulation impact. [on shuttle orbiter high temperature reusable surface insulation tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L.; Norton, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    High temperature reusable surface insulation (HTRSI) tiles were impacted by a variety of foam insulation materials typical of the debris expected to strike the shuttle orbiter during the initial phases of flight. Failure of the HIRSI coating was strongly dependent on the density and size of the projectile. The failure threshold was as low as 140 ft/sec for rubber and as high as 740 ft/sec for styrofoam. In addition, the impact pressure was measured for a variety of debris materials as a function of velocity.

  5. Development of a reusable, flight-weight cryogenic foam insulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, P. S.; Davis, R. C.; Taylor, A. H.

    1986-06-01

    Attention is given to a light weight foam insulation system applicable to reusable cryogenic propellant tankage for hypersonic aircraft and space launch vehicles. The insulation system consists of nominally sized blocks of a high temperature-resistant polymethacrylimide foam that is wrapped with a vapor-impermeable membrane of Kapton-aluminum-Kapton laminate, which is adhesively bonded to the outer propellant tank wall. Test results are presented which indicate that this insulation system is capable of enduring a Mach 5 service environment without structural cracking, deterioration, or loss of performance.

  6. Transportation Systems Analyses (TSA): Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST). A preliminary programmatic assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffey, Jack; Lowrey, Alan

    1996-01-01

    This report overviews the strategic implications of the Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) program. The analysis postulates the anticipated HRST market (window is 2006-30, with a 2015 focus). Next the analysis speculates on market 'price of entry' for several potential markets. HRST is envisioned as a NASA overlay to either the STS modernization or the on-going RLV initiative. Three NASA options are reviewed. An example HRST program (MagLifter + RBCC RLV) is assessed in terms of financial/political issues. The merits of HRST-vs-RLV are briefly examined. Finally, a Small Launch Vehicle (SLV) HRST application is reviewed.

  7. Scalable and reusable emulator for evaluating the performance of SS7 networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Tseng, Kent H.; Lim, Koon Seng; Choe, Winston

    1994-04-01

    A scalable and reusable emulator was designed and implemented for studying the behavior of SS7 networks. The emulator design was largely based on public domain software. It was developed on top of an environment supported by PVM, the Parallel Virtual Machine, and managed by OSIMIS-the OSI Management Information Service platform. The emulator runs on top of a commercially available ATM LAN interconnecting engineering workstations. As a case study for evaluating the emulator, the behavior of the Singapore National SS7 Network under fault and unbalanced loading conditions was investigated.

  8. Radiation exposure to the orbiting lunar station and lunar surface related to reusable nuclear shuttle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, P. I.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation environment created by the Reusable Nuclear Vehicle (RNS) in performing its normal mission functions while in the lunar vicinity and the impact of that environment on the Orbiting Lunar Station (OLS) and/or the lunar surface are examined. Lunar surface exposures from the operating reactor were evaluated for both the arrival and departure burns and while there is little probability that manned bases would lie along the paths in which measurable exposures would be recorded, the analyses do indicate the need to consider this possibility in planning such operations. Conclusions supported by the analyses and recommended operational constraints for the RNS are presented.

  9. Damage-mitigating control of a reusable rocket engine for high performance and extended life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asok; Dai, Xiaowen

    1995-01-01

    The goal of damage mitigating control in reusable rocket engines is to achieve high performance with increased durability of mechanical structures such that functional lives of the critical components are increased. The major benefit is an increase in structural durability with no significant loss of performance. This report investigates the feasibility of damage mitigating control of reusable rocket engines. Phenomenological models of creep and thermo-mechanical fatigue damage have been formulated in the state-variable setting such that these models can be combined with the plant model of a reusable rocket engine, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), for synthesizing an optimal control policy. Specifically, a creep damage model of the main thrust chamber wall is analytically derived based on the theories of sandwich beam and viscoplasticity. This model characterizes progressive bulging-out and incremental thinning of the coolant channel ligament leading to its eventual failure by tensile rupture. The objective is to generate a closed form solution of the wall thin-out phenomenon in real time where the ligament geometry is continuously updated to account for the resulting deformation. The results are in agreement with those obtained from the finite element analyses and experimental observation for both Oxygen Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper and a copper-zerconium-silver alloy called NARloy-Z. Due to its computational efficiency, this damage model is suitable for on-line applications of life prediction and damage mitigating control, and also permits parametric studies for off-line synthesis of damage mitigating control systems. The results are presented to demonstrate the potential of life extension of reusable rocket engines via damage mitigating control. The control system has also been simulated on a testbed to observe how the damage at different critical points can be traded off without any significant loss of engine performance. The research work

  10. Customized oligonucleotide microchips that convert multiple genetic information to simple patterns, are portable and reusable

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei; Guschin, Dmitry Y.; Chik, Valentine; Drobyshev, Aleksei; Fotin, Alexander; Yershov, Gennadiy; Lysov, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to using customized oligonucleotide microchips as biosensors for the detection and identification of nucleic acids specific for different genes, organisms and/or individuals in the environment, in food and in biological samples. The microchips are designed to convert multiple bits of genetic information into simpler patterns of signals that are interpreted as a unit. Because of an improved method of hybridizing oligonucleotides from samples to microchips, microchips are reusable and transportable. For field study, portable laser or bar code scanners are suitable.

  11. Joint architecture for reusable vehicle-integrated software (J.A.R.V.I.S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Mark A.

    An integrated software architecture for development of unmanned research vehicles is developed. It has been created under the premise that all unmanned vehicles require a core set of functionality that is common across platforms and that priority should be to the readability and reusability of the code base. The architecture defines the top-level system interfaces allowing internal algorithms to be manipulated without affecting the rest of the system. A robust aerospace toolbox has been developed that provides a means to rapidly prototype algorithms without the need of recreating commonly used functions or the use of expensive, proprietary software.

  12. Design and development of pressure and repressurization purge system for reusable space shuttle multilayer insulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The manufacturing tasks for the program included the fabrication and assembly of an epoxy fiberglass purge bag to encapsulate an insulated cryogenic propellant tank. Purge, repressurization and venting hardware were procured and installed on the purge bag assembly in preparation for performance testing. The fabrication and installation of the superfloc multilayer insulation (MLI) on the cryogenic tank was accomplished as part of a continuing program. An abstraction of the results of the MLI fabrication task is included to describe the complete fabrication requirements for a reusable cryogenic propellant space storage system.

  13. Development of a reusable, flight-weight cryogenic foam insulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcauliffe, P. S.; Davis, R. C.; Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to a light weight foam insulation system applicable to reusable cryogenic propellant tankage for hypersonic aircraft and space launch vehicles. The insulation system consists of nominally sized blocks of a high temperature-resistant polymethacrylimide foam that is wrapped with a vapor-impermeable membrane of Kapton-aluminum-Kapton laminate, which is adhesively bonded to the outer propellant tank wall. Test results are presented which indicate that this insulation system is capable of enduring a Mach 5 service environment without structural cracking, deterioration, or loss of performance.

  14. Modeling, analysis and optimization of cylindrical stiffened panels for reusable launch vehicle structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Satchithanandam

    The design of reusable launch vehicles is driven by the need for minimum weight structures. Preliminary design of reusable launch vehicles requires many optimizations to select among competing structural concepts. Accurate models and analysis methods are required for such structural optimizations. Model, analysis, and optimization complexities have to be compromised to meet constraints on design cycle time and computational resources. Stiffened panels used in reusable launch vehicle tanks exhibit complex buckling failure modes. Using detailed finite element models for buckling analysis is too expensive for optimization. Many approximate models and analysis methods have been developed for design of stiffened panels. This dissertation investigates the use of approximate models and analysis methods implemented in PANDA2 software for preliminary design of stiffened panels. PANDA2 is also used for a trade study to compare weight efficiencies of stiffened panel concepts for a liquid hydrogen tank of a reusable launch vehicle. Optimum weights of stiffened panels are obtained for different materials, constructions and stiffener geometry. The study investigates the influence of modeling and analysis choices in PANDA2 on optimum designs. Complex structures usually require finite element analysis models to capture the details of their response. Design of complex structures must account for failure modes that are both global and local in nature. Often, different analysis models or computer programs are employed to calculate global and local structural response. Integration of different analysis programs is cumbersome and computationally expensive. Response surface approximation provides a global polynomial approximation that filters numerical noise present in discretized analysis models. The computational costs are transferred from optimization to development of approximate models. Using this process, the analyst can create structural response models that can be used by

  15. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Hand Cleaning Solvent Replacement at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keen, Jill M.; DeWeese, Darrell C.; Key, Leigh W.

    1997-01-01

    At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Thiokol Corporation provides the engineering to assemble and prepare the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for launch. This requires hand cleaning over 86 surfaces including metals, adhesives, rubber and electrical insulations, various painted surfaces and thermal protective materials. Due to the phase-out of certain ozone depleting chemical (ODC) solvents, all RSRM hand wipe operations being performed at KSC using l,l,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were eliminated. This presentation summarizes the approach used and the data gathered in the effort to eliminate TCA from KSC hand wipe operations.

  16. Reusable Surface Insulation Tile Thermal Protection Materials: Past, Present and the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Stewart, David A.; Venkatapathy, Ethiras (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silica (LI-900) Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) tile have been used on the majority of the Shuttle since its initial flight. Its overall performance with Reaction Cured Glass (RCG) coating applied will be reviewed. Improvements in insulations, Fibrous Refractory Composite Insulation (FRCI-12) and Alumina Enhanced Thermal Barrier (AETB-8) and coatings/surface treatments such as Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation (TUFI) have been developed and successfully applied. The performance of these enhancements on the Shuttle Orbiters over the past few years along with the next version of tile materials, High Efficiency Tantalum-based Ceramic (HETC) with even broader applicability will also be discussed.

  17. Quantum secret sharing based on reusable Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states as secure carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Bagherinezhad, Saber; Karimipour, Vahid

    2003-04-01

    We introduce a protocol for quantum secret sharing based on reusable entangled states. The entangled state between the sender and the receiver acts only as a carrier to which data bits are entangled by the sender and disentangled from it by the receivers, all by local actions of simple gates. We also show that the interception by Eve or the cheating of one of the receivers introduces a quantum bit error rate larger than 25% which can be detected by comparing a subsequence of the bits.

  18. Pattern-definable and low cost fabrication of nanopatterned conducting polymer film on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihye; Choi, Dae-Geun; Altun, Ali Ozhan; Kim, Ki-Don; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Eung-Sug; Jeong, Jun-Ho

    2010-09-01

    This study reports the pattern definable and low cost fabrication of nanopatterned conducting polymer film on flexible substrates. Noble nanopatterned polymer hard template was fabricated by using nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and used for electropolymerization of conducting polymer. Conducting polymer was electrochemically deposited on the template and transferred over to flexible substrates. Eventually conducting polymer films with various nanopatterns were fabricated on flexible substrates. High pattern definability was achieved by nanoimprinted polymer template, which was molded from lithographically fabricated stamp. Low cost fabrication was accomplished due to low cost NIL, reusable polymer templates, and low material consumption of electrodeposition. The electrodeposited films were transferred using double sided tape. Because the templates are made of flexible polymer, the transfer bonding method applied in this study is adaptable to both wafers and flexible polymer substrates. The fabricated nanopatterned conducting polymer film can be applied to gas sensors, super capacitors, super wetting films, and neuron interfaces due to its characteristic of high surface to volume. For an illustrative application, the gas sensing properties of films were tested. The result showed enhanced sensing characteristic with nanopatterned film, which are attributed to the high surface to volume ratio of nanopatterned films.

  19. An integrated development framework for rapid development of platform-independent and reusable satellite on-board software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemke, Claas; Kuwahara, Toshinori; Kossev, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    Even in the field of small satellites, the on-board data handling subsystem has become complex and powerful. With the introduction of powerful CPUs and the availability of considerable amounts of memory on-board a small satellite it has become possible to utilize the flexibility and power of contemporary platform-independent real-time operating systems. Especially the non-commercial sector such like university institutes and community projects such as AMSAT or SSETI are characterized by the inherent lack of financial as well as manpower resources. The opportunity to utilize such real-time operating systems will contribute significantly to achieve a successful mission. Nevertheless the on-board software of a satellite is much more than just an operating system. It has to fulfill a multitude of functional requirements such as: Telecommand interpretation and execution, execution of control loops, generation of telemetry data and frames, failure detection isolation and recovery, the communication with peripherals and so on. Most of the aforementioned tasks are of generic nature and have to be conducted on any satellite with only minor modifications. A general set of functional requirements as well as a protocol for communication is defined in the SA ECSS-E-70-41A standard "Telemetry and telecommand packet utilization". This standard not only defines the communication protocol of the satellite-ground link but also defines a set of so called services which have to be available on-board of every compliant satellite and which are of generic nature. In this paper, a platform-independent and reusable framework is described which is implementing not only the ECSS-E-70-41A standard but also functionalities for interprocess communication, scheduling and a multitude of tasks commonly performed on-board of a satellite. By making use of the capabilities of the high-level programming language C/C++, the powerful open source library BOOST, the real-time operating system RTEMS and

  20. Teaching tools in Evidence Based Practice: evaluation of reusable learning objects (RLOs) for learning about Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background All healthcare students are taught the principles of evidence based practice on their courses. The ability to understand the procedures used in systematically reviewing evidence reported in studies, such as meta-analysis, are an important element of evidence based practice. Meta-analysis is a difficult statistical concept for healthcare students to understand yet it is an important technique used in systematic reviews to pool data from studies to look at combined effectiveness of treatments. In other areas of the healthcare curricula, by supplementing lectures, workbooks and workshops with pedagogically designed, multimedia learning objects (known as reusable learning objects or RLOs) we have shown an improvement in students' perceived understanding in subjects they found difficult. In this study we describe the development and evaluation of two RLOs on meta-analysis. The RLOs supplement associated lectures and aim to improve students' understanding of meta-analysis in healthcare students. Methods Following a quality controlled design process two RLOs were developed and delivered to two cohorts of students, a Master in Public Health course and Postgraduate diploma in nursing course. Students' understanding of five key concepts of Meta-analysis were measured before and after a lecture and again after RLO use. RLOs were also evaluated for their educational value, learning support, media attributes and usability using closed and open questions. Results Students rated their understanding of meta-analysis as improved after a lecture and further improved after completing the RLOs (Wilcoxon paired test, p < 0.01 in all cases) Whilst the media components of the RLOs such as animations helped most students (86%) understand concepts including for example Forest plots, 93% of students rated usability and control as important to their learning. A small number of students stated they needed the support of a lecturer alongside the RLOs (7% 'Agreed' and 21% 'Neutral

  1. Design, fabrication and test of a liquid hydrogen titanium honeycomb cryogenic test tank for use as a reusable launch vehicle main propellant tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, Patrick B.; Keller, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's) utilizing LOX\\LH2 as the propellant require lightweight durable structural systems to meet mass fraction goals and to reduce overall systems operating costs. Titanium honeycomb sandwich with flexible blanket TPS on the windward surface is potentially the lightest-weight and most operable option. Light weight is achieved in part because the honeycomb sandwich tank provides insulation to its liquid hydrogen contents, with no need for separate cryogenic insulation, and in part because the high use temperature of titanium honeycomb reduces the required surface area of re-entry thermal protection systems. System operability is increased because TPS needs to be applied only to surfaces where temperatures exceed approximately 650 K. In order to demonstrate the viability of a titanium sandwich constructed propellant tank, a technology demonstration program was conducted including the design, fabrication and testing of a propellant tank-TPS system. The tank was tested in controlled as well as ambient environments representing ground hold conditions for a RLV main propellant tank. Data collected during each test run was used to validate predictions for air liquefaction, outside wall temperature, boil-off rates, frost buildup and its insulation effects, and the effects of placing a thermal protection system blanket on the external surface. Test results indicated that titanium honeycomb, when used as a RLV propellant tank material, has great promise as a light-weight structural system.

  2. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  3. Flexible DM-NRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeza, Örs; Moca, Pascu; Tóth, Anna; Weymann, Ireneusz; Zaránd, Gergely

    2011-07-01

    This code combines the spectral sum-conserving methods of Weichselbaum and von Delft and of Peters, Pruschke and Anders (both relying upon the complete basis set construction of Anders and Schiller) with the use of non-Abelian symmetries in a flexible manner: Essentially any non-Abelian symmetry can be taught to the code, and any number of such symmetries can be used throughout the computation for any density of states, and to compute any local operators' correlation function's real and imaginary parts or any thermodynamical expectation value. The code works both at zero and finite temperatures.

  4. Flexible Volumetric Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Schlecht, Robin W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A flexible volumetric structure has a first spring that defines a three-dimensional volume and includes a serpentine structure elongatable and compressible along a length thereof. A second spring is coupled to at least one outboard edge region of the first spring. The second spring is a sheet-like structure capable of elongation along an in-plane dimension thereof. The second spring is oriented such that its in-plane dimension is aligned with the length of the first spring's serpentine structure.

  5. Flexible composite radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, Edward B.

    2006-12-05

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  6. Flexible Material Systems Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John K.; Shook, Lauren S.; Ware, Joanne S.; Welch, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program has been undertaken to better characterize the stress-strain characteristics of flexible material systems to support a NASA ground test program for inflatable decelerator material technology. A goal of the current study is to investigate experimental methods for the characterization of coated woven material stiffness. This type of experimental mechanics data would eventually be used to define the material inputs of fluid-structure interaction simulation models. The test methodologies chosen for this stress-strain characterization are presented along with the experimental results.

  7. Automatic and Flexible

    PubMed Central

    Hassin, Ran R.; Bargh, John A.; Zimerman, Shira

    2008-01-01

    Arguing from the nature of goal pursuit and from the economy of mental resources this paper suggests that automatic goal pursuit, much like its controlled counterpart, may be flexible. Two studies that employ goal priming procedures examine this hypothesis using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (Study 1) and a variation of the Iowa Gambling Task (Study 2). Implications of the results for our understanding of the dichotomy between automatic and controlled processes in general, and for our conception of automatic goal pursuit in particular, are discussed. PMID:19325712

  8. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  9. Composite Flexible Blanket Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Pitts, William C. (Inventor); Goldstein, Howard E. (Inventor); Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with the currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems are useful in providing lightweight insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  10. Performance of full size metallic and RSI thermal protection systems in a Mach 7 environment. [Reusable Surface Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohon, H. L.; Sawyer, J. W.; Hunt, L. R.; Weinstein, I.

    1975-01-01

    The integrity and reusability of three flight-weight metallic and RSI thermal protection systems, designed for the Shuttle entry environment, have been demonstrated. Each model successfully survived over 23 entry thermal cycles without serious degradation. The metallic systems were more tolerant of the hostile environment and provided a higher degree of reusability than did the RSI. Thermal expansion slip joints of the metallic TPS successfully prevented hot gas ingress to the substructure. The RSI demonstrated high damage tolerance and field repairs increased its reusability. Heat-transfer tests to further assess RSI gap heating indicate that stacked tile orientations may impose a penalty on tile thickness. Parameters influencing RSI impingement heating were determined, and the heating data were correlated.

  11. Numerical flow simulation of a reusable sounding rocket during nose-up rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuu, Kazuto; Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Shima, Eiji

    2010-11-01

    Flow around a reusable sounding rocket during nose-up rotation is simulated using unstructured compressible CFD code. While a reusable sounding rocket is expected to reduce the cost of the flight management, it is demanded that this rocket has good performance for wide range of flight conditions from vertical take-off to vertical landing. A rotating body, which corresponds to a vehicle's motion just before vertical landing, is one of flight environments that largely affect its aerodynamic design. Unlike landing of the space shuttle, this vehicle must rotate from gliding position to vertical landing position in nose-up direction. During this rotation, the vehicle generates massive separations in the wake. As a result, induced flow becomes unsteady and could have influence on aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. In this study, we focus on the analysis of such dynamic characteristics of the rotating vehicle. An employed numerical code is based on a cell-centered finite volume compressible flow solver applied to a moving grid system. The moving grid is introduced for the analysis of rotating motion. Furthermore, in order to estimate an unsteady turbulence, we employed DDES method as a turbulence model. In this simulation, flight velocity is subsonic. Through this simulation, we discuss the effect on aerodynamic characteristics of a vehicle's shape and motion.

  12. Construction of a reusable, high-fidelity model to enhance extracorporeal membrane oxygenation training through simulation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jess L; Grisham, Lisa M; Scott, Jeanne; Mogan, Chris; Prescher, Hannes; Biffar, David; Jarred, John; Meyer, Robyn J; Hamilton, Allan J

    2014-04-01

    Initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is stressful, especially for inexperienced extracorporeal life support providers. The main objective of this study was to create a novel, reusable mannequin for high-fidelity simulation of ECMO initiation. We modified a Laerdal neonatal mannequin (SimNewB; Stavanger, Norway) so that it could be used to simulate an ECMO initiation. A simulation of a neonatal patient suffering from meconium aspiration was performed in the pediatric intensive care unit, and participants included new extracorporeal life support specialists in addition to the composition of the clinical ECMO team. A total of 17 individuals participated in the neonatal ECMO initiation simulation. Questionnaire results showed that 88% of participants felt better prepared to assist in an ECMO initiation after the simulation. All participants (100%) agreed that the modified mannequin and the environment were realistic and that this simulation helps teamwork and communication in future initiations of ECMO. Simulation can be used for the prevention, identification, and reduction of anxiety-related crisis situations that novice providers may infrequently encounter during routine clinical use of mechanical circulatory support. Use of a reusable, high-fidelity mannequin may be beneficial for effective team training of complex pediatric ECMO-related procedures. PMID:24675629

  13. Simulation and Analyses of Stage Separation of Two-Stage Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Neirynck, Thomas A.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Scallion, William I.; Murphy, K. J.; Covell, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has initiated the development of methodologies, techniques and tools needed for analysis and simulation of stage separation of next generation reusable launch vehicles. As a part of this activity, ConSep simulation tool is being developed which is a MATLAB-based front-and-back-end to the commercially available ADAMS(Registerd TradeMark) solver, an industry standard package for solving multi-body dynamic problems. This paper discusses the application of ConSep to the simulation and analysis of staging maneuvers of two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) Bimese reusable launch vehicles, one staging at Mach 3 and the other at Mach 6. The proximity and isolated aerodynamic database were assembled using the data from wind tunnel tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. The effects of parametric variations in mass, inertia, flight path angle, altitude from their nominal values at staging were evaluated. Monte Carlo runs were performed for Mach 3 staging to evaluate the sensitivity to uncertainties in aerodynamic coefficients.

  14. Thermal Structures Technology Development for Reusable Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Natividad, Roderick; Rivers, H. Kevin; Smith, Russell W.

    2005-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies conducted at the NASA, Langley Research Center (LaRC) for investigating integrated cryogenic propellant tank systems for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) are described. The cryogenic tanks are investigated as an integrated tank system. An integrated tank system includes the tank wall, cryogenic insulation, thermal protection system (TPS) attachment sub-structure, and TPS. Analysis codes are used to size the thicknesses of cryogenic insulation and TPS insulation for thermal loads, and to predict tank buckling strengths at various ring frame spacings. The unique test facilities developed for the testing of cryogenic tank components are described. Testing at cryogenic and high-temperatures verifies the integrity of materials, design concepts, manufacturing processes, and thermal/structural analyses. Test specimens ranging from the element level to the subcomponent level are subjected to projected vehicle operational mechanical loads and temperatures. The analytical and experimental studies described in this paper provide a portion of the basic information required for the development of light-weight reusable cryogenic propellant tanks.

  15. Modern architectures for intelligent systems: reusable ontologies and problem-solving methods.

    PubMed Central

    Musen, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    When interest in intelligent systems for clinical medicine soared in the 1970s, workers in medical informatics became particularly attracted to rule-based systems. Although many successful rule-based applications were constructed, development and maintenance of large rule bases remained quite problematic. In the 1980s, an entire industry dedicated to the marketing of tools for creating rule-based systems rose and fell, as workers in medical informatics began to appreciate deeply why knowledge acquisition and maintenance for such systems are difficult problems. During this time period, investigators began to explore alternative programming abstractions that could be used to develop intelligent systems. The notions of "generic tasks" and of reusable problem-solving methods became extremely influential. By the 1990s, academic centers were experimenting with architectures for intelligent systems based on two classes of reusable components: (1) domain-independent problem-solving methods-standard algorithms for automating stereotypical tasks--and (2) domain ontologies that captured the essential concepts (and relationships among those concepts) in particular application areas. This paper will highlight how intelligent systems for diverse tasks can be efficiently automated using these kinds of building blocks. The creation of domain ontologies and problem-solving methods is the fundamental end product of basic research in medical informatics. Consequently, these concepts need more attention by our scientific community. PMID:9929181

  16. Development of metallic thermal protection systems for the reusable launch vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Blosser, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    A reusable Thermal Protection System (TPS) that is not only lightweight, but durable, operable and cost effective is one of the technologies required by the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) to achieve the goal of drastically reducing the cost of delivering payload to orbit. Metallic TPS is one of the systems being developed to meet this challenge. Current efforts involve improving the superalloy honeycomb TPS concept, which consists of a foil-gage metallic box encapsulating a low density fibrous insulation, and evaluating it for RLV requirements. The superalloy honeycomb TPS concept is mechanically attached to the vehicle structure. Improvements include more efficient internal insulation, a simpler, lighter weight configuration, and a quick-release fastener system for easier installation and removal. Evaluation includes thermal and structural analysis, fabrication and testing of both coupons and TPS panels under conditions simulating RLV environments. Coupons of metallic honeycomb sandwich, representative of the outer TPS surface, were subjected to low speed impact, hypervelocity impact, and rain erosion testing as well as subsequent arcjet exposure. Arrays of TPS panels have been subjected to radiant heating in a thermal/vacuum facility, aerodynamic heating in an arcjet facility and acoustic loading. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Development of metallic thermal protection systems for the reusable launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1997-01-01

    A reusable Thermal Protection System (TPS) that is not only lightweight, but durable, operable and cost effective is one of the technologies required by the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) to achieve the goal of drastically reducing the cost of delivering payload to orbit. Metallic TPS is one of the systems being developed to meet this challenge. Current efforts involve improving the superalloy honeycomb TPS concept, which consists of a foil-gage metallic box encapsulating a low density fibrous insulation, and evaluating it for RLV requirements. The superalloy honeycomb TPS concept is mechanically attached to the vehicle structure. Improvements include more efficient internal insulation, a simpler, lighter weight configuration, and a quick-release fastener system for easier installation and removal. Evaluation includes thermal and structural analysis, fabrication and testing of both coupons and TPS panels under conditions simulating RLV environments. Coupons of metallic honeycomb sandwich, representative of the outer TPS surface, were subjected to low speed impact, hypervelocity impact, and rain erosion testing as well as subsequent arcjet exposure. Arrays of TPS panels have been subjected to radiant heating in a thermal/vacuum facility, aerodynamic heating in an arcjet facility and acoustic loading.

  18. Simulation and Analyses of Stage Separation Two-Stage Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Neirynck, Thomas A.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Scallion, William I.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Covell, Peter F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA has initiated the development of methodologies, techniques and tools needed for analysis and simulation of stage separation of next generation reusable launch vehicles. As a part of this activity, ConSep simulation tool is being developed which is a MATLAB-based front-and-back-end to the commercially available ADAMS(registered Trademark) solver, an industry standard package for solving multi-body dynamic problems. This paper discusses the application of ConSep to the simulation and analysis of staging maneuvers of two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) Bimese reusable launch vehicles, one staging at Mach 3 and the other at Mach 6. The proximity and isolated aerodynamic database were assembled using the data from wind tunnel tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. The effects of parametric variations in mass, inertia, flight path angle, altitude from their nominal values at staging were evaluated. Monte Carlo runs were performed for Mach 3 staging to evaluate the sensitivity to uncertainties in aerodynamic coefficients.

  19. Thermal Structures Technology Development for Reusable Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Natividad, Roderick; Rivers, H. Kevin; Smith, Russell

    1998-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center for investigating integrated cryogenic propellant tank systems for a Reusable Launch Vehicle are described. The cryogenic tanks are investigated as an integrated tank system. An integrated tank system includes the tank wall, cryogenic insulation, Thermal Protection System (TPS) attachment sub-structure, and TPS. Analysis codes are used to size the thicknesses of cryogenic insulation and TPS insulation for thermal loads, and to predict tank buckling strengths at various ring frame spacings. The unique test facilities developed for the testing of cryogenic tank components are described. Testing at cryogenic and high-temperatures verifies the integrity of materials, design concepts, manufacturing processes, and thermal/structural analyses. Test specimens ranging from the element level to the subcomponent level are subjected to projected vehicle operational mechanical loads and temperatures. The analytical and experimental studies described in this paper provide a portion of the basic information required for the development of light-weight reusable cryogenic propellant tanks.

  20. Development of Metallic Thermal Protection Systems for the Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1996-01-01

    A reusable Thermal Protection System (TPS) that is not only lightweight, but durable, operable and cost effective is one of the technologies required by the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) to achieve the goal of drastically reducing the cost of delivering payload to orbit. Metallic TPS is one of the systems being developed to meet this challenge. Current efforts involve improving the superalloy honeycomb TPS concept, which consists of a foil-gage metallic box encapsulating a low density fibrous insulation, and evaluating it for RLV requirements. The superalloy honeycomb TPS concept is mechanically attached to the vehicle structure. Improvements include more efficient internal insulation, a simpler, lighter weight configuration, and a quick-release fastener system for easier installation and removal. Evaluation includes thermal and structural analysis, fabrication and testing of both coupons and TPS panels under conditions simulating RLV environments. Coupons of metallic honeycomb sandwich, representative of the outer TPS surface, were subjected to low speed impact, hypervelocity impact, and rain erosion testing as well as subsequent arcjet exposure. Arrays of TPS panels have been subjected to radiant heating in a thermal/vacuum facility, aerodynamic heating in an arcjet facility and acoustic loading.

  1. Soda-lime glass as a binder in reusable experimental investment for dental castings.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Satoshi; Zhang, Zutai; Aida, Yoshiteru; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, different glasses were investigated to improve reusable investments. Borosilicate glass (BSG) powder and soda-lime glass (SLG) powder were prepared by milling broken beakers and microscope slides, respectively, and used in experimental investments (I-BSG, I-SLG) by blending glass powder (10 wt%) with cristobalite (90 wt%). Some properties and casting fits were evaluated with commercial gypsum-bonded investment as the control. Both BSG and SLG were mainly composed of Si, but SLG had a large Ca content. The glass transition temperatures were approximately 800°C (BSG) and 700°C (SLG). Experimental investments with heating showed the significantly (p<0.05) higher expansion than that of the control. The compressive strength of I-SLG was higher than that of I-BSG, and increased with temperature. The MOD inlay obtained from I-SLG had a significantly smaller gap than that from I-BSG, and was comparable to the control. These results suggest SLG could be applied clinically as a reusable dental investment.

  2. GoldenBraid: an iterative cloning system for standardized assembly of reusable genetic modules.

    PubMed

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Falconi, Erica Elvira; Zandalinas, Sara I; Juárez, Paloma; Fernández-del-Carmen, Asun; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic Biology requires efficient and versatile DNA assembly systems to facilitate the building of new genetic modules/pathways from basic DNA parts in a standardized way. Here we present GoldenBraid (GB), a standardized assembly system based on type IIS restriction enzymes that allows the indefinite growth of reusable gene modules made of standardized DNA pieces. The GB system consists of a set of four destination plasmids (pDGBs) designed to incorporate multipartite assemblies made of standard DNA parts and to combine them binarily to build increasingly complex multigene constructs. The relative position of type IIS restriction sites inside pDGB vectors introduces a double loop ("braid") topology in the cloning strategy that allows the indefinite growth of composite parts through the succession of iterative assembling steps, while the overall simplicity of the system is maintained. We propose the use of GoldenBraid as an assembly standard for Plant Synthetic Biology. For this purpose we have GB-adapted a set of binary plasmids for A. tumefaciens-mediated plant transformation. Fast GB-engineering of several multigene T-DNAs, including two alternative modules made of five reusable devices each, and comprising a total of 19 basic parts are also described. PMID:21750718

  3. A demonstration of an intelligent control system for a reusable rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1992-01-01

    An Intelligent Control System for reusable rocket engines is under development at NASA Lewis Research Center. The primary objective is to extend the useful life of a reusable rocket propulsion system while minimizing between flight maintenance and maximizing engine life and performance through improved control and monitoring algorithms and additional sensing and actuation. This paper describes current progress towards proof-of-concept of an Intelligent Control System for the Space Shuttle Main Engine. A subset of identifiable and accommodatable engine failure modes is selected for preliminary demonstration. Failure models are developed retaining only first order effects and included in a simplified nonlinear simulation of the rocket engine for analysis under closed loop control. The engine level coordinator acts as an interface between the diagnostic and control systems, and translates thrust and mixture ratio commands dictated by mission requirements, and engine status (health) into engine operational strategies carried out by a multivariable control. Control reconfiguration achieves fault tolerance if the nominal (healthy engine) control cannot. Each of the aforementioned functionalities is discussed in the context of an example to illustrate the operation of the system in the context of a representative failure. A graphical user interface allows the researcher to monitor the Intelligent Control System and engine performance under various failure modes selected for demonstration.

  4. A Reusable PZT Transducer for Monitoring Initial Hydration and Structural Health of Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaowen; Divsholi, Bahador Sabet; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2010-01-01

    During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use. PMID:22399929

  5. Infections and exposures: reported incidents associated with unsuccessful decontamination of reusable surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Southworth, P M

    2014-11-01

    Reusable surgical instruments provide a potential route for the transmission of pathogenic agents between patients in healthcare facilities. As such, the decontamination process between uses is a vital component in the prevention of healthcare-associated infections. This article reviews reported outbreaks and incidents associated with inappropriate, inadequate, or unsuccessful decontamination of surgical instruments, indicating potential pitfalls of decontamination practices worldwide. To the author's knowledge, this is the first review of surgical instrument decontamination failures. Databases of medical literature, Medline and Embase, were searched systematically. Articles detailing incidents associated with unsuccessful decontamination of surgical instruments were identified. Twenty-one articles were identified reporting incidents associated with failures in decontamination. A large proportion of incidents involved the attempted disinfection, rather than sterilization, of surgical instruments (43% of articles), counter to a number of national guidelines. Instruments used in eye surgery were most frequently reported to be associated with decontamination failures (29% of articles). Of the few articles detailing potential or confirmed pathogenic transmission, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mycobacterium spp. were most represented. One incident of possible variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease transmission was also identified. Limitations of analysing only published incidents mean that the likelihood of under-reporting (including reluctance to publish failure) must be considered. Despite these limitations, the small number of articles identified suggests a relatively low risk of cross-infection through reusable surgical instruments when cleaning/sterilization procedures are adhered to. The diverse nature of reported incidents also suggests that failures are not systemic.

  6. Reusable glucose sensing using carbon nanotube-based self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Samaddar, Sarbani; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr.

    2013-09-01

    Lipid functionalized single walled carbon nanotube-based self assembly forms a super-micellar structure. This assemblage has been exploited to trap glucose oxidase in a molecular cargo for glucose sensing. The advantage of such a molecular trap is that all components of this unique structure (both the trapping shell and the entrapped enzyme) are reusable and rechargeable. The unique feature of this sensing method lies in the solid state functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes that facilitates liquid state immobilization of the enzyme. The method can be used for soft-immobilization (a new paradigm in enzyme immobilization) of enzymes with better thermostability that is imparted by the strong hydrophobic environment provided through encapsulation by the nanotubes.Lipid functionalized single walled carbon nanotube-based self assembly forms a super-micellar structure. This assemblage has been exploited to trap glucose oxidase in a molecular cargo for glucose sensing. The advantage of such a molecular trap is that all components of this unique structure (both the trapping shell and the entrapped enzyme) are reusable and rechargeable. The unique feature of this sensing method lies in the solid state functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes that facilitates liquid state immobilization of the enzyme. The method can be used for soft-immobilization (a new paradigm in enzyme immobilization) of enzymes with better thermostability that is imparted by the strong hydrophobic environment provided through encapsulation by the nanotubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02609d

  7. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study: System cost estimates document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) program was initiated to provide life science investigators relatively inexpensive, frequent access to space for extended periods of time with eventual satellite recovery on earth. The RRS will provide an on-orbit laboratory for research on biological and material processes, be launched from a number of expendable launch vehicles, and operate in Low-Altitude Earth Orbit (LEO) as a free-flying unmanned laboratory. SAIC's design will provide independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing in the continental U.S., orbit for a maximum of 60 days, and will sustain three flights per year for 10 years. The Reusable Reentry Vehicle (RRV) will be 3-axis stabilized with artificial gravity up to 1.5g's, be rugged and easily maintainable, and have a modular design to accommodate a satellite bus and separate modular payloads (e.g., rodent module, general biological module, ESA microgravity botany facility, general botany module). The purpose of this System Cost Estimate Document is to provide a Life Cycle Cost Estimate (LCCE) for a NASA RRS Program using SAIC's RRS design. The estimate includes development, procurement, and 10 years of operations and support (O&S) costs for NASA's RRS program. The estimate does not include costs for other agencies which may track or interface with the RRS program (e.g., Air Force tracking agencies or individual RRS experimenters involved with special payload modules (PM's)). The life cycle cost estimate extends over the 10 year operation and support period FY99-2008.

  8. Modelling informally collected quantities of bulky waste and reusable items in Austria.

    PubMed

    Ramusch, R; Pertl, A; Scherhaufer, S; Schmied, E; Obersteiner, G

    2015-10-01

    Disparities in earnings between Western and Eastern European countries are the reason for a well-established informal sector actively involved in collection and transboundary shipment activities from Austria to Hungary. The preferred objects are reusable items and wastes within the categories bulky waste, WEEE and metals, intended to be sold on flea markets. Despite leading to a loss of recyclable resources for Austrian waste management, these informal activities may contribute to the extension of the lifetime of certain goods when they are reused in Hungary; nevertheless they are discussed rather controversially. The aim of this paper is to provide objective data on the quantities informally collected and transhipped. The unique activities of informal collectors required the development and implementation of a new set of methodologies. The concept of triangulation was used to verify results obtained by field visits, interviews and a traffic counting campaign. Both approaches lead to an estimation of approx. 100,000 t per year of reusable items informally collected in Austria. This means that in addition to the approx. 72 kg/cap/yr formally collected bulky waste, bulky waste wood, household scrap (excluding packaging) and WEEE, up to a further 12 kg/cap/yr might, in the case that informal collection is abandoned, end up as waste or in the second-hand sector. PMID:26209344

  9. Development of design allowables data for adhesives for attaching reusables surface insulation, addendum 1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. P.; Carroll, M. T.

    1973-01-01

    The task consisted of conducting mechanical and thermal tests to establish design allowables data on a new room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone adhesive, X3-6004. Low modulus, coupled with relatively low density and good low-temperature properties of this adhesive, places it in contention as a candidate for attaching reusable surface insulation on the space shuttle. Data obtained show that the modulus values of X3-6004 are significantly lower than those of RTV-560 and the other three adhesives characterized at test temperatures from 550 to -175 F. At -175, -200 and -270 F, the modulus of X3-6004 is approximately the same as GE RTV-560 and the other three silicone adhesives. The X3-6004 adhesive exhibits good processing properties. It has a 12 percent lower density than RTV-560. Although lower in overall strength properties as compared to the other adhesives in the program, X3-6004 has adequate adhesion to 2024T81 aluminum to compete as an adhesive for attaching reusable surface insulation. It does exhibit some tendency to revert and soften at temperatures above 350 F when in a confined area.

  10. Modelling informally collected quantities of bulky waste and reusable items in Austria.

    PubMed

    Ramusch, R; Pertl, A; Scherhaufer, S; Schmied, E; Obersteiner, G

    2015-10-01

    Disparities in earnings between Western and Eastern European countries are the reason for a well-established informal sector actively involved in collection and transboundary shipment activities from Austria to Hungary. The preferred objects are reusable items and wastes within the categories bulky waste, WEEE and metals, intended to be sold on flea markets. Despite leading to a loss of recyclable resources for Austrian waste management, these informal activities may contribute to the extension of the lifetime of certain goods when they are reused in Hungary; nevertheless they are discussed rather controversially. The aim of this paper is to provide objective data on the quantities informally collected and transhipped. The unique activities of informal collectors required the development and implementation of a new set of methodologies. The concept of triangulation was used to verify results obtained by field visits, interviews and a traffic counting campaign. Both approaches lead to an estimation of approx. 100,000 t per year of reusable items informally collected in Austria. This means that in addition to the approx. 72 kg/cap/yr formally collected bulky waste, bulky waste wood, household scrap (excluding packaging) and WEEE, up to a further 12 kg/cap/yr might, in the case that informal collection is abandoned, end up as waste or in the second-hand sector.

  11. Design of an unmanned, reusable vehicle to de-orbit debris in Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aziz, Shahed; Cunningham, Timothy W.; Moore-Mccassey, Michelle

    1990-01-01

    The space debris problem is becoming more important because as orbital missions increase, the amount of debris increases. It was the design team's objective to present alternative designs and a problem solution for a deorbiting vehicle that will alleviate the problem by reducing the amount of large debris in earth orbit. The design team was asked to design a reusable, unmanned vehicle to de-orbit debris in earth orbit. The design team will also construct a model to demonstrate the system configuration and key operating features. The alternative designs for the unmanned, reusable vehicle were developed in three stages: selection of project requirements and success criteria, formulation of a specification list, and the creation of alternatives that would satisfy the standards set forth by the design team and their sponsor. The design team selected a Chain and Bar Shot method for deorbiting debris in earth orbit. The De-orbiting Vehicle (DOV) uses the NASA Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) as the propulsion and command modules with the deorbiting module attached to the front.

  12. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Person, Abraham

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  13. Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Electrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones, camera flashes which needs flexible and miniaturized energy storage device with all non-aqueous components. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique over hydrogen decrepitated Mischmetal (Mm) based AB3alloy hydride. The polymer dispersed MWNTs have been obtained by insitu polymerization and the metal oxide/MWNTs were synthesized by sol-gel method. Morphological characterizations of polymer dispersed MWNTs have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). An assymetric double supercapacitor stack has been fabricated using polymer/MWNTs and metal oxide/MWNTs coated over flexible carbon fabric as electrodes and nafion®membrane as a solid electrolyte. Electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor stack has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  14. 42 CFR 84.1144 - Silica dust test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; single-use or reusable filters; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirators; single-use or reusable filters; minimum requirements. 84.1144 Section 84.1144 Public Health... Silica dust test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; single-use or reusable filters; minimum requirements. (a) Three non-powered respirators with single-use filters will be tested for periods of...

  15. Generalized flexibility-rigidity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Duy; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) has been developed as a robust, accurate, and efficient method for macromolecular thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. The performance of FRI depends on its formulations of rigidity index and flexibility index. In this work, we introduce alternative rigidity and flexibility formulations. The structure of the classic Gaussian surface is utilized to construct a new type of rigidity index, which leads to a new class of rigidity densities with the classic Gaussian surface as a special case. Additionally, we introduce a new type of flexibility index based on the domain indicator property of normalized rigidity density. These generalized FRI (gFRI) methods have been extensively validated by the B-factor predictions of 364 proteins. Significantly outperforming the classic Gaussian network model, gFRI is a new generation of methodologies for accurate, robust, and efficient analysis of protein flexibility and fluctuation. Finally, gFRI based molecular surface generation and flexibility visualization are demonstrated.

  16. Flexible transformation plasmonics using graphene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei Bing; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Hong Ju; Ni, Zhen Hua; Dong, Zheng Gao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2013-05-01

    The flexible control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is important and intriguing due to its wide application in novel plasmonic devices. Transformation optics (TO) offers the capability either to confine the SPP propagation on rigid curved/uneven surfaces, or to control the flow of SPPs on planar surfaces. However, TO has not permitted us to confine, manipulate, and control SPP waves on flexible curved surfaces. Here, we propose to confine and freely control flexible SPPs using TO and graphene. We show that SPP waves can be naturally confined and propagate on curved or uneven graphene surfaces with little bending and radiation losses, and the confined SPPs are further manipulated and controlled using TO. Flexible plasmonic devices are presented, including the bending waveguides, wave splitter, and Luneburg lens on curved surfaces. Together with the intrinsic flexibility, graphene can be served as a good platform for flexible transformation plasmonics. PMID:23669904

  17. Flexible transformation plasmonics using graphene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei Bing; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Hong Ju; Ni, Zhen Hua; Dong, Zheng Gao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2013-05-01

    The flexible control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is important and intriguing due to its wide application in novel plasmonic devices. Transformation optics (TO) offers the capability either to confine the SPP propagation on rigid curved/uneven surfaces, or to control the flow of SPPs on planar surfaces. However, TO has not permitted us to confine, manipulate, and control SPP waves on flexible curved surfaces. Here, we propose to confine and freely control flexible SPPs using TO and graphene. We show that SPP waves can be naturally confined and propagate on curved or uneven graphene surfaces with little bending and radiation losses, and the confined SPPs are further manipulated and controlled using TO. Flexible plasmonic devices are presented, including the bending waveguides, wave splitter, and Luneburg lens on curved surfaces. Together with the intrinsic flexibility, graphene can be served as a good platform for flexible transformation plasmonics.

  18. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  19. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Taura, Joseph Charles; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Demiroglu, Mehmet; Predmore, Daniel Ross

    1999-01-01

    A seal assembly having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch therebetween which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal.

  20. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.