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Sample records for advanced flight simulator

  1. Advanced concepts flight simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Chappell, S L; Sexton, G A

    1986-12-01

    The cockpit environment is changing rapidly. New technology allows airborne computerised information, flight automation and data transfer with the ground. By 1995, not only will the pilot's task have changed, but also the tools for doing that task. To provide knowledge and direction for these changes, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Lockheed-Georgia Company have completed three identical Advanced Concepts Flight Simulation Facilities. Many advanced features have been incorporated into the simulators - e g, cathode ray tube (CRT) displays of flight and systems information operated via touch-screen or voice, print-outs of clearances, cockpit traffic displays, current databases containing navigational charts, weather and flight plan information, and fuel-efficient autopilot control from take-off to touchdown. More importantly, this cockpit is a versatile test bed for studying displays, controls, procedures and crew management in a full-mission context. The facility also has an air traffic control simulation, with radio and data communications, and an outside visual scene with variable weather conditions. These provide a veridical flight environment to evaluate accurately advanced concepts in flight stations.

  2. Design and simulation of advanced fault tolerant flight control schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gururajan, Srikanth

    This research effort describes the design and simulation of a distributed Neural Network (NN) based fault tolerant flight control scheme and the interface of the scheme within a simulation/visualization environment. The goal of the fault tolerant flight control scheme is to recover an aircraft from failures to its sensors or actuators. A commercially available simulation package, Aviator Visual Design Simulator (AVDS), was used for the purpose of simulation and visualization of the aircraft dynamics and the performance of the control schemes. For the purpose of the sensor failure detection, identification and accommodation (SFDIA) task, it is assumed that the pitch, roll and yaw rate gyros onboard are without physical redundancy. The task is accomplished through the use of a Main Neural Network (MNN) and a set of three De-Centralized Neural Networks (DNNs), providing analytical redundancy for the pitch, roll and yaw gyros. The purpose of the MNN is to detect a sensor failure while the purpose of the DNNs is to identify the failed sensor and then to provide failure accommodation. The actuator failure detection, identification and accommodation (AFDIA) scheme also features the MNN, for detection of actuator failures, along with three Neural Network Controllers (NNCs) for providing the compensating control surface deflections to neutralize the failure induced pitching, rolling and yawing moments. All NNs continue to train on-line, in addition to an offline trained baseline network structure, using the Extended Back-Propagation Algorithm (EBPA), with the flight data provided by the AVDS simulation package. The above mentioned adaptive flight control schemes have been traditionally implemented sequentially on a single computer. This research addresses the implementation of these fault tolerant flight control schemes on parallel and distributed computer architectures, using Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) sockets and Message Passing Interface (MPI) for inter

  3. Advanced flight deck/crew station simulator functional requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, R. L.; Tate, J. L.; Moss, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    This report documents a study of flight deck/crew system research facility requirements for investigating issues involved with developing systems, and procedures for interfacing transport aircraft with air traffic control systems planned for 1985 to 2000. Crew system needs of NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and industry were investigated and reported. A matrix of these is included, as are recommended functional requirements and design criteria for simulation facilities in which to conduct this research. Methods of exploiting the commonality and similarity in facilities are identified, and plans for exploiting this in order to reduce implementation costs and allow efficient transfer of experiments from one facility to another are presented.

  4. A graphical workstation based part-task flight simulator for preliminary rapid evaluation of advanced displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Hahn, Edward; Pritchett, Amy; Hansman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology are significantly changing the cockpit environment in current transport aircraft. The MIT Aeronautical Systems Lab (ASL) has developed a part-task flight simulator specifically to study the effects of these new technologies on flight crew situational awareness and performance. The simulator is based on a commercially-available graphics workstation, and can be rapidly reconfigured to meet the varying demands of experimental studies. The simulator has been successfully used to evaluate graphical microburst alerting displays, electronic instrument approach plates, terrain awareness and alerting displays, and ATC routing amendment delivery through digital datalinks.

  5. A graphical workstation based part-task flight simulator for preliminary rapid evaluation of advanced displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Hahn, Edward; Pritchett, A.; Hansman, R. John

    1994-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology are significantly changing the cockpit environment in current transport aircraft. The MIT Aeronautical Systems Lab (ASL) developed a part-task flight simulator specifically to study the effects of these new technologies on flight crew situational awareness and performance. The simulator is based on a commercially-available graphics workstation, and can be rapidly reconfigured to meet the varying demands of experimental studies. The simulator was successfully used to evaluate graphical microbursts alerting displays, electronic instrument approach plates, terrain awareness and alerting displays, and ATC routing amendment delivery through digital datalinks.

  6. Flight Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    PROCEEDINGS No.408 Flight Simulation DTIC !ELECTE NOVO505s ’ D -J DISTRIBUTION AND AVAILABILITY I I •k i nimy fle-"-- THE MISSION OF AGARI) The mission of...recherche. Ie d ~veloppement et lentrainement. Les objectifs du symposium de la commmission m~canique de vol de L’AGARD 6taient de fournir une description...tttbution Availjbiily CcodeS AvailI a.- d or Dist Spe~cial FLIGHT MECHANICS PANEL OFFICERS Chairman: Dr Ing. P.Hamcl Deputy Chairman: Dr Ing. A.Filisetti

  7. A Flight Dynamic Simulation Program in Air-Path Axes Using ACSL (Advanced Continuous Simulation Language).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    NO-A±?3 649 A FLIGHT DYNANIC SINULRTION PROGRAM IN AIR-PRTH AXES 11𔃼 USING ACSL (ADVANCED.. (U) AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABS MELBOURNE (AUSTRALIA) P W...Aeronajutical Restvarch Laboratrmes, ....,. i P.O. Box 4331,M lo re Vic:toria. 3001, Aus trali ."-" Melbourne.-a ’ 𔃾’ -- .-,, : _" • , (C) CMMONWALTH F...of time dependent results . e Tne DERIVATIVE section contains tne aitnd1- of the six degrees look- of freedom flight model. Tr imm inrg o f tnte a ir

  8. Advanced flight software reconfiguraton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porcher, Bryan

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on advanced flight software reconfiguration. Reconfiguration is defined as identifying mission and configuration specific requirements, controlling mission and configuration specific data, binding this information to the flight software code to perform specific missions, and the release and distribution of the flight software. The objectives are to develop, demonstrate, and validate advanced software reconfiguration tools and techniques; to demonstrate reconfiguration approaches on Space Station Freedom (SSF) onboard systems displays; and to interactively test onboard systems displays, flight software, and flight data.

  9. Ejector nozzle test results at simulated flight conditions for an advanced supersonic transport propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Bresnahan, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of wind tunnel tests conducted to verify the performance improvements of a refined ejector nozzle design for advanced supersonic transport propulsion systems. The analysis of results obtained at simulated engine operating conditions is emphasized. Tests were conducted with models of approximately 1/10th scale which were configured to simulate nozzle operation at takeoff, subsonic cruise, transonic cruise, and supersonic cruise. Transonic cruise operation was not a consideration during the nozzle design phase, although an evaluation at this condition was later conducted. Test results, characterized by thrust and flow coefficients, are given for a range of nozzle pressure ratios, emphasizing the thrust performance at the engine operating conditions predicted for each flight Mach number. The results indicate that nozzle performance goals were met or closely approximated at takeoff and supersonic cruise, while subsonic cruise performance was within 2.3 percent of the goal with further improvement possible.

  10. An Aerodynamic Performance Evaluation of the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, Paul F.

    1987-01-01

    The results of an aerodynamic performance evaluation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS), conducted in association with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics, are presented. The ACFS is a full-mission flight simulator which provides an excellent platform for the critical evaluation of emerging flight systems and aircrew performance. The propulsion and flight dynamics models were evaluated using classical flight test techniques. The aerodynamic performance model of the ACFS was found to realistically represent that of current day, medium range transport aircraft. Recommendations are provided to enhance the capabilities of the ACFS to a level forecast for 1995 transport aircraft. The graphical and tabular results of this study will establish a performance section of the ACFS Operation's Manual.

  11. Advanced manned space flight simulation and training: An investigation of simulation host computer system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, Bruce C.; Bishop, Alfred M.; Redfield, Joe B.

    1989-01-01

    The findings of a preliminary investigation by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in simulation host computer concepts is presented. It is designed to aid NASA in evaluating simulation technologies for use in spaceflight training. The focus of the investigation is on the next generation of space simulation systems that will be utilized in training personnel for Space Station Freedom operations. SwRI concludes that NASA should pursue a distributed simulation host computer system architecture for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) rather than a centralized mainframe based arrangement. A distributed system offers many advantages and is seen by SwRI as the only architecture that will allow NASA to achieve established functional goals and operational objectives over the life of the Space Station Freedom program. Several distributed, parallel computing systems are available today that offer real-time capabilities for time critical, man-in-the-loop simulation. These systems are flexible in terms of connectivity and configurability, and are easily scaled to meet increasing demands for more computing power.

  12. Advanced Flight Simulator: Utilization in A-10 Conversion and Air-to-Surface Attack Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    CLASSIFIC.TION OF THIS PAGE(1Whl Data Emiterd) Item 20 (Continued) -" blocks of instruction on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). The first...training, the transfer of training from the ASPT to the A-10 is nearly 100 percent. therefore, in the early phases of AiS training, one simulator... ASPT ) could be suitably modified, an alternative to initially dangerous and expensive aircraft training would exist which also offered considerable

  13. Flight code validation simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, B.A.

    1995-08-01

    An End-To-End Simulation capability for software development and validation of missile flight software on the actual embedded computer has been developed utilizing a 486 PC, i860 DSP coprocessor, embedded flight computer and custom dual port memory interface hardware. This system allows real-time interrupt driven embedded flight software development and checkout. The flight software runs in a Sandia Digital Airborne Computer (SANDAC) and reads and writes actual hardware sensor locations in which IMU (Inertial Measurements Unit) data resides. The simulator provides six degree of freedom real-time dynamic simulation, accurate real-time discrete sensor data and acts on commands and discretes from the flight computer. This system was utilized in the development and validation of the successful premier flight of the Digital Miniature Attitude Reference System (DMARS) in January 1995 at the White Sands Missile Range on a two stage attitude controlled sounding rocket.

  14. Researcher's guide to the NASA Ames Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinacori, J. B.; Stapleford, R. L.; Jewell, W. F.; Lehman, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Performance, limitations, supporting software, and current checkout and operating procedures are presented for the flight simulator, in terms useful to the researcher who intends to use it. Suggestions to help the researcher prepare the experimental plan are also given. The FSAA's central computer, cockpit, and visual and motion systems are addressed individually but their interaction is considered as well. Data required, available options, user responsibilities, and occupancy procedures are given in a form that facilitates the initial communication required with the NASA operations' group.

  15. Parameter identification studies on the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckavitt, Thomas P., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The results of an aircraft parameters identification study conducted on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) in conjunction with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics are given. The ACFS is a commercial airline simulator with a design based on future technology. The simulator is used as a laboratory for human factors research and engineering as applied to the commercial airline industry. Parametric areas examined were engine pressure ratio (EPR), optimum long range cruise Mach number, flap reference speed, and critical take-off speeds. Results were compared with corresponding parameters of the Boeing 757 and 767 aircraft. This comparison identified two areas where improvements can be made: (1) low maximum lift coefficients (on the order of 20-25 percent less than those of a 757); and (2) low optimum cruise Mach numbers. Recommendations were made to those anticipated with the application of future technologies.

  16. Advanced flight control system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G. L.; Wall, J. E., Jr.; Rang, E. R.; Lee, H. P.; Schulte, R. W.; Ng, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fly by wire flight control system architecture designed for high reliability includes spare sensor and computer elements to permit safe dispatch with failed elements, thereby reducing unscheduled maintenance. A methodology capable of demonstrating that the architecture does achieve the predicted performance characteristics consists of a hierarchy of activities ranging from analytical calculations of system reliability and formal methods of software verification to iron bird testing followed by flight evaluation. Interfacing this architecture to the Lockheed S-3A aircraft for flight test is discussed. This testbed vehicle can be expanded to support flight experiments in advanced aerodynamics, electromechanical actuators, secondary power systems, flight management, new displays, and air traffic control concepts.

  17. Advanced flight control system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, J.; Moses, K.; Klafin, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The architecture, requirements, and system elements of an ultrareliable, advanced flight control system are described. The basic criteria are functional reliability of 10 to the minus 10 power/hour of flight and only 6 month scheduled maintenance. A distributed system architecture is described, including a multiplexed communication system, reliable bus controller, the use of skewed sensor arrays, and actuator interfaces. Test bed and flight evaluation program are proposed.

  18. Simulated flight acoustic investigation of treated ejector effectiveness on advanced mechanical suppresors for high velocity jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brausch, J. F.; Motsinger, R. E.; Hoerst, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Ten scale-model nozzles were tested in an anechoic free-jet facility to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of a mechanically suppressed inverted-velocity-profile coannular nozzle with an accoustically treated ejector system. The nozzle system used was developed from aerodynamic flow lines evolved in a previous contract, defined to incorporate the restraints imposed by the aerodynamic performance requirements of an Advanced Supersonic Technology/Variable Cycle Engine system through all its mission phases. Accoustic data of 188 test points were obtained, 87 under static and 101 under simulated flight conditions. The tests investigated variables of hardwall ejector application to a coannular nozzle with 20-chute outer annular suppressor, ejector axial positioning, treatment application to ejector and plug surfaces, and treatment design. Laser velocimeter, shadowgraph photograph, aerodynamic static pressure, and temperature measurement were acquired on select models to yield diagnositc information regarding the flow field and aerodynamic performance characteristics of the nozzles.

  19. Takeoff certification considerations for large subsonic and supersonic transport airplanes using the Ames flight simulator for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Fry, E. B.; Forrest, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Data for use in development of takeoff airworthiness standards for new aircraft designs such as the supersonic transport (SST) and the large wide-body subsonic jet transport are provided. An advanced motion simulator was used to compare the performance and handling characteristics of three representative large jet transports during specific flight certification tasks. Existing regulatory constraints and methods for determining rotation speed were reviewed, and the effects on takeoff performance of variations in rotation speed, pitch attitude, and pitch attitude rate during the rotation maneuver were analyzed. A limited quantity of refused takeoff information was obtained. The aerodynamics, wing loading, and thrust-to-weight ratio of the subject SST resulted in takeoff speeds limited by climb (rather than lift-off) considerations. Take-off speeds based on U.S. subsonic transport requirements were found unacceptable because of the criticality of rotation-abuse effects on one-engine-inoperative climb performance. Adequate safety margin was provided by takeoff speeds based on proposed Anglo-French supersonic transport (TSS) criteria, with the limiting criterion being that takeoff safety speed be at least 1.15 times the one-engine-inoperative zero-rate-of-climb speed. Various observations related to SST certification are presented.

  20. Advanced flight computer. Special study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coo, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    This report documents a special study to define a 32-bit radiation hardened, SEU tolerant flight computer architecture, and to investigate current or near-term technologies and development efforts that contribute to the Advanced Flight Computer (AFC) design and development. An AFC processing node architecture is defined. Each node may consist of a multi-chip processor as needed. The modular, building block approach uses VLSI technology and packaging methods that demonstrate a feasible AFC module in 1998 that meets that AFC goals. The defined architecture and approach demonstrate a clear low-risk, low-cost path to the 1998 production goal, with intermediate prototypes in 1996.

  1. Parallel methods for the flight simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Wei Zhong; Swietlik, C.

    1994-06-01

    The Advanced Computer Applications Center (ACAC) has been involved in evaluating advanced parallel architecture computers and the applicability of these machines to computer simulation models. The advanced systems investigated include parallel machines with shared. memory and distributed architectures consisting of an eight processor Alliant FX/8, a twenty four processor sor Sequent Symmetry, Cray XMP, IBM RISC 6000 model 550, and the Intel Touchstone eight processor Gamma and 512 processor Delta machines. Since parallelizing a truly efficient application program for the parallel machine is a difficult task, the implementation for these machines in a realistic setting has been largely overlooked. The ACAC has developed considerable expertise in optimizing and parallelizing application models on a collection of advanced multiprocessor systems. One of aspect of such an application model is the Flight Simulation Model, which used a set of differential equations to describe the flight characteristics of a launched missile by means of a trajectory. The Flight Simulation Model was written in the FORTRAN language with approximately 29,000 lines of source code. Depending on the number of trajectories, the computation can require several hours to full day of CPU time on DEC/VAX 8650 system. There is an impetus to reduce the execution time and utilize the advanced parallel architecture computing environment available. ACAC researchers developed a parallel method that allows the Flight Simulation Model to be able to run in parallel on the multiprocessor system. For the benchmark data tested, the parallel Flight Simulation Model implemented on the Alliant FX/8 has achieved nearly linear speedup. In this paper, we describe a parallel method for the Flight Simulation Model. We believe the method presented in this paper provides a general concept for the design of parallel applications. This concept, in most cases, can be adapted to many other sequential application programs.

  2. Advances in robust flight design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Dhand, Sanjeev K.

    1991-01-01

    Current launch vehicle trajectory design philosophies, generally based on maximizing payload capability, result in an expensive and time-consuming iteration in trajectory design for each mission. However, for a launch system that is not performance-driven, a flight design that is robust to variations in missions and provides single-engine-out capability can be highly cost-effective. This philosophy has led to the development of two flight design concepts to reduce recurring costs: standard trajectories and command multiplier steering. Preliminary analyses of these two concepts had proven the feasibility and showed encouraging results in applications to an Advanced Launch System vehicle. Recent progress has demonstrated the effective and efficient integration of the two concepts with minimal payload penalty.

  3. Technical evaluation report on the Flight Mechanics Panel Symposium on Flight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony M.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, important advances were made in technology both for ground-based and in-flight simulators. There was equally a broadening of the use of flight simulators for research, development, and training purposes. An up-to-date description of the state-of-the-art of technology and engineering was provided for both ground-based and in-flight simulators and their respective roles were placed in context within the aerospace scene.

  4. Aerodynamic Simulation of Indoor Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Leon, Nelson; De Leon, Matthew N.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional flight simulator for lightweight (less than 10 g) indoor planes. The simulator consists of four coupled time differential equations describing the plane CG, plane pitch and motor. The equations are integrated numerically with appropriate parameters and initial conditions for two planes: (1) Science Olympiad and (2)…

  5. Laser Altimeter for Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Height of flight-simulator probe above model of terrain measured by automatic laser triangulation system. Airplane simulated by probe that moves over model of terrain. Altitude of airplane scaled from height of probe above model. Height measured by triangulation of laser beam aimed at intersection of model surface with plumb line of probe.

  6. Single pilot scanning behavior in simulated instrument flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennington, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A simulation of tasks associated with single pilot general aviation flight under instrument flight rules was conducted as a baseline for future research studies on advanced flight controls and avionics. The tasks, ranging from simple climbs and turns to an instrument landing systems approach, were flown on a fixed base simulator. During the simulation the control inputs, state variables, and the pilots visual scan pattern including point of regard were measured and recorded.

  7. Current Simulator Substitution Practices in Flight Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    environments. The percentage reduction of the original in-flight syllabus (effectiveness) and the ratio of simulator hours required per in-flight...in the report are percent flight TAEG Report No. 43 syllabus reduction and flight substitution ratio. Explanatory information is provided to...formula (Percent Flight Syllabus Reduction) expresses the overall ability of the simulator to reduce the amount of in-flight training in the syllabus

  8. Flight simulator with spaced visuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, Richard D. (Inventor); Thurston, Marlin O. (Inventor); Olson, Karl W. (Inventor); Ventola, Ronald W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A flight simulator arrangement wherein a conventional, movable base flight trainer is combined with a visual cue display surface spaced a predetermined distance from an eye position within the trainer. Thus, three degrees of motive freedom (roll, pitch and crab) are provided for a visual proprioceptive, and vestibular cue system by the trainer while the remaining geometric visual cue image alterations are developed by a video system. A geometric approach to computing runway image eliminates a need to electronically compute trigonometric functions, while utilization of a line generator and designated vanishing point at the video system raster permits facile development of the images of the longitudinal edges of the runway.

  9. Determining the transferability of flight simulator data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David

    1992-01-01

    This paper presented a method for collecting and graphically correlating subjective ratings and objective flight test data. The method enables flight-simulation engineers to enhance the simulator characterization of rotor craft flight in order to achieve maximum transferability of simulator experience.

  10. Advancements of In-Flight Mass Moment of Inertia and Structural Deflection Algorithms for Satellite Attitude Simulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    simulators are geometrically limited to rotate about the center of an air- bearing , not necessarily the center of mass. As a result, there are potentially... bearing satellite attitude simulator. The simulation results were compared against truth, and the experimental results were compared against an a-priori MOI...review of air- bearings , Smith [34] derived the equations of various disturbance torques experience by satellite attitude simulators. During Smith’s

  11. Use of Convex supercomputers for flight simulation at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1992-01-01

    The use of the Convex Computer Corporation supercomputers for flight simulation is discussed focusing on a real-time input/output system for supporting the flight simulation. The flight simulation computing system is based on two single processor control data corporation CYBER 175 computers, coupled through extended memory. The Advanced Real-Time Simulation System for digital data distribution and signal conversion is a state-of-the-art, high-speed fiber-optic-based, ring network system which is based on the computer automated measurement and control technology.

  12. Advancements of in-flight mass moment of inertia and structural deflection algorithms for satellite attitude simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jonathan W.

    Experimental satellite attitude simulators have long been used to test and analyze control algorithms in order to drive down risk before implementation on an operational satellite. Ideally, the dynamic response of a terrestrial-based experimental satellite attitude simulator would be similar to that of an on-orbit satellite. Unfortunately, gravitational disturbance torques and poorly characterized moments of inertia introduce uncertainty into the system dynamics leading to questionable attitude control algorithm experimental results. This research consists of three distinct, but related contributions to the field of developing robust satellite attitude simulators. In the first part of this research, existing approaches to estimate mass moments and products of inertia are evaluated followed by a proposition and evaluation of a new approach that increases both the accuracy and precision of these estimates using typical on-board satellite sensors. Next, in order to better simulate the micro-torque environment of space, a new approach to mass balancing satellite attitude simulator is presented, experimentally evaluated, and verified. Finally, in the third area of research, we capitalize on the platform improvements to analyze a control moment gyroscope (CMG) singularity avoidance steering law. Several successful experiments were conducted with the CMG array at near-singular configurations. An evaluation process was implemented to verify that the platform remained near the desired test momentum, showing that the first two components of this research were effective in allowing us to conduct singularity avoidance experiments in a representative space-like test environment.

  13. Simulation of the Physics of Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, W. Brian

    2013-01-01

    Computer simulations continue to prove to be a valuable tool in physics education. Based on the needs of an Aviation Physics course, we developed the PHYSics of FLIght Simulator (PhysFliS), which numerically solves Newton's second law for an airplane in flight based on standard aerodynamics relationships. The simulation can be used to pique…

  14. Humanoid Flight Metabolic Simulator Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) has identified several areas of technology that will require significant improvements in terms of performance, capacity, and efficiency, in order to make a manned mission to Mars possible. These include crew vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), EVA suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and Information Systems, autonomous environmental monitoring, radiation exposure monitoring and protection, and vehicle thermal control systems (TCS). (MADMACS) in a Suit can be configured to simulate human metabolism, consuming crew resources (oxygen) in the process. In addition to providing support for testing Life Support on unmanned flights, MADMACS will also support testing of suit thermal controls, and monitor radiation exposure, body zone temperatures, moisture, and loads.

  15. Iced Aircraft Flight Data for Flight Simulator Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Blankenship, Kurt; Rieke, William; Brinker, David J.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is developing and validating technology to incorporate aircraft icing effects into a flight training device concept demonstrator. Flight simulation models of a DHC-6 Twin Otter were developed from wind tunnel data using a subscale, complete aircraft model with and without simulated ice, and from previously acquired flight data. The validation of the simulation models required additional aircraft response time histories of the airplane configured with simulated ice similar to the subscale model testing. Therefore, a flight test was conducted using the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft. Over 500 maneuvers of various types were conducted in this flight test. The validation data consisted of aircraft state parameters, pilot inputs, propulsion, weight, center of gravity, and moments of inertia with the airplane configured with different amounts of simulated ice. Emphasis was made to acquire data at wing stall and tailplane stall since these events are of primary interest to model accurately in the flight training device. Analyses of several datasets are described regarding wing and tailplane stall. Key findings from these analyses are that the simulated wing ice shapes significantly reduced the C , max, while the simulated tail ice caused elevator control force anomalies and tailplane stall when flaps were deflected 30 deg or greater. This effectively reduced the safe operating margins between iced wing and iced tail stall as flap deflection and thrust were increased. This flight test demonstrated that the critical aspects to be modeled in the icing effects flight training device include: iced wing and tail stall speeds, flap and thrust effects, control forces, and control effectiveness.

  16. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    The following research work is reported: (1) vestibular-visual interactions; (2) flight management and crew system interactions; (3) peripheral cue utilization in simulation technology; (4) control of signs and symptoms of motion sickness; (5) auditory cue utilization in flight simulators, and (6) vestibular function: Animal experiments.

  17. Full Motion Flight Simulator in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Brad

    2005-01-01

    Virtual flight can be very entertaining, and computer-based simulators can also be educational, if organized and used correctly. When Berea College decided to find a flight simulator suited to the school's educational goals, the faculty settled on an ANT-18 Link trainer. This article begins with a discussion of Link trainers' history, and then…

  18. Design of an advanced flight planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Goka, T.

    1985-01-01

    The demand for both fuel conservation and four-dimensional traffic management require that the preflight planning process be designed to account for advances in airborne flight management and weather forecasting. The steps and issues in designing such an advanced flight planning system are presented. Focus is placed on the different optimization options for generating the three-dimensional reference path. For the cruise phase, one can use predefined jet routes, direct routes based on a network of evenly spaced grid points, or a network where the grid points are existing navaid locations. Each choice has its own problem in determining an optimum solution. Finding the reference path is further complicated by choice of cruise altitude levels, use of a time-varying weather field, and requiring a fixed time-of-arrival (four-dimensional problem).

  19. Extending a Flight Management Computer for Simulation and Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.; Sugden, Paul C.

    2005-01-01

    In modern transport aircraft, the flight management computer (FMC) has evolved from a flight planning aid to an important hub for pilot information and origin-to-destination optimization of flight performance. Current trends indicate increasing roles of the FMC in aviation safety, aviation security, increasing airport capacity, and improving environmental impact from aircraft. Related research conducted at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) often requires functional extension of a modern, full-featured FMC. Ideally, transport simulations would include an FMC simulation that could be tailored and extended for experiments. However, due to the complexity of a modern FMC, a large investment (millions of dollars over several years) and scarce domain knowledge are needed to create such a simulation for transport aircraft. As an intermediate alternative, the Flight Research Services Directorate (FRSD) at LaRC created a set of reusable software products to extend flight management functionality upstream of a Boeing-757 FMC, transparently simulating or sharing its operator interfaces. The paper details the design of these products and highlights their use on NASA projects.

  20. Real time digital propulsion system simulation for manned flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihaloew, J. R.; Hart, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A real time digital simulation of a STOL propulsion system was developed which generates significant dynamics and internal variables needed to evaluate system performance and aircraft interactions using manned flight simulators. The simulation ran at a real-to-execution time ratio of 8.8. The model was used in a piloted NASA flight simulator program to evaluate the simulation technique and the propulsion system digital control. The simulation is described and results shown. Limited results of the flight simulation program are also presented.

  1. Psychological aspects of aeronautical flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, E. M.; Nagel, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Attention is given to the class of ground based devices which have been used by scientists, engineers, and test pilots to evaluate current or future aircraft systems. The characteristics of a flight simulator and its major subsystems are considered, taking into account simulator cockpits, visual scene attachments, aspects of visual attachment fidelity, simulator motion systems, motion system fidelity, and simulation computer systems. Questions related to psychological research and simulation are examined. Simulator validity criteria are discussed along with problems of subsystem fidelity.

  2. Simulation to Flight Test for a UAV Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.; Logan, Michael J.; French, Michael L.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis, Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights, including a fully autonomous demonstration at the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) UAV Demo 2005. Simulations based on wind tunnel data are being used to further develop advanced controllers for implementation and flight test.

  3. Flight trajectory simulation of fluid payload projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, H. R.; Wolfe, W. P.; Oberkampf, W. L.

    A flight trajectory simulation method has been developed for calculating the six degree-of-freedom motion of fluid filled projectiles. Numerically calculated internal fluid moments and experimentally known aerodynamic forces and moments are coupled to the projectile motion. Comparisons of predicted results with flight test data of an M483 155mm artillery projectile with a highly viscous payload confirm the accuracy of the simulation. This simulation clearly shows that the flight instability is due to the growth of the nutation component of angular motion caused by the viscous effects of the fluid payload. This simulation procedure, when used in conjunction with the previously developed method for calculating internal fluid moments, allows the designer to examine the effects of various liquid payloads and container geometries on the dynamic behavior of flight vehicles.

  4. Advanced Civil Transport Simulator Cockpit View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS) is a futuristic aircraft cockpit simulator designed to provide full-mission capabilities for researching issues that will affect future transport aircraft flight stations and crews. The objective is to heighten the pilots situation awareness through improved information availability and ease of interpretation in order to reduce the possibility of misinterpreted data. The simulators five 13-inch Cathode Ray Tubes are designed to display flight information in a logical easy-to-see format. Two color flat panel Control Display Units with touch sensitive screens provide monitoring and modification of aircraft parameters, flight plans, flight computers, and aircraft position. Three collimated visual display units have been installed to provide out-the-window scenes via the Computer Generated Image system. The major research objectives are to examine needs for transfer of information to and from the flight crew; study the use of advanced controls and displays for all-weather flying; explore ideas for using computers to help the crew in decision making; study visual scanning and reach behavior under different conditions with various levels of automation and flight deck-arrangements.

  5. Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The program objectives were defined in the original proposal entitled "Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in the JIAFS at NASA Langley Research Center" which was originated March 20, 1975, and in yearly renewals of the research program dated December 1, 1979 to December 1, 1998. The program included three major topics: 1) Improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for flight and wind tunnel data analysis based on system identification methodology. 2) Application of these methods to flight and wind tunnel data obtained from advanced aircraft. 3) Modeling and control of aircraft, space structures and spacecraft. The principal investigator of the program was Dr. Vladislav Klein, Professor at The George Washington University, Washington, D.C.. Thirty-seven Graduate Research Scholar Assistants, two of them doctoral students, also participated in the program. The results of the research conducted during nineteen years of the total co-operative period were published in 23 NASA technical reports, 2 D.Sc. Dissertations, 14 M.S. Theses and 33 papers. The list of these publications is included. The results were also reported in more than 30 seminar lectures presented at various research establishments world-wide. For contributions to the research supported by the co-operative agreement, three NASA Awards were received: 1) NASA LARC Group Achievement Award, May 30, 1990, to Dr. V. Klein as a member of the X-29 Drop Model Team. 2) NASA Medal for Exceptional Engineering Achievement, March 27, 1992, to Dr. V. Klein for innovative contributions in the development of advanced techniques and computer programs in the field of system identification. 3) NASA LaRC Team Excellence Award, May 7, 1994, to Dr. V. Klein as a member of the X-31 Drop Model Team.

  6. Turbulence flight director analysis and preliminary simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. E.; Klein, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A control column and trottle flight director display system is synthesized for use during flight through severe turbulence. The column system is designed to minimize airspeed excursions without overdriving attitude. The throttle system is designed to augment the airspeed regulation and provide an indication of the trim thrust required for any desired flight path angle. Together they form an energy management system to provide harmonious display indications of current aircraft motions and required corrective action, minimize gust upset tendencies, minimize unsafe aircraft excursions, and maintain satisfactory ride qualities. A preliminary fixed-base piloted simulation verified the analysis and provided a shakedown for a more sophisticated moving-base simulation to be accomplished next. This preliminary simulation utilized a flight scenario concept combining piloting tasks, random turbulence, and discrete gusts to create a high but realistic pilot workload conducive to pilot error and potential upset. The turbulence director (energy management) system significantly reduced pilot workload and minimized unsafe aircraft excursions.

  7. Visual Elements in Flight Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    control. In consequence, current efforts tc create appropriate visual simulations run the gamut from efforts toward almost complete replication of the...create appropriate visual simulations run the gamut from efforts to create appropriate visual simulations run the gamut from efforts toward almost

  8. 14 CFR 125.297 - Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of flight simulators and flight... MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.297 Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices....

  9. 14 CFR 125.297 - Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Approval of flight simulators and flight... MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.297 Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices....

  10. 14 CFR 125.297 - Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Approval of flight simulators and flight... MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.297 Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices....

  11. 14 CFR 125.297 - Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Approval of flight simulators and flight... MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.297 Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices....

  12. 14 CFR 125.297 - Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Approval of flight simulators and flight... MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.297 Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices....

  13. Data exchange protocols in flight simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, Jaime; Fernández, Ramón A.; Carriegos, Miguel V.

    2014-12-01

    Modeling and simulation are fundamental in early stages of engineering design and testing. That is the reason why aerospace engineering students need to learn those disciplines at the University. In particular, we propose the use of Simulink in combination with a X-Plane based flight simulator to improve the motivation of such students. Our approach suggests beginning with two simple lab assignments that help the students develop their very first models and simulation by acquiring some flight parameters and by sending commands to the aircraft.

  14. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    All 139 research papers published under this ten-year program are listed. Experimental work was carried out at the Ames Research Center involving man's sensitivity to rotational acceleration, and psychophysical functioning of the semicircular canals; vestibular-visual interactions and effects of other sensory systems were studied in flight simulator environments. Experiments also dealt with the neurophysiological vestibular functions of animals, and flight management investigations of man-vehicle interactions.

  15. Flight Simulations Prep Shuttle Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    As they simulate one of the three spacewalks scheduled for their upcoming mission to the International Space Station, Commander Ken Ham and Mission Specialist Mike Good discuss with Mike Massimino ...

  16. Advanced aeroservoelastic stabilization techniques for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Samuel Y.; Cheng, Peter Y.; Myers, Thomas T.; Klyde, David H.; Magdaleno, Raymond E.; Mcruer, Duane T.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced high performance vehicles, including Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) hypersonic flight vehicles, that are statically unstable, require higher bandwidth flight control systems to compensate for the instability resulting in interactions between the flight control system, the engine/propulsion dynamics, and the low frequency structural modes. Military specifications, such as MIL-F-9490D and MIL-F-87242, tend to limit treatment of structural modes to conventional gain stabilization techniques. The conventional gain stabilization techniques, however, introduce low frequency effective time delays which can be troublesome from a flying qualities standpoint. These time delays can be alleviated by appropriate blending of gain and phase stabilization techniques (referred to as Hybrid Phase Stabilization or HPS) for the low frequency structural modes. The potential of using HPS for compensating structural mode interaction was previously explored. It was shown that effective time delay was significantly reduced with the use of HPS; however, the HPS design was seen to have greater residual response than a conventional gain stablized design. Additional work performed to advance and refine the HPS design procedure, to further develop residual response metrics as a basis for alternative structural stability specifications, and to develop strategies for validating HPS design and specification concepts in manned simulation is presented. Stabilization design sensitivity to structural uncertainties and aircraft-centered requirements are also assessed.

  17. Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Aeroacoustics Research Program is an integral part of the Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences at The George Washington University. It is affiliated with many civil, mechanical, and environmental engineering courses, particularly those that stress theory and numerical or other analytic methods in engineering. This report lists the courses presented, the names of graduate research assistants, and bibliographic information regarding publications and presentations. Three graduate degrees were awarded and the abstracts of each dissertation is included. The dissertations were as follows: "A Numerical Investigation of Thermoacoustic Oscillations", which discusses advances in the study of acoustic phenomena through the use of computational aeroacoustics. "Computation of Vortex Shedding and Radiated Sound for a Circular Cylinder: Subcritical to Transcritical Reynolds Numbers", which discusses predicting tonal noise generated by vortex shedding from a circular cylinder. And finally, "The Radiated Field Generated by a Monopole Source in a Short, Rigid, Rectangular Duct", which develops a method for modeling the acoustic field generated by a monopole source placed in a moving rectangular duct.

  18. NLS Flight Simulation Laboratory (FSL) documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Flight Simulation Laboratory (FSL) Electronic Documentation System design consists of modification and utilization of the MSFC Integrated Engineering System (IES), translation of the existing FSL documentation to an electronic format, and generation of new drawings to represent the Engine Flight Simulation Laboratory design and implementation. The intent of the electronic documentation is to provide ease of access, local print/plot capabilities, as well as the ability to correct and/or modify the stored data by network users who are authorized to access this information.

  19. A Standard Kinematic Model for Flight Simulation at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A standard kinematic model for aircraft simulation exists at NASA-Ames on a variety of computer systems, one of which is used to control the flight simulator for advanced aircraft (FSAA). The derivation of the kinematic model is given and various mathematical relationships are presented as a guide. These include descriptions of standardized simulation subsystems such as the atmospheric turbulence model and the generalized six-degrees-of-freedom trim routine, as well as an introduction to the emulative batch-processing system which enables this facility to optimize its real-time environment.

  20. Helicopter simulation validation using flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, D. L.; Hansen, R. S.; Cleveland, W. B.; Abbott, W. Y.

    1982-01-01

    A joint NASA/Army effort to perform a systematic ground-based piloted simulation validation assessment is described. The best available mathematical model for the subject helicopter (UH-60A Black Hawk) was programmed for real-time operation. Flight data were obtained to validate the math model, and to develop models for the pilot control strategy while performing mission-type tasks. The validated math model is to be combined with motion and visual systems to perform ground based simulation. Comparisons of the control strategy obtained in flight with that obtained on the simulator are to be used as the basis for assessing the fidelity of the results obtained in the simulator.

  1. Advanced transport operating system software upgrade: Flight management/flight controls software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Debure, Kelly R.; Dickson, Richard W.; Heaphy, William J.; Parks, Mark A.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Wolverton, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software for the Norden 2 (PDP-11/70M) computer installed on the NASA 737 aircraft is described. The software computes the navigation position estimates, guidance commands, those commands to be issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight based on the modes selected on the Advanced Guidance Control System (AGSC) mode panel, and the flight path selected via the Navigation Control/Display Unit (NCDU).

  2. A Flight Simulator Program Takes Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Don

    2003-01-01

    Aviation concepts, including forces acting on an airplane, navigation, correct aircraft terminology, and general aviation vocabulary, are often part of a comprehensive fifth-grade aviation curriculum. But in one school district, students also learned about flying planes and even trained in a flight simulator. This article describes how industry…

  3. Characteristics of flight simulator visual systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, I. C. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The physical parameters of the flight simulator visual system that characterize the system and determine its fidelity are identified and defined. The characteristics of visual simulation systems are discussed in terms of the basic categories of spatial, energy, and temporal properties corresponding to the three fundamental quantities of length, mass, and time. Each of these parameters are further addressed in relation to its effect, its appropriate units or descriptors, methods of measurement, and its use or importance to image quality.

  4. 14 CFR 91.1091 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 91.1091 Section 91.1091 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 91.1095: (1) A flight instructor (aircraft) is a person who is qualified to instruct in...

  5. 14 CFR 91.1091 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 91.1091 Section 91.1091 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 91.1095: (1) A flight instructor (aircraft) is a person who is qualified to instruct in...

  6. 14 CFR 91.1091 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 91.1091 Section 91.1091 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 91.1095: (1) A flight instructor (aircraft) is a person who is qualified to instruct in...

  7. 14 CFR 91.1091 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 91.1091 Section 91.1091 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 91.1095: (1) A flight instructor (aircraft) is a person who is qualified to instruct in...

  8. 14 CFR 91.1091 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 91.1091 Section 91.1091 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 91.1095: (1) A flight instructor (aircraft) is a person who is qualified to instruct in...

  9. 14 CFR 121.412 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). 121.412 Section 121.412 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Training Program § 121.412 Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 121.414: (1) A flight instructor (airplane) is...

  10. 14 CFR 121.412 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). 121.412 Section 121.412 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Training Program § 121.412 Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 121.414: (1) A flight instructor (airplane) is...

  11. Advances in time-of-flight PET

    PubMed Central

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs. PMID:26778577

  12. Simulation Testing of Embedded Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahabuddin, Mohammad; Reinholtz, William

    2004-01-01

    Virtual Real Time (VRT) is a computer program for testing embedded flight software by computational simulation in a workstation, in contradistinction to testing it in its target central processing unit (CPU). The disadvantages of testing in the target CPU include the need for an expensive test bed, the necessity for testers and programmers to take turns using the test bed, and the lack of software tools for debugging in a real-time environment. By virtue of its architecture, most of the flight software of the type in question is amenable to development and testing on workstations, for which there is an abundance of commercially available debugging and analysis software tools. Unfortunately, the timing of a workstation differs from that of a target CPU in a test bed. VRT, in conjunction with closed-loop simulation software, provides a capability for executing embedded flight software on a workstation in a close-to-real-time environment. A scale factor is used to convert between execution time in VRT on a workstation and execution on a target CPU. VRT includes high-resolution operating- system timers that enable the synchronization of flight software with simulation software and ground software, all running on different workstations.

  13. A HILS System for the Simulation of MAV Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-17

    A HILS System for the Simulation of MAV Flight In this research a HILS system in which a small autopilot can experience flight stimuli, such as...pitch, roll, yaw, and GPS is investigated. These stimuli are controlled by a flight simulator hosting an airframe model that the autopilot in question...fly’s. Such a system allows the autopilot to fly the virtual model of the flight simulator while experiencing all flight stimuli as if it is in real

  14. Flight testing and simulation of an F-15 airplane using throttles for flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel; Wolf, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Flight tests and simulation studies using the throttles of an F-15 airplane for emergency flight control have been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. The airplane and the simulation are capable of extended up-and-away flight, using only throttles for flight path control. Initial simulation results showed that runway landings using manual throttles-only control were difficult, but possible with practice. Manual approaches flown in the airplane were much more difficult, indicating a significant discrepancy between flight and simulation. Analysis of flight data and development of improved simulation models that resolve the discrepancy are discussed. An augmented throttle-only control system that controls bank angle and flight path with appropriate feedback parameters has also been developed, evaluated in simulations, and is planned for flight in the F-15.

  15. Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test 1 - Post-Flight Assessment of Simulation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumyo; Bowes, Angela L.; Striepe, Scott A.; Davis, Jody L.; Queen, Eric M.; Blood, Eric M.; Ivanov, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project conducted its first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT-1) on June 28, 2014. Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) was one of the flight dynamics codes used to simulate and predict the flight performance and Monte Carlo analysis was used to characterize the potential flight conditions experienced by the test vehicle. This paper compares the simulation predictions with the reconstructed trajectory of SFDT-1. Additionally, off-nominal conditions seen during flight are modeled in post-flight simulations to find the primary contributors that reconcile the simulation with flight data. The results of these analyses are beneficial for the pre-flight simulation and targeting of the follow-on SFDT flights currently scheduled for summer 2015.

  16. Helicopter flight simulation motion platform requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Jeffery Allyn

    Flight simulators attempt to reproduce in-flight pilot-vehicle behavior on the ground. This reproduction is challenging for helicopter simulators, as the pilot is often inextricably dependent on external cues for pilot-vehicle stabilization. One important simulator cue is platform motion; however, its required fidelity is unknown. To determine the required motion fidelity, several unique experiments were performed. A large displacement motion platform was used that allowed pilots to fly tasks with matched motion and visual cues. Then, the platform motion was modified to give cues varying from full motion to no motion. Several key results were found. First, lateral and vertical translational platform cues had significant effects on fidelity. Their presence improved performance and reduced pilot workload. Second, yaw and roll rotational platform cues were not as important as the translational platform cues. In particular, the yaw rotational motion platform cue did not appear at all useful in improving performance or reducing workload. Third, when the lateral translational platform cue was combined with visual yaw rotational cues, pilots believed the platform was rotating when it was not. Thus, simulator systems can be made more efficient by proper combination of platform and visual cues. Fourth, motion fidelity specifications were revised that now provide simulator users with a better prediction of motion fidelity based upon the frequency responses of their motion control laws. Fifth, vertical platform motion affected pilot estimates of steady-state altitude during altitude repositionings. This refutes the view that pilots estimate altitude and altitude rate in simulation solely from visual cues. Finally, the combined results led to a general method for configuring helicopter motion systems and for developing simulator tasks that more likely represent actual flight. The overall results can serve as a guide to future simulator designers and to today's operators.

  17. Post-Flight Assessment of Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Flight Dynamics Test 2 Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumyo; Bowes, Angela L.; White, Joseph P.; Striepe, Scott A.; Queen, Eric M.; O'Farrel, Clara; Ivanov, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project conducted its second Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT-2) on June 8, 2015. The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) was one of the flight dynamics tools used to simulate and predict the flight performance and was a major tool used in the post-flight assessment of the flight trajectory. This paper compares the simulation predictions with the reconstructed trajectory. Additionally, off-nominal conditions seen during flight are modeled in the simulation to reconcile the predictions with flight data. These analyses are beneficial to characterize the results of the flight test and to improve the simulation and targeting of the subsequent LDSD flights.

  18. A Unique Software System For Simulation-to-Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Victoria I.; Hutchinson, Brian K.

    2001-01-01

    "Simulation-to-Flight" is a research development concept to reduce costs and increase testing efficiency of future major aeronautical research efforts at NASA. The simulation-to-flight concept is achieved by using common software and hardware, procedures, and processes for both piloted-simulation and flight testing. This concept was applied to the design and development of two full-size transport simulators, a research system installed on a NASA B-757 airplane, and two supporting laboratories. This paper describes the software system that supports the simulation-to-flight facilities. Examples of various simulation-to-flight experimental applications were also provided.

  19. Design and analysis of advanced flight planning concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this continuing effort are to develop and evaluate new algorithms and advanced concepts for flight management and flight planning. This includes the minimization of fuel or direct operating costs, the integration of the airborne flight management and ground-based flight planning processes, and the enhancement of future traffic management systems design. Flight management (FMS) concepts are for on-board profile computation and steering of transport aircraft in the vertical plane between a city pair and along a given horizontal path. Flight planning (FPS) concepts are for the pre-flight ground based computation of the three-dimensional reference trajectory that connects the city pair and specifies the horizontal path, fuel load, and weather profiles for initializing the FMS. As part of these objectives, a new computer program called EFPLAN has been developed and utilized to study advanced flight planning concepts. EFPLAN represents an experimental version of an FPS. It has been developed to generate reference flight plans compatible as input to an FMS and to provide various options for flight planning research. This report describes EFPLAN and the associated research conducted in its development.

  20. Methods of sound simulation and applications in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaertner, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of methods for electronically synthesizing sounds is presented. A given amount of hardware and computer capacity places an upper limit on the degree and fidelity of realism of sound simulation which is attainable. Good sound realism for aircraft simulators can be especially expensive because of the complexity of flight sounds and their changing patterns through time. Nevertheless, the flight simulator developed at the Research Institute for Human Engineering, West Germany, shows that it is possible to design an inexpensive sound simulator with the required acoustic properties using analog computer elements. The characteristics of the sub-sound elements produced by this sound simulator for take-off, cruise and approach are discussed.

  1. Training needs for advanced technology flight decks.

    PubMed

    Maurino, D

    1991-05-01

    The author examines training implications of increased automation in aircraft flight decks. Training issues include the need for basic pilot skills and knowledge, general knowledge of the aircraft, revision of Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) to reflect changes due to technology, and tailoring Line-Oriented Flight Training to focus on routine human-automation interfaces and CRM principles in addition to scenarios of abnormal conditions.

  2. Advanced Free Flight Planner and Dispatcher's Workstation: Preliminary Design Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J.; Wright, C.; Couluris, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has implemented the Advanced Air Transportation Technology (AATT) program to investigate future improvements to the national and international air traffic management systems. This research, as part of the AATT program, developed preliminary design requirements for an advanced Airline Operations Control (AOC) dispatcher's workstation, with emphasis on flight planning. This design will support the implementation of an experimental workstation in NASA laboratories that would emulate AOC dispatch operations. The work developed an airline flight plan data base and specified requirements for: a computer tool for generation and evaluation of free flight, user preferred trajectories (UPT); the kernel of an advanced flight planning system to be incorporated into the UPT-generation tool; and an AOC workstation to house the UPT-generation tool and to provide a real-time testing environment. A prototype for the advanced flight plan optimization kernel was developed and demonstrated. The flight planner uses dynamic programming to search a four-dimensional wind and temperature grid to identify the optimal route, altitude and speed for successive segments of a flight. An iterative process is employed in which a series of trajectories are successively refined until the LTPT is identified. The flight planner is designed to function in the current operational environment as well as in free flight. The free flight environment would enable greater flexibility in UPT selection based on alleviation of current procedural constraints. The prototype also takes advantage of advanced computer processing capabilities to implement more powerful optimization routines than would be possible with older computer systems.

  3. A Laboratory Glass-Cockpit Flight Simulator for Automation and Communications Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanich, Gregory M.; Heers, Susan T.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A laboratory glass-cockpit flight simulator supporting research on advanced commercial flight deck and Air Traffic Control (ATC) automation and communication interfaces has been developed at the Aviation Operations Branch at the NASA Ames Research Center. This system provides independent and integrated flight and ATC simulator stations, party line voice and datalink communications, along with video and audio monitoring and recording capabilities. Over the last several years, it has been used to support the investigation of flight human factors research issues involving: communication modality; message content and length; graphical versus textual presentation of information, and human accountability for automation. This paper updates the status of this simulator, describing new functionality in the areas of flight management system, EICAS display, and electronic checklist integration. It also provides an overview of several experiments performed using this simulator, including their application areas and results. Finally future enhancements to its ATC (integration of CTAS software) and flight deck (full crew operations) functionality are described.

  4. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, David A.; Dickson, Richard W.; Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    The flight software developed for the Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) MicroVAX computer used on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle for Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) research is described. The FM/FC software computes navigation position estimates, guidance commands, and those commands issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight. Various modes of flight are provided for, ranging from computer assisted manual modes to fully automatic modes including automatic landing. A high-level system overview as well as a description of each software module comprising the system is provided. Digital systems diagrams are included for each major flight control component and selected flight management functions.

  5. Trimming an aircraft model for flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Real-time piloted aircraft simulations with digital computers have been performed at Ames Research Center (ARC) for over two decades. For the simulation of conventional aircraft models, the establishment of initial vehicle and control orientations at various operational flight regimes has been adequately handled by either analog techniques or simple inversion processes. However, exotic helicopter configurations have been introduced recently that require more sophisticated techniques because of their expanded degrees of freedom and environmental vibration levels. At ARC, these techniques are used for the backward solutions to real-time simulation models as required for the generation of trim points. These techniques are presented in this paper with examples from a blade-element helicopter simulation model.

  6. Orbital flight simulation utility software unit specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The HP PASCAL source code contained in pages 6 through 104 was developed for the Mission Planning and Analysis Division (MPAD) and takes the place of detailed flow charts defining the specifications for a Utility Software Unit designed to support orbital flight simulators such as MANHANDLE and GREAS (General Research and Engineering Analysis Simulator). Besides providing basic input/output, mathematical, vector, matrix, quaternion, and statistical routines for such simulators, one of the primary functions of the Utility Software Unit is to isolate all system-dependent code in one well-defined compartment, thereby facilitating transportation of the simulations from one computer to another. Directives to the PASCAL compilers of the HP-9000 Series 200 PASCAL 3.0 operating system and the HP-9000 Series 500 HP-UX 5.0 operations systems are also provided.

  7. Advanced electromagnetic gun simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. L.; George, E. B.; Lippert, J. R.; Balius, A. R.

    1986-11-01

    The architecture, software and application of a simulation system for evaluating electromagnetic gun (EMG) operability, maintainability, test data and performance tradeoffs are described. The system features a generic preprocessor designed for handling the large data rates necessary for EMG simulations. The preprocessor and postprocessor operate independent of the EMG simulation, which is viewed through windows by the user, who can then select the areas of the simulation desired. The simulation considers a homopolar generator, busbars, pulse shaping coils, the barrel, switches, and prime movers. In particular, account is taken of barrel loading by the magnetic field, Lorentz force and plasma pressure.

  8. 14 CFR 135.338 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 135.338 Section 135.338 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training § 135.338 Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and §...

  9. 14 CFR 135.338 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 135.338 Section 135.338 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training § 135.338 Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and §...

  10. 14 CFR 135.338 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 135.338 Section 135.338 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training § 135.338 Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and §...

  11. 14 CFR 135.338 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 135.338 Section 135.338 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training § 135.338 Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and §...

  12. 14 CFR 135.338 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). 135.338 Section 135.338 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training § 135.338 Qualifications: Flight instructors (aircraft) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and §...

  13. Flight simulation for flight control computer S/N 0104-1 (ASTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Flight control computer (FCC) 0104-I has been designated the prime unit for the SA-210 launch vehicle. The results of the final flight simulation for FCC S/N 0104-I are documented. These results verify satisfactory implementation of the design release and proper interfacing of the FCC with flight-type control sensor elements and simulated thrust vector control system.

  14. In-flight load testing of advanced shuttle thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, B. M.; Meyer, R., Jr.; Sawko, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has conducted in-flight airload testing of some advanced thermal protection systems (TPS) at the Dryden Flight Research Center. The two flexible TPS materials tested, felt reusable surface insulation (FRSI) and advanced flexible reusable surface insulation (AFRSI), are currently certified for use on the Shuttle orbiter. The objectives of the flight tests were to evaluate the performance of FRSI and AFRSI at simulated launch airloads and to provide a data base for future advanced TPS flight tests. Five TPS configurations were evaluated in a flow field which was representative of relatively flat areas without secondary flows. The TPS materials were placed on a fin, the Flight Test fixture (FTF), that is attached to the underside of the fuselage of an F-104 aircraft. This paper describes the test approach and techniques used and presents the results of the advanced TPS flight test. There were no failures noted during post-flight inspections of the TPS materials which were exposed to airloads 40 percent higher than the design launch airloads.

  15. Comparison of Different Methods of Grading a Level Turn Task on a Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Bruce E.; Crier, tomyka

    2003-01-01

    With the advancements in the computing power of personal computers, pc-based flight simulators and trainers have opened new avenues in the training of airplane pilots. It may be desirable to have the flight simulator make a quantitative evaluation of the progress of a pilot's training thereby reducing the physical requirement of the flight instructor who must, in turn, watch every flight. In an experiment, University students conducted six different flights, each consisting of two level turns. The flights were three minutes in duration. By evaluating videotapes, two certified flight instructors provided separate letter grades for each turn. These level turns were also evaluated using two other computer based grading methods. One method determined automated grades based on prescribed tolerances in bank angle, airspeed and altitude. The other method used was deviations in altitude and bank angle for performance index and performance grades.

  16. The relationship of certified flight instructors' emotional intelligence levels on flight student advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokeness, Mark Merrill

    Aviation researchers estimate airline companies will require nearly 500,000 pilots in the next 20 years. The role of a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) is to move student pilots to professional pilots with training typically conducted in one-on-one student and instructor sessions. The knowledge of aviation, professionalism as a teacher, and the CFI’s interpersonal skills can directly affect the successes and advancement of a student pilot. A new and emerging assessment of people skills is known as emotional intelligence (EI). The EI of the CFI can and will affect a flight students’ learning experiences. With knowledge of emotional intelligence and its effect on flight training, student pilot dropouts from aviation may be reduced, thus helping to ensure an adequate supply of pilots. Without pilots, the growth of the commercial aviation industry will be restricted. This mixed method research study established the correlation between a CFI’s measured EI levels and the advancement of flight students. The elements contributing to a CFI’s EI level were not found to be teaching or flight-related experiences, suggesting other life factors are drawn upon by the CFI and are reflected in their emotional intelligence levels presented to flight students. Students respond positively to CFIs with higher levels of emotional intelligence. Awareness of EI skills by both the CFI and flight student contribute to flight student successes and advancement.

  17. In-flight simulation studies at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Mary F.

    1994-01-01

    Since the late 1950's the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Facility has found in-flight simulation to be an invaluable tool. In-flight simulation has been used to address a wide variety of flying qualities questions, including low lift-to-drag ratio approach characteristics for vehicles like the X-15, the lifting bodies, and the space shuttle; the effects of time delays on controllability of aircraft with digital flight control systems; the causes and cures of pilot-induced oscillation in a variety of aircraft; and flight control systems for such diverse aircraft as the X-15 and the X-29. In-flight simulation has also been used to anticipate problems, avoid them, and solve problems once they appear. This paper presents an account of the in-flight simulation at the Dryden Flight Research Facility and some discussion. An extensive bibliography is included.

  18. Flight Simulation Model Exchange. Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center Review Board sponsored an assessment of the draft Standard, Flight Dynamics Model Exchange Standard, BSR/ANSI-S-119-201x (S-119) that was conducted by simulation and guidance, navigation, and control engineers from several NASA Centers. The assessment team reviewed the conventions and formats spelled out in the draft Standard and the actual implementation of two example aerodynamic models (a subsonic F-16 and the HL-20 lifting body) encoded in the Extensible Markup Language grammar. During the implementation, the team kept records of lessons learned and provided feedback to the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee representative. This document contains the appendices to the main report.

  19. Flight Simulation Model Exchange. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center Review Board sponsored an assessment of the draft Standard, Flight Dynamics Model Exchange Standard, BSR/ANSI-S-119-201x (S-119) that was conducted by simulation and guidance, navigation, and control engineers from several NASA Centers. The assessment team reviewed the conventions and formats spelled out in the draft Standard and the actual implementation of two example aerodynamic models (a subsonic F-16 and the HL-20 lifting body) encoded in the Extensible Markup Language grammar. During the implementation, the team kept records of lessons learned and provided feedback to the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee representative. This document contains the results of the assessment.

  20. JT15D simulated flight data evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The noise characteristics of the JT15D turbofan engine was analyzed with the objectives of: (1) assessing the state-of-art ability to simulate flight acoustic data using test results acquired in wind tunnel and outdoor (turbulence controlled) environments; and (2) predicting the farfield noise directivity of the blade passage frequency (BPF) tonal components using results from rotor blade mounted dynamic pressure instrumentation. Engine rotor tip speeds at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic conditions were evaluated. The ability to simulate flight results was generally within 2-3 dB for both outdoor and wind tunnel acoustic results. Some differences did occur in the broadband noise level and in the multiple-pure-tone harmonics at supersonic tip speeds. The prediction of blade passage frequency tone directivity from dynamic pressure measurements was accomplished for the three tip speed conditions. Predictions were made of the random and periodic components of the tone directivity. The technique for estimating the random tone component used hot wire data to establish a correlation between dynamic pressure and turbulence intensity. This prediction overestimated the tone level by typically 10 dB with the greatest overestimates occurring at supersonic conditions.

  1. Flight Simulator and Training Human Factors Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Scott T.; Leland, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Loss of control has been identified as the leading cause of aircraft accidents in recent years. Efforts have been made to better equip pilots to deal with these types of events, commonly referred to as upsets. A major challenge in these endeavors has been recreating the motion environments found in flight as the majority of upsets take place well beyond the normal operating envelope of large aircraft. The Environmental Tectonics Corporation has developed a simulator motion base, called GYROLAB, that is capable of recreating the sustained accelerations, or G-forces, and motions of flight. A two part research study was accomplished that coupled NASA's Generic Transport Model with a GYROLAB device. The goal of the study was to characterize physiological effects of the upset environment and to demonstrate that a sustained motion based simulator can be an effective means for upset recovery training. Two groups of 25 Air Transport Pilots participated in the study. The results showed reliable signs of pilot arousal at specific stages of similar upsets. Further validation also demonstrated that sustained motion technology was successful in improving pilot performance during recovery following an extensive training program using GYROLAB technology.

  2. Helicopter Flight Simulation Motion Platform Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffery Allyn

    1999-01-01

    To determine motion fidelity requirements, a series of piloted simulations was performed. Several key results were found. First, lateral and vertical translational platform cues had significant effects on fidelity. Their presence improved performance and reduced pilot workload. Second, yaw and roll rotational platform cues were not as important as the translational platform cues. In particular, the yaw rotational motion platform cue did not appear at all useful in improving performance or reducing workload. Third, when the lateral translational platform cue was combined with visual yaw rotational cues, pilots believed the platform was rotating when it was not. Thus, simulator systems can be made more efficient by proper combination of platform and visual cues. Fourth, motion fidelity specifications were revised that now provide simulator users with a better prediction of motion fidelity based upon the frequency responses of their motion control laws. Fifth, vertical platform motion affected pilot estimates of steady-state altitude during altitude repositioning. Finally, the combined results led to a general method for configuring helicopter motion systems and for developing simulator tasks that more likely represent actual flight. The overall results can serve as a guide to future simulator designers and to today's operators.

  3. Advanced Space Shuttle simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Smith, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A non-recursive model (based on von Karman spectra) for atmospheric turbulence along the flight path of the shuttle orbiter was developed. It provides for simulation of instantaneous vertical and horizontal gusts at the vehicle center-of-gravity, and also for simulation of instantaneous gusts gradients. Based on this model the time series for both gusts and gust gradients were generated and stored on a series of magnetic tapes, entitled Shuttle Simulation Turbulence Tapes (SSTT). The time series are designed to represent atmospheric turbulence from ground level to an altitude of 120,000 meters. A description of the turbulence generation procedure is provided. The results of validating the simulated turbulence are described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. One-dimensional von Karman spectra are tabulated, while a discussion of the minimum frequency simulated is provided. The results of spectral and statistical analyses of the SSTT are presented.

  4. Simulation of nap-of-the-Earth flight in helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gregory W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Ames along with the U.S. Army has conducted extensive simulation studies of rotorcraft in the nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) environment and has developed facility capabilities specifically designed for this flight regime. The experience gained to date in applying these facilities to the NOE flight regime are reported along with the results of specific experimental studies conducted to understand the influence of both motion and visual scene on the fidelity of NOE simulation. Included are comparisons of results from concurrent piloted simulation and flight research studies. The results of a recent simulation experiment to study simulator sickness in this flight regime is also discussed.

  5. Simulation of nap-of-Earth flight in helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gregory W.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Ames in conjunction with U.S. Army has conducted extensive simulation investigations of rotorcraft in the nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) environment and has developed facility capabilities specifically designed for this flight regime. The experience gained to date in applying these facilities to the NOE flight regime are reported along with the results of specific experimental investigations conducted to understand the influence of both motion and visual scene on the fidelity of NOE simulation. Included are comparisons of results from concurrent piloted simulation and flight research investigations. The results of a recent simulation experiment to investigate simulator sickness in this flight regime is also discussed.

  6. Rapid Automated Aircraft Simulation Model Updating from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, Geoff; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques to identify aircraft aerodynamic characteristics from flight measurements and compute corrections to an existing simulation model of a research aircraft were investigated. The purpose of the research was to develop a process enabling rapid automated updating of aircraft simulation models using flight data and apply this capability to all flight regimes, including flight envelope extremes. The process presented has the potential to improve the efficiency of envelope expansion flight testing, revision of control system properties, and the development of high-fidelity simulators for pilot training.

  7. Advanced Video Data-Acquisition System For Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Geoffrey; Richwine, David M.; Hass, Neal E.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced video data-acquisition system (AVDAS) developed to satisfy variety of requirements for in-flight video documentation. Requirements range from providing images for visualization of airflows around fighter airplanes at high angles of attack to obtaining safety-of-flight documentation. F/A-18 AVDAS takes advantage of very capable systems like NITE Hawk forward-looking infrared (FLIR) pod and recent video developments like miniature charge-couple-device (CCD) color video cameras and other flight-qualified video hardware.

  8. Advanced flight computers for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, R. Rhoads

    1988-01-01

    Research concerning flight computers for use on interplanetary probes is reviewed. The history of these computers from the Viking mission to the present is outlined. The differences between ground commercial computers and computers for planetary exploration are listed. The development of a computer for the Mariner Mark II comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission is described. Various aspects of recently developed computer systems are examined, including the Max real time, embedded computer, a hypercube distributed supercomputer, a SAR data processor, a processor for the High Resolution IR Imaging Spectrometer, and a robotic vision multiresolution pyramid machine for processsing images obtained by a Mars Rover.

  9. Advanced boundary layer transition measurement methods for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Croom, C. C.; Gail, P. D.; Manuel, G. S.; Carraway, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    In modern laminar flow flight research, it is important to understand the specific cause(s) of laminar to turbulent boundary-layer transition. Such information is crucial to the exploration of the limits of practical application of laminar flow for drag reduction on aircraft. The transition modes of interest in current flight investigations include the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting instability, the inflectional instability at laminar separation, and the crossflow inflectional instability, as well as others. This paper presents the results to date of research on advanced devices and methods used for the study of laminar boundary-layer transition phenomena in the flight environment. Recent advancements in the development of arrayed hot-film devices and of a new flow visualization method are discussed. Arrayed hot-film devices have been designed to detect the presence of laminar separation, and of crossflow vorticity. The advanced flow visualization method utilizes color changes in liquid-crystal coatings to detect boundary-layer transition at high altitude flight conditions. Flight and wind tunnel data are presented to illustrate the design and operation of these advanced methods. These new research tools provide information on disturbance growth and transition mode which is essential to furthering our understanding of practical design limits for applications of laminar flow technology.

  10. 14 CFR 61.4 - Qualification and approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualification and approval of flight... GROUND INSTRUCTORS General § 61.4 Qualification and approval of flight simulators and flight training..., testing, or checking requirement under this chapter, must be qualified and approved by the...

  11. 14 CFR 61.4 - Qualification and approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification and approval of flight... GROUND INSTRUCTORS General § 61.4 Qualification and approval of flight simulators and flight training..., testing, or checking requirement under this chapter, must be qualified and approved by the...

  12. ATS-6 - Flight performance of the Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. P.; Brennan, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment on ATS-6 was designed to demonstrate the thermal control capability of a thermal diode (one-way) heat pipe, a phase-change material for thermal storage, and a feedback-controlled heat pipe. Flight data for the different operational modes are compared to ground test data, and the performance of the components is evaluated on an individual basis and as an integrated temperature-control system.

  13. Application of technology developed for flight simulation at NASA. Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1991-01-01

    In order to meet the stringent time-critical requirements for real-time man-in-the-loop flight simulation, computer processing operations including mathematical model computation and data input/output to the simulators must be deterministic and be completed in as short a time as possible. Personnel at NASA's Langley Research Center are currently developing the use of supercomputers for simulation mathematical model computation for real-time simulation. This, coupled with the use of an open systems software architecture, will advance the state-of-the-art in real-time flight simulation.

  14. The NASA Lewis integrated propulsion and flight control simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Simon, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    A new flight simulation facility was developed at NASA-Lewis. The purpose of this flight simulator is to allow integrated propulsion control and flight control algorithm development and evaluation in real time. As a preliminary check of the simulator facility capabilities and correct integration of its components, the control design and physics models for a short take-off and vertical landing fighter aircraft model were shown, with their associated system integration and architecture, pilot vehicle interfaces, and display symbology. The initial testing and evaluation results show that this fixed based flight simulator can provide real time feedback and display of both airframe and propulsion variables for validation of integrated flight and propulsion control systems. Additionally, through the use of this flight simulator, various control design methodologies and cockpit mechanizations can be tested and evaluated in a real time environment.

  15. Array haptic actuator for flight simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hyun-U.; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kafy, Abdullahil; Kim, Sang Yeon; Kim, Jaehwan

    2015-04-01

    Array haptic actuator to realize texture of button for virtue flight simulator is fabricated by using cellulose acetate (CA) film. The haptic actuator has independent 3 × 3 cells for identical vibration. Each cell consists of topside CA layer and bottomside CA layer with two pillars. Two ends of topside CA layer are fixed on the pillars similar with fixed end beam. By an electrostatic force in the presence of electric field, the topside CA layer vibrates. Each cell shows its resonance frequency peak in the capable frequency range of vibrotactile feeling from 100 Hz to 500 Hz. The acceleration performance is shown to be higher than vibrotactile threshold on wide frequency band from 100 Hz to 400 Hz.

  16. Flight simulator fidelity assessment in a rotorcraft lateral translation maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Malsbury, T.; Atencio, A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A model-based methodology for assessing flight simulator fidelity in closed-loop fashion is exercised in analyzing a rotorcraft low-altitude maneuver for which flight test and simulation results were available. The addition of a handling qualities sensitivity function to a previously developed model-based assessment criteria allows an analytical comparison of both performance and handling qualities between simulation and flight test. Model predictions regarding the existence of simulator fidelity problems are corroborated by experiment. The modeling approach is used to assess analytically the effects of modifying simulator characteristics on simulator fidelity.

  17. Development of Advanced Plant Habitat Flight Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Curtis J., Jr

    2013-01-01

    With NASA's current goals and resources moving forward to bring the idea of Manned Deep-Space missions from a long-thought concept to a reality, innovative research methods and expertise are being utilized for studies that integrate human needs with that of technology to make for the most efficient operations possible. Through the capability to supply food, provide oxygen from what was once carbon dioxide, and various others which help to make plant research one of the prime factors of future long-duration mission, the Advanced Plant Habitat will be the largest microgravity plant growth chamber on the International Space Station when it is launched in the near future (2014- 2015). Soon, the Advanced Plant Habitat unit will continue on and enrich the discoveries and studies on the long-term effects of microgravity on plants.

  18. The Design and Implementation of NASA's Advanced Flight Computing Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkakaj, Leon; Straedy, Richard; Jarvis, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a working flight computer Multichip Module developed jointly by JPL and TRW under their respective research programs in a collaborative fashion. The MCM is fabricated by nCHIP and is packaged within a 2 by 4 inch Al package from Coors. This flight computer module is one of three modules under development by NASA's Advanced Flight Computer (AFC) program. Further development of the Mass Memory and the programmable I/O MCM modules will follow. The three building block modules will then be stacked into a 3D MCM configuration. The mass and volume of the flight computer MCM achieved at 89 grams and 1.5 cubic inches respectively, represent a major enabling technology for future deep space as well as commercial remote sensing applications.

  19. Aerothermodynamic Flight Simulation Capabilities for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles G.

    1998-01-01

    Aerothermodynamics, encompassing aerodynamics, aeroheating, and fluid dynamics and physical processes, is the genesis for the design and development of advanced space transportation vehicles and provides crucial information to other disciplines such as structures, materials, propulsion, avionics, and guidance, navigation and control. Sources of aerothermodynamic information are ground-based facilities, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) and engineering computer codes, and flight experiments. Utilization of this aerothermodynamic triad provides the optimum aerothermodynamic design to safely satisfy mission requirements while reducing design conservatism, risk and cost. The iterative aerothermodynamic process for initial screening/assessment of aerospace vehicle concepts, optimization of aerolines to achieve/exceed mission requirements, and benchmark studies for final design and establishment of the flight data book are reviewed. Aerothermodynamic methodology centered on synergism between ground-based testing and CFD predictions is discussed for various flow regimes encountered by a vehicle entering the Earth s atmosphere from low Earth orbit. An overview of the resources/infrastructure required to provide accurate/creditable aerothermodynamic information in a timely manner is presented. Impacts on Langley s aerothermodynamic capabilities due to recent programmatic changes such as Center reorganization, downsizing, outsourcing, industry (as opposed to NASA) led programs, and so forth are discussed. Sample applications of these capabilities to high Agency priority, fast-paced programs such as Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)/X-33 Phases I and 11, X-34, Hyper-X and X-38 are presented and lessons learned discussed. Lastly, enhancements in ground-based testing/CFD capabilities necessary to partially/fully satisfy future requirements are addressed.

  20. Integrated Flight and Propulsion Controls for Advanced Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter; Garg, Sanjay

    1995-01-01

    The research vision of the NASA Lewis Research Center in the area of integrated flight and propulsion controls technologies is described. In particular the Integrated Method for Propulsion and Airframe Controls developed at the Lewis Research Center is described including its application to an advanced aircraft configuration. Additionally, future research directions in integrated controls are described.

  1. Multi-Exciter Vibroacoustic Simulation of Hypersonic Flight Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; CAP,JEROME S.; TOGAMI,THOMAS C.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.; HOLLINGSHEAD,JAMES RONALD

    1999-11-11

    Many aerospace structures must survive severe high frequency, hypersonic, random vibration during their flights. The random vibrations are generated by the turbulent boundary layer developed along the exterior of the structures during flight. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past using a fixed-based, single exciter input with an upper frequency range of 2 kHz. This study investigates the possibility of using acoustic ardor independently controlled multiple exciters to more accurately simulate hypersonic flight vibration. The test configuration, equipment, and methodology are described. Comparisons with actual flight measurements and previous single exciter simulations are also presented.

  2. The modeling of miniature UAV flight visualization simulation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-hui; Li, Xin; Yang, Le-le; Li, Xiong

    2015-12-01

    This paper combines virtual technology with visualization visual simulation theory, construct the framework of visual simulation platform, apply open source software FlightGear simulator combined with GoogleEarth design a small UAV flight visual simulation platform. Using software AC3D to build 3D models of aircraft and complete the model loading based on XML configuration, the design and simulation of visualization modeling visual platform is presented. By using model-driven and data transforming in FlightGear , the design of data transmission module is realized based on Visual Studio 2010 development platform. Finally combined with GoogleEarth it can achieve the tracking and display.

  3. Characteristics of Flight Simulator Visual Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    reduce these angles. By contrast, the U.S. Air Force’s Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT )’ (Ref. 4) has an irregular field boundary shape with...field. The binocular field size of the human (with head and eyes fixed) is similar to that for the ASPT ; how- ever, the field shape is not. The field...azimuth and elevation angles for a circular shape and a zone. Several other field-of-view boundaries, including that for the ASPT , are plotted in

  4. Simulation at Dryden Flight Research Facility from 1957 to 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John P.; Schilling, Lawrence J.; Wagner, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Facility has been a leader in developing simulation as an integral part of flight test research. The history of that effort is reviewed, starting in 1957 and continuing to the present time. The contributions of the major program activities conducted at Dryden during this 25-year period to the development of a simulation philosophy and capability is explained.

  5. Flight Test of Advanced Digital Control Concepts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    the model (Equation 51). 34 OPTIONII .>-COFY, GMATr, MMArtCOPY, IMATvAMAT, COP’Y, JMAT, BmA, 87, >COPY , FMArNMAT, COPYY GMAT , GMAT Next, EKEY...YCMA;TFFMAT ,COPY, FMAT, AMATY,COPY, MMA-T, EMAr ,74, COPY, CMAT r (ThAT, ’:.COFY LMAT, AMAT YCOPYP NMAT, EMAT,73, COPY, GMAT , BmAr, *::COFY, pmA, AMAT...74, COPY, GMAT , UMA’TLMAT, MMAT, NMA T, MA-T, PFMAT, ’UMATPUMAT Next use CKEY to check the results. C B and CF are substituted into the "simulator

  6. Flight Testing an Iced Business Jet for Flight Simulation Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Lee, Sam; Cooper, Jon

    2007-01-01

    A flight test of a business jet aircraft with various ice accretions was performed to obtain data to validate flight simulation models developed through wind tunnel tests. Three types of ice accretions were tested: pre-activation roughness, runback shapes that form downstream of the thermal wing ice protection system, and a wing ice protection system failure shape. The high fidelity flight simulation models of this business jet aircraft were validated using a software tool called "Overdrive." Through comparisons of flight-extracted aerodynamic forces and moments to simulation-predicted forces and moments, the simulation models were successfully validated. Only minor adjustments in the simulation database were required to obtain adequate match, signifying the process used to develop the simulation models was successful. The simulation models were implemented in the NASA Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD) to enable company pilots to evaluate flight characteristics of the simulation models. By and large, the pilots confirmed good similarities in the flight characteristics when compared to the real airplane. However, pilots noted pitch up tendencies at stall with the flaps extended that were not representative of the airplane and identified some differences in pilot forces. The elevator hinge moment model and implementation of the control forces on the ICEFTD were identified as a driver in the pitch ups and control force issues, and will be an area for future work.

  7. Flight Technical Error Analysis of the SATS Higher Volume Operations Simulation and Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Adams, Catherine H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of Flight Technical Error (FTE) from recent SATS experiments, called the Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Simulation and Flight experiments, which NASA conducted to determine pilot acceptability of the HVO concept for normal operating conditions. Reported are FTE results from simulation and flight experiment data indicating the SATS HVO concept is viable and acceptable to low-time instrument rated pilots when compared with today s system (baseline). Described is the comparative FTE analysis of lateral, vertical, and airspeed deviations from the baseline and SATS HVO experimental flight procedures. Based on FTE analysis, all evaluation subjects, low-time instrument-rated pilots, flew the HVO procedures safely and proficiently in comparison to today s system. In all cases, the results of the flight experiment validated the results of the simulation experiment and confirm the utility of the simulation platform for comparative Human in the Loop (HITL) studies of SATS HVO and Baseline operations.

  8. Flight Simulation of Taketombo Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Flight Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kohei; Ueno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In the present study we have developed a numerical method to simulate the flight dynamics of a small flying body with unsteady motion, where both aerodynamics and flight dynamics are fully considered. A key point of this numerical code is to use computational fluid dynamics and computational flight dynamics at the same time, which is referred to as CFD2, or double CFDs, where several new ideas are adopted in the governing equations, the method to make each quantity nondimensional, and the coupling method between aerodynamics and flight dynamics. This numerical code can be applied to simulate the unsteady motion of small vehicles such as micro air vehicles (MAV). As a sample calculation, we take up Taketombo, or a bamboo dragonfly, and its free flight in the air is demonstrated. The eventual aim of this research is to virtually fly an aircraft with arbitrary motion to obtain aerodynamic and flight dynamic data, which cannot be taken in the conventional wind tunnel.

  9. Flight Control and Simulation for Aerial Refueling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-18

    Modeling Considerations for Close Formation Flight,” Proceed- ings of the 1998 AIAA GNC Conference, Boston, MA, Jul. 1998, pp. 476–86, Paper no. 4343 ...with Wake Vortices,” STI Technical Report 1035-4 , 1975 , pp. 38–57. 20Pachter, M., D’Azzo, J., and Proud, A., “Tight Formation Flight Control,” J

  10. Improving Aviation Safety with information Visualization: A Flight Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Hearst, Marti

    2005-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with invisible airflow hazards. Recent advances in aviation sensor technology offer the potential for aircraft-based sensors that can gather large amounts of airflow velocity data in real-time. With this influx of data comes the need to study how best to present it to the pilot - a cognitively overloaded user focused on a primary task other than that of information visualization. In this paper, we present the results of a usability study of an airflow hazard visualization system that significantly reduced the crash rate among experienced helicopter pilots flying a high fidelity, aerodynamically realistic fixed-base rotorcraft flight simulator into hazardous conditions. We focus on one particular aviation application, but the results may be relevant to user interfaces in other operationally stressful environments.

  11. Use of Flight Simulators for Pilot-Control Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathert, George A., Jr.; Creer, Brent Y.; Douvillier, Joseph G., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between actual flight results and results obtained with fixed and moving flight simulators in a number of phases of flying airplanes with a wide range of characteristics. These results have been used to study the importance of providing motion stimuli in a simulator in order that the pilot operate the simulator in a realistic manner. Regions of airplane characteristics where motion stimuli are either mandatory or desirable are indicated.

  12. Modeling human response errors in synthetic flight simulator domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ntuen, Celestine A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a control theoretic approach to modeling human response errors (HRE) in the flight simulation domain. The human pilot is modeled as a supervisor of a highly automated system. The synthesis uses the theory of optimal control pilot modeling for integrating the pilot's observation error and the error due to the simulation model (experimental error). Methods for solving the HRE problem are suggested. Experimental verification of the models will be tested in a flight quality handling simulation.

  13. The Utilization of Flight Simulation for Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Totah, Joseph J.; Snyder, C. Thomas (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the conventional uses of flight simulation at NASA Ames Research Center for research and development, and to also consider the many new areas that have embraced flight simulation as an effective and economic research tool. Flight simulators have always been a very useful and economic research tool. Component technologies have evolved considerably to meet demands imposed by the aerospace community. In fact, the utilization of flight simulators for research and development has become so widely accepted that non-traditional uses have evolved. Whereas flight dynamics and control, guidance and navigation, vehicle design, mission assessment, and training have been, and perhaps always will be, the most popular research areas associated with simulation, many new areas under the broad categories of human factors and information science have realized significant benefits from the use of flight simulators for research and development. This paper will survey the simulation facilities at NASA Ames Research Center, and discuss selected topics associated with research programs, simulation experiments, and related technology development activities for the purpose of highlighting the expanding role of simulation in aerospace research and development. The information in this paper will in no way provide foreign companies with a competitive advantage over U. S. industry.

  14. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certain flight tests. (a) No person may operate a civil aircraft (except a manned free balloon) that is... used for a flight test for an airline transport pilot certificate or a class or type rating on...

  15. Robust flight design for an advanced launch system vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhand, Sanjeev K.; Wong, Kelvin K.

    1991-01-01

    Current launch vehicle trajectory design philosophies are generally based on maximizing payload capability. This approach results in an expensive trajectory design process for each mission. Two concepts of robust flight design have been developed to significantly reduce this cost: Standardized Trajectories and Command Multiplier Steering (CMS). These concepts were analyzed for an Advanced Launch System (ALS) vehicle, although their applicability is not restricted to any particular vehicle. Preliminary analysis has demonstrated the feasibility of these concepts at minimal loss in payload capability.

  16. 14 CFR 141.41 - Flight simulators, flight training devices, and training aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., and training aids. 141.41 Section 141.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aids. An applicant for a pilot school certificate or a provisional pilot school certificate must show that its flight simulators, flight training devices, training aids, and equipment meet the...

  17. 14 CFR 141.41 - Flight simulators, flight training devices, and training aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., and training aids. 141.41 Section 141.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aids. An applicant for a pilot school certificate or a provisional pilot school certificate must show that its flight simulators, flight training devices, training aids, and equipment meet the...

  18. 14 CFR 141.41 - Flight simulators, flight training devices, and training aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., and training aids. 141.41 Section 141.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aids. An applicant for a pilot school certificate or a provisional pilot school certificate must show that its flight simulators, flight training devices, training aids, and equipment meet the...

  19. 14 CFR 141.41 - Flight simulators, flight training devices, and training aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., and training aids. 141.41 Section 141.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aids. An applicant for a pilot school certificate or a provisional pilot school certificate must show that its flight simulators, flight training devices, training aids, and equipment meet the...

  20. 14 CFR 141.41 - Flight simulators, flight training devices, and training aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., and training aids. 141.41 Section 141.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aids. An applicant for a pilot school certificate or a provisional pilot school certificate must show that its flight simulators, flight training devices, training aids, and equipment meet the...

  1. Human Factors Topics in Flight Simulation: An Annotated Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    were compared with 6 students trained only in the aircraft. Experiment 2 - Instrument Flight The experimental routine was similar to EXPT I, but here...states in the experimental and recovery periods. HAMILTON, J.E. F-IOIIF-106 flight simulator flashblindness experiment . SAM TR-65-82, 1965. Six pilots... experiment was designed to determine the differences in flight attitude control as a function of the two experimentally manipulated variables, extent and

  2. Secondary metabolism in simulated microgravity and space flight.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Liu, Zhiheng; Zhang, Lixin

    2011-11-01

    Space flight experiments have suggested that microgravity can affect cellular processes in microorganisms. To simulate the microgravity environment on earth, several models have been developed and applied to examine the effect of microgravity on secondary metabolism. In this paper, studies of effects of space flight on secondary metabolism are exemplified and reviewed along with the advantages and disadvantages of the current models used for simulating microgravity. This discussion is both significant and timely to researchers considering the use of simulated microgravity or space flight to explore effects of weightlessness on secondary metabolism.

  3. A three-axis flight simulator. [for testing and evaluating inertial measuring units, and flight platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    A simulator is described, which was designed for testing and evaluating inertial measuring units, and flight platforms. Mechanical and electrical specifications for the outer, middle, and inner axis are presented. Test results are included.

  4. Development and application of an atmospheric turbulence model for use in flight simulators in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Joshi, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of simulated turbulence on aircraft handling qualities was investigated. Pilot opinion of the handling qualities of a light general aviation aircraft were evaluated in a motion-base simulator using a simulated turbulence environment. A realistic representation of turbulence disturbances is described in terms of rms intensity and scale length and their random variations with time. The time histories generated by the proposed turbulence models showed characteristics which appear to be more similar to real turbulence than the frequently-used Gaussian turbulence model. In addition, the proposed turbulence models can flexibly accommodate changes in atmospheric conditions and be easily implemented in flight simulator studies. Six turbulence time histories, including the conventional Gaussian model, were used in an IFR-tracking task. The realism of each of the turbulence models and the handling qualities of the simulated airplane were evaluated. Analysis of pilot opinions shows that at approximately the same rms intensities of turbulence, the handling quality ratings transit from the satisfactory level, for the simple Gaussian model, to an unacceptable level for more realistic and compositely structured turbulence models.

  5. IFR flight simulation in a distributed virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefele, Jens; Albert, Oliver; Doerr, Kai Uwe

    1998-08-01

    For some of today's simulations very expensive, heavy and large equipment is needed. Examples are driving, shipping, and flight simulators with huge and expensive visual and motion systems. In order to reduce cost, immersive `Virtual Simulation' becomes very attractive. Head Mounted Displays or Computer Animated Virtual Environments, Datagloves, and cheap `Seating Bucks' are used to generate a stereoscopic virtual environment for a trainee. Such systems are already in use for caterpillar, submarine, and F15-fighter simulation. In our approach we partially simulate an Airbus A340 cockpit. All interaction devices such as side stick, pedals, thrust-levers, knobs, buttons, and dials are modeled as 3D geometry. All other parts and surfaces are formed by images (textures). Some devices are physically available such as sidesticks, pedals, and thrust-levers. All others are replaced by plastic panels to generate a forced feedback for the pilots. A simplified outside visual is available to generate immersive flight simulations. A virtual Primary Flight display, Navigation display, and a virtual stereoscopic Head Up Display are used in a first approach. These virtual displays show basic information necessary to perform a controlled flight and allow basic performance analysis with the system. All parts such as physical input devices, virtual input devices, flight mechanics, traffic, and rendering run in a distributed environment on different high end graphics work stations. The `Virtual Cockpit' can logically replace an also available conventional cockpit mockup in the flight simulation.

  6. Virtual flight simulation of a dual rotor micro air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongming

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a new computational method is developed based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) coupled with rigid body dynamics (RBD) and flight control law in an in-house programmed source code. The CFD solver is established based on momentum source method, preconditioning method, lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel iteration method, and moving overset grid method. Two-equation shear-stress transport k - ω turbulence model is employed to close the governing equations. Third-order Adams prediction-correction method is used to couple CFD and RBD in the inner iteration. The wing-rock motion of the delta wing is simulated to validate the capability of the computational method for virtual flight simulation. Finally, the developed computational method is employed to simulate the longitudinal virtual flight of a dual rotor micro air vehicle (MAV). Results show that the computational method can simulate the virtual flight of the dual rotor MAV.

  7. Advanced simulation of digital filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, G. S.

    1980-09-01

    An Advanced Simulation of Digital Filters has been implemented on the IBM 360/67 computer utilizing Tektronix hardware and software. The program package is appropriate for use by persons beginning their study of digital signal processing or for filter analysis. The ASDF programs provide the user with an interactive method by which filter pole and zero locations can be manipulated. Graphical output on both the Tektronix graphics screen and the Versatec plotter are provided to observe the effects of pole-zero movement.

  8. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of the flight dynamic characteristics of an advanced turboprop business/commuter aircraft configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, Paul L., Jr.; Turner, Steven G.; Owens, D. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the low-speed flight dynamic behavior of a representative advanced turboprop business/commuter aircraft concept. Free-flight tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel. In support of the free-flight tests, conventional static, dynamic, and free-to-roll oscillation tests were performed. Tests were intended to explore normal operating and post stall flight conditions, and conditions simulating the loss of power in one engine.

  9. User type certification for advanced flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, Richard D.; Abbott, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced avionics through flight management systems (FMS) coupled with autopilots can now precisely control aircraft from takeoff to landing. Clearly, this has been the most important improvement in aircraft since the jet engine. Regardless of the eventual capabilities of this technology, it is doubtful that society will soon accept pilotless airliners with the same aplomb they accept driverless passenger trains. Flight crews are still needed to deal with inputing clearances, taxiing, in-flight rerouting, unexpected weather decisions, and emergencies; yet it is well known that the contribution of human errors far exceed those of current hardware or software systems. Thus human errors remain, and are even increasing in percentage as the largest contributor to total system error. Currently, the flight crew is regulated by a layered system of certification: by operation, e.g., airline transport pilot versus private pilot; by category, e.g., airplane versus helicopter; by class, e.g., single engine land versus multi-engine land; and by type (for larger aircraft and jet powered aircraft), e.g., Boeing 767 or Airbus A320. Nothing in the certification process now requires an in-depth proficiency with specific types of avionics systems despite their prominent role in aircraft control and guidance.

  10. Results of a Flight Simulation Software Methods Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce

    1995-01-01

    A ten-page questionnaire was mailed to members of the AIAA Flight Simulation Technical Committee in the spring of 1994. The survey inquired about various aspects of developing and maintaining flight simulation software, as well as a few questions dealing with characterization of each facility. As of this report, 19 completed surveys (out of 74 sent out) have been received. This paper summarizes those responses.

  11. A psychophysiological assessment of operator workload during simulated flight missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Arthur F.; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Braune, Rolf

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the dual-task event-related (brain) potential (ERP) paradigm to the assessment of an operator's mental workload and residual capacity in a complex situation of a flight mission was demonstrated using ERP measurements and subjective workload ratings of student pilots flying a fixed-based single-engine simulator. Data were collected during two separate 45-min flights differing in difficulty; flight demands were examined by dividing each flight into four segments: takeoff, straight and level flight, holding patterns, and landings. The P300 ERP component in particular was found to discriminate among the levels of task difficulty in a systematic manner, decreasing in amplitude with an increase in task demands. The P300 amplitude is shown to be negatively correlated with deviations from command headings across the four flight segments.

  12. The Effects of Advanced 'Glass Cockpit' Displayed Flight Instrumentation on In-flight Pilot Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigerwald, John

    The Cognitive Continuum Theory (CCT) was first proposed 25 years ago to explain the relationship between intuition and analytical decision making processes. In order for aircraft pilots to make these analytical and intuitive decisions, they obtain information from various instruments within the cockpit of the aircraft. Advanced instrumentation is used to provide a broad array of information about the aircraft condition and flight situation to aid the flight crew in making effective decisions. The problem addressed is that advanced instrumentation has not improved the pilot decision making in modern aircraft. Because making a decision is dependent upon the information available, this experimental quantitative study sought to determine how well pilots organize and interpret information obtained from various cockpit instrumentation displays when under time pressure. The population for this study was the students, flight instructors, and aviation faculty at the Middle Georgia State College School of Aviation campus in Eastman, Georgia. The sample was comprised of two groups of 90 individuals (45 in each group) in various stages of pilot licensure from student pilot to airline transport pilot (ATP). The ages ranged from 18 to 55 years old. There was a statistically significant relationship at the p < .05 level in the ability of the participants to organize and interpret information between the advanced glass cockpit instrumentation and the traditional cockpit instrumentation. It is recommended that the industry explore technological solutions toward creating cockpit instrumentation that could match the type of information display to the type of decision making scenario in order to aid pilots in making decisions that will result in better organization of information. Understanding the relationship between the intuitive and analytical decisions that pilots make and the information source they use to make those decisions will aid engineers in the design of instrumentation

  13. Simulation Model Development for Icing Effects Flight Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, Billy P.; Dickes, Edward G.; Gingras, David R.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2003-01-01

    A high-fidelity simulation model for icing effects flight training was developed from wind tunnel data for the DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft. First, a flight model of the un-iced airplane was developed and then modifications were generated to model the icing conditions. The models were validated against data records from the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research flight test program with only minimal refinements being required. The goals of this program were to demonstrate the effectiveness of such a simulator for training pilots to recognize and recover from icing situations and to establish a process for modeling icing effects to be used for future training devices.

  14. Space Shuttle flight crew/computer interface simulation studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callihan, J. C.; Rybarczyk, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    An approach to achieving an optimized set of crew/computer interface requirements on the Space Shuttle program is described. It consists of defining the mission phases and crew timelines, developing a functional description of the crew/computer interface displays and controls software, conducting real-time simulations using pilot evaluation of the interface displays and controls, and developing a set of crew/computer functional requirements specifications. The simulator is a two-man crew station which includes three CRTs with keyboards for simulating the crew/computer interface. The programs simulate the mission phases and the flight hardware, including the flight computer and CRT displays.

  15. Advances in atomic oxygen simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, Joseph F.; Bareiss, Lyle E.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) present in the atmosphere at orbital altitudes of 200 to 700 km has been shown to degrade various exposed materials on Shuttle flights. The relative velocity of the AO with the spacecraft, together with the AO density, combine to yield an environment consisting of a 5 eV beam energy with a flux of 10(exp 14) to 10(exp 15) oxygen atoms/sq cm/s. An AO ion beam apparatus that produces flux levels and energy similar to that encountered by spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been in existence since 1987. Test data was obtained from the interaction of the AO ion beam with materials used in space applications (carbon, silver, kapton) and with several special coatings of interest deposited on various surfaces. The ultimate design goal of the AO beam simulation device is to produce neutral AO at sufficient flux levels to replicate on-orbit conditions. A newly acquired mass spectrometer with energy discrimination has allowed 5 eV neutral oxygen atoms to be separated and detected from the background of thermal oxygen atoms of approx 0.2 eV. Neutralization of the AO ion beam at 5 eV was shown at the Martin Marietta AO facility.

  16. Voice measures of workload in the advanced flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Sid J.; Alpert, Murray; Odonnell, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Voice samples were obtained from 14 male subjects under high and low workload conditions. Acoustical analysis of the voice suggested that high workload conditions can be revealed by their effects on the voice over time. Aircrews in the advanced flight deck will be voicing short, imperative sentences repeatedly. A drop in the energy of the voice, as reflected by reductions in amplitude and frequency over time, and the failure to achieve old amplitude and frequency levels after rest periods, can signal that the workload demands of the situation are straining the speaker. This kind of measurement would be relatively unaffected by individual differences in acoustical measures.

  17. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certain flight tests. (a) No person may operate a civil aircraft (except a manned free balloon) that is... transport pilot certificate or a class or type rating on that certificate, or for a part 121...

  18. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certain flight tests. (a) No person may operate a civil aircraft (except a manned free balloon) that is... transport pilot certificate or a class or type rating on that certificate, or for a part 121...

  19. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certain flight tests. (a) No person may operate a civil aircraft (except a manned free balloon) that is... transport pilot certificate or a class or type rating on that certificate, or for a part 121...

  20. Computers for real time flight simulation: A market survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, G. A.; Karplus, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    An extensive computer market survey was made to determine those available systems suitable for current and future flight simulation studies at Ames Research Center. The primary requirement is for the computation of relatively high frequency content (5 Hz) math models representing powered lift flight vehicles. The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) was used as a benchmark vehicle for computation comparison studies. The general nature of helicopter simulations and a description of the benchmark model are presented, and some of the sources of simulation difficulties are examined. A description of various applicable computer architectures is presented, along with detailed discussions of leading candidate systems and comparisons between them.

  1. Flight Hour Reductions in Fleet Replacement Pilot Training through Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smode, Alfred F.

    A project was undertaken to integrate the 2F87F operational flight trainer into the program for training replacement patrol plane pilots. The objectives were to determine the potential of the simulator as a substitute environment for learning aircraft tasks and to effectively utilize the simulator in pilot training. The students involved in the…

  2. High performance flight simulation at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II; Sudik, Steven J.; Grove, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    The use of real-time simulation at the NASA facility is reviewed specifically with regard to hardware, software, and the use of a fiberoptic-based digital simulation network. The network hardware includes supercomputers that support 32- and 64-bit scalar, vector, and parallel processing technologies. The software include drivers, real-time supervisors, and routines for site-configuration management and scheduling. Performance specifications include: (1) benchmark solution at 165 sec for a single CPU; (2) a transfer rate of 24 million bits/s; and (3) time-critical system responsiveness of less than 35 msec. Simulation applications include the Differential Maneuvering Simulator, Transport Systems Research Vehicle simulations, and the Visual Motion Simulator. NASA is shown to be in the final stages of developing a high-performance computing system for the real-time simulation of complex high-performance aircraft.

  3. Development of a Free-Flight Simulation Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Eric S.; Wing, David J.; Davis, Paul C.

    1999-01-01

    In anticipation of a projected rise in demand for air transportation, NASA and the FAA are researching new air-traffic-management (ATM) concepts that fall under the paradigm known broadly as ":free flight". This paper documents the software development and engineering efforts in progress by Seagull Technology, to develop a free-flight simulation (FFSIM) that is intended to help NASA researchers test mature-state concepts for free flight, otherwise referred to in this paper as distributed air / ground traffic management (DAG TM). Under development is a distributed, human-in-the-loop simulation tool that is comprehensive in its consideration of current and envisioned communication, navigation and surveillance (CNS) components, and will allow evaluation of critical air and ground traffic management technologies from an overall systems perspective. The FFSIM infrastructure is designed to incorporate all three major components of the ATM triad: aircraft flight decks, air traffic control (ATC), and (eventually) airline operational control (AOC) centers.

  4. A potential flow based flight simulator for an underwater glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoemsapthawee, Surasak; Le Boulluec, Marc; Laurens, Jean-Marc; Deniset, François

    2013-03-01

    Underwater gliders are recent innovative types of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) used in ocean exploration and observation. They adjust their buoyancy to dive and to return to the ocean surface. During the change of altitude, they use the hydrodynamic forces developed by their wings to move forward. Their flights are controlled by changing the position of their centers of gravity and their buoyancy to adjust their trim and heel angles. For better flight control, the understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior and the flight mechanics of the underwater glider is necessary. A 6-DOF motion simulator is coupled with an unsteady potential flow model for this purpose. In some specific cases, the numerical study demonstrates that an inappropriate stabilizer dimension can cause counter-steering behavior. The simulator can be used to improve the automatic flight control. It can also be used for the hydrodynamic design optimization of the devices.

  5. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Technology Maturation in Preparation for Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Cornell, Peggy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) is being developed by an integrated team of Sunpower and National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA s) Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASC development, funded by NASA s Science Mission Directorate, started as a technology development effort in 2003 and has since evolved through progressive convertor builds and successful testing to demonstrate high conversion efficiency, low mass, and capability to meet long-life Radioisotope Power System (RPS) requirements. The technology has been adopted by the Department of Energy and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company s Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), which has been selected for potential flight demonstration on Discovery 12. This paper provides an overview of the status of ASC development including the most recent ASC-E2 convertors that have been delivered to GRC and an introduction to the ASC-E3 and ASC flight convertors that Sunpower will build next. The paper also describes the technology maturation and support tasks being conducted at GRC to support ASC and ASRG development in the areas of convertor and generator extended operation, high-temperature materials, heater head life assessment, organics, nondestructive inspection, spring fatigue testing, and other reliability verification tasks.

  6. High speed research system study. Advanced flight deck configuration effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swink, Jay R.; Goins, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    In mid-1991 NASA contracted with industry to study the high-speed civil transport (HSCT) flight deck challenges and assess the benefits, prior to initiating their High Speed Research Program (HSRP) Phase 2 efforts, then scheduled for FY-93. The results of this nine-month effort are presented, and a number of the most significant findings for the specified advanced concepts are highlighted: (1) a no nose-droop configuration; (2) a far forward cockpit location; and (3) advanced crew monitoring and control of complex systems. The results indicate that the no nose-droop configuration is critically dependent upon the design and development of a safe, reliable, and certifiable Synthetic Vision System (SVS). The droop-nose configuration would cause significant weight, performance, and cost penalties. The far forward cockpit location, with the conventional side-by-side seating provides little economic advantage; however, a configuration with a tandem seating arrangement provides a substantial increase in either additional payload (i.e., passengers) or potential downsizing of the vehicle with resulting increases in performance efficiencies and associated reductions in emissions. Without a droop nose, forward external visibility is negated and takeoff/landing guidance and control must rely on the use of the SVS. The technologies enabling such capabilities, which de facto provides for Category 3 all-weather operations on every flight independent of weather, represent a dramatic benefits multiplier in a 2005 global ATM network: both in terms of enhanced economic viability and environmental acceptability.

  7. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  8. Data Comm Flight Deck Human-in-the-Loop Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandra; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Sharma, Shivanjli; Kaneshige, John T.; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discusses an upcoming simulation for data comm in the terminal area. The purpose of the presentation is to provide the REDAC committee with a summary of some of the work in Data Comm that is being sponsored by the FAA. The focus of the simulation is upon flight crew human performance variables, such as crew procedures, timing and errors. The simulation is scheduled to be conducted in Sept 2012.

  9. Evaluation of electronic jamming effect based on seeker captive flight test and missile flight simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Tie, Weitao

    2017-01-01

    In order to test and evaluate the jamming effect of electronic warfare weapons on missiles, a method based on seeker captive flight jamming test and missile flight simulation test is put forward, in which real data for the jamming effect of the electronic warfare weapon on seekers is obtained by seeker captive flight jamming test, and immitted into a missile digital simulation system to perform large numbers of missile flight simulation tests under jamming, then one could evaluate the jamming effect of the electronic warfare weapon on missiles according to the simulation test results. The method is demonstrated and validated by test and evaluation of the jamming effect of a smokescreen jamming device on TV guidance missiles. The results show that, the method proposed here not only overcomes the shortcomings of both pure digital simulation test and field test, but also combines their advantages, thus could be taken as an easy, economical and reliable method for testing and evaluating electronic jamming effect on missiles.

  10. Piloted Flight Simulator Developed for Icing Effects Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to expand pilot training methods to avoid icing-related accidents, the NASA Glenn Research Center and Bihrle Applied Research Inc. have developed the Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD). ICEFTD simulates the flight characteristics of the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft in a no-ice baseline and in two ice configurations simulating ice-protection-system failures. Key features of the training device are the force feedback in the yoke, the instrument panel and out-the-window graphics, the instructor s workstation, and the portability of the unit.

  11. Accomplishments of the Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) RBCC Project at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, J. Craig (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the NASA / Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) project is to advance and develop Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) technologies. The ART project began in 1996 as part of the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP). The project is composed of several activities including RBCC engine ground testing, tool development, vehicle / mission studies, and component testing / development. The major contractors involved in the ART project are Aerojet and Rocketdyne. A large database of RBCC ground test data was generated for the air-augmented rocket (AAR), ramjet, scramjet, and ascent rocket modes of operation for both the Aerojet and Rocketdyne concepts. Transition between consecutive modes was also demonstrated as well as trajectory simulation. The Rocketdyne freejet tests were conducted at GASL in the Flight Acceleration Simulation Test (FAST) facility. During a single test, the FAST facility is capable of simulating both the enthalpy and aerodynamic conditions over a range of Mach numbers in a flight trajectory. Aerojet performed freejet testing in the Pebble Bed facility at GASL as well as direct-connect testing at GASL. Aerojet also performed sea-level static (SLS) testing at the Aerojet A-Zone facility in Sacramento, CA. Several flight-type flowpath components were developed under the ART project. Aerojet designed and fabricated ceramic scramjet injectors. The structural design of the injectors will be tested in a simulated scramjet environment where thermal effects and performance will be assessed. Rocketdyne will be replacing the cooled combustor in the A5 rig with a flight-weight combustor that is near completion. Aerojet's formed duct panel is currently being fabricated and will be tested in the SLS rig in Aerojet's A-Zone facility. Aerojet has already successfully tested a cooled cowl panel in the same facility. In addition to MSFC, other NASA centers have contributed to the ART project as well. Inlet testing

  12. Flight simulator with IR and MMW radar image generation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonjean, Maxime E.; Lapierre, Fabian D.; Schiefele, Jens; Verly, Jacques G.

    2006-05-01

    In the future, modern airliners will use enhanced-synthesic vision systems (ESVS) to improve aeronautical operations in bad weather conditions. Before ESVS are effectively found aboard airliners, one must develop a multisensor flight simulator capable of synthetizing, in real time, images corresponding to a variety of imaging modalities. We present a real-time simulator called ARIS (Airborne Radar and Infrared Simulator) which is capable of generating two such imaging modalities: a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) and a millimeter-wave radar (MMWR) imaging system. The proposed simulator is modular sothat additional imaging modalities can be added. Example of images generated by the simulator are shown.

  13. Atmospheric turbulence simulation techniques with application to flight analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. T.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical modeling of atmospheric turbulence is discussed. The statistical properties of atmospheric turbulence, in particular the probability distribution, the spectra, and the coherence are reviewed. Different atmospheric turbulence simulation models are investigated, and appropriate statistical analyses are carried out to verify their validity. The models for simulation are incorporated into a computer model of aircraft flight dynamics. Statistical results of computer simulated landings for an aircraft having characteristics of a DC-8 are reported for the different turbulence simulation techniques. The significance of various degrees of sophistication in the turbulence simulation techniques on the landing performance of the aircraft is discussed.

  14. Comparison of Flight Simulators Based on Human Motion Perception Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valente Pais, Ana R.; Correia Gracio, Bruno J.; Kelly, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2015-01-01

    In flight simulation, motion filters are used to transform aircraft motion into simulator motion. When looking for the best match between visual and inertial amplitude in a simulator, researchers have found that there is a range of inertial amplitudes, rather than a single inertial value, that is perceived by subjects as optimal. This zone, hereafter referred to as the optimal zone, seems to correlate to the perceptual coherence zones measured in flight simulators. However, no studies were found in which these two zones were compared. This study investigates the relation between the optimal and the coherence zone measurements within and between different simulators. Results show that for the sway axis, the optimal zone lies within the lower part of the coherence zone. In addition, it was found that, whereas the width of the coherence zone depends on the visual amplitude and frequency, the width of the optimal zone remains constant.

  15. Development of a Flight Simulation Data Visualization Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Chen, Ronnie; Kenney, Patrick S.; Koval, Christopher M.; Hutchinson, Brian K.

    1996-01-01

    Today's moderm flight simulation research produces vast amounts of time sensitive data. The meaning of this data can be difficult to assess while in its raw format . Therefore, a method of breaking the data down and presenting it to the user in a graphical format is necessary. Simulation Graphics (SimGraph) is intended as a data visualization software package that will incorporate simulation data into a variety of animated graphical displays for easy interpretation by the simulation researcher. Although it was created for the flight simulation facilities at NASA Langley Research Center, SimGraph can be reconfigured to almost any data visualization environment. This paper traces the design, development and implementation of the SimGraph program, and is intended to be a programmer's reference guide.

  16. Analysis of interior noise ground and flight test data for advanced turboprop aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, M. A.; Tran, B. N.

    1991-01-01

    Interior noise ground tests conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are described. The objectives were to study ground test and analysis techniques for evaluating the effectiveness of interior noise control treatments for advanced turboprop aircraft, and to study the sensitivity of the ground test results to changes in various test conditions. Noise and vibration measurements were conducted under simulated advanced turboprop excitation, for two interior noise control treatment configurations. These ground measurement results were compared with results of earlier UHB (Ultra High Bypass) Demonstrator flight tests with comparable interior treatment configurations. The Demonstrator is an MD-80 test aircraft with the left JT8D engine replaced with a prototype UHB advanced turboprop engine.

  17. Flight evaluation of advanced third-generation midwave infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chyau N.; Donn, Matthew

    1998-08-01

    In FY-97 the Counter Drug Optical Upgrade (CDOU) demonstration program was initiated by the Program Executive Office for Counter Drug to increase the detection and classification ranges of P-3 counter drug aircraft by using advanced staring infrared sensors. The demonstration hardware is a `pin-for-pin' replacement of the AAS-36 Infrared Detection Set (IRDS) located under the nose radome of a P-3 aircraft. The hardware consists of a 3rd generation mid-wave infrared (MWIR) sensor integrated into a three axis-stabilized turret. The sensor, when installed on the P- 3, has a hemispheric field of regard and analysis has shown it will be capable of detecting and classifying Suspected Drug Trafficking Aircraft and Vessels at ranges several factors over the current IRDS. This paper will discuss the CDOU system and it's lab, ground, and flight evaluation results. Test targets included target templates, range targets, dedicated target boats, and targets of opportunity at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division and at operational test sites. The objectives of these tests were to: (1) Validate the integration concept of the CDOU package into the P-3 aircraft. (2) Validate the end-to-end functionality of the system, including sensor/turret controls and recording of imagery during flight. (3) Evaluate the system sensitivity and resolution on a set of verified resolution targets templates. (4) Validate the ability of the 3rd generation MWIR sensor to detect and classify targets at a significantly increased range.

  18. Wind Tunnel Tests Conducted to Develop an Icing Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    As part of NASA's Aviation Safety Program goals to reduce aviation accidents due to icing, NASA Glenn Research Center is leading a flight simulator development activity to improve pilot training for the adverse flying characteristics due to icing. Developing flight simulators that incorporate the aerodynamic effects of icing will provide a critical element in pilot training programs by giving pilots a pre-exposure of icing-related hazards, such as ice-contaminated roll upset or tailplane stall. Integrating these effects into training flight simulators will provide an accurate representation of scenarios to develop pilot skills in unusual attitudes and loss-of-control events that may result from airframe icing. In order to achieve a high level of fidelity in the flight simulation, a series of wind tunnel tests have been conducted on a 6.5-percent-scale Twin Otter aircraft model. These wind tunnel tests were conducted at the Wichita State University 7- by 10-ft wind tunnel and Bihrle Applied Research's Large Amplitude Multiple Purpose Facility in Neuburg, Germany. The Twin Otter model was tested without ice (baseline), and with two ice configurations: 1) Ice on the horizontal tail only; 2) Ice on the wing, horizontal tail, and vertical tail. These wind tunnel tests resulted in data bases of aerodynamic forces and moments as functions of angle of attack; sideslip; control surface deflections; forced oscillations in the pitch, roll, and yaw axes; and various rotational speeds. A limited amount of wing and tail surface pressure data were also measured for comparison with data taken at Wichita State and with flight data. The data bases from these tests will be the foundation for a PC-based Icing Flight Simulator to be delivered to Glenn in fiscal year 2001.

  19. Advanced protein crystal growth flight hardware for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Frederick T.

    1988-01-01

    The operational environment of the Space Station will differ considerably from the previous short term missions such as the Spacelabs. Limited crew availability combined with the near continuous operation of Space Station facilities will require a high degree of facility automation. This paper will discuss current efforts to develop automated flight hardware for advanced protein crystal growth on the Space Station. Particular areas discussed will be the automated monitoring of key growth parameters for vapor diffusion growth and proposed mechanisms for control of these parameters. A history of protein crystal growth efforts will be presented in addition to the rationale and need for improved protein crystals for X-ray diffraction. The facility will be capable of simultaneously processing several hundred protein samples at various temperatures, pH's, concentrations etc., and provide allowances for real time variance of growth parameters.

  20. Advanced Command Destruct System (ACDS) Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tow, David

    2009-01-01

    NASA Dryden started working towards a single vehicle enhanced flight termination system (EFTS) in January 2008. NASA and AFFTC combined their efforts to work towards final operating capability for multiple vehicle and multiple missions simultaneously, to be completed by the end of 2011. Initially, the system was developed to support one vehicle and one frequency per mission for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at NASA Dryden. By May 2008 95% of design and hardware builds were completed, however, NASA Dryden's change of software safety scope and requirements caused delays after May 2008. This presentation reviews the initial and final operating capabilities for the Advanced Command Destruct System (ACDS), including command controller and configuration software development. A requirements summary is also provided.

  1. Economical graphics display system for flight simulation avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During the past academic year the focal point of this project has been to enhance the economical flight simulator system by incorporating it into the aero engineering educational environment. To accomplish this goal it was necessary to develop appropriate software modules that provide a foundation for student interaction with the system. In addition experiments had to be developed and tested to determine if they were appropriate for incorporation into the beginning flight simulation course, AERO-41B. For the most part these goals were accomplished. Experiments were developed and evaluated by graduate students. More work needs to be done in this area. The complexity and length of the experiments must be refined to match the programming experience of the target students. It was determined that few undergraduate students are ready to absorb the full extent and complexity of a real-time flight simulation. For this reason the experiments developed are designed to introduce basic computer architectures suitable for simulation, the programming environment and languages, the concept of math modules, evaluation of acquired data, and an introduction to the meaning of real-time. An overview is included of the system environment as it pertains to the students, an example of a flight simulation experiment performed by the students, and a summary of the executive programming modules created by the students to achieve a user-friendly multi-processor system suitable to an aero engineering educational program.

  2. Predicting Fruit Fly's Sensing Rate From Insect Flight Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jane; Chang, Song

    2013-11-01

    Without sensory feedbacks, flies cannot fly. Exactly how sensory feedback controls work in flying insects is a complex puzzle to solve. What do insects measure in order to stabilize their flight? What kinds of neural computations and muscle activities are involved in order to correct their flight course or to turn? How often and how fast do animals adjust their wings to remain stable? To understand the algorithms used by insects to control their dynamic instability, we have developed a simulation tool to study flapping flight, where motions of the insect body and wings are coupled instantaneously. To stabilize the flight in the simulation, we construct a control algorithm that modulates wing motion based on discrete measurements of the body-pitch orientation. Our simulations give theoretical bounds both on the sensing rate and the delay time between sensing and actuation. Interpreting these findings together with experimental results on fruit flies' reaction time and sensory motor reflexes, we give a sharper bound on the sensing rate and further reason that fruit flies sense their kinematic states every wing-beat in order to stabilize their flight.

  3. Hypoxia and Flight Performance of Military Instructor Pilots in a Flight Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    aircraft or flight simulators a LinkGAT-l instrument trainer ronttcl~d ~ quent report accuracy and the occurrence of errors during cross- country Hights ...in procedural errors due to hypoxia, but no ronvincing evidence for any impact on primary Hight performance, i.e., the pilot’s stick and rudder...control of the aircraft. Most recently, a presentation reported a de- crease in simulated Hight performance that correlated with a decrease in cognitive

  4. Flight Simulator: Field of View Utilized in Performing Tactical Maneuvers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    were taken in the Simulator for Air-to-Air Combat (SAAC) and the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). During the air-to-ground data collection...ground maneuvers were performed In the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). The data collected provided an estimate of the FOV dimensions that a...tactical maneuvers were conducted in the AFHIRL ASPT located at Williams AFB. The ASPT had a fully instrumnted F-16 cockpit. The g-cueing was available

  5. Status of NASA/Army rotorcraft research and development piloted flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gregory W.; Gossett, Terrence D.

    1988-01-01

    The status of the major NASA/Army capabilities in piloted rotorcraft flight simulation is reviewed. The requirements for research and development piloted simulation are addressed as well as the capabilities and technologies that are currently available or are being developed by NASA and the Army at Ames. The application of revolutionary advances (in visual scene, electronic cockpits, motion, and modelling of interactive mission environments and/or vehicle systems) to the NASA/Army facilities are also addressed. Particular attention is devoted to the major advances made in integrating these individual capabilities into fully integrated simulation environment that were or are being applied to new rotorcraft mission requirements. The specific simulators discussed are the Vertical Motion Simulator and the Crew Station Research and Development Facility.

  6. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occur during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological flight experiments on animals was discussed. The mouse model is an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to the one used with rats. It is shown that this murine model yield similar results to the rat model of antiorthostatic suspension for simulating some aspects of weightlessness. It is also shown that mice suspended in this model have decreased interferon-alpha/beta production as compared to control, nonsuspended mice or to orthostatically suspended mice. It is suggested that the conditions occuring during space flight could possibly affect interferon production. The regulatory role of interferon in nonviral diseases is demonstrated including several bacterial and protozoan infections indicating the great significance of interferon in resistance to many types of infectious diseases.

  7. Airflow Hazard Visualization for Helicopter Pilots: Flight Simulation Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2005-01-01

    Airflow hazards such as vortices or low level wind shear have been identified as a primary contributing factor in many helicopter accidents. US Navy ships generate airwakes over their decks, creating potentially hazardous conditions for shipboard rotorcraft launch and recovery. Recent sensor developments may enable the delivery of airwake data to the cockpit, where visualizing the hazard data may improve safety and possibly extend ship/helicopter operational envelopes. A prototype flight-deck airflow hazard visualization system was implemented on a high-fidelity rotorcraft flight dynamics simulator. Experienced helicopter pilots, including pilots from all five branches of the military, participated in a usability study of the system. Data was collected both objectively from the simulator and subjectively from post-test questionnaires. Results of the data analysis are presented, demonstrating a reduction in crash rate and other trends that illustrate the potential of airflow hazard visualization to improve flight safety.

  8. A flight investigation of simulated data-link communications during single-pilot IFR flight. Volume 2: Flight evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. F., Jr.; Duffy, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Key problems in single pilot instrument flight operations are in the management of flight data and the processing of cockpit information during conditions of heavy workload. A flight data console was developed to allow simulation of a digital data link to replace the current voice communications stem used in air traffic control. This is a human factors evaluation of a data link communications system to determine how such a system might reduce cockpit workload, improve flight proficiency, and be accepted by general aviation pilots. The need for a voice channel as backup to a digital link is examined. The evaluations cover both airport terminal area operations and full mission instrument flight. Results show that general aviation pilots operate well with a digital data link communications system. The findings indicate that a data link system for pilot/ATC communications, with a backup voice channel, is well accepted by general aviation pilots and is considered to be safer, more efficient, and result in less workload than the current voice system.

  9. 19. Interior view showing flight simulator partition and rear overhead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Interior view showing flight simulator partition and rear overhead door, dock no. 493. View to south. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  10. Computers With Wings: Flight Simulation and Personalized Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oss, Stefano

    2005-03-01

    We propose, as a special way to explore the physics of flying objects, to use a flight simulator with a personalized scenery to reproduce the territory where students live. This approach increases the participation and attention of students to physics classes but also creates several opportunities for addressing side activities and arguments of various nature, from history to geography, computer science, and much more.

  11. Computers with Wings: Flight Simulation and Personalized Landscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    We propose, as a special way to explore the physics of flying objects, to use a flight simulator with a personalized scenery to reproduce the territory where students live. This approach increases the participation and attention of students to physics classes but also creates several opportunities for addressing side activities and arguments of…

  12. User's Guide for Flight Simulation Data Visualization Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Chen, Ronnie; Kenney, Patrick S.; Koval, Christopher M.; Hutchinson, Brian K.

    1996-01-01

    Today's modern flight simulation research produces vast amounts of time sensitive data. The meaning of this data can be difficult to assess while in its raw format. Therefore, a method of breaking the data down and presenting it to the user in a graphical format is necessary. Simulation Graphics (SimGraph) is intended as a data visualization software package that will incorporate simulation data into a variety of animated graphical displays for easy interpretation by the simulation researcher. This document is intended as an end user's guide.

  13. Effects of alcohol on pilot performance in simulated flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.; Demosthenes, T.; White, T. R.; O'Hara, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    Ethyl alcohol's known ability to produce reliable decrements in pilot performance was used in a study designed to evaluate objective methods for assessing pilot performance. Four air carrier pilot volunteers were studied during eight simulated flights in a B727 simulator. Total errors increased linearly and significantly with increasing blood alcohol. Planning and performance errors, procedural errors and failures of vigilance each increased significantly in one or more pilots and in the group as a whole.

  14. Low-Level Flight Simulation: Vertical Cues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    The ASPT visual s’ester Soiftware autoematic’ally droips the’m freim the scene- at altitudes above 2000 fe’et AGI.) In an attempt to make the cue’s...8217 vertical (V) field of view. The ASPT has a - 15’ view o er the nose. - 370 over the left side, and - 15’ over the right side. (The aircraft field of...simulation, the ASPT /F-16 provided several instructional features that were used in this study. A video display of the HUD (Figures 1 and 21 and forward

  15. In-flight and simulated aircraft fuel temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    Fuel tank measurements from ten flights of an L1011 commercial aircraft are reported for the first time. The flights were conducted from 1981 to 1983. A thermocouple rake was installed in an inboard wing tank and another in an outboard tank. During the test periods of either 2 or 5 hr, at altitudes of 10,700 m (35,000 ft) or higher, either the inboard or the outboard tank remained full. Fuel temperature profiles generally developed in the expected manner. The bulk fuel was mixed by natural convection to a nearly uniform temperature, especially in the outboard tank, and a gradient existed at the bottom conduction zone. The data indicated that when full, the upper surface of the inboard tank was wetted and the outboard tank was unwetted. Companion NASA Lewis Research Center tests were conducted in a 0.20 cubic meter (52 gal) tank simulator of the outboard tank, chilled on the top and bottom, and insulated on the sides. Even though the simulator tank had no internal components corresponding to the wing tank, temperatures agreed with the flight measurements for wetted upper surface conditions, but not for unwetted conditions. It was concluded that if boundary conditions are carefully controlled, simulators are a useful way of evaluating actual flight temperatures.

  16. SimGraph: A Flight Simulation Data Visualization Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Kenney, Patrick S.

    1997-01-01

    Today's modern flight simulation research produces vast amounts of time sensitive data, making a qualitative analysis of the data difficult while it remains in a numerical representation. Therefore, a method of merging related data together and presenting it to the user in a more comprehensible format is necessary. Simulation Graphics (SimGraph) is an object-oriented data visualization software package that presents simulation data in animated graphical displays for easy interpretation. Data produced from a flight simulation is presented by SimGraph in several different formats, including: 3-Dimensional Views, Cockpit Control Views, Heads-Up Displays, Strip Charts, and Status Indicators. SimGraph can accommodate the addition of new graphical displays to allow the software to be customized to each user s particular environment. A new display can be developed and added to SimGraph without having to design a new application, allowing the graphics programmer to focus on the development of the graphical display. The SimGraph framework can be reused for a wide variety of visualization tasks. Although it was created for the flight simulation facilities at NASA Langley Research Center, SimGraph can be reconfigured to almost any data visualization environment. This paper describes the capabilities and operations of SimGraph.

  17. Advanced Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for Flight Dynamics; Interim Results and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, David C.; Shweyk, Kamal M.; Brown, Frank; Shah, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    As part of the NASA Vehicle Systems Safety Technologies (VSST), Assuring Safe and Effective Aircraft Control Under Hazardous Conditions (Technical Challenge #3), an effort is underway within Boeing Research and Technology (BR&T) to address Advanced Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for Flight Dynamics (VSST1-7). The scope of the effort is to develop and evaluate advanced multidisciplinary flight dynamics modeling techniques, including integrated uncertainties, to facilitate higher fidelity response characterization of current and future aircraft configurations approaching and during loss-of-control conditions. This approach is to incorporate multiple flight dynamics modeling methods for aerodynamics, structures, and propulsion, including experimental, computational, and analytical. Also to be included are techniques for data integration and uncertainty characterization and quantification. This research shall introduce new and updated multidisciplinary modeling and simulation technologies designed to improve the ability to characterize airplane response in off-nominal flight conditions. The research shall also introduce new techniques for uncertainty modeling that will provide a unified database model comprised of multiple sources, as well as an uncertainty bounds database for each data source such that a full vehicle uncertainty analysis is possible even when approaching or beyond Loss of Control boundaries. Methodologies developed as part of this research shall be instrumental in predicting and mitigating loss of control precursors and events directly linked to causal and contributing factors, such as stall, failures, damage, or icing. The tasks will include utilizing the BR&T Water Tunnel to collect static and dynamic data to be compared to the GTM extended WT database, characterizing flight dynamics in off-nominal conditions, developing tools for structural load estimation under dynamic conditions, devising methods for integrating various modeling elements

  18. Advanced Command Destruct System (ACDS) Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tow, David K.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides information on the development, integration, and operational usage of the Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS) at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and Air Force Flight Test Center. The presentation will describe the efforts completed to certify the system and acquire approval for operational usage, the efforts to integrate the system into the NASA Dryden existing flight termination infrastructure, and the operational support of aircraft with EFTS at Edwards AFB.

  19. Helicopter flight dynamics simulation with refined aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Colin Rhys

    This dissertation describes the development of a coupled rotor-fuselage flight dynamic simulation that includes a maneuvering free wake model and a coupled flap-lag-torsion flexible blade representation. This mathematical model is used to investigate effects of main rotor inflow and blade modeling on various flight dynamics characteristics for both articulated and hingeless rotor helicopters. The inclusion of the free wake model requires the development of new numerical procedures for the calculation of trim equilibrium positions, for the extraction of high-order, constant coefficient linearized models, and for the calculation of the free flight responses to arbitrary pilot inputs. The free wake model, previously developed by other investigators at the University of Maryland, is capable of modeling the changes in rotor wake geometry resulting from maneuvers, and the effects of such changes on the main rotor inflow. The overall flight dynamic model is capable of simulating the helicopter behavior during maneuvers that can be arbitrarily large. The combination of sophisticated models of rotor wake and blade flexibility enables the flight dynamics model to capture the effects of maneuvers with unprecedented accuracy for simulations based on first principles: this is the main contribution of the research presented in this dissertation. The increased accuracy brought about by the free wake model significantly improves the predictions of the helicopter trim state for both helicopter configurations considered in this study. This is especially true in low speed flight and hover. The most significant improvements are seen in the predictions of the main rotor collective and power required by the rotor, which can be significantly underpredicted using traditional linear inflow models. Results show that the free-flight on-axis responses to pilot inputs can be predicted with good accuracy with a relatively unsophisticated models that do not include either a free wake nor a

  20. Reactions of Air Transport Flight Crews to Displays of Weather During Simulated Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, James P.; Fallon, Corey; Bustamante, Ernesto; Bailey, William R., III; Anderson, Brittany

    2005-01-01

    Display of information in the cockpit has long been a challenge for aircraft designers. Given the limited space in which to present information, designers have had to be extremely selective about the types and amount of flight related information to present to pilots. The general goal of cockpit display design and implementation is to ensure that displays present information that is timely, useful, and helpful. This suggests that displays should facilitate the management of perceived workload, and should allow maximal situation awareness. The formatting of current and projected weather displays represents a unique challenge. As technologies have been developed to increase the variety and capabilities of weather information available to flight crews, factors such as conflicting weather representations and increased decision importance have increased the likelihood for errors. However, if formatted optimally, it is possible that next generation weather displays could allow for clearer indications of weather trends such as developing or decaying weather patterns. Important issues to address include the integration of weather information sources, flight crew trust of displayed weather information, and the teamed reactivity of flight crews to displays of weather. Past studies of weather display reactivity and formatting have not adequately addressed these issues; in part because experimental stimuli have not approximated the complexity of modern weather displays, and in part because they have not used realistic experimental tasks or participants. The goal of the research reported here was to investigate the influence of onboard and NEXRAD agreement, range to the simulated potential weather event, and the pilot flying on flight crew deviation decisions, perceived workload, and perceived situation awareness. Fifteen pilot-copilot teams were required to fly a simulated route while reacting to weather events presented in two graphical formats on a separate visual display

  1. Simulated high speed flight effects on supersonic jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, Thomas D.; Brown, Martha C.

    1993-01-01

    A free jet is utilized to investigate the changes in the noise received from supersonic jets in high speed subsonic flight. Flight Mach numbers to 0.9 are simulated for supersonic jets with fully expanded Mach numbers between 1 and 2. Plume pressure measurements show only minor changes in the shock structure of off-design jets up to a Mach number of 0.6. Correspondingly, far-field noise measurements indicate little change to the broadband shock noise emitted at right angles to the jet. However, measurements within the free jet show that convection effects on the noise are substantial, and that the point source convective amplification that is proportional to the fourth power of the Doppler factor may apply for broadband shock noise in flight. Measurements of jet mixing noise for an on-design supersonic jet show that the current predictions of mixing noise in flight can be extended to flight Mach numbers of at least 0.5.

  2. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye: primary flight display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolillo, Paul W.; Saxena, Ragini; Garruba, Jonathan; Tripathi, Sanjay; Blanchard, Randy

    2006-05-01

    This paper is a response to the challenge of providing a large area avionics display for the E-2D AHE aircraft. The resulting display design provides a pilot with high-resolution visual information content covering an image area of almost three square feet (Active Area of Samsung display = 33.792cm x 27.0336 cm = 13.304" x 10.643" = 141.596 square inches = 0.983 sq. ft x 3 = 2.95 sq. ft). The avionics display application, design and performance being described is the Primary Flight Display for the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft. This cockpit display has a screen diagonal size of 17 inches. Three displays, with minimum bezel width, just fit within the available instrument panel area. The significant design constraints of supporting an upgrade installation have been addressed. These constraints include a display image size that is larger than the mounting opening in the instrument panel. This, therefore, requires that the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) window, LCD panel and backlight all fit within the limited available bezel depth. High brightness and a wide dimming range are supported with a dual mode Cold Cathode Fluorescent Tube (CCFT) and LED backlight. Packaging constraints dictated the use of multiple U shaped fluorescent lamps in a direct view backlight design for a maximum display brightness of 300 foot-Lamberts. The low intensity backlight levels are provided by remote LEDs coupled through a fiber optic mesh. This architecture generates luminous uniformity within a minimum backlight depth. Cross-cockpit viewing is supported with ultra-wide field-of-view performance including contrast and the color stability of an advanced LCD cell design supports. Display system design tradeoffs directed a priority to high optical efficiency for minimum power and weight.

  3. Computer Simulations Imply Forelimb-Dominated Underwater Flight in Plesiosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiqiu; Smith, Adam S.; Gu, Yuting; Tan, Jie; Liu, C. Karen; Turk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Plesiosaurians are an extinct group of highly derived Mesozoic marine reptiles with a global distribution that spans 135 million years from the Early Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous. During their long evolutionary history they maintained a unique body plan with two pairs of large wing-like flippers, but their locomotion has been a topic of debate for almost 200 years. Key areas of controversy have concerned the most efficient biologically possible limb stroke, e.g. whether it consisted of rowing, underwater flight, or modified underwater flight, and how the four limbs moved in relation to each other: did they move in or out of phase? Previous studies have investigated plesiosaur swimming using a variety of methods, including skeletal analysis, human swimmers, and robotics. We adopt a novel approach using a digital, three-dimensional, articulated, free-swimming plesiosaur in a simulated fluid. We generated a large number of simulations under various joint degrees of freedom to investigate how the locomotory repertoire changes under different parameters. Within the biologically possible range of limb motion, the simulated plesiosaur swims primarily with its forelimbs using an unmodified underwater flight stroke, essentially the same as turtles and penguins. In contrast, the hindlimbs provide relatively weak thrust in all simulations. We conclude that plesiosaurs were forelimb-dominated swimmers that used their hind limbs mainly for maneuverability and stability. PMID:26683221

  4. Stability and control issues associated with lightly loaded rotors autorotating in high advance ratio flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigsby, James Michael

    sensitivities with advance ratio, and advance ratio dependent control cross coupling. Hub moment response to rotor disturbances results in transients where rotor damping is reduced due to low Lock number blades and reduced rotor angular velocity. Experimentally identified frequency response shows dominant low frequency modes with advance ratio dependent damping and the frequencies are on the order of typical airframe modes. Rotor speed response to swashplate control perturbations from trim results in non-linear behavior that is advance ratio dependent, and which stems from cyclic flapping behavior at high advance ratio. Rotor control strategies were developed including the use of variable shaft incidence to achieve rotor speed control with hub moment suppression achieved through cyclic control. Flight dynamics characteristics resulting from the coupling of the rotor and airframe were predicted in flight using a baseline airframe with conventional fixed-wing controls, representative of the current interest in the concept vehicle. Results predicted by linearization of the non-linear models were compared with system identification results using the non-linear simulation as surrogate flight test data. Low frequency rotor response is shown to couple with the vehicle motion for short period and roll mode response to airframe control inputs. The rotor speed mode is shown to couple with short period and long period vehicle modes as the rotor torque balance is sensitive to vehicle speed and attitude changes.

  5. Advances in low-thrust trajectory optimization and flight mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang

    The dissertation presents advances in trajectory optimization and flight mechanics of low-thrust spacecraft. With the aid of the extended multiple-shooting techniques with state and costate nodes, the hybrid method and the direct-shooting method are systematically described and used to solve a variety of optimal orbit transfer problems. The optimization methods are demonstrated by presenting solutions for optimal Earth-orbit and interplanetary trajectory examples, and complex interplanetary missions using solar electric propulsion (such as Eros sample return and Pluto-flyby missions). Alternative formulations of equations of motion are discussed, which include inertial frame transformation in terms of three Euler angles and a modified set of equinoctial elements using non-dimensional angular momentum. Finally, a low-thrust Earth-capture guidance scheme is developed and presented, which makes novel use of Perkins' low-thrust universal solution and doesn't require a stored reference trajectory. The simplicity and performance of this new guidance design makes it a viable candidate for onboard implementation.

  6. Age and Expertise Effects in Aviation Decision Making and Flight Control in a Flight Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy L.; Reade, Gordon; Yesavage, Jerome A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Age (due to declines in cognitive abilities necessary for navigation) and level of aviation expertise are two factors that may affect aviation performance and decision making under adverse weather conditions. We examined the roles of age, expertise, and their relationship on aviation decision making and flight control performance during a flight simulator task. Methods Seventy-two IFR-rated general aviators, aged 19–79 yr, made multiple approach, holding pattern entry, and landing decisions while navigating under Instrument Flight Rules weather conditions. Over three trials in which the fog level varied, subjects decided whether or not to land the aircraft. They also completed two holding pattern entries. Subjects’ flight control during approaches and holding patterns was measured. Results Older pilots (41+ yr) were more likely than younger pilots to land when visibility was inadequate (older pilots’ mean false alarm rate: 0.44 vs 0.25). They also showed less precise flight control for components of the approach, performing 0.16 SD below mean approach scores. Expertise attenuated an age-related decline in flight control during holding patterns: older IFR/CFI performed 0.73 SD below mean score; younger IFR/CFI, younger CFII/ATP, older CFII/ATP: 0.32, 0.26, 0.03 SD above mean score. Additionally, pilots with faster processing speed (by median split) had a higher mean landing decision false alarm rate (0.42 vs 0.28), yet performed 0.14 SD above the mean approach control score. Conclusions Results have implications regarding specialized training for older pilots and for understanding processes involved in older adults’ real world decision making and performance. PMID:20464816

  7. The hybrid bio-inspired aerial vehicle: Concept and SIMSCAPE flight simulation.

    PubMed

    Tao Zhang; Su, Steven; Nguyen, Hung T

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a Silver Gull-inspired hybrid aerial vehicle, the Super Sydney Silver Gull (SSSG), which is able to vary its structure, under different manoeuvre requirements, to implement three flight modes: the flapping wing flight, the fixed wing flight, and the quadcopter flight (the rotary wing flight of Unmanned Air Vehicle). Specifically, through proper mechanism design and flight mode transition, the SSSG can imitate the Silver Gull's flight gesture during flapping flight, save power consuming by switching to the fixed wing flight mode during long-range cruising, and hover at targeted area when transferring to quadcopter flight mode. Based on the aerodynamic models, the Simscape, a product of MathWorks, is used to simulate and analyse the performance of the SSSG's flight modes. The entity simulation results indicate that the created SSSG's 3D model is feasible and ready to be manufactured for further flight tests.

  8. Advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI)/F-16 Automated Maneuvering Attack System final flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowden, Donald J.; Bessette, Denis E.

    1987-01-01

    The AFTI F-16 Automated Maneuvering Attack System has undergone developmental and demonstration flight testing over a total of 347.3 flying hours in 237 sorties. The emphasis of this phase of the flight test program was on the development of automated guidance and control systems for air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons delivery, using a digital flight control system, dual avionics multiplex buses, an advanced FLIR sensor with laser ranger, integrated flight/fire-control software, advanced cockpit display and controls, and modified core Multinational Stage Improvement Program avionics.

  9. Helmet-mounted display systems for flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loren A.; Bucher, Nancy M.

    1989-01-01

    Simulation scientists are continually improving simulation technology with the goal of more closely replicating the physical environment of the real world. The presentation or display of visual information is one area in which recent technical improvements have been made that are fundamental to conducting simulated operations close to the terrain. Detailed and appropriate visual information is especially critical for nap-of-the-earth helicopter flight simulation where the pilot maintains an 'eyes-out' orientation to avoid obstructions and terrain. This paper describes visually coupled wide field of view helmet-mounted display (WFOVHMD) system technology as a viable visual presentation system for helicopter simulation. Tradeoffs associated with this mode of presentation as well as research and training applications are discussed.

  10. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  11. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  12. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  13. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  14. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  15. Flight Simulator Evaluation of Synthetic Vision Display Concepts to Prevent Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Parrish, Russell V.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2004-01-01

    In commercial aviation, over 30-percent of all fatal accidents worldwide are categorized as Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) accidents, where a fully functioning airplane is inadvertently flown into the ground. The major hypothesis for a simulation experiment conducted at NASA Langley Research Center was that a Primary Flight Display (PFD) with synthetic terrain will improve pilots ability to detect and avoid potential CFITs compared to conventional instrumentation. All display conditions, including the baseline, contained a Terrain Awareness and Warning System (TAWS) and Vertical Situation Display (VSD) enhanced Navigation Display (ND). Each pilot flew twenty-two approach departure maneuvers in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to the terrain challenged Eagle County Regional Airport (EGE) in Colorado. For the final run, flight guidance cues were altered such that the departure path went into terrain. All pilots with a synthetic vision system (SVS) PFD (twelve of sixteen pilots) noticed and avoided the potential CFIT situation. The four pilots who flew the anomaly with the conventional baseline PFD configuration (which included a TAWS and VSD enhanced ND) had a CFIT event. Additionally, all the SVS display concepts enhanced the pilot s situational awareness, decreased workload and improved flight technical error (FTE) compared to the baseline configuration.

  16. The role of simulation in the development and flight test of the HiMAT vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. B.; Schilling, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Real time simulations have been essential in the flight test program of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle at NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility. The HiMAT project makes extensive use of simulations in design, development, and qualification for flight, pilot training, and flight planning. Four distinct simulations, each with varying amounts of hardware in the loop, were developed for the HiMAT project. The use of simulations in detecting anomalous behavior of the flight software and hardware at the various stages of development, verification, and validation has been the key to flight qualification of the HiMAT vehicle.

  17. A flight simulator control system using electric torque motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musick, R. O.; Wagner, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Control systems are required in flight simulators to provide representative stick and rudder pedal characteristics. A system has been developed that uses electric dc torque motors instead of the more common hydraulic actuators. The torque motor system overcomes certain disadvantages of hydraulic systems, such as high cost, high power consumption, noise, oil leaks, and safety problems. A description of the torque motor system is presented, including both electrical and mechanical design as well as performance characteristics. The system develops forces sufficiently high for most simulations, and is physically small and light enough to be used in most motion-base cockpits.

  18. Flight Test Results of the Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager Advanced Land Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendenhall, Jeffrey A.; Lencioni, Donald E.; Hearn, David R.; Digenis, Constantine J.

    2002-09-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) is the primary instrument on the Earth Observing-1 spacecraft (EO-1) and was developed under NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). The NMP mission objective is to flight-validate advanced technologies that will enable dramatic improvements in performance, cost, mass, and schedule for future, Landsat-like, Earth Science Enterprise instruments. ALI contains a number of innovative features designed to achieve this objective. These include the basic instrument architecture, which employs a push-broom data collection mode, a wide field-of-view optical design, compact multi-spectral detector arrays, non-cryogenic HgCdTe for the short wave infrared bands, silicon carbide optics, and a multi-level solar calibration technique. The sensor includes detector arrays that operate in ten bands, one panchromatic, six VNIR and three SWIR, spanning the range from 0.433 to 2.35 μm. Launched on November 21, 2000, ALI instrument performance was monitored during its first year on orbit using data collected during solar, lunar, stellar, and earth observations. This paper will provide an overview of EO-1 mission activities during this period. Additionally, the on-orbit spatial and radiometric performance of the instrument will be compared to pre-flight measurements and the temporal stability of ALI will be presented.

  19. 14 CFR 60.35 - Specific full flight simulator compliance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN FLIGHT SIMULATION TRAINING DEVICE INITIAL AND CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND USE... the extent necessary for the training, testing, and/or checking that comprise the simulation...

  20. 14 CFR 60.35 - Specific full flight simulator compliance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN FLIGHT SIMULATION TRAINING DEVICE INITIAL AND CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND USE... the extent necessary for the training, testing, and/or checking that comprise the simulation...

  1. Flight Controllability Limits and Related Human Transfer Functions as Determined from Simulator and Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Day, Richard E.

    1961-01-01

    A simulator study and flight tests were performed to determine the levels of static stability and damping necessary to enable a pilot to control the longitudinal and lateral-directional dynamics of a vehicle for short periods of time. Although a basic set of aerodynamic characteristics was used, the study was conducted so that the results would be applicable to a wide range of flight conditions and configurations. Novel piloting techniques were found which enabled the pilot to control the vehicle at conditions that were otherwise uncontrollable. The influence of several critical factors in altering the controllability limits was also investigated. Several human transfer functions were used which gave fairly good representations of the controllability limits determined experimentally for the short-period longitudinal, directional, and lateral modes. A transfer function with approximately the same gain and phase angle as the pilot at the controlling frequencies along the controllability limits was also derived.

  2. Optical Fiber Illumination System for visual flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollow, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    An electronically controlled lighting system simulating runway, aircraft carrier, and landing aid lights for flight simulations is described. The various colored lights that would be visible to a pilot by day, at dusk, or at night are duplicated at the distances the lights would normally become visible. Plastic optical fiber illuminators using tungsten halogen lights are distributed behind the model. The tips of the fibers of illuminators simulating runway lights are bevelled in order that they may be seen from long distances and at low angles. Fibers representing taxiway lights are pointed and polished for omni-directional visibility. The electronic intensity controls, which can be operated either manually or remotely, regulate the intensity of the lights to simulate changes in distance. A dichronic mirror, infrared filter system is used to maintain color integrity.

  3. Aviation instruction through flight simulation and related learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mavis Frankel

    The use of simulation in General Aviation flight training is an emergent practice and promises to increase substantially. Training through simulation is not addressed in the primary publication used to train flight instructors, however. In effect, training devices have been added into the curriculum by those using the technology as a cross between flight and ground instruction. The significance of how one learns in a training device is the potential effect on both in-flight learning and normal practices. A review of the literature, document review, interviews with flight instructors and students, and observations of instructional sessions in training devices, provided data to answer the prime research question: (a) What type(s) of learning best explain how learners are socialized to aviation through the use of simulation technology? One segment of the general aviation population, college and university flight programs, was sampled. Four types of learning provided a conceptual framework: reception; autonomous; guided inquiry; and social cognitive operationalized as cognitive apprenticeship. A central dilemma was identified from the data collected. This dilemma is the extent to which aviation and aviation instruction in training devices is perceived by instructors as being either safe or risky. Two sub-dilemmas of the central dilemma are also identified: (1) whether the perception of aviation on the part of instructors is one of control or autonomy and (2) whether aviators use and should be taught routines or innovation;. Three ways of viewing the aviation environment were identified from the combination of these sub-dilemmas by instructors: (1) aviation as safe; (2) aviation as somewhat safe; and (3) aviation as risky. Resolution of the fundamental dilemma results in an emergent view of aviation as risky and the implications of this view are discussed. Social cognitive learning operationalized as cognitive apprenticeship as an appropriate type of learning for high

  4. Correlating Computed and Flight Instructor Assessments of Straight-In Landing Approaches by Novice Pilots on a Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Bruce E.; Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia; Ali, Syed Firasat

    2005-01-01

    The rising cost of flight training and the low cost of powerful computers have resulted in increasing use of PC-based flight simulators. This has prompted FAA standards regulating such use and allowing aspects of training on simulators meeting these standards to be substituted for flight time. However, the FAA regulations require an authorized flight instructor as part of the training environment. Thus, while costs associated with flight time have been reduced, the cost associated with the need for a flight instructor still remains. The obvious area of research, therefore, has been to develop intelligent simulators. However, the two main challenges of such attempts have been training strategies and assessment. The research reported in this paper was conducted to evaluate various performance metrics of a straight-in landing approach by 33 novice pilots flying a light single engine aircraft simulation. These metrics were compared to assessments of these flights by two flight instructors to establish a correlation between the two techniques in an attempt to determine a composite performance metric for this flight maneuver.

  5. Simulator Sickness in the AH-1S (Cobra) Flight Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Postural stability ........................................ 38 Correlations .............................................. 38 Pilot variables...in seven helicopter simulators ...................... 34 4. Pre- and post-SSQ means (standard deviations) and paired t-test values...nausea (Kennedy and Frank, 1986). Postural changes occur during and after exposure. Other signs (Colehour and Graybiel, 1966; McClure and Fregly, 1972

  6. Launch vehicle flight control augmentation using smart materials and advanced composites (CDDF Project 93-05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a rich heritage of launch vehicles that have used aerodynamic surfaces for flight stability such as the Saturn vehicles and flight control such as on the Redstone. Recently, due to aft center-of-gravity locations on launch vehicles currently being studied, the need has arisen for the vehicle control augmentation that is provided by these flight controls. Aerodynamic flight control can also reduce engine gimbaling requirements, provide actuator failure protection, enhance crew safety, and increase vehicle reliability, and payload capability. In the Saturn era, NASA went to the Moon with 300 sq ft of aerodynamic surfaces on the Saturn V. Since those days, the wealth of smart materials and advanced composites that have been developed allow for the design of very lightweight, strong, and innovative launch vehicle flight control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the advanced composites and smart materials that are directly applicable to launch vehicle control surfaces.

  7. Comparison of Fluka-2006 Monte Carlo Simulation and Flight Data for the ATIC Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunasingha, R.M.; Fazely, A.R.; Adams, J.H.; Ahn, H.S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.L.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Ganel, O.; Guzik, T.G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K.C.; Kouznetsov, E.N.; Panasyuk, M.I.; Panov, A.D.; Schmidt, W.K.H.; Seo, E.S.; Sokolskaya, N.V.; Watts, John W.; Wefel, J.P.; Wu, J.C.; Zatsepin, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) detector using the MC code FLUKA-2006 which is capable of simulating particles up to 10 PeV. The ATIC detector has completed two successful balloon flights from McMurdo, Antarctica lasting a total of more than 35 days. ATIC is designed as a multiple, long duration balloon flight, investigation of the cosmic ray spectra from below 50 GeV to near 100 TeV total energy; using a fully active Bismuth Germanate(BGO) calorimeter. It is equipped with a large mosaic of.silicon detector pixels capable of charge identification, and, for particle tracking, three projective layers of x-y scintillator hodoscopes, located above, in the middle and below a 0.75 nuclear interaction length graphite target. Our simulations are part of an analysis package of both nuclear (A) and energy dependences for different nuclei interacting in the ATIC detector. The MC simulates the response of different components of the detector such as the Si-matrix, the scintillator hodoscopes and the BGO calorimeter to various nuclei. We present comparisons of the FLUKA-2006 MC calculations with GEANT calculations and with the ATIC CERN data and ATIC flight data.

  8. Pattern Recognition for a Flight Dynamics Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; Hurtado, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The design, analysis, and verification and validation of a spacecraft relies heavily on Monte Carlo simulations. Modern computational techniques are able to generate large amounts of Monte Carlo data but flight dynamics engineers lack the time and resources to analyze it all. The growing amounts of data combined with the diminished available time of engineers motivates the need to automate the analysis process. Pattern recognition algorithms are an innovative way of analyzing flight dynamics data efficiently. They can search large data sets for specific patterns and highlight critical variables so analysts can focus their analysis efforts. This work combines a few tractable pattern recognition algorithms with basic flight dynamics concepts to build a practical analysis tool for Monte Carlo simulations. Current results show that this tool can quickly and automatically identify individual design parameters, and most importantly, specific combinations of parameters that should be avoided in order to prevent specific system failures. The current version uses a kernel density estimation algorithm and a sequential feature selection algorithm combined with a k-nearest neighbor classifier to find and rank important design parameters. This provides an increased level of confidence in the analysis and saves a significant amount of time.

  9. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  10. Flight Simulation of ARES in the Mars Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, P. Sean; Croom, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A report discusses using the Aerial Regional- scale Environmental Survey (ARES) light airplane as an observation platform on Mars in order to gather data. It would have to survive insertion into the atmosphere, fly long enough to meet science objectives, and provide a stable platform. The feasibility of such a platform was tested using the Langley Standard Real- Time Simulation in C++. The unique features of LaSRS++ are: full, six-degrees- of-freedom flight simulation that can be used to evaluate the performance of the aircraft in the Martian environment; capability of flight analysis from start to finish; support of Monte Carlo analysis of aircraft performance; and accepting initial conditions from POST results for the entry and deployment of the entry body. Starting with a general aviation model, the design was tweaked to maintain a stable aircraft under expected Martian conditions. Outer mold lines were adjusted based on experience with the Martian atmosphere. Flight control was modified from a vertical acceleration control law to an angle-of-attack control law. Navigation was modified from a vertical acceleration control system to an alpha control system. In general, a pattern of starting with simple models with well-understood behaviors was selected and modified during testing.

  11. Simulating Flights of Future Launch Vehicles and Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarter, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Marshall Aerospace Vehicle Representation in C (MAVERIC) is a computer program for generic, low-to-high-fidelity simulation of the flight(s) of one or more launch vehicle(s) or spacecraft. MAVERIC is designed to accommodate multi-staged vehicles, powered serially or in parallel, with multiple engines, tanks, and cargo elements. Engines can be of jet or conventional rocket types, using either liquid or solid propellants. MAVERIC includes generic subsystem software models for propulsion systems, mass properties, reaction control systems, aerodynamic properties, guidance systems, and navigation systems. Simulations can be started at points other than liftoff. Also included are guidance-system software models that accommodate the ascent, orbit, coasting, deorbiting, entry, terminal-area-energy-management, approach, and landing phases of flight. Options to use different wind profiles and atmospheres are included. A Monte Carlo capability is provided for modeling dispersions associated with atmospheric effects (including winds), propulsion, navigation, aerodynamics, and mass properties. Failures of engines and other subsystems can be modeled. The program is written in the C programming language, which makes it possible for the program to have high degrees of modularity, reusability, and maintainability, thereby also facilitating modification for modeling new vehicles.

  12. Application of Flight Simulator Record/Playback Feature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    complex visual flying task in ASPT under one of three instructional conditions which differed in their use of an automated record/playback feature. The...Advanced Instructional Features and Methods in ASPT . The work unit supports project 1123, Flying Training Development; task 112302, Ivstructional...cloverleaf maneuver flown in the present study. Appwffaa. The study was conducted on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) located at the Flying

  13. Preliminary simulation of an advanced, hingless rotor XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcveigh, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the tilt-rotor concept was verified through investigation of the performance, stability and handling qualities of the XV-15 tilt rotor. The rotors were replaced by advanced-technology fiberglass/composite hingless rotors of larger diameter, combined with an advanced integrated fly-by-wire control system. A parametric simulation model of the HRXV-15 was developed, model was used to define acceptable preliminary ranges of primary and secondary control schedules as functions of the flight parameters, to evaluate performance, flying qualities and structural loads, and to have a Boeing-Vertol pilot conduct a simulated flight test evaluation of the aircraft.

  14. Anticipation of the landing shock phenomenon in flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    An aircraft landing may be described as a controlled crash because a runway surface is intercepted. In a simulation model the transition from aerodynamic flight to weight on wheels involves a single computational cycle during which stiff differential equations are activated; with a significant probability these initial conditions are unrealistic. This occurs because of the finite cycle time, during which large restorative forces will accompany unrealistic initial oleo compressions. This problem was recognized a few years ago at Ames Research Center during simulation studies of a supersonic transport. The mathematical model of this vehicle severely taxed computational resources, and required a large cycle time. The ground strike problem was solved by a described technique called anticipation equations. This extensively used technique has not been previously reported. The technique of anticipating a significant event is a useful tool in the general field of discrete flight simulation. For the differential equations representing a landing gear model stiffness, rate of interception and cycle time may combine to produce an unrealistic simulation of the continuum.

  15. Perception and performance in flight simulators: The contribution of vestibular, visual, and auditory information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The pilot's perception and performance in flight simulators is examined. The areas investigated include: vestibular stimulation, flight management and man cockpit information interfacing, and visual perception in flight simulation. The effects of higher levels of rotary acceleration on response time to constant acceleration, tracking performance, and thresholds for angular acceleration are examined. Areas of flight management examined are cockpit display of traffic information, work load, synthetic speech call outs during the landing phase of flight, perceptual factors in the use of a microwave landing system, automatic speech recognition, automation of aircraft operation, and total simulation of flight training.

  16. Multi-Agent Flight Simulation with Robust Situation Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric N.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A robust situation generation architecture has been developed that generates multi-agent situations for human subjects. An implementation of this architecture was developed to support flight simulation tests of air transport cockpit systems. This system maneuvers pseudo-aircraft relative to the human subject's aircraft, generating specific situations for the subject to respond to. These pseudo-aircraft maneuver within reasonable performance constraints, interact in a realistic manner, and make pre-recorded voice radio communications. Use of this system minimizes the need for human experimenters to control the pseudo-agents and provides consistent interactions between the subject and the pseudo-agents. The achieved robustness of this system to typical variations in the subject's flight path was explored. It was found to successfully generate specific situations within the performance limitations of the subject-aircraft, pseudo-aircraft, and the script used.

  17. Simulating flight boundary conditions for orbiter payload modal survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Y. T.; Sernaker, M. L.; Peebles, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An approach to simulate the characteristics of the payload/orbiter interfaces for the payload modal survey was developed. The flexure designed for this approach is required to provide adequate stiffness separation in the free and constrained interface degrees of freedom to closely resemble the flight boundary condition. Payloads will behave linearly and demonstrate similar modal effective mass distribution and load path as the flight if the flexure fixture is used for the payload modal survey. The potential non-linearities caused by the trunnion slippage during the conventional fixed base modal survey may be eliminated. Consequently, the effort to correlate the test and analysis models can be significantly reduced. An example is given to illustrate the selection and the sensitivity of the flexure stiffness. The advantages of using flexure fixtures for the modal survey and for the analytical model verification are also demonstrated.

  18. NASA Langley Distributed Propulsion VTOL Tilt-Wing Aircraft Testing, Modeling, Simulation, Control, and Flight Test Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothhaar, Paul M.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Bacon, Barton J.; Gregory, Irene M.; Grauer, Jared A.; Busan, Ronald C.; Croom, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Control of complex Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) aircraft traversing from hovering to wing born flight mode and back poses notoriously difficult modeling, simulation, control, and flight-testing challenges. This paper provides an overview of the techniques and advances required to develop the GL-10 tilt-wing, tilt-tail, long endurance, VTOL aircraft control system. The GL-10 prototype's unusual and complex configuration requires application of state-of-the-art techniques and some significant advances in wind tunnel infrastructure automation, efficient Design Of Experiments (DOE) tunnel test techniques, modeling, multi-body equations of motion, multi-body actuator models, simulation, control algorithm design, and flight test avionics, testing, and analysis. The following compendium surveys key disciplines required to develop an effective control system for this challenging vehicle in this on-going effort.

  19. Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Doughty, C.; Kowalsky, M.B.; Moridis, G.J.; Pan,L.; Xu, T.; Zhang, Y.; Pruess, K.

    2007-02-01

    The vadose zone can be characterized as a complex subsurfacesystem in which intricate physical and biogeochemical processes occur inresponse to a variety of natural forcings and human activities. Thismakes it difficult to describe, understand, and predict the behavior ofthis specific subsurface system. The TOUGH nonisothermal multiphase flowsimulators are well-suited to perform advanced vadose zone studies. Theconceptual models underlying the TOUGH simulators are capable ofrepresenting features specific to the vadose zone, and of addressing avariety of coupled phenomena. Moreover, the simulators are integratedinto software tools that enable advanced data analysis, optimization, andsystem-level modeling. We discuss fundamental and computationalchallenges in simulating vadose zone processes, review recent advances inmodeling such systems, and demonstrate some capabilities of the TOUGHsuite of codes using illustrative examples.

  20. Flight Test Identification and Simulation of a UH-60A Helicopter and Slung Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicolani, Luigi S.; Sahai, Ranjana; Tucker, George E.; McCoy, Allen H.; Tyson, Peter H.; Tischler, Mark B.; Rosen, Aviv

    2001-01-01

    Helicopter slung-load operations are common in both military and civil contexts. Helicopters and loads are often qualified for these operations by means of flight tests, which can be expensive and time consuming. There is significant potential to reduce such costs both through revisions in flight-test methods and by using validated simulation models. To these ends, flight tests were conducted at Moffett Field to demonstrate the identification of key dynamic parameters during flight tests (aircraft stability margins and handling-qualities parameters, and load pendulum stability), and to accumulate a data base for simulation development and validation. The test aircraft was a UH-60A Black Hawk, and the primary test load was an instrumented 8- by 6- by 6-ft cargo container. Tests were focused on the lateral and longitudinal axes, which are the axes most affected by the load pendulum modes in the frequency range of interest for handling qualities; tests were conducted at airspeeds from hover to 80 knots. Using telemetered data, the dynamic parameters were evaluated in near real time after each test airspeed and before clearing the aircraft to the next test point. These computations were completed in under 1 min. A simulation model was implemented by integrating an advanced model of the UH-60A aerodynamics, dynamic equations for the two-body slung-load system, and load static aerodynamics obtained from wind-tunnel measurements. Comparisons with flight data for the helicopter alone and with a slung load showed good overall agreement for all parameters and test points; however, unmodeled secondary dynamic losses around 2 Hz were found in the helicopter model and they resulted in conservative stability margin estimates.

  1. Flight Dynamics Modeling and Simulation of a Damaged Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gautam H.; Hill, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center to establish, demonstrate, and apply methodology for modeling and implementing the aerodynamic effects of MANPADS damage to a transport aircraft into real-time flight simulation, and to demonstrate a preliminary capability of using such a simulation to conduct an assessment of aircraft survivability. Key findings from this study include: superpositioning of incremental aerodynamic characteristics to the baseline simulation aerodynamic model proved to be a simple and effective way of modeling damage effects; the primary effect of wing damage rolling moment asymmetry may limit minimum airspeed for adequate controllability, but this can be mitigated by the use of sideslip; combined effects of aerodynamics, control degradation, and thrust loss can result in significantly degraded controllability for a safe landing; and high landing speeds may be required to maintain adequate control if large excursions from the nominal approach path are allowed, but high-gain pilot control during landing can mitigate this risk.

  2. Recent Advances and Future Advances in Time-of-Flight PET

    PubMed Central

    Moses, William W.

    2007-01-01

    Simple theory predicts that the statistical noise variance in PET can be reduced by an order of magnitude by using time-of-flight (TOF) information. This reduction can be obtained by improving the coincidence timing resolution, and so would be achievable in clinical, whole body studies using with PET systems that differ little from existing cameras. The potential impact of this development is large, especially for oncology studies in large patients, where it is sorely needed. TOF PET was extensively studied in the 1980’s but died away in the 1990’s, as it was impossible to reliably achieve sufficient timing resolution without sacrificing other important PET performance aspects, such as spatial resolution and efficiency. Recent advances in technology (scintillators, photodetectors, and high speed electronics) have renewed interest in TOF PET, which is experiencing a rebirth. However, there is still much to be done, both in instrumentation development and evaluating the true benefits of TOF in modern clinical PET. This paper looks at what has been accomplished and what needs to be done before time-of-flight PET can reach its full potential. PMID:18836513

  3. STOVL aircraft simulation for integrated flight and propulsion control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihaloew, James R.; Drummond, Colin K.

    1989-01-01

    The United States is in the initial stages of committing to a national program to develop a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft. The goal of the propulsion community in this effort is to have the enabling propulsion technologies for this type aircraft in place to permit a low risk decision regarding the initiation of a research STOVL supersonic attack/fighter aircraft in the late mid-90's. This technology will effectively integrate, enhance, and extend the supersonic cruise, STOVL and fighter/attack programs to enable U.S. industry to develop a revolutionary supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing fighter/attack aircraft in the post-ATF period. A joint NASA Lewis and NASA Ames research program, with the objective of developing and validating technology for integrated-flight propulsion control design methodologies for short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, was planned and is underway. This program, the NASA Supersonic STOVL Integrated Flight-Propulsion Controls Program, is a major element of the overall NASA-Lewis Supersonic STOVL Propulsion Technology Program. It uses an integrated approach to develop an integrated program to achieve integrated flight-propulsion control technology. Essential elements of the integrated controls research program are realtime simulations of the integrated aircraft and propulsion systems which will be used in integrated control concept development and evaluations. This paper describes pertinent parts of the research program leading up to the related realtime simulation development and remarks on the simulation structure to accommodate propulsion system hardware drop-in for real system evaluation.

  4. A General Simulation Method for Multiple Bodies in Proximate Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of unsteady aerodynamic simulation for an arbitrary number of independent bodies flying in close proximity are considered. A novel method to efficiently detect collision contact points is described. A method to compute body trajectories in response to aerodynamic loads, applied loads, and inter-body collisions is also given. The physical correctness of the methods are verified by comparison to a set of analytic solutions. The methods, combined with a Navier-Stokes solver, are used to demonstrate the possibility of predicting the unsteady aerodynamics and flight trajectories of moving bodies that involve rigid-body collisions.

  5. Human habitat positioning system for NASA's space flight environmental simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.; Keas, P.

    1998-01-01

    Artificial gravity by centrifugation offers an effective countermeasure to the physiologic deconditioning of chronic exposure to microgravity; however, the system requirements of rotational velocity, radius of rotation, and resultant centrifugal acceleration require thorough investigation to ascertain the ideal human-use centrifuge configuration. NASA's Space Flight Environmental Simulator (SFES), a 16-meter (52-foot) diameter, animal-use centrifuge, was recently modified to accommodate human occupancy. This paper describes the SFES Human Habitat Positioning System, the mechanism that facilitates radius of rotation variability and alignment of the centrifuge occupants with the artificial gravity vector.

  6. Scaling Methods for Simulating Aircraft In-Flight Icing Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Ruff, Gary A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses scaling methods which permit the use of subscale models in icing wind tunnels to simulate natural flight in icing. Natural icing conditions exist when air temperatures are below freezing but cloud water droplets are super-cooled liquid. Aircraft flying through such clouds are susceptible to the accretion of ice on the leading edges of unprotected components such as wings, tailplane and engine inlets. To establish the aerodynamic penalties of such ice accretion and to determine what parts need to be protected from ice accretion (by heating, for example), extensive flight and wind-tunnel testing is necessary for new aircraft and components. Testing in icing tunnels is less expensive than flight testing, is safer, and permits better control of the test conditions. However, because of limitations on both model size and operating conditions in wind tunnels, it is often necessary to perform tests with either size or test conditions scaled. This paper describes the theoretical background to the development of icing scaling methods, discusses four methods, and presents results of tests to validate them.

  7. Using a Low Cost Flight Simulation Environment for Interdisciplinary Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia; ALi, Syed F.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary education is increasingly being emphasized for engineering undergraduates. However, often the focus is on interaction between engineering disciplines. This paper discusses the experience at Tuskegee University in providing interdisciplinary research experiences for undergraduate students in both Aerospace Engineering and Psychology through the utilization of a low cost flight simulation environment. The environment, which is pc-based, runs a low-cost of-the-shelf software and is configured for multiple out-of-the-window views and a synthetic heads down display with joystick, rudder and throttle controls. While the environment is being utilized to investigate and evaluate various strategies for training novice pilots, students were involved to provide them with experience in conducting such interdisciplinary research. On the global inter-disciplinary level these experiences included developing experimental designs and research protocols, consideration of human participant ethical issues, and planning and executing the research studies. During the planning phase students were apprised of the limitations of the software in its basic form and the enhancements desired to investigate human factors issues. A number of enhancements to the flight environment were then undertaken, from creating Excel macros for determining the performance of the 'pilots', to interacting with the software to provide various audio/video cues based on the experimental protocol. These enhancements involved understanding the flight model and performance, stability & control issues. Throughout this process, discussions of data analysis included a focus from a human factors perspective as well as an engineering point of view.

  8. Creating a Realistic Weather Environment for Motion-Based Piloted Flight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Schaffner, Philip R.; Evans, Emory T.; Neece, Robert T.; Young, Steve D.

    2012-01-01

    A flight simulation environment is being enhanced to facilitate experiments that evaluate research prototypes of advanced onboard weather radar, hazard/integrity monitoring (HIM), and integrated alerting and notification (IAN) concepts in adverse weather conditions. The simulation environment uses weather data based on real weather events to support operational scenarios in a terminal area. A simulated atmospheric environment was realized by using numerical weather data sets. These were produced from the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model hosted and run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To align with the planned flight simulation experiment requirements, several HRRR data sets were acquired courtesy of NOAA. These data sets coincided with severe weather events at the Memphis International Airport (MEM) in Memphis, TN. In addition, representative flight tracks for approaches and departures at MEM were generated and used to develop and test simulations of (1) what onboard sensors such as the weather radar would observe; (2) what datalinks of weather information would provide; and (3) what atmospheric conditions the aircraft would experience (e.g. turbulence, winds, and icing). The simulation includes a weather radar display that provides weather and turbulence modes, derived from the modeled weather along the flight track. The radar capabilities and the pilots controls simulate current-generation commercial weather radar systems. Appropriate data-linked weather advisories (e.g., SIGMET) were derived from the HRRR weather models and provided to the pilot consistent with NextGen concepts of use for Aeronautical Information Service (AIS) and Meteorological (MET) data link products. The net result of this simulation development was the creation of an environment that supports investigations of new flight deck information systems, methods for incorporation of better weather information, and pilot interface and operational improvements

  9. Three-dimensional simulation for fast forward flight of a calliope hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Song, Jialei; Tobalske, Bret W; Powers, Donald R; Hedrick, Tyson L; Luo, Haoxiang

    2016-06-01

    We present a computational study of flapping-wing aerodynamics of a calliope hummingbird (Selasphorus calliope) during fast forward flight. Three-dimensional wing kinematics were incorporated into the model by extracting time-dependent wing position from high-speed videos of the bird flying in a wind tunnel at 8.3 m s(-1). The advance ratio, i.e. the ratio between flight speed and average wingtip speed, is around one. An immersed-boundary method was used to simulate flow around the wings and bird body. The result shows that both downstroke and upstroke in a wingbeat cycle produce significant thrust for the bird to overcome drag on the body, and such thrust production comes at price of negative lift induced during upstroke. This feature might be shared with bats, while being distinct from insects and other birds, including closely related swifts.

  10. Three-dimensional simulation for fast forward flight of a calliope hummingbird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jialei; Tobalske, Bret W.; Powers, Donald R.; Hedrick, Tyson L.; Luo, Haoxiang

    2016-06-01

    We present a computational study of flapping-wing aerodynamics of a calliope hummingbird (Selasphorus calliope) during fast forward flight. Three-dimensional wing kinematics were incorporated into the model by extracting time-dependent wing position from high-speed videos of the bird flying in a wind tunnel at 8.3 m s-1. The advance ratio, i.e. the ratio between flight speed and average wingtip speed, is around one. An immersed-boundary method was used to simulate flow around the wings and bird body. The result shows that both downstroke and upstroke in a wingbeat cycle produce significant thrust for the bird to overcome drag on the body, and such thrust production comes at price of negative lift induced during upstroke. This feature might be shared with bats, while being distinct from insects and other birds, including closely related swifts.

  11. Three-dimensional simulation for fast forward flight of a calliope hummingbird

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jialei; Powers, Donald R.; Hedrick, Tyson L.; Luo, Haoxiang

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational study of flapping-wing aerodynamics of a calliope hummingbird (Selasphorus calliope) during fast forward flight. Three-dimensional wing kinematics were incorporated into the model by extracting time-dependent wing position from high-speed videos of the bird flying in a wind tunnel at 8.3 m s−1. The advance ratio, i.e. the ratio between flight speed and average wingtip speed, is around one. An immersed-boundary method was used to simulate flow around the wings and bird body. The result shows that both downstroke and upstroke in a wingbeat cycle produce significant thrust for the bird to overcome drag on the body, and such thrust production comes at price of negative lift induced during upstroke. This feature might be shared with bats, while being distinct from insects and other birds, including closely related swifts. PMID:27429779

  12. Apollo experience report: Simulation of manned space flight for crew training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodling, C. H.; Faber, S.; Vanbockel, J. J.; Olasky, C. C.; Williams, W. K.; Mire, J. L. C.; Homer, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Through space-flight experience and the development of simulators to meet the associated training requirements, several factors have been established as fundamental for providing adequate flight simulators for crew training. The development of flight simulators from Project Mercury through the Apollo 15 mission is described. The functional uses, characteristics, and development problems of the various simulators are discussed for the benefit of future programs.

  13. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC)--From Technology Development to Future Flight Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wood, J. Gary; Wilson, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) is being developed by Sunpower Inc. under contract to NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) with critical technology support tasks led by GRC. The ASC development, funded by NASA s Science Mission Directorate, started in 2003 as one of 10 competitively awarded contracts that were intended to address the power conversion needs of future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). The ASC technology has since evolved through progressive convertor builds and successful testing to demonstrate high conversion efficiency (38 percent), low mass (1.3 kg), hermetic sealing, launch vibration simulation, EMI characterization, and is undergoing extended operation. The GRC and Sunpower team recently delivered two ASC-E convertors to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company for integration onto the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit (ASRG EU) plus one spare. The design of the next build, called the ASC-E2, has recently been initiated and is based on the heritage ASC-E with design refinements to increase reliability margin and offer higher temperature operation and improve performance. The ASC enables RPS system specific power of about 7 to 8 W/kg. This paper provides a chronology of ASC development to date and summarizes technical achievements including advancements toward flight implementation of the technology on ASRG by as early as 2013.

  14. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    SciTech Connect

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    ScienceCinema

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2016-07-12

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. 14 CFR 121.412 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR... pilot in command, a flight engineer, or a flight navigator, as applicable, in operations under this part... recurrent training, that are required to serve as a pilot in command, flight engineer, or flight...

  17. Measurement of human pilot dynamic characteristics in flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, James T.

    1987-01-01

    Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Least Square Error (LSE) estimation techniques were applied to the problem of identifying pilot-vehicle dynamic characteristics in flight simulation. A brief investigation of the effects of noise, input bandwidth and system delay upon the FFT and LSE techniques was undertaken using synthetic data. Data from a piloted simulation conducted at NASA Ames Research Center was then analyzed. The simulation was performed in the NASA Ames Research Center Variable Stability CH-47B helicopter operating in fixed-basis simulator mode. The piloting task consisted of maintaining the simulated vehicle over a moving hover pad whose motion was described by a random-appearing sum of sinusoids. The two test subjects used a head-down, color cathode ray tube (CRT) display for guidance and control information. Test configurations differed in the number of axes being controlled by the pilot (longitudinal only versus longitudinal and lateral), and in the presence or absence of an important display indicator called an 'acceleration ball'. A number of different pilot-vehicle transfer functions were measured, and where appropriate, qualitatively compared with theoretical pilot- vehicle models. Some indirect evidence suggesting pursuit behavior on the part of the test subjects is discussed.

  18. STOL Simulation Requirements for Development of Integrated Flight/propulsion Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, K. E.; Anderson, D. C.; Watson, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The role and use of simulation as a design tool in developing integrated systems where design criteria is largely unavailable is well known. This paper addresses additional simulation needs for the development of Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control Systems (IFPCS) which will improve the probability of properly interpreting simulation results. These needs are based on recent experience with power approach flying qualities evaluations of an advanced fighter configuration which incorporated Short Takeoff and Landing (STOL) technologies and earlier experiences with power approach flying qualities evaluations on the AFTI/F-16 program. The use of motion base platforms with axial and normal degrees of freedom will help in evaluating pilot coupling and workload in the presence of high frequency low amplitude axial accelerations produced by high bandwidth airspeed controllers in a gusty environment.

  19. A Vision of Quantitative Imaging Technology for Validation of Advanced Flight Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robert V.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Grinstead, Jay H.; Schwartz, Richard J.; Gibson, David M.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Tack, Steve; Dantowitz, Ronald F.

    2011-01-01

    Flight-testing is traditionally an expensive but critical element in the development and ultimate validation and certification of technologies destined for future operational capabilities. Measurements obtained in relevant flight environments also provide unique opportunities to observe flow phenomenon that are often beyond the capabilities of ground testing facilities and computational tools to simulate or duplicate. However, the challenges of minimizing vehicle weight and internal complexity as well as instrumentation bandwidth limitations often restrict the ability to make high-density, in-situ measurements with discrete sensors. Remote imaging offers a potential opportunity to noninvasively obtain such flight data in a complementary fashion. The NASA Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements Project has demonstrated such a capability to obtain calibrated thermal imagery on a hypersonic vehicle in flight. Through the application of existing and accessible technologies, the acreage surface temperature of the Shuttle lower surface was measured during reentry. Future hypersonic cruise vehicles, launcher configurations and reentry vehicles will, however, challenge current remote imaging capability. As NASA embarks on the design and deployment of a new Space Launch System architecture for access beyond earth orbit (and the commercial sector focused on low earth orbit), an opportunity exists to implement an imagery system and its supporting infrastructure that provides sufficient flexibility to incorporate changing technology to address the future needs of the flight test community. A long term vision is offered that supports the application of advanced multi-waveband sensing technology to aid in the development of future aerospace systems and critical technologies to enable highly responsive vehicle operations across the aerospace continuum, spanning launch, reusable space access and global reach. Motivations for development of an Agency level imagery

  20. Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) Flight Testing of the Lidar Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soreide, David C.; Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. J.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Bowdle, David A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the ACLAIM program is ultimately to establish the viability of light detection and ranging (lidar) as a forward-looking sensor for turbulence. The goals of this flight test are to: 1) demonstrate that the ACLAIM lidar system operates reliably in a flight test environment, 2) measure the performance of the lidar as a function of the aerosol backscatter coefficient (beta), 3) use the lidar system to measure atmospheric turbulence and compare these measurements to onboard gust measurements, and 4) make measurements of the aerosol backscatter coefficient, its probability distribution and spatial distribution. The scope of this paper is to briefly describe the ACLAIM system and present examples of ACLAIM operation in flight, including comparisons with independent measurements of wind gusts, gust-induced normal acceleration, and the derived eddy dissipation rate.

  1. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain; Haas, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    Rarefied flows about hypersonic vehicles entering the upper atmosphere or through nozzles expanding into a near vacuum may only be simulated accurately with a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Under this grant, researchers enhanced the models employed in the DSMC method and performed simulations in support of existing NASA projects or missions. DSMC models were developed and validated for simulating rotational, vibrational, and chemical relaxation in high-temperature flows, including effects of quantized anharmonic oscillators and temperature-dependent relaxation rates. State-of-the-art advancements were made in simulating coupled vibration - dissociation - recombination for post-shock flows. Models were also developed to compute vehicle surface temperatures directly in the code rather than requiring isothermal estimates. These codes were instrumental in simulating aerobraking of NASA's Magellan spacecraft during orbital maneuvers to assess heat transfer and aerodynamic properties of the delicate satellite. NASA also depended upon simulations of entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter to provide drag and flow field information essential for accurate interpretation of an onboard experiment. Finally, the codes have been used extensively to simulate expanding nozzle flows in low-power thrusters in support of propulsion activities at NASA-Lewis. Detailed comparisons between continuum calculations and DSMC results helped to quantify the limitations of continuum CFD codes in rarefied applications.

  2. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain; Haas, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    Rarefied flows about hypersonic vehicles entering the upper atmosphere or through nozzles expanding into a near vacuum may only be simulated accurately with a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Under this grant, researchers enhanced the models employed in the DSMC method and performed simulations in support of existing NASA projects or missions. DSMC models were developed and validated for simulating rotational, vibrational, and chemical relaxation in high-temperature flows, including effects of quantized anharmonic oscillators and temperature-dependent relaxation rates. State-of-the-art advancements were made in simulating coupled vibration-dissociation recombination for post-shock flows. Models were also developed to compute vehicle surface temperatures directly in the code rather than requiring isothermal estimates. These codes were instrumental in simulating aerobraking of NASA's Magellan spacecraft during orbital maneuvers to assess heat transfer and aerodynamic properties of the delicate satellite. NASA also depended upon simulations of entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter to provide drag and flow field information essential for accurate interpretation of an onboard experiment. Finally, the codes have been used extensively to simulate expanding nozzle flows in low-power thrusters in support of propulsion activities at NASA-Lewis. Detailed comparisons between continuum calculations and DSMC results helped to quantify the limitations of continuum CFD codes in rarefied applications.

  3. Flight evaluation of advanced flight control systems and cockpit displays for powered-lift STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Smith, D. W.; Watson, D. M.; Warner, D. N., Jr.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess the improvements, in longitudinal path control during a STOL approach and landing, that can be achieved with manual and automatic control system concepts and cockpit displays with various degrees of complexity. NASA-Ames powered-lift Augmentor Wing Research Aircraft was used in the research program. Satisfactory flying qualities were demonstrated for selected stabilization and command augmentation systems and flight director combinations. The ability of the pilot to perform precise landings at low touchdown sink rates with a gentle flare maneuver was also achieved. The path-control improvement is considered to be applicable to other powered-lift aircraft configurations.

  4. General Aviation Flight Test of Advanced Operations Enabled by Synthetic Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Hughhes, Monica F.; Parrish, Russell V.; Takallu, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test was performed to compare the use of three advanced primary flight and navigation display concepts to a baseline, round-dial concept to assess the potential for advanced operations. The displays were evaluated during visual and instrument approach procedures including an advanced instrument approach resembling a visual airport traffic pattern. Nineteen pilots from three pilot groups, reflecting the diverse piloting skills of the General Aviation pilot population, served as evaluation subjects. The experiment had two thrusts: 1) an examination of the capabilities of low-time (i.e., <400 hours), non-instrument-rated pilots to perform nominal instrument approaches, and 2) an exploration of potential advanced Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC)-like approaches in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Within this context, advanced display concepts are considered to include integrated navigation and primary flight displays with either aircraft attitude flight directors or Highway In The Sky (HITS) guidance with and without a synthetic depiction of the external visuals (i.e., synthetic vision). Relative to the first thrust, the results indicate that using an advanced display concept, as tested herein, low-time, non-instrument-rated pilots can exhibit flight-technical performance, subjective workload and situation awareness ratings as good as or better than high-time Instrument Flight Rules (IFR)-rated pilots using Baseline Round Dials for a nominal IMC approach. For the second thrust, the results indicate advanced VMC-like approaches are feasible in IMC, for all pilot groups tested for only the Synthetic Vision System (SVS) advanced display concept.

  5. Orbital flight simulation utility software unit specifications, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The HP PASCAL source code defines the specifications for a Utility Software Unit (USU) designed to support orbital flight simulators such as MANHANDLE and GREAS (General Research and Engineering Analysis Simulator). Besides providing basic input/output, mathematical, matrix, quaternion, and statistical routines for such simulators, one of the primary functions of the USU is to isolate all system-dependent codes in one well-defined compartment, thereby facilitating transportation of the simulations from one computer to another. Directives are given for the PASCAL compilers of the HP-9000 Series 200 Pascal 3.0 and the HP-9000 Series 500 HP-UX 5.0 operating systems that produce a single file of relocatable code from four separate files of source code. Three of the source code files are common to both operating systems. The fourth source code file (utilspif.I) contains all of the system-dependent PASCAL code for the USU. A fifth file of source code written in C is required to interface utilspif.I with the HP-UX I/O package. The Pascal 3.0 compiler directives and the driver source code for a unit rest program and counterparts for the HP-UX 5.0 operating system are given. The major portion of the unit test program source code is common to both operating systems. Unit test results from the Pascal 3.0 operating system and results from the HP-UX operating system are given.

  6. Relationship Between Optimal Gain and Coherence Zone in Flight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracio, Bruno Jorge Correia; Pais, Ana Rita Valente; vanPaassen, M. M.; Mulder, Max; Kely, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    In motion simulation the inertial information generated by the motion platform is most of the times different from the visual information in the simulator displays. This occurs due to the physical limits of the motion platform. However, for small motions that are within the physical limits of the motion platform, one-to-one motion, i.e. visual information equal to inertial information, is possible. It has been shown in previous studies that one-to-one motion is often judged as too strong, causing researchers to lower the inertial amplitude. When trying to measure the optimal inertial gain for a visual amplitude, we found a zone of optimal gains instead of a single value. Such result seems related with the coherence zones that have been measured in flight simulation studies. However, the optimal gain results were never directly related with the coherence zones. In this study we investigated whether the optimal gain measurements are the same as the coherence zone measurements. We also try to infer if the results obtained from the two measurements can be used to differentiate between simulators with different configurations. An experiment was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center which used both the Cockpit Motion Facility and the Visual Motion Simulator. The results show that the inertial gains obtained with the optimal gain are different than the ones obtained with the coherence zone measurements. The optimal gain is within the coherence zone.The point of mean optimal gain was lower and further away from the one-to-one line than the point of mean coherence. The zone width obtained for the coherence zone measurements was dependent on the visual amplitude and frequency. For the optimal gain, the zone width remained constant when the visual amplitude and frequency were varied. We found no effect of the simulator configuration in both the coherence zone and optimal gain measurements.

  7. Aerodynamics of ski jumping flight and its control: II. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungil; Lee, Hansol; Kim, Woojin; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    In a ski jumping competition, it is essential to analyze the effect of various posture parameters of a ski jumper to achieve a longer flight distance. For this purpose, we conduct a large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow past a model ski jumper which is obtained by 3D scanning a ski jumper's body (Mr. Chil-Ku Kang, member of the Korean national team). The angle of attack of the jump ski is 30° and the Reynolds number based on the length of the jump ski is 540,000. The flow statistics including the drag and lift coefficients in flight are in good agreements with our own experimental data. We investigate the flow characteristics such as the flow separation and three-dimensional vortical structures and their effects on the drag and lift. In addition to LES, we construct a simple geometric model of a ski jumper where each part of the ski jumper is modeled as a canonical bluff body such as the sphere, cylinder and flat plate, to find its optimal posture. The results from this approach will be compared with those by LES and discussed. Supported by NRF program (2014M3C1B1033848, 2014R1A1A1002671).

  8. Orbital Express Advanced Video Guidance Sensor: Ground Testing, Flight Results and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin M.; Howard, Richard T.; Heaton, Andrew F.

    2008-01-01

    Orbital Express (OE) was a successful mission demonstrating automated rendezvous and docking. The 2007 mission consisted of two spacecraft, the Autonomous Space Transport Robotic Operations (ASTRO) and the Next Generation Serviceable Satellite (NEXTSat) that were designed to work together and test a variety of service operations in orbit. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor, AVGS, was included as one of the primary proximity navigation sensors on board the ASTRO. The AVGS was one of four sensors that provided relative position and attitude between the two vehicles. Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for the AVGS software and testing (especially the extensive ground testing), flight operations support, and analyzing the flight data. This paper briefly describes the historical mission, the data taken on-orbit, the ground testing that occurred, and finally comparisons between flight data and ground test data for two different flight regimes.

  9. 14 CFR 121.412 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR... rating required to serve as a pilot in command, a flight engineer, or a flight navigator, as applicable... engineer, or flight navigator, as applicable, in operations under this part; (3) Has...

  10. 14 CFR 121.412 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR... rating required to serve as a pilot in command, a flight engineer, or a flight navigator, as applicable... engineer, or flight navigator, as applicable, in operations under this part; (3) Has...

  11. Flight simulators. Part 1: Present situation and trends. Part 2: Implications for training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, D.; Volk, W.

    1977-01-01

    The present situation and developments in the technology of flight simulators based on digital computers are evaluated from the standpoint of training airline flight crews. Areas covered are minicomputers and their advantages in terms of cost, space and time savings, software data packets, motion simulation, visual simulation and instructor aids. The division of training time between aircraft and simulator training and the possible advantages from increased use of simulators are evaluated.

  12. Modeling small-scale unmanned rotorcraft for advanced flight control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettler, Bernard F.

    Rotorcraft can take off and land vertically, and can perform flight ranging from hovering to airplane-like cruising with agility and maneuverability. These qualities have made them indispensable vehicles for a variety of applications. Today, there is a growing interest in using small-scale rotorcraft as platforms for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Current RUAVs, however, fail to exploit the vehicles' full potential because of deficient flight control systems. The design of high performance control systems for a vehicle with complex dynamics requires a mathematical model that accurately describes the vehicle's dynamics. Linear, low order models are preferred, setting difficult constraints on the modeling task. This thesis describes the development of a dynamic model for a small-scale Yamaha R-50 helicopter using rotorcraft system identification techniques. Based on experimental data collected from the vehicle, a parameterized model of its dynamics was identified. The parameterized model accounts for the presence of a stabilizer bar and an active yaw damping system; which are typical stability augmentation system on small-scale helicopters. Because rotorcraft dynamics change with operating conditions, both a hover and cruise flight condition were identified. The resulting models were validated against flight-test data and were shown to be highly accurate in predicting the vehicle responses, and the identified parameters were shown to be close to the theoretical values. The model helped us understand typical characteristics of small-scale rotorcraft. We used dynamic scaling rules to determine the effect of scale on the dynamic characteristics of helicopters, and at the same time, we used these rules to compare between the characteristics of the R-50 and those of a full-scale Bell UH-1H helicopter. By explicitly accounting for the stabilizer bar, we were able to use our model to determine and simulate the effect that system has on the vehicle dynamics. Finally, by

  13. Implementation of a Helicopter Flight Simulator with Individual Blade Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchiak, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    Nearly all modern helicopters are designed with a swashplate-based system for control of the main rotor blades. However, the swashplate-based approach does not provide the level of redundancy necessary to cope with abnormal actuator conditions. For example, if an actuator fails (becomes locked) on the main rotor, the cyclic inputs are consequently fixed and the helicopter may become stuck in a flight maneuver. This can obviously be seen as a catastrophic failure, and would likely lead to a crash. These types of failures can be overcome with the application of individual blade control (IBC). IBC is achieved using the blade pitch control method, which provides complete authority of the aerodynamic characteristics of each rotor blade at any given time by replacing the normally rigid pitch links between the swashplate and the pitch horn of the blade with hydraulic or electronic actuators. Thus, IBC can provide the redundancy necessary for subsystem failure accommodation. In this research effort, a simulation environment is developed to investigate the potential of the IBC main rotor configuration for fault-tolerant control. To examine the applications of IBC to failure scenarios and fault-tolerant controls, a conventional, swashplate-based linear model is first developed for hover and forward flight scenarios based on the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter. The linear modeling techniques for the swashplate-based helicopter are then adapted and expanded to include IBC. Using these modified techniques, an IBC based mathematical model of the UH-60 helicopter is developed for the purposes of simulation and analysis. The methodology can be used to model and implement a different aircraft if geometric, gravimetric, and general aerodynamic data are available. Without the kinetic restrictions of the swashplate, the IBC model effectively decouples the cyclic control inputs between different blades. Simulations of the IBC model prove that the primary control functions can be manually

  14. Comparison of Pilots' Situational Awareness While Monitoring Autoland Approaches Using Conventional and Advanced Flight Display Formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Busquets, Anthony M.

    2000-01-01

    A simulation experiment was performed to assess situation awareness (SA) and workload of pilots while monitoring simulated autoland operations in Instrument Meteorological Conditions with three advanced display concepts: two enhanced electronic flight information system (EFIS)-type display concepts and one totally synthetic, integrated pictorial display concept. Each concept incorporated sensor-derived wireframe runway and iconic depictions of sensor-detected traffic in different locations on the display media. Various scenarios, involving conflicting traffic situation assessments, main display failures, and navigation/autopilot system errors, were used to assess the pilots' SA and workload during autoland approaches with the display concepts. From the results, for each scenario, the integrated pictorial display concept provided the pilots with statistically equivalent or substantially improved SA over the other display concepts. In addition to increased SA, subjective rankings indicated that the pictorial concept offered reductions in overall pilot workload (in both mean ranking and spread) over the two enhanced EFIS-type display concepts. Out of the display concepts flown, the pilots ranked the pictorial concept as the display that was easiest to use to maintain situational awareness, to monitor an autoland approach, to interpret information from the runway and obstacle detecting sensor systems, and to make the decision to go around.

  15. Piloted Simulator Evaluation of Maneuvering Envelope Information for Flight Crew Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombaerts, Thomas; Schuet, Stefan; Acosta, Diana; Kaneshige, John; Shish, Kimberlee; Martin, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    The implementation and evaluation of an efficient method for estimating safe aircraft maneuvering envelopes are discussed. A Bayesian approach is used to produce a deterministic algorithm for estimating aerodynamic system parameters from existing noisy sensor measurements, which are then used to estimate the trim envelope through efficient high- fidelity model-based computations of attainable equilibrium sets. The safe maneuverability limitations are extended beyond the trim envelope through a robust reachability analysis derived from an optimal control formulation. The trim and maneuvering envelope limits are then conveyed to pilots through three axes on the primary flight display. To evaluate the new display features, commercial airline crews flew multiple challenging approach and landing scenarios in the full motion Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center, as part of a larger research initiative to investigate the impact on the energy state awareness of the crew. Results show that the additional display features have the potential to significantly improve situational awareness of the flight crew.

  16. The Value of Biomedical Simulation Environments to Future Human Space Flight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry G.; Skytland, Nicholas G.; Platts, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    With the ambitious goals to send manned missions to asteroids and onto Mars, substantial work will be required to ensure the well being of the men and women who will undertake these difficult missions. Unlike current International Space Station or Shuttle missions, astronauts will be required to endure long-term exposure to higher levels of radiation, isolation and reduced gravity. These new operation conditions will pose health risks that are currently not well understood and perhaps unanticipated. Therefore, it is essential to develop and apply advanced tools to predict, assess and mitigate potential hazards to astronaut health. NASA s Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working to develop and apply computational models of physiologic response to space flight operation conditions over various time periods and environmental circumstances. The collective application and integration of well vetted models assessing the physiology, biomechanics and anatomy is referred to as the Digital Astronaut. The Digital Astronaut simulation environment will serve as a practical working tool for use by NASA in operational activities such as the prediction of biomedical risks and functional capabilities of astronauts. In additional to space flight operation conditions, DAP s work has direct applicability to terrestrial biomedical research by providing virtual environments for hypothesis testing, experiment design, and to reduce animal/human testing. A practical application of the DA to assess pre and post flight responses to exercise is illustrated and the difficulty in matching true physiological responses is discussed.

  17. Illustration of the X-37 Advanced Technology Demonstrator during flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An artist's conception of the X-37 Advanced Technology Demonstrator as it glides to a landing on earth. Its design features a rounded fuselage topped by an experiment bay; short, double delta wings (like those of the Shuttle orbiter); and two stabilizers (that form a V-shape) at the rear of the vehicle.

  18. Hydrogen Vent Ground Umbilical Quick Disconnect - Flight Seal Advanced Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girard, Doug; Jankowski, Fred; Minich, Mark C.; Yu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    This project is a team effort between NASA Engineering (NE) and Team QNA Engineering personnel to provide support for the Umbilical Systems Development project which is funded by Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) and 21st Century Launch Complex. Specifically, this project seeks to develop a new interface between the PPBE baselined Legacy SSP LH2 Vent Arm QD probe and SLS vent seal.

  19. Advanced application flight experiment breadboard pulse compression radar altimeter program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design, development and performance of the pulse compression radar altimeter is described. The high resolution breadboard system is designed to operate from an aircraft at 10 Kft above the ocean and to accurately measure altitude, sea wave height and sea reflectivity. The minicomputer controlled Ku band system provides six basic variables and an extensive digital recording capability for experimentation purposes. Signal bandwidths of 360 MHz are obtained using a reflective array compression line. Stretch processing is used to achieve 1000:1 pulse compression. The system range command LSB is 0.62 ns or 9.25 cm. A second order altitude tracker, aided by accelerometer inputs is implemented in the system software. During flight tests the system demonstrated an altitude resolution capability of 2.1 cm and sea wave height estimation accuracy of 10%. The altitude measurement performance exceeds that of the Skylab and GEOS-C predecessors by approximately an order of magnitude.

  20. Fiber optic (flight quality) sensors for advanced aircraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Development of flight prototype, fiber-optic sensing system components for measuring nine sensed parameters (three temperatures, two speeds, three positions, and one flame) on an F404-400 aircraft engine is described. Details of each sensor's design, functionality, and environmental testing, and the electro-optics architecture for sensor signal conditioning are presented. Eight different optical sensing techniques were utilized. Design, assembly, and environmental testing of an engine-mounted, electro-optics chassis unit (EOU), providing MIL-C-1553 data output, are related. Interconnection cables and connectors between the EOU and the sensors are identified. Results of sensor/cable/circuitry integrated testing, and installation and ground testing of the sensor system on an engine in October 1993 and April 1994 are given, including comparisons with the engine control system's electrical sensors. Lessons learned about the design, fabrication, testing, and integration of the sensor system components are included.

  1. Evaluation of the Malcolm horizon in a moving-base flight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillingham, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    The efficacy of the Malcolm Horizon (MH) in a controlled, simulated, instrument flight environment was examined. Eight flight parameters were used to compare performance under experimental and control conditions. The parameters studied were pitch attitude, roll attitude, turn rate, airspeed, vertical velocity, heading, altitude, and course deviation. Testing of a commercial realization of the MH concept in a flight simulator revealed strengths and weaknesses of the currently available MH hardware.

  2. Design of a magnetic shielding system for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Cui, Z Q; Chen, Z J; Xie, X F; Peng, X Y; Hu, Z M; Du, T F; Ge, L J; Zhang, X; Yuan, X; Xia, Z W; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Fan, T S; Chen, J X; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H

    2014-11-01

    The novel neutron spectrometer TOFED (Time of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics), comprising 90 individual photomultiplier tubes coupled with 85 plastic scintillation detectors through light guides, has been constructed and installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A dedicated magnetic shielding system has been constructed for TOFED, and is designed to guarantee the normal operation of photomultiplier tubes in the stray magnetic field leaking from the tokamak device. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations carried out employing the finite element method are combined to optimize the design of the magnetic shielding system. The system allows detectors to work properly in an external magnetic field of 200 G.

  3. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Helicopter Full Flight Simulators

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualification Performance Standards for Helicopter Full Flight Simulators C Appendix C to Part 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN FLIGHT SIMULATION TRAINING DEVICE INITIAL AND CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND USE Pt. 60,...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Helicopter Full Flight Simulators

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Qualification Performance Standards for Helicopter Full Flight Simulators C Appendix C to Part 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN FLIGHT SIMULATION TRAINING DEVICE INITIAL AND CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND USE Pt. 60,...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Helicopter Full Flight Simulators

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Qualification Performance Standards for Helicopter Full Flight Simulators C Appendix C to Part 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN FLIGHT SIMULATION TRAINING DEVICE INITIAL AND CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND USE Pt. 60,...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Helicopter Full Flight Simulators

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualification Performance Standards for Helicopter Full Flight Simulators C Appendix C to Part 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN FLIGHT SIMULATION TRAINING DEVICE INITIAL AND CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND USE Pt. 60,...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Definitions and Abbreviations for Flight Simulation Training Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices; and Appendix F, for Definitions and... the FSTD against the applicable regulatory criteria. Quality Management System (QMS)—a flight... definition of “sideslip.”) Simulation Quality Management System (SQMS)—the elements of a quality...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Definitions and Abbreviations for Flight Simulation Training Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices; and Appendix F, for Definitions and... the FSTD against the applicable regulatory criteria. Quality Management System (QMS)—a flight... definition of “sideslip.”) Simulation Quality Management System (SQMS)—the elements of a quality...

  9. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Definitions and Abbreviations for Flight Simulation Training Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices; and Appendix F, for Definitions and... the FSTD against the applicable regulatory criteria. Quality Management System (QMS)—a flight... definition of “sideslip.”) Simulation Quality Management System (SQMS)—the elements of a quality...

  10. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Definitions and Abbreviations for Flight Simulation Training Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices; and Appendix F, for Definitions and... the FSTD against the applicable regulatory criteria. Quality Management System (QMS)—a flight... definition of “sideslip.”) Simulation Quality Management System (SQMS)—the elements of a quality...

  11. Three-Dimensional Stereographic Pictorial Visual Interfaces And Display Systems In Flight Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Alan L.; Reising, John M.

    1987-06-01

    By combining stereoscopic aspects of vision with other optical clues, the pilot of a flight simulator is able to perceive true three-dimensional representations of pictorial display formats or simulated visual scenes. Three-dimensional (3-D) stereographic pictorial formats and their corresponding display systems are being developed and evaluated in order to determine the payoffs of the 3-D computer-generated display formats in the cockpit. The objectives of this research in true three-dimensional cockpit imagery are 1) to determine whether a pilot can better interpret complex pictorial display formats or visual scenes when the third dimension is added and 2) to determine how motion and depth cues can be used to tightly couple the human responses of the pilot to the aircraft control systems. This paper reviews current research, development, and evaluation of easily modifiable 3-D stereo-graphic pictorial display systems being used at the Advanced Cockpit Display Laboratory (ACDL), Lockheed-Georgia Company and at the Flight Dynamics Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB. This research includes the analysis and development of true 3-D pictorial formats representing the entire 3-D flight profile; e.g., displays for terrain following/terrain avoidance/threat avoidance and air-to-air and air-to-surface weapon delivery. Electro-optical shuttering systems; e.g., active and passive liquid crystal shutters (LCSs), stereographic display systems, and high-performance pseudo 3-D computer graphics workstations (Silicon Graphics IRIS), are being used to generate stereo pairs. Sidestick and throttle controllers are used to fly through the visual database. These near real-time simulations will be performed in realistic fighter and transport cockpit shells, which may evolve into 1995 designs.

  12. Expansion of flight simulator capability for study and solution of aircraft directional control problems on runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibbee, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    The development, evaluation, and evaluation results of a DC-9-10 runway directional control simulator are described. An existing wide bodied flight simulator was modified to this aircraft configuration. The simulator was structured to use either two of antiskid simulations; (1) an analog mechanization that used aircraft hardware; or (2) a digital software simulation. After the simulation was developed it was evaluated by 14 pilots who made 818 simulated flights. These evaluations involved landings, rejected takeoffs, and various ground maneuvers. Qualitatively most pilots evaluated the simulator as realistic with good potential especially for pilot training for adverse runway conditions.

  13. Onyx-Advanced Aeropropulsion Simulation Framework Created

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a new software environment for analyzing and designing aircraft engines and, eventually, space transportation systems. Its purpose is to dramatically reduce the time, effort, and expense necessary to design and test jet engines by creating sophisticated computer simulations of an aerospace object or system (refs. 1 and 2). Through a university grant as part of that effort, researchers at the University of Toledo have developed Onyx, an extensible Java-based (Sun Micro-systems, Inc.), objectoriented simulation framework, to investigate how advanced software design techniques can be successfully applied to aeropropulsion system simulation (refs. 3 and 4). The design of Onyx's architecture enables users to customize and extend the framework to add new functionality or adapt simulation behavior as required. It exploits object-oriented technologies, such as design patterns, domain frameworks, and software components, to develop a modular system in which users can dynamically replace components with others having different functionality.

  14. Applications of flight control system methods to an advanced combat rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Fletcher, Jay W.; Morris, Patrick M.; Tucker, George T.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced flight control system design, analysis, and testing methodologies developed at the Ames Research Center are applied in an analytical and flight test evaluation of the Advanced Digital Optical Control System (ADOCS) demonstrator. The primary objectives are to describe the knowledge gained about the implications of digital flight control system design for rotorcraft, and to illustrate the analysis of the resulting handling-qualities in the context of the proposed new handling-qualities specification for rotorcraft. Topics covered in-depth are digital flight control design and analysis methods, flight testing techniques, ADOCS handling-qualities evaluation results, and correlation of flight test results with analytical models and the proposed handling-qualities specification. The evaluation of the ADOCS demonstrator indicates desirable response characteristics based on equivalent damping and frequency, but undersirably large effective time-delays (exceeding 240 m sec in all axes). Piloted handling-qualities are found to be desirable or adequate for all low, medium, and high pilot gain tasks; but handling-qualities are inadequate for ultra-high gain tasks such as slope and running landings.

  15. Assessing information transfer in full mission flight simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable attention must be given to the important topic of aircrew situation awareness in any discussion of aviation safety and flight deck design. Reliable means of assessing this important aspect of crew behavior without simultaneously interfering with the behavior are difficult to develop. Unobtrusive measurement of crew situation awareness is particularly important in the conduct of full mission simulations where considerable effort and cost is expended to achieve a high degree of operational fidelity. An unobtrusive method of assessing situational awareness is described here which employs a topical analysis of intra-crew communications. The communications were taken from videotapes of crew behavior prior to, during, and following an encounter with a microburst/windshear event. The simulation scenario re-created an actual encounter with an event during an approach into Denver Stapleton Airport. The analyses were conducted on twelve experienced airline crews with the objective of determining the effect on situation awareness of uplinking ground-based information of the crew during the approach. The topical analysis of crew communication was conducted on all references to weather or weather-related topics. The general weather topic was further divided into weather subtopical references such as surface winds, windshear, precipitation, etc., thereby allowing for an assessment of the relative frequency of subtopic reference during the scenario. Reliable differences were found between the relative frequency of subtopic references when comparing the communications of crews receiving a cockpit display of ground-based information to the communications of a control group. The findings support the utility of this method of assessing situation awareness and information value in full mission simulations. A limiting factor in the use of this measure is that crews vary in the amount of intra-crew communications that may take place due to individual differences and other

  16. Vertical flight training: An overview of training and flight simulator technology with emphasis on rotary-wing requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alderete, Thomas S.; Ascencio-Lee, Carmen E.; Bray, Richard; Carlton, John; Dohme, Jack; Eshow, Michelle M.; Francis, Stephen; Lee, Owen M.; Lintern, Gavan; Lombardo, David A.

    1994-01-01

    The principal purpose of this publication is to provide a broad overview of the technology that is relevant to the design of aviation training systems and of the techniques applicable to the development, use, and evaluation of those systems. The issues addressed in our 11 chapters are, for the most part, those that would be expected to surface in any informed discussion of the major characterizing elements of aviation training systems. Indeed, many of the same facets of vertical-flight training discussed were recognized and, to some extent, dealt with at the 1991 NASA/FAA Helicopter Simulator Workshop. These generic topics are essential to a sound understanding of training and training systems, and they quite properly form the basis of any attempt to systematize the development and evaluation of more effective, more efficient, more productive, and more economical approaches to aircrew training. Individual chapters address the following topics: an overview of the vertical flight industry: the source of training requirements; training and training schools: meeting current requirements; training systems design and development; transfer of training and cost-effectiveness; the military quest for flight training effectiveness; alternative training systems; training device manufacturing; simulator aero model implementation; simulation validation in the frequency domain; cockpit motion in helicopter simulation; and visual space perception in flight simulators.

  17. F-15B in flight with test panels covered with advanced spray-on foam insulation material for the Spa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.

  18. Analysis and Preliminary Design of an Advanced Technology Transport Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazzini, R.; Vaughn, D.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis and preliminary design of an advanced technology transport aircraft flight control system using avionics and flight control concepts appropriate to the 1980-1985 time period are discussed. Specifically, the techniques and requirements of the flight control system were established, a number of candidate configurations were defined, and an evaluation of these configurations was performed to establish a recommended approach. Candidate configurations based on redundant integration of various sensor types, computational methods, servo actuator arrangements and data-transfer techniques were defined to the functional module and piece-part level. Life-cycle costs, for the flight control configurations, as determined in an operational environment model for 200 aircraft over a 15-year service life, were the basis of the optimum configuration selection tradeoff. The recommended system concept is a quad digital computer configuration utilizing a small microprocessor for input/output control, a hexad skewed set of conventional sensors for body rate and body acceleration, and triple integrated actuators.

  19. Multiplexing electro-optic architectures for advanced aircraft integrated flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, D. W.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the results of a 10 month program sponsored by NASA. The objective of this program was to evaluate various optical sensor modulation technologies and to design an optimal Electro-Optic Architecture (EOA) for servicing remote clusters of sensors and actuators in advanced aircraft flight control systems. The EOA's supply optical power to remote sensors and actuators, process the modulated optical signals returned from the sensors, and produce conditioned electrical signals acceptable for use by a digital flight control computer or Vehicle Management System (VMS) computer. This study was part of a multi-year initiative under the Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program to design, develop, and test a totally integrated fiber optic flight/propulsion control system for application to advanced aircraft. Unlike earlier FOCSI studies, this program concentrated on the design of the EOA interface rather than the optical transducer technology itself.

  20. Development of Advanced Hydrocarbon Fuels at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, S. D.; Dumbacher, P.; Cole, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    This was a small-scale, hot-fire test series to make initial measurements of performance differences of five new liquid fuels relative to rocket propellant-1 (RP-1). The program was part of a high-energy-density materials development at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the fuels tested were quadricyclane, 1-7 octodiyne, AFRL-1, biclopropylidene, and competitive impulse noncarcinogenic hypergol (CINCH) (di-methyl-aminoethyl-azide). All tests were conducted at MSFC. The first four fuels were provided by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Edwards Air Force Base, CA. The U.S. Army, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, AL, provided the CINCH. The data recorded in all hot-fire tests were used to calculate specific impulse and characteristic exhaust velocity for each fuel, then compared to RP-1 at the same conditions. This was not an exhaustive study, comparing each fuel to RP-1 at an array of mixture ratios, nor did it include important fuel parameters, such as fuel handling or long-term storage. The test hardware was designed for liquid oxygen (lox)/RP-1, then modified for gaseous oxygen/RP-1 to avoid two-phase lox at very small flow rates. All fuels were tested using the same thruster/injector combination designed for RP-1. The results of this test will be used to determine which fuels will be tested in future test programs.

  1. Simulation methods for advanced scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, T.E.; Carlson, J.A.; Forster, R.A.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to create effective new algorithms for solving N-body problems by computer simulation. The authors concentrated on developing advanced classical and quantum Monte Carlo techniques. For simulations of phase transitions in classical systems, they produced a framework generalizing the famous Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms for Ising and Potts models. For spin-glass-like problems, they demonstrated the effectiveness of an extension of the multicanonical method for the two-dimensional, random bond Ising model. For quantum mechanical systems, they generated a new method to compute the ground-state energy of systems of interacting electrons. They also improved methods to compute excited states when the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method is used and to compute longer time dynamics when the stationary phase quantum Monte Carlo method is used.

  2. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test program of STOL operating systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system was developed and evaluated for a light wing loading turboprop aircraft. The aircraft utilized an onboard advanced digital avionics system. Flight tests were conducted at a facility that included a STOL runway site with a microwave landing system. Longitudinal flight-test results were presented and compared with available (basically CTOL) criteria. These comparisons were augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft which included representations of navigation errors that were encountered in flight and atmospheric disturbances. Acceptable performance on final approach and at touchdown was achieved by the autoland (automatic landing) system for the moderate winds and turbulence conditions encountered in flight. However, some touchdown performance goals were marginally achieved, and simulation results suggested that difficulties could be encountered in the presence of more extreme atmospheric conditions. Suggestions were made for improving performance under those more extreme conditions.

  3. Formal representation of the requirements for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frincke, Deborah; Wolber, Dave; Fisher, Gene; Cohen, Gerald C.; Mclees, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A partial requirement specification for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) Flight Control System is described. The example was adopted from requirements given in a NASA Contractor report. The language used to describe the requirements, Requirements Specification Language (RSL), is described in a companion document.

  4. The Aircraft Simulation Role in Improving Flight Safety Through Control Room Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shy, Karla S.; Hageman, Jacob J.; Le, Jeanette H.; Sitz, Joel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center uses its six-degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) fixed-base simulations for mission control room training to improve flight safety and operations. This concept is applied to numerous flight projects such as the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS), the X-38 Actuator Control Test (XACT), and X-43A (Hyper-X). The Dryden 6-DOF simulations are typically used through various stages of a project, from design to ground tests. The roles of these simulations have expanded to support control room training, reinforcing flight safety by building control room staff proficiency. Real-time telemetry, radar, and video data are generated from flight vehicle simulation models. These data are used to drive the control room displays. Nominal static values are used to complete information where appropriate. Audio communication is also an integral part of training sessions. This simulation capability is used to train control room personnel and flight crew for nominal missions and emergency situations. Such training sessions are also opportunities to refine flight cards and control room display pages, exercise emergency procedures, and practice control room setup for the day of flight. This paper describes this technology as it is used in the X-43A and F-15 IFCS and XACT projects.

  5. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... simulator instructors and check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... simulator instructors and check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... simulator instructors and check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... simulator instructors and check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  9. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.

    1993-01-01

    parametric study was performed and reported in AIAA Paper No. 93-2806 (Appendix C) which assessed the accuracy penalties associated with simulations of varying grid resolution and flow domain size. The paper was also presented at the Thermophysics Conference and will be submitted to the journal shortly. Finally, the DSMC code was employed to assess the pitch, yaw, and roll aerodynamics of the Magellan spacecraft during entry into the Venus atmosphere at off-design attitudes. This work was in support of the Magellan aerobraking maneuver of May 25-Aug. 3, 1993. Furthermore, analysis of the roll characteristics of the configuration with canted solar panels was performed in support of the proposed 'Windmill' experiment. Results were reported in AIAA Paper No. 93-3676 (Appendix D) presented at the Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference in August 1993, and were submitted to Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets.

  10. Comparison of Commercial Aircraft Fuel Requirements in Regards to FAR, Flight Profile Simulation, and Flight Operational Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzman, Nicholas

    There are significant fuel consumption consequences for non-optimal flight operations. This study is intended to analyze and highlight areas of interest that affect fuel consumption in typical flight operations. By gathering information from actual flight operators (pilots, dispatch, performance engineers, and air traffic controllers), real performance issues can be addressed and analyzed. A series of interviews were performed with various individuals in the industry and organizations. The wide range of insight directed this study to focus on FAA regulations, airline policy, the ATC system, weather, and flight planning. The goal is to highlight where operational performance differs from design intent in order to better connect optimization with actual flight operations. After further investigation and consensus from the experienced participants, the FAA regulations do not need any serious attention until newer technologies and capabilities are implemented. The ATC system is severely out of date and is one of the largest limiting factors in current flight operations. Although participants are pessimistic about its timely implementation, the FAA's NextGen program for a future National Airspace System should help improve the efficiency of flight operations. This includes situational awareness, weather monitoring, communication, information management, optimized routing, and cleaner flight profiles like Required Navigation Performance (RNP) and Continuous Descent Approach (CDA). Working off the interview results, trade-studies were performed using an in-house flight profile simulation of a Boeing 737-300, integrating NASA legacy codes EDET and NPSS with a custom written mission performance and point-performance "Skymap" calculator. From these trade-studies, it was found that certain flight conditions affect flight operations more than others. With weather, traffic, and unforeseeable risks, flight planning is still limited by its high level of precaution. From this

  11. Coupled Simulations, Ground-Based Experiments and Flight Experiments for Astrodynamics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, R.; Brown, M.; Lorrain, P.; Capon, C.; Lambert, A.; Benson, C.; Tuttle, S.; Griffin, D.

    Near-Earth satellites undergo complex and poorly understood interactions with their environment, leading to large uncertainties in predicting orbits and an associated risk of collision with other satellites and with space debris. The nature, evolution and behaviour of the growing cloud of space debris in that environment is even less well understood. Significant effort and expenditure is currently being made by governments in Australia, UK, USA, Europe and elsewhere in space surveillance and tracking, in order to mitigate the risk. However, a major gap exists with respect to the science of in-orbit behaviour. Research is underway in Australia to enable the prediction of the orbits of near-Earth space objects with order(s) of magnitude greater fidelity than currently possible. This is being achieved by coupling together the necessary parts of the puzzle - the physics of rarefied space object “aerodynamics” and the space physics and space weather that affects it - and employing our capabilities in ground-based and in-orbit experiments, ground-based observations and high performance computing to do so. As part of the effort, UNSW Canberra is investing $10M to develop a sustainable university-led program to develop and fly affordable in-orbit missions for space research. In the coming 6 years, we will fly a minimum of four cubesat missions, some in partnership with DSTO, which will include flight experiments for validating Space Situational Awareness astrodynamics simulation and observation capabilities. The flights are underpinned by ground-based experimental research employing space test chambers, advanced diagnostics, and supercomputer simulations that couple DSMC and Particle-in-Cell methods for modelling space object interactions with the ionosphere. This paper will describe the research both underway and planned, with particular emphasis on the coupled numerical/experimental/flight approach.

  12. Development of an advanced high-speed rotor - Final results from the Advanced Flight Research Rotor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, Mark; Haslim, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    The final results of the Advanced Flight Research Rotor (AFRR) study, a NASA sponsored research program, are summarized. First, the results of the initial phase of the AFRR program, consisting of the definition of a conventional rotor with planform and prescribed twist distributions, are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of the calculated performance benefit is then explained, and a detailed analysis of the prescribed twist distribution is presented. Recommendations are made on the practical means of approximating the prescribed twist on the actual rotor.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Baseline Control Law: Flight-Test Results for the Full-scale Advanced Systems Testbed F/A-18 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    A model reference nonlinear dynamic inversion control law has been developed to provide a baseline controller for research into simple adaptive elements for advanced flight control laws. This controller has been implemented and tested in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation and in flight. The flight results agree well with the simulation predictions and show good handling qualities throughout the tested flight envelope with some noteworthy deficiencies highlighted both by handling qualities metrics and pilot comments. Many design choices and implementation details reflect the requirements placed on the system by the nonlinear flight environment and the desire to keep the system as simple as possible to easily allow the addition of the adaptive elements. The flight-test results and how they compare to the simulation predictions are discussed, along with a discussion about how each element affected pilot opinions. Additionally, aspects of the design that performed better than expected are presented, as well as some simple improvements that will be suggested for follow-on work.

  14. Flight dynamics analysis and simulation of heavy lift airships. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Tischler, M. B.; Jex, H. R.; Emmen, R. D.; Ashkenas, I. L.

    1982-01-01

    A generic, yet comprehensive mathematical model and computer simulation of the HLA flight dynamics over its entire flight envelope was developed. Implicit in this simulation development are the data reviews and analyses which support the equations of motion and the calculation of forces and moments acting on the vehicle. The simulation, HYBRDS, is addressed to the broad requirements and is intended for use as a synthesis and analysis tool for the evaluation of competing HLA design concepts.

  15. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  16. Piloted simulator study of allowable time delay in pitch flight control system of a transport airplane with negative static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, William D.; Smith, Paul M.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Meyer, Robert T.; Tingas, Stephen A.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to determine the permissible time delay in the flight control system of a 10-percent statically unstable transport airplane during cruise flight conditions. The math model used for the simulation was a derivative Lockheed L-1011 wide-body jet transport. Data were collected and analyzed from a total of 137 cruising flights in both calm- and turbulent-air conditions. Results of this piloted simulation study verify previous findings that show present military specifications for allowable control-system time delay may be too stringent when applied to transport-size airplanes. Also, the degree of handling-qualities degradation due to time delay is shown to be strongly dependent on the source of the time delay in an advanced flight control system. Maximum allowable time delay for each source of time delay in the control system, in addition to a less stringent overall maximum level of time delay, should be considered for large aircraft. Preliminary results also suggest that adverse effects of control-system time delay may be at least partially offset by variations in control gearing. It is recommended that the data base include different airplane baselines, control systems, and piloting tasks with many pilots participating, so that a reasonable set of limits for control-system time delay can be established to replace the military specification limits currently being used.

  17. Generation of optimum vertical profiles for an advanced flight management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Waters, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    Algorithms for generating minimum fuel or minimum cost vertical profiles are derived and examined. The option for fixing the time of flight is included in the concepts developed. These algorithms form the basis for the design of an advanced on-board flight management system. The variations in the optimum vertical profiles (resulting from these concepts) due to variations in wind, takeoff mass, and range-to-destination are presented. Fuel savings due to optimum climb, free cruise altitude, and absorbing delays enroute are examined.

  18. An example of requirements for Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system using structured techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclees, Robert E.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements are presented for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system generated using structured techniques. The requirements definition starts from initially performing a mission analysis to identify the high level control system requirements and functions necessary to satisfy the mission flight. The result of the study is an example set of control system requirements partially represented using a derivative of Yourdon's structured techniques. Also provided is a research focus for studying structured design methodologies and in particular design-for-validation philosophies.

  19. 14 CFR 142.59 - Flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall not be restricted to specific— (1) Route segments during line-oriented flight training scenarios; and (2) Visual data bases replicating a specific customer's bases of operation. (f) Training...

  20. 14 CFR 142.59 - Flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shall not be restricted to specific— (1) Route segments during line-oriented flight training scenarios; and (2) Visual data bases replicating a specific customer's bases of operation. (f) Training...

  1. 14 CFR 142.59 - Flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... shall not be restricted to specific— (1) Route segments during line-oriented flight training scenarios; and (2) Visual data bases replicating a specific customer's bases of operation. (f) Training...

  2. 14 CFR 142.59 - Flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... shall not be restricted to specific— (1) Route segments during line-oriented flight training scenarios; and (2) Visual data bases replicating a specific customer's bases of operation. (f) Training...

  3. 14 CFR 142.59 - Flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall not be restricted to specific— (1) Route segments during line-oriented flight training scenarios; and (2) Visual data bases replicating a specific customer's bases of operation. (f) Training...

  4. Flight School in the Virtual Environment: Capabilities and Risks of Executing a Simulations-Based Flight Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-17

    Social Sciences, 2007), 3; Nau, Krondak, and Lewis, "Flight School XXI (FSXXI) Training Effectiveness Analysis (TEA)," chap. 1, 4-5. RL 3 is the...Skill Adaptability, Constructivism , and Fidelity," (Advanced Distributed Learning, 2010), 3. 25 The FAA and Army Aviation subscribe to several...foundational theories work together to explain learning in aviation—behavioral learning theory, cognitive learning theory, constructivism , experiential

  5. Pre-Flight Testing of Spaceborne GPS Receivers using a GPS Constellation Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Davis, Edward; Alonso, R.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Global Positioning System (GPS) applications test facility has been established within the GSFC Guidance Navigation and Control Center. The GPS test facility is currently housing the Global Simulation Systems Inc. (GSSI) STR2760 GPS satellite 40-channel attitude simulator and a STR4760 12-channel navigation simulator. The facility also contains a few other resources such as an atomic time standard test bed, a rooftop antenna platform and a radome. It provides a new capability for high dynamics GPS simulations of space flight that is unique within the aerospace community. The GPS facility provides a critical element for the development and testing of GPS based technologies i.e. position, attitude and precise time determination used on-board a spacecraft, suborbital rocket balloon. The GPS simulation system is configured in a transportable rack and is available for GPS component development as well as for component, spacecraft subsystem and system level testing at spacecraft integration and tests sites. The GPS facility has been operational since early 1996 and has utilized by space flight projects carrying GPS experiments, such as the OrbView-2 and the Argentine SAC-A spacecrafts. The SAC-A pre-flight test data obtained by using the STR2760 simulator and the comparison with preliminary analysis of the GPS data from SAC-A telemetry are summarized. This paper describes pre-flight tests and simulations used to support a unique spaceborne GPS experiment. The GPS experiment mission objectives and the test program are described, as well as the GPS test facility configuration needed to verify experiment feasibility. Some operational and critical issues inherent in GPS receiver pre-flight tests and simulations using this GPS simulation, and test methodology are described. Simulation and flight data are presented. A complete program of pre-flight testing of spaceborne GPS receivers using a GPS constellation simulator is detailed.

  6. Pre-Flight Testing of Spaceborne GPS Receivers Using a GPS Constellation Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Davis, Edward; Alonso, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Global Positioning System (GPS) applications test facility has been established within the GSFC Guidance Navigation and Control Center. The GPS test facility is currently housing the Global Simulation Systems Inc. (GSSI) STR2760 GPS satellite 40-channel attitude simulator and a STR4760 12-channel navigation simulator. The facility also contains a few other resources such as an atomic time standard test bed, a rooftop antenna platform and a radome. It provides a new capability for high dynamics GPS simulations of space flight that is unique within the aerospace community. The GPS facility provides a critical element for the development and testing of GPS based technologies i.e. position, attitude and precise time determination used on-board a spacecraft, suborbital rocket or balloon. The GPS simulator system is configured in a transportable rack and is available for GPS component development as well as for component, spacecraft subsystem and system level testing at spacecraft integration and test sites. The GPS facility has been operational since early 1996 and has been utilized by space flight projects carrying GPS experiments, such as the OrbView-2 and the Argentine SAC-A spacecrafts. The SAC-A pre-flight test data obtained by using the STR2760 simulator and the comparison with preliminary analysis of the GPS data from SAC-A telemetry are summarized. This paper describes pre-flight tests and simulations used to support a unique spaceborne GPS experiment. The GPS experiment mission objectives and the test program are described, as well as the GPS test facility configuration needed to verify experiment feasibility. Some operational and critical issues inherent in GPS receiver pre-flight tests and simulations using this GPS simulator, and test methodology are described. Simulation and flight data are presented. A complete program of pre-flight testing of spaceborne GPS receivers using a GPS constellation simulator is

  7. Cockpit simulation study of use of flight path angle for instrument approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisch, B.; Ernst, H.; Johnston, R.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a piloted simulation experiment to evaluate the effect of integrating flight path angle information into a typical transport electronic attitude director indicator display format for flight director instrument landing system approaches are presented. Three electronic display formats are evaluated during 3 deg straight-in approaches with wind shear and turbulence conditions. Flight path tracking data and pilot subjective comments are analyzed with regard to the pilot's tracking performance and workload for all three display formats.

  8. Modeling and HIL Simulation of Flight Conditions Simulating Control System for the Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Shen, Li; Zhang, Tianhong

    2016-12-01

    Simulated altitude test is an essential exploring, debugging, verification and validation means during the development of aero-engine. Free-jet engine test can simulate actual working conditions of aero-engine more realistically than direct-connect engine test but with relatively lower cost compared to propulsion wind tunnel test, thus becoming an important developing area of simulated altitude test technology. The Flight Conditions Simulating Control System (FCSCS) is of great importance to the Altitude Test Facility (ATF) but the development of that is a huge challenge. Aiming at improving the design efficiency and reducing risks during the development of FCSCS for ATFs, a Hardware- in-the-Loop (HIL) simulation system was designed and the mathematical models of key components such as the pressure stabilizing chamber, free-jet nozzle, control valve and aero-engine were built in this paper. Moreover, some HIL simulation experiments were carried out. The results show that the HIL simulation system designed and established in this paper is reasonable and effective, which can be used to adjust control parameters conveniently and assess the software and hardware in the control system immediately.

  9. Effects of long and short simulated flights on the saccadic eye movement velocity of aviators.

    PubMed

    Di Stasi, Leandro L; McCamy, Michael B; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Gayles, Ellis; Hoare, Chad; Foster, Michael; Catena, Andrés; Macknik, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Aircrew fatigue is a major contributor to operational errors in civil and military aviation. Objective detection of pilot fatigue is thus critical to prevent aviation catastrophes. Previous work has linked fatigue to changes in oculomotor dynamics, but few studies have studied this relationship in critical safety environments. Here we measured the eye movements of US Marine Corps combat helicopter pilots before and after simulated flight missions of different durations.We found a decrease in saccadic velocities after long simulated flights compared to short simulated flights. These results suggest that saccadic velocity could serve as a biomarker of aviator fatigue.

  10. LDSD POST2 Simulation and SFDT-1 Pre-Flight Launch Operations Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowes, Angela L.; Davis, Jody L.; Dutta, Soumyo; Striepe, Scott A.; Ivanov, Mark C.; Powell, Richard W.; White, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Project's first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT-1) occurred June 28, 2014. Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) was utilized to develop trajectory simulations characterizing all SFDT-1 flight phases from drop to splashdown. These POST2 simulations were used to validate the targeting parameters developed for SFDT- 1, predict performance and understand the sensitivity of the vehicle and nominal mission designs, and to support flight test operations with trajectory performance and splashdown location predictions for vehicle recovery. This paper provides an overview of the POST2 simulations developed for LDSD and presents the POST2 simulation flight dynamics support during the SFDT-1 launch, operations, and recovery.

  11. Recent advances in superconducting-mixer simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withington, S.; Kennedy, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last few years, considerable progress have been made in the development of techniques for fabricating high-quality superconducting circuits, and this success, together with major advances in the theoretical understanding of quantum detection and mixing at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, has made the development of CAD techniques for superconducting nonlinear circuits an important new enterprise. For example, arrays of quasioptical mixers are now being manufactured, where the antennas, matching networks, filters and superconducting tunnel junctions are all fabricated by depositing niobium and a variety of oxides on a single quartz substrate. There are no adjustable tuning elements on these integrated circuits, and therefore, one must be able to predict their electrical behavior precisely. This requirement, together with a general interest in the generic behavior of devices such as direct detectors and harmonic mixers, has lead us to develop a range of CAD tools for simulating the large-signal, small-signal, and noise behavior of superconducting tunnel junction circuits.

  12. Fluid-structure interaction simulation of an avian flight model.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Sebastian; Oertel, Herbert

    2010-12-15

    A three-dimensional numerical avian model was developed to investigate the unsteady and turbulent aerodynamic performance of flapping wings for varying wingbeat frequencies and flow velocities (up to 12 Hz and 9 m s(-1)), corresponding to a reduced frequency range of k=0.22 to k=1.0 and a Reynolds number range of Re=16,000 to Re=50,000. The wings of the bird-inspired model consist of an elastic membrane. Simplifying the complicated locomotion kinematics to a sinusoidal wing rotation about two axes, the main features of dynamic avian flight were approximated. Numerical simulation techniques of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) providing a fully resolved flow field were applied to calculate the aerodynamic performance of the flapping elastic wings with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. The results were used to characterize and describe the macroscopic flow configurations in terms of starting, stopping, trailing and bound vortices. For high reduced frequencies up to k=0.67 it was shown that the wake does not consist of individual vortex rings known as the discrete vortex ring gait. Rather, the wake is dominated by a chain of elliptical vortex rings on each wing. The structures are interlocked at the starting and stopping vortices, which are shed in pairs at the reversal points of the wingbeat cycle. For decreasing reduced frequency, the results indicate a transition to a continuous vortex gait. The upstroke becomes more aerodynamically active, leading to a consistent circulation of the bound vortex on the wing and a continuous spanwise shedding of small scale vortices. The formation of the vortices shed spanwise in pairs at the reversal points is reduced and the wake is dominated by the tip and root vortices, which form long drawn-out vortex structures.

  13. Simulation model of the integrated flight/propulsion control system, displays, and propulsion system for ASTOVL lift-fan aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. Y. William; Borchers, Paul F.; Franklin, James A.

    1995-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed for use in piloted evaluations of takeoff, transition, hover, and landing characteristics of an advanced, short takeoff, vertical landing lift fan fighter aircraft. The flight/propulsion control system includes modes for several response types which are coupled to the aircraft's aerodynamic and propulsion system effectors through a control selector tailored to the lift fan propulsion system. Head-up display modes for approach and hover, tailored to their corresponding control modes are provided in the simulation. Propulsion system components modeled include a remote lift and a lift/cruise engine. Their static performance and dynamic response are represented by the model. A separate report describes the subsonic, power-off aerodynamics and jet induced aerodynamics in hover and forward flight, including ground effects.

  14. Assessment of simulation fidelity using measurements of piloting technique in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, W. F.; Cleveland, W. B.; Key, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Army and NASA joined together on a project to conduct a systematic investigation and validation of a ground based piloted simulation of the Army/Sikorsky UH-60A helicopter. Flight testing was an integral part of the validation effort. Nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) piloting tasks which were investigated included the bob-up, the hover turn, the dash/quickstop, the sidestep, the dolphin, and the slalom. Results from the simulation indicate that the pilot's NOE task performance in the simulator is noticeably and quantifiably degraded when compared with the task performance results generated in flight test. The results of the flight test and ground based simulation experiments support a unique rationale for the assessment of simulation fidelity: flight simulation fidelity should be judged quantitatively by measuring pilot's control strategy and technique as induced by the simulator. A quantitative comparison is offered between the piloting technique observed in a flight simulator and that observed in flight test for the same tasks performed by the same pilots.

  15. Development and Assessment of a Novel Training Package for Basic Maneuvering Tasks on a Flight Simulator Using Self Instruction Methods and Above Real Time Training (ARTT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia J.; Heath, Bruce e.; Crane, Peter; Ward, Marcus; Crier, Tomyka; Knighten, Tremaine; Culpepper, Christi

    2007-01-01

    One result of the relatively recent advances in computing technology has been the decreasing cost of computers and increasing computational power. This has allowed high fidelity airplane simulations to be run on personal computers (PC). Thus, simulators are now used routinely by pilots to substitute real flight hours for simulated flight hours for training for an aircraft type rating thereby reducing the cost of flight training. However, FAA regulations require that such substitution training must be supervised by Certified Flight Instructors (CFI). If the CFI presence could be reduced or eliminated for certain tasks this would mean a further cost savings to the pilot. This would require that the flight simulator have a certain level of 'intelligence' in order to provide feedback on pilot performance similar to that of a CFI. The 'intelligent' flight simulator would have at least the capability to use data gathered from the flight to create a measure for the performance of the student pilot. Also, to fully utilize the advances in computational power, the simulator would be capable of interacting with the student pilot using the best possible training interventions. This thesis reports on the two studies conducted at Tuskegee University investigating the effects of interventions on the learning of two flight maneuvers on a flight simulator and the robustness and accuracy of calculated performance indices as compared to CFI evaluations of performance. The intent of these studies is to take a step in the direction of creating an 'intelligent' flight simulator. The first study deals with the comparisons of novice pilot performance trained at different levels of above real-time to execute a level S-turn. The second study examined the effect of out-of-the-window (OTW) visual cues in the form of hoops on the performance of novice pilots learning to fly a landing approach on the flight simulator. The reliability/robustness of the computed performance metrics was assessed

  16. Simulator Sickness During Emergency Procedures Training in a Helicopter Simulator: Age, Flight Experience, and Amount Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    drivers are more susceptible than male drivers" (Hein, p. 610). Age. Walt Disney World’s "Mission: Space" thrill ride left some older riders gulping...since those with more flight hrs naturally tend to fall into older age groups. (McGuinness et al., 1981, p. 25) 3. The SS symptoms reported by the...symptomatology and are useful for determining the pattern of discomfort produced by a given simulator. All scores have as their lowest level a natural zero (no

  17. The Role of Visual Occlusion in Altitude Maintenance during Simulated Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, R.; Geri, G. A.; Akhtar, S. C.; Covas, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    The use of visual occlusion as a cue to altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight (LAF) was investigated. The extent to which the ground surface is occluded by 3-D objects varies with altitude and depends on the height, radius, and density of the objects. Participants attempted to maintain a constant altitude during simulated flight over an…

  18. Intraindividual Variability in Basic Reaction Time Predicts Middle-Aged and Older Pilots’ Flight Simulator Performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots. Method. Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40–69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. Results. Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%–12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance. Discussion. IIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance. PMID:23052365

  19. Simulation Based Evaluation of Integrated Adaptive Control and Flight Planning Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan Forrest; Kaneshige, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to leverage NASA resources to enable effective evaluation of resilient aircraft technologies through simulation. This includes examining strengths and weaknesses of adaptive controllers, emergency flight planning algorithms, and flight envelope determination algorithms both individually and as an integrated package.

  20. CREW INTERACTION DURING A THIRTY-DAY SIMULATED SPACE FLIGHT. PRELIMINARY STUDY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AN ANALYSIS WAS MADE OF CREW INTERACTION DURING A TWO-MAN SIMULATED SPACE CHAMBER FLIGHT. By use of the well-known Bales Interaction Process ... Analysis , the behavior of the two subjects was rated during 2 hours of observation each day throughout the 30-day flight. Four kinds of summary interaction

  1. In-flight quality and accuracy of attitude measurements from the CHAMP advanced stellar compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Peter S.; Jørgensen, John L.; Denver, Troelz; Betto, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    The German geo-observations satellite CHAMP carries highly accurate vector instruments. The orientation of these relative to the inertial reference frame is obtained using star trackers. These advanced stellar compasses (ASC) are fully autonomous units, which provide, in real time, the absolute attitude with accuracy in the arc second range. In order to investigate the in-flight accuracy of the ASC, the terminology to characterize noise and biases is introduced. Relative instrument accuracy (RIA) and absolute instrument accuracy (AIA) can in principle be determined in-flight. However problems with modeling external noise sources often arise. The special CHAMP configuration with two star tracker cameras mounted fixed together provides an excellent opportunity to determine the AIA in-flight using the inter boresight angle.

  2. Postnatal development under conditions of simulated weightlessness and space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, K.

    1998-01-01

    The adaptability of the developing nervous system to environmental influences and the mechanisms underlying this plasticity has recently become a subject of interest in space neuroscience. Ground studies on neonatal rats using the tail suspension model of weightlessness have shown that the force of gravity clearly influences the events underlying the postnatal development of motor function. These effects depend on the age of the animal, duration of the perturbation and the motor function studied. A nine-day flight study has shown that a dam and neonates can develop under conditions of space flight. The motor function of the flight animals after landing was consistent with that seen in the tail suspension studies, being marked by limb joint extension. However, there were expected differences due to: (1) the unloading of the vestibular system in flight, which did not occur in the ground-based experiments; (2) differences between flight and suspension durations; and (3) the inability to evaluate motor function during the flight. The next step is to conduct experiments in space with the flexibility and rigor that is now limited to ground studies: an opportunity offered by the International Space Station. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Optimization and simulation of flight control laws under parameter uncertainty and external disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Several tasks pertinent to flight control in parameter uncertainty and wind-gust loading were successfully completed. Identification algorithms for extracting stability and control derivatives from flight data taking gust loading into account were developed. They were verified by simulation and evaluated throughly on actual flight data taken on a Lockheed Jet Star flying in turbulence. In particular the need for automatically generated dither-like inputs was studied. Criteria for performance evaluation using stochastic models were developed for gust alleviation as well as handling quantities. Algorithms for assessing degradation in performance due to parameter uncertainty were developed and evaluated using flight test data.

  4. Flight evaluation results from the general-aviation advanced avionics system program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, G. P.; Denery, D. G.; Hardy, G. H.; Nedell, B. F.

    1983-01-01

    A demonstration advanced avionics system (DAAS) for general-aviation aircraft was tested at NASA Ames Research Center to provide information required for the design of reliable, low-cost, advanced avionics systems which would make general-aviation operations safer and more practicable. Guest pilots flew a DAAS-equipped NASA Cessna 402-B aircraft to evaluate the usefulness of data busing, distributed microprocessors, and shared electronic displays, and to provide data on the DAAS pilot/system interface for the design of future integrated avionics systems. Evaluation results indicate that the DAAS hardware and functional capability meet the program objective. Most pilots felt that the DAAS representative of the way avionics systems would evolve and felt the added capability would improve the safety and practicability of general-aviation operations. Flight-evaluation results compiled from questionnaires are presented, the results of the debriefings are summarized. General conclusions of the flight evaluation are included.

  5. The First Test Flight of the Delta Clipper-Experimental Advanced (DC-XA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Delta Clipper-Experimental Advanced (DC-XA) is a single-stage-to-orbit, vertical takeoff / vertical landing launch vehicle concept, whose development was geared to significantly reduce launch cost and provided a test bed for NASA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology. This photograph shows the descending vehicle landing during the first successful test flight at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The program was discontinued in 2003.

  6. Performance-Based Testing and Success in Naval Advanced Flight Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    tabulation tables that the failure rate for women is comparable to that for 15 the men . Of course, the overall number of women in the data base is...association between a dual-task performance test and success in advanced flight training. These results are presented using a different method, as compared to...Tracking test, the Absolute Difference test, and the combined Absolute Difference -Horizontal Tracking test because these tests exbibited an association

  7. Integrated Clinical Training for Space Flight Using a High-Fidelity Patient Simulator in a Simulated Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor; Doerr, Harold K.; Polk, J. D.; Schmid, Josef; Parazynksi, Scott; Kelly, Scott

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of telemedicine in a simulated microgravity environment using a patient simulator. For decades, telemedicine techniques have been used in terrestrial environments by many cohorts with varied clinical experience. The success of these techniques has been recently expanded to include microgravity environments aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In order to investigate how an astronaut crew medical officer will execute medical tasks in a microgravity environment, while being remotely guided by a flight surgeon, the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST) used the simulated microgravity environment provided aboard DC-9 aircraft teams of crew medical officers, and remote flight surgeons performed several tasks on a patient simulator.

  8. Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Systems for NextGen (SEVS) Simulation and Flight Test Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Kevin J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Ellis,Kyle K.; Rehfeld, Sherri A.

    2012-01-01

    The Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Systems for NextGen (SEVS) simulation and flight tests are jointly sponsored by NASA's Aviation Safety Program, Vehicle Systems Safety Technology project and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The flight tests were conducted by a team of Honeywell, Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation and NASA personnel with the goal of obtaining pilot-in-the-loop test data for flight validation, verification, and demonstration of selected SEVS operational and system-level performance capabilities. Nine test flights (38 flight hours) were conducted over the summer and fall of 2011. The evaluations were flown in Gulfstream.s G450 flight test aircraft outfitted with the SEVS technology under very low visibility instrument meteorological conditions. Evaluation pilots flew 108 approaches in low visibility weather conditions (600 ft to 2400 ft visibility) into various airports from Louisiana to Maine. In-situ flight performance and subjective workload and acceptability data were collected in collaboration with ground simulation studies at LaRC.s Research Flight Deck simulator.

  9. Measurement of exhaust emissions from two J-58 engines at simulated supersonic cruise flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Emissions of total oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide from two J-58 afterburning turbojet engines at simulated high-altitude flight conditions are reported. Test conditions included flight speeds from Mach 2 to 3 at altitudes from 16 to 23 km. For each flight condition, exhaust measurements were made for four or five power levels from maximum power without afterburning through maximum afterburning. The data show that exhaust emissions vary with flight speed, altitude, power level, and radial position across the exhaust. Oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions decreased with increasing altitude, and increased with increasing flight speed. NOX emission indices with afterburning were less than half the value without afterburning. Carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions increased with increasing altitude, and decreased with increasing flight speed. Emissions of these species were substantially higher with afterburning than without.

  10. 14 CFR 61.64 - Use of a flight simulator and flight training device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... practical test for a type rating for a turbojet airplane (except for preflight inspection), an applicant... must— (1) Hold a type rating in a turbojet airplane of the same class of airplane for which the type...) Have 1,000 hours of flight time in two different turbojet airplanes of the same class of airplane...

  11. 14 CFR 61.64 - Use of a flight simulator and flight training device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... practical test for a type rating for a turbojet airplane (except for preflight inspection), an applicant...— (1) Hold a type rating in a turbojet airplane of the same class of airplane for which the type rating...) Have 1,000 hours of flight time in two different turbojet airplanes of the same class of airplane...

  12. 14 CFR 61.64 - Use of a flight simulator and flight training device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... practical test for a type rating for a turbojet airplane (except for preflight inspection), an applicant... must— (1) Hold a type rating in a turbojet airplane of the same class of airplane for which the type...) Have 1,000 hours of flight time in two different turbojet airplanes of the same class of airplane...

  13. Flight performance effects of thermal stress and two aviator uniforms in a UH-60 helicopter simulator.

    PubMed

    Reardon, M J; Fraser, E B; Omer, J M

    1998-06-01

    The effects on flight performance of the four combinations of an unencumbered mission oriented protective posture (MOPP) aviator battle dress uniform (ABDU) and encumbered MOPP4 over ABDU flight ensemble in cool (70 degrees F or 21.1 degrees C, 50% relative humidity [RH]) and hot (100 degrees F or 37.8 degrees C, 50% RH) UH-60 simulator cockpit conditions were evaluated with a repeated measures, 2 x 2 factorial study using nine crews. The encumbered MOPP4 uniform had the most frequent adverse effect on flight performance followed by heat stress, with less frequent effects from the combination or interaction of these two factors. This study confirmed that heat stress and wearing an encumbered U.S. Army MOPP4 flight uniform significantly reduced endurance and flight performance in a UH-60 simulator.

  14. Exhaust emission survey of an F100 afterburning turbofan engine at simulated altitude flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. E.; Cullom, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Emissions of carbon monoxide, total oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide from an F100, afterburning, two spool turbofan engine at simulated flight conditions are reported. For each flight condition emission measurements were made for two or three power levels from intermediate power (nonafterburning) through maximum afterburning. The data showed that emissions vary with flight speed, altitude, power level, and radial position across the nozzle. Carbon monoxide emissions were low for intermediate power (nonafterburning) and partial afterburning, but regions of high carbon monoxide were present downstream of the flame holder at maximum afterburning. Unburned hydrocarbon emissions were low for most of the simulated flight conditions. The local NOX concentrations and their variability with power level increased with increasing flight Mach number at constant altitude, and decreased with increasing altitude at constant Mach number. Carbon dioxide emissions were proportional to local fuel air ratio for all conditions.

  15. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  16. Parabolic Flights with Single-Engine Aerobatic Aircraft: Flight Profile and a Computer Simulator for its Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigos, Miguel; Perez-Poch, Antoni; Alpiste, Francesc; Torner, Jordi; González Alonso, Daniel Ventura

    2014-11-01

    We report the results of residual acceleration obtained from initial tests of parabolic flights (more than 100 hours) performed with a small single-engine aerobatic aircraft (CAP10B), and propose a method that improves these figures. Such aircraft have proved capable of providing researchers with periods of up to 8 seconds of reduced gravity in the cockpit, with a gravity quality in the range of 0.1 g 0, where g 0 is the gravitational acceleration of the Earth. Such parabolas may be of interest to experimenters in the reduced gravity field, when this range of reduced gravity is acceptable for the experiment undertaken. They have also proven to be useful for motivational and educational campaigns. Furthermore, these flights may be of interest to researchers as a test-bed for obtaining a proof-of-concept for subsequent access to parabolic flights with larger aircraft or other microgravity platforms. The limited cost of the operations with these small aircraft allows us to perform them as part of a non-commercial joint venture between the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya - BarcelonaTech (UPC), the Barcelona cluster BAIE and the Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell. Any improvements in the length and quality of reduced gravity would increase the capabilities of these small aircraft. To that end, we have developed a method based on a simulator for training aerobatic pilots. The simulation is performed with the CAD software for mechanical design Solidworks Motion{circledR }, which is widely distributed in industry and in universities. It specifically simulates the parabolic flight manoeuvre for our small aircraft and enables us to improve different aspects of the manoeuvre. The simulator is first validated with experimental data from the test flights. We have conducted an initial intensive period of specific pilot training with the aid of the simulator output. After such initial simulation-aided training, results show that the reduced gravity quality has significantly

  17. Check-Cases for Verification of 6-Degree-of-Freedom Flight Vehicle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Shelton, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of innovative unmanned aeronautical systems and the emergence of commercial space activities have resulted in a number of relatively new aerospace organizations that are designing innovative systems and solutions. These organizations use a variety of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house-developed simulation and analysis tools including 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) flight simulation tools. The increased affordability of computing capability has made highfidelity flight simulation practical for all participants. Verification of the tools' equations-of-motion and environment models (e.g., atmosphere, gravitation, and geodesy) is desirable to assure accuracy of results. However, aside from simple textbook examples, minimal verification data exists in open literature for 6-DOF flight simulation problems. This assessment compared multiple solution trajectories to a set of verification check-cases that covered atmospheric and exo-atmospheric (i.e., orbital) flight. Each scenario consisted of predefined flight vehicles, initial conditions, and maneuvers. These scenarios were implemented and executed in a variety of analytical and real-time simulation tools. This tool-set included simulation tools in a variety of programming languages based on modified flat-Earth, round- Earth, and rotating oblate spheroidal Earth geodesy and gravitation models, and independently derived equations-of-motion and propagation techniques. The resulting simulated parameter trajectories were compared by over-plotting and difference-plotting to yield a family of solutions. In total, seven simulation tools were exercised.

  18. Assessment of simulation fidelity using measurements of piloting technique in flight. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, S. W.; Clement, W. F.; Hoh, R. H.; Cleveland, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    Two components of the Vertical Motion Simulator (presently being used to assess the fidelity of UH-60A simulation) are evaluated: (1) the dash/quickstop Nap-of-the-earth (NOE) piloting task, and (2) the bop-up task. Data from these two flight test experiments are presented which provide information on the effect of reduced visual field of view, variation in scene content and texture, and the affect of pure time delay in the closed-loop pilot response. In comparison with task performance results obtained in flight tests, the results from the simulation indicate that the pilot's NOE task performance in the simulator is significantly degraded.

  19. Wind Shear/Turbulence Inputs to Flight Simulation and Systems Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Roland L. (Editor); Frost, Walter (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for industry, universities, and government to assess current status and likely future requirements for application of flight simulators to aviation safety concerns and system certification issues associated with wind shear and atmospheric turbulence. Research findings presented included characterization of wind shear and turbulence hazards based on modeling efforts and quantitative results obtained from field measurement programs. Future research thrusts needed to maximally exploit flight simulators for aviation safety application involving wind shear and turbulence were identified. The conference contained sessions on: Existing wind shear data and simulator implementation initiatives; Invited papers regarding wind shear and turbulence simulation requirements; and Committee working session reports.

  20. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  1. To Fly or Not to Fly: Teaching Advanced Secondary School Students about Principles of Flight in Biological Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietsch, Renée B.; Bohland, Cynthia L.; Schmale, David G., III.

    2015-01-01

    Biological flight mechanics is typically taught in graduate level college classes rather than in secondary school classes. We developed an interdisciplinary unit for advanced upper-level secondary school students (ages 15-18) to teach the principles of flight and applications to biological systems. This unit capitalised on the tremendous…

  2. An analysis of airline landing flare data based on flight and training simulator measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, R. K.; Schulman, T. M.; Clement, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Landings by experienced airline pilots transitioning to the DC-10, performed in flight and on a simulator, were analyzed and compared using a pilot-in-the-loop model of the landing maneuver. By solving for the effective feedback gains and pilot compensation which described landing technique, it was possible to discern fundamental differences in pilot behavior between the actual aircraft and the simulator. These differences were then used to infer simulator fidelity in terms of specific deficiencies and to quantify the effectiveness of training on the simulator as compared to training in flight. While training on the simulator, pilots exhibited larger effective lag in commanding the flare. The inability to compensate adequately for this lag was associated with hard or inconsistent landings. To some degree this deficiency was carried into flight, thus resulting in a slightly different and inferior landing technique than exhibited by pilots trained exclusively on the actual aircraft.

  3. A conceptual framework for using Doppler radar acquired atmospheric data for flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1983-01-01

    A concept is presented which can permit turbulence simulation in the vicinity of microbursts. The method involves a large data base, but should be fast enough for use with flight simulators. The model permits any pilot to simulate any flight maneuver in any aircraft. The model simulates a wind field with three-component mean winds and three-component turbulent gusts, and gust variation over the body of an aircraft so that all aerodynamic loads and moments can be calculated. The time and space variation of mean winds and turbulent intensities associated with a particular atmospheric phenomenon such as a microburst is used in the model. In fact, Doppler radar data such as provided by JAWS is uniquely suited for use with the proposed model. The concept is completely general and is not restricted to microburst studies. Reentry and flight in terrestrial or planetary atmospheres could be realistically simulated if supporting data of sufficient resolution were available.

  4. An Evaluation of Training Interventions and Computed Scoring Techniques for Grading a Level Turn Task and a Straight In Landing Approach on a PC-Based Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    One result of the relatively recent advances in computing technology has been the decreasing cost of computers and increasing computational power. This has allowed high fidelity airplane simulations to be run on personal computers (PC). Thus, simulators are now used routinely by pilots to substitute real flight hours for simulated flight hours for training for an aircraft type rating thereby reducing the cost of flight training. However, FAA regulations require that such substitution training must be supervised by Certified Flight Instructors (CFI). If the CFI presence could be reduced or eliminated for certain tasks this would mean a further cost savings to the pilot. This would require that the flight simulator have a certain level of 'intelligence' in order to provide feedback on pilot perfolmance similar to that of a CFI. The 'intelligent' flight sinlulator would have at least the capability to use data gathered from the flight to create a measure for the performance of the student pilot. Also, to fully utilize the advances in computational power, the sinlulator would be capable of interacting with the student pilot using the best possible training interventions. This thesis reposts on the two studies conducted at Tuskegee University investigating the effects of interventions on the learning of two flight maneuvers on a flight sinlulator and the robustness and accuracy of calculated perfornlance indices as compared to CFI evaluations of performance. The intent of these studies is to take a step in the direction of creating an 'intelligent' flight simulator. The first study deals with the comparisons of novice pilot performance trained at different levels of above real-time to execute a level S-turn. The second study examined the effect of out-of-the-window (OTW) visual cues in the form of hoops on the performance of novice pilots learning to fly a landing approach on the flight simulator. The reliability/robustness of the computed performance metrics was

  5. The building blocks for JWST I&T to operations: from simulator to flight units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiak, Francis; Ochs, William; Johns, Alan; Seaton, Bonita; Adams, Cynthia; Fatig, Curtis; Jones, Ronald; Jackson, Wallace

    2012-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project has an extended integration and test (I&T) phase due to long procurement and development times of various components as well as recent launch delays. The JWST Ground Segment and Operations group has developed a roadmap of the various ground and flight elements and their use in the various JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project's building block approach to the eventual operational systems, while not new, is complex and challenging; a large-scale mission like JWST involves international partners, many vendors across the United States, and competing needs for the same systems. One of the challenges is resource balancing so simulators and flight products for various elements congeal into integrated systems used for I&T and flight operations activities. This building block approach to an incremental buildup provides for early problem identification with simulators and exercises the flight operations systems, products, and interfaces during the JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project has completed some early I&T with the simulators, engineering models and some components of the operational ground system. The JWST Project is testing the various flight units as they are delivered and will continue to do so for the entire flight and operational system. The JWST Project has already and will continue to reap the value of the building block approach on the road to launch and flight operations.

  6. Development of a Model Following Control Law for Inflight Simulation and Flight Controls Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Mark; Fletcher, Jay; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Army and NASA are currently developing the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) at the Ames Research Center. RASCAL, shown in Figure 1, is a UH-60, which is being modified in a phased development program to have a research fly-by-wire flight control system, and an advanced navigation research platform. An important part of the flight controls and handling qualities research on RASCAL will be an FCS design for the aircraft to achieve high bandwidth control responses and disturbance rejection characteristics. Initially, body states will be used as feedbacks, but research into the use of rotor states will also be considered in later stages to maximize agility and maneuverability. In addition to supporting flight controls research, this FCS design will serve as the inflight simulation control law to support basic handling qualities, guidance, and displays research. Research in high bandwidth controls laws is motivated by the desire to improve the handling qualities in aggressive maneuvering and in severely degraded weather conditions. Naturally, these advantages will also improve the quality of the model following, thereby improving the inflight simulation capabilities of the research vehicle. High bandwidth in the control laws provides tighter tracking allowing for higher response bandwidths which can meet handling qualities requirements for aggressive maneuvering. System sensitivity is also reduced preventing variations in the response from the vehicle due to changing flight conditions. In addition, improved gust rejection will result from this reduced sensitivity. The gust rejection coupled with a highly stable system will make more precise maneuvering and pointing possible in severely degraded weather conditions. The difficulty in achieving higher bandwidths from the control laws in the feedback and in the responses arises from the complexity of the models that are needed to produce a satisfactory design. In this case, high

  7. Advanced flight computing technologies for validation by NASA's new millennium program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    1996-11-01

    The New Millennium Program (NMP) consists of a series of Deep-Space and Earth Orbiting missions that are technology-driven, in contrast to the more traditional science-driven space exploration missions of the past. These flights are designed to validate technologies that will enable a new era of low-cost highly miniaturized and highly capable spacebome applications in the new millennium. In addition to the series of flight projects managed by separate flight teams, the NMP technology initiatives are managed by the following six focused technology programs: Microelectronics Systems, Autonomy, Telecommunications, Instrument Technologies and Architectures, In-Situ Instruments and Micro-electromechanical Systems, and Modular and Multifunctional Systems. Each technology program is managed as an Integrated Product Development Team (IPDT) of government, academic, and industry partners. In this paper, we will describe elements of the technology roadmap proposed by the NMP Microelectronics IPDT. Moreover, we will relate the proposed technology roadmap to existing NASA technology development programs, such as the Advanced Flight Computing (AFC) program, and the Remote Exploration and Experimentation (REE) program, which constitute part of the on-going NASA technology development pipeline. We will also describe the Microelectronics Systems technologies that have been accepted as part of the first New Millennium Deep-Space One spacecraft, which is an asteroid fly-by mission scheduled for launched in July 1998.

  8. The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor: Flight Heritage and Current Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2009-03-01

    The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) is the latest in a line of sensors that have flown four times in the last 10 years. The NGAVGS has been under development for the last two years as a long-range proximity operations and docking sensor for use in an Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) system. The first autonomous rendezvous and docking in the history of the U.S. Space Program was successfully accomplished by Orbital Express, using the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) as the primary docking sensor. That flight proved that the United States now has a mature and flight proven sensor technology for supporting Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEV) and Commercial Orbital Transport Systems (COTS) Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). NASA video sensors have worked well in the past: the AVGS used on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission operated successfully in "spot mode" out to 2 km, and the first generation rendezvous and docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on Space Shuttle flights in 1997 and 1998.

  9. Use of high performance networks and supercomputers for real-time flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1993-01-01

    In order to meet the stringent time-critical requirements for real-time man-in-the-loop flight simulation, computer processing operations must be consistent in processing time and be completed in as short a time as possible. These operations include simulation mathematical model computation and data input/output to the simulators. In 1986, in response to increased demands for flight simulation performance, NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC), working with the contractor, developed extensions to the Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC) technology which resulted in a factor of ten increase in the effective bandwidth and reduced latency of modules necessary for simulator communication. This technology extension is being used by more than 80 leading technological developers in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Included among the commercial applications are nuclear process control, power grid analysis, process monitoring, real-time simulation, and radar data acquisition. Personnel at LaRC are completing the development of the use of supercomputers for mathematical model computation to support real-time flight simulation. This includes the development of a real-time operating system and development of specialized software and hardware for the simulator network. This paper describes the data acquisition technology and the development of supercomputing for flight simulation.

  10. The story of 520 days on a simulated flight to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva; Šolcová, Iva; Stuchlíková, Iva; Mazehóová, Yvona

    2016-09-01

    The project Mars-500 was the first long-term simulation of a manned flight to Mars. We examined the ways crew members described their experiences and their life during simulation, what they saw as key episodes and key topics in simulation, as well as key problems and key benefits. The aim of this paper is to present the Mars-500 simulation in its complexity, from beginning to end, as a one narrative story.

  11. A simulation study of crew performance in operating an advanced transport aircraft in an automated terminal area environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A simulation study assessing crew performance operating an advanced transport aircraft in an automated terminal area environment is described. The linking together of the Langley Advanced Transport Operating Systems Aft Flight Deck Simulator with the Terminal Area Air Traffic Model Simulation was required. The realism of an air traffic control (ATC) environment with audio controller instructions for the flight crews and the capability of inserting a live aircraft into the terminal area model to interact with computer generated aircraft was provided. Crew performance using the advanced displays and two separate control systems (automatic and manual) in flying area navigation routes in the automated ATC environment was assessed. Although the crews did not perform as well using the manual control system, their performances were within acceptable operational limits with little increase in workload. The crews favored using the manual control system and felt they were more alert and aware of their environment when using it.

  12. Precision Casting via Advanced Simulation and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program was conducted to develop and commercially implement selected casting manufacturing technologies to enable significant reductions in the costs of castings, increase the complexity and dimensional accuracy of castings, and reduce the development times for delivery of high quality castings. The industry-led R&D project was cost shared with NASA's Aerospace Industry Technology Program (AITP). The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American, Inc. served as the team lead with participation from Lockheed Martin, Ford Motor Company, Howmet Corporation, PCC Airfoils, General Electric, UES, Inc., University of Alabama, Auburn University, Robinson, Inc., Aracor, and NASA-LeRC. The technical effort was organized into four distinct tasks. The accomplishments reported herein. Task 1.0 developed advanced simulation technology for core molding. Ford headed up this task. On this program, a specialized core machine was designed and built. Task 2.0 focused on intelligent process control for precision core molding. Howmet led this effort. The primary focus of these experimental efforts was to characterize the process parameters that have a strong impact on dimensional control issues of injection molded cores during their fabrication. Task 3.0 developed and applied rapid prototyping to produce near net shape castings. Rocketdyne was responsible for this task. CAD files were generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototype patterns were fabricated using SLS and SLA, and castings produced and evaluated. Task 4.0 was aimed at developing technology transfer. Rocketdyne coordinated this task. Casting related technology, explored and evaluated in the first three tasks of this program, was implemented into manufacturing processes.

  13. A technique for simulating turbulence for aerospace vehicle flight simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1977-01-01

    An atmospheric turbulence model which accommodates variability of turbulence properties along an aerospace vehicle trajectory was developed. The technique involves the use of Dryden spectral forms in which the defining parameters are the standard deviations (sigma) and integral scales (L) of turbulence. These spectra are expressed as nondimensional functions of the nondimensional frequency Omega = omega L/V where omega is dimensional radian frequency and V is the true air speed of the aerospace vehicle. The nondimensional spectra are factored by standard techniques to obtain nondimensional linear recursive filters in the time domain whereby band-limited white-like noise can be operated upon to obtain nondimensional longitudinal, lateral, and vertical turbulence velocities, as functions of nondimensional time, tV/L, where t is time. Application of the technique to the simulation of the space shuttle orbiter entry flight phase is discussed.

  14. Space-flight simulations of calcium metabolism using a mathematical model of calcium regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a series of simulation studies of calcium matabolic changes which have been recorded during human exposure to bed rest and space flight are presented. Space flight and bed rest data demonstrate losses of total body calcium during exposure to hypogravic environments. These losses are evidenced by higher than normal rates of urine calcium excretion and by negative calcium balances. In addition, intestinal absorption rates and bone mineral content are assumed to decrease. The bed rest and space flight simulations were executed on a mathematical model of the calcium metabolic system. The purpose of the simulations is to theoretically test hypotheses and predict system responses which are occurring during given experimental stresses. In this case, hypogravity occurs through the comparison of simulation and experimental data and through the analysis of model structure and system responses. The model reliably simulates the responses of selected bed rest and space flight parameters. When experimental data are available, the simulated skeletal responses and regulatory factors involved in the responses agree with space flight data collected on rodents. In addition, areas within the model that need improvement are identified.

  15. Guidance simulation and test support for differential GPS flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geier, G. J.; Loomis, P. V. W.; Cabak, A.

    1987-01-01

    Three separate tasks which supported the test preparation, test operations, and post test analysis of the NASA Ames flight test evaluation of the differential Global Positioning System (GPS) are presented. Task 1 consisted of a navigation filter design, coding, and testing to optimally make use of GPS in a differential mode. The filter can be configured to accept inputs from external censors such as an accelerometer and a barometric or radar altimeter. The filter runs in real time onboard a NASA helicopter. It processes raw pseudo and delta range measurements from a single channel sequential GPS receiver. The Kalman filter software interfaces are described in detail, followed by a description of the filter algorithm, including the basic propagation and measurement update equations. The performance during flight tests is reviewed and discussed. Task 2 describes a refinement performed on the lateral and vertical steering algorithms developed on a previous contract. The refinements include modification of the internal logic to allow more diverse inflight initialization procedures, further data smoothing and compensation for system induced time delays. Task 3 describes the TAU Corp participation in the analysis of the real time Kalman navigation filter. The performance was compared to that of the Z-set filter in flight and to the laser tracker position data during post test analysis. This analysis allowed a more optimum selection of the parameters of the filter.

  16. Forward flight trim calculation and frequency response validation of a high-order helicopter simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Frederick D.; Celi, Roberto; Tischler, Mark B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new trim procedure, that includes the calculation of the steady-state response of the rotor blades, and that is applicable to straight flight and steady coordinated turns. This paper also describes the results of a validation study for a high order linearized model of helicopter flight dynamics, that includes rotor, inflow, and actuator dynamics. The model is obtained by numerical perturbations of a nonlinear, blade element type mathematical model. Predicted responses are compared with flight test data for two values of flight speed. The comparison is carried out in the frequency domain. Numerical simulations show that the trim algorithm is very accurate, and preserves the periodicity of the aircraft states. The results also indicate that the predictions of the linearized model are in good agreement with flight test data, especially at medium and high frequencies.

  17. Piloted simulator investigation of helicopter control systems effects on handling qualities during instrument flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, R. D.; Chen, R. T. N.; Gerdes, R. M.; Alderete, T. S.; Gee, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An exploratory piloted simulation was conducted to investigate the effects of the characteristics of helicopter flight control systems on instrument flight handling qualities. This joint FAA/NASA study was motivated by the need to improve instrument flight capability. A near-term objective is to assist in updating the airworthiness criteria for helicopter instrument flight. The experiment consisted of variations of single-rotor helicopter types and levels of stability and control augmentation systems (SCAS). These configurations were evaluated during an omnirange approach task under visual and instrument flight conditions. The levels of SCAS design included a simple rate damping system, collective decoupling plus rate damping, and an attitude command system with collective decoupling. A limited evaluation of stick force versus airspeed stability was accomplished. Some problems were experienced with control system mechanization which had a detrimental effect on longitudinal stability. Pilot ratings, pilot commentary, and performance data related to the task are presented.

  18. Flight evaluation of an advanced technology light twin-engine airplane (ATLIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Project organization and execution, airplane description and performance predictions, and the results of the flight evaluation of an advanced technology light twin engine airplane (ATLIT) are presented. The ATLIT is a Piper PA-34-200 Seneca I modified by the installation of new wings incorporating the GA(W)-1 (Whitcomb) airfoil, reduced wing area, roll control spoilers, and full span Fowler flaps. The conclusions for the ATLIT evaluation are based on complete stall and roll flight test results and partial performance test results. The Stalling and rolling characteristics met design expectations. Climb performance was penalized by extensive flow separation in the region of the wing body juncture. Cruise performance was found to be penalized by a large value of zero lift drag. Calculations showed that, with proper attention to construction details, the improvements in span efficiency and zero lift drag would permit the realization of the predicted increases in cruising and maximum rate of climb performance.

  19. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  20. A review of recent programs and future plans for rotorcraft in-flight simulation at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshow, Michelle M.; Aiken, Edwin W.; Hindson, William S.; Lebacqz, J. V.; Denery, Dallas G.

    1991-01-01

    A new flight research vehicle, the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL), is being developed by the U.S. Army and NASA at Ames Research Center. The requirements for this new facility stem from a perception of rotorcraft system technology requirements for the next decade together with operational experience with the CH-47B research helicopter that was operated as an in-flight simulator at Ames during the past 10 years. Accordingly, both the principal design features of the CH-47B variable-stability system and the flight-control and cockpit-display programs that were conducted using this aircraft at Ames are reviewed. Another U.S. Army helicopter, a UH-60A Black Hawk, has been selected as the baseline vehicle for the RASCAL. The research programs that influence the design of the RASCAL are summarized, and the resultant requirements for the RASCAL research system are described. These research programs include investigations of advanced, integrated control concepts for achieving high levels of agility and maneuverability, and guidance technologies, employing computer/sensor-aiding, designed to assist the pilot during low-altitude flight in conditions of limited visibility. The approach to the development of the new facility is presented and selected plans for the preliminary design of the RASCAL are described.

  1. Further Development of Verification Check-Cases for Six- Degree-of-Freedom Flight Vehicle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Madden, Michael M.; Shelton, Robert; Jackson, A. A.; Castro, Manuel P.; Noble, Deleena M.; Zimmerman, Curtis J.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; White, Joseph P.; Dutta, Doumyo; Queen, Eric M.; Powell, Richard W.; Sellers, WIlliam A.; Striepe, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    This follow-on paper describes the principal methods of implementing, and documents the results of exercising, a set of six-degree-of-freedom rigid-body equations of motion and planetary geodetic, gravitation and atmospheric models for simple vehicles in a variety of endo- and exo-atmospheric conditions with various NASA, and one popular open-source, engineering simulation tools. This effort is intended to provide an additional means of verification of flight simulations. The models used in this comparison, as well as the resulting time-history trajectory data, are available electronically for persons and organizations wishing to compare their flight simulation implementations of the same models.

  2. Postflight simulation of parachute deployment dynamics of Viking qualification flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Poole, L. R.; Talay, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Simulation calculations of the Viking qualification flight tests are conducted by use of analytical models of the parachute deployment dynamics process. Results from the study indicate that good simulations of event times and trajectory are obtained. If the full-scale parachute drag coefficient is used, a good simulation of first opening load is obtained and the overall nature of the load history is calculated. For longitudinal motions, the two-degree-of-freedom models give good agreement with a six-degree-of-freedom model. It is believed that the analytical models used are tools which will aid in the analysis of future flight systems.

  3. The Virtual Flier: The Link Trainer, Flight Simulation, and Pilot Identity.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chihyung

    2015-01-01

    The Link Trainer is often described as the first successful attempt at what we now recognize as flight simulation and even virtual reality. Instead of asking how well the device simulated flight conditions, this article shows that what the Link Trainer simulated was not the conditions of the air, but rather the conditions of the cockpit that was gradually filled with flight instruments. The article also considers the Link Trainer as a cultural space in which shifting ideas about what it meant to be a pilot were manifested. A pilot in the Link Trainer was trained into a new category of flier-the virtual flier-who was an avid reader of instruments and an attentive listener to signals. This article suggests that, by situating the pilot within new spaces, protocols, and relationships, technologies of simulation have constituted the identity of the modern pilot and other operators of machines.

  4. Analysis procedures and subjective flight results of a simulator validation and cue fidelity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Peter C.; Mckissick, Burnell T.

    1988-01-01

    A joint experiment to investigate simulator validation and cue fidelity was conducted by the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center (Ames-Dryden) and NASA Langley Research Center. The primary objective was to validate the use of a closed-loop pilot-vehicle mathematical model as an analytical tool for optimizing the tradeoff between simulator fidelity requirements and simulator cost. The validation process includes comparing model predictions with simulation and flight test results to evaluate various hypotheses for differences in motion and visual cues and information transfer. A group of five pilots flew air-to-air tracking maneuvers in the Langley differential maneuvering simulator and visual motion simulator and in an F-14 aircraft at Ames-Dryden. The simulators used motion and visual cueing devices including a g-seat, a helmet loader, wide field-of-view horizon, and a motion base platform.

  5. Flight controllers from Soviet Union in joint simulation activity at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A group of flight controllers from the Soviet Union take part in Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) joint simulation activity at JSC. They are in one of the support rooms in the Mission Control Center. The simulations are part of the preparations for the U.S.-U.S.S.R. ASTP docking in Earth orbit mission.

  6. Integration of visual and motion cues for flight simulator requirements and ride quality investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations for the improvement of flight simulators are reported. Topics include: visual cues in landing, comparison of linear and nonlinear washout filters using a model of the vestibular system, and visual vestibular interactions (yaw axis). An abstract is given for a thesis on the applications of human dynamic orientation models to motion simulation.

  7. The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor: Flight Heritage and Current Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) is the latest in a line of sensors that have flown four times in the last 10 years. The NGAVGS has been under development for the last two years as a long-range proximity operations and docking sensor for use in an Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) system. The first autonomous rendezvous and docking in the history of the U.S. Space Program was successfully accomplished by Orbital Express, using the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) as the primary docking sensor. That flight proved that the United States now has a mature and flight proven sensor technology for supporting Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEV) and Commercial Orbital Transport Systems (COTS) Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). NASA video sensors have worked well in the past: the AVGS used on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission operated successfully in "spot mode" out to 2 km, and the first generation rendezvous and docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on Space Shuttle flights in 1997 and 1998. This paper presents the flight heritage and results of the sensor technology, some hardware trades for the current sensor, and discusses the needs of future vehicles that may rendezvous and dock with the International Space Station (ISS) and other Constellation vehicles. It also discusses approaches for upgrading AVGS to address parts obsolescence, and concepts for minimizing the sensor footprint, weight, and power requirements. In addition, the testing of the various NGAVGS development units will be discussed along with the use of the NGAVGS as a proximity operations and docking sensor.

  8. Pathfinding the Flight Advanced Stirling Convertor Design with the ASC-E3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Kyle; Smith, Eddie; Collins, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) was initially developed by Sunpower, Inc. under contract to NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) as a technology development project. The ASC technology fulfills NASA s need for high efficiency power convertors for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Early successful technology demonstrations between 2003 to 2005 eventually led to the expansion of the project including the decision in 2006 to use the ASC technology on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). Sunpower has delivered 22 ASC convertors of progressively mature designs to date to GRC. Currently, Sunpower with support from GRC, Lockheed Martin Space System Company (LMSSC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the flight ASC-F in parallel with the ASC-E3 pathfinders. Sunpower will deliver four pairs of ASC-E3 convertors to GRC which will be used for extended operation reliability assessment, independent validation and verification testing, system interaction tests, and to support LMSSC controller verification. The ASC-E3 and -F convertors are being built to the same design and processing documentation and the same product specification. The initial two pairs of ASC-E3 are built before the flight units and will validate design and processing changes prior to implementation on the ASC-F flight convertors. This paper provides a summary on development of the ASC technology and the status of the ASC-E3 build and how they serve the vital pathfinder role ahead of the flight build for ASRG. The ASRG is part of two of the three candidate missions being considered for selection for the Discovery 12 mission.

  9. Pathfinding the Flight Advanced Stirling Convertor Design with the ASC-E3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Kyle; Smith, Eddie; Collins, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) was initially developed by Sunpower, Inc. under contract to NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) as a technology development project. The ASC technology fulfills NASA's need for high efficiency power convertors for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Early successful technology demonstrations between 2003 to 2005 eventually led to the expansion of the project including the decision in 2006 to use the ASC technology on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). Sunpower has delivered 22 ASC convertors of progressively mature designs to date to GRC. Currently, Sunpower with support from GRC, Lockheed Martin Space System Company (LMSSC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the flight ASC-F in parallel with the ASC-E3 pathfinders. Sunpower will deliver four pairs of ASC-E3 convertors to GRC which will be used for extended operation reliability assessment, independent validation and verification testing, system interaction tests, and to support LMSSC controller verification. The ASC-E3 and -F convertors are being built to the same design and processing documentation and the same product specification. The initial two pairs of ASC-E3 are built before the flight units and will validate design and processing changes prior to implementation on the ASC-F flight convertors. This paper provides a summary on development of the ASC technology and the status of the ASC-E3 build and how they serve the vital pathfinder role ahead of the flight build for ASRG. The ASRG is part of two of the three candidate missions being considered for selection for the Discovery 12 mission.

  10. Parabolic Flight Investigation for Advanced Exercise Concept Hardware Hybrid Ultimate Lifting Kit (HULK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. S.; Funk, J. H.; Funk, N. W.; Sheehan, C. C.; Humphreys, B. T.; Perusek, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    Long-duration space flight poses many hazards to the health of the crew. Among those hazards is the physiological deconditioning of the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems due to prolonged exposure to microgravity. To combat this erosion of physical condition space flight may take on the crew, the Human Research Program (HRP) is charged with developing Advanced Exercise Concepts to maintain astronaut health and fitness during long-term missions, while keeping device mass, power, and volume to a minimum. The goal of this effort is to preserve the physical capability of the crew to perform mission critical tasks in transit and during planetary surface operations. The HULK is a pneumatic-based exercise system, which provides both resistive and aerobic modes to protect against human deconditioning in microgravity. Its design targeted the International Space Station (ISS) Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) high level performance characteristics and provides up to 600 foot pounds resitive loading with the capability to allow for eccentric to concentric (E:C) ratios of higher than 1:1 through a DC motor assist component. The device's rowing mode allows for high cadence aerobic activity. The HULK parabolic flight campaign, conducted through the NASA Flight Opportunities Program at Ellington Field, resulted in the creation of device specific data sets including low fidelity motion capture, accelerometry and both inline and ground reaction forces. These data provide a critical link in understanding how to vibration isolate the device in both ISS and space transit applications. Secondarily, the study of human exercise and associated body kinematics in microgravity allows for more complete understanding of human to machine interface designs to allow for maximum functionality of the device in microgravity.

  11. Degradation of learned skills. Effectiveness of practice methods on simulated space flight skill retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitterley, T. E.; Berge, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Manual flight control and emergency procedure task skill degradation was evaluated after time intervals of from 1 to 6 months. The tasks were associated with a simulated launch through the orbit insertion flight phase of a space vehicle. The results showed that acceptable flight control performance was retained for 2 months, rapidly deteriorating thereafter by a factor of 1.7 to 3.1 depending on the performance measure used. Procedural task performance showed unacceptable degradation after only 1 month, and exceeded an order of magnitude after 4 months. The effectiveness of static rehearsal (checklists and briefings) and dynamic warmup (simulator practice) retraining methods were compared for the two tasks. Static rehearsal effectively countered procedural skill degradation, while some combination of dynamic warmup appeared necessary for flight control skill retention. It was apparent that these differences between methods were not solely a function of task type or retraining method, but were a function of the performance measures used for each task.

  12. Real-time aerodynamic heating and surface temperature calculations for hypersonic flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    1990-01-01

    A real-time heating algorithm was derived and installed on the Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility real-time flight simulator. This program can calculate two- and three-dimensional stagnation point surface heating rates and surface temperatures. The two-dimensional calculations can be made with or without leading-edge sweep. In addition, upper and lower surface heating rates and surface temperatures for flat plates, wedges, and cones can be calculated. Laminar or turbulent heating can be calculated, with boundary-layer transition made a function of free-stream Reynolds number and free-stream Mach number. Real-time heating rates and surface temperatures calculated for a generic hypersonic vehicle are presented and compared with more exact values computed by a batch aeroheating program. As these comparisons show, the heating algorithm used on the flight simulator calculates surface heating rates and temperatures well within the accuracy required to evaluate flight profiles for acceptable heating trajectories.

  13. Development of a VOR/DME model for an advanced concepts simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, G. G.; Bowles, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The report presents a definition of a VOR/DME, airborne and ground systems simulation model. This description was drafted in response to a need in the creation of an advanced concepts simulation in which flight station design for the 1980 era can be postulated and examined. The simulation model described herein provides a reasonable representation of VOR/DME station in the continental United States including area coverage by type and noise errors. The detail in which the model has been cast provides the interested researcher with a moderate fidelity level simulator tool for conducting research and evaluation of navigator algorithms. Assumptions made within the development are listed and place certain responsibilities (data bases, communication with other simulation modules, uniform round earth, etc.) upon the researcher.

  14. Can a glass cockpit display help (or hinder) performance of novices in simulated flight training?

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephen; O'Hare, David

    2015-03-01

    The analog dials in traditional GA aircraft cockpits are being replaced by integrated electronic displays, commonly referred to as glass cockpits. Pilots may be trained on glass cockpit aircraft or encounter them after training on traditional displays. The effects of glass cockpit displays on initial performance and potential transfer effects between cockpit display configurations have yet to be adequately investigated. Flight-naïve participants were trained on either a simulated traditional display cockpit or a simulated glass display cockpit. Flight performance was measured in a test flight using either the same or different cockpit display. Loss of control events and accuracy in controlling altitude, airspeed and heading, workload, and situational awareness were assessed. Preferences for cockpit display configurations and opinions on ease of use were also measured. The results revealed consistently poorer performance on the test flight for participants using the glass cockpit compared to the traditional cockpit. In contrast the post-flight questionnaire data revealed a strong subjective preference for the glass cockpit over the traditional cockpit displays. There was only a weak effect of prior training. The specific glass cockpit display used in this study was subjectively appealing but yielded poorer flight performance in participants with no previous flight experience than a traditional display. Performance data can contradict opinion data. The design of glass cockpit displays may present some difficulties for pilots in the very early stages of training.

  15. Gaseous exhaust emissions from a J-58 engine at simulated supersonic flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Emissions of total oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide from a J-58 engine at simulated flight conditions of Mach 2.0, 2.4, and 2.8 at 19.8 km altitude are reported. For each flight condition, measurements were made for four engine power levels from maximum power without afterburning through maximum afterburning. These measurements were made 7 cm downstream of the engine primary nozzle using a single point traversing gas sample probe. Results show that emissions vary with flight speed, engine power level, and with radial position across the exhaust.

  16. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 4: Engineering flight simulation facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Capelluro, L. P.; Harrison, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    The general purpose capabilities of government and industry in the area of real time engineering flight simulation are discussed. The information covers computer equipment, visual systems, crew stations, and motion systems, along with brief statements of facility capabilities. Facility construction and typical operational costs are included where available. The facilities provide for economical and safe solutions to vehicle design, performance, control, and flying qualities problems of manned and unmanned flight systems.

  17. Statistical Trajectory Estimation Program (STEP) implementation for BLDT post flight trajectory simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to provide flight conditions for qualifying the Viking Decelerator System in a simulated Mars environment. A balloon launched decelerator test (BLDT) vehicle which has an external shape similar to the actual Mars Viking Lander Capsule was used so that the decelerator would be deployed in the wake of a blunt body. An effort was made to simulate the BLDT vehicle flights from the time they were dropped from the balloon, through decelerator deployment, until stable decelerator conditions were reached. The procedure used to simulate these flights using the Statistical Trajectory Estimation Program (STEP) is discussed. Using primarily ground-based position radar and vehicle onboard rate gyro and accelerometer data, the STEP produces a minimum variance solution of the vehicle trajectory and calculates vehicle attitude histories. Using film from cameras in the vehicle along with a computer program, attitude histories for portions of the flight before and after decelerator deployment were calculated independent of the STEP simulation. With the assumption that the vehicle motions derived from camera data are accurate, a comparison reveals that STEP was able to simulate vehicle motions for all flights both before and after decelerator deployment.

  18. A flight investigation of simulated data-link communications during single-pilot IFR flight. Volume 1: Experimental design and initial test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. F., Jr.; Duffy, J. W.; Christensen, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    A Flight Data Console simulation of a digital communication link to replace the current voice communication system used in air traffic control (ATC) was developed. The study determined how a digital communications system reduces cockpit workload, improve, flight proficiency, and is acceptable to general aviation pilots. It is shown that instrument flight, including approach and landing, can be accomplished by using a digital data link system for ATC communication.

  19. Emulation of an Advanced G-Seat on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    ASPT ) which culminated in the emulation of an advanced approach to G-seat simulation. The development of the software, the design of the advanced seat...components, the implementation of the advanced design on the ASPT , and the results of the study are presented. (Author)

  20. Development of electrical feedback controlled heat pipes and the advanced thermal control flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of electrical feedback controlled heat pipes (FCHP) are discussed. An analytical model was produced to describe the performance of the FCHP under steady state and transient conditions. An advanced thermal control flight experiment was designed to demonstrate the performance of the thermal control component in a space environment. The thermal control equipment was evaluated on the ATS-F satellite to provide performance data for the components and to act as a thermal control system which can be used to provide temperature stability of spacecraft components in future applications.

  1. A landmark recognition and tracking experiment for flight on the Shuttle/Advanced Technology Laboratory (ATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design of an experiment for landmark recognition and tracking from the Shuttle/Advanced Technology Laboratory is described. It makes use of parallel coherent optical processing to perform correlation tests between landmarks observed passively with a telescope and previously made holographic matched filters. The experimental equipment including the optics, the low power laser, the random access file of matched filters and the electro-optical readout device are described. A real time optically excited liquid crystal device is recommended for performing the input non-coherent optical to coherent optical interface function. A development program leading to a flight experiment in 1981 is outlined.

  2. Simulation-To-Flight (STF-1): A Mission to Enable CubeSat Software-Based Validation and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Justin; Zemerick, Scott; Grubb, Matt; Lucas, John; Jaridi, Majid; Gross, Jason N.; Ohi, Nicholas; Christian, John A.; Vassiliadis, Dimitris; Kadiyala, Anand; Pachol, Matthew; Dawson, Jeremy; Korakakis, Dimitris; Bishop, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The Simulation-to-Flight 1 (STF-1) CubeSat mission aims to demonstrate how legacy simulation technologies may be adapted for flexible and effective use on missions using the CubeSat platform. These technologies, named NASA Operational Simulator (NOS), have demonstrated significant value on several missions such as James Webb Space Telescope, Global Precipitation Measurement, Juno, and Deep Space Climate Observatory in the areas of software development, mission operations/training, verification and validation (V&V), test procedure development and software systems check-out. STF-1 will demonstrate a highly portable simulation and test platform that allows seamless transition of mission development artifacts to flight products. This environment will decrease development time of future CubeSat missions by lessening the dependency on hardware resources. In addition, through a partnership between NASA GSFC, the West Virginia Space Grant Consortium and West Virginia University, the STF-1 CubeSat will hosts payloads for three secondary objectives that aim to advance engineering and physical-science research in the areas of navigation systems of small satellites, provide useful data for understanding magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and space weather, and verify the performance and durability of III-V Nitride-based materials.

  3. ISS emergency scenarios and a virtual training simulator for Flight Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Thomas; Roshani, Frank-Cyrus; Amodio, Ciro; Rovera, Alessandro; Zekusic, Nikola; Helmholz, Hannes; Fairchild, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    The current emergency response concept for the International Space Station (ISS) includes the support of the Flight Control Team. Therefore, the team members need to be trained in emergencies and the corresponding crew procedures to ensure a smooth collaboration between crew and ground. In the case where the astronaut and ground personnel training is not collocated it is a challenging endeavor to ensure and maintain proper knowledge and skills for the Flight Control Team. Therefore, a virtual 3D simulator at the Columbus Control Center (Col-CC) is presented, which is used for ground personnel training in the on-board emergency response. The paper briefly introduces the main ISS emergency scenarios and the corresponding response strategy, details the resulting learning objectives for the Flight Controllers and elaborates on the new simulation method, which will be used in the future. The status of the 3D simulator, first experiences and further plans are discussed.

  4. Rotorcraft brownout mitigation through flight path optimization using a high fidelity rotorcraft simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, Jillian Samantha

    Brownout conditions often occur during approach, landing, and take off in a desert environment and involve the entrainment and mobilization of loose sediment and dust into the rotor flow field. For this research, a high fidelity flight dynamics model is used to perform a study on brownout mitigation through operational means of flight path. In order for the high fidelity simulation to model an approach profile, a method for following specific profiles was developed. An optimization study was then performed using this flight dynamics model in a comprehensive brownout simulation. The optimization found a local shallow optimum approach and a global steep optimum approach minimized the intensity of the resulting brownout clouds. These results were consistent previous mitigation studies and operational methods. The results also demonstrated that the addition of a full rotorcraft model into the brownout simulation changed the characteristics of the velocity flow field, and hence changing the character of the brownout cloud that was produced.

  5. Inverse simulation as a tool for flight dynamics research—Principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Douglas; Bradley, Roy

    2006-05-01

    The technique of inverse simulation is finding application in many and varied fields. As the name implies this technique is used to calculate the control action required to achieve a specified system response. The field of aircraft flight dynamics is particularly suited to this form of simulation as the question of what control actions must the pilot (or automatic flight control system) take for the aircraft to fly along a particular trajectory (a landing approach, for example) is often asked. This paper looks specifically at the application of inverse simulation in flight dynamics. The aim is not only to give an overview of the various techniques and applications but also to provide guidance to potential users of the technique on several of the physical and numerical features often observed in the results. An extensive review of the methodologies used within the family of inverse simulations is presented followed by a formal treatment of the theoretical development of inverse simulation as an established technique. A case study involving the inverse simulation of a helicopter flying a slalom manoeuvre is presented to demonstrate the application of inverse simulation in a flight dynamics analysis. An important feature of the use of inverse simulation is that it is necessary to define the output response required-in the case of flight dynamics the required flight path has to be modelled. Some of the methods used are documented, and their validity discussed. The paper also gives an insight into the types of problem which can be addressed by inverse simulation by detailing some of the many applications to which it has been put in the past. These include studies of rotorcraft handling qualities, performance and design, and pilot modelling as well as model validation. An important element of this paper is the formal, theoretical analysis of some of the numerical and physical features exhibited by inverse simulation which should aid potential users to interpret their

  6. Rapidly Re-Configurable Flight Simulator Tools for Crew Vehicle Integration Research and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Paul C.; Trujillo, Anna; Pritchett, Amy R.

    2000-01-01

    While simulation is a valuable research and design tool, the time and difficulty required to create new simulations (or re-use existing simulations) often limits their application. This report describes the design of the software architecture for the Reconfigurable Flight Simulator (RFS), which provides a robust simulation framework that allows the simulator to fulfill multiple research and development goals. The core of the architecture provides the interface standards for simulation components, registers and initializes components, and handles the communication between simulation components. The simulation components are each a pre-compiled library 'plug-in' module. This modularity allows independent development and sharing of individual simulation components. Additional interfaces can be provided through the use of Object Data/Method Extensions (OD/ME). RFS provides a programmable run-time environment for real-time access and manipulation, and has networking capabilities using the High Level Architecture (HLA).

  7. Rapidly Re-Configurable Flight Simulator Tools for Crew Vehicle Integration Research and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.

    2002-01-01

    While simulation is a valuable research and design tool, the time and difficulty required to create new simulations (or re-use existing simulations) often limits their application. This report describes the design of the software architecture for the Reconfigurable Flight Simulator (RFS), which provides a robust simulation framework that allows the simulator to fulfill multiple research and development goals. The core of the architecture provides the interface standards for simulation components, registers and initializes components, and handles the communication between simulation components. The simulation components are each a pre-compiled library 'plugin' module. This modularity allows independent development and sharing of individual simulation components. Additional interfaces can be provided through the use of Object Data/Method Extensions (OD/ME). RFS provides a programmable run-time environment for real-time access and manipulation, and has networking capabilities using the High Level Architecture (HLA).

  8. The Role of Adaptive Supplemental Visual Cuing in Flight Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    aircrif!t S-1 a3o em J) e by in .re vi Aer" "yne foris eoo -., Doto f the a .ro raf t before learnin of 1!; 3p~ 1 1 e t a 3K, part ic,:larly perceptual...77-A195 932 THE ROLE OF ADAPTIVE SUPPLEMENTAL VISUAL CUING IN t/1 FLIGHT 5IMULRTION(U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSONAFA OH E RBBILLMAN 1987...UNCLASSIFIED AF T/CI/NR-8 -iB6T F/G 5/9 UL E ,7hEcE7hEhhhhEEohEohhE EhhhhmmhhohhE _ _ , -,,.ah. .- ’-, - .. - ’ . ’ -~ ..V .. _ .. ,,. . . , ,,VW Y W

  9. Modeling methods for high-fidelity rotorcraft flight mechanics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansur, M. Hossein; Tischler, Mark B.; Chaimovich, Menahem; Rosen, Aviv; Rand, Omri

    1992-01-01

    The cooperative effort being carried out under the agreements of the United States-Israel Memorandum of Understanding is discussed. Two different models of the AH-64 Apache Helicopter, which may differ in their approach to modeling the main rotor, are presented. The first model, the Blade Element Model for the Apache (BEMAP), was developed at Ames Research Center, and is the only model of the Apache to employ a direct blade element approach to calculating the coupled flap-lag motion of the blades and the rotor force and moment. The second model was developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and uses an harmonic approach to analyze the rotor. The approach allows two different levels of approximation, ranging from the 'first harmonic' (similar to a tip-path-plane model) to 'complete high harmonics' (comparable to a blade element approach). The development of the two models is outlined and the two are compared using available flight test data.

  10. Validation test of advanced technology for IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells: Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts with the intention of improving cycle life and performance. One advancement was to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte to improve cycle life. Another advancement was to modify the state-of-the-art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes. The modified design is referred to as the advanced design. A breakthrough in the low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO testing at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis Contract. An advanced 125 Ah IPV nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, LEO spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent KOH electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are: extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of nickel electrode expansion. The advanced cell design is in the process of being validated using real time LEO cycle life testing of NWSC, Crane, Indiana. An update of validation test results confirming this technology is presented.

  11. Aircraft flight simulation of spacelab experiment using an implanted telemetry system to obtain cardiovascular data from the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, E. P.; Miranda, R.; Fryer, T. B.; Hodges, G.; Newson, B. D.; Pace, N.

    1977-01-01

    The utility of a multichannel implantable telemetry system for obtaining cardiovascular data was tested in a monkey with a CV-990 aircraft flight simulation of a space flight experiment. Valuable data were obtained to aid planning and execution of flight experiments using chronically instrumented animals.

  12. Voice measures of workload in the advanced flight deck: Additional studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Sid J.; Alpert, Murray

    1989-01-01

    These studies investigated acoustical analysis of the voice as a measure of workload in individual operators. In the first study, voice samples were recorded from a single operator during high, medium, and low workload conditions. Mean amplitude, frequency, syllable duration, and emphasis all tended to increase as workload increased. In the second study, NASA test pilots performed a laboratory task, and used a flight simulator under differing work conditions. For two of the pilots, high workload in the simulator brought about greater amplitude, peak duration, and stress. In both the laboratory and simulator tasks, high workload tended to be associated with more statistically significant drop-offs in the acoustical measures than were lower workload levels. There was a great deal of intra-subject variability in the acoustical measures. The results suggested that in individual operators, increased workload might be revealed by high initial amplitude and frequency, followed by rapid drop-offs over time.

  13. A method for three-dimensional modeling of wind-shear environments for flight simulator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    A computational method for modeling severe wind shears of the type that have been documented during severe convective atmospheric conditions is offered for use in research and training flight simulation. The procedure was developed with the objectives of operational flexibility and minimum computer load. From one to five, simple down burst wind models can be configured and located to produce the wind field desired for specific simulated flight scenarios. A definition of related turbulence parameters is offered as an additional product of the computations. The use of the method to model several documented examples of severe wind shear is demonstrated.

  14. Flight Simulator Experiments on Influence of Wideness of Front View for Pilot's Roll Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumata, Kazunari; Nishihata, Michiteru; Kobayashi, Osamu

    Fixed based flight simulator experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of wideness of front view for pilot's roll control. In these experiments, the airplane's motion was considered as a single-degree-of-freedom system in roll, and three front views having different view-angle were provided. The results of these experiments showed that the pilot's roll control characteristics, and the pilot's sensing parameter and reaction time for rolling motion were influenced by the differences of wideness of front view in flight simulator.

  15. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua; Wang, Xuyong; Wang, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  16. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Xuyong

    2014-12-15

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  17. An optimal control approach to the design of moving flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivan, R.; Ish-Shalom, J.; Huang, J.-K.

    1982-01-01

    An abstract flight simulator design problem is formulated in the form of an optimal control problem, which is solved for the linear-quadratic-Gaussian special case using a mathematical model of the vestibular organs. The optimization criterion used is the mean-square difference between the physiological outputs of the vestibular organs of the pilot in the aircraft and the pilot in the simulator. The dynamical equations are linearized, and the output signal is modeled as a random process with rational power spectral density. The method described yields the optimal structure of the simulator's motion generator, or 'washout filter'. A two-degree-of-freedom flight simulator design, including single output simulations, is presented.

  18. Simulation Training Versus Real Time Console Training for New Flight Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    For new flight controllers, the two main learning tools are simulations and real time console performance training. These benefit the new flight controllers in different ways and could possibly be improved. Simulations: a) Allow for mistakes without serious consequences. b) Lets new flight controllers learn the working style of other new flight controllers. c) Lets new flight controllers eventually begin to feel like they have mastered the sim world, so therefore they must be competent in the real time world too. Real time: a) Shows new flight controllers some of the unique problems that develop and have to be accounted for when dealing with certain payloads or systems. b) Lets new flight controllers experience handovers - gathering information from the previous shift on what the room needs to be aware of and what still needs to be done. c) Gives new flight controllers confidence that they can succeed in the position they are training for when they can solve real anomalies. How Sims could be improved and more like real-time ops for the ISS Operations Controller position: a) Operations Change Requests to review. b) Fewer anomalies (but still more than real time for practice). c) Payload Planning Manager Handover sheet for the E-1 and E-3 reviews. d) Flight note in system with at least one comment to verify for the E-1 and E-3 reviews How the real time console performance training could be improved for the ISS Operations Controller position: a) Schedule the new flight controller to be on console for four days but with a different certified person each day. This will force them to be the source of knowledge about every OCR in progress, everything that has happened in those few days, and every activity on the timeline. Constellation program flight controllers will have to learn entirely from simulations, thereby losing some of the elements that they will need to have experience with for real time ops. It may help them to practice real time console performance training

  19. [EEG-correlates of pilots' functional condition in simulated flight dynamics].

    PubMed

    Kiroy, V N; Aslanyan, E V; Bakhtin, O M; Minyaeva, N R; Lazurenko, D M

    2015-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of the EEG recorded on two professional pilots in the simulator TU-154 aircraft in flight dynamics, including takeoff, landing and horizontal flight (in particular during difficult conditions) were analyzed. EEG recording was made with frequency band 0.1-70 Hz continuously from 15 electrodes. The EEG recordings were evaluated using analysis of variance and discriminant analysis. Statistical significant of the identified differences and the influence of the main factors and their interactions were evaluated using Greenhouse - Gaiser corrections. It was shown that the spectral characteristics of the EEG are highly informative features of the state of the pilots, reflecting the different flight phases. High validity ofthe differences including individual characteristic, indicates their non-random nature and the possibility of constructing a system of pilots' state control during all phases of flight, based on EEG features.

  20. Workstation-Based Avionics Simulator to Support Mars Science Laboratory Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriquez, David; Canham, Timothy; Chang, Johnny T.; McMahon, Elihu

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory developed the WorkStation TestSet (WSTS) to support flight software development. The WSTS is the non-real-time flight avionics simulator that is designed to be completely software-based and run on a workstation class Linux PC. This provides flight software developers with their own virtual avionics testbed and allows device-level and functional software testing when hardware testbeds are either not yet available or have limited availability. The WSTS has successfully off-loaded many flight software development activities from the project testbeds. At the writing of this paper, the WSTS has averaged an order of magnitude more usage than the project's hardware testbeds.

  1. Lessons Learned from Numerical Simulations of the F-16XL Aircraft at Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Arthur; Jirasek, Adam; Lamar, John; Crippa, Simone; Badcock, Kenneth; Boelens, Oklo

    2009-01-01

    Nine groups participating in the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International (CAWAPI) project have contributed steady and unsteady viscous simulations of a full-scale, semi-span model of the F-16XL aircraft. Three different categories of flight Reynolds/Mach number combinations were computed and compared with flight-test measurements for the purpose of code validation and improved understanding of the flight physics. Steady-state simulations are done with several turbulence models of different complexity with no topology information required and which overcome Boussinesq-assumption problems in vortical flows. Detached-eddy simulation (DES) and its successor delayed detached-eddy simulation (DDES) have been used to compute the time accurate flow development. Common structured and unstructured grids as well as individually-adapted unstructured grids were used. Although discrepancies are observed in the comparisons, overall reasonable agreement is demonstrated for surface pressure distribution, local skin friction and boundary velocity profiles at subsonic speeds. The physical modeling, steady or unsteady, and the grid resolution both contribute to the discrepancies observed in the comparisons with flight data, but at this time it cannot be determined how much each part contributes to the whole. Overall it can be said that the technology readiness of CFD-simulation technology for the study of vehicle performance has matured since 2001 such that it can be used today with a reasonable level of confidence for complex configurations.

  2. Development and Utility of a Piloted Flight Simulator for Icing Effects Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Ranaudo, Richard J.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Dickes, Edward G.; Gingras, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A piloted flight simulator called the Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD), which uses low cost desktop components and a generic cockpit replication is being developed. The purpose of this device is to demonstrate the effectiveness of its use for training pilots to recognize and recover from aircraft handling anomalies that result from airframe ice formations. High-fidelity flight simulation models for various baseline (non-iced) and iced configurations were developed from wind tunnel tests of a subscale DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft model. These simulation models were validated with flight test data from the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft, which included the effects of ice on wing and tail stall characteristics. These simulation models are being implemented into an ICEFTD that will provide representative aircraft characteristics due to airframe icing. Scenario-based exercises are being constructed to give an operational-flavor to the simulation. Training pilots will learn to recognize iced aircraft characteristics from the baseline, and will practice and apply appropriate recovery procedures to a handling event.

  3. Validation of the Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Program (C81) Using Operational Loads Survey Flight Test Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    could be improved by the use of one of the sensitive, accurate, cup - anemometer type of airspeed sensors that have recently been developed. 8.1.4...programs of this nature to enhance their use for the validation of simulation programs: - Remove the airspeed sensor from the boom and use a cup - anemometer ...transducers to allow access to the instrumentation. Hot-wire anemometers were then applied to the leading edge at the same five blade stations. 24 The

  4. Simulation and flight test evaluation of head-up-display guidance for harrier approach transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorr, D. W.; Moralez, E., III; Merrick, V. K.

    1994-01-01

    Position and speed guidance displays for STOVL aircraft curved, decelerating approaches to hover and vertical landing have been evaluated for their effectiveness in reducing pilot workload and improving performance. The NASA V/STOL Systems Research Aircraft, a modified YAV-8B Harrier prototype, was used to evaluate the displays in flight, whereas the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator was used to extend the flight test results to instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) and to examine performance in various conditions of wind and turbulence. The simulation data showed close correlation with the flight test data, and both demonstrated the feasibility of the displays. With the exception of the hover task in zero visibility, which was level-3, averaged Copper-Harper handling qualities ratings given during simulation were level-2 for both the approach task and the hover task in all conditions. During flight tests in calm and clear conditions, the displays also gave rise to level-2 handling qualities ratings. Pilot opinion showed that the guidance displays would be useful in visual flight, especially at night, as well as in IMC.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Flight Simulators for Military Training. Volume 2. Estimating Costs of Training in Simulators and Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    academico and simulator session and each flight sortie (for each category of pilot and NFO.) These descriptions, though, are the same for both pilot and...for which acquisition has not been completed. Aircraft used in continuation and transition training generoally have mobilization assignments, and the

  6. Simulator design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    This simulation design task completion report documents the simulation techniques associated with the network models of both the Interim Service ISDN (integrated services digital network) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures. The ISIS network model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communication satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete events simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  7. An Integrated Approach for Entry Mission Design and Flight Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping; Rao, Prabhakara

    2004-01-01

    An integrated approach for entry trajectory design, guidance, and simulation is proposed. The key ingredients for this approach are an on-line 3 degree-of-freedom entry trajectory planning algorithm and the entry guidance algorithm that generates the guidance gains automatically. When fully developed, such a tool could enable end-bend entry mission design and simulations in 3DOF and 6DOF mode from de-orbit burn to the TAEM interface and beyond, all in one key stroke. Some preliminary examples of such a capability are presented in this paper that demonstrate the potential of this type of integrated environment.

  8. Enhanced Capabilities of Advanced Airborne Radar Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    RCF UNIX-Based Machine 65 BAUHAUS A-l Illustrations to Understand How GTD Files are Read 78 C-l Input File for Sidelobe Jammer Nulling...on the UNIX-based machine BAUHAUS are provided to illustrate the enhancements in run time, as compared to the original version of the simulation [1...Figure 27 presents some CPU run times for executing the enhanced simulation on the RCF UNIX-based machine BAUHAUS . The run times are shown only for

  9. In-flight acoustic results from an advanced-design propeller at Mach numbers to 0.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, K. G.; Lasagna, P. L.; Walsh, K.; Dittmar, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic data for the advanced-design SR-3 propeller at Mach numbers to 0.8 and helical tip Mach numbers to 1.14 are presented. Several advanced-design propellers, previously tested in wind tunnels at the Lewis Research Center, are being tested in flight at the Dryden Flight Research Facility. The flight-test propellers are mounted on a pylon on the top of the fuselage of a JetStar airplane. Instrumentation provides near-field acoustic data for the SR-3. Acoustic data for the SR-3 propeller at Mach numbers up to 0.8, for propeller helical tip Mach numbers up to 1.14, and comparison of wind tunnel to flight data are included. Flowfield profiles measured in the area adjacent to the propeller are also included.

  10. Full Scale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST): Capabilities and Recent Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    At the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center research is being conducted into flight control technologies that will enable the next generation of air and space vehicles. The Full Scale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST) aircraft provides a laboratory for flight exploration of these technologies. In recent years novel but simple adaptive architectures for aircraft and rockets have been researched along with control technologies for improving aircraft fuel efficiency and control structural interaction. This presentation outlines the FAST capabilities and provides a snapshot of the research accomplishments to date. Flight experimentation allows a researcher to substantiate or invalidate their assumptions and intuition about a new technology or innovative approach Data early in a development cycle is invaluable for determining which technology barriers are real and which ones are imagined Data for a technology at a low TRL can be used to steer and focus the exploration and fuel rapid advances based on real world lessons learned It is important to identify technologies that are mature enough to benefit from flight research data and not be tempted to wait until we have solved all the potential issues prior to getting some data Sometimes a stagnated technology just needs a little real world data to get it going One trick to getting data for low TRL technologies is finding an environment where it is okay to take risks, where occasional failure is an expected outcome Learning how things fail is often as valuable as showing that they work FAST has been architected to facilitate this type of testing for control system technologies, specifically novel algorithms and sensors Rapid prototyping with a quick turnaround in a fly-fix-fly paradigm Sometimes it's easier and cheaper to just go fly it than to analyze the problem to death The goal is to find and test control technologies that would benefit from flight data and find solutions to the real barriers to innovation. The FAST

  11. Measurement and simulation of the response function of time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer for beam ion studies at EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, X. Y.; Chen, Z. J.; Zhang, X.; Du, T. F.; Hu, Z. M.; Ge, L. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Sun, J. Q.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Pu, N.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S.

    2016-11-01

    The 2.5 MeV TOFED (Time-Of-Flight Enhanced Diagnostics) neutron spectrometer with a double-ring structure has been installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to perform advanced neutron emission spectroscopy diagnosis of deuterium plasmas. This work describes the response function of the TOFED spectrometer, which is evaluated for the fully assembled instrument in its final layout. Results from Monte Carlo simulations and dedicated experiments with pulsed light sources are presented and used to determine properties of light transport from the scintillator. A GEANT4 model of the TOFED spectrometer was developed to calculate the instrument response matrix. The simulated TOFED response function was successfully benchmarked against measurements of the time-of-flight spectra for quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range of 1-4 MeV. The results are discussed in relation to the capability of TOFED to perform beam ion studies on EAST.

  12. Measurement and simulation of the response function of time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer for beam ion studies at EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Peng, X Y; Chen, Z J; Zhang, X; Du, T F; Hu, Z M; Ge, L J; Zhang, Y M; Sun, J Q; Gorini, G; Nocente, M; Tardocchi, M; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Pu, N; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H; Chen, J X; Fan, T S

    2016-11-01

    The 2.5 MeV TOFED (Time-Of-Flight Enhanced Diagnostics) neutron spectrometer with a double-ring structure has been installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to perform advanced neutron emission spectroscopy diagnosis of deuterium plasmas. This work describes the response function of the TOFED spectrometer, which is evaluated for the fully assembled instrument in its final layout. Results from Monte Carlo simulations and dedicated experiments with pulsed light sources are presented and used to determine properties of light transport from the scintillator. A GEANT4 model of the TOFED spectrometer was developed to calculate the instrument response matrix. The simulated TOFED response function was successfully benchmarked against measurements of the time-of-flight spectra for quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range of 1-4 MeV. The results are discussed in relation to the capability of TOFED to perform beam ion studies on EAST.

  13. Predicting Performance in Technical Preclinical Dental Courses Using Advanced Simulation.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Riki; Baechle, Mary A; Janus, Charles; Lanning, Sharon K

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether advanced simulation parameters, such as simulation exam scores, number of student self-evaluations, time to complete the simulation, and time to complete self-evaluations, served as predictors of dental students' preclinical performance. Students from three consecutive classes (n=282) at one U.S. dental school completed advanced simulation training and exams within the first four months of their dental curriculum. The students then completed conventional preclinical instruction and exams in operative dentistry (OD) and fixed prosthodontics (FP) courses, taken during the first and second years of dental school, respectively. Two advanced simulation exam scores (ASES1 and ASES2) were tested as predictors of performance in the two preclinical courses based on final course grades. ASES1 and ASES2 were found to be predictors of OD and FP preclinical course grades. Other advanced simulation parameters were not significantly related to grades in the preclinical courses. These results highlight the value of an early psychomotor skills assessment in dentistry. Advanced simulation scores may allow early intervention in students' learning process and assist in efficient allocation of resources such as faculty coverage and tutor assignment.

  14. The physiological consequences of simulated helicopter flight in NBC protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Thornton, R; Caldwell, J L

    1993-01-01

    The physiological effects of wearing U.S. Army aviator nuclear-biological-chemical (NBC) individual protective equipment (IPE) were evaluated in the USAARL UH-60 research flight simulator. There were 16 male aviators who flew the simulator in 4 test conditions: standard flight suit and cool cockpit, standard flight suit and hot cockpit, NBC IPE and cool cockpit, NBC IPE and hot cockpit. The cool condition was a WBGT of 17.9 degrees C, the hot 30.6 degrees C. Rectal temperature, mean skin temperature, and heart rate were monitored and showed significant increases for the NBC hot condition compared with the other three. Seven subjects failed to complete the sortie in the NBC hot condition, with a mean survival time of 298 min. All subjects flew for the target 6 h in the other conditions.

  15. Simulation and Flight Test Capability for Testing Prototype Sense and Avoid System Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Charles T.; Stock, Todd M.; Verstynen, Harry A.; Wehner, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and The MITRE Corporation (MITRE) have developed, and successfully demonstrated, an integrated simulation-to-flight capability for evaluating sense and avoid (SAA) system elements. This integrated capability consists of a MITRE developed fast-time computer simulation for evaluating SAA algorithms, and a NASA LaRC surrogate unmanned aircraft system (UAS) equipped to support hardware and software in-the-loop evaluation of SAA system elements (e.g., algorithms, sensors, architecture, communications, autonomous systems), concepts, and procedures. The fast-time computer simulation subjects algorithms to simulated flight encounters/ conditions and generates a fitness report that records strengths, weaknesses, and overall performance. Reviewed algorithms (and their fitness report) are then transferred to NASA LaRC where additional (joint) airworthiness evaluations are performed on the candidate SAA system-element configurations, concepts, and/or procedures of interest; software and hardware components are integrated into the Surrogate UAS research systems; and flight safety and mission planning activities are completed. Onboard the Surrogate UAS, candidate SAA system element configurations, concepts, and/or procedures are subjected to flight evaluations and in-flight performance is monitored. The Surrogate UAS, which can be controlled remotely via generic Ground Station uplink or automatically via onboard systems, operates with a NASA Safety Pilot/Pilot in Command onboard to permit safe operations in mixed airspace with manned aircraft. An end-to-end demonstration of a typical application of the capability was performed in non-exclusionary airspace in October 2011; additional research, development, flight testing, and evaluation efforts using this integrated capability are planned throughout fiscal year 2012 and 2013.

  16. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods and techniques... and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced airplane simulators. The requirements in... Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or D training under this appendix all...

  17. Assessment of simulation fidelity using measurements of piloting technique in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, S. W.; Clement, W. F.; Cleveland, W. B.; Key, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Army and NASA have undertaken the systematic validation of a ground-based piloted simulator for the UH-60A helicopter. The results of previous handling quality and task performance flight tests for this helicopter have been used as a data base for evaluating the fidelity of the present simulation, which is being conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center's Vertical Motion Simulator. Such nap-of-the-earth piloting tasks as pop-up, hover turn, dash/quick stop, sidestep, dolphin, and slalom, have been investigated. It is noted that pilot simulator performance is significantly and quantifiable degraded by comparison with flight test results for the same tasks.

  18. A high fidelity video delivery system for real-time flight simulation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Daniel A.; Roach, Carl C.

    1993-01-01

    The Flight Systems and Simulation Research Laboratory (Simlab) at the NASA Ames Research Center, utilizes an extensive network of video image generation, delivery, processing, and display systems coupled with a large amplitude Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to provide a high fidelity visual environment for flight simulation research. This paper will explore the capabilities of the current Simlab video distribution system architecture with a view toward technical solutions implemented to resolve a variety of video interface, switching, and distribution issues common to many simulation facilities. Technical discussions include a modular approach to a video switching and distribution system capable of supporting both coax and fiber optic video signal transmission, video scan conversion and processing techniques for lab observation and recording, adaptation of image generation and display system video interfaces to industry standards, an all raster solution for 'glass cockpit' configurations encompassing Head up, Head-down, and Out-the-Window display systems.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  20. Transfer of Training Effectiveness in Flight Simulation: 1986 to 1997.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    scenarios. REFERENCES Goettl, B . P. (1995). Part-task training of complex tasks. In Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and... B . E., & Roscoe, S. N. (1987). Content, variety, and augmentation of simulated visual scenes for teaching air-to-ground attack. Human Factors, 29...Space, and Environmental Medicine, 60, 1043-1048. Brooks, R. B . (1985). Radar warning receiver special function trainer: Preliminary Evaluation

  1. A compact inflow control device for simulating flight fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homyak, L.; Mcardle, J. G.; Heidelberg, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Inflow control device (ICD's) of various shapes and sizes have been used to simulate inflight fan tone noise during ground static tests. A small, simple inexpensive ICD design was optimized from previous design and fabrication techniques. This compact two-fan-diameter ICD exhibits satisfactory acoustic performance characteristics without causing noise attenuation or redirection. In addition, it generates no important new noise sources. Design and construction details of the compact ICD are discussed and acoustic performance test results are presented.

  2. STS 51-L crewmembers during training session in flight deck simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    S85-46207 (December 1985) --- Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) scene of astronauts Michael J. Smith, Ellison S. Onizuka, Judith A. Resnik, and Francis R. (Dick) Scobee in their launch and entry positions on the flight deck. The photo was taken by Bill Bowers.

  3. Evaluation of the Course of the Flight Simulators from the Perspective of Students and University Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaysi, Feyzi; Bavli, Bünyamin; Gürol, Aysun

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluates the flight simulators course which was opened to fulfill the intermediate staff need of the sector. To collect data, Qualitative techniques were applied. Within this scope, the case study method was employed in the study. The study group consisted of students and instructors. In-depth and focus group interviews were conducted…

  4. Orbiter/shuttle carrier aircraft separation: Wind tunnel, simulation, and flight test overview and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, D. J.; Denison, D. E.; Elchert, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the approach and landing test phase of the space shuttle program is given from the orbiter/shuttle carrier aircraft separation point of view. The data and analyses used during the wind tunnel testing, simulation, and flight test phases in preparation for the orbiter approach and landing tests are reported.

  5. Simulating Parabolic Flight like g-Profiles on Ground - A Combination of Centrifuge and Clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brungs, Sonja; Petrat, Guido; der Wiesche, Melanie von; Anken, Ralf; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    Clinostats and centrifuges are widely used to create simulated microgravity or hypergravity, respectively, in order to study the impact of gravity on biosystems. Here, we used a clinostat and a centrifuge in alternating modes of operation in order to create a simulated parabolic flight like g-profile. To our knowledge, it is the first time that both devices were run in connection. In order to test the method, we investigated the production of reactive oxygen species of immune cells (macrophages) during oxidative burst in an on-line kinetic approach, which has been extensively studied under real (parabolic flight) and simulated microgravity (clinostat) as well as under hypergravity conditions (centrifuge). Our results indicate that clinostat and centrifuge can be operated in an alternating way to simulate the repetitive changes of gravity during parabolic flight. Although the switch from one gravity level to the other could not be carried out as quickly as it takes place during actual parabolic flight due to technical and operational reasons, it can be concluded that running experiments in a clinostat aboard a centrifuge on ground are suitable for studying gravity-related phenomena.

  6. 14 CFR 60.35 - Specific full flight simulator compliance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN FLIGHT SIMULATION TRAINING DEVICE INITIAL AND CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND USE... initial or upgrade qualification to a FFS at Level C or Level D under this part unless it includes the... certificate or rating. (b) No device will be eligible for initial or upgrade qualification to a FFS at Level...

  7. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators. 237.102-71 Section 237.102-71 Federal Acquisition...

  8. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators. 237.102-71 Section 237.102-71 Federal Acquisition...

  9. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators. 237.102-71 Section 237.102-71 Federal Acquisition...

  10. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators. 237.102-71 Section 237.102-71 Federal Acquisition...

  11. Effects of visual flight display dynamics on altitude tracking performance in a flight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weener, E. F.; Howe, R. M.; Pew, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The effects were studied of visual display dynamics on pilot tracking performance in a simulator. The tracking task consisted of maintaining the piloted aircraft at the same altitude as two aircraft positioned three-hundred feet ahead; as would be required in level formation flying. The two leading aircraft were represented symbolically along with the horizon on a CRT display. Vertical position of these aircraft with respect to the horizon indicated the altitude of the subject's aircraft, which was disturbed by atmospheric turbulence. Various bandwidths of second-order dynamics were interposed between the true aircraft altitude and the displayed altitude, whereas no dynamics were interposed in the attitude display. Experiments were run using two experienced pilots and two substantially different longitudinal dynamics for the piloted aircraft. Preliminary results indicate a significant decrease in altitude tracking performance for display dynamics with natural frequencies below ten radians per second.

  12. Simulator evaluation of a flight-path-angle control system for a transport airplane with direct lift control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    A piloted simulator was used to evaluate the flight path angle control capabilities of a system that employs spoiler direct lift control. The system was designated the velocity vector control system and was compared with a baseline flight path angle control system which used elevator for control. The simulated airplane was a medium jet transport. Research pilots flew a manual instrument landing system glide slope tracking task and a variable flight path angle task in the landing configuration to obtain comparative performance data.

  13. STS 51-L crewmembers during training session in flight deck simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Shuttle mission simulator (SMS) scene of Astronauts Michael J. Smith, Ellison S. Onizuka, Judith A. Resnik, and Francis R. (Dick) Scobee in their launch and entry positions on the flight deck (46207); Left to right, Backup payload specialist Barbara R. Morgan, Teacher in Space Payload specialist Christa McAuliffe, Hughes Payload specialist Gregory B. Jarvis, and Mission Specialist Ronald E. McNair in the middeck portion of the Shuttle Mission Simulator at JSC (46208).

  14. Pitch control margin at high angle of attack - Quantitative requirements (flight test correlation with simulation predictions)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackey, J.; Hadfield, C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent mishaps and incidents on Class IV aircraft have shown a need for establishing quantitative longitudinal high angle of attack (AOA) pitch control margin design guidelines for future aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center has conducted a series of simulation tests to define these design guidelines. Flight test results have confirmed the simulation studies in that pilot rating of high AOA nose-down recoveries were based on the short-term response interval in the forms of pitch acceleration and rate.

  15. Advanced Simulation and Computing Business Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rummel, E.

    2015-07-09

    To maintain a credible nuclear weapons program, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Office of Defense Programs (DP) needs to make certain that the capabilities, tools, and expert staff are in place and are able to deliver validated assessments. This requires a complete and robust simulation environment backed by an experimental program to test ASC Program models. This ASC Business Plan document encapsulates a complex set of elements, each of which is essential to the success of the simulation component of the Nuclear Security Enterprise. The ASC Business Plan addresses the hiring, mentoring, and retaining of programmatic technical staff responsible for building the simulation tools of the nuclear security complex. The ASC Business Plan describes how the ASC Program engages with industry partners—partners upon whom the ASC Program relies on for today’s and tomorrow’s high performance architectures. Each piece in this chain is essential to assure policymakers, who must make decisions based on the results of simulations, that they are receiving all the actionable information they need.

  16. Interactive visualization to advance earthquake simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, L.H.; Bawden, G.W.; Bernardin, T.; Billen, M.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M.; Kreylos, O.; Staadt, O.; Sumner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. For example, simulations of earthquake-related processes typically generate complex, time-varying data sets in two or more dimensions. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these data sets, evaluate the underlying models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. Virtual mapping tools allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions. Interactive tools allow us to manipulate shapes in order to construct models of geological features for geodynamic models, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulation or field observations, thereby enabling us to improve our interpretation of the dynamical processes that drive earthquakes. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool, albeit with active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. This approach also takes advantage of the specialized skills of geological scientists who are trained to interpret, the often limited, geological and geophysical data available from field observations. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  17. Display content in advanced NVG and HMD systems: a pilot/flight surgeon's concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Joseph C.

    2008-04-01

    Night vision goggles have been in use for many years and limitations in their use have been well studied through training research and flight experience. However, advances in technology have led to improvements in NVG display capabilities and in some cases helmet mounted display (HMD) technology has begun replacing NVG systems. These advances have led to an increase in the complexity of imaged scene content, thus requiring a greater level of cognitive effort for interpretation, especially when compared to the images provided by current NVG systems. In some cases the complexity of visual imagery has resulted in systems not being classified as operationally suitable. This presentation will focus on a few of the problems noted while testing some of these advanced systems. Topics will include: added complexity of imagery in wide-field-of-view (WFOV) NVG systems, effects due to imagery created by sensors displaced from the normal eye position (increased interocular separation), effects due to imagery projected onto seethrough visor designs, and effects resulting from cockpit design/geometry (e.g., location and design of large-format head-down displays, and the position of structures such as window frames). Training concerns and potential mitigation strategies for HMD design concepts will also be covered. The issues discussed are important for manufacturers to understand during the early design phase, and for testers to understand during developmental or operational testing.

  18. Advanced Concepts, Technologies and Flight Experiments for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, Barry D.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has established a tradition of excellence in scientific research and leading-edge system developments, which have contributed to improved scientific understanding of our Earth system. Specifically, LaRC advances knowledge of atmospheric processes to enable proactive climate prediction and, in that role, develops first-of-a-kind atmospheric sensing capabilities that permit a variety of new measurements to be made within a constrained enterprise budget. These advances are enabled by the timely development and infusion of new, state-of-the-art (SOA), active and passive instrument and sensor technologies. In addition, LaRC's center-of-excellence in structures and materials is being applied to the technological challenges of reducing measurement system size, mass, and cost through the development and use of space-durable materials; lightweight, multi-functional structures; and large deployable/inflatable structures. NASA Langley is engaged in advancing these technologies across the full range of readiness levels from concept, to components, to prototypes, to flight experiments, and on to actual science mission infusion. The purpose of this paper is to describe current activities and capabilities, recent achievements, and future plans of the integrated science, engineering, and technology team at Langley Research Center who are working to enable the future of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  19. Simulation Credibility: Advances in Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B. (Editor); Eklund, Dean R.; Romero, Vicente J.; Pearce, Jeffrey A.; Keim, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    Decision makers and other users of simulations need to know quantified simulation credibility to make simulation-based critical decisions and effectively use simulations, respectively. The credibility of a simulation is quantified by its accuracy in terms of uncertainty, and the responsibility of establishing credibility lies with the creator of the simulation. In this volume, we present some state-of-the-art philosophies, principles, and frameworks. The contributing authors involved in this publication have been dedicated to advancing simulation credibility. They detail and provide examples of key advances over the last 10 years in the processes used to quantify simulation credibility: verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification. The philosophies and assessment methods presented here are anticipated to be useful to other technical communities conducting continuum physics-based simulations; for example, issues related to the establishment of simulation credibility in the discipline of propulsion are discussed. We envision that simulation creators will find this volume very useful to guide and assist them in quantitatively conveying the credibility of their simulations.

  20. Simulation Toolkit for Renewable Energy Advanced Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Scott; Kemper, Travis; Larsen, Ross; Graf, Peter

    2013-11-13

    STREAMM is a collection of python classes and scripts that enables and eases the setup of input files and configuration files for simulations of advanced energy materials. The core STREAMM python classes provide a general framework for storing, manipulating and analyzing atomic/molecular coordinates to be used in quantum chemistry and classical molecular dynamics simulations of soft materials systems. The design focuses on enabling the interoperability of materials simulation codes such as GROMACS, LAMMPS and Gaussian.

  1. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices E Appendix E to Part 60 Aeronautics and...—Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices Begin... NSPM a proposed Quality Management System (QMS) program as described in this appendix. The NSPM...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices E Appendix E to Part 60 Aeronautics and...—Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices Begin... NSPM a proposed Quality Management System (QMS) program as described in this appendix. The NSPM...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices E Appendix E to Part 60 Aeronautics and...—Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices Begin... NSPM a proposed Quality Management System (QMS) program as described in this appendix. The NSPM...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices E Appendix E to Part 60 Aeronautics and...—Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices Begin... NSPM a proposed Quality Management System (QMS) program as described in this appendix. The NSPM...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices E Appendix E to Part 60 Aeronautics and...—Qualification Performance Standards for Quality Management Systems for Flight Simulation Training Devices Begin... NSPM a proposed Quality Management System (QMS) program as described in this appendix. The NSPM...

  6. Simulator Evaluation of Simplified Propulsion-Only Emergency Flight Control Systems on Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Kaneshige, John; Bull, John; Maine, Trindel A.

    1999-01-01

    With the advent of digital engine control systems, considering the use of engine thrust for emergency flight control has become feasible. Many incidents have occurred in which engine thrust supplemented or replaced normal aircraft flight controls. In most of these cases, a crash has resulted, and more than 1100 lives have been lost. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system in which computer-controlled engine thrust provides emergency flight control capability. Using this PCA system, an F-15 and an MD-11 airplane have been landed without using any flight controls. In simulations, C-17, B-757, and B-747 PCA systems have also been evaluated successfully. These tests used full-authority digital electronic control systems on the engines. Developing simpler PCA systems that can operate without full-authority engine control, thus allowing PCA technology to be installed on less capable airplanes or at lower cost, is also a desire. Studies have examined simplified ?PCA Ultralite? concepts in which thrust control is provided using an autothrottle system supplemented by manual differential throttle control. Some of these concepts have worked well. The PCA Ultralite study results are presented for simulation tests of MD-11, B-757, C-17, and B-747 aircraft.

  7. Performance assessment in a flight simulator test—Validation of a space psychology methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, B.; Salnitski, Vyacheslav; Soll, Henning; Rauch, Melina; Goeters, Klaus-Martin; Maschke, Peter; Stelling, Dirk; Eißfeldt, Hinnerk

    2007-02-01

    The objective assessment of operator performance in hand controlled docking of a spacecraft on a space station has 30 years of tradition and is well established. In the last years the performance assessment was successfully combined with a psycho-physiological approach for the objective assessment of the levels of physiological arousal and psychological load. These methods are based on statistical reference data. For the enhancement of the statistical power of the evaluation methods, both were actually implemented into a comparable terrestrial task: the flight simulator test of DLR in the selection procedure for ab initio pilot applicants for civil airlines. In the first evaluation study 134 male subjects were analysed. Subjects underwent a flight simulator test including three tasks, which were evaluated by instructors applying well-established and standardised rating scales. The principles of the performance algorithms of the docking training were adapted for the automated flight performance assessment. They are presented here. The increased human errors under instrument flight conditions without visual feedback required a manoeuvre recognition algorithm before calculating the deviation of the flown track from the given task elements. Each manoeuvre had to be evaluated independently of former failures. The expert rated performance showed a highly significant correlation with the automatically calculated performance for each of the three tasks: r=.883, r=.874, r=.872, respectively. An automated algorithm successfully assessed the flight performance. This new method will possibly provide a wide range of other future applications in aviation and space psychology.

  8. Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

    2009-07-08

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  9. Advanced life support control/monitor instrumentation concepts for flight application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Dahlhausen, M. J.; Fell, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Development of regenerative Environmental Control/Life Support Systems requires instrumentation characteristics which evolve with successive development phases. As the development phase moves toward flight hardware, the system availability becomes an important design aspect which requires high reliability and maintainability. This program was directed toward instrumentation designs which incorporate features compatible with anticipated flight requirements. The first task consisted of the design, fabrication and test of a Performance Diagnostic Unit. In interfacing with a subsystem's instrumentation, the Performance Diagnostic Unit is capable of determining faulty operation and components within a subsystem, perform on-line diagnostics of what maintenance is needed and accept historical status on subsystem performance as such information is retained in the memory of a subsystem's computerized controller. The second focus was development and demonstration of analog signal conditioning concepts which reduce the weight, power, volume, cost and maintenance and improve the reliability of this key assembly of advanced life support instrumentation. The approach was to develop a generic set of signal conditioning elements or cards which can be configured to fit various subsystems. Four generic sensor signal conditioning cards were identified as being required to handle more than 90 percent of the sensors encountered in life support systems. Under company funding, these were detail designed, built and successfully tested.

  10. An advanced hypervelocity aerophysics facility - A ground-based flight-test range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, R. D.; Scallion, W. I.; Carter, D. J., Jr.; Courter, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses a concept for a ground-based flight-test facility, a large aeroballistic range capable of launching models large enough to permit the installation of significant amounts of onboard instrumentation. The large model size would also provide thick shock/boundary layers, thus providing the opportunity to measure flow-field properties via advanced offboard diagnostics. Current fabrication technology should permit the construction of a two-stage light-gas gun capable of accelerating 20 to 25 cm diameter models to velocities on the order of 6 km/sec. An electromagnetic launcher or a ram accelerator is considered as a potential means for achieving larger model sizes and/or greater launch velocities. Possible methods for obtaining and recording data are discussed as are the test chamber and model deceleration section requirements.

  11. SPHERES tethered formation flight testbed: advancements in enabling NASA's SPECS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Adams, Danielle; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Kong, Edmund; Miller, David W.; Leisawitz, David; Lorenzini, Enrico; Sell, Steve

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on efforts to control a tethered formation flight spacecraft array for NASA's SPECS mission using the SPHERES test-bed developed by the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. Specifically, advances in methodology and experimental results realized since the 2005 SPIE paper are emphasized. These include a new test-bed setup with a reaction wheel assembly, a novel relative attitude measurement system using force torque sensors, and modeling of non-ideal tethers to account for tether vibration modes. The nonlinear equations of motion of multi-vehicle tethered spacecraft with elastic flexible tethers are derived from Lagrange's equations. The controllability analysis indicates that both array resizing and spin-up are fully controllable by the reaction wheels and the tether motor, thereby saving thruster fuel consumption. Based upon this analysis, linear and nonlinear controllers have been successfully implemented on the tethered SPHERES testbed, and tested at the NASA MSFC's flat floor facility using two and three SPHERES configurations.

  12. Process simulation for advanced composites production

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Ferko, S.M.; Griffiths, S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency and lower the cost of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes used to manufacture advanced ceramics by providing the physical and chemical understanding necessary to optimize and control these processes. Project deliverables include: numerical process models; databases of thermodynamic and kinetic information related to the deposition process; and process sensors and software algorithms that can be used for process control. Target manufacturing techniques include CVD fiber coating technologies (used to deposit interfacial coatings on continuous fiber ceramic preforms), chemical vapor infiltration, thin-film deposition processes used in the glass industry, and coating techniques used to deposit wear-, abrasion-, and corrosion-resistant coatings for use in the pulp and paper, metals processing, and aluminum industries.

  13. Determination of Flight Paths of an SBD-1 Airplane in Simulated Diving Attacks, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Harold I.

    1943-01-01

    An investigation has been made to determine the motions of and the flight paths describe by a Navy dive-bombing airplane in simulated diving attacks. The data necessary to evaluate these items, with the exception of the atmospheric wind data, were obtained from automatic recording instruments installed entirely within the airplane. The atmospheric wind data were obtained from the ground by the balloon-theodolite method. The results of typical dives at various dive angles are presented in the form of time histories of the motion of the airplane as well as flight paths calculated with respect to still air and with respect to the ground.

  14. Free Flight Simulation: An Initial Examination of Air-Ground Integration Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandra; McGann, Alison; Cashion, Patricia; Dunbar, Melisa; Mackintosh, Margaret; Dulchinos, Victoria; Jordan, Kevin; Remington, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The concept of "free flight" is intended to emphasize more flexibility for operators in the National Airspace System (RTCA, 1995). This may include the potential for aircraft self-separation. The purpose of this simulation was to begin examining some of the communication and procedural issues associated with self-separation in an integrated air-ground environment. Participants were 10 commercial U.S. flight crews who flew the B747-400 simulator and 10 Denver ARTCC controllers who monitored traffic in an ATC simulation. A prototypic airborne alerting logic and flight deck display features were designed to allow for increased traffic and maneuvering information. Eight different scenarios representing different conflict types were developed. The effects of traffic density (high and low) and different traffic convergence angles (obtuse, acute, and right) were assessed. Conflict detection times were found to be lower for the flight crews in low density compared to high density scenarios. For the controllers, an interaction between density and convergence angle was revealed. Analyses on the controller detection times found longer detection times in the obtuse high density compared to obtuse low density, as well as the shortest detection times in the high density acute angle condition. Maneuvering and communication events are summarized, and a discussion of future research issues is provided.

  15. Research and implementation of a shaking seat system for flight simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaolin; Yu, Youzhi; Shen, Weiqun; Song, Zishan

    2006-11-01

    To a helicopter the shaking seat system can simulate the vibration caused by the main rotor, tail rotor, engine, weapon firing, landing, etc. This paper focuses on the research and analysis of the shaking system of a helicopter flight simulator. The vibration model of the seat is built and the system is also developed. According to different flight states of the helicopter the vibration states of the seat are classified based on real measurement data, and the spectra of the vibration are interpolated to model the vibration of the seat. An electro-hydraulic servo system is used to drive the seat to shake along the direction that is parallel to the vertical body axis. The seat is shaken under the instructions at reference height with position close-loop control method, and the control law is PID algorithm. Running parameters of the system are configured by the software. The motional states of the shaking seat are displayed to the user through the visualization software. The main parts of the system and some key technologies of the implementation are also presented in the paper. The system can generate the special vibration environment in the helicopter flight process, and is successfully applied to the flight simulator. So the pilots' immersion feelings are increased.

  16. Model-Based GN and C Simulation and Flight Software Development for Orion Missions beyond LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Ryan; Milenkovic, Zoran; Henry, Joel; Buttacoli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    For Orion missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) system is being developed using a model-based approach for simulation and flight software. Lessons learned from the development of GN&C algorithms and flight software for the Orion Exploration Flight Test One (EFT-1) vehicle have been applied to the development of further capabilities for Orion GN&C beyond EFT-1. Continuing the use of a Model-Based Development (MBD) approach with the Matlab®/Simulink® tool suite, the process for GN&C development and analysis has been largely improved. Furthermore, a model-based simulation environment in Simulink, rather than an external C-based simulation, greatly eases the process for development of flight algorithms. The benefits seen by employing lessons learned from EFT-1 are described, as well as the approach for implementing additional MBD techniques. Also detailed are the key enablers for improvements to the MBD process, including enhanced configuration management techniques for model-based software systems, automated code and artifact generation, and automated testing and integration.

  17. Predicting fruit fly’s sensing rate with insect flight simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Song; Wang, Z. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Without sensory feedback, flies cannot fly. Exactly how various feedback controls work in insects is a complex puzzle to solve. What do insects measure to stabilize their flight? How often and how fast must insects adjust their wings to remain stable? To gain insights into algorithms used by insects to control their dynamic instability, we develop a simulation tool to study free flight. To stabilize flight, we construct a control algorithm that modulates wing motion based on discrete measurements of the body-pitch orientation. Our simulations give theoretical bounds on both the sensing rate and the delay time between sensing and actuation. Interpreting our findings together with experimental results on fruit flies’ reaction time and sensory motor reflexes, we conjecture that fruit flies sense their kinematic states every wing beat to stabilize their flight. We further propose a candidate for such a control involving the fly’s haltere and first basalar motor neuron. Although we focus on fruit flies as a case study, the framework for our simulation and discrete control algorithms is applicable to studies of both natural and man-made fliers. PMID:25049376

  18. Simulation and flight evaluation of a head-up landing aid for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. L., Sr.; Goode, M. W.; Yenni, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    A head-up general aviation landing aid called a landing site indicator (LASI) was tested in a fixed-base, visual simulator and in an airplane to determine the effectiveness of the LASI. The display, which had a simplified format and method of implementation, presented to the pilot in his line of sight through the windshield a graphic representation of the airplane's velocity vector. In each testing model (simulation of flight), each of 4 pilots made 20 landing approaches with the LASI and 20 approaches without it. The standard deviations of approach and touchdown parameters were considered an indication of pilot consistency. Use of the LASI improved consistency and also reduced elevator, aileron, and rudder control activity. Pilots' comments indicated that the LASI reduced work load. An appendix is included with a discussion of the simulator effectiveness for visual flight tasks.

  19. Objective Fidelity Evaluation in Multisensory Virtual Environments: Auditory Cue Fidelity in Flight Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Georg F.; Wong, Li Ting; Timson, Emma; Perfect, Philip; White, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    We argue that objective fidelity evaluation of virtual environments, such as flight simulation, should be human-performance-centred and task-specific rather than measure the match between simulation and physical reality. We show how principled experimental paradigms and behavioural models to quantify human performance in simulated environments that have emerged from research in multisensory perception provide a framework for the objective evaluation of the contribution of individual cues to human performance measures of fidelity. We present three examples in a flight simulation environment as a case study: Experiment 1: Detection and categorisation of auditory and kinematic motion cues; Experiment 2: Performance evaluation in a target-tracking task; Experiment 3: Transferrable learning of auditory motion cues. We show how the contribution of individual cues to human performance can be robustly evaluated for each task and that the contribution is highly task dependent. The same auditory cues that can be discriminated and are optimally integrated in experiment 1, do not contribute to target-tracking performance in an in-flight refuelling simulation without training, experiment 2. In experiment 3, however, we demonstrate that the auditory cue leads to significant, transferrable, performance improvements with training. We conclude that objective fidelity evaluation requires a task-specific analysis of the contribution of individual cues. PMID:22957068

  20. Simulation evaluation of a low-altitude helicopter flight guidance system adapted for a helmet-mounted display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Harry N.; Zelenka, Richard E.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Dearing, Munro G.

    1992-01-01

    A computer aiding concept for low-altitude helicopter flight was developed and evaluated in a real-time piloted simulation. The concept included an optimal control trajectory-generation algorithm based upon dynamic programming and a helmet-mounted display (HMD) presentation of a pathway-in-the-sky, a phantom aircraft, and flight-path vector/predictor guidance symbology. The trajectory-generation algorithm uses knowledge of the global mission requirements, a digital terrain map, aircraft performance capabilities, and advanced navigation information to determine a trajectory between mission way points that seeks valleys to minimize threat exposure. The pilot evaluation was conducted at NASA ARC moving base Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) by pilots representing NASA, the U.S. Army, the Air Force, and the helicopter industry. The pilots manually tracked the trajectory generated by the algorithm utilizing the HMD symbology. The pilots were able to satisfactorily perform the tracking tasks while maintaining a high degree of awareness of the outside world.

  1. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaolin

    2013-01-14

    Our final report on the accomplishments of ITAPS at Stony Brook during period covered by the research award includes component service, interface service and applications. On the component service, we have designed and implemented a robust functionality for the Lagrangian tracking of dynamic interface. We have migrated the hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic solver from stage-wise second order toward global second order schemes. We have implemented high order coupling between interface propagation and interior PDE solvers. On the interface service, we have constructed the FronTier application programer's interface (API) and its manual page using doxygen. We installed the FronTier functional interface to conform with the ITAPS specifications, especially the iMesh and iMeshP interfaces. On applications, we have implemented deposition and dissolution models with flow and implemented the two-reactant model for a more realistic precipitation at the pore level and its coupling with Darcy level model. We have continued our support to the study of fluid mixing problem for problems in inertial comfinement fusion. We have continued our support to the MHD model and its application to plasma liner implosion in fusion confinement. We have simulated a step in the reprocessing and separation of spent fuels from nuclear power plant fuel rods. We have implemented the fluid-structure interaction for 3D windmill and parachute simulations. We have continued our collaboration with PNNL, BNL, LANL, ORNL, and other SciDAC institutions.

  2. Flight Test of an Adaptive Controller and Simulated Failure/Damage on the NASA NF-15B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschbacher, Mark; Maliska, Heather

    2006-01-01

    The method of flight-testing the Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Second Generation (Gen-2) project on the NASA NF-15B is herein described. The Gen-2 project objective includes flight-testing a dynamic inversion controller augmented by a direct adaptive neural network to demonstrate performance improvements in the presence of simulated failure/damage. The Gen-2 objectives as implemented on the NASA NF-15B created challenges for software design, structural loading limitations, and flight test operations. Simulated failure/damage is introduced by modifying control surface commands, therefore requiring structural loads measurements. Flight-testing began with the validation of a structural loads model. Flight-testing of the Gen-2 controller continued, using test maneuvers designed in a sequenced approach. Success would clear the new controller with respect to dynamic response, simulated failure/damage, and with adaptation on and off. A handling qualities evaluation was conducted on the capability of the Gen-2 controller to restore aircraft response in the presence of a simulated failure/damage. Control room monitoring of loads sensors, flight dynamics, and controller adaptation, in addition to postflight data comparison to the simulation, ensured a safe methodology of buildup testing. Flight-testing continued without major incident to accomplish the project objectives, successfully uncovering strengths and weaknesses of the Gen-2 control approach in flight.

  3. Description of convective-scale numerical weather simulation use in a flight simulator within the Flysafe project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradier-Vabre, S.; Forster, C.; Heesbeen, W. W. M.; Pagé, C.; Sénési, S.; Tafferner, A.; Bernard-Bouissières, I.; Caumont, O.; Drouin, A.; Ducrocq, V.; Guillou, Y.; Josse, P.

    2009-03-01

    Within the framework of the Flysafe project, dedicated tools aiming at improving flight safety are developed. In particular, efforts are directed towards the development of the Next Generation-Integrated Surveillance System (NG-ISS), i.e. a combination of new on-board systems and ground-based tools which provides the pilot with integrated information on three risks playing a major role in aircraft accidents: collision with another aircraft, collision with terrain, and adverse weather conditions. For the latter, Weather Information Management Systems (WIMSs) based on nowcasts of atmospheric hazards are developed. This paper describes the set-up of a test-bed for the NG-ISS incorporating two types of WIMS data, those related to aircraft in-flight icing and thunderstorm risks. The test-bed is based on convective-scale numerical simulations of a particular weather scenario with thunderstorms and icing in the area of the Innsbruck airport. Raw simulated fields as well as more elaborate diagnostics (synthetic reflectivity and satellite brightness temperature) feed both the flight simulator including the NG-ISS and the algorithms in charge of producing WIMS data. WIMS outputs based on the synthetic data are discussed, and it is indicated that the high-resolution simulated fields are beneficial for the NG-ISS test-bed purposes and its technical feasibility.

  4. Effectiveness of Circadian countermeasures in simulated transmeridian flight schedules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moline, Margaret L.; Monk, Timothy H.

    1989-01-01

    The symptoms of jet-lag commonly afflict travelers who cross time zones. Insomnia during the new night, daytime fatigue, malaise, sleepiness, and gastrointestinal disturbances can occur for as long as 3 weeks after jet travel across even a few time zones. These symptoms are largely due to the slow rate of adjustment of the internal circadian timing system to the new time zone. Since business (or pleasure) can be seriously interrupted by such symptoms, it is important to determine ways to speed up the adjustment process to ameliorate the symptoms. Airline pilots have reported that they frequently nap to counter jet lag symptoms, and that they view this as a useful technique. Napping as a countermeasure would be attractive since it is practical and would take advantage of a naturally occurring phase of sleepiness after lunch. Napping also makes sense since insomnia is a common jet lag symptom. Thus, a laboratory simulation of jet lag was designed to test the ability of napping to increase the rate of adjustment following a time zone shift in a population of middle-aged men.

  5. Qualification of the flight-critical AFTI/F-16 digital flight control system. [Advanced Fighter Technology Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, D. A.; Ishmael, S. D.; Regenie, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    Qualification considerations for assuring the safety of a life-critical digital flight control system include four major areas: systems interactions, verification, validation, and configuration control. The AFTI/F-16 design, development, and qualification illustrate these considerations. In this paper, qualification concepts, procedures, and methodologies are discussed and illustrated through specific examples.

  6. Advanced piloted aircraft flight control system design methodology. Volume 2: The FCX flight control design expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Thomas T.; Mcruer, Duane T.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive and electric methodology for conceptual and preliminary design of flight control systems is presented and illustrated. The methodology is focused on the design states starting with the layout of system requirements and ending when some viable competing system architectures (feedback control structures) are defined. The approach is centered on the human pilot and the aircraft as both the sources of, and the keys to the solution of, many flight control problems. The methodology relies heavily on computational procedures which are highly interactive with the design engineer. To maximize effectiveness, these techniques, as selected and modified to be used together in the methodology, form a cadre of computational tools specifically tailored for integrated flight control system preliminary design purposes. The FCX expert system as presently developed is only a limited prototype capable of supporting basic lateral-directional FCS design activities related to the design example used. FCX presently supports design of only one FCS architecture (yaw damper plus roll damper) and the rules are largely focused on Class IV (highly maneuverable) aircraft. Despite this limited scope, the major elements which appear necessary for application of knowledge-based software concepts to flight control design were assembled and thus FCX represents a prototype which can be tested, critiqued and evolved in an ongoing process of development.

  7. Pyroshock Simulation Systems: Are We Correctly Qualifying Flight Hardware for Pyroshock Environments?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Nayeri, Reza; Kern, Dennis L.

    2009-01-01

    There are several methods of shock testing that are commonly used by the aerospace industry to qualify flight hardware to pyroshock environments. In some cases the shock results and in particular the shock response spectra computed from these tests were interpreted in such a way as to satisfy the testing requirements and were often considered successful for flight hardware qualification. However, close scrutiny of these acquired shock data suggest gross violation of the pyroshock qualification requirements. There are several issues, both in terms of the shock generation mechanisms and the shock signature acquisition and analysis that have led to improper qualification of flight hardware. In this paper some factors contributing to the misinterpretation of the shock data are reviewed. First, issues with the hardware fixturing and instrumentation that may lead to incorrect shock testing are discussed. Second, issues facing the shock simulation systems and pyrotechnic testing are reviewed. Finally, issues pertaining to the data acquisition and analysis are briefly discussed.

  8. Pitch Controllability Based on Airplane Model without Short-Period Approximation—Flight Simulator Experiment—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Osamu; Kobayashi, Osamu

    Pitch controllability of an airplane is very important for longitudinal flying qualities, therefore, much research has been conducted. However, it has not been clarified why pitch handling qualities degrades in the low speed, e.g. take-off and landing flight phases. On this topic, this paper investigates the effect of several parameters of the short-period mode and phugoid mode using a flight simulator. The results show the following conclusions: The difference between the initial phase angles in two modal components in the pitch attitude response to elevator step input plays the most important role in the pitch handling qualities among modal parameters; and the difference of the two modal natural frequencies has small effect on the pitch controllability even when flight speed decreases.

  9. New Predictive Filters for Compensating the Transport Delay on a Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Liwen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Houck, Jacob A.; Kelly, Lon C.; Wolters, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    The problems of transport delay in a flight simulator, such as its sources and effects, are reviewed. Then their effects on a pilot-in-the-loop control system are investigated with simulations. Three current prominent delay compensators the lead/lag filter, McFarland filter, and the Sobiski/Cardullo filter were analyzed and compared. This paper introduces two novel delay compensation techniques an adaptive predictor using the Kalman estimator and a state space predictive filter using a reference aerodynamic model. Applications of these two new compensators on recorded data from the NASA Langley Research Center Visual Motion Simulator show that they achieve better compensation over the current ones.

  10. Simulation of automatic rotorcraft nap-of-the-earth flight in graphics workstation environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, T.; Cheng, Victor H. L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional (3D) helicopter flight simulation system. The simulation is designed to be a readily available tool for concept verification and tuning of automatic obstacle-avoidance guidance algorithms. The system has been implemented on networked workstations capable of interactive 3D graphics simulation. The simulation uses realistic terrain and obstacle models. The dynamics of the rotorcraft and the functional capabilities of the range sensors are simulated to provide all the components required to evaluate the guidance function. Standard graphics hardware available on the workstation is utilized to accelerate the range-data calculations for sensor simulation at the guidance rate. An example is given to demonstrate the performance of the obstacle-avoidance capability.

  11. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  12. Understanding Crew Decision-Making in the Presence of Complexity: A Flight Simulation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Daniels, Taumi S.; Evans, Emory; deHaag, Maarten Uijt; Duan, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Crew decision making and response have long been leading causal and contributing factors associated with aircraft accidents. Further, it is anticipated that future aircraft and operational environments will increase exposure to risks related to these factors if proactive steps are not taken to account for ever-increasing complexity. A flight simulation study was designed to collect data to help in understanding how complexity can, or may, be manifest. More specifically, an experimental apparatus was constructed that allowed for manipulation of information complexity and uncertainty, while also manipulating operational complexity and uncertainty. Through these manipulations, and the aid of experienced airline pilots, several issues have been discovered, related most prominently to the influence of information content, quality, and management. Flight crews were immersed in an environment that included new operational complexities suggested for the future air transportation system as well as new technological complexities (e.g. electronic flight bags, expanded data link services, synthetic and enhanced vision systems, and interval management automation). In addition, a set of off-nominal situations were emulated. These included, for example, adverse weather conditions, traffic deviations, equipment failures, poor data quality, communication errors, and unexpected clearances, or changes to flight plans. Each situation was based on one or more reference events from past accidents or incidents, or on a similar case that had been used in previous developmental tests or studies. Over the course of the study, 10 twopilot airline crews participated, completing over 230 flights. Each flight consisted of an approach beginning at 10,000 ft. Based on the recorded data and pilot and research observations, preliminary results are presented regarding decision-making issues in the presence of the operational and technological complexities encountered during the flights.

  13. Motions Recognized through Visual Scene by Pilots and Flight Simulator Tests with Only Lateral-Directional Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Masahito; Kobayashi, Osamu

    A flight simulator must exactly simulate the aircraft motion. So, engineers check if the solution of equations of motion, the calculation of flight positions and attitudes, and then, the drawn-up of visual scenery from cockpit windows according to the calculated positions and attitudes are correct. This paper proposes an additional check if the aircraft motion perceived from visual scenery by pilot is same as the calculated motion. This opinion is applied to the simulation case that just lateral-directional flying qualities are evaluated, and it is found that the pitching motion rate (q) and Euler’s pitch attitude rate (Θ) should not be perfectly neglected (i.e. q=Θ=0) but (q and Θ) should be given assuming steady level turn flight should be given. The flight simulator test showed that the pilot felt more real flight motion and controlled some harder than in the condition of q=Θ=0.

  14. Flight service evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component on commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development and flight evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component is presented. The recommended concept for the covers is graphite-epoxy hats bonded to a graphite-epoxy skin. The hat flare-out has been eliminated, instead the hat is continuous into the joint. The recommended concept for the spars is graphite-epoxy caps and a hybrid of Kevlar-49 and graphite-epoxy in the spar web. The spar cap, spar web stiffeners for attaching the ribs, and intermediate stiffeners are planned to be fabricated as a unit. Access hole in the web will be reinforced with a donut type, zero degree graphite-epoxy wound reinforcement. The miniwich design concept in the upper three ribs originally proposed is changed to a graphite-epoxy stiffened solid laminate design concept. The recommended configuration for the lower seven ribs remains as graphite-epoxy caps with aluminum cruciform diagonals. The indicated weight saving for the current advanced composite vertical fin configuration is 20.2% including a 24 lb growth allowance. The project production cost saving is approximately 1% based on a cumulative average of 250 aircraft and including only material, production labor, and quality assurance costs.

  15. Flight Test Results from the NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Project with Adaptation to a Simulated Stabilator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Williams-Hayes, Peggy S.

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive flight control systems have the potential to be more resilient to extreme changes in airplane behavior. Extreme changes could be a result of a system failure or of damage to the airplane. A direct adaptive neural-network-based flight control system was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System airplane and subjected to an inflight simulation of a failed (frozen) (unmovable) stabilator. Formation flight handling qualities evaluations were performed with and without neural network adaptation. The results of these flight tests are presented. Comparison with simulation predictions and analysis of the performance of the adaptation system are discussed. The performance of the adaptation system is assessed in terms of its ability to decouple the roll and pitch response and reestablish good onboard model tracking. Flight evaluation with the simulated stabilator failure and adaptation engaged showed that there was generally improvement in the pitch response; however, a tendency for roll pilot-induced oscillation was experienced. A detailed discussion of the cause of the mixed results is presented.

  16. Flight Test Results from the NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Project with Adaptation to a Simulated Stabilator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Williams-Hayes, Peggy S.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive flight control systems have the potential to be more resilient to extreme changes in airplane behavior. Extreme changes could be a result of a system failure or of damage to the airplane. A direct adaptive neural-network-based flight control system was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System airplane and subjected to an inflight simulation of a failed (frozen) (unmovable) stabilator. Formation flight handling qualities evaluations were performed with and without neural network adaptation. The results of these flight tests are presented. Comparison with simulation predictions and analysis of the performance of the adaptation system are discussed. The performance of the adaptation system is assessed in terms of its ability to decouple the roll and pitch response and reestablish good onboard model tracking. Flight evaluation with the simulated stabilator failure and adaptation engaged showed that there was generally improvement in the pitch response; however, a tendency for roll pilot-induced oscillation was experienced. A detailed discussion of the cause of the mixed results is presented.

  17. Thermal Protection System Evaluation Using Arc-jet Flows: Flight Simulation or Research Tool?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Venkatapathy, Ethiras (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The arc-jet has been used to evaluate thermal protection systems (TPS) and materials for the past forty years. Systems that have been studied in this environmerd include ablators, active, and passive TPS concepts designed for vehicles entering planetary and Earth atmospheres. The question of whether arc-jet flow can simulate a flight environment or is it a research tool that provides an aero-thermodynamic heating environment to obtain critical material properties will be addressed. Stagnation point tests in arc-jets are commonly used to obtain material properties such as mass loss rates, thermal chemical stability data, optical properties, and surface catalytic efficiency. These properties are required in computational fluid dynamic codes to accurately predict the performance of a TPS during flight. Special facilities have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to approximate the flow environment over the mid-fuselage and body flap regions of proposed space-planes type vehicles. This paper compares flow environments generated in flight over a vehicle with those created over an arc-jet test articles in terms of scale, chemistry, and fluid dynamic properties. Flight experiments are essential in order to validate the material properties obtained from arc-jet tests and used to predict flight performance of any TPS being considered for use on a vehicle entering the Earth atmosphere at hypersonic speed.

  18. Time parallelization of advanced operation scenario simulations of ITER plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samaddar, D.; Casper, T. A.; Kim, S. H.; Berry, Lee A; Elwasif, Wael R; Batchelor, Donald B; Houlberg, Wayne A

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates that simulations of advanced burning plasma operation scenarios can be successfully parallelized in time using the parareal algorithm. CORSICA - an advanced operation scenario code for tokamak plasmas is used as a test case. This is a unique application since the parareal algorithm has so far been applied to relatively much simpler systems except for the case of turbulence. In the present application, a computational gain of an order of magnitude has been achieved which is extremely promising. A successful implementation of the Parareal algorithm to codes like CORSICA ushers in the possibility of time efficient simulations of ITER plasmas.

  19. A General Simulator Using State Estimation for a Space Tug Navigation System. [computerized simulation, orbital position estimation and flight mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1975-01-01

    A general simulation program is presented (GSP) involving nonlinear state estimation for space vehicle flight navigation systems. A complete explanation of the iterative guidance mode guidance law, derivation of the dynamics, coordinate frames, and state estimation routines are given so as to fully clarify the assumptions and approximations involved so that simulation results can be placed in their proper perspective. A complete set of computer acronyms and their definitions as well as explanations of the subroutines used in the GSP simulator are included. To facilitate input/output, a complete set of compatable numbers, with units, are included to aid in data development. Format specifications, output data phrase meanings and purposes, and computer card data input are clearly spelled out. A large number of simulation and analytical studies were used to determine the validity of the simulator itself as well as various data runs.

  20. Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Flight Dynamics Simulations Using MATLAB (R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Headrick, R. D.; Rowe, J. N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a study to verify onboard attitude control laws in the coarse Sun-pointing (CSP) mode by simulation and to develop procedures for operational support for the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. SOHO was launched on December 2, 1995, and the predictions of the simulation were verified with the flight data. This study used a commercial off the shelf product MATLAB(tm) to do the following: Develop procedures for computing the parasitic torques for orbital maneuvers; Simulate onboard attitude control of roll, pitch, and yaw during orbital maneuvers; Develop procedures for predicting firing time for both on- and off-modulated thrusters during orbital maneuvers; Investigate the use of feed forward or pre-bias torques to reduce the attitude handoff during orbit maneuvers - in particular, determine how to use the flight data to improve the feed forward torque estimates for use on future maneuvers. The study verified the stability of the attitude control during orbital maneuvers and the proposed use of feed forward torques to compensate for the attitude handoff. Comparison of the simulations with flight data showed: Parasitic torques provided a good estimate of the on- and off-modulation for attitude control; The feed forward torque compensation scheme worked well to reduce attitude handoff during the orbital maneuvers. The work has been extended to prototype calibration of thrusters from observed firing time and observed reaction wheel speed changes.