Science.gov

Sample records for advanced flow simulation

  1. Use of advanced computers for aerodynamic flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The current and projected use of advanced computers for large-scale aerodynamic flow simulation applied to engineering design and research is discussed. The design use of mature codes run on conventional, serial computers is compared with the fluid research use of new codes run on parallel and vector computers. The role of flow simulations in design is illustrated by the application of a three dimensional, inviscid, transonic code to the Sabreliner 60 wing redesign. Research computations that include a more complete description of the fluid physics by use of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation formulations are also presented. Results of studies for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are used to project the feasibility of design applications employing these more advanced three dimensional viscous flow simulations.

  2. Recent advances in the simulation of particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harting, J.; Frijters, S.; Ramaioli, M.; Robinson, M.; Wolf, D. E.; Luding, S.

    2014-10-01

    A substantial number of algorithms exists for the simulation of moving particles suspended in fluids. However, finding the best method to address a particular physical problem is often highly non-trivial and depends on the properties of the particles and the involved fluid(s) together. In this report, we provide a short overview on a number of existing simulation methods and provide two state of the art examples in more detail. In both cases, the particles are described using a Discrete Element Method (DEM). The DEM solver is usually coupled to a fluid-solver, which can be classified as grid-based or mesh-free (one example for each is given). Fluid solvers feature different resolutions relative to the particle size and separation. First, a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (mesh-based and with rather fine resolution) is presented to study the behavior of particle stabilized fluid interfaces and second, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics implementation (mesh-free, meso-scale resolution, similar to the particle size) is introduced to highlight a new player in the field, which is expected to be particularly suited for flows including free surfaces.

  3. Advanced Methodology for Simulation of Complex Flows Using Structured Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David

    1995-01-01

    Detailed simulations of viscous flows in complicated geometries pose a significant challenge to current capabilities of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). To enable routine application of CFD to this class of problems, advanced methodologies are required that employ (a) automated grid generation, (b) adaptivity, (c) accurate discretizations and efficient solvers, and (d) advanced software techniques. Each of these ingredients contributes to increased accuracy, efficiency (in terms of human effort and computer time), and/or reliability of CFD software. In the long run, methodologies employing structured grid systems will remain a viable choice for routine simulation of flows in complex geometries only if genuinely automatic grid generation techniques for structured grids can be developed and if adaptivity is employed more routinely. More research in both these areas is urgently needed.

  4. Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry

    2010-11-01

    Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single

  5. Recent advances in numerical simulation and control of asymmetric flows around slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Sharaf, Hazem H.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The problems of asymmetric flow around slender bodies and its control are formulated using the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer or full Navier-Stokes equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. The problem is numerically simulated for both locally-conical and three-dimensional flows. The numerical applications include studies of the effects of relative incidence, Mach number and Reynolds number on the flow asymmetry. For the control of flow asymmetry, the numerical simulation cover passive and active control methods. For the passive control, the effectiveness of vertical fins placed in the leeward plane of geometric symmetry and side strakes with different orientations is studied. For the active control, the effectiveness of normal and tangential flow injection and surface heating and a combination of these methods is studied.

  6. Simulation of turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Significant advancements have been made in the last five years in the ability to model turbomachinery flows of engineering interest. This advancement can be directly attributed to the second generation of supercomputers like the Cray XMP and Cray 2 and advanced instrumentation techniques. Early on, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lewis Research Center recognized the potential gains in turbomachinery performance and life that could be achieved by taking advantage of this technology and instituted a comprehensive research program in turbomachinery flow modeling. This activity combined the areas of fluid flow analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and experimental fluid mechanics. As a result of this activity, Lewis has become an internationally recognized leader in turbomachinery flow modeling. Many of the research activities conducted under this program are utilized by industry. The presentation gives an overview of this program and provides sample illustration of simulation performed to date.

  7. Akuna - Integrated Toolsets Supporting Advanced Subsurface Flow and Transport Simulations for Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Deborah A.; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Gable, Carl W.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth H.; Lansing, Carina S.; Meyer, Joerg; Moeglein, William A.M.; Pau, George S.H.; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Shoshani, Arie; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika

    2012-04-24

    A next generation open source subsurface simulator and user environment for environmental management is being developed through a collaborative effort across Department of Energy National Laboratories. The flow and transport simulator, Amanzi, will be capable of modeling complex subsurface environments and processes using both unstructured and adaptive meshes at very fine spatial resolutions that require supercomputing-scale resources. The user environment, Akuna, provides users with a range of tools to manage environmental and simulator data sets, create models, manage and share simulation data, and visualize results. Underlying the user interface are core toolsets that provide algorithms for sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. Akuna is open-source, cross platform software that is initially being demonstrated on the Hanford BC Cribs remediation site. In this paper, we describe the emerging capabilities of Akuna and illustrate how these are being applied to the BC Cribs site.

  8. Unsteady Turbopump Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centin, Kiris C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the current effort is two-fold: 1) to provide a computational framework for design and analysis of the entire fuel supply system of a liquid rocket engine; and 2) to provide high-fidelity unsteady turbopump flow analysis capability to support the design of pump sub-systems for advanced space transportation vehicle. Since the space launch systems in the near future are likely to involve liquid propulsion system, increasing the efficiency and reliability of the turbopump components is an important task. To date, computational tools for design/analysis of turbopump flow are based on relatively lower fidelity methods. Unsteady, three-dimensional viscous flow analysis tool involving stationary and rotational components for the entire turbopump assembly has not been available, at least, for real-world engineering applications. Present effort is an attempt to provide this capability so that developers of the vehicle will be able to extract such information as transient flow phenomena for start up, impact of non-uniform inflow, system vibration and impact on the structure. Those quantities are not readily available from simplified design tools. In this presentation, the progress being made toward complete turbo-pump simulation capability for a liquid rocket engine is reported. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbo-pump is used as a test case for the performance evaluation of the hybrid MPI/Open-MP and MLP versions of the INS3D code. Relative motion of the grid system for rotor-stator interaction was obtained by employing overset grid techniques. Time-accuracy of the scheme has been evaluated by using simple test cases. Unsteady computations for SSME turbopump, which contains 106 zones with 34.5 Million grid points, are currently underway on Origin 2000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. Results from these time-accurate simulations with moving boundary capability and the performance of the parallel versions of the code will be presented.

  9. Numerical simulation of the reactive flow in advanced (HSR) combustors using KIVA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winowich, Nicholas S.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work has been done with the goal of establishing ultralow emission aircraft gas turbine combustors. A significant portion of the effort is the development of three dimensional computational combustor models. The KIVA-II computer code which is based on the Implicit Continuous Eulerian Difference mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ICED-ALE) numerical scheme is one of the codes selected by NASA to achieve these goals. This report involves a simulation of jet injection through slanted slots within the Rich burn/Quick quench/Lean burn (RQL) baseline experimental rig. The RQL combustor distinguishes three regions of combustion. This work specifically focuses on modeling the quick quench mixer region in which secondary injection air is introduced radially through 12 equally spaced slots around the mixer circumference. Steady state solutions are achieved with modifications to the KIVA-II program. Work currently underway will evaluate thermal mixing as a function of injection air velocity and angle of inclination of the slots.

  10. Virtual Flow Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Calderer, Antoni; Yang, Xiaolei; Angelidis, Dionysios; Khosronejad, Ali; Le, Trung; Kang, Seokkoo; Gilmanov, Anvar; Ge, Liang; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, the two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482. The VFS

  11. Virtual Flow Simulator

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, themore » two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482

  12. Advances in measurements and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in burners/combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. X.

    2009-02-01

    Innovative coal combustors were developed, and measurement and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in such combustors were done in the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University. LDV/PDPA measurements are made to understand the behavior of turbulent gas-particle flows in coal combustors. Coal combustion test was done for the non-slagging cyclone coal combustor. The full two-fluid model developed by the present author was used to simulate turbulent gas-particle flows, coal combustion and NOx formation. It is found by measurements and simulation that the optimum design can give large-size recirculation zones for improving the combustion performance for all the combustors. The combustion test shows that the nonslagging coal combustor can burn 3-5mm coal particles with good combustion efficiency and low NO emission. Simulation in comparison with experiments indicates that the swirl number can significantly affect the NO formation in the swirl coal combustor.

  13. Advanced Wellbore Thermal Simulator

    1992-03-04

    GEOTEMP2, which is based on the earlier GEOTEMP program, is a wellbore thermal simulator designed for geothermal well drilling and production applications. The code treats natural and forced convection and conduction within the wellbore and heat conduction within the surrounding rock matrix. A variety of well operations can be modeled including injection, production, forward and reverse circulation with gas or liquid, gas or liquid drilling, and two-phase steam injection and production. Well completion with severalmore » different casing sizes and cement intervals can be modeled. The code allows variables, such as flow rate, to change with time enabling a realistic treatment of well operations. Provision is made in the flow equations to allow the flow areas of the tubing to vary with depth in the wellbore. Multiple liquids can exist in GEOTEMP2 simulations. Liquid interfaces are tracked through the tubing and annulus as one liquid displaces another. GEOTEMP2, however, does not attempt to simulate displacement of liquids with a gas or two-phase steam or vice versa. This means that it is not possible to simulate an operation where the type of drilling fluid changes, e.g. mud going to air. GEOTEMP2 was designed primarily for use in predicting the behavior of geothermal wells, but it is flexible enough to handle many typical drilling, production, and injection problems in the oil industry as well. However, GEOTEMP2 does not allow the modeling of gas-filled annuli in production or injection problems. In gas or mist drilling, no radiation losses are included in the energy balance. No attempt is made to model flow in the formation. Average execution time is 50 CP seconds on a CDC CYBER170. This edition of GEOTEMP2 is designated as Version 2.0 by the contributors.« less

  14. Advanced numerical methods for the simulation of flows in heterogeneous porous media and their application to parallel computing

    SciTech Connect

    Rame, M.

    1990-01-01

    Flows in highly heterogeneous porous media arise in a variety of processes including enhanced oil recovery, in situ bioremediation of underground contaminants, transport in underground aquifers and transport through biological membranes. The common denominator of these processes is the transport (and possibly reaction) of a multi-component fluid in several phases. A new numerical methodology for the analysis of flows in heterogeneous porous media is presented. Cases of miscible and immiscible displacement are simulated to investigate the influence of the local heterogeneities on the flow paths. This numerical scheme allows for a fine description of the flowing medium and the concentration and saturation distributions thus generated show low numerical dispersion. If the size of the area of interest is a square of a thousand feet per side, geological information on the porous medium can be incorporated to a length scale of about one to two feet. The technique here introduced, Operator Splitting on Multiple Grids, solves the elliptic operators by a higher-order finite-element technique on a coarse grid that proves efficient and accurate in incorporating different scales of heterogeneities. This coarse solution is interpolated to a fine grid by a splines-under-tension technique. The equations for the conservation of species are solved on this fine grid (of approximately half a million cells) by a finite-difference technique yielding numerical dispersions of less than ten feet. Cases presented herein involve a single phase miscible flow, and liquid-phase immiscible displacements. Cases are presented for model distributions of physical properties and for porosity and permeability data taken from a real reservoir. Techniques for the extension of the methods to compressible flow situations and compositional simulations are discussed.

  15. r.avaflow: An advanced open source computational framework for the GIS-based simulation of two-phase mass flows and process chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergili, Martin; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Fellin, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Alexander; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical mass flows stand for a broad range of processes and process chains such as flows and avalanches of snow, soil, debris or rock, and their interactions with water bodies resulting in flood waves. Despite considerable efforts put in model development, the simulation, and therefore the appropriate prediction of these types of events still remains a major challenge in terms of the complex material behaviour, strong phase interactions, process transformations and the complex mountain topography. Sophisticated theories exist, but they have hardly been brought to practice yet. We fill this gap by developing a novel and unified high-resolution computational tool, r.avaflow, representing a comprehensive and advanced open source GIS simulation environment for geophysical mass flows. Based on the latest and most advanced two-phase physical-mathematical models, r.avaflow includes the following features: (i) it is suitable for a broad spectrum of mass flows such as rock, rock-ice and snow avalanches, glacial lake outburst floods, debris and hyperconcentrated flows, and even landslide-induced tsunamis and submarine landslides, as well as process chains involving more than one of these phenomena; (ii) it accounts for the real two-phase nature of many flow types: viscous fluids and solid particles are considered separately with advanced mechanics and strong phase interactions; (iii) it is freely available and adoptable along with the GRASS GIS software. In the future, it will include the intrinsic topographic influences on the flow dynamics and morphology as well as an advanced approach to simulate the entrainment and deposition of solid and fluid material. As input r.avaflow needs information on (a) the mountain topography, (b) the material properties and (c) the spatial distribution of the solid and fluid release masses or one or more hydrographs of fluid and solid material. We demonstrate the functionalities and performance of r.avaflow by using some generic and real

  16. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  17. Successes and Challenges of Incompressible Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2003-01-01

    During the past thirty years, numerical methods and simulation tools for incompressible flows have been advanced as a subset of CFD discipline. Even though incompressible flows are encountered in many areas of engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to rather stringent requirements for predicting aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, while flow devices involving low speed or incompressible flow could be reasonably well designed without resorting to accurate numerical simulations. As flow devices are required to be more sophisticated and highly efficient, CFD tools become indispensable in fluid engineering for incompressible and low speed flow. This paper is intended to review some of the successes made possible by advances in computational technologies during the same period, and discuss some of the current challenges.

  18. Advanced diagnostics for reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Baganoff, D.; Bowman, C. T.; Byer, R. L.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1983-11-01

    Progress is reported for the third year of an interdisciplinary program to innovate modern diagnostic techniques for application to reacting flows. Project areas are: (1) fiber optic absorption/fluorescence probes for species measurements employing tunable ultraviolet, visable and infrared laser sources; (2) wavelength modulation spectroscopy, using rapid-scanning ultraviolet, visible and infrared laser sources, for measurements of species, temperature and absorption lineshapes, (3) quantitative flow visualization, including temporally and spatially resolved species measurements in a plane, using laser-induced fluorescence; (4) multiple-point velocity visualization; (5) plasma diagnostics, utilizing planar laser-induced fluorescence and wavelength modulation techniques; (6) diagnostic techniques for thermionic converter plasmas; (7) application of advanced diagnostic techniques for studies of turbulent reacting flows; (8) development of measurement techniques and a novel facility for investigations of droplet evaporation in turbulent flows; (9) holographic display techniques for 3-D visualization of flowfield data; (10) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) for temperature and velocity measurements in a supersonic jet; and (11) computed absorption tomography system for species measurements in a plane.

  19. Simulator for concurrent processing data flow architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Stoughton, John W.; Mielke, Roland R.

    1992-01-01

    A software simulator capability of simulating execution of an algorithm graph on a given system under the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) rules is presented. ATAMM is capable of modeling the execution of large-grained algorithms on distributed data flow architectures. Investigating the behavior and determining the performance of an ATAMM based system requires the aid of software tools. The ATAMM Simulator presented is capable of determining the performance of a system without having to build a hardware prototype. Case studies are performed on four algorithms to demonstrate the capabilities of the ATAMM Simulator. Simulated results are shown to be comparable to the experimental results of the Advanced Development Model System.

  20. Simulation of multistage turbine flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Mulac, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A flow model has been developed for analyzing multistage turbomachinery flows. This model, referred to as the average passage flow model, describes the time-averaged flow field with a typical passage of a blade row embedded within a multistage configuration. Computer resource requirements, supporting empirical modeling, formulation code development, and multitasking and storage are discussed. Illustrations from simulations of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) fuel turbine performed to date are given.

  1. Simulation of turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1991-01-01

    With the interest in jet propulsion at the end of World War II, aerodynamicists were challenged to develop mathematical models which could be used to design turbomachinery components for jets. NASA Lewis engineers and scientists played a major role in meeting this challenge. Some of their accomplishments are highlighted as well as those of others. Several problems are addressed which must be solved if jet propulsion technology is to advance.

  2. Advanced Combustion Modeling for Complex Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Frank Stanford

    2005-01-01

    The next generation of aircraft engines will need to pass stricter efficiency and emission tests. NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has set an ambitious goal of 70% reduction of NO(x) emissions and a 15% increase in fuel efficiency of aircraft engines. We will demonstrate the state-of-the-art combustion tools developed a t Stanford's Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) as part of this program. In the last decade, CTR has spear-headed a multi-physics-based combustion modeling program. Key technologies have been transferred to the aerospace industry and are currently being used for engine simulations. In this demo, we will showcase the next-generation combustion modeling tools that integrate a very high level of detailed physics into advanced flow simulation codes. Combustor flows involve multi-phase physics with liquid fuel jet breakup, evaporation, and eventual combustion. Individual components of the simulation are verified against complex test cases and show excellent agreement with experimental data.

  3. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S.

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position, and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.

  4. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position,more » and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.« less

  5. Advanced simulation of digital filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, G. S.

    1980-09-01

    An Advanced Simulation of Digital Filters has been implemented on the IBM 360/67 computer utilizing Tektronix hardware and software. The program package is appropriate for use by persons beginning their study of digital signal processing or for filter analysis. The ASDF programs provide the user with an interactive method by which filter pole and zero locations can be manipulated. Graphical output on both the Tektronix graphics screen and the Versatec plotter are provided to observe the effects of pole-zero movement.

  6. Development of Advanced Casing Treatments for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Tsung, Fu-Lin

    2001-01-01

    Under the Base R&T and Ultra Efficient Engine Technology programs, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center Compressor Branch is investigating flow control strategies required to increase the loading and efficiency of core compressors while maintaining current levels of operability. Flow-control strategies being studied include advanced casing treatments, wall jet injection, and blade-tip injection for compressor stability enhancement, directed jets for surface boundary layer control, and vortex-generating devices. The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to assess the effectiveness of flow-control devices and to guide their design is a key element in this research. CFD simulations serve to screen potential flow-control concepts at a lower cost than executing physical experiments in turbomachinery facilities. CFD simulations also provide guidance in designing physical experiments for those flow control concepts, which appear promising.

  7. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  8. Simulation of Multistage Turbine Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of turbine flows serves to enhance the understanding of the flow phenomena within multistage turbomachinery components. The direct benefit of this activity is improved modeling capability, which can be used to improve component efficiency and durability. A hierarchy of equations was formulated to assess the difficulty in analyzing the flow field within multistage turbomachinery components. The Navier-Stokes equations provides the most complete description. The simplest description is given by a set of equations that govern the quasi-one-dimensional flow. The number of unknowns to be solved for increases monotonically above the number of equations. The development of the additional set of equations needed to mathematically close the system of equations forms the closure problem associated with that level of description. For the Navier-Stokes equation there is no closure problem. For the quasi-one-dimensional equation set random flow fluctuations, unsteady fluctuations, nonaxisymmetric flow variations, and hub-to-shroud variations on the quasi-one-dimensional flow must be accounted for.

  9. Multistage Turbomachinery Flows Simulated Numerically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Adamczyk, John J.; Shabbir, Aamir; Wellborn, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a comprehensive assessment was made of the predictive capability of the average passage flow model as applied to multistage axial-flow compressors. This model, which describes the time-averaged flow field within a typical passage of a blade row embedded in a multistage configuration, is being widely used throughout U.S. aircraft industry as an integral part of their design systems. Rotor flow-angle deviation. In this work, detailed data taken within a four and one-half stage large low-speed compressor were used to assess the weaknesses and strengths of the predictive capabilities of the average passage flow model. The low-speed compressor blading is of modern design and employs stator end-bends. Measurements were made with slow- and high response instrumentation. The high-response measurements revealed the velocity components of both the rotor and stator wakes. From the measured wake profiles, we found that the flow exiting the rotors deviated from the rotor exit metal angle to a lesser degree than was predicted by the average passage flow model. This was found to be due to blade boundary layer transition, which recently has been shown to exist on multistage axial compressor rotor and stator blades, but was not accounted for in the average passage model. Consequently, a model that mimics the effects of blade boundary layer transition, Shih k-epsilon model, was incorporated into the average passage model. Simulations that incorporated this transition model showed a dramatic improvement in agreement with data. The altered model thus improved predictive capability for multistage axial-flow compressors, and this was verified by detailed experimental measurement.

  10. Simulation of water flow in terrestrial systems

    2008-12-18

    ParFlow is a parallel, variabley saturated groundwater flow code that is especially suitable for large scale problem. ParFlow simulates the three-dimensional saturated and variably saturated subsurface flow in heterogeneous porous media in three spatial dimensions. ParFlow's developemt and appkication has been on-ging for more than 10 uear. ParFlow has recently been extended to coupled surface-subsurface flow to enabel the simulation of hillslope runoff and channel routing in a truly integrated fashion. ParFlow simulates the three-dimensionalmore » varably saturated subsurface flow in strongly heterogeneous porous media in three spatial dimension.« less

  11. Remote access of the ILLIAC 4. [computer flow distribution simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, K. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The ILLIAC-4 hardware is described. The Illiac system, the Advanced Research Projects Agency computer network, and IMLAC PDS-1 are included. The space shuttle flow simulation is demonstrated to show the feasibility of using an advanced computer from a remote location.

  12. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, Craig J.

    1990-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementation of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program to extend the present capabilities of this method was initiated for the treatment of chemically reacting flows. In the DNS efforts, the focus is on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and non-equilibrium kinetics modelings in high speed reacting flows. Emphasis was on the simulations of simple flows, namely homogeneous compressible flows, and temporally developing high speed mixing layers.

  13. An Advanced Reservoir Simulator for Tracer Transport in Multicomponent Multiphase Compositional Flow and Applications to the Cranfield CO2 Sequestration Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoir simulators are widely used to constrain uncertainty in the petrophysical properties of subsurface formations by matching the history of injection and production data. However, such measurements may be insufficient to uniquely characterize a reservoir's properties. Monitoring of natural (isotopic) and introduced tracers is a developing technology to further interrogate the subsurface for applications such as enhanced oil recovery from conventional and unconventional resources, and CO2 sequestration. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been piloting this tracer technology during and following CO2 injection at the Cranfield, Mississippi, CO2 sequestration test site. Two campaigns of multiple perfluorocarbon tracers were injected together with CO2 and monitored at two wells at 68 m and 112 m from the injection site. The tracer data suggest that multiple CO2 flow paths developed towards the monitoring wells, indicative of either channeling through high permeability pathways or of fingering. The results demonstrate that tracers provide an important complement to transient pressure data. Numerical modeling is essential to further explain and interpret the observations. To aid the development of tracer technology, we enhanced a compositional multiphase reservoir simulator to account for tracer transport. Our research simulator uses higher-order finite element (FE) methods that can capture the small-scale onset of fingering on the coarse grids required for field-scale modeling, and allows for unstructured grids and anisotropic heterogeneous permeability fields. Mass transfer between fluid phases and phase behavior are modeled with rigorous equation-of-state based phase-split calculations. We present our tracer simulator and preliminary results related to the Cranfield experiments. Applications to noble gas tracers in unconventional resources are presented by Darrah et al.

  14. Higher level simulations of turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The fundamentals of large eddy simulation are considered and various approaches to this simulation are compared. The subgrid model required by large eddy simulation is discussed as well as the use of this type of simulation in the development of models for the Reynolds-averaged equations and the application of direct simulation to the testing of both subgrid scale and Reynolds-averaged models. Numerical methods used in large eddy and direct simulation are described with emphasis on special purpose methods. Topics covered include the simulation of homogeneous flow, free shear flows, the mixing layer, wakes, and wall-bounded flows including channel flow and the boundary layer. Applications of large eddy simulation in the laboratory as in meteorological and other environmental flows are examined. Directions in which the work is proceeding and what can be expected from higher levels simulated on are examined.

  15. Higher-level simulations of turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The fundamentals of large eddy simulation are considered and the approaches to it are compared. Subgrid scale models and the development of models for the Reynolds-averaged equations are discussed as well as the use of full simulation in testing these models. Numerical methods used in simulating large eddies, the simulation of homogeneous flows, and results from full and large scale eddy simulations of such flows are examined. Free shear flows are considered with emphasis on the mixing layer and wake simulation. Wall-bounded flow (channel flow) and recent work on the boundary layer are also discussed. Applications of large eddy simulation and full simulation in meteorological and environmental contexts are included along with a look at the direction in which work is proceeding and what can be expected from higher-level simulation in the future.

  16. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  17. Advanced Space Shuttle simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Smith, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A non-recursive model (based on von Karman spectra) for atmospheric turbulence along the flight path of the shuttle orbiter was developed. It provides for simulation of instantaneous vertical and horizontal gusts at the vehicle center-of-gravity, and also for simulation of instantaneous gusts gradients. Based on this model the time series for both gusts and gust gradients were generated and stored on a series of magnetic tapes, entitled Shuttle Simulation Turbulence Tapes (SSTT). The time series are designed to represent atmospheric turbulence from ground level to an altitude of 120,000 meters. A description of the turbulence generation procedure is provided. The results of validating the simulated turbulence are described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. One-dimensional von Karman spectra are tabulated, while a discussion of the minimum frequency simulated is provided. The results of spectral and statistical analyses of the SSTT are presented.

  18. Simulation of mildly unsaturated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letha, J.; Elango, K.

    1994-02-01

    In the study of unsaturated flow in the soil profile, the soil characteristic functions, one relating the pressure head to water saturation and the other relating the permeability to water saturation, are usually established with data covering a wide range. The application of these functions to situations with a mildly unsaturated range, such as encountered in a wet irrigation setting in a coarse soil, has been investigated. Certain shortcomings in using these soil characteristic functions directly have been identified, and modifications to the procedure of determining the characteristic functions have been proposed and tested. The improvements have been quantified in terms of the goodness of fit to published field measurements on the soil characteristics and also in terms of simulation results for an idealized test situation corresponding to irrigation practice in a relatively coarse soil. The special features of the C language have been utilized in developing a computer program for finite element modelling of the nonlinear Richards' equation describing unsaturated subsurface water flow. A weighted least-squares procedure improves the fit of the Brooks and Corey characteristic functions for pressure head vs. degree of saturation. A numerical integration procedure improves the fit of the Van Genuchten characteristic functions for permeability vs. degree of saturation. The present study indicates that even for sandy soil, the conventional Van Genuchten and Brooks and Corey soil characteristic functions need to be modified to yield acceptable results for the mildly unsaturated regime.

  19. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Markl, M; Schnell, S; Wu, C; Bollache, E; Jarvis, K; Barker, A J; Robinson, J D; Rigsby, C K

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented. PMID:26944696

  20. Recent advances in computer image generation simulation.

    PubMed

    Geltmacher, H E

    1988-11-01

    An explosion in flight simulator technology over the past 10 years is revolutionizing U.S. Air Force (USAF) operational training. The single, most important development has been in computer image generation. However, other significant advances are being made in simulator handling qualities, real-time computation systems, and electro-optical displays. These developments hold great promise for achieving high fidelity combat mission simulation. This article reviews the progress to date and predicts its impact, along with that of new computer science advances such as very high speed integrated circuits (VHSIC), on future USAF aircrew simulator training. Some exciting possibilities are multiship, full-mission simulators at replacement training units, miniaturized unit level mission rehearsal training simulators, onboard embedded training capability, and national scale simulator networking.

  1. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  2. Advancing the LSST Operations Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Ridgway, S. T.; Cook, K. H.; Delgado, F.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Petry, C. E.; Operations Simulator Group

    2013-01-01

    The Operations Simulator for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST; http://lsst.org) allows the planning of LSST observations that obey explicit science driven observing specifications, patterns, schema, and priorities, while optimizing against the constraints placed by design-specific opto-mechanical system performance of the telescope facility, site specific conditions (including weather and seeing), as well as additional scheduled and unscheduled downtime. A simulation run records the characteristics of all observations (e.g., epoch, sky position, seeing, sky brightness) in a MySQL database, which can be queried for any desired purpose. Derivative information digests of the observing history database are made with an analysis package called Simulation Survey Tools for Analysis and Reporting (SSTAR). Merit functions and metrics have been designed to examine how suitable a specific simulation run is for several different science applications. This poster reports recent work which has focussed on an architectural restructuring of the code that will allow us to a) use "look-ahead" strategies that avoid cadence sequences that cannot be completed due to observing constraints; and b) examine alternate optimization strategies, so that the most efficient scheduling algorithm(s) can be identified and used: even few-percent efficiency gains will create substantive scientific opportunity. The enhanced simulator will be used to assess the feasibility of desired observing cadences, study the impact of changing science program priorities, and assist with performance margin investigations of the LSST system.

  3. Time-Dependent Simulations of Turbopump Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the current effort is to provide a computational framework for design and analysis of the entire fuel supply system of a liquid rocket engine, including high-fidelity unsteady turbopump flow analysis. This capability is needed to support the design of pump sub-systems for advanced space transportation vehicles that are likely to involve liquid propulsion systems. To date, computational tools for design/analysis of turbopump flows are based on relatively lower fidelity methods. An unsteady, three-dimensional viscous flow analysis tool involving stationary and rotational components for the entire turbopump assembly has not been available for real-world engineering applications. The present effort will provide developers with information such as transient flow phenomena at start up, impact of non-uniform inflows, system vibration and impact on the structure. In the proposed paper, the progress toward the capability of complete simulation of the turbo-pump for a liquid rocket engine is reported. The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbo-pump is used as a test case for evaluation of the hybrid MPI/Open-MP and MLP versions of the INS3D code. The relative motion of the grid systems for the rotor-stator interaction was obtained using overset grid techniques. Time-accuracy of the scheme has been evaluated with simple test cases. Unsteady computations for the SSME turbo-pump, which contains 114 zones with 34.5 million grid points, are carried out on Origin 2000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. Results from these time-accurate simulations with moving boundary capability will be presented along with the performance of parallel versions of the code.

  4. Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

  5. Numerical simulation of wall-bounded turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in three dimensional, time dependent numerical simulation of turbulent flows bounded by a wall are reviewed. Both direct and large eddy simulation techniques are considered within the same computational framework. The computational spatial grid requirements as dictated by the known structure of turbulent boundary layers are presented. The numerical methods currently in use are reviewed and some of the features of these algorithms, including spatial differencing and accuracy, time advancement, and data management are discussed. A selection of the results of the recent calculations of turbulent channel flow, including the effects of system rotation and transpiration on the flow are included.

  6. Simulation Of Advanced Train Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Paul; Oman, Paul

    This paper describes an Advanced Train Control System (ATCS) simulation environment created using the Network Simulator 2 (ns-2) discrete event network simulation system. The ATCS model is verified using ATCS monitoring software, laboratory results and a comparison with a mathematical model of ATCS communications. The simulation results are useful in understanding ATCS communication characteristics and identifying protocol strengths, weaknesses, vulnerabilities and mitigation techniques. By setting up a suite of ns-2 scripts, an engineer can simulate hundreds of possible scenarios in the space of a few seconds to investigate failure modes and consequences.

  7. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 2; Sub-Scale Air Flow Simulation of Port Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y. P.; Ramandran, N.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    The injection-flow issuing from a porous medium in the cold-flow simulation of internal port flows in solid rocket motors is characterized by a spatial instability termed pseudoturbulence that produces a rather non-uniform (lumpy) injection-velocity profile. The objective of this study is to investigate the interaction between the injection- and the developing axial-flows. The findings show that this interaction generally weakens the lumpy injection profile and affects the subsequent development of the axial flow. The injection profile is found to depend on the material characteristics, and the ensuing pseudoturbulence is a function of the injection velocity, the axial position and the distance from the porous wall. The flow transition (from laminar to turbulent) of the axial-flow is accelerated in flows emerging from smaller pores primarily due to the higher pseudoturbulence produced by the smaller pores in comparison to that associated with larger pores. In flows with rather uniform injection-flow profiles (weak or no pseudoturbulence), the axial and transverse velocity components in the porous duct are found to satisfy the sine/cosine analytical solutions derived from inviscid assumptions. The transition results from the present study are compared with previous results from surveyed literature, and detailed flow development measurements are presented in terms of the blowing fraction, and characterizing Reynolds numbers.

  8. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; James, S.; Givi, P.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES) methods for computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the first year of Phase 3 of this research.

  9. Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Doughty, C.; Kowalsky, M.B.; Moridis, G.J.; Pan,L.; Xu, T.; Zhang, Y.; Pruess, K.

    2007-02-01

    The vadose zone can be characterized as a complex subsurfacesystem in which intricate physical and biogeochemical processes occur inresponse to a variety of natural forcings and human activities. Thismakes it difficult to describe, understand, and predict the behavior ofthis specific subsurface system. The TOUGH nonisothermal multiphase flowsimulators are well-suited to perform advanced vadose zone studies. Theconceptual models underlying the TOUGH simulators are capable ofrepresenting features specific to the vadose zone, and of addressing avariety of coupled phenomena. Moreover, the simulators are integratedinto software tools that enable advanced data analysis, optimization, andsystem-level modeling. We discuss fundamental and computationalchallenges in simulating vadose zone processes, review recent advances inmodeling such systems, and demonstrate some capabilities of the TOUGHsuite of codes using illustrative examples.

  10. Advances in atomic oxygen simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, Joseph F.; Bareiss, Lyle E.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) present in the atmosphere at orbital altitudes of 200 to 700 km has been shown to degrade various exposed materials on Shuttle flights. The relative velocity of the AO with the spacecraft, together with the AO density, combine to yield an environment consisting of a 5 eV beam energy with a flux of 10(exp 14) to 10(exp 15) oxygen atoms/sq cm/s. An AO ion beam apparatus that produces flux levels and energy similar to that encountered by spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been in existence since 1987. Test data was obtained from the interaction of the AO ion beam with materials used in space applications (carbon, silver, kapton) and with several special coatings of interest deposited on various surfaces. The ultimate design goal of the AO beam simulation device is to produce neutral AO at sufficient flux levels to replicate on-orbit conditions. A newly acquired mass spectrometer with energy discrimination has allowed 5 eV neutral oxygen atoms to be separated and detected from the background of thermal oxygen atoms of approx 0.2 eV. Neutralization of the AO ion beam at 5 eV was shown at the Martin Marietta AO facility.

  11. Deceleration in advance in the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Gang; Gao, Zi-You; Jia, Bin; Jiang, Rui

    2009-05-01

    Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg model, we study the impact of deceleration in advance on the dynamics of traffic flow. In the process of deceleration in advance, the effect of reaction delay and the effect of expectation are considered respectively. The traffic flow properties are studied by analyzing the fundamental diagram, spatio-temporal patterns, distance headway distribution and car accidents. The simulation results show that reaction delay brings complex traffic flow patterns and expectation makes the serious car accidents rarely happen.

  12. Advanced numerics for multi-dimensional fluid flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Vanka, S.P.

    1984-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development and use of mathematical models for the simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer and combustion processes in engineering equipment. The equations representing the multi-dimensional transport of mass, momenta and species are numerically solved by finite-difference or finite-element techniques. However despite the multiude of differencing schemes and solution algorithms, and the advancement of computing power, the calculation of multi-dimensional flows, especially three-dimensional flows, remains a mammoth task. The following discussion is concerned with the author's recent work on the construction of accurate discretization schemes for the partial derivatives, and the efficient solution of the set of nonlinear algebraic equations resulting after discretization. The present work has been jointly supported by the Ramjet Engine Division of the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  13. Advanced numerics for multi-dimensional fluid flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanka, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development and use of mathematical models for the simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer and combustion processes in engineering equipment. The equations representing the multi-dimensional transport of mass, momenta and species are numerically solved by finite-difference or finite-element techniques. However despite the multiude of differencing schemes and solution algorithms, and the advancement of computing power, the calculation of multi-dimensional flows, especially three-dimensional flows, remains a mammoth task. The following discussion is concerned with the author's recent work on the construction of accurate discretization schemes for the partial derivatives, and the efficient solution of the set of nonlinear algebraic equations resulting after discretization. The present work has been jointly supported by the Ramjet Engine Division of the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  14. Progress in Unsteady Turbopump Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Chan, William; Kwak, Dochan; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses unsteady flow simulations for a turbopump intended for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The simulation process makes use of computational grids and parallel processing. The architecture of the parallel computers used is discussed, as is the scripting of turbopump simulations.

  15. Advances in Monte Carlo computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swendsen, Robert H.

    2011-03-01

    Since the invention of the Metropolis method in 1953, Monte Carlo methods have been shown to provide an efficient, practical approach to the calculation of physical properties in a wide variety of systems. In this talk, I will discuss some of the advances in the MC simulation of thermodynamics systems, with an emphasis on optimization to obtain a maximum of useful information.

  16. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    ScienceCinema

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2016-07-12

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    SciTech Connect

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Supercomputing Aspects for Simulating Incompressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kris, Cetin C.

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to support the design of liquid rocket systems for the Advanced Space Transportation System. Since the space launch systems in the near future are likely to rely on liquid rocket engines, increasing the efficiency and reliability of the engine components is an important task. One of the major problems in the liquid rocket engine is to understand fluid dynamics of fuel and oxidizer flows from the fuel tank to plume. Understanding the flow through the entire turbo-pump geometry through numerical simulation will be of significant value toward design. One of the milestones of this effort is to develop, apply and demonstrate the capability and accuracy of 3D CFD methods as efficient design analysis tools on high performance computer platforms. The development of the Message Passage Interface (MPI) and Multi Level Parallel (MLP) versions of the INS3D code is currently underway. The serial version of INS3D code is a multidimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes solver based on overset grid technology, INS3D-MPI is based on the explicit massage-passing interface across processors and is primarily suited for distributed memory systems. INS3D-MLP is based on multi-level parallel method and is suitable for distributed-shared memory systems. For the entire turbo-pump simulations, moving boundary capability and efficient time-accurate integration methods are built in the flow solver, To handle the geometric complexity and moving boundary problems, an overset grid scheme is incorporated with the solver so that new connectivity data will be obtained at each time step. The Chimera overlapped grid scheme allows subdomains move relative to each other, and provides a great flexibility when the boundary movement creates large displacements. Two numerical procedures, one based on artificial compressibility method and the other pressure projection method, are outlined for obtaining time-accurate solutions of the incompressible Navier

  19. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Tsai, A.

    1991-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementations of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program was initiated to extend the present capabilities of this method for the treatment of chemically reacting flows, whereas in the DNS efforts, focus was on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and nonequilibrium kinetics modeling in high speed reacting flows. The efforts to date were primarily focussed on simulations of simple flows, namely, homogeneous compressible flows and temporally developing hign speed mixing layers. A summary of the accomplishments is provided.

  20. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  1. Simulation of multiphase flow in hydrocyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, P.

    2013-04-01

    Multiphase gas-liquid-solid swirling flow within hydrocyclone is simulated. Geometry and boundary conditions are based on Hsieh's 75 mm hydrocyclone. Extensive simulations point that standard mixture model with careful selection of interphase drag law is suitable for correct prediction of particle classification in case of dilute suspensions. However this approach fails for higher mass loading. It is also confirmed that Reynolds stress model is the best choice for multiphase modeling of the swirling flow on relatively coarse grids.

  2. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These simulations of atmospheric flow use the same experimental parameters but started with slightly different initial conditions in the model. The simulations were part of data analysis for the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC), a planet in a test tube apparatus flown on Spacelab to mimic the atmospheres on gas giant planets and stars. (Credit: Dr. Tim Miller of Global Hydrology and Climate Center at the Marshall Space Flight Center)

  3. Mapping lava flow hazards using computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wadge, G.; Young, P.A.V.; Mckendrick, I.J.

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulations of the paths of flowing lava are achieved using a program, FLOWFRONT, that describes the behavior of flow and digital models of the terrain. Two methods of application of simulations of the hazards posed by lava flows are described. The first, deterministic, method requires that program parameters such as vent position, minimum flow thickness, and thickness/slope relationship be based on the ambient eruptive conditions so that the future course of a specific lava flow can be simulated. This is illustrated using retrospective modeling of the first 21 days of the eruption of an andesitic lava flow at Lonquimay volcano, Chile, in 1988-1989. The usefulness of this method for real-time predictive modeling is likely to be limited by the lack of accurate field data on flow characteristics, the simple nature of the model, and the sensitivity to parameter choice of the final planimetric form of the model flow. The second application is probabilistic in nature and creates a map of the likelihood of inundation by lava flows that is useful for long-term land use planning. This method uses the historical record of past eruptions to constrain a series of Monte Carlo simulations and is illustrated using data from Etna volcano in Sicily. A multivariate statistical analysis of nine parameters for the 1763-1989 eruption catalog using simulated annealing permitted a classification of Etna`s flank eruptions into two types: A and B. Type A eruptions are short-lived and produce linear lava flows; type B eruptions are long-lived, and produce lava flows that are much broader in shape, and their vents are restricted to the eastern flank of the volcano.

  4. Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2011-03-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  5. Mapping lava flow hazards using computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.; Young, P. A. V.; McKendrick, I. J.

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulations of the paths of flowing lava are achieved using a program, FLOWFRONT, that describes the behavior of flow and digital models of the terrain. Two methods of application of simulations of the hazards posed by lava flows are described. The first, deterministic, method requires that program parameters such as vent position, minimum flow thickness, and thickness/slope relationship be based on the ambient eruptive conditions so that the future course of a specific lava flow can be simulated. This is illustrated using retrospective modeling of the first 21 days of the eruption of an andesitic lava flow at Lonquimay volcano, Chile, in 1988-1989. The usefulness of this method for real-time predictive modeling is likely to be limited by the lack of accurate field data on flow characteristics, the simple nature of the model, and the sensitivity to parameter choice of the final planimetric form of the model flow. The second application is probabilistic in nature and creates a map of the likelihood of inundation by lava flows that is useful for long-term land use planning. This method uses the historical record of past eruptions to constrain a series of Monte Carlo simulations and is illustrated using data from Etna volcano in Sicily. A multivariate statistical analysis of nine parameters for the 1763-1989 eruption catalog using simulated annealing permitted a classification of Etna's flank eruptions into two types: A and B. Type A eruptions are short-lived and produce linear lava flows; type B eruptions are long-lived, and produce lava flows that are much broader in shape, and their vents are restricted to the eastern flank of the volcano. The simulation method consists of creating a probability surface of the location of future eruption vents and segmenting the region according to the most likely historical eruption on which to base the simulation. Analysis of the autocorrelation of the historical eruptions shows that type A eruptions are strongly

  6. Assembly flow simulation of a radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, W. C.; Biggs, P. M.

    1994-01-01

    A discrete event simulation model has been developed to predict the assembly flow time of a new radar product. The simulation was the key tool employed to identify flow constraints. The radar, production facility, and equipment complement were designed, arranged, and selected to provide the most manufacturable assembly possible. A goal was to reduce the assembly and testing cycle time from twenty-six weeks. A computer software simulation package (SLAM 2) was utilized as the foundation for simulating the assembly flow time. FORTRAN subroutines were incorporated into the software to deal with unique flow circumstances that were not accommodated by the software. Detailed information relating to the assembly operations was provided by a team selected from the engineering, manufacturing management, inspection, and production assembly staff. The simulation verified that it would be possible to achieve the cycle time goal of six weeks. Equipment and manpower constraints were identified during the simulation process and adjusted as required to achieve the flow with a given monthly production requirement. The simulation is being maintained as a planning tool to be used to identify constraints in the event that monthly output is increased. 'What-if' studies have been conducted to identify the cost of reducing constraints caused by increases in output requirement.

  7. Advanced tomographic flow diagnostics for opaque multiphase fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, J.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.; Jackson, N.B.; Shollenberger, K.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the work performed for the ``Advanced Tomographic Flow Diagnostics for Opaque Multiphase Fluids`` LDRD (Laboratory-Directed Research and Development) project and is presented as the fulfillment of the LDRD reporting requirement. Dispersed multiphase flows, particularly gas-liquid flows, are industrially important to the chemical and applied-energy industries, where bubble-column reactors are employed for chemical synthesis and waste treatment. Due to the large range of length scales (10{sup {minus}6}-10{sup 1}m) inherent in real systems, direct numerical simulation is not possible at present, so computational simulations are forced to use models of subgrid-scale processes, the accuracy of which strongly impacts simulation fidelity. The development and validation of such subgrid-scale models requires data sets at representative conditions. The ideal measurement techniques would provide spatially and temporally resolved full-field measurements of the distributions of all phases, their velocity fields, and additional associated quantities such as pressure and temperature. No technique or set of techniques is known that satisfies this requirement. In this study, efforts are focused on characterizing the spatial distribution of the phases in two-phase gas-liquid flow and in three-phase gas-liquid-solid flow. Due to its industrial importance, the bubble-column geometry is selected for diagnostics development and assessment. Two bubble-column testbeds are utilized: one at laboratory scale and one close to industrial scale. Several techniques for measuring the phase distributions at conditions of industrial interest are examined: level-rise measurements, differential-pressure measurements, bulk electrical impedance measurements, electrical bubble probes, x-ray tomography, gamma-densitometry tomography, and electrical impedance tomography.

  8. Reactive multiphase flow simulation workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeyden, W.B.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on computer simulation of reactive multiphase flow was held on May 18 and 19, 1995 in the Computational Testbed for Industry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Approximately 35 to 40 people attended the workshop. This included 21 participants from 12 companies representing the petroleum, chemical, environmental and consumer products industries, two representatives from the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and several from Los Alamos. The dialog at the meeting suggested that reactive multiphase flow simulation represents an excellent candidate for government/industry/academia collaborative research. A white paper on a potential consortium for reactive multiphase flow with input from workshop participants will be issued separately.

  9. Simulating the flow of entangled polymers.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    To optimize automation for polymer processing, attempts have been made to simulate the flow of entangled polymers. In industry, fluid dynamics simulations with phenomenological constitutive equations have been practically established. However, to account for molecular characteristics, a method to obtain the constitutive relationship from the molecular structure is required. Molecular dynamics simulations with atomic description are not practical for this purpose; accordingly, coarse-grained models with reduced degrees of freedom have been developed. Although the modeling of entanglement is still a challenge, mesoscopic models with a priori settings to reproduce entangled polymer dynamics, such as tube models, have achieved remarkable success. To use the mesoscopic models as staging posts between atomistic and fluid dynamics simulations, studies have been undertaken to establish links from the coarse-grained model to the atomistic and macroscopic simulations. Consequently, integrated simulations from materials chemistry to predict the macroscopic flow in polymer processing are forthcoming.

  10. Numerical simulations of cryogenic cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Hyeongjun; Min, Daeho; Kim, Chongam

    2015-12-01

    The present study deals with a numerical method for cryogenic cavitating flows. Recently, we have developed an accurate and efficient baseline numerical scheme for all-speed water-gas two-phase flows. By extending such progress, we modify the numerical dissipations to be properly scaled so that it does not show any deficiencies in low Mach number regions. For dealing with cryogenic two-phase flows, previous EOS-dependent shock discontinuity sensing term is replaced with a newly designed EOS-free one. To validate the proposed numerical method, cryogenic cavitating flows around hydrofoil are computed and the pressure and temperature depression effect in cryogenic cavitation are demonstrated. Compared with Hord's experimental data, computed results are turned out to be satisfactory. Afterwards, numerical simulations of flow around KARI turbopump inducer in liquid rocket are carried out under various flow conditions with water and cryogenic fluids, and the difference in inducer flow physics depending on the working fluids are examined.

  11. Progress in Unsteady Turbopump Flow Simulations Using Overset Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Chan, William; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on unsteady flow simulations for the Second Generation RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) baseline turbopump. Three impeller rotations were simulated by using a 34.3 million grid points model. MPI/OpenMP hybrid parallelism and MLP shared memory parallelism has been implemented and benchmarked in INS3D, an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. For RLV turbopump simulations a speed up of more than 30 times has been obtained. Moving boundary capability is obtained by using the DCF module. Scripting capability from CAD geometry to solution is developed. Unsteady flow simulations for advanced consortium impeller/diffuser by using a 39 million grid points model are currently underway. 1.2 impeller rotations are completed. The fluid/structure coupling is initiated.

  12. METC Gasifier Advanced Simulation (MGAS) model

    SciTech Connect

    Syamlal, M.; Bissett, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    Morgantown Energy Technology Center is developing an advanced moving-bed gasifier, which is the centerpiece of the Integrated Gasifier Combined-Cycle (IGCC) system, with the features of good efficiency, low cost, and minimal environmental impact. A mathematical model of the gasifier, the METC-Gasifier Advanced Simulation (MGAS) model, has been developed for the analysis and design of advanced gasifiers and other moving-bed gasifiers. This report contains the technical and the user manuals of the MGAS model. The MGAS model can describe the transient operation of coflow, counterflow, or fixed-bed gasifiers. It is a one-dimensional model and can simulate the addition and withdrawal of gas and solids at multiple locations in the bed, a feature essential for simulating beds with recycle. The model describes the reactor in terms of a gas phase and a solids (coal or char) phase. These phases may exist at different temperatures. The model considers several combustion, gasification, and initial stage reactions. The model consists of a set of mass balances for 14 gas species and three coal (pseudo-) species and energy balances for the gas and the solids phases. The resulting partial differential equations are solved using a finite difference technique.

  13. MPSalsa 3D Simulations of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many important scientific and engineering applications require a detailed analysis of complex systems with coupled fluid flow, thermal energy transfer, mass transfer and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. Currently, computer simulations of these complex reacting flow problems are limited to idealized systems in one or two spatial dimensions when coupled with a detailed, fundamental chemistry model. The goal of our research is to develop, analyze and implement advanced MP numerical algorithms that will allow high resolution 3D simulations with an equal emphasis on fluid flow and chemical kinetics modeling. In our research, we focus on the development of new, fully coupled, implicit solution strategies that are based on robust MP iterative solution methods (copied from http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/). These simulations are needed for scientific and technical areas such as: combustion research for transportation, atmospheric chemistry modeling for pollution studies, chemically reacting flow models for analysis and control of manufacturing processes, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling for production of advanced semiconductor materials (http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/).

    This project website provides six QuickTime videos of these simulations, along with a small image gallery and slideshow animations. A list of related publications and conference presentations is also made available.

  14. Numerical Simulations of Wing-Body Junction Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, C.; Chandra, S.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the research project is to contribute to the optimized design of fan bypass systems in advanced turbofan engines such as the Advanced Ducted Propulsors (ADP). The immediate objective is to perform numerical simulation of duct-strut interactions to elucidate the loss mechanisms associated with this configuration that is characteristic of ADP. These numerical simulations would complement an experimental study being undertaken at Purdue University. As the first step in the process, a numerical study of wing-body junction flow is being undertaken as it shares a number of characteristics with the duct-strut interaction flow. The presence of the characteristic horseshoe vortex and the associated secondary flow are the salient features that contribute to making this flow a challenge to predict numerically. The simulations will be performed with the NPARC code on the CRAY Y-MP platform at LeRC. The grids for the simulation have been generated using an algebraic mapping technique with a multisurface algorithm.

  15. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in humans, especially in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed to quantify the flow in these devices such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended to the analysis and development of a ventricular assist device (VAD), i.e., a blood pump. The blood flow in a VAD is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure can be applied. A primitive variable formulation is used in conjunction with the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. The primary purpose of developing the incompressible flow analysis capability was to quantify the flow in advanced turbopump for space propulsion system. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey VAD that is based on an axial blood pump. Due to massive computing requirements, high-end computing is necessary for simulating three-dimensional flow in these pumps. Computational, experimental, and clinical results are presented.

  16. Simulation of complex three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diewert, G. S.; Rothmund, H. J.; Nakahashi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of splitting is used extensively to simulate complex three dimensional flows on modern computer architectures. Used in all aspects, from initial grid generation to the determination of the final converged solution, splitting is used to enhance code vectorization, to permit solution driven grid adaption and grid enrichment, to permit the use of concurrent processing, and to enhance data flow through hierarchal memory systems. Three examples are used to illustrate these concepts to complex three dimensional flow fields: (1) interactive flow over a bump; (2) supersonic flow past a blunt based conical afterbody at incidence to a free stream and containing a centered propulsive jet; and (3) supersonic flow past a sharp leading edge delta wing at incidence to the free stream.

  17. Numerical simulations of unsteady flows in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorney, Daniel Joseph

    The performance of axial and centrifugal turbomachines is significantly affected by the presence of unsteady and viscous flow mechanisms. Most contemporary design systems, however, use steady or linearized unsteady inviscid flow analyses to generate new blade shapes. In an effort to increase the understanding of unsteady viscous flows in turbomachinery blade rows, and to determine the limitations of linearized inviscid flow analyses, a two-part investigation was conducted. In the first portion of this investigation, a nonlinear viscous flow analysis was developed for the prediction of unsteady flows in two dimensional axial turbomachinery blade rows. The boundary conditions were formulated to allow the specification of vortical, entropic and acoustic excitations at the inlet, and acoustic excitations at exit, of a cascade. Numerical simulations were performed for flat plate and compressor exit guide vane cascades, and the predicted results were compared with solutions from classical linearized theory and linearized inviscid flow analysis. The unsteady pressure fields predicted with the current analysis showed close agreement with the linearized solutions for low to moderate temporal frequency vortical and acoustic excitations. As the temporal frequency of the excitations was increased, nonlinear effects caused discrepancies to develop between the linearized and Navier-Stokes solution sets. The inclusion of viscosity had a significant impact on the unsteady vorticity field, but only a minimal effect on the unsteady pressure field. In the second part of this investigation, a quasi-three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis was modified and applied to flows in centrifugal turbomachinery blade rows. Inviscid and viscous flow simulations were performed for a centrifugal impeller at three operating conditions. By comparing the predicted and experimental circumferential distributions of the relative frame velocity and flow angle downstream of the impeller, it was

  18. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent circular jet flows

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S. C.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Sale, M. J.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents a numerical method for carrying out large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent free shear flows and an application of a method to simulate the flow generated by a nozzle discharging into a stagnant reservoir. The objective of the study was to elucidate the complex features of the instantaneous flow field to help interpret the results of recent biological experiments in which live fish were exposed to the jet shear zone. The fish-jet experiments were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems program. The experiments were designed to establish critical thresholds of shear and turbulence-induced loads to guide the development of innovative, fish-friendly hydropower turbine designs.

  19. Flow simulation and analysis of high-power flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, E.; Albertus, P.; Cho, K. T.; Weber, A. Z.; Kojic, A.

    2015-12-01

    The cost of a flow battery system can be reduced by increasing its power density and thereby reducing its stack area. If per-pass utilizations are held constant, higher battery power densities can only be achieved using higher flow rates. Here, a 3D computational fluid dynamics model of a flow battery flow field and electrode is used to analyze the implications of increasing flow rates to high power density operating conditions. Interdigitated and serpentine designs, and cell sizes ranging from 10 cm2 to 400 cm2, are simulated. The results quantify the dependence of pressure loss on cell size and design, demonstrating that the details of the passages that distribute flow between individual channels and the inlet and outlet have a major impact on pressure losses in larger cells. Additionally, in-cell flow behavior is analyzed as a function of cell size and design. Flow structures are interrogated to show how and where electrode parameters influence pressure drops, and how regions where transport is slow are correlated with the presence of experimentally observed cell degradation.

  20. Onyx-Advanced Aeropropulsion Simulation Framework Created

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a new software environment for analyzing and designing aircraft engines and, eventually, space transportation systems. Its purpose is to dramatically reduce the time, effort, and expense necessary to design and test jet engines by creating sophisticated computer simulations of an aerospace object or system (refs. 1 and 2). Through a university grant as part of that effort, researchers at the University of Toledo have developed Onyx, an extensible Java-based (Sun Micro-systems, Inc.), objectoriented simulation framework, to investigate how advanced software design techniques can be successfully applied to aeropropulsion system simulation (refs. 3 and 4). The design of Onyx's architecture enables users to customize and extend the framework to add new functionality or adapt simulation behavior as required. It exploits object-oriented technologies, such as design patterns, domain frameworks, and software components, to develop a modular system in which users can dynamically replace components with others having different functionality.

  1. Advancing Material Models for Automotive Forming Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vegter, H.; An, Y.; ten Horn, C. H. L. J.; Atzema, E. H.; Roelofsen, M. E.

    2005-08-01

    Simulations in automotive industry need more advanced material models to achieve highly reliable forming and springback predictions. Conventional material models implemented in the FEM-simulation models are not capable to describe the plastic material behaviour during monotonic strain paths with sufficient accuracy. Recently, ESI and Corus co-operate on the implementation of an advanced material model in the FEM-code PAMSTAMP 2G. This applies to the strain hardening model, the influence of strain rate, and the description of the yield locus in these models. A subsequent challenge is the description of the material after a change of strain path. The use of advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry requires a description of plastic material behaviour of multiphase steels. The simplest variant is dual phase steel consisting of a ferritic and a martensitic phase. Multiphase materials also contain a bainitic phase in addition to the ferritic and martensitic phase. More physical descriptions of strain hardening than simple fitted Ludwik/Nadai curves are necessary. Methods to predict plastic behaviour of single-phase materials use a simple dislocation interaction model based on the formed cells structures only. At Corus, a new method is proposed to predict plastic behaviour of multiphase materials have to take hard phases into account, which deform less easily. The resulting deformation gradients create geometrically necessary dislocations. Additional micro-structural information such as morphology and size of hard phase particles or grains is necessary to derive the strain hardening models for this type of materials. Measurements available from the Numisheet benchmarks allow these models to be validated. At Corus, additional measured values are available from cross-die tests. This laboratory test can attain critical deformations by large variations in blank size and processing conditions. The tests are a powerful tool in optimising forming simulations

  2. Numerical simulations of thin film thermal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hung; Cale, Timothy S.

    1994-12-01

    The thin film thermal flow process in long trenches is analyzed using a simulator which solves the equations which govern viscous, incompressible fluid flow. The total thermal baking process is divided into small time steps. At each time step, we solve the governing equations using the penalty function formulation and the Galerkin finite element method to obtain local velocity vectors. The free surface of the flowing film is updated according to these local velocity vectors. As an example application, we simulate the flow of boron and phosphorus doped silicon dioxide glass films in 2 micrometer high by 2 micrometer wide, infinitely long trenches, for which two-dimensional profile evolution is appropriate. The simulated film profiles show that the local leveling rate of a film is a sensitive function of surface curvature. The simulation program predicts that lower viscosity and thicker films have superior planarization properties compared with higher viscosity and thinner films. These trends are in agreement with empirical observations and previous modeling and simulation work on glass film planarization processes.

  3. EGR Distribution in Engine Cylinders Using Advanced Virtual Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xuetong

    2000-08-20

    Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is a well-known technology for reduction of NOx in diesel engines. With the demand for extremely low engine out NOx emissions, it is important to have a consistently balanced EGR flow to individual engine cylinders. Otherwise, the variation in the cylinders' NOx contribution to the overall engine emissions will produce unacceptable variability. This presentation will demonstrate the effective use of advanced virtual simulation in the development of a balanced EGR distribution in engine cylinders. An initial design is analyzed reflecting the variance in the EGR distribution, quantitatively and visually. Iterative virtual lab tests result in an optimized system.

  4. The numerical simulation of multistage turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Beach, T. A.; Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; To, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    The need to account for momentum and energy transport by the unsteady deterministic flow field in modeling the time-averaged flow state within a blade row passage embedded in a multistage compressor is assessed. It was found that, within the endwall regions, large-scale three-dimensional unsteady structures existed which caused significant transport of momentum and energy across the time-averaged stream surface of a stator flow field. These experiments confirmed that the tranport process is dominated by turbulent diffusion in the midspan region. A model was then proposed for simulating this transport process, and a limited study was undertaken to assess its validity.

  5. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  6. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-07-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  7. Simulation methods for advanced scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, T.E.; Carlson, J.A.; Forster, R.A.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to create effective new algorithms for solving N-body problems by computer simulation. The authors concentrated on developing advanced classical and quantum Monte Carlo techniques. For simulations of phase transitions in classical systems, they produced a framework generalizing the famous Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms for Ising and Potts models. For spin-glass-like problems, they demonstrated the effectiveness of an extension of the multicanonical method for the two-dimensional, random bond Ising model. For quantum mechanical systems, they generated a new method to compute the ground-state energy of systems of interacting electrons. They also improved methods to compute excited states when the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method is used and to compute longer time dynamics when the stationary phase quantum Monte Carlo method is used.

  8. Simulation of lateral flow with SWAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calibration of the SWAT model for the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed (GCEW) showed that percolation through the restrictive claypan layer, lateral flow above that layer, and redistribution of excess moisture up to the ground surface were not correctly simulated. In addition, surface runoff a...

  9. Cardiovascular flow simulation at extreme scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Sahni, Onkar; Kim, H. Jin; Figueroa, C. Alberto; Taylor, Charles A.; Shephard, Mark S.; Jansen, Kenneth E.

    2009-12-01

    As cardiovascular models grow more sophisticated in terms of the geometry considered, and more physiologically realistic boundary conditions are applied, and fluid flow is coupled to structural models, the computational complexity grows. Massively parallel adaptivity and flow solvers with extreme scalability enable cardiovascular simulations to reach an extreme scale while keeping the time-to-solution reasonable. In this paper, we discuss our efforts in this area and provide two demonstrations: one on an extremely large and complex geometry (including many of the major arteries below the neck) where the solution is efficiently captured with anisotropic adaptivity and another case (severe abdominal aorta aneurysm) where the transitional flow leads to extremely large meshes (O(109)) and scalability to extremely large core counts (O(105)) for both rigid and deforming wall simulations.

  10. Simulation forecasts complex flow streams from Ekofisk

    SciTech Connect

    Arnes, F.C.; Lillejord, H.

    1996-10-28

    A commercial steady-state process flowsheet simulation program serves as the basis for a rigorous calculation model for predicting produced flow rates from the Ekofisk complex in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. The complex is the center of an extensive gathering system that collects oil and gas streams from several producing fields. Prior to running a production forecast, the simulation model is initiated by matching several years of production. Once the simulation model matches historical production data within acceptable limits, it then is driven by production forecasts from reservoir simulations to develop long-term forecasts of gas, NGL, and oil production. The paper describes the Ekofisk field, the process simulation, implementation of the model, and problems encountered.

  11. Advances in gas-liquid flows 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.M. . Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Rohatgi, U.S. ); Hashemi, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Gas-liquid two-phase flows commonly occur in nature and industrial applications. Rain, clouds, geysers, and waterfalls are examples of natural gas-liquid flow phenomena, whereas industrial applications can be found in nuclear reactors, steam generators, boilers, condensers, evaporators, fuel atomization, heat pipes, electronic equipment cooling, petroleum engineering, chemical process engineering, and many others. The household-variety phenomena such as garden sprinklers, shower, whirlpool bath, dripping faucet, boiling tea pot, and bubbling beer provide daily experience of gas-liquid flows. The papers presented in this volume reflect the variety and richness of gas-liquid two-phase flow and the increasing role it plays in modern technology. This volume contains papers dealing with some recent development in gas-liquid flow science and technology, covering basic gas-liquid flows, measurements and instrumentation, cavitation and flashing flows, countercurrent flow and flooding, flow in various components and geometries liquid metals and thermocapillary effects, heat transfer, nonlinear phenomena, instability, and other special and general topics related to gas-liquid flows.

  12. Petaflop hydrokinetic simulations of complex flows on massive GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, M.; Bisson, M.; Fatica, M.; Melchionna, S.; Succi, S.

    2013-02-01

    We present recent extensions of the MUPHY computational framework for multi-scale simulation of complex bio-fluidic phenomena in real-life geometries. The new framework, which builds on concurrent advances of the computational modeling and parallelization techniques, is able to simulate suspensions with several hundreds of millions of finite-size bodies, interacting with each other and with the surrounding fluid, in geometries of realistic anatomic complexity. Blood flow through the human coronary arteries, at physiological hematocrit values, is simulated with a spatial resolution of 10 micrometers, comparable with the size of red blood cells. The simulation exhibits excellent parallel scalability on a cluster of 4000 M2050 Nvidia GPUs, with an aggregate performance close to 1 Petaflop/s.

  13. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  14. Weakly nonlinear simulation of planar stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael R.; McCready, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    The interfacial behavior of two-fluid, planar flows is studied by numerical integration of weakly-nonlinear amplitude equations derived via eigenfunction expansion of the governing equations. This study extends the range of classic Stuart-Landau theories by the inclusion of a spectrum of modes allowing all possible quadratic and cubic interactions. Results are obtained for four cases where linear and Stuart-Landau theories do not give a complete description; gas-liquid and oil-water pressure driven flow, matched-density liquid-liquid Couette flow, and the region of gas-liquid flow near resonance that switches from supercritical to subcritical. It is found that integration of amplitude equations gives better qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments than Stuart-Landau theory. Further, the distinctively different behaviors of these systems can be understood in terms of the spectrum of nonlinear coefficients. In gas-liquid channel flow a low wave number wave is destabilized through quadratic interaction with the mean flow mode. For liquid-liquid Poiseuille flow, a low wave number wave is destabilized through cubic interactions with higher modes. For depth and viscosity ratios where liquid-liquid Couette flow is unstable to long waves and for which the growth rates are not too large, simulation results predict that the waves grow to a statistically steady state where there is no preferred wave number. Stabilization is provided by an apparently self-similar cascade of energy to higher modes that are linearly stable, explaining why no visible waves occur in experiments done in this region. While Stuart-Landau theory provides no prediction of wave amplitude above criticality for subcritical cases, simulations show that wave saturation at small amplitude is possible and suggests that subcritical predictions may not mean that steady waves do not exist. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Bubble Augmented Propulsor Mixture Flow Simulation near Choked Flow Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    The concept of waterjet thrust augmentation through bubble injection has been the subject of many patents and publications over the past several decades, and computational and experimental evidences of the augmentation of the jet thrust through bubble growth in the jet stream have been reported. Through our experimental studies, we have demonstrated net thrust augmentation as high as 70%for air volume fractions as high as 50%. However, in order to enable practical designs, an adequately validated modeling tool is required. In our previous numerical studies, we developed and validated a numerical code to simulate and predict the performance of a two-phase flow water jet propulsion system for low void fractions. In the present work, we extend the numerical method to handle higher void fractions to enable simulations for the high thrust augmentation conditions. At high void fractions, the speed of sound in the bubbly mixture decreases substantially and could be as low as 20 m/s, and the mixture velocity can approach the speed of sound in the medium. In this numerical study, we extend our numerical model, which is based on the two-way coupling between the mixture flow field and Lagrangian tracking of a large number of bubbles, to accommodate compressible flow regimes. Numerical methods used and the validation studies for various flow conditions in the bubble augmented propulsor will be presented. This work is supported by Office of Naval Research through contract N00014-11-C-0482 monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Complex Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernobrovkin, A. A.; Lakshiminarayana, B.

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady, multiblock, Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes solver based on Runge-Kutta scheme and Pseudo-time step for turbo-machinery applications was developed. The code was validated and assessed against analytical and experimental data. It was used to study a variety of physical mechanisms of unsteady, three-dimensional, turbulent, transitional, and cooling flows in compressors and turbines. Flow over a cylinder has been used to study effects of numerical aspects on accuracy of prediction of wake decay and transition, and to modify K-epsilon models. The following simulations have been performed: (a) Unsteady flow in a compressor cascade: Three low Reynolds number turbulence models have been assessed and data compared with Euler/boundary layer predictions. Major flow features associated with wake induced transition were predicted and studied; (b) Nozzle wake-rotor interaction in a turbine: Results compared to LDV data in design and off-design conditions, and cause and effect of unsteady flow in turbine rotors were analyzed; (c) Flow in the low-pressure turbine: Assessed capability of the code to predict transitional, attached and separated flows at a wide range of low Reynolds numbers and inlet freestream turbulence intensity. Several turbulence and transition models have been employed and comparisons made to experiments; (d) leading edge film cooling at compound angle: Comparisons were made with experiments, and the flow physics of the associated vortical structures were studied; and (e) Tip leakage flow in a turbine. The physics of the secondary flow in a rotor was studied and sources of loss identified.

  17. Advanced stability analysis for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY stability analysis code to the full eighth order compressible stability equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the stability of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the stability of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.

  18. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2000-08-28

    This project targets the development of (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling non-conventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and well index (for use in simulation models), including the effects of wellbore flow; and (3) accurate approaches to account for heterogeneity in the near-well region.

  19. A static data flow simulation study at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barszcz, Eric; Howard, Lauri S.

    1987-01-01

    Demands in computational power, particularly in the area of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), led NASA Ames Research Center to study advanced computer architectures. One architecture being studied is the static data flow architecture based on research done by Jack B. Dennis at MIT. To improve understanding of this architecture, a static data flow simulator, written in Pascal, has been implemented for use on a Cray X-MP/48. A matrix multiply and a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT), two algorithms used in CFD work at Ames, have been run on the simulator. Execution times can vary by a factor of more than 2 depending on the partitioning method used to assign instructions to processing elements. Service time for matching tokens has proved to be a major bottleneck. Loop control and array address calculation overhead can double the execution time. The best sustained MFLOPS rates were less than 50% of the maximum capability of the machine.

  20. Time Dependent Simulation of Turbopump Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan; Chan, William; Williams, Robert

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this viewgraph presentation is to enhance incompressible flow simulation capability for developing aerospace vehicle components, especially unsteady flow phenomena associated with high speed turbo pumps. Unsteady Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME)-rig1 1 1/2 rotations are completed for the 34.3 million grid points model. The moving boundary capability is obtained by using the DCF module. MLP shared memory parallelism has been implemented and benchmarked in INS3D. The scripting capability from CAD geometry to solution is developed. Data compression is applied to reduce data size in post processing and fluid/structure coupling is initiated.

  1. Simulation of Flow Control Using Deformable Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truman, C. Randall

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to numerically simulate the effects of oscillatory actuators placed on the leading edge of an airfoil, and to quantify the effects of oscillatory blowing on an airfoil stall behavior. It has been demonstrated experimentally that periodic blowing can delay flow separation at high angle of attack. The computations are to be performed for a TAU 0015 airfoil at a high Reynolds number of approx. 1 x 10(exp 6) with turbulent flow conditions. The two-equation Wilcox k - w turbulence model has been shown to provide reliable descriptions of transition and turbulence at high Reynolds numbers. The results are to be compared to Seifert's experimental data.

  2. Molecular Simulation of Nonequilibrium Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzentruber, T. E.; Valentini, P.; Tump, P.

    2011-08-01

    Large-scale conventional time-driven molecular dynam- ics (MD) simulations of normal shock waves are performed for monatomic argon and argon-helium mixtures. For pure argon, near perfect agreement between MD and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results using the variable-hard-sphere model are found for density and temperature profiles as well as for velocity distribution functions throughout the shock. MD simulation results for argon are also in excellent agreement with experimental shock thickness data. Preliminary MD simulation results for argon-helium mixtures are in qualitative agreement with experimental density and temperature profile data, where separation between argon and helium density profiles due to disparate atomic mass is observed. Since conventional time-driven MD simulation of di- lute gases is computationally inefficient, a combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven MD algorithm is presented. The ED/TD-MD algorithm computes impending collisions and advances molecules directly to their next collision while evaluating the collision using conventional time-driven MD with an arbitrary interatomic potential. The method timestep thus approaches the mean-collision- time in the gas, while also detecting and simulating multi- body collisions with a small approximation. Extension of the method to diatomic and small polyatomic molecules is detailed, where center-of-mass velocities and extended cutoff radii are used to advance molecules to impending collisions. Only atomic positions are integrated during collisions and molecule sorting algorithms are employed to determine if atoms are bound in a molecule after a collision event. Rotational relaxation to equilibrium for a low density diatomic gas is validated by comparison with large-scale conventional time-driven MD simulation, where the final rotational distribution function is verified to be the correct Boltzmann rotational energy distribution.

  3. Advanced designs for fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Research was carried out on existing and new designs for minimally intrusive measurement of flow fields in the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell and the proposed Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment. The following topics are discussed: (1) identification and removal of foreign particles, (2) search for higher dielectric photochromic solutions, (3) selection of uv light source, (4) analysis of refractive techniques and (5) examination of fresnel lens applicability.

  4. Numerical simulation of flow through orifice meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, J. J.; Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The FLUENT and FLUENT/BFC computer programs have been used to numerically model turbulent flow through orifice meters. These simulations were based on solution of the Navier-Stokes equations incorporating a k-epsilon turbulence model. For ideal installations, trends in the discharge coefficient with Reynolds number, beta ratio, and surface roughness have been reproduced, and the value of the discharge coefficient has been computed to within 2 percent. Nonideal installations have also been simulated, including the effects of expanders, reducers, valves, and bends. Detailed modeling of flow through a bend has yielded results in good agreement with experimental data. The trend in discharge coefficient shifts for orifice meters downstream of bends has been predicted reasonably well.

  5. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airplane simulators. The requirements in this appendix are in addition to the simulator approval requirements in § 121.407. Each simulator used under this appendix must be approved as a Level B, C, or D simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airplane simulators. The requirements in this appendix are in addition to the simulator approval requirements in § 121.407. Each simulator used under this appendix must be approved as a Level B, C, or D simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  7. Advanced Potential Energy Surfaces for Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Alex; Boateng, Henry A; Bradshaw, Richard T; Demerdash, Omar N; Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Margul, Daniel T; Swails, Jason; Zeng, Qiao; Case, David A; Eastman, Peter; Wang, Lee-Ping; Essex, Jonathan W; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pande, Vijay S; Ponder, Jay W; Shao, Yihan; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Todorov, Ilian T; Tuckerman, Mark E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-09-22

    Advanced potential energy surfaces are defined as theoretical models that explicitly include many-body effects that transcend the standard fixed-charge, pairwise-additive paradigm typically used in molecular simulation. However, several factors relating to their software implementation have precluded their widespread use in condensed-phase simulations: the computational cost of the theoretical models, a paucity of approximate models and algorithmic improvements that can ameliorate their cost, underdeveloped interfaces and limited dissemination in computational code bases that are widely used in the computational chemistry community, and software implementations that have not kept pace with modern high-performance computing (HPC) architectures, such as multicore CPUs and modern graphics processing units (GPUs). In this Feature Article we review recent progress made in these areas, including well-defined polarization approximations and new multipole electrostatic formulations, novel methods for solving the mutual polarization equations and increasing the MD time step, combining linear-scaling electronic structure methods with new QM/MM methods that account for mutual polarization between the two regions, and the greatly improved software deployment of these models and methods onto GPU and CPU hardware platforms. We have now approached an era where multipole-based polarizable force fields can be routinely used to obtain computational results comparable to state-of-the-art density functional theory while reaching sampling statistics that are acceptable when compared to that obtained from simpler fixed partial charge force fields.

  8. Advanced Potential Energy Surfaces for Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Alex; Boateng, Henry A; Bradshaw, Richard T; Demerdash, Omar N; Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Margul, Daniel T; Swails, Jason; Zeng, Qiao; Case, David A; Eastman, Peter; Wang, Lee-Ping; Essex, Jonathan W; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pande, Vijay S; Ponder, Jay W; Shao, Yihan; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Todorov, Ilian T; Tuckerman, Mark E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-09-22

    Advanced potential energy surfaces are defined as theoretical models that explicitly include many-body effects that transcend the standard fixed-charge, pairwise-additive paradigm typically used in molecular simulation. However, several factors relating to their software implementation have precluded their widespread use in condensed-phase simulations: the computational cost of the theoretical models, a paucity of approximate models and algorithmic improvements that can ameliorate their cost, underdeveloped interfaces and limited dissemination in computational code bases that are widely used in the computational chemistry community, and software implementations that have not kept pace with modern high-performance computing (HPC) architectures, such as multicore CPUs and modern graphics processing units (GPUs). In this Feature Article we review recent progress made in these areas, including well-defined polarization approximations and new multipole electrostatic formulations, novel methods for solving the mutual polarization equations and increasing the MD time step, combining linear-scaling electronic structure methods with new QM/MM methods that account for mutual polarization between the two regions, and the greatly improved software deployment of these models and methods onto GPU and CPU hardware platforms. We have now approached an era where multipole-based polarizable force fields can be routinely used to obtain computational results comparable to state-of-the-art density functional theory while reaching sampling statistics that are acceptable when compared to that obtained from simpler fixed partial charge force fields. PMID:27513316

  9. Numerical simulation of swept-wing flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.

    1991-01-01

    The transition process characteristics of flows over swept wings were computationally modelled. The crossflow instability and crossflow/T-S wave interaction are analyzed through the numerical solution of the full three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations including unsteadiness, curvature, and sweep. The leading-edge region of a swept wing is considered in a three-dimensional spatial simulation with random disturbances as the initial conditions.

  10. Simulated nonresonant pulsed laser manipulation of a nitrogen flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, T. C.

    2011-09-01

    The continuing advance of laser technology enables a range of broadly applicable, laser-based flow manipulation techniques relevant to a number of aerospace, basic physics, and microtechnology applications. Theories for laser-molecule interactions have been under development since the advent of laser technology. Yet, the theories have not been adequately integrated into kinetic flow solvers. Realizing this integration would greatly enhance the scaling of laser-species interactions beyond the realm of ultra-cold atomic physics. This goal was realized in the present study. A representative numerical investigation of laser-based neutral nonpolar molecular flow manipulations was conducted using non-resonant pulsed laser fields. The numerical tool employed for this study was a specifically modified version of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo statistical kinetic solver known as SMILE. Flow steering and collimation was simulated for a nitrogen effluence with a stagnation condition of 1 Pa and 300 K emptying into vacuum. The laser pulses were 250 mJ, 5 ns pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm. Flow modification mapped out contours which followed the intensity gradient of the laser field, consistent with the use of the induced dipole gradient force along the field's radial direction and previously published experiments.

  11. Thermal and Fluid Flow Brazing Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HOSKING, FLOYD MICHAEL; GIANOULAKIS,STEVEN E.; GIVLER,RICHARD C.; SCHUNK,P. RANDALL

    1999-12-15

    The thermal response of fixtured parts in a batch-type brazing furnace can require numerous, time-consuming development runs before an acceptable furnace schedule or joint design is established. Powerful computational simulation tools are being developed to minimize the required number of verification experiments, improve furnace throughput, and increase product yields. Typical furnace simulations are based on thermal, fluid flow, and structural codes that incorporate the fundamental physics of the brazing process. The use of massively parallel computing to predict furnace and joint-level responses is presented. Measured and computed data are compared. Temperature values are within 1-270 of the expected peak brazing temperature for different loading conditions. Sensitivity studies reveal that the thermal response is more sensitive to the thermal boundary conditions of the heating enclosure than variability y in the materials data. Braze flow simulations predict fillet geometry and free surface joint defects. Dynamic wetting conditions, interfacial reactions, and solidification structure add a high degree of uncertainty to the flow results.

  12. Simulation of a flow around biting teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narusawa, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Eriko; Kuwahara, Kunio

    2008-11-01

    We simulated a flow around biting teeth. The decayed tooth is a disease that a majority of people are annoyed. These are often generated from a deep groove at occlusal surface. It is known that a person who bites well doesn't suffer from a decayed tooth easily. Biting forces reach as much as 60 kg/cm^2 by an adult male, and when chewing, upper and lower teeth approach to bite by those forces. The crushed food mixed with saliva becomes high viscosity fluid, and is pushed out of ditches of teeth in the direction of the cheek or the tongue. Teeth with complex three dimension curved surface are thought to form venturi at this time, and to generate big pressure partially. An excellent dental articulation will possibly help a natural generation of a flow to remove dental plaque, i.e. the cause of the decayed tooth. Moreover, the relation of this flow with the destruction of the filled metal or the polymer is doubted. In this research, we try to clarify the pressure distributions by this flow generation as well as its dynamics when chewing. One of our goals is to enable an objective design of the shape of the dental fillings and the artificial tooth. Tooth has a very small uneven ground and a bluff body. In this case, to calculate a computational numerical simulation to solve the Navier-Stokes equations three dimension Cartesian coordinate system is employed.

  13. Large eddy simulation of turbulent cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanaskandan, A.; Mahesh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Large Eddy Simulation is employed to study two turbulent cavitating flows: over a cylinder and a wedge. A homogeneous mixture model is used to treat the mixture of water and water vapor as a compressible fluid. The governing equations are solved using a novel predictor- corrector method. The subgrid terms are modeled using the Dynamic Smagorinsky model. Cavitating flow over a cylinder at Reynolds number (Re) = 3900 and cavitation number (σ) = 1.0 is simulated and the wake characteristics are compared to the single phase results at the same Reynolds number. It is observed that cavitation suppresses turbulence in the near wake and delays three dimensional breakdown of the vortices. Next, cavitating flow over a wedge at Re = 200, 000 and σ = 2.0 is presented. The mean void fraction profiles obtained are compared to experiment and good agreement is obtained. Cavity auto-oscillation is observed, where the sheet cavity breaks up into a cloud cavity periodically. The results suggest LES as an attractive approach for predicting turbulent cavitating flows.

  14. Direct simulation of rarefied hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.

    1989-01-01

    As the capability of the space transportation vehicles (STV's) expand to meet the requirements for future space exploration and utilization, the effects of rarefied hypersonic flows will play a more significant role in defining the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic performance of STV's. This is particularly true of the low lift/drag aeroassisted STV's where aerobraking occurs at relatively high altitudes and high velocity. Because of the limitations of the continuum description as expressed by the Navier-Stokes equations and the difficulties of solving the Boltzmann equation, the particle of molecular approach has been developed over the last three decades for modeling rarefied gas effects. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird is the most used method today for simulating rarefied flows. The DSMC method provides a direct physical simulation as opposed to a numerical solution of a set of model equations. This is accomplished by developing phenomenological models of the relevant physical events. The DSMC method accounts for translational, thermal, chemical, and radiative nonequilibrium effects. The general features of the DSMC method, the numerical requirements for obtaining meaningful results, the modeling used to simulate high temperature gas effects, and applications of the method to calculate the flow about an aeroassist flight experiment vehicle (AFE) are reviewed. The AFE simulates a geosynchronous return while entering the Earth's upper atmosphere at approximately 10 km/s. Results obtained using a general 3-D code are presented for the more rarefied portion of the atmospheric encounter (altitudes of 200 to 100 km) emphasizing surface, flowfield, and aerodynamic characteristics of the AFE. Finally, results obtained using axisymmetric and 1-D versions of the code are presented for lower altitude conditions.

  15. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaolin

    2013-01-14

    Our final report on the accomplishments of ITAPS at Stony Brook during period covered by the research award includes component service, interface service and applications. On the component service, we have designed and implemented a robust functionality for the Lagrangian tracking of dynamic interface. We have migrated the hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic solver from stage-wise second order toward global second order schemes. We have implemented high order coupling between interface propagation and interior PDE solvers. On the interface service, we have constructed the FronTier application programer's interface (API) and its manual page using doxygen. We installed the FronTier functional interface to conform with the ITAPS specifications, especially the iMesh and iMeshP interfaces. On applications, we have implemented deposition and dissolution models with flow and implemented the two-reactant model for a more realistic precipitation at the pore level and its coupling with Darcy level model. We have continued our support to the study of fluid mixing problem for problems in inertial comfinement fusion. We have continued our support to the MHD model and its application to plasma liner implosion in fusion confinement. We have simulated a step in the reprocessing and separation of spent fuels from nuclear power plant fuel rods. We have implemented the fluid-structure interaction for 3D windmill and parachute simulations. We have continued our collaboration with PNNL, BNL, LANL, ORNL, and other SciDAC institutions.

  16. Advancements in Afterbody Radiative Heating Simulations for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Panesi, Marco; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Four advancements to the simulation of backshell radiative heating for Earth entry are presented. The first of these is the development of a flow field model that treats electronic levels of the dominant backshell radiator, N, as individual species. This is shown to allow improvements in the modeling of electron-ion recombination and two-temperature modeling, which are shown to increase backshell radiative heating by 10 to 40%. By computing the electronic state populations of N within the flow field solver, instead of through the quasi-steady state approximation in the radiation code, the coupling of radiative transition rates to the species continuity equations for the levels of N, including the impact of non-local absorption, becomes feasible. Implementation of this additional level of coupling between the flow field and radiation codes represents the second advancement presented in this work, which is shown to increase the backshell radiation by another 10 to 50%. The impact of radiative transition rates due to non-local absorption indicates the importance of accurate radiation transport in the relatively complex flow geometry of the backshell. This motivates the third advancement, which is the development of a ray-tracing radiation transport approach to compute the radiative transition rates and divergence of the radiative flux at every point for coupling to the flow field, therefore allowing the accuracy of the commonly applied tangent-slab approximation to be assessed for radiative source terms. For the sphere considered at lunar-return conditions, the tangent-slab approximation is shown to provide a sufficient level of accuracy for the radiative source terms, even for backshell cases. This is in contrast to the agreement between the two approaches for computing the radiative flux to the surface, which differ by up to 40%. The final advancement presented is the development of a nonequilibrium model for NO radiation, which provides significant backshell

  17. DSMC simulation of ionized rarefied flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartel, Timothy J.; Justiz, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    Recently a renewed interest has been exhibited in understanding contamination and space environmental effect in the LEO range of 200 to 600 km as well as in low density microelectronics manufacturing technologies. Realistic simulations must model the physics of the highly coupled effects of neutral and charged particle flows, thermodynamic nonequilibrium, surface charging, and electromagnetic field effects. The computational requirements are enormous for this level of modeling and are almost impossible on current single processor supercomputers. An effort was initiated to develop this capability on a massively parallel MIMD supercomputers. The Wake Shield Facility experiment will be used for test case calculations. Preliminary results indicate that parallel supercomputers may be the only computers capable of simulating the required level of physics and spatial resolution. Calculations which contain from 1 to 8 million simulation particles are presented.

  18. Numerical simulation of freeway traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Lyrintzis, A.S.; Michalopoulos, P.G.

    1997-11-01

    A new high-order continuum model is presented in this paper. This high-order model exhibits smooth solutions rather than discontinuities, is able to describe the amplification of small disturbances on heavy traffic, and allows fluctuations of speed around the equilibrium values. Furthermore, unlike some earlier high-order models, it does not result in negative speeds at the tail of congested regions and disturbance propagation speeds greater than the flow speed. The model takes into account the relaxation time as a function of density and, in the equilibrium limit, it is consistent with the simple continuum model. A Riemann-problem-based numerical method is proposed for the solution of the new high-order model. Modeling of interrupted flow behavior such as merging, diverging, and weaving is also investigated. Based on the new high order model, the proposed numerical method and the modeling of interrupted flow, a versatile code is developed for the numerical simulation of freeway traffic flow that includes several freeway geometries. The authors compare the high-order model with the simple continuum model and the proposed numerical method with the Lax method based on 30-s and 5-min field data. The model is tested in interrupted flow situations (e.g., pipeline, merging, diverging, and weaving areas). A comparison of numerical results with limited field data shows that the high-order model performs better than the simple continuum model and describes better than a previously proposed method.

  19. Flume simulation of sedimentation in recirculating flow

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.C. ); Rubin, D.M. ); Ikeda, H. )

    1990-05-01

    A 4-m-wide flume at the University of Tsukuba Environmental Research Center was used to simulate flow conditions near debris fans in bedrock gorges. Flow was constricted to 2 m by a semicircular obstruction. During the authors experiments (discharge = 600 L/sec; Froude number of constricted flow = 1) a zone of recirculating current extended 25-30 m downstream from the separation point at the constriction. The pattern and velocity of surface flow was determined using time-lapse photography; subsurface velocity was measured with a two-dimensional electromagnetic current meter. During 32-hr of run time, a fine, very coarse sand mixture was fed into the flow at a rate between 0.5-1 kg/sec. Oscillation ripples developed beneath the separation surface that bounds the recirculation zone, and upstream-migrating dunes and ripples developed within the recirculation zone upstream from the reattachment point. A mid-channel expansion bar was deposited downstream from the reattachment point. Sedimentation within the recirculation zone continued by vertical aggradation and by upstream migration of dunes and ripples. Sediments within the recirculation zone were areally sorted with the finest sediment deposited near the separation point. These patterns are consistent with field observations of bars along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

  20. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  1. Adaptive LES Methodology for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg V. Vasilyev

    2008-06-12

    Although turbulent flows are common in the world around us, a solution to the fundamental equations that govern turbulence still eludes the scientific community. Turbulence has often been called one of the last unsolved problem in classical physics, yet it is clear that the need to accurately predict the effect of turbulent flows impacts virtually every field of science and engineering. As an example, a critical step in making modern computational tools useful in designing aircraft is to be able to accurately predict the lift, drag, and other aerodynamic characteristics in numerical simulations in a reasonable amount of time. Simulations that take months to years to complete are much less useful to the design cycle. Much work has been done toward this goal (Lee-Rausch et al. 2003, Jameson 2003) and as cost effective accurate tools for simulating turbulent flows evolve, we will all benefit from new scientific and engineering breakthroughs. The problem of simulating high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows of engineering and scientific interest would have been solved with the advent of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) techniques if unlimited computing power, memory, and time could be applied to each particular problem. Yet, given the current and near future computational resources that exist and a reasonable limit on the amount of time an engineer or scientist can wait for a result, the DNS technique will not be useful for more than 'unit' problems for the foreseeable future (Moin & Kim 1997, Jimenez & Moin 1991). The high computational cost for the DNS of three dimensional turbulent flows results from the fact that they have eddies of significant energy in a range of scales from the characteristic length scale of the flow all the way down to the Kolmogorov length scale. The actual cost of doing a three dimensional DNS scales as Re{sup 9/4} due to the large disparity in scales that need to be fully resolved. State-of-the-art DNS calculations of isotropic turbulence

  2. Direct numerical simulation of reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) to extend the technique of direct numerical simulations to turbulent, chemically reacting flows, (2) to test the validity of the method by comparing computational results with laboratory data, and (3) to use the simulations to gain a better understanding of the effects of turbulence on chemical reactions. The effects of both the large scale structure and the smaller scale turbulence on the overall reaction rates are addressed. The relationship between infinite reaction rate and finite reaction rate chemistry is compared with some of the results of calculations with existing theories and laboratory data. The direct numerical simulation method involves the numerical solution of the detailed evolution of the complex turbulent velocity and concentration fields. Using very efficient numerical methods (e.g., pseudospectral methods), the fully nonlinear (possibly low pass filtered) equations of motion are solved and no closure assumptions or turbulence models are used. Statistical data are obtained by performing spatial, temporal, and/or ensemble averages over the computed flow fields.

  3. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced airplane simulators. The requirements in this appendix are in addition to the simulator approval requirements in § 121.407. Each simulator used under this appendix must be approved as a Level B, C, or D simulator, as appropriate....

  4. KULL Simulations of OMEGA Radiation Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, J.; MacLaren, S.; Baker, K.; Amala, P.; Lewis, K.; Zika, M.

    2012-10-01

    The problem of radiation flow in a right circular cylinder is of interest for the verification and validation of radiation codes, which utilize several mechanisms for determining radiation transport (diffusion, discrete ordinates, and Monte Carlo). This flow is analogous to free molecular flow in a similar geometry.footnotetextE. Garelis and T.E. Wainwright. Phys. Fluids. 16, 4 (1973) A series of experiments were conducted on the OMEGA laser in cases with a low-density heated cylindrical wall. The experiments consisted of a 1.6 mm diameter gold hohlraum containing an on-axis 700 μm diameter SiO2 cylinder contained in an 80 μm thick carbon foam tube. Five shots panning three test cases were used: the nominal geometry described above (heated wall), the carbon tube replaced with solid gold, and a gold cap placed on the laser end of the cylinder assembly to block axial radiation flow. Simulations of each experimental target type were run with the KULL radiation code, and were used to compare the different radiation transport packages in KULL by employing synthetic diagnostics to match the experimental DANTE cavity radiation temperature time history and soft x-ray images taken by a streak camera imaging the far end of the hohlraum.

  5. Numerical simulation of three dimensional transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahu, Jubaraj; Steger, Joseph L.

    1987-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow over a projectile has been computed using an implicit, approximately factored, partially flux-split algorithm. A simple composite grid scheme has been developed in which a single grid is partitioned into a series of smaller grids for applications which require an external large memory device such as the SSD of the CRAY X-MP/48, or multitasking. The accuracy and stability of the composite grid scheme has been tested by numerically simulating the flow over an ellipsoid at angle of attack and comparing the solution with a single grid solution. The flowfield over a projectile at M = 0.96 and 4 deg angle-of-attack has been computed using a fine grid, and compared with experiment.

  6. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  7. STRING 3: An Advanced Groundwater Flow Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Simon; Michel, Isabel; Biedert, Tim; Gräfe, Marius; Seidel, Torsten; König, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The visualization of 3D groundwater flow is a challenging task. Previous versions of our software STRING [1] solely focused on intuitive visualization of complex flow scenarios for non-professional audiences. STRING, developed by Fraunhofer ITWM (Kaiserslautern, Germany) and delta h Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH (Witten, Germany), provides the necessary means for visualization of both 2D and 3D data on planar and curved surfaces. In this contribution we discuss how to extend this approach to a full 3D tool and its challenges in continuation of Michel et al. [2]. This elevates STRING from a post-production to an exploration tool for experts. In STRING moving pathlets provide an intuition of velocity and direction of both steady-state and transient flows. The visualization concept is based on the Lagrangian view of the flow. To capture every detail of the flow an advanced method for intelligent, time-dependent seeding is used building on the Finite Pointset Method (FPM) developed by Fraunhofer ITWM. Lifting our visualization approach from 2D into 3D provides many new challenges. With the implementation of a seeding strategy for 3D one of the major problems has already been solved (see Schröder et al. [3]). As pathlets only provide an overview of the velocity field other means are required for the visualization of additional flow properties. We suggest the use of Direct Volume Rendering and isosurfaces for scalar features. In this regard we were able to develop an efficient approach for combining the rendering through raytracing of the volume and regular OpenGL geometries. This is achieved through the use of Depth Peeling or A-Buffers for the rendering of transparent geometries. Animation of pathlets requires a strict boundary of the simulation domain. Hence, STRING needs to extract the boundary, even from unstructured data, if it is not provided. In 3D we additionally need a good visualization of the boundary itself. For this the silhouette based on the angle of

  8. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, Juan; Hubbard, Susan; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Moulton, David; Denham, Miles E.

    2011-03-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development (EM-32), is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high performance computing tool will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. As part of the initial development process, a series of demonstrations were defined to test ASCEM components and provide feedback to developers, engage end users in applications, and lead to an outcome that would benefit the sites. The demonstration was implemented for a sub-region of the Savannah River Site General Separations Area that includes the F-Area Seepage Basins. The physical domain included the unsaturated and saturated zones in the vicinity of the seepage basins and Fourmile Branch, using an unstructured mesh fit to the hydrostratigraphy and topography of the site. The calculations modeled variably saturated flow and the resulting flow field was used in simulations of the advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of uranium. As part of the demonstrations, a new set of data management, visualization, and uncertainty quantification tools were developed to analyze simulation results and existing site data. These new tools can be used to provide summary statistics, including information on which simulation parameters were most important in the prediction of uncertainty and to visualize the relationships between model input and output.

  9. Time-Dependent Simulations of Turbopump Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan; Chan, William; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Unsteady flow simulations for RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicles) 2nd Generation baseline turbopump for one and half impeller rotations have been completed by using a 34.3 Million grid points model. MLP (Multi-Level Parallelism) shared memory parallelism has been implemented in INS3D, and benchmarked. Code optimization for cash based platforms will be completed by the end of September 2001. Moving boundary capability is obtained by using DCF module. Scripting capability from CAD (computer aided design) geometry to solution has been developed. Data compression is applied to reduce data size in post processing. Fluid/Structure coupling has been initiated.

  10. Recent Advances in Hot Flow Anomaly Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) are events observed near planetary bow shocks that are characterized by greatly heated solar wind plasmas and substantial flow deflection. HFAs are universal phenomena that have been observed near the bow shock of Earth, Venus, Mars, and Saturn. HFAs are not stable structures and they evolve with time. Statistical study shows that both ion and electron spectra can be used to classify young and mature HFAs. HFAs were also classified into four categories ("-+", "+-", "M", and "W") according their dynamic pressure profile. Most "W" type HFAs are mature HFAs (according to ion spectra) and most "-+" and "+-" type HFAs are young HFAs. Half of the "M" type HFAs are mature HFAs. Superposed epoch analysis result shows that variations of plasma parameters and magnetic field of mature HFAs are more dramatic than those of young HFAs, except for temperature. "M" and "W" type HFAs may be the later evolution stages of "-+" and "+-" type HFAs; on the other hand, four categories of HFAs may be due to the fact that the spacecraft crossed an HFA structure along different paths.

  11. Advances in flow cytometry for sperm sexing.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J C; Evans, K M

    2009-01-01

    This review presents the key technological developments that have been implemented in the 20 years since the first reports of successful measurement, sorting, insemination and live births using flow cytometry as a proven physical sperm separation technique. Since the first reports of sexed sperm, flow technology efforts have been largely focused on improving sample throughput by increasing the rate at which sperm are introduced to the sorter, and on improving measurement resolution, which has increased the proportion of cells that can be reliably measured and sorted. Today, routine high-purity sorting of X- or Y-chromosome-bearing sperm can be achieved at rates up to 8000 s(-1) for an input rate of 40,000 X- and Y-sperms(-1). With current protocols, straws of sex-sorted sperm intended for use in artificial insemination contain approximately 2 x 10(6)sperm. The sort rate of 8000 sperms(-1) mentioned above corresponds to a production capacity of approximately 14 straws of each sex per hour per instrument. PMID:18950849

  12. Simulation and optimization of electromagnetohydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Brian Harrison

    2000-10-01

    Electromagnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) is the study of flow of electrically conducting incompressible fluids in applied electric and magnetic fields. The goal of this research was to develop and implement a numerical method for the simulation and optimization of steady viscous planar and axisymmetric EMHD flows. A finite element method based on least-squares variational principles, known as least-squares finite element method (LSFEM), was used to discretize the governing system of partial differential equations. The use of LSFEM allows the use of equal order approximation functions for all unknowns and is stable for high Reynolds numbers. In addition, the LSFEM allows the enforcement of the divergence constraint on the magnetic field in a straight forward manner. The associated linear algebraic system is symmetric and positive definite. A new second order theoretical model of the combined interaction of externally applied electric and magnetic fields and viscous incompressible fluid flows was rewritten as a system of first order partial differential equations, making it suitable for the application of LSFEM. The method was implemented in an object-oriented fashion using the C++ programming language. Both h and p-type finite elements were implemented in the software. The p-type finite elements were developed using hierarchical basis functions based on Jacobi polynomials. The hierarchical basis leads to a linear algebraic system with a natural multilevel structure that is well suited to adaptive enrichment. The sparse linear systems were solved by either direct sparse LU factorization or by iterative methods. Two iterative methods were implemented in the software, one based on a Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient and the another based a multigrid-like technique that uses the hierarchy of basis functions instead of a hierarchy of finer grids. The software was tested against analytic solutions for Navier-Stokes equations and for channel flows through transverse

  13. Brownian dynamics simulations of DNA in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald

    2002-03-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule imaging methods applied to DNA molecules in flow (Smith and Chu 1998) and advances in computer speed have allowed detailed comparisons to be made between observed and predicted behavior of polymeric DNA molecules in simple flows. These have shown that the conformations and rheology of DNA molecules in bulk solution can be predicted with high accuracy by Brownian dynamics simulations using bead-spring or bead-rod course-grained models (Larson et al. 1999; Hur et al. 2000). A logical next step is to extend these methods to the interactions of flowing DNA polymers with surfaces, which are of importance in the development of microfluidic devices for processing of DNA and other large molecules for genomics, bio-assays, combinatorial polymer science, etc. Using single-molecule experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations we consider isolated DNA molecules near adsorbing and non-adsorbing walls in the presence of a simple shearing flow and in an evaporating droplet. The former flow is predicted to produce highly stretched adsorbed molecules due to the prevalence of end-sticking, following by regular unraveling from one end to the other and laying down of the molecule onto the surface. In the drying-droplet flow, this process is inhibited by the downward convection, which drives the molecule towards the surface, resulting in complete adhesion before unraveling is complete. Experimental studies using surfaces treated with APTES (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) to produce strong sticking of DNA confirm the Brownian dynamics predictions for the drying flow containing DNA. In simple shearing flow, an unusual, and unexplained, interaction of DNA with the surface inhibits stretching, at distances as great as 20 microns from the surface. 1) Hur, J.S., Shaqfeh, E.S.G., and Larson, R.G., J. Rheol., 44:713 (2000). 2) Larson, R.G., Hu, H., Smith, D.E., and Chu, S. J. Rheol., 43:267 (1999). 3) Smith, D.E., and Chu, S., Science, 281:1335 (1998).

  14. Precision Casting via Advanced Simulation and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program was conducted to develop and commercially implement selected casting manufacturing technologies to enable significant reductions in the costs of castings, increase the complexity and dimensional accuracy of castings, and reduce the development times for delivery of high quality castings. The industry-led R&D project was cost shared with NASA's Aerospace Industry Technology Program (AITP). The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American, Inc. served as the team lead with participation from Lockheed Martin, Ford Motor Company, Howmet Corporation, PCC Airfoils, General Electric, UES, Inc., University of Alabama, Auburn University, Robinson, Inc., Aracor, and NASA-LeRC. The technical effort was organized into four distinct tasks. The accomplishments reported herein. Task 1.0 developed advanced simulation technology for core molding. Ford headed up this task. On this program, a specialized core machine was designed and built. Task 2.0 focused on intelligent process control for precision core molding. Howmet led this effort. The primary focus of these experimental efforts was to characterize the process parameters that have a strong impact on dimensional control issues of injection molded cores during their fabrication. Task 3.0 developed and applied rapid prototyping to produce near net shape castings. Rocketdyne was responsible for this task. CAD files were generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototype patterns were fabricated using SLS and SLA, and castings produced and evaluated. Task 4.0 was aimed at developing technology transfer. Rocketdyne coordinated this task. Casting related technology, explored and evaluated in the first three tasks of this program, was implemented into manufacturing processes.

  15. Molecular simulation of small Knudsen number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fei; Fan, Jing

    2012-11-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a powerful particle-based method for modeling gas flows. It works well for relatively large Knudsen (Kn) numbers, typically larger than 0.01, but quickly becomes computationally intensive as Kn decreases due to its time step and cell size limitations. An alternative approach was proposed to relax or remove these limitations, based on replacing pairwise collisions with a stochastic model corresponding to the Fokker-Planck equation [J. Comput. Phys., 229, 1077 (2010); J. Fluid Mech., 680, 574 (2011)]. Similar to the DSMC method, the downside of that approach suffers from computationally statistical noise. To solve the problem, a diffusion-based information preservation (D-IP) method has been developed. The main idea is to track the motion of a simulated molecule from the diffusive standpoint, and obtain the flow velocity and temperature through sampling and averaging the IP quantities. To validate the idea and the corresponding model, several benchmark problems with Kn ˜ 10-3-10-4 have been investigated. It is shown that the IP calculations are not only accurate, but also efficient because they make possible using a time step and cell size over an order of magnitude larger than the mean collision time and mean free path, respectively.

  16. Large eddy simulations of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter-Locklear, Freda

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of existing models for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of incompressible turbulent flows has been completed. LES is a computation in which the large, energy-carrying structures to momentum and energy transfer is computed exactly, and only the effect of the smallest scales of turbulence is modeled. That is, the large eddies are computed and the smaller eddies are modeled. The dynamics of the largest eddies are believed to account for most of sound generation and transport properties in a turbulent flow. LES analysis is based on an observation that pressure, velocity, temperature, and other variables are the sum of their large-scale and small-scale parts. For instance, u(i) (velocity) can be written as the sum of bar-u(i) and u(i)-prime, where bar-u(i) is the large-scale and u(i)-prime is the subgrid-scale (SGS). The governing equations for large eddies in compressible flows are obtained after filtering the continuity, momentum, and energy equations, and recasting in terms of Favre averages. The filtering operation maintains only large scales. The effects of the small-scales are present in the governing equations through the SGS stress tensor tau(ij) and SGS heat flux q(i). The mathematical formulation of the Favre-averaged equations of motion for LES is complete.

  17. Flow field simulation for a corncob incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.H.

    1999-02-01

    This article utilizes the standard k-{epsilon} turbulent model to simulate a corncob incinerator using the PISO algorithm with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The flow patterns of the incinerator equipped with secondary air inlets are predicted and compared for the various geometrical layouts. It is demonstrated that a wider recirculation zone can be found while the inclined angles of inlets increased, so a longer residence time and higher combustion efficiency will be expected. The longer distance between primary and secondary inlets will facilitate the formation of recirculation zone in this bigger space. The more the number of the secondary air inlets, the less the resident air in the top recirculation zone near the exit of the furnace. By using the CFD technique, the flow field of the incinerator can be understood more precisely, and it can serve as an excellent design tool. Furthermore, the computational program can be composed with FORTRAN and set up on a PC, and can easily be analyzed to get the flow field of the corncob incinerator.

  18. Heart blood flow simulation: a perspective review.

    PubMed

    Doost, Siamak N; Ghista, Dhanjoo; Su, Boyang; Zhong, Liang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death today, incorporates a wide range of cardiovascular system malfunctions that affect heart functionality. It is believed that the hemodynamic loads exerted on the cardiovascular system, the left ventricle (LV) in particular, are the leading cause of CVD initiation and propagation. Moreover, it is believed that the diagnosis and prognosis of CVD at an early stage could reduce its high mortality and morbidity rate. Therefore, a set of robust clinical cardiovascular assessment tools has been introduced to compute the cardiovascular hemodynamics in order to provide useful insights to physicians to recognize indicators leading to CVD and also to aid the diagnosis of CVD. Recently, a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different medical imaging tools, image-based CFD (IB-CFD), has been widely employed for cardiovascular functional assessment by providing reliable hemodynamic parameters. Even though the capability of CFD to provide reliable flow dynamics in general fluid mechanics problems has been widely demonstrated for many years, up to now, the clinical implications of the IB-CFD patient-specific LVs have not been applicable due to its limitations and complications. In this paper, we review investigations conducted to numerically simulate patient-specific human LV over the past 15 years using IB-CFD methods. Firstly, we divide different studies according to the different LV types (physiological and different pathological conditions) that have been chosen to reconstruct the geometry, and then discuss their contributions, methodologies, limitations, and findings. In this regard, we have studied CFD simulations of intraventricular flows and related cardiology insights, for (i) Physiological patient-specific LV models, (ii) Pathological heart patient-specific models, including myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Finally, we

  19. Heart blood flow simulation: a perspective review.

    PubMed

    Doost, Siamak N; Ghista, Dhanjoo; Su, Boyang; Zhong, Liang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-08-25

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death today, incorporates a wide range of cardiovascular system malfunctions that affect heart functionality. It is believed that the hemodynamic loads exerted on the cardiovascular system, the left ventricle (LV) in particular, are the leading cause of CVD initiation and propagation. Moreover, it is believed that the diagnosis and prognosis of CVD at an early stage could reduce its high mortality and morbidity rate. Therefore, a set of robust clinical cardiovascular assessment tools has been introduced to compute the cardiovascular hemodynamics in order to provide useful insights to physicians to recognize indicators leading to CVD and also to aid the diagnosis of CVD. Recently, a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different medical imaging tools, image-based CFD (IB-CFD), has been widely employed for cardiovascular functional assessment by providing reliable hemodynamic parameters. Even though the capability of CFD to provide reliable flow dynamics in general fluid mechanics problems has been widely demonstrated for many years, up to now, the clinical implications of the IB-CFD patient-specific LVs have not been applicable due to its limitations and complications. In this paper, we review investigations conducted to numerically simulate patient-specific human LV over the past 15 years using IB-CFD methods. Firstly, we divide different studies according to the different LV types (physiological and different pathological conditions) that have been chosen to reconstruct the geometry, and then discuss their contributions, methodologies, limitations, and findings. In this regard, we have studied CFD simulations of intraventricular flows and related cardiology insights, for (i) Physiological patient-specific LV models, (ii) Pathological heart patient-specific models, including myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Finally, we

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of pipe elbow flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, Gregory Francis

    2004-08-01

    One problem facing today's nuclear power industry is flow-accelerated corrosion and erosion in pipe elbows. The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing experiments in their Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) test loop to better characterize these phenomena, and develop advanced sensor technologies for the condition monitoring of critical elbows on a continuous basis. In parallel with these experiments, Sandia National Laboratories is performing Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the flow in one elbow of the FAC test loop. The simulations are being performed using the FLUENT commercial software developed and marketed by Fluent, Inc. The model geometry and mesh were created using the GAMBIT software, also from Fluent, Inc. This report documents the results of the simulations that have been made to date; baseline results employing the RNG k-e turbulence model are presented. The predicted value for the diametrical pressure coefficient is in reasonably good agreement with published correlations. Plots of the velocities, pressure field, wall shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy adjacent to the wall are shown within the elbow section. Somewhat to our surprise, these indicate that the maximum values of both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy occur near the elbow entrance, on the inner radius of the bend. Additional simulations were performed for the same conditions, but with the RNG k-e model replaced by either the standard k-{var_epsilon}, or the realizable k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The predictions using the standard k-{var_epsilon} model are quite similar to those obtained in the baseline simulation. However, with the realizable k-{var_epsilon} model, more significant differences are evident. The maximums in both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy now appear on the outer radius, near the elbow exit, and are {approx}11% and 14% greater, respectively, than those predicted in the baseline calculation

  1. Advanced surface paneling method for subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.; Johnson, F. T.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical results illustrating the capabilities of an advanced aerodynamic surface paneling method are presented. The method is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow, as represented by linearized potential flow theory. The method is based on linearly varying sources and quadratically varying doublets which are distributed over flat or curved panels. These panels are applied to the true surface geometry of arbitrarily shaped three dimensional aerodynamic configurations.

  2. Left Ventricular Flow Analysis: Recent Advances in Numerical Methods and Applications in Cardiac Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Westerdale, John; McMahon, Eileen M.; Rajaraman, Prathish K.; Heys, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) pumps oxygenated blood from the lungs to the rest of the body through systemic circulation. The efficiency of such a pumping function is dependent on blood flow within the LV chamber. It is therefore crucial to accurately characterize LV hemodynamics. Improved understanding of LV hemodynamics is expected to provide important clinical diagnostic and prognostic information. We review the recent advances in numerical and experimental methods for characterizing LV flows and focus on analysis of intraventricular flow fields by echocardiographic particle image velocimetry (echo-PIV), due to its potential for broad and practical utility. Future research directions to advance patient-specific LV simulations include development of methods capable of resolving heart valves, higher temporal resolution, automated generation of three-dimensional (3D) geometry, and incorporating actual flow measurements into the numerical solution of the 3D cardiovascular fluid dynamics. PMID:23690874

  3. A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

    2008-06-18

    In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering

  4. Review Article: Recent advancements in optofluidic flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Godin, Jessica M.; Chen, Chun-Hao; Qiao, Wen; Lee, Hosuk; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop optofluidic flow cytometers. Optofluidics, where optics and microfluidics work together to create novel functionalities on a small chip, holds great promise for lab-on-a-chip flow cytometry. The development of a low-cost, compact, handheld flow cytometer and microfluorescence-activated cell sorter system could have a significant impact on the field of point-of-care diagnostics, improving health care in, for example, underserved areas of Africa and Asia, that struggle with epidemics such as HIV∕AIDS. In this paper, we review recent advancements in microfluidics, on-chip optics, novel detection architectures, and integrated sorting mechanisms. PMID:21267434

  5. SHARP simulation of discontinuities in highly convective steady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1987-01-01

    For steady multidimesional convection, the Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) scheme has several attractive properties. However, for highly convective simulation of step profiles, QUICK produces unphysical overshoots and a few oscillations, and this may cause serious problems in nonlinear flows. Fortunately, it is possible to modify the convective flux by writing the normalized convected control-volume face value as a function of the normalized adjacent upstream node value, developing criteria for monotonic resolution without sacrificing formal accuracy. This results in a nonlinear functional relationship between the normalized variables, whereas standard methods are all linear in this sense. The resulting Simple High Accuracy Resolution Program (SHARP) can be applied to steady multidimensional flows containing thin shear or mixing layers, shock waves, and other frontal phenomena. This represents a significant advance in modeling highly convective flows of engineering and geophysical importance. SHARP is based on an explicit, conservative, control-volume flux formation, equally applicable to one, two, or three dimensional elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic, or mixed-flow regimes. Results are given for the bench-mark purely convective first-order results and the nonmonotonic predictions of second- and third-order upwinding.

  6. Implementation of Advanced Two Equation Turbulence Models in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Massey, Steven J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2000-01-01

    USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flows over complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does not have advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flow. We have implemented two modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-epsilon "two-equation" turbulence model and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conducted for three flat plate boundary layer cases, a RAE2822 airfoil and an ONERA M6 wing. The results are compared with those from direct numerical simulation, empirical formulae, theoretical results, and the existing Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model.

  7. Advanced Techniques for Simulating the Behavior of Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothier, M.; Bailey, M.

    2009-12-01

    research is to simulate the look and behavior of sand, this work will go beyond simple particle collision. In particular, we can continue to use our parallel algorithms not only on single particles but on particle “clumps” that consist of multiple combined particles. Since sand is typically not spherical in nature, these particle “clumps” help to simulate the coarse nature of sand. In a simulation environment, multiple combined particles could be used to simulate the polygonal and granular nature of sand grains. Thus, a diversity of sand particles can be generated. The interaction between these particles can then be parallelized using GPU hardware. As such, this research will investigate different graphics and physics techniques and determine the tradeoffs in performance and visual quality for sand simulation. An enhanced sand model through the use of high performance computing and GPUs has great potential to impact research for both earth and space scientists. Interaction with JPL has provided an opportunity for us to refine our simulation techniques that can ultimately be used for their vehicle simulator. As an added benefit of this work, advancements in simulating sand can also benefit scientists here on earth, especially in regard to understanding landslides and debris flows.

  8. Shearing Box Simulations Of Circumplanetary Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Val-Borro, Miguel

    2008-09-01

    We study the accretion flow from a gaseous protoplanetary disk onto an embedded protoplanet. We use a code based on FLASH with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to achieve high resolution inside the Hill sphere and in the proximity of shocks. The code solves the local Hill equations in Cartesian and polar coordinates centered on the planet with typical resolution near the planet of 0.001 gravitational radius. A circumplanetary disk forms inside the Hill radius while spiral arms are created for the case of massive planets extending to the point where the fluid becames subsonic in our frame of reference. We find that the two-dimensional approximation gives a correct estimate of the accretion rate for the terrestrial planet simulations.

  9. Simulation of katabatic flow and mountain waves

    SciTech Connect

    Poulos, G.S.

    1995-05-01

    It is well-known that both mountain waves and katabatic flows frequently form in the severe relief of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Occasionally these phenomena have been found to occur simultaneously. Generally, however, the large body of literature regarding them has treated each individually, seldom venturing into the regime of their potential interaction. The exceptions to this rule are Arritt and Pielke (1986), Barr and Orgill (1989). Gudiksen et al. (1992), Moriarty (1984), Orgill et al. (1992), Orgill and Schreck (1985). Neff and King (1988), Stone and Hoard (1989), Whiteman and Doran (1993) and Ying and Baopu (1993). The simulations overviewed here attempt to reproduce both atmospheric features simultaneously for two case days during the 1993 ASCOT observational program near Rocky Flats, Colorado.

  10. Large eddy simulation of cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanaskandan, Aswin; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2014-11-01

    Large eddy simulation on unstructured grids is used to study hydrodynamic cavitation. The multiphase medium is represented using a homogeneous equilibrium model that assumes thermal equilibrium between the liquid and the vapor phase. Surface tension effects are ignored and the governing equations are the compressible Navier Stokes equations for the liquid/vapor mixture along with a transport equation for the vapor mass fraction. A characteristic-based filtering scheme is developed to handle shocks and material discontinuities in non-ideal gases and mixtures. A TVD filter is applied as a corrector step in a predictor-corrector approach with the predictor scheme being non-dissipative and symmetric. The method is validated for canonical one dimensional flows and leading edge cavitation over a hydrofoil, and applied to study sheet to cloud cavitation over a wedge. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  11. The numerical simulation of a high-speed axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulac, Richard A.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The advancement of high-speed axial-flow multistage compressors is impeded by a lack of detailed flow-field information. Recent development in compressor flow modeling and numerical simulation have the potential to provide needed information in a timely manner. The development of a computer program is described to solve the viscous form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery. Programming issues such as in-core versus out-of-core data storage and CPU utilization (parallelization, vectorization, and chaining) are addressed. Code performance is evaluated through the simulation of the first four stages of a five-stage, high-speed, axial-flow compressor. The second part addresses the flow physics which can be obtained from the numerical simulation. In particular, an examination of the endwall flow structure is made, and its impact on blockage distribution assessed.

  12. Numerical simulations of drainage flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, Thomas R.; Howard, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    Data collected by Viking Landers have shown that the meteorology of the near surface Martian environment is analogous to desertlike terrestrial conditions. Geological evidence such as dunes and frost streaks indicate that the surface wind is a potentially important factor in scouring of the martian landscape. In particular, the north polar basin shows erosional features that suggest katabatic wind convergence into broad valleys near the margin of the polar cap. The pattern of katabatic wind drainage off the north polar cap is similar to that observed on Earth over Antarctica or Greenland. The sensitivity is explored of Martian drainage flows to variations in terrain slope and diurnal heating using a numerical modeling approach. The model used is a 2-D sigma coordinate primitive equation system that has been used for simulations of Antarctic drainage flows. Prognostic equations include the flux forms of the horizontal scalar momentum equations, temperature, and continuity. Parameterization of both longwave (terrestrial) and shortwave (solar) radiation is included. Turbulent transfer of heat and momentum in the Martian atmosphere remains uncertain since relevant measurements are essentially nonexistent.

  13. Turbulent Flow Simulations in Complex Multilouvered Fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafti, Danesh

    2000-11-01

    Air-side resistance makes up roughly 80resistance in compact heat exchangers. Multilouvered fins find widespread use in the automotive and HVAC industry for heat transfer augmentation. We will describe the computational methodology for simulating the complex three-dimensional geometry and present results at a Reynolds number of 1100 based on louver pitch and the average flow velocity. The three-dimensionality in the louver geometry occurs along the height of the fin, where the angled louver transitions to the flat landing and joins with the tube surface. The transition region is characterized by a swept leading edge and decreasing flow area between louvers. Results show the formation of spanwise vortices at the leading edge of the angled portion of the louver which convect downstream in the vicinity of the louver surface. Further there is evidence of a separate louver wake instability which interacts with the vortices shed from the leading edge. In the transition region, a high energy streamwise vortex jet is formed. The jet forms in the vicinity of the louver junction with the flat landing and is drawn under the louver in the transition region. The passage of the jet in the vicinity of the louver surface produces a high pressure stagnant zone directly under the jet with a net effect of reducing heat transfer. On the other hand, the top surface of the louver in the transition region experiences high velocities in the vicinity of the surface and exhibits much higher heat transfer coefficients than the bottom surface.

  14. Preliminary aerodynamic design considerations for advanced laminar flow aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Yip, Long P.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Modern composite manufacturing methods have provided the opportunity for smooth surfaces that can sustain large regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) boundary layer behavior and have stimulated interest in developing advanced NLF airfoils and improved aircraft designs. Some of the preliminary results obtained in exploratory research investigations on advanced aircraft configurations at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed. Results of the initial studies have shown that the aerodynamic effects of configuration variables such as canard/wing arrangements, airfoils, and pusher-type and tractor-type propeller installations can be particularly significant at high angles of attack. Flow field interactions between aircraft components were shown to produce undesirable aerodynamic effects on a wing behind a heavily loaded canard, and the use of properly designed wing leading-edge modifications, such as a leading-edge droop, offset the undesirable aerodynamic effects by delaying wing stall and providing increased stall/spin resistance with minimum degradation of laminar flow behavior.

  15. Simulations of a Liquid Hydrogen Inducer at Low-Flow Off-Design Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.; Ungewitter, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to accurately model details of inlet back flow for inducers operating a t low-flow, off-design conditions is evaluated. A sub-scale version of a three-bladed liquid hydrogen inducer tested in water with detailed velocity and pressure measurements is used as a numerical test bed. Under low-flow, off-design conditions the length of the separation zone as well as the swirl velocity magnitude was under predicted with a standard k-E model. When the turbulent viscosity coefficient was reduced good comparison was obtained a t all the flow conditions examined with both the magnitude and shape of the profile matching well with the experimental data taken half a diameter upstream of the leading edge. The velocity profiles and incidence angles a t the leading edge itself were less sensitive to the back flow length predictions indicating that single-phase performance predictions may be well predicted even if the details of flow separation modeled are incorrect. However, for cavitating flow situations the prediction of the correct swirl in the back flow and the pressure depression in the core becomes critical since it leads to vapor formation. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD(Registered Trademark) code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework and a n advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids. The framework has been validated rigorously for predictions of temperature and pressure depression in cryogenic fluid cavities and has also been shown to predict the cavitation breakdown point for inducers a t design conditions.

  16. Simulation of inflated pahoehoe lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2013-04-01

    A new stochastic model simulates late-stage pahoehoe lobes where random processes dominate emplacement. The model prescribes probabilistic rules for determining where and when parcels of lava move within the lobe. Unlike a classical Brownian motion random walk, the model allows individual parcels to remain dormant, but fluid, for multiple time steps. The randomness of parcel volume transfers within the lobe interior as well as at the margins qualitatively reflects inflation processes observed in the field. The fraction of inflated volume to total volume increases with the total volume, with greater than 75% of the lobe volume contributed through inflation for typical lobes. The influence on planform shape and topographic cross-sectional profiles of total volume, source area and shape, topographic confinement, and sequential breakouts at the lobe margins, are all explored with the stochastic model. Each of these factors influences the overall lobe thickness and width. The model provides a means for assessing the relative importance of these processes through comparisons with field data. For the first time, Gaussian and parabolic functions are quantitatively fit to field measurements of pahoehoe lobes. Both functional forms provide adequate description of the cross-sectional flow shapes. When comparing simulated lobes to field data, sequential breakouts at the lobe margins are found to be an important process controlling the final topographic distribution of observed pahoehoe lobes.

  17. Direct Statistical Simulation of Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Brad; Chini, Greg; Tobias, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Statistics of models of geophysical and astrophysical fluids may be directly accessed by solving the equations of motion for the statistics themselves as proposed by Lorenz nearly 50 years ago. Motivated by the desire to capture seamlessly multiscale physics we introduce a new approach to such Direct Statistical Simulation (DSS) based upon separating eddies by length scale. Discarding triads that involve only small-scale waves, the equations of motion generalize the quasi-linear approximation (GQL) and are able to accurately reproduce the low-order statistics of a stochastically-driven barotropic jet. Furthermore the two-point statistics of high wavenumber modes close and thus generalize second-order cumulant expansions (CE2) that employ zonal averaging. This GCE2 approach is tested on two-layer primitive equations. Comparison to statistics accumulated from numerical simulation finds GCE2 to be quantitatively accurate. DSS thus leads to new insight into important processes in geophysical and astrophysical flows. Supported in part by NSF DMR-1306806 and NSF CCF-1048701.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  19. Optimal design and uncertainty quantification in blood flow simulations for congenital heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison

    2009-11-01

    Recent work has demonstrated substantial progress in capabilities for patient-specific cardiovascular flow simulations. Recent advances include increasingly complex geometries, physiological flow conditions, and fluid structure interaction. However inputs to these simulations, including medical image data, catheter-derived pressures and material properties, can have significant uncertainties associated with them. For simulations to predict clinically useful and reliable output information, it is necessary to quantify the effects of input uncertainties on outputs of interest. In addition, blood flow simulation tools can now be efficiently coupled to shape optimization algorithms for surgery design applications, and these tools should incorporate uncertainty information. We present a unified framework to systematically and efficient account for uncertainties in simulations using adaptive stochastic collocation. In addition, we present a framework for derivative-free optimization of cardiovascular geometries, and layer these tools to perform optimization under uncertainty. These methods are demonstrated using simulations and surgery optimization to improve hemodynamics in pediatric cardiology applications.

  20. Using CONFIG for Simulation of Operation of Water Recovery Subsystems for Advanced Control Software Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Flores, Luis; Fleming, Land; Throop, Daiv

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool, CONFIG, has been developed to support evaluation of the operability life support systems. CON FIG simulates operations scenarios in which flows and pressures change continuously while system reconfigurations occur as discrete events. In simulations, intelligent control software can interact dynamically with hardware system models. CONFIG simulations have been used to evaluate control software and intelligent agents for automating life support systems operations. A CON FIG model of an advanced biological water recovery system has been developed to interact with intelligent control software that is being used in a water system test at NASA Johnson Space Center

  1. Hybrid and Electric Advanced Vehicle Systems Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, R. F.; Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    Predefined components connected to represent wide variety of propulsion systems. Hybrid and Electric Advanced Vehicle System (HEAVY) computer program is flexible tool for evaluating performance and cost of electric and hybrid vehicle propulsion systems. Allows designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict performance of proposed drive train.

  2. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advanced Simulation H Appendix H to Part... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. H Appendix H to Part 121—Advanced... ensure that all instructors and check airmen used in appendix H training and checking are...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Simulation H Appendix H to Part... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. H Appendix H to Part 121—Advanced... ensure that all instructors and check airmen used in appendix H training and checking are...

  4. Advances in modelling of biomimetic fluid flow at different scales

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The biomimetic flow at different scales has been discussed at length. The need of looking into the biological surfaces and morphologies and both geometrical and physical similarities to imitate the technological products and processes has been emphasized. The complex fluid flow and heat transfer problems, the fluid-interface and the physics involved at multiscale and macro-, meso-, micro- and nano-scales have been discussed. The flow and heat transfer simulation is done by various CFD solvers including Navier-Stokes and energy equations, lattice Boltzmann method and molecular dynamics method. Combined continuum-molecular dynamics method is also reviewed. PMID:21711847

  5. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  6. Design, construction and evaluation of a simulated geothermal flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Mackanic, J.C.

    1980-07-28

    A system was designed and built to simulate the flow from a geothermal well. The simulated flow will be used to power a Lysholm engine, the performance of which will then be evaluated for different simulated geothermal flows. Two main subjects are covered: 1) the design, construction and evaluation of the behavior of the system that simulates the geothermal flow; included in that topic is a discussion of the probable behavior of the Lysholm engine when it is put into operation, and 2) the investigation of the use of dynamic modeling techniques to determine whether they can provide a suitable means for predicting the behavior of the system.

  7. Simulator design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    This simulation design task completion report documents the simulation techniques associated with the network models of both the Interim Service ISDN (integrated services digital network) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures. The ISIS network model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communication satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete events simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  8. Advanced Supersonic Nozzle Concepts: Experimental Flow Visualization Results Paired With LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andrew; Stack, Cory; Gaitonde, Datta; Glauser, Mark; Syracuse University Team; The Ohio State University Team

    2015-11-01

    Advanced supersonic nozzle concepts are currently under investigation, utilizing multiple bypass streams and airframe integration to bolster performance and efficiency. This work focuses on the parametric study of a supersonic, multi-stream jet with aft deck. The single plane of symmetry, rectangular nozzle, displays very complex and unique flow characteristics. Flow visualization techniques in the form of PIV and schlieren capture flow features at various deck lengths and Mach numbers. LES is compared to the experimental results to both validate the computational model and identify limitations of the simulation. By comparing experimental results to LES, this study will help create a foundation of knowledge for advanced nozzle designs in future aircraft. SBIR Phase II with Spectral Energies, LLC under direction of Barry Kiel.

  9. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2014-11-14

    A multiscale linear-solver framework for the pressure equation associated with flow in highly heterogeneous porous formations was developed. The multiscale based approach is cast in a general algebraic form, which facilitates integration of the new scalable linear solver in existing flow simulators. The Algebraic Multiscale Solver (AMS) is employed as a preconditioner within a multi-stage strategy. The formulations investigated include the standard MultiScale Finite-Element (MSFE) andMultiScale Finite-Volume (MSFV) methods. The local-stage solvers include incomplete factorization and the so-called Correction Functions (CF) associated with the MSFV approach. Extensive testing of AMS, as an iterative linear solver, indicate excellent convergence rates and computational scalability. AMS compares favorably with advanced Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) solvers for highly detailed three-dimensional heterogeneous models. Moreover, AMS is expected to be especially beneficial in solving time-dependent problems of coupled multiphase flow and transport in large-scale subsurface formations.

  10. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rénier, Mathieu; Marchiano, Régis; Gaudard, Eric; Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Acoustical shock waves propagate through flows in many situations. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft influenced by winds, or the so-called Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades when rotating at supersonic speeds, are two examples of such a phenomenon. In this work, an original method called FLHOWARD, acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction, is presented. It relies on a scalar nonlinear wave equation, which takes into account propagation in a privileged direction (one-way approach), with diffraction, flow, heterogeneous and nonlinear effects. Theoretical comparison of the dispersion relations between that equation and parabolic equations (standard or wide angle) shows that this approach is more precise than the parabolic approach because there are no restrictions about the angle of propagation. A numerical procedure based on the standard split-step technique is used. It consists in splitting the nonlinear wave equation into simpler equations. Each of these equations is solved thanks to an analytical solution when it is possible, and a finite differences scheme in other cases. The advancement along the propagation direction is done with an implicit scheme. The validity of that numerical procedure is assessed by comparisons with analytical solutions of the Lilley's equation in waveguides for uniform or shear flows in linear regime. Attention is paid to the advantages and drawbacks of that method. Finally, the numerical code is used to simulate the propagation of sonic boom through a piece of atmosphere with flows and heterogeneities. The effects of the various parameters are analysed.

  11. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-01

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics "core simulator" based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed.

  14. Virtual reality aided visualization of fluid flow simulations with application in medical education and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Tijana; Mandic, Vesna; Filipovic, Nenad

    2013-12-01

    Medical education, training and preoperative diagnostics can be drastically improved with advanced technologies, such as virtual reality. The method proposed in this paper enables medical doctors and students to visualize and manipulate three-dimensional models created from CT or MRI scans, and also to analyze the results of fluid flow simulations. Simulation of fluid flow using the finite element method is performed, in order to compute the shear stress on the artery walls. The simulation of motion through the artery is also enabled. The virtual reality system proposed here could shorten the length of training programs and make the education process more effective. PMID:24290920

  15. Recent Advances in Binary Black Hole Merger Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, John

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical simulation techniques have lead to dramatic progress in understanding binary black hole merger radiation. I present recent results from simulations performed at Goddard, focusing on the gravitational radiation waveforms, and the application of these results to gravitational wave observations.

  16. Advanced Simulation and Computing Business Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rummel, E.

    2015-07-09

    To maintain a credible nuclear weapons program, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Office of Defense Programs (DP) needs to make certain that the capabilities, tools, and expert staff are in place and are able to deliver validated assessments. This requires a complete and robust simulation environment backed by an experimental program to test ASC Program models. This ASC Business Plan document encapsulates a complex set of elements, each of which is essential to the success of the simulation component of the Nuclear Security Enterprise. The ASC Business Plan addresses the hiring, mentoring, and retaining of programmatic technical staff responsible for building the simulation tools of the nuclear security complex. The ASC Business Plan describes how the ASC Program engages with industry partners—partners upon whom the ASC Program relies on for today’s and tomorrow’s high performance architectures. Each piece in this chain is essential to assure policymakers, who must make decisions based on the results of simulations, that they are receiving all the actionable information they need.

  17. Interactive visualization to advance earthquake simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, L.H.; Bawden, G.W.; Bernardin, T.; Billen, M.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M.; Kreylos, O.; Staadt, O.; Sumner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. For example, simulations of earthquake-related processes typically generate complex, time-varying data sets in two or more dimensions. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these data sets, evaluate the underlying models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. Virtual mapping tools allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions. Interactive tools allow us to manipulate shapes in order to construct models of geological features for geodynamic models, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulation or field observations, thereby enabling us to improve our interpretation of the dynamical processes that drive earthquakes. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool, albeit with active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. This approach also takes advantage of the specialized skills of geological scientists who are trained to interpret, the often limited, geological and geophysical data available from field observations. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  18. Advances in the analysis and prediction of turbulent viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Thais, L.; Mompean, G.

    2014-08-01

    It has been well-known for over six decades that the addition of minute amounts of long polymer chains to organic solvents, or water, can lead to significant turbulent drag reduction. This discovery has had many practical applications such as in pipeline fluid transport, oil well operations, vehicle design and submersible vehicle projectiles, and more recently arteriosclerosis treatment. However, it has only been the last twenty-five years that the full utilization of direct numerical simulation of such turbulent viscoelastic flows has been achieved. The unique characteristics of viscoelastic fluid flow are dictated by the nonlinear differential relationship between the flow strain rate field and the extra-stress induced by the additive polymer. A primary motivation for the analysis of these turbulent fluid flows is the understanding of the effect on the dynamic transfer of energy in the turbulent flow due to the presence of the extra-stress field induced by the presence of the viscoelastic polymer chain. Such analyses now utilize direct numerical simulation data of fully developed channel flow for the FENE-P (Finite Extendable Nonlinear Elastic - Peterlin) fluid model. Such multi-scale dynamics suggests an analysis of the transfer of energy between the various component motions that include the turbulent kinetic energy, and the mean polymeric and elastic potential energies. It is shown that the primary effect of the interaction between the turbulent and polymeric fields is to transfer energy from the turbulence to the polymer.

  19. Simulating Subsurface Reactive Flows on Ultrascale Computers with PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. T.; Hammond, G. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Lu, C.; Smith, B. F.; Philip, B.

    2009-12-01

    To provide true predictive utility, subsurface simulations often must accurately resolve--in three dimensions--complicated, multi-phase flow fields in highly heterogeneous geology with numerous chemical species and complex chemistry. This task is especially daunting because of the wide range of spatial scales involved--from the pore scale to the field scale--ranging over six orders of magnitude, and the wide range of time scales ranging from seconds or less to millions of years. This represents a true "Grand Challenge" computational problem, requiring not only the largest-scale ("ultrascale") supercomputers, but accompanying advances in algorithms for the efficient numerical solution of systems of PDEs using these machines, and in mathematical modeling techniques that can adequately capture the truly multi-scale nature of these problems. We describe some of the specific challenges involved and present the software and algorithmic approaches that are being using in the computer code PFLOTRAN to provide scalable performance for such simulations on tens of thousands of processors. We focus particularly on scalable techniques for solving the large (up to billions of total degrees of freedom), sparse algebraic systems that arise. We also describe ongoing work to address disparate time and spatial scales by both the development of adaptive mesh refinement methods and the use of multiple continuum formulations. Finally, we present some examples from recent simulations conducted on Jaguar, the 150152 processor core Cray XT5 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is currently one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world.

  20. Simulation Toolkit for Renewable Energy Advanced Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Scott; Kemper, Travis; Larsen, Ross; Graf, Peter

    2013-11-13

    STREAMM is a collection of python classes and scripts that enables and eases the setup of input files and configuration files for simulations of advanced energy materials. The core STREAMM python classes provide a general framework for storing, manipulating and analyzing atomic/molecular coordinates to be used in quantum chemistry and classical molecular dynamics simulations of soft materials systems. The design focuses on enabling the interoperability of materials simulation codes such as GROMACS, LAMMPS and Gaussian.

  1. New scene projector developments at the AMRDEC's advanced simulation center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Daniel A.; Bowden, Mark; Buford, James

    2006-05-01

    The Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center's (AMRDEC) System Simulation and Development Directorate (SS&DD) has an extensive history of applying all types of modeling and simulation (M&S) to weapon system development and has been a particularly strong advocate of hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation and test for many years. Key to the successful application of HWIL testing at AMRDEC has been the use of state-of-the-art Scene Projector technologies. This paper describes recent advancements over the past year within the AMRDEC Advanced Simulation Center (ASC) HWIL facilities with a specific emphasis on the state of the various IRSP technologies employed. Areas discussed include application of FMS-compatible IR projectors, advancements in hybrid and multi-spectral projectors, and characterization of existing and emerging technologies.

  2. Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

    2009-07-08

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  3. Model equation for simulating flows in multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    A steady, three-dimensional average-passage equation system is derived for use in simulating multistage turbomachinery flows. These equations describe a steady, viscous flow that is periodic from blade passage to blade passage. From this system of equations, various reduced forms can be derived for use in simulating the three-dimensional flow field within multistage machinery. It is suggested that a properly scaled form of the average-passage equation system would provide an improved mathematical model for simulating the flow in multistage machines at design and, in particular, at off-design conditions.

  4. Model equation for simulating flows in multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    A steady, three-dimensional average-passage equation system is derived for use in simulating multistage turbomachinery flows. These equations describe a steady, viscous flow that is periodic from blade passage to blade passage. From this system of equations, various reduced forms can be derived for use in simulating the three-dimensional flow field within multistage machinery. It is suggested that a properly scaled form of the averaged-passage equation system would provide an improved mathematical model for simulating the flow in multistage machines at design and, in particular, at off-design conditions.

  5. Process simulation for advanced composites production

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Ferko, S.M.; Griffiths, S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency and lower the cost of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes used to manufacture advanced ceramics by providing the physical and chemical understanding necessary to optimize and control these processes. Project deliverables include: numerical process models; databases of thermodynamic and kinetic information related to the deposition process; and process sensors and software algorithms that can be used for process control. Target manufacturing techniques include CVD fiber coating technologies (used to deposit interfacial coatings on continuous fiber ceramic preforms), chemical vapor infiltration, thin-film deposition processes used in the glass industry, and coating techniques used to deposit wear-, abrasion-, and corrosion-resistant coatings for use in the pulp and paper, metals processing, and aluminum industries.

  6. Recommendations for Achieving Accurate Numerical Simulation of Tip Clearance Flows in Transonic Compressor Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R,; Hathaway, Michael D.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    2000-01-01

    The tip clearance flows of transonic compressor rotors are important because they have a significant impact on rotor and stage performance. While numerical simulations of these flows are quite sophisticated. they are seldom verified through rigorous comparisons of numerical and measured data because these kinds of measurements are rare in the detail necessary to be useful in high-speed machines. In this paper we compare measured tip clearance flow details (e.g. trajectory and radial extent) with corresponding data obtained from a numerical simulation. Recommendations for achieving accurate numerical simulation of tip clearance flows are presented based on this comparison. Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) measurements acquired in a transonic compressor rotor, NASA Rotor 35, are used. The tip clearance flow field of this transonic rotor was simulated using a Navier-Stokes turbomachinery solver that incorporates an advanced k-epsilon turbulence model derived for flows that are not in local equilibrium. Comparison between measured and simulated results indicates that simulation accuracy is primarily dependent upon the ability of the numerical code to resolve important details of a wall-bounded shear layer formed by the relative motion between the over-tip leakage flow and the shroud wall. A simple method is presented for determining the strength of this shear layer.

  7. Simulating Pressure Effects of High-Flow Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic test stresses realized without high-volume pumps. Assembled in Sections in gas-flow passage, contoured mandrel restricts flow rate to valve convenient for testing and spatially varies pressure on passage walls to simulate operating-pressure profile. Realistic test pressures thereby achieved without extremely high flow volumes.

  8. Simulation of Flow Around Cylinder Actuated by DBD Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuling; Gao, Chao; Wu, Bin; Hu, Xu

    2016-07-01

    The electric-static body force model is obtained by solving Maxwell's electromagnetic equations. Based on the electro-static model, numerical modeling of flow around a cylinder with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma effect is also presented. The flow streamlines between the numerical simulation and the particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment are consistent. According to the numerical simulation, DBD plasma can reduce the drag coefficient and change the vortex shedding frequencies of flow around the cylinder.

  9. Successes and Challenges for Flow Control Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2008-01-01

    A survey is made of recent computations published for synthetic jet flow control cases from a CFD workshop held in 2004. The three workshop cases were originally chosen to represent different aspects of flow control physics: nominally 2-D synthetic jet into quiescent air, 3-D circular synthetic jet into turbulent boundarylayer crossflow, and nominally 2-D flow-control (both steady suction and oscillatory zero-net-mass-flow) for separation control on a simple wall-mounted aerodynamic hump shape. The purpose of this survey is to summarize the progress as related to these workshop cases, particularly noting successes and remaining challenges for computational methods. It is hoped that this summary will also by extension serve as an overview of the state-of-the-art of CFD for these types of flow-controlled flow fields in general.

  10. Successes and Challenges for Flow Control Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2008-01-01

    A survey is made of recent computations published for synthetic jet flow control cases from a CFD workshop held in 2004. The three workshop cases were originally chosen to represent different aspects of flow control physics: nominally 2-D synthetic jet into quiescent air, 3-D circular synthetic jet into turbulent boundary-layer crossflow, and nominally 2-D flow-control (both steady suction and oscillatory zero-net-mass-flow) for separation control on a simple wall-mounted aerodynamic hump shape. The purpose of this survey is to summarize the progress as related to these workshop cases, particularly noting successes and remaining challenges for computational methods. It is hoped that this summary will also by extension serve as an overview of the state-of-the-art of CFD for these types of flow-controlled flow fields in general.

  11. Advanced neutron source reactor probabilistic flow blockage assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, C.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Phase I Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor identified core flow blockage as the most likely internal event leading to fuel damage. The flow blockage event frequency used in the original ANS PRA was based primarily on the flow blockage work done for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) PRA. This report examines potential flow blockage scenarios and calculates an estimate of the likelihood of debris-induced fuel damage. The bulk of the report is based specifically on the conceptual design of ANS with a 93%-enriched, two-element core; insights to the impact of the proposed three-element core are examined in Sect. 5. In addition to providing a probability (uncertainty) distribution for the likelihood of core flow blockage, this ongoing effort will serve to indicate potential areas of concern to be focused on in the preliminary design for elimination or mitigation. It will also serve as a loose-parts management tool.

  12. Alignment and Initial Operation of an Advanced Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Jefferies, Kent S.; Mason, Lee S.

    1996-01-01

    A solar simulator utilizing nine 30-kW xenon arc lamps was built to provide radiant power for testing a solar dynamic space power system in a thermal vacuum environment. The advanced solar simulator achieved the following values specific to the solar dynamic system: (1) a subtense angle of 1 deg; (2) the ability to vary solar simulator intensity up to 1.7 kW/sq m; (3) a beam diameter of 4.8 m; and (4) uniformity of illumination on the order of +/-10%. The flexibility of the solar simulator design allows for other potential uses of the facility.

  13. Traffic flow theory and traffic flow simulation models. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    ;Contents: Comparison of Simulation Modules of TRANSYT and INTEGRATION Models; Evaluation of SCATSIM-RTA Adaptive Traffic Network Simulation Model; Comparison NETSIM, NETFLO I, and NETFLO II Traffic Simulation Models for Fixed-Time Signal Control; Traffic Flow Simulation Through Parallel Processing; Cluster Analysis as Tool in Traffic Engineering; Traffic Platoon Dispersion Modeling on Arterial Streets; Hybrid Model for Estimating Permitted Left-Turn Saturations Flow Rate; and Passing Sight Distance and Overtaking Dilemma on Two-Lane Roads.

  14. ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Helmberger, Donald V.; Tromp, Jeroen; Rodgers, Arthur J.

    2008-04-15

    The recent Nevada Earthquake (M=6) produced an extraordinary set of crustal guided waves. In this study, we examine the three-component data at all the USArray stations in terms of how well existing models perform in predicting the various phases, Rayleigh waves, Love waves, and Pnl waves. To establish the source parameters, we applied the Cut and Paste Code up to distance of 5° for an average local crustal model which produced a normal mechanism (strike=35°,dip=41°,rake=-85°) at a depth of 9 km and Mw=5.9. Assuming this mechanism, we generated synthetics at all distances for a number of 1D and 3D models. The Pnl observations fit the synthetics for the simple models well both in timing (VPn=7.9km/s) and waveform fits out to a distance of about 5°. Beyond this distance a great deal of complexity can be seen to the northwest apparently caused by shallow subducted slab material. These paths require considerable crustal thinning and higher P-velocities. Small delays and advances outline the various tectonic province to the south, Colorado Plateau, etc. with velocities compatible with that reported on by Song et al.(1996). Five-second Rayleigh waves (Airy Phase) can be observed throughout the whole array and show a great deal of variation ( up to 30s). In general, the Love waves are better behaved than the Rayleigh waves. We are presently adding higher frequency to the source description by including source complexity. Preliminary inversions suggest rupture to northeast with a shallow asperity. We are, also, inverting the aftershocks to extend the frequencies to 2 Hz and beyond following the calibration method outlined in Tan and Helmberger (2007). This will allow accurate directivity measurements for events with magnitude larger than 3.5. Thus, we will address the energy decay with distance as s function of frequency band for the various source types.

  15. Simulation of gas particle flow in a HVOF torch

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Moore, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    A transient two-dimensional numerical simulation of Inconel spraying in an HVOF torch barrel has been performed. The gas flow is treated as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting flow, while particles are modeled using a stochastic particle spray model, fully coupled to the gas flow. The calculated results agree well with experimental data, and show important statistical aspects of particle flow in the torch.

  16. Advanced Redox Flow Batteries for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-03-19

    This report describes the status of the advanced redox flow battery research being performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 of FY2012 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails completion of evaluation and optimization of single cell components for the two advanced redox flow battery electrolyte chemistries recently developed at the lab, the all vanadium (V) mixed acid and V-Fe mixed acid solutions. All the single cell components to be used in future kW-scale stacks have been identified and optimized in this quarter, which include solution electrolyte, membrane or separator; carbon felt electrode and bi-polar plate. Varied electrochemical, chemical and physical evaluations were carried out to assist the component screening and optimization. The mechanisms of the battery capacity fading behavior for the all vanadium redox flow and the Fe/V battery were discovered, which allowed us to optimize the related cell operation parameters and continuously operate the system for more than three months without any capacity decay.

  17. MHD Simulation of Plasma Flow through the VASIMR Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, A. G.; Shebalin, J. V.

    2003-10-01

    The VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket, [1]) concept is currently in the experimental development phase at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center. The current experimental effort is mainly focused on the demonstration of the efficient plasma production (light ion helicon source, [2]) and energy boosting (ion cyclotron resonance heating section). Two other critical issues, the plasma detachment process and the collimation of the plasma plume in the magnetic nozzle, are essential for the near term experimental development and are being addressed through an MHD simulation modeling effort with the NIMROD code [3,4]. The model follows the plasma flow up to few meters from the nozzle throat: at that distance the plasma exhaust parameters reach values comparable with the ionospheric plasma background [5]. Results from two-dimensional simulation runs (cylindrical geometry, assuming azimuthal symmetry) aimed in particular at testing the effectiveness of different open-end boundary condition schemes are presented. [1] F. R. Chang-Diaz, Scientific American, p. 90, Nov. 2000 [2] M. D. Carter, et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 5097-5110, 2002 [3] http://www.nimrodteam.org [4] A. Tarditi et al., 28th Int. Electric Propulsion Conf., IEPC 2003, Toulouse, France, March 2003 [5] A. V. Ilin et al., Proc. 40th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV, Jan. 2002

  18. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent flow over a heavy vehicle with drag reduction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangseung; Kim, Myeongkyun; You, Donghyun

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic drag contributes to a considerable amount of energy loss of heavy vehicles. To reduce the energy loss, drag reduction devices such as side skirts and boat tails, are often installed to the side and the rear of a heavy vehicle. In the present study, turbulent flow around a heavy vehicle with realistic geometric details is simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES), which is capable of providing unsteady flow physics responsible for aerodynamic in sufficient detail. Flow over a heavy vehicle with and without a boat tail and side skirts as drag reduction devices is simulated. The simulation results are validated against accompanying in-house experimental measurements. Effects of a boat tail and side skirts on drag reduction are discussed in detail. Supported by the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) Grant NTIS 1615007940.

  19. The numerical simulation of multistage turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Beach, T. A.; Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; To, W. M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the unsteady flow field in a multistage compressor on the time-averaged performance was assessed. The energy transport by the unsteady deterministic flow field was taken into account. The magnitude of the body force resulting from the aerodynamic loading on a blade row was compared to the gradient of the stress tensor associated with the unsteady time-resolved flow field generated by the blade row. The magnitude of the work performed by these forces was compared to the divergence of the energy correlations produced by the unsteady time-resolved flow field. The stress tensor and the energy correlations are non-negligible in the end wall regions. The results suggest that the turbulence is the primary source of flow mixing in the midspan region.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Microvillus in a Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Liu, Y.; So, R. M. C.; Yang, J. M.

    One of the functions of microvilli in the microvessel endothelial glycocalyx is molecular filtering. The microvillus behaves as a mechanosensory system which may sense the fluid shear and drag forces. The permeability of small particles in microvessel is crucial for drug design and drug delivery. Therefore a better understanding of flow field around microvillus is important to simulate accurately the particle penetration in microvessel. Since the dimension of the microvilli is about ~10 nm, the conventional Navier-Stokes equation may not be good enough to simulate the fluid flow in such microscale and nanoscale structures. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful method to simulate the fluid flow at the molecular level. As a first attempt, the microvillus is reduced as a two-dimensional cylinder which is in a cross flow. The detailed drag and lift together with flow field are obtained and compared with available data.

  1. Simulating flow and segregation of cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongzhi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and accurate simulation of cylindrical particles using discrete element method (DEM) is a challenge. Typical approaches to simulating cylindrical particle systems are based on the glued spheres method, which has low accuracy, or real shape models, which have high computational cost. In this work we utilize super-ellipsoids, which belong to super-quadrics, to model cylindrical particles in DEM simulations. Simulations of a single cylinder impacting a flat wall indicate that super-ellipsoids provide the same accuracy as real shape models and much better accuracy than the glued sphere method. Simulations of super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles in rotating tumblers result in nearly the same angle of repose as experiments and real shape simulations, demonstrating the accuracy of super-ellipsoid DEM simulations for multi-particle systems. The segregation of bidisperse cylindrical particles differing in length in a bounded heap was simulated by super-ellipsoid DEM, and the results are similar to the experiment. In spite of these advantages of using super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles, simulations of filling a box with particles indicate that the simulation times for super-ellipsoid cylinders is about an order of magnitude longer than that for the same number of spherical particles.

  2. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  3. Numerical simulation of small perturbation transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seebass, A. R.; Yu, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of small perturbation transonic flows are presented. Both the flow over thin airfoils and the flow over wedges were investigated. Various numerical schemes were employed in the study. The prime goal of the research was to determine the efficiency of various numerical procedures by accurately evaluating the wave drag, both by computing the pressure integral around the body and by integrating the momentum loss across the shock. Numerical errors involved in the computations that affect the accuracy of drag evaluations were analyzed. The factors that effect numerical stability and the rate of convergence of the iterative schemes were also systematically studied.

  4. The very local Hubble flow: Computer simulations of dynamical history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Makarov, D. I.

    2004-02-01

    The phenomenon of the very local (≤3 Mpc) Hubble flow is studied on the basis of the data of recent precision observations. A set of computer simulations is performed to trace the trajectories of the flow galaxies back in time to the epoch of the formation of the Local Group. It is found that the ``initial conditions'' of the flow are drastically different from the linear velocity-distance relation. The simulations enable one also to recognize the major trends of the flow evolution and identify the dynamical role of universal antigravity produced by the cosmic vacuum.

  5. Tracking colloid transport in porous media using discrete flow fields and sensitivity of simulated colloid deposition to space discretization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhelong; Zhang, Dongxiao; Li, Xiqing

    2010-02-15

    Advances in pore structure characterization and lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations of flow fields in pore spaces are making mechanistic simulations of colloid transport in real porous media a realistic goal. The primary challenge to reach this goal may be the computational demand of LB flow simulations in discretized porous medium domains at an assemblage scale. In this work, flow fields in simple cubic and dense packing systems were simulated at different discretization resolutions using the LB method. The simulated flow fields were incorporated into to a three-dimensional particle tracking model to simulate colloid transport in the two systems. The simulated colloid deposition tended to become asymptotic at a critical discretization resolution (voxel-grain size ratio = 0.01) at groundwater flow regimes for colloids down to submicrometer level under favorable conditions and down to around 1 microm under unfavorable conditions. The average simulated fluid velocities near grain surfaces were extracted to explain the sensitivities of simulated depositions to space discretization under both conditions. At the critical discretization resolution, current computation capacity would allow flow simulations and particle tracking in assemblage porous medium domains. In addition, particle tracking simulations revealed that colloids may be retained in flow vortices under conditions both favorable and unfavorable for deposition. Colloid retention in flow vortices has been proposed only very recently. Here we provide a mechanistic confirmation to this novel retention process. PMID:20088544

  6. Speeding Convergence In Simulations Of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J.; Cheung, S.; Cheer, A.; Hafez, M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes study aimed at accelerating rates of convergence of iterative schemes for numerical integration of equations of hypersonic flow of viscous and inviscid fluids. Richardson-type overrelaxation method applied.

  7. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hypersonic Flow Features in Dilute Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzentruber, Thomas; Valentini, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    Accurate simulation of high-altitude hypersonic flows requires advanced physical models capable of predicting the transfer of energy between translational, rotational, vibrational, and chemical modes of a gas in strong thermochemical non-equilibrium. A combined Event-Driven / Time-Driven (ED/TD) Molecular Dynamics (MD) algorithm is presented that greatly accelerates the MD simulation of dilute gases. The goal of this research is to utilize advances in computational chemistry to study thermochemical non-equilibrium processes in hypersonic flows. The ED/TD MD method identifies impending collisions (including multi-body collisions) and advances molecules directly to their next interaction, however, then integrates each interaction accurately using an arbitrary interatomic potential via conventional MD with small timesteps. First, the ED/TD MD algorithm and efficiency will be detailed. Next, ED/TD MD simulations of normal shock waves in dilute argon will be validated with experiment and direct simulation Monte Carlo simulations employing the variable-hard-sphere collision model. Profiling of the code reveals that the relative computational time required for the MD integration of collisions is extremely low and the potential for incorporating advanced classical and first-principles interatomic potentials within the ED/TD MD method will be discussed.

  8. Toward large eddy simulation of turbulent flow over an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Haecheon

    1993-01-01

    The flow field over an airfoil contains several distinct flow characteristics, e.g. laminar, transitional, turbulent boundary layer flow, flow separation, unstable free shear layers, and a wake. This diversity of flow regimes taxes the presently available Reynolds averaged turbulence models. Such models are generally tuned to predict a particular flow regime, and adjustments are necessary for the prediction of a different flow regime. Similar difficulties are likely to emerge when the large eddy simulation technique is applied with the widely used Smagorinsky model. This model has not been successful in correctly representing different turbulent flow fields with a single universal constant and has an incorrect near-wall behavior. Germano et al. (1991) and Ghosal, Lund & Moin have developed a new subgrid-scale model, the dynamic model, which is very promising in alleviating many of the persistent inadequacies of the Smagorinsky model: the model coefficient is computed dynamically as the calculation progresses rather than input a priori. The model has been remarkably successful in prediction of several turbulent and transitional flows. We plan to simulate turbulent flow over a '2D' airfoil using the large eddy simulation technique. Our primary objective is to assess the performance of the newly developed dynamic subgrid-scale model for computation of complex flows about aircraft components and to compare the results with those obtained using the Reynolds average approach and experiments. The present computation represents the first application of large eddy simulation to a flow of aeronautical interest and a key demonstration of the capabilities of the large eddy simulation technique.

  9. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  10. Numerical simulation of cavitating turbulent flow through a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, J. T.; Wu, Y. L.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady cavitating turbulent flow in a Francis turbine is simulated based on governing equations of the mixture model for cavity-liquid two-phase flows with the RNG k-epsilon turbulence model in the present paper. An improved mass transfer expression in the mixture model is obtained based on evaporation and condensation mechanics with considering the effects of the non-dissolved gas, the turbulence, the tension of interface at cavity and the effect of phase change rate and so on. The governing equations of the mixture model for the unsteady cavitating-liquid flow is solved by a direct coupling method numerically with the finite volume method (FVM) using the unstructured tetrahedron grid and the structured hexahedral grid system. This direct coupling simulation was successfully applied to simulate the cavitating two-phase turbulent flow through a Francis turbine. The simulated external results agreed well with the experimental results.

  11. Using Process/CFD Co-Simulation for the Design and Analysis of Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.

    2007-04-01

    In this presentation we describe the major features and capabilities of NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) and highlight its application to advanced energy systems, ranging from small fuel cell systems to commercial-scale power plants including the coal-fired, gasification-based electricity and hydrogen plant in the DOE’s $1 billion, 10-year FutureGen demonstration project. APECS is an integrated software suite which allows the process and energy industries to optimize overall plant performance with respect to complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena by combining process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus®) with high-fidelity equipment simulations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models (e.g., FLUENT®).

  12. Digital Rock Simulation of Flow in Carbonate Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemin, D.; Andersen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoir engineering has becomes more complex to deal with current challenges, so core analysts must understand and model pore geometries and fluid behaviors at pores scales more rapidly and realistically. We introduce an industry-unique direct hydrodynamic pore flow simulator that operates on pore geometries from digital rock models obtained using microCT or 3D scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. The PVT and rheological models used in the simulator represent real reservoir fluids. Fluid-solid interactions are introduced using distributed micro-scale wetting properties. The simulator uses density functional approach applied for hydrodynamics of complex systems. This talk covers selected applications of the simulator. We performed microCT scanning of six different carbonate rock samples from homogeneous limestones to vuggy carbonates. From these, we constructed digital rock models representing pore geometries for the simulator. We simulated nonreactive tracer flow in all six digital models using a digital fluid description that included a passive tracer solution. During the simulation, we evaluated the composition of the effluent. Results of tracer flow simulations corresponded well with experimental data of nonreactive tracer floods for the same carbonate rock types. This simulation data of the non-reactive tracer flow can be used to calculate the volume of the rock accessible by the fluid, which can be further used to predict response of a porous medium to a reactive fluid. The described digital core analysis workflow provides a basis for a wide variety of activities, including input to design acidizing jobs and evaluating treatment efficiency and EOR economics. Digital rock multiphase flow simulations of a scanned carbonate rock evaluated the effect of wettability on flow properties. Various wetting properties were tested: slightly oil wet, slightly water wet, and water wet. Steady-state relative permeability simulations yielded curves for all three

  13. Flows in Pinned Arrays Simulating Brush Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R.C.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.; Braun, M. J.; Athavale, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Flows through idealized pin arrays were investigated using an unstructured grid finite difference model and the simplified Ergun model to predict leakage flows and pressure drops in brush seals. The models are in good agreement in the laminar region with departures in the laminar-turbulent transition region defined by the simplified Ergun model. No local disturbances in the velocity or pressure fields, symptomatic of turbulence were found in the numerical results. The simplified model failed to predict the pressure drop of a 32-pin anisotropic array. Transitional and anisotropic behavior requires

  14. Suitability research on the cavitation model and numerical simulation of the unsteady pulsed cavitation jet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. Y.; Yu, X. F.; Luan, D. Y.; Qu, Y. P.; Zhou, C.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the cavitation jet mechanism, it can first study its critical state of single-phase flow before cavity occurrence to explore the trend of pulsed cavitation jet. Then select the cavitation model to simulate the complex multiphase flow state. Such a step-by-step approach is beneficial to advance research reliably and steady, relying on the foundation for further solving the problem. Three turbulence models such as Euler Hybrid Model, Euler Two Phase Model and Euler Lagrange Model are discussed on their suitability. In this paper, it states only RNG k- ε turbulent model can simulate small scale vortex of jet in the transient simulation. Grid independent verification and the effect of time step is presented. The simulation results show that a large scale vortex ring surrounding jet flow in the nozzle, the pressure of vortex core is slightly lower than the upstream nozzle pressure. Considering the capture ability of small scale eddies, an equivalent pressure is established. The single-phase flow turbulence model is modified to simulate the turbulence flow in the self-excited pulsed cavitation after the cavitation occurs. Through different results comparison of not modified cavitation model and the modified cavitation model to the experimental results, it proves that the latter simulation results are relatively accurate.

  15. Advanced Multi-Phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  16. Numerical Simulations of Plasma Based Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Jacob, J. D.; Ashpis, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to simulate flow control applications using plasma actuators. The effects of the plasma actuators on the external flow are incorporated into Navier Stokes computations as a body force vector. In order to compute this body force vector, the model solves two additional equations: one for the electric field due to the applied AC voltage at the electrodes and the other for the charge density representing the ionized air. The model is calibrated against an experiment having plasma-driven flow in a quiescent environment and is then applied to simulate a low pressure turbine flow with large flow separation. The effects of the plasma actuator on control of flow separation are demonstrated numerically.

  17. Review of numerical simulations for high-speed, turbulent cavity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. J.; Barakos, G. N.

    2011-04-01

    High speed flows inside cavities are encountered in many aerospace applications including weapon bays of combat aircraft as well as landing gear. The flow field inside these cavities is associated with strong acoustic effects, unsteadiness and turbulence. With increasing emphasis on stealth operation of unmanned combat air vehicles and noise concerns near airports, cavity flows attracted the interest of many researchers in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. Several attempts were made using wind tunnel experimentation and computational fluid dynamics analyses to understand the complex flow physics associated with cavity flows and alleviate their adverse effects via flow control. The problem proved to be complex, and current research revealed a very complex flow with several flow phenomena taking place. With the aid of experiments, CFD methods were validated and then used for simulations of several cavity configurations. The detached-eddy and large-eddy simulation methods proved invaluable for these studies and their application highlights the need for advanced turbulence simulation techniques in aerospace. The success of these methods and a summary of the current status of the experimental and computational progress over the past twenty years is summarised in this paper.

  18. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows.

  19. Computational Simulation of Blood Flow through Bileaflet Heart Valve Prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Timothy; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2001-11-01

    Non-physiologic flow patterns and levels of turbulence caused by contemporary bileaflet mechanical heart valve (MHV) designs are believed to be partially responsible for thromboembolic complications caused by these valves. Presently, computer-based flow assessment is not employed as a design tool. Rather, CFD is used to understand flow dynamics under highly-specialized circumstances after a design has been selected and tested experimentally. The absence of CFD from the design-screening process is most likely due to undeveloped tools specific to the heart valve problem. CFD tools for assessing MHV flow performance should be efficient at simulating the fluid-structure interaction and the resulting leaflet motion. As the first stage in the development of MHV simulation tools, a high-accuracy Chimera solver was developed and tested for laminar flow through two bileaflet MHV designs. Steady and time-dependent simulations were performed providing the highest resolution simulations of three-dimensional MHV flow fields to date. Flow structures and time-dependent flow phenomena were investigated and interpreted in the context of the clinical performance of each design studied.

  20. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    WALTZ RE; CANDY J; HINTON FL; ESTRADA-MILA C; KINSEY JE

    2004-10-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite {beta}, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius ({rho}{sub *}) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or a globally with physical profile variation. Rohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, plasma pinches and impurity flow, and simulations at fixed flow rather than fixed gradient are illustrated and discussed.

  1. Advanced adaptive computational methods for Navier-Stokes simulations in rotorcraft aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowers, S. T.; Bass, J. M.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 research and development effort was conducted in area transonic, compressible, inviscid flows with an ultimate goal of numerically modeling complex flows inherent in advanced helicopter blade designs. The algorithms and methodologies therefore are classified as adaptive methods, which are error estimation techniques for approximating the local numerical error, and automatically refine or unrefine the mesh so as to deliver a given level of accuracy. The result is a scheme which attempts to produce the best possible results with the least number of grid points, degrees of freedom, and operations. These types of schemes automatically locate and resolve shocks, shear layers, and other flow details to an accuracy level specified by the user of the code. The phase 1 work involved a feasibility study of h-adaptive methods for steady viscous flows, with emphasis on accurate simulation of vortex initiation, migration, and interaction. Phase 2 effort focused on extending these algorithms and methodologies to a three-dimensional topology.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of sharkskin denticles in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, A.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2016-03-01

    The hydrodynamic function of sharkskin has been under investigation for the past 30 years. Current literature conflicts on whether sharkskin is able to reduce skin friction similar to riblets. To contribute insights toward reconciling these conflicting views, direct numerical simulations are carried out to obtain detailed flow fields around realistic denticles. A sharp interface immersed boundary method is employed to simulate two arrangements of actual sharkskin denticles (from Isurus oxyrinchus) in a turbulent boundary layer at Reτ ≈ 180. For comparison, turbulent flow over drag-reducing scalloped riblets is also simulated with similar flow conditions and with the same numerical method. Although the denticles resemble riblets, both sharkskin arrangements increase total drag by 44%-50%, while the riblets reduce drag by 5%. Analysis of the simulated flow fields shows that the turbulent flow around denticles is highly three-dimensional and separated, with 25% of the total drag being form drag. The complex three-dimensional shape of the denticles gives rise to a mean flow dominated by strong secondary flows in sharp contrast with the mean flow generated by riblets, which is largely two-dimensional. The so resulting three-dimensionality of sharkskin flows leads to an increase in the magnitude of the turbulent statistics near the denticles, which further contributes to increasing the total drag. The simulations also show that, at least for the simulated arrangements, sharkskin, in sharp contrast with drag-reducing riblets, is unable to isolate high shear stress near denticle ridges causing a significant portion of the denticle surface to be exposed to high mean shear.

  3. CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Douglas B.

    2010-11-01

    Like the fusion community, the nuclear engineering community is embarking on a new computational effort to create integrated, multiphysics simulations. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), one of 3 newly-funded DOE Energy Innovation Hubs, brings together an exceptionally capable team that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated the Virtual Reactor (VR), will: 1) Enable the use of leadership-class computing for engineering design and analysis to improve reactor capabilities, 2) Promote an enhanced scientific basis and understanding by replacing empirically based design and analysis tools with predictive capabilities, 3) Develop a highly integrated multiphysics environment for engineering analysis through increased fidelity methods, and 4) Incorporate UQ as a basis for developing priorities and supporting, application of the VR tools for predictive simulation. In this presentation, we present the plans for CASL and comment on the similarity and differences with the proposed Fusion Simulation Project (FSP).

  4. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  5. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of wall turbulent flows with microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Akihiro; Miyata, Hideaki

    2001-03-01

    The marker-density-function (MDF) method has been developed to conduct direct numerical simulation (DNS) for bubbly flows. The method is applied to turbulent bubbly channel flows to elucidate the interaction between bubbles and wall turbulence. The simulation is designed to clarify the structure of the turbulent boundary layer containing microbubbles and the mechanism of frictional drag reduction. It is deduced from the numerical tests that the interaction between bubbles and wall turbulence depends on the Weber and Froude numbers. The reduction of the frictional resistance on the wall is attained and its mechanism is explained from the modulation of the three-dimensional structure of the turbulent flow. Copyright

  7. Model equations for simulating flows in multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1996-01-01

    A steady, three dimensional average-passage equation system was derived. The purpose was to simulate multistage turbomachinery flows. These equations describe a steady, viscous flow that is periodic from blade passage to blade passage. Moreover, these equations have a closure problem that is similar to that of the Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes equations. A scaled form of the average-passage equation system could provide an improved mathematical model for simulating the flow in the design and in the off-design conditions of a multistage machine.

  8. Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  9. Two critical issues in Langevin simulation of gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Fan, Jing

    2014-12-09

    A stochastic algorithm based on the Langevin equation has been recently proposed to simulate rarefied gas flows. Compared with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, the Langevin method is more efficient in simulating small Knudsen number flows. While it is well-known that the cell sizes and time steps should be smaller than the mean free path and the mean collision time, respectively, in DSMC simulations, the Langevin equation uses a drift term and a diffusion term to describe molecule movements, so no direct molecular collisions have to be modeled. This enables the Langevin simulation to proceed with a much larger time step than that in the DSMC method. Two critical issues in Langevin simulation are addressed in this paper. The first issue is how to reproduce the transport properties as that described by kinetic theory. Transport coefficients predicted by Langevin equation are obtained by using Green-Kubo formulae. The second issue is numerical scheme with boundary conditions. We present two schemes corresponding to small time step and large time step, respectively. For small time step, the scheme is similar to DSMC method as the update of positions and velocities are uncoupled; for large time step, we present an analytical solution of the hitting time, which is the crucial factor for accurate simulation. Velocity-Couette flow, thermal-Couette flow, Rayleigh-Bénard flow and wall-confined problem are simulated by using these two schemes. Our study shows that Langevin simulation is a promising tool to investigate small Knudsen number flows.

  10. Flow induced migration in polymer melts – Theory and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorgan, John Robert Rorrer, Nicholas Andrew

    2015-04-28

    Flow induced migration, whereby polymer melts are fractionated by molecular weight across a flow field, represents a significant complication in the processing of polymer melts. Despite its long history, such phenomena remain relatively poorly understood. Here a simple analytical theory is presented which predicts the phenomena based on well-established principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is unambiguously shown that for purely viscous materials, a gradient in shear rate is needed to drive migration; for purely viscometric flows no migration is expected. Molecular scale simulations of flow migration effects in dense polymer melts are also presented. In shear flow the melts exhibit similar behavior as the quiescent case; a constant shear rate across the gap does not induce chain length based migration. In comparison, parabolic flow causes profound migration for both unentangled and entangled melts. These findings are consistent with the analytical theory. The picture that emerges is consistent with flow induced migration mechanisms predominating over competing chain degradation mechanisms.

  11. Robustness of de Saint Venant equations for simulating unsteady flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baltzer, Robert A.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Lai, Chintu; ,

    1995-01-01

    Long-wave motion in open channels can be expressed mathematically by the one-dimensional de Saint Venant equations describing conservation of fluid mass and momentum. Numerical simulation models, based on either depth/velocity or water-level/discharge dependent-variable formulations of these equations, are typically used to simulate unsteady open-channel flow. However, the implications and significance of selecting either dependent-variable form - on model development, discretization and numerical solution processes, and ultimately on the range-of-application and simulation utility of resulting models - are not well known. Results obtained from a set of numerical experiments employing two models - one based on depth/velocity and the other on water-level/discharge equation formulations - reveal the sensitivity of the two equation sets to various channel properties and dynamic flow conditions. In particular, the effects of channel gradient, channel width-to-depth ratio, flow-resistance coefficient, and flow unsteadiness are analyzed and discussed.

  12. Integration of Advanced Simulation and Visualization for Manufacturing Process Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chenn; Wang, Jichao; Tang, Guangwu; Moreland, John; Fu, Dong; Wu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The integration of simulation and visualization can provide a cost-effective tool for process optimization, design, scale-up and troubleshooting. The Center for Innovation through Visualization and Simulation (CIVS) at Purdue University Northwest has developed methodologies for such integration with applications in various manufacturing processes. The methodologies have proven to be useful for virtual design and virtual training to provide solutions addressing issues on energy, environment, productivity, safety, and quality in steel and other industries. In collaboration with its industrial partnerships, CIVS has provided solutions to companies, saving over US38 million. CIVS is currently working with the steel industry to establish an industry-led Steel Manufacturing Simulation and Visualization Consortium through the support of National Institute of Standards and Technology AMTech Planning Grant. The consortium focuses on supporting development and implementation of simulation and visualization technologies to advance steel manufacturing across the value chain.

  13. Numerical simulation of transient hypervelocity flow in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Several numerical simulations of the transient flow of helium in an expansion tube are presented in an effort to identify some of the basic mechanisms which cause the noisy test flows seen in experiments. The calculations were performed with an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code based on a finite volume formulation and upwinding techniques. Although laminar flow and ideal bursting of the diaphragms was assumed, the simulations showed some of the important features seen in experiments. In particular, the discontinuity in tube diameter of the primary diaphragm station introduced a transverse perturbation to the expanding driver gas and this perturbation was seen to propagate into the test gas under some flow conditions. The disturbances seen in the test flow can be characterized as either small amplitude, low frequency noise possibly introduced during shock compression or large amplitude, high frequency noise associated with the passage of the reflected head of the unsteady expansion.

  14. Reducing spurious flow in simulations of electrokinetic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempfer, Georg; Davies, Gary B.; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-07-01

    Electrokinetic transport phenomena can strongly influence the behaviour of macromolecules and colloidal particles in solution, with applications in, e.g., DNA translocation through nanopores, electro-osmotic flow in nanocapillaries, and electrophoresis of charged macromolecules. Numerical simulations are an important tool to investigate these electrokinetic phenomena, but are often plagued by spurious fluxes and spurious flows that can easily exceed physical fluxes and flows. Here, we present a method that reduces one of these spurious currents, spurious flow, by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the effectiveness and generality of our method for both the electrokinetic lattice-Boltzmann and finite-element-method based algorithms by simulating a charged sphere in an electrolyte solution and flow through a nanopore. We also show that previous attempts to suppress these spurious currents introduce other sources of error.

  15. GASFLOW Simulations of Flow in Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, C.; Liles, D.R.; Spore, J.W.; Niederauer, G.F.

    1998-09-01

    The goal of these simulation studies was to demonstrate the capability of the GASFLOW computer code to predict detailed concentration distributions of toxic gases released in a subway station and in an airplane hangar, which represents an open building like a gymnasium. GASFLOW is a finite-volume computer code for solving transient, three-dimensional, compressible, Navier-Stokes equations for multiple gas species. It calculates the transport, mixing, and combustion of flammable gases and aerosols in geometrically complex domains.

  16. Modeling and Direct Numerical Simulation of Ternary Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Seok; Lowengrub, John; Longmire, Ellen

    2001-06-01

    In this talk, we will present a physically-based model of flows involving three liquid components. The components may exhibit preferential miscibility with one another. The flows we consider are characterized by the presence of interfaces separating immiscible flow components with pinchoff and reconnection of interfaces being important features of the flow. In our model, these topological transitions are handled smoothly without explicit interface reconstruction. In addition, we model the diffusion of miscible components in the bulk and across the interfaces. To illustrate the method, we present numerical simulations of remediation of a contaminant-laden fluid using liquid/liquid extraction.

  17. Simulation of dust streaming in toroidal traps: Stationary flows

    SciTech Connect

    Reichstein, Torben; Piel, Alexander

    2011-08-15

    Molecular-dynamic simulations were performed to study dust motion in a toroidal trap under the influence of the ion drag force driven by a Hall motion of the ions in E x B direction, gravity, inter-particle forces, and friction with the neutral gas. This article is focused on the inhomogeneous stationary streaming motion. Depending on the strength of friction, the spontaneous formation of a stationary shock or a spatial bifurcation into a fast flow and a slow vortex flow is observed. In the quiescent streaming region, the particle flow features a shell structure which undergoes a structural phase transition along the flow direction.

  18. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  19. Advanced experimental upscaling of flow and transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, A.; Musch, T.; Gevers, M.; Gebhardt, P.; Groth, S.; Kersting, R.; Goekpinar, T.

    2013-12-01

    It has been found that for precise understanding and prediction of passive and reactive transport, physical and chemical processes, their interaction and feedbacks have to be considered. These processes are known to be governed by the physical and chemical heterogeneity of the subsurface, which appear to be inherent at all spatiotemporal scales. As sampling at every point in space is unfeasible, upscaling of flow and transport is strongly needed. As mathematical and numerical upscaling of such processes is challenging and such upscaling procedures need to be verified to become useful for proper transport prediction, experimental laboratory upscaling of flow and transport from the pore- to the meter-scale is required. Our recently developed methodology based on the combination of column and sandbox experiments is capable for experimental upscaling of flow and transport as follows: In a first step, a cubic Darcy cell of 0.1 m x 0.1 m x 0.1 m is used to experimentally estimate flow and transport characteristics of an unconsolidated sediment, means flow and transport is experimentally upscaled from the pore-scale to the 0.1 m- scale. In a second step, the sediment filled Darcy cell is frozen and the frozen sediment cube is extracted from the Darcy cell. In a third step, nine frozen sediment cubes are composed in a sandbox model such that a sediment body of 0.3 m x 0.3 m x 0.1 m is formed. Finally the flow and transport characteristics of the sediment body are estimated based on flow and transport experiments. Such procedure could allow for successive experimental upscaling from the pore- to the 0.1 m- to the 1 m-scale of flow and reactive transport. First tests of the recently developed setup for experimental upscaling showed that it is feasible to form sediment cubes, extract them from the experimental apparatus and assemble them in a sandbox model. It could also be shown that the developed experimental set up is well suited to study flow and transport in single

  20. Preface to advances in numerical simulation of plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott E.; Chacon, Luis

    2016-10-01

    This Journal of Computational Physics Special Issue, titled "Advances in Numerical Simulation of Plasmas," presents a snapshot of the international state of the art in the field of computational plasma physics. The articles herein are a subset of the topics presented as invited talks at the 24th International Conference on the Numerical Simulation of Plasmas (ICNSP), August 12-14, 2015 in Golden, Colorado. The choice of papers was highly selective. The ICNSP is held every other year and is the premier scientific meeting in the field of computational plasma physics.

  1. Hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (heavy) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program to simulate hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (HEAVY) is described. It is intended for use early in the design process: concept evaluation, alternative comparison, preliminary design, control and management strategy development, component sizing, and sensitivity studies. It allows the designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict the performance of a proposed drive train. The user defines the system to be simulated using a library of predefined component models that may be connected to represent a wide variety of propulsion systems. The development of three models are discussed as examples.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Two Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2001-01-01

    Two phase flows can be found in broad situations in nature, biology, and industry devices and can involve diverse and complex mechanisms. While the physical models may be specific for certain situations, the mathematical formulation and numerical treatment for solving the governing equations can be general. Hence, we will require information concerning each individual phase as needed in a single phase. but also the interactions between them. These interaction terms, however, pose additional numerical challenges because they are beyond the basis that we use to construct modern numerical schemes, namely the hyperbolicity of equations. Moreover, due to disparate differences in time scales, fluid compressibility and nonlinearity become acute, further complicating the numerical procedures. In this paper, we will show the ideas and procedure how the AUSM-family schemes are extended for solving two phase flows problems. Specifically, both phases are assumed in thermodynamic equilibrium, namely, the time scales involved in phase interactions are extremely short in comparison with those in fluid speeds and pressure fluctuations. Details of the numerical formulation and issues involved are discussed and the effectiveness of the method are demonstrated for several industrial examples.

  3. Advanced 3D Photocathode Modeling and Simulations Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitre A Dimitrov; David L Bruhwiler

    2005-06-06

    High brightness electron beams required by the proposed Next Linear Collider demand strong advances in photocathode electron gun performance. Significant improvement in the production of such beams with rf photocathode electron guns is hampered by the lack high-fidelity simulations. The critical missing piece in existing gun codes is a physics-based, detailed treatment of the very complex and highly nonlinear photoemission process.

  4. Flow measurements based on speckle decorrelation: Simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Zhu, Juan; Rubin, Jonathan M.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Hall, Anne L.

    2001-05-01

    Traditional Doppler-based flow measurements suffer from bad signal to noise for large angles between the wavevector and the flow direction. To overcome this limitation, speckle decorrelation might be used to measure lateral flow. Experiments were performed on a flow phantom (tube diameter 6.35 mm, flow 1.6 mL/min) with the tube axis positioned in the imaging plane of a GE Logiq 9 scanner. IQ data sets of ten frames with 16 firings per scanline were recorded and speckle decorrelation used to estimate flow speeds throughout the image. The decorrelation computations were performed over different kernel types and compared to simulations performed using Field II by J. Jensen with acoustical transmit as well as beamforming parameters set to match experiments. Speckle decorrelation rates in experiments scale correctly for the parabolic flow profile inside the tube. Simulations reproduced a similar but smoother profile. Flow velocities could be estimated using a scaling factor based on the spatial correlation of the beam. The combination of velocity estimates from Doppler and speckle decorrelation may provide a more uniform display of flow and lead to less angle dependence. [Research supported by U.S. Army Grant No. DAMD17-00-1-0344 and GE Medical Systems.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Fluidic Actuators for Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasta, Veer N.; Koklu, Mehti; Wygnanski, Israel L.; Fares, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Active flow control technology is finding increasing use in aerospace applications to control flow separation and improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper we examine the characteristics of a class of fluidic actuators that are being considered for active flow control applications for a variety of practical problems. Based on recent experimental work, such actuators have been found to be more efficient for controlling flow separation in terms of mass flow requirements compared to constant blowing and suction or even synthetic jet actuators. The fluidic actuators produce spanwise oscillating jets, and therefore are also known as sweeping jets. The frequency and spanwise sweeping extent depend on the geometric parameters and mass flow rate entering the actuators through the inlet section. The flow physics associated with these actuators is quite complex and not fully understood at this time. The unsteady flow generated by such actuators is simulated using the lattice Boltzmann based solver PowerFLOW R . Computed mean and standard deviation of velocity profiles generated by a family of fluidic actuators in quiescent air are compared with experimental data. Simulated results replicate the experimentally observed trends with parametric variation of geometry and inflow conditions.

  6. Multiscale Simulation of Moist Global Atmospheric Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2015-04-13

    The overarching goal of this award was to include phase changes of the water substance and accompanying latent heating and precipitation processes into the all-scale nonhydrostatic atmospheric dynamics EUlerian/LAGrangian (EULAG) model. The model includes fluid flow solver that is based on either an unabbreviated set of the governing equations (i.e., compressible dynamics) or a simplified set of equations without sound waves (i.e., sound-proof, either anelastic or pseudo-incompressible). The latter set has been used in small-scale dynamics for decades, but its application to the all-scale dynamics (from small-scale to planetary) has never been studied in practical implementations. The highlight of the project is the development of the moist implicit compressible model that can be run by applying time steps, as long as the anelastic model is limited only by the computational stability of the fluid flow and not by the speed of sound waves that limit the stability of explicit compressible models. Applying various versions of the EULAG model within the same numerical framework allows for an unprecedented comparison of solutions obtained with various sets of the governing equations and straightforward evaluation of the impact of various physical parameterizations on the model solutions. The main outcomes of this study are reported in three papers, two published and one currently under review. These papers include comparisons between model solutions for idealized moist problems across the range of scales from small to planetary. These tests include: moist thermals rising in the stable-stratified environment (following Grabowski and Clark, J. Atmos. Sci. 1991) and in the moist-neutral environment (after Bryan and Fritsch, Mon. Wea. Rev. 2002), moist flows over a mesoscale topography (as in Grabowski and Smolarkiewicz, Mon. Wea. Rev. 2002), deep convection in a sheared environment (following Weisman and Klemp, Mon. Wea. Rev. 1982), moist extension of the baroclinic wave on

  7. A flexible open-source toolkit for lava flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossoux, Sophie; Feltz, Adelin; Poppe, Sam; Canters, Frank; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2014-05-01

    Lava flow hazard modeling is a useful tool for scientists and stakeholders confronted with imminent or long term hazard from basaltic volcanoes. It can improve their understanding of the spatial distribution of volcanic hazard, influence their land use decisions and improve the city evacuation during a volcanic crisis. Although a range of empirical, stochastic and physically-based lava flow models exists, these models are rarely available or require a large amount of physical constraints. We present a GIS toolkit which models lava flow propagation from one or multiple eruptive vents, defined interactively on a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). It combines existing probabilistic (VORIS) and deterministic (FLOWGO) models in order to improve the simulation of lava flow spatial spread and terminal length. Not only is this toolkit open-source, running in Python, which allows users to adapt the code to their needs, but it also allows users to combine the models included in different ways. The lava flow paths are determined based on the probabilistic steepest slope (VORIS model - Felpeto et al., 2001) which can be constrained in order to favour concentrated or dispersed flow fields. Moreover, the toolkit allows including a corrective factor in order for the lava to overcome small topographical obstacles or pits. The lava flow terminal length can be constrained using a fixed length value, a Gaussian probability density function or can be calculated based on the thermo-rheological properties of the open-channel lava flow (FLOWGO model - Harris and Rowland, 2001). These slope-constrained properties allow estimating the velocity of the flow and its heat losses. The lava flow stops when its velocity is zero or the lava temperature reaches the solidus. Recent lava flows of Karthala volcano (Comoros islands) are here used to demonstrate the quality of lava flow simulations with the toolkit, using a quantitative assessment of the match of the simulation with the real lava flows. The

  8. Detached Eddy Simulation of Flap Side-Edge Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, Shankar K.; Shariff, Karim R.

    2016-01-01

    Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) of flap side-edge flow was performed with a wing and half-span flap configuration used in previous experimental and numerical studies. The focus of the study is the unsteady flow features responsible for the production of far-field noise. The simulation was performed at a Reynolds number (based on the main wing chord) of 3.7 million. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were performed as a precursor to the DES. The results of these precursor simulations match previous experimental and RANS results closely. Although the present DES simulations have not reached statistical stationary yet, some unsteady features of the developing flap side-edge flowfield are presented. In the final paper it is expected that statistically stationary results will be presented including comparisons of surface pressure spectra with experimental data.

  9. Simulating the interaction of seagrasses with their ambient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, Jan O.; Verduin, Jennifer J.

    2008-12-01

    The interaction of seagrasses with the dynamics of an oscillatory wave induced flow is assessed with a new Lagrangian plant model. The plant model simulates moving plants in canopies and their dissipative effect on the ambient flow. Concomitantly the plant model is interactively coupled to a 3D hydrodynamic numerical model allowing for a bilateral feedback between moving plants and flow. Model results demonstrate that this interaction causes a modification of current profiles within and above a canopy as compared to an undisturbed flow. While the overall effect of submerged plant canopies is a dampening of dynamics, the flow may locally be intensified. The model predicted an intensification of the flow near the top of a canopy in concurrence with field and laboratory observations. Dissipation in the coupled model, due to the applied non-linear friction law, grows exponentially with increasing flow. As a result the permeability of a canopy to the ambient flow decreases with increasing dissipation. Consequently, at high flow velocities, while becoming increasingly impermeable, a canopy acts like an obstacle that deflects the flow above it, which causes the observed intensification. Results for canopies consisting of seagrasses with different leaf structure and plant geometry show remarkable differences in predicted plant motions, current profiles, drag forces, and velocity shear. Predictions for moving plants are compared with those for rigid, less flexible, structures and undisturbed flow.

  10. The USC macro data-flow simulator. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, N.; Gaudiot, J.L.

    1989-10-11

    As device technology develops to the limit of speed of light, parallel processing comes into play for high performance calculation. Conventional von Neumann computation show difficulty because of its single threadness. Many hybrid models have been proposed; they are reviewed, leading to the macro data-flow model. This macro data-flow is a scheme having a multilevel of model of execution which higher model is a tagged data-flow and lower level is von Neumann. Partitioning should be carefully done. A simple simulator has been developed, executing a macro data-flow graph. Micro instructions within a macro actor can access and process those vector data from higher data-flow level. Architectural description of this simulator and some special actors supporting this hybrid model are discussed. Details of instructions are explained as user reference manual, including sample programs and statistic gathering methods. In addition to the hardware simulator, a graph simulator was developed for simple execution of data-flow graph without resource limit of hardware details.

  11. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  12. Numerical simulation of the SOFIA flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotz, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a concise summary of the contribution of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project at NASA Ames and presents results obtained from closed- and open-cavity SOFIA simulations. The aircraft platform is a Boeing 747SP and these are the first SOFIA simulations run with the aircraft empennage included in the geometry database. In the open-cavity runs the telescope is mounted behind the wings. Results suggest that the cavity markedly influences the mean pressure distribution on empennage surfaces and that 110-140 decibel (db) sound pressure levels are typical in the cavity and on the horizontal and vertical stabilizers. A strong source of sound was found to exist on the rim of the open telescope cavity. The presence of this source suggests that additional design work needs to be performed in order to minimize the sound emanating from that location. A fluid dynamic analysis of the engine plumes is also contained in this report. The analysis was part of an effort to quantify the degradation of telescope performance resulting from the proximity of the port engine exhaust plumes to the open telescope bay.

  13. Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Podowski

    2009-11-30

    The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

  14. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  15. A general kinetic-flow coupling model for FCC riser flow simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-05-18

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code has been developed for fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser flow simulation. Depending on the application of interest, a specific kinetic model is needed for the FCC flow simulation. This paper describes a method to determine a kinetic model based on limited pilot-scale test data. The kinetic model can then be used with the CFD code as a tool to investigate optimum operating condition ranges for a specific FCC unit.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Sickle Cell Blood Flow in the Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2001-11-01

    A numerical simulation of normal and sickle cell blood flow through the transverse arteriole-capillary microcirculation is carried out to model the dominant mechanisms involved in the onset of vascular stasis in sickle cell disease. The transverse arteriole-capillary network is described by Strahler's network branching method, and the oxygen and blood transport in the capillaries is modeled by a Krogh cylinder analysis utilizing Lighthill's lubrication theory, as developed by Berger and King. Poiseuille's law is used to represent blood flow in the arterioles. Applying this flow and transport model and utilizing volumetric flow continuity at each network bifurcation, a nonlinear system of equations is obtained, which is solved iteratively using a steepest descent algorithm coupled with a Newton solver. Ten different networks are generated and flow results are calculated for normal blood and sickle cell blood without and with precapillary oxygen loss. We find that total volumetric blood flow through the network is greater in the two sickle cell blood simulations than for normal blood owing to the anemia associated with sickle cell disease. The percentage of capillary blockage in the network increases dramatically with decreasing pressure drop across the network in the sickle cell cases while there is no blockage when normal blood flows through simulated networks. It is concluded that, in sickle cell disease, without any vasomotor dilation response to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the blood, capillary blockage will occur in the microvasculature even at average pressure drops across the transverse arteriole-capillary networks.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field Within Parallel Plate Plastometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    2002-01-01

    Parallel Plate Plastometer (PPP) is a device commonly used for measuring the viscosity of high polymers at low rates of shear in the range 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) poises. This device is being validated for use in measuring the viscosity of liquid glasses at high temperatures having similar ranges for the viscosity values. PPP instrument consists of two similar parallel plates, both in the range of 1 inch in diameter with the upper plate being movable while the lower one is kept stationary. Load is applied to the upper plate by means of a beam connected to shaft attached to the upper plate. The viscosity of the fluid is deduced from measuring the variation of the plate separation, h, as a function of time when a specified fixed load is applied on the beam. Operating plate speeds measured with the PPP is usually in the range of 10.3 cm/s or lower. The flow field within the PPP can be simulated using the equations of motion of fluid flow for this configuration. With flow speeds in the range quoted above the flow field between the two plates is certainly incompressible and laminar. Such flows can be easily simulated using numerical modeling with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. We present below the mathematical model used to simulate this flow field and also the solutions obtained for the flow using a commercially available finite element CFD code.

  18. A review on continuous-flow microfluidic PCR in droplets: Advances, challenges and future.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghao; Jiang, Hui-Rong

    2016-03-31

    Significant advances have been made in developing microfluidic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices in the last two decades. More recently, microfluidic microdroplet technology has been exploited to perform PCR in droplets because of its unique features. For example, it can prevent crossover contamination and PCR inhibition, is suitable for single-cell and single-molecule analyses, and has the potential for system integration and automation. This review will therefore focus on recent developments on droplet-based continuous-flow microfluidic PCR, and the major research challenges. This paper will also discuss a new way of on-chip flow control and a rational design simulation tool, which are required to underpin fully integrated and automated droplet-based microfluidic systems. We will conclude with a scientific speculation of future autonomous scientific discoveries enabled by microfluidic microdroplet technologies. PMID:26965323

  19. A review on continuous-flow microfluidic PCR in droplets: Advances, challenges and future.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghao; Jiang, Hui-Rong

    2016-03-31

    Significant advances have been made in developing microfluidic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices in the last two decades. More recently, microfluidic microdroplet technology has been exploited to perform PCR in droplets because of its unique features. For example, it can prevent crossover contamination and PCR inhibition, is suitable for single-cell and single-molecule analyses, and has the potential for system integration and automation. This review will therefore focus on recent developments on droplet-based continuous-flow microfluidic PCR, and the major research challenges. This paper will also discuss a new way of on-chip flow control and a rational design simulation tool, which are required to underpin fully integrated and automated droplet-based microfluidic systems. We will conclude with a scientific speculation of future autonomous scientific discoveries enabled by microfluidic microdroplet technologies.

  20. Two inviscid computational simulations of separated flow about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Two inviscid computational simulations of separated flow about airfoils are described. The basic computational method is the line relaxation finite-difference method. Viscous separation is approximated with inviscid free-streamline separation. The point of separation is specified, and the pressure in the separation region is calculated. In the first simulation, the empiricism of constant pressure in the separation region is employed. This empiricism is easier to implement with the present method than with singularity methods. In the second simulation, acoustic theory is used to determine the pressure in the separation region. The results of both simulations are compared with experiment.

  1. Advanced Flow Control as a Management Tool in the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wugalter, S.

    1974-01-01

    Advanced Flow Control is closely related to Air Traffic Control. Air Traffic Control is the business of the Federal Aviation Administration. To formulate an understanding of advanced flow control and its use as a management tool in the National Airspace System, it becomes necessary to speak somewhat of air traffic control, the role of FAA, and their relationship to advanced flow control. Also, this should dispell forever, any notion that advanced flow control is the inspirational master valve scheme to be used on the Alaskan Oil Pipeline.

  2. Advanced thermal energy management: A thermal test bed and heat pipe simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1986-01-01

    Work initiated on a common-module thermal test simulation was continued, and a second project on heat pipe simulation was begun. The test bed, constructed from surplus Skylab equipment, was modeled and solved for various thermal load and flow conditions. Low thermal load caused the radiator fluid, Coolanol 25, to thicken due to its temperature avoided by using a regenerator-heat-exchanger. Other possible solutions modeled include a radiator heater and shunting heat from the central thermal bus to the radiator. Also, module air temperature can become excessive with high avionics load. A second preoject concerning advanced heat pipe concepts was initiated. A program was written which calculates fluid physical properties, liquid and vapor pressure in the evaporator and condenser, fluid flow rates, and thermal flux. The program is directed to evaluating newer heat pipe wicks and geometries, especially water in an artery surrounded by six vapor channels. Effects of temperature, groove and slot dimensions, and wick properties are reported.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Gap Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles. PMID:25635395

  4. Simulation of Flow Fluid in the BOF Steelmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ming; Zhu, Rong; Guo, Ya-Guang; Wang, Yong-Wei

    2013-12-01

    The basic oxygen furnace (BOF) smelting process consists of different chemical reactions among oxygen, slag, and molten steel, which engenders a vigorous stirring process to promote slagging, dephosphorization, decarbonization, heating of molten steel, and homogenization of steel composition and temperature. Therefore, the oxygen flow rate, lance height, and slag thickness vary during the smelting process. This simulation demonstrated a three-dimensional mathematical model for a 100 t converter applying four-hole supersonic oxygen lance and simulated the effect of oxygen flow rate, lance height, and slag thickness on the flow of molten bath. It is found that as the oxygen flow rate increases, the impact area and depth increases, which increases the flow speed in the molten bath and decreases the area of dead zone. Low oxygen lance height benefits the increase of impact depth and accelerates the flow speed of liquid steel on the surface of the bath, while high oxygen lance height benefits the increase of impact area, thereafter enhances the uniform distribution of radial velocity in the molten steel and increases the flow velocity of molten steel at the bottom of furnace hearth. As the slag thickness increases, the diameter of impinging cavity on the slag and steel surface decreases. The radial velocity of liquid steel in the molten bath is well distributed when the jet flow impact on the slag layer increases.

  5. Compressible Turbulent Flow Numerical Simulations of Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatami, F.; van der Weide, E.; Hoeijmakers, H.

    2015-12-01

    For an elliptic Arndt's hydrofoil numerical simulations of vortex cavitation are presented. An equilibrium cavitation model is employed. This single-fluid model assumes local thermodynamic and mechanical equilibrium in the mixture region of the flow, is employed. Furthermore, for characterizing the thermodynamic state of the system, precomputed multiphase thermodynamic tables containing data for the appropriate equations of state for each of the phases are used and a fast, accurate, and efficient look-up approach is employed for interpolating the data. The numerical simulations are carried out using the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations for compressible flow. The URANS equations of motion are discretized using an finite volume method for unstructured grids. The numerical simulations clearly show the formation of the tip vortex cavitation in the flow about the elliptic hydrofoil.

  6. Toward the improved simulation of microscale gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNenly, Matthew James

    2007-12-01

    Recent interest in fluidic micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) in gaseous environments has increased the need for accurate simulation techniques to aid in their design process. Many fluidic MEMS operate in a low-speed non-equilibrium gas flow regime that is challenging to simulate both accurately and efficiently. Classic computational fluid dynamics techniques (e.g. Navier-Stokes simulation) are based on the assumption that the fluid behaves as a continuum. This assumption, however, becomes increasingly less accurate as the local flow conditions deviate further from local thermodynamic equilibrium. Alternatively, it is possible to achieve an accurate approximation of non-equilibrium gas flows using particle-based methods (e.g. DSMC), but the resulting simulations are much more computationally expensive than the continuum-based method. In fact, for the very low speeds commonly found in fluidic MEMS, the slow convergence of the DSMC solution can lead to intractably long computation times on all but the largest supercomputers. Two different approaches are pursued in this investigation, in an effort to design a physically accurate and computationally efficient simulation of low-speed, non-equilibrium flows. The first approach constructs new empirical models to correct the error in the Navier-Stokes simulation in the transition regime due to the appreciable deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium. The empirically corrected Navier-Stokes simulation is not actually predicting strongly non-equilibrium gas flows; however, it is shown to be a useful analysis tool in certain design situations. The second more novel approach develops an original quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) particle simulation that retains the physical accuracy of the DSMC method while at the same time achieving a faster (near-linear) convergence rate. The design of a QMC method is far more complex in general than a Monte Carlo method for the same problem. Further, no known QMC particle simulation has

  7. Numerical simulation of transient hypervelocity flow in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Several numerical simulations of the transient flow of helium in an expansion tube are presented. The aim of the exercise is to provide further information on the operational problems of the NASA Langley expansion tube. The calculations were performed with an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code based on a finite-volume formulation and upwinding techniques. Although laminar flow and ideal bursting of the diaphragms was assumed, the simulations showed some of the important features seen in the experiments. In particular, the discontinuity in the tube diameter at the primary diaphragm station introduced a transverse perturbation to the expanding driver gas, and this perturbation was seen to propagate into the test gas under some flow conditions. The disturbances seen in the test flow can be characterized as either 'small-amplitude' noise possibly introduced during shock compression or 'large-amplitude' noise associated with the passage of the reflected head of the unsteady expansion.

  8. Advanced optical fiber communication simulations in electrotechnical engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervaeke, Michael; Nguyen Thi, Cac; Thienpont, Hugo

    2004-10-01

    We present our efforts in education to apply advanced optical communication simulation software into our Electrical Engineering curriculum by implementing examples from theoretical courses with commercially available simulation software. Photonic design software is an interesting tool for the education of Engineers: these tools are able to simulate a huge variety of photonic components without major investments in student lab hardware. Moreover: some exotic phenomena ,which would usually involve specialty hardware, can be taught. We chose to implement VPItransmissionMaker from VPIsystems in the lab exercises for graduating Electrotechnical Engineers with majors in Photonics. The guideline we develop starts with basic examples provided by VPIsystems. The simplified simulation schemes serve as an introduction to the simulation techniques. Next, we highlight examples from the theoretical courses on Optical Telecommunications. A last part is an assignment where students have to design and simulate a system using real life component datasheets. The aim is to train them to interpret datasheets, to make design choices for their optical fiber system and to enhance their management skills. We detail our approach, highlight the educational aspects, the insight gained by the students, and illustrate our method with different examples.

  9. SPH numerical simulation of fluid flow through a porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp-Escribano, Jaime; Mayoral-Villa, Estela; Rodriguez-Meza, Mario Alberto; de La Cruz-Sanchez, Eduardo; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Inin-Abacus Collaboration; Ivic Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We have tested an improved a method for 3D SPH simulations of fluid flow through a porous media using an implementation of this method with the Dual-Physics code. This improvement makes it possible to simulate many particles (of the order of several million) in reasonable computer times because its execution on GPUs processors makes it possible to reduce considerably the simulation cost for large systems. Modifications in the initial configuration have been implemented in order to simulate different arrays and geometries for the porous media. The basic tests were reproduced and the performance was analyzed. Our 3D simulations of fluid flow through a saturated homogeneous porous media shows a discharge velocity proportional to the hydraulic gradient reproducing Darcy's law at small body forces. The results are comparable with values obtained in previous work and published in the literature for simulations of flow through periodic porous media. Our simulations for a non saturated porous media produce adequate qualitative results showing that a non steady state is generated. The relaxation time for these systems were obtained. Work partially supported by Cinvestav-ABACUS, CONACyT grant EDOMEX-2011-C01-165873.

  10. Experimental Validation of Numerical Simulations for an Acoustic Liner in Grazing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Pastouchenko, Nikolai N.; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2013-01-01

    A coordinated experimental and numerical simulation effort is carried out to improve our understanding of the physics of acoustic liners in a grazing flow as well our computational aeroacoustics (CAA) method prediction capability. A numerical simulation code based on advanced CAA methods is developed. In a parallel effort, experiments are performed using the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube at the NASA Langley Research Center. In the experiment, a liner is installed in the upper wall of a rectangular flow duct with a 2 inch by 2.5 inch cross section. Spatial distribution of sound pressure levels and relative phases are measured on the wall opposite the liner in the presence of a Mach 0.3 grazing flow. The computer code is validated by comparing computed results with experimental measurements. Good agreements are found. The numerical simulation code is then used to investigate the physical properties of the acoustic liner. It is shown that an acoustic liner can produce self-noise in the presence of a grazing flow and that a feedback acoustic resonance mechanism is responsible for the generation of this liner self-noise. In addition, the same mechanism also creates additional liner drag. An estimate, based on numerical simulation data, indicates that for a resonant liner with a 10% open area ratio, the drag increase would be about 4% of the turbulent boundary layer drag over a flat wall.

  11. Advanced process engineering co-simulation using CFD-based reduced order models

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Y.-D.; Biegler, L.T.; Munteanu, S.; Madsen, J.I.; Zitney, S.E.

    2007-11-04

    The process and energy industries face the challenge of designing the next generation of plants to operate with unprecedented efficiency and near-zero emissions, while performing profitably amid fluctuations in costs for raw materials, finished products, and energy. To achieve these targets, the designers of future plants are increasingly relying upon modeling and simulation to create virtual plants that allow them to evaluate design concepts without the expense of pilot-scale and demonstration facilities. Two of the more commonly used simulation tools include process simulators for describing the entire plant as a network of simplified equipment models and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) packages for modeling an isolated equipment item in great detail by accounting for complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been developed to combine process simulation software with CFD-based equipment simulation software so that design engineers can analyze and optimize the coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions that drive overall plant performance (Zitney et al., 2006). The process/CFD software integration was accomplished using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN interfaces.

  12. Hydrodynamic performance and cavitation of an open propeller in a simulated ice-blocked flow

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.; Bose, N.; Yamaguchi, H. )

    1994-08-01

    Experiments were done on a 200-mm-dia open propeller behind a simulated ice blockage in a cavitation tunnel. The propeller performance in uniform flow and blocked flow is contrasted over a range of advance coefficients and at different cavitation numbers. Mean thrust and torque coefficients are presented. The types of cavitation, and its intermittent nature over a cycle of operation, are reported. The experiments indicate the likelihood of cavitation at full scale for blocked conditions and illustrate the effects of cavitation on mean values of thrust and torque.

  13. Advanced studies on Simulation Methodologies for very Complicated Fracture Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Toshihisa

    2010-06-01

    Although nowadays, computational techniques are well developed, for Extremely Complicated Fracture Phenomena, they are still very difficult to simulate, for general engineers, researchers. To overcome many difficulties in those simulations, we have developed not only Simulation Methodologies but also theoretical basis and concepts. We sometimes observe extremely complicated fracture patterns, especially in dynamic fracture phenomena such as dynamic crack branching, kinking, curving, etc. For examples, although the humankind, from primitive men to modern scientists such as Albert Einstein had watched the post-mortem patterns of dynamic crack branching, the governing condition for the onset of the phenomena had been unsolved until our experimental study. From in these studies, we found the governing condition of dynamic crack bifurcation, as follows. When the total energy flux per unit time into a propagating crack tip reaches the material crack resistance, the crack braches into two cracks [total energy flux criterion]. The crack branches many times whenever the criterion is satisfied. Furthermore, the complexities also arise due to their time-dependence and/or their-deformation dependence. In order to make it possible to simulate such extremely complicated fracture phenomena, we developed many original advanced computational methods and technologies. These are (i)moving finite element method based on Delaunay automatic triangulation (MFEMBOAT), path independent,(ii) equivalent domain integral expression of the dynamic J integral associated with a continuous auxiliary function,(iii) Mixed phase path-prediction mode simulation, (iv) implicit path prediction criterion. In this paper, these advanced computational methods are thoroughly explained together with successful comparison with the experimental results. Since multiple dynamic crack branching phenomena may be most complicated fracture due to complicated fracture paths, and its time dependence (transient), this

  14. Virtual and Experimental Visualization of Flows in Packed Beds of Spheres Simulating Porous Media Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Athavale, M. M.; Lattime, S. B.; Braun, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    A videotape presentation of flow in a packed bed of spheres is provided. The flow experiment consisted of three principal elements: (1) an oil tunnel 76.2 mm by 76.2 mm in cross section, (2) a packed bed of spheres in regular and irregular arrays, and (3) a flow characterization methodology, either (a) full flow field tracking (FFFT) or (b) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation. The refraction indices of the oil and the test array of spheres were closely matched, and the flow was seeded with aluminum oxide particles. Planar laser light provided a two-dimensional projection of the flow field, and a traverse simulated a three-dimensional image of the entire flow field. Light focusing and reflection rendered the spheres black, permitting visualization of the planar circular interfaces in both the axial and transverse directions. Flows were observed near the wall-sphere interface and within the set of spheres. The CFD model required that a representative section of a packed bed be formed and gridded, enclosing and cutting six spheres so that symmetry conditions could be imposed at all cross-boundaries. Simulations had to be made with the flow direction at right angles to that used in the experiments, however, to take advantage of flow symmetry. Careful attention to detail was required for proper gridding. The flow field was three-dimensional and complex to describe, yet the most prominent finding was flow threads, as computed in the representative 'cube' of spheres with face symmetry and conclusively demonstrated experimentally herein. Random packing and bed voids tended to disrupt the laminar flow, creating vortices.

  15. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the third year of Phase III of this research. This is the Final Report of our activities on this research sponsored by the NASA LaRC.

  16. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the transfer of rocket engine flow simulation technology to work involving the development of blood pumps. Details are offered regarding the design and requirements of mechanical heart assist devices, or VADs (ventricular assist device). There are various computational fluid dynamics issues involved in the visualization of flow in such devices, and these are highlighted and compared to those of rocket turbopumps.

  17. Numerical simulation of supersonic wake flow with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Soetrisno, M.

    1995-07-01

    Simulating a supersonic wake flow field behind a conical body is a computing intensive task. It requires a large number of computational cells to capture the dominant flow physics and a robust numerical algorithm to obtain a reliable solution. High performance parallel computers with unique distributed processing and data storage capability can provide this need. They have larger computational memory and faster computing time than conventional vector computers. We apply the PINCA Navier-Stokes code to simulate a wind-tunnel supersonic wake experiment on Intel Gamma, Intel Paragon, and IBM SP2 parallel computers. These simulations are performed to study the mean flow in the near wake region of a sharp, 7-degree half-angle, adiabatic cone at Mach number 4.3 and freestream Reynolds number of 40,600. Overall the numerical solutions capture the general features of the hypersonic laminar wake flow and compare favorably with the wind tunnel data. With a refined and clustering grid distribution in the recirculation zone, the calculated location of the rear stagnation point is consistent with the 2D axisymmetric and 3D experiments. In this study, we also demonstrate the importance of having a large local memory capacity within a computer node and the effective utilization of the number of computer nodes to achieve good parallel performance when simulating a complex, large-scale wake flow problem.

  18. Simulating traffic flow with Lotus 1-2-3

    SciTech Connect

    Snelting, D.T.

    1986-07-01

    This article discusses the use of spreadsheet software in simulating traffic flow on an approach to a pretimed signalized intersection. Such a simulation model would serve the following purposes: 1. It could help traffic engineers realize the types of applications that are possible with spreadsheets or expand their current thinking in this area. 2. It should provide traffic engineers and transportation planners with a relatively simple tool for obtaining a ''feel'' for traffic flow characteristics. 3. Delay and stopping data generated from the model could be used to verify other research data and actual field data.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Incompressible Flows with Moving Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medale, Marc; Jaeger, Marc

    1997-03-01

    A numerical model has been developed for the 2D simulation of free surface flows or, more generally speaking, moving interface ones. The bulk fluids on both sides of the interface are taken into account in simulating the incompressible laminar flow state. In the case of heat transfer the whole system, i.e. walls as well as possible obstacles, is considered. This model is based on finite element analysis with an Eulerian approach and an unstructured fixed mesh. A special technique to localize the interface allows its temporal evolution through this mesh. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the model.

  20. Simulation of Inviscid Compressible Multi-Phase Flow with Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelleners, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Condensation of vapours in rapid expansions of compressible gases is investigated. In the case of high temperature gradients the condensation will start at conditions well away from thermodynamic equilibrium of the fluid. In those cases homogeneous condensation is dominant over heterogeneous condensation. The present work is concerned with development of a simulation tool for computation of high speed compressible flows with homogeneous condensation. The resulting ow solver should preferably be accurate and robust to be used for simulation of industrial flows in general geometries.

  1. Simulated tornado debris tracks: implications for inferring corner flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Michael; Lewellen, David

    2011-11-01

    A large collection of three-dimensional large eddy simulations of tornadoes with fine debris have been recently been performed as part of a longstanding effort at West Virginia University to understand tornado corner flow structure and dynamics. Debris removal and deposition is accounted for at the surface, in effect simulating formation of tornado surface marks. Physical origins and properties of the most prominent marks will be presented, and the possibility of inferring tornado corner flow structure from real marks in the field will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0635681 and AGS-1013154.

  2. Toward Automatic Verification of Goal-Oriented Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the power of adaptive mesh refinement with adjoint-based error estimates in verification of simulations governed by the steady Euler equations. The flow equations are discretized using a finite volume scheme on a Cartesian mesh with cut cells at the wall boundaries. The discretization error in selected simulation outputs is estimated using the method of adjoint-weighted residuals. Practical aspects of the implementation are emphasized, particularly in the formulation of the refinement criterion and the mesh adaptation strategy. Following a thorough code verification example, we demonstrate simulation verification of two- and three-dimensional problems. These involve an airfoil performance database, a pressure signature of a body in supersonic flow and a launch abort with strong jet interactions. The results show reliable estimates and automatic control of discretization error in all simulations at an affordable computational cost. Moreover, the approach remains effective even when theoretical assumptions, e.g., steady-state and solution smoothness, are relaxed.

  3. A heterogeneous computing environment for simulating astrophysical fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazes, J.

    1994-01-01

    In the Concurrent Computing Laboratory in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Louisiana State University we have constructed a heterogeneous computing environment that permits us to routinely simulate complicated three-dimensional fluid flows and to readily visualize the results of each simulation via three-dimensional animation sequences. An 8192-node MasPar MP-1 computer with 0.5 GBytes of RAM provides 250 MFlops of execution speed for our fluid flow simulations. Utilizing the parallel virtual machine (PVM) language, at periodic intervals data is automatically transferred from the MP-1 to a cluster of workstations where individual three-dimensional images are rendered for inclusion in a single animation sequence. Work is underway to replace executions on the MP-1 with simulations performed on the 512-node CM-5 at NCSA and to simultaneously gain access to more potent volume rendering workstations.

  4. Pore-scale simulation of laminar flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, M.; Casagrande, D.; Schena, G.; Santini, M.

    2014-04-01

    The experimental investigation of flow through porous media is inherently difficult due to the lack of optical access. The recent developments in the fields of X-ray micro-tomography (micro-CT hereafter), digital sample reconstruction by image-processing techniques and fluid-dynamics simulation, together with the increasing power of super-computers, allow to carry out pore-scale simulations through digitally-reconstructed porous samples. The scientific relevance of pore-scale simulations lies in the possibility of upscaling the pore-level data, yielding volume-averaged quantities useful for practical purposes. One of the best-known examples of upscaling is the calculation of absolute and relative permeability of reservoir rocks. This contribution presents a complete work-flow for setting up pore-scale simulations, starting from the micro-CT of a (in general small) porous sample. Relevant applications are discussed in order to reveal the potential of the proposed methodology.

  5. Numerical simulation of flow in a horizontal channel with multiple cross-flow inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pranab N.; Smith, Chuck; Metcalfe, Ralph W.

    2014-11-01

    Flow in a horizontal channel with multiple cross-flow inlets was studied numerically. Based on Reynolds and Mach number analysis of data obtained from a horizontal natural gas well having 31 completion stages, measured at two different times in the production cycle, it was determined that an incompressible flow model may be applied to study a large fraction of the wellbore. Using five cross-flow inlets, the existence of three basic flow regimes - trickle flow, partially blocked flow and fully blocked flow - were identified with respect to the blocking of upstream inlets by the downstream ones. The existence of these flow regimes is consistent with field data. A lumped-parameter model for pressure drop was used to simulate large axial distances between two inlets. A pressure boundary condition was employed at each inlet to simulate a linearly depleting reservoir. This was used to study the dynamic interaction between the inlets in the channel. The characteristic time scales related to the transient depletion were identified and analyzed. The transition of flow regimes is consistent with the trends observed from field data and gives an insight into the behavior of horizontal wells. Supported in part by Apache Corp., Houston.

  6. Vortical flow aerodynamics - Physical aspects and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, Richard W.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress in the numerical simulation of vortical flow due to three-dimensional flow separation about flight vehicles at high angles of attack and quasi-steady flight conditions is surveyed. Primary emphasis is placed on Euler and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes methods where the vortices are 'captured' as a solution to the governing equations. A discussion of the relevant flow physics provides a perspective from which to assess numerical solutions. Current numerical prediction capabilities and their evolutionary development are surveyed. Future trends and challenges are identified and discussed.

  7. Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Systems in Simulated Airline Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving laminar flow on the wings of a commercial transport involves difficult problems associated with the wing leading edge. The NASA Leading Edge Flight Test Program has made major progress toward the solution of these problems. The effectiveness and practicality of candidate laminar flow leading edge systems were proven under representative airline service conditions. This was accomplished in a series of simulated airline service flights by modifying a JetStar aircraft with laminar flow leading edge systems and operating it out of three commercial airports in the United States. The aircraft was operated as an airliner would under actual air traffic conditions, in bad weather, and in insect infested environments.

  8. Direct simulations of turbulent flow using finite-difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Moin, Parviz

    1989-01-01

    A high-order accurate finite-difference approach is presented for calculating incompressible turbulent flow. The methods used include a kinetic energy conserving central difference scheme and an upwind difference scheme. The methods are evaluated in test cases for the evolution of small-amplitude disturbances and fully developed turbulent channel flow. It is suggested that the finite-difference approach can be applied to complex geometries more easilty than highly accurate spectral methods. It is concluded that the upwind scheme is a good candidate for direct simulations of turbulent flows over complex geometries.

  9. Numerical simulation of low Mach number reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Aspden, Andrew J.; Day, Marcus S.; Lijewski,Michael J.

    2007-06-20

    Using examples from active research areas in combustion andastrophysics, we demonstrate a computationally efficient numericalapproach for simulating multiscale low Mach number reacting flows. Themethod enables simulations that incorporate an unprecedented range oftemporal and spatial scales, while at the same time, allows an extremelyhigh degree of reaction fidelity. Sample applications demonstrate theefficiency of the approach with respect to a traditional time-explicitintegration method, and the utility of the methodology for studying theinteraction of turbulence with terrestrial and astrophysical flamestructures.

  10. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  11. Dynamic unified RANS-LES simulations of high Reynolds number separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtarpoor, Reza; Heinz, Stefan; Stoellinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The development of hybrid RANS-LES methods is seen to be a very promising approach to enable efficient simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows involving flow separation. To contribute to further advances, we present a new, theoretically well based, dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method, referred to as DLUM. It is applied to a high Reynolds number flow involving both attached and separated flow regimes: a periodic hill flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 37 000. Its performance is compared to pure LES, pure RANS, other hybrid RANS-LES (given by DLUM modifications), and experimental observations. It is shown that the use of this computational method offers huge cost reductions (which scale with Re/200, Re refers to the Reynolds number) of very high Reynolds number flow simulations compared to LES, it is much more accurate than RANS, and more accurate than LES, which is not fully resolved. In particular, this conclusion does also apply to the comparison of DLUM and pure LES simulations on rather coarse grids, which are often simply required to deal with simulations of very high Reynolds number flows: the DLUM provides mean velocity fields which are hardly affected by the grid, whereas LES velocity fields reveal significant shortcomings. We identified the reason for the superior performance of our new dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method compared to LES: it is the model's ability to respond to a changing resolution with adequate turbulent viscosity changes by ensuring simultaneously a physically correct turbulence length scale specification under the presence of interacting RANS and LES modes.

  12. Wind Flow Simulation Around NASA KSC Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, B. T.; Verdier, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    A model of the wind flow conditions around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VA B) is presented. An incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver was used to compute the flow field around fixed Launch Complex 39 (LC-39) buildings and structures. The 3-D flow field. including velocity magnitude and velocity vectors, was established to simulate the localized wind speeds and directions at specified locations in and around LC-39 buildings and structures. The results of this study not only help explain the physical phenomena of the flow patterns around LC-39 buildings but also are useful to the Shuttle personnel. Current Operations and Maintenance Requirements and Specifications (OMRS) for vehicle transfer operations are based on empirically derived historical data, and no detailed mathematical analysis of wind conditions around LC-39 structures has ever been accomplished.

  13. Simulation of blood flow through an artificial heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee; Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan

    1991-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the incompressible viscous flow through a prosthetic tilting disk heart valve is presented in order to demonstrate the current capability to model unsteady flows with moving boundaries. Both steady state and unsteady flow calculations are done by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in 3-D generalized curvilinear coordinates. In order to handle the moving boundary problems, the chimera grid embedding scheme which decomposes a complex computational domain into several simple subdomains is used. An algebraic turbulence model for internal flows is incorporated to reach the physiological values of Reynolds number. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical results and experimental measurements. It is found that the tilting disk valve causes large regions of separated flow, and regions of high shear.

  14. A Numerical simulation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G.; Biringen, S.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 7500 is described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 by 33 by 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and which are characteristic of various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streak-like formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), implementation of subgrid-scale terms are necessary to obtain proper turbulent statistics.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Canted Nozzle and Scarfed Nozzle Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used for the analysis of issues concerning non-conventional (canted and scarfed) nozzle flow fields. Numerical simulations are carried out for the quality of flow in terms of axisymmetric nature at the inlet of canted nozzles of a rocket motor. Two different nozzle geometries are examined. The analysis of these simulation results shows that the flow field at the entry of the nozzles is non axisymmetric at the start of the motor. With time this asymmetry diminishes, also the flow becomes symmetric before the nozzle throat, indicating no misalignment of thrust vector with the nozzle axis. The qualitative flow fields at the inlet of the nozzles are used in selecting the geometry with lesser flow asymmetry. Further CFD methodology is used to analyse flow field of a scarfed nozzle for the evaluation of thrust developed and its direction. This work demonstrates the capability of the CFD based methods for the nozzle analysis problems which were earlier solved only approximately by making simplifying assumptions and semi empirical methods.

  16. Numerical simulation of non-Newtonian free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.; Azaiez, J.

    1993-01-01

    Free shear flows, like those of mixing layers, are encountered in aerodynamics, in the atmosphere, and in the ocean as well as in many industrial applications such as flow reactors or combustion chambers. It is, therefore, crucial to understand the mechanisms governing the process of transition to turbulence in order to predict and control the evolution of the flow. Delaying transition to turbulence as far downstream as possible allows a gain in energy expenditure while accelerating the transition can be of interest in processes where high mixing is desired. Various methods, including the use of polymer additives, can be effective in controlling fluid flows. The drag reduction obtained by the addition of small amounts of high polymers has been an active area of research for the last three decades. It is now widely believed that polymer additives can affect the stability of a large variety of flows and that dilute solutions of these polymers have been shown to produce drag reductions of over 80 percent in internal flows and over 60 percent in external flows under a wide range of conditions. The major thrust of this work is to study the effects of polymer additives on the stability of the incompressible mixing layer through large scale numerical simulations. In particular, we focus on the two dimensional flow and examine how the presence of viscoelasticity may affect the typical structures of the flow, namely roll-up and pairing of vortices.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  18. Advanced Virtual Reality Simulations in Aerospace Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, L.; Trivailo, P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent research developments at Aerospace Engineering, RMIT University have demonstrated great potential for using Virtual Reality simulations as a very effective tool in advanced structures and dynamics applications. They have also been extremely successful in teaching of various undergraduate and postgraduate courses for presenting complex concepts in structural and dynamics designs. Characteristic examples are related to the classical orbital mechanics, spacecraft attitude and structural dynamics. Advanced simulations, reflecting current research by the authors, are mainly related to the implementation of various non-linear dynamic techniques, including using Kane's equations to study dynamics of space tethered satellite systems and the Co-rotational Finite Element method to study reconfigurable robotic systems undergoing large rotations and large translations. The current article will describe the numerical implementation of the modern methods of dynamics, and will concentrate on the post-processing stage of the dynamic simulations. Numerous examples of building Virtual Reality stand-alone animations, designed by the authors, will be discussed in detail. These virtual reality examples will include: The striking feature of the developed technology is the use of the standard mathematical packages, like MATLAB, as a post-processing tool to generate Virtual Reality Modelling Language files with brilliant interactive, graphics and audio effects. These stand-alone demonstration files can be run under Netscape or Microsoft Explorer and do not require MATLAB. Use of this technology enables scientists to easily share their results with colleagues using the Internet, contributing to the flexible learning development at schools and Universities.

  19. DNSLab: A gateway to turbulent flow simulation in Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorinen, V.; Keskinen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research is increasingly much focused towards computationally intensive, eddy resolving simulation techniques of turbulent flows such as large-eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, we present a compact educational software package called DNSLab, tailored for learning partial differential equations of turbulence from the perspective of DNS in Matlab environment. Based on educational experiences and course feedback from tens of engineering post-graduate students and industrial engineers, DNSLab can offer a major gateway to turbulence simulation with minimal prerequisites. Matlab implementation of two common fractional step projection methods is considered: the 2d Fourier pseudo-spectral method, and the 3d finite difference method with 2nd order spatial accuracy. Both methods are based on vectorization in Matlab and the slow for-loops are thus avoided. DNSLab is tested on two basic problems which we have noted to be of high educational value: 2d periodic array of decaying vortices, and 3d turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 180. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is possibly the first to investigate efficiency of a 3d turbulent, wall bounded flow in Matlab. The accuracy and efficiency of DNSLab is compared with a customized OpenFOAM solver called rk4projectionFoam. Based on our experiences and course feedback, the main contribution of DNSLab consists of the following features. (i) The very compact Matlab implementation of present Navier-Stokes solvers provides a gateway to efficient learning of both, physics of turbulent flows, and simulation of turbulence. (ii) Only relatively minor prerequisites on fluid dynamics and numerical methods are required for using DNSLab. (iii) In 2d, interactive results for turbulent flow cases can be obtained. Even for a 3d channel flow, the solver is fast enough for nearly interactive educational use. (iv) DNSLab is made openly available and thus contributing to

  20. Some Developments of the Equilibrium Particle Simulation Method for the Direct Simulation of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrossan, M. N.

    1995-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the established technique for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. In some flows of engineering interest, such as occur for aero-braking spacecraft in the upper atmosphere, DSMC can become prohibitively expensive in CPU time because some regions of the flow, particularly on the windward side of blunt bodies, become collision dominated. As an alternative to using a hybrid DSMC and continuum gas solver (Euler or Navier-Stokes solver) this work is aimed at making the particle simulation method efficient in the high density regions of the flow. A high density, infinite collision rate limit of DSMC, the Equilibrium Particle Simulation method (EPSM) was proposed some 15 years ago. EPSM is developed here for the flow of a gas consisting of many different species of molecules and is shown to be computationally efficient (compared to DSMC) for high collision rate flows. It thus offers great potential as part of a hybrid DSMC/EPSM code which could handle flows in the transition regime between rarefied gas flows and fully continuum flows. As a first step towards this goal a pure EPSM code is described. The next step of combining DSMC and EPSM is not attempted here but should be straightforward. EPSM and DSMC are applied to Taylor-Couette flow with Kn = 0.02 and 0.0133 and S(omega) = 3). Toroidal vortices develop for both methods but some differences are found, as might be expected for the given flow conditions. EPSM appears to be less sensitive to the sequence of random numbers used in the simulation than is DSMC and may also be more dissipative. The question of the origin and the magnitude of the dissipation in EPSM is addressed. It is suggested that this analysis is also relevant to DSMC when the usual accuracy requirements on the cell size and decoupling time step are relaxed in the interests of computational efficiency.

  1. Numerical simulation of the decay of swirling flow in a constant volume engine simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1986-05-01

    The KIVA and COYOTE computer programs were used to simulate the decay of turbulent swirling flow in a constant-volume combustion bomb. The results are in satisfactory agreement with the measurement of both swirl velocity and temperature. Predictions of secondary flows and suggestions for future research also are presented. 14 refs., 15 figs.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Rapidly Rotating Boundary-Coupled Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Michael Andrew

    Many of the large-scale fluid systems present on and within the Earth, other planetary bodies in the Solar System, and throughout our universe are characterized by large length scales, weak viscous forces, and a rapid background rotation. The combination of these attributes with various forcing mechanisms results in unique fluid dynamical phenomena that dictate the evolutionary path of our universe. However, even for relatively small fluid velocities (e.g. 10-4 m s-1), these systems are often characterized by large Reynolds numbers and the presence of localized boundary layers due to sharp hydrodynamic, thermal, chemical, or magnetic gradients that render laboratory or numerical modeling difficult. Furthermore, geophysical and planetary fluid flows often interact in a complex manner with bounding solid surfaces that result in further difficulties. Physical and mathematical simplifications are thus paramount for advancing our understanding of these fluid systems. In this document we explain our approach at attempting to understand two problems in the field of geophysical fluid dynamics using simplified, two-dimensional numerical simulations. Studies have shown that angular momentum is exchanged between the Earth's liquid outer core and solid mantle, resulting in measurable changes in the rotation rate of the Earth. The physical mechanism responsible for this exchange is not currently understood. One possibility is the interaction of flow in the core with topography present along the core-mantle boundary. Towards this end, we employ a quasi-two-dimensional thermal convection model in a spherical shell to carry out the first detailed study on the effects of core-mantle boundary topography. We find that the presence of topography can generate a spatially heterogeneous flow field and azimuthally dependent heat flux along the inner and outer boundaries. The total heat transfer and azimuthal velocities are typically enhanced in the presence of the topography. These

  3. Numerical simulation of turbidity current flow and sedimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, J.

    1992-01-01

    A computer-based numerical model of turbidity-current flow and sedimentation has been developed by integrating geological observations with basic equations for fluid and sediment motion. The model emphasizes water mixing across the upper boundary, particle-concentration controls on sediment support and flow dynamics, and sediment fractionation during sedimentation. The model includes three numerical components: (1) a sedimentation/fluidization model for quantifying sediment-size fractionation in sedimenting multi-component suspensions; (2) a concentration-viscosity model for quantifying the changes in density and viscosity of high-concentrated sediment suspensions; and (3) a layer-averaged flow model for tracing downslope flow evolution using continuity and momentum equations. The resulting simulation monitors the sedimentation history of layer-averaged turbidity flows over submarine slopes in terms of the evolution of flow velocity, thickness, and sediment concentration and the resulting rate of sedimentation and sediment size fractionation in a longitudinal section of the flow. The model generates turbidites and outputs downslope variations in their thickness and grain-size structuring. The model is tested by reference to modern turbidity currents in Bute Inlet, British Columbia. Using initial and boundary conditions approximating those of Bute Inlet yields model flows that show downslope evolutions and deposit turbidites closely resembling their natural counterparts. Additional flow experiments provide quantitative evaluation of the effects of basin geometry, sediment concentration, and sediment sources on the formation and properties of turbidites. Experimental high-concentration flows show much higher downslope velocities and lower sediment-setting velocities than more dilute flows, resulting in longer sediment-transport. Model turbidites formed by high-concentration and low-concentration flows show both distribution and coarse-tail grading.

  4. Simulated herbivory advances autumn phenology in Acer rubrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkner, Rebecca E.

    2014-05-01

    To determine the degree to which herbivory contributes to phenotypic variation in autumn phenology for deciduous trees, red maple ( Acer rubrum) branches were subjected to low and high levels of simulated herbivory and surveyed at the end of the season to assess abscission and degree of autumn coloration. Overall, branches with simulated herbivory abscised ˜7 % more leaves at each autumn survey date than did control branches within trees. While branches subjected to high levels of damage showed advanced phenology, abscission rates did not differ from those of undamaged branches within trees because heavy damage induced earlier leaf loss on adjacent branch nodes in this treatment. Damaged branches had greater proportions of leaf area colored than undamaged branches within trees, having twice the amount of leaf area colored at the onset of autumn and having ˜16 % greater leaf area colored in late October when nearly all leaves were colored. When senescence was scored as the percent of all leaves abscised and/or colored, branches in both treatments reached peak senescence earlier than did control branches within trees: dates of 50 % senescence occurred 2.5 days earlier for low herbivory branches and 9.7 days earlier for branches with high levels of simulated damage. These advanced rates are of the same time length as reported delays in autumn senescence and advances in spring onset due to climate warming. Thus, results suggest that should insect damage increase as a consequence of climate change, it may offset a lengthening of leaf life spans in some tree species.

  5. Simulated herbivory advances autumn phenology in Acer rubrum.

    PubMed

    Forkner, Rebecca E

    2014-05-01

    To determine the degree to which herbivory contributes to phenotypic variation in autumn phenology for deciduous trees, red maple (Acer rubrum) branches were subjected to low and high levels of simulated herbivory and surveyed at the end of the season to assess abscission and degree of autumn coloration. Overall, branches with simulated herbivory abscised ∼7 % more leaves at each autumn survey date than did control branches within trees. While branches subjected to high levels of damage showed advanced phenology, abscission rates did not differ from those of undamaged branches within trees because heavy damage induced earlier leaf loss on adjacent branch nodes in this treatment. Damaged branches had greater proportions of leaf area colored than undamaged branches within trees, having twice the amount of leaf area colored at the onset of autumn and having ~16 % greater leaf area colored in late October when nearly all leaves were colored. When senescence was scored as the percent of all leaves abscised and/or colored, branches in both treatments reached peak senescence earlier than did control branches within trees: dates of 50 % senescence occurred 2.5 days earlier for low herbivory branches and 9.7 days earlier for branches with high levels of simulated damage. These advanced rates are of the same time length as reported delays in autumn senescence and advances in spring onset due to climate warming. Thus, results suggest that should insect damage increase as a consequence of climate change, it may offset a lengthening of leaf life spans in some tree species.

  6. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    WALTZ,R.E; CANDY,J; HINTON,F.L; ESTRADA-MILA,C; KINSEY,J.E

    2004-10-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite {beta}, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius ({rho}{sub *}) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated.

  7. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Zuo, G Z; Hu, J S; Sun, Z; Yang, Q X; Li, J G; Zakharov, L E; Xie, H; Chen, Z X

    2015-02-01

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a "first," or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak-both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST. PMID:25725839

  8. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Yang, Q. X.; Li, J. G.; Xie, H.; Chen, Z. X.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2015-02-15

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a “first,” or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak—both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST.

  9. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Zuo, G Z; Hu, J S; Sun, Z; Yang, Q X; Li, J G; Zakharov, L E; Xie, H; Chen, Z X

    2015-02-01

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a "first," or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak-both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST.

  10. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) - Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a US-led concept for a next-generation instrument in ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The most important design requirement for AGIS is a sensitivity of about 10 times greater than current observatories like Veritas, H.E.S.S or MAGIC. We present results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance, collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity are discussed.

  11. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.; Vassiliev, V.V.; /UCLA

    2011-06-14

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory being planned in the U.S. The anticipated sensitivity of AGIS is about one order of magnitude better than the sensitivity of current observatories, allowing it to measure gamma-ray emission from a large number of Galactic and extra-galactic sources. We present here results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance - collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity - are discussed.

  12. Unsteady 3D flow simulations in cranial arterial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph; Karniadakis, George

    2008-11-01

    High resolution unsteady 3D flow simulations in major cranial arteries have been performed. Two cases were considered: 1) a healthy volunteer with a complete Circle of Willis (CoW); and 2) a patient with hydrocephalus and an incomplete CoW. Computation was performed on 3344 processors of the new half petaflop supercomputer in TACC. Two new numerical approaches were developed and implemented: 1) a new two-level domain decomposition method, which couples continuous and discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the computational domain; and 2) a new type of outflow boundary conditions, which imposes, in an accurate and computationally efficient manner, clinically measured flow rates. In the first simulation, a geometric model of 65 cranial arteries was reconstructed. Our simulation reveals a high degree of asymmetry in the flow at the left and right parts of the CoW and the presence of swirling flow in most of the CoW arteries. In the second simulation, one of the main findings was a high pressure drop at the right anterior communicating artery (PCA). Due to the incompleteness of the CoW and the pressure drop at the PCA, the right internal carotid artery supplies blood to most regions of the brain.

  13. Pockels-effect cell for gas-flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A Pockels effect cell using a 75 cu cm DK*P crystal was developed and used as a gas flow simulator. Index of refraction gradients were produced in the cell by the fringing fields of parallel plate electrodes. Calibration curves for the device were obtained for index of refraction gradients in excess of .00025 m.

  14. Water Flow Simulation using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Berg, Jared; Harris, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of water flow from the rainbird nozzles has been accomplished using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The advantage of using SPH is that no meshing is required, thus the grid quality is no longer an issue and accuracy can be improved.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Ferrofluid Flow for Subsurface Environmental Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Moridis, George J.

    1997-05-05

    Ferrofluids are suspensions of magnetic particles of diameter approximately 10 nm stabilized by surfactants in carrier liquids. The large magnetic susceptibility of ferrofluids allows the mobilization of ferrofluid through permeable rock and soil by the application of strong external magnetic fields. We have developed simulation capabilities for both miscible and immiscible conceptualizations of ferrofluid flow through porous media in response to magnetic forces arising from the magnetic field of a rectangular permanent magnet. The flow of ferrofluid is caused by the magnetization of the particles and their attraction toward a magnet, regardless of the orientation of the magnet. The steps involved in calculating the flow of ferrofluid are (1) calculation of the external magnetic field, (2) calculation of the gradient of the external magnetic field, (3) calculation of the magnetization of the ferrofluid, and (4) assembly of the magnetic body force term and addition of this term to the standard pressure gradient and gravity force terms. We compare numerical simulations to laboratory measurements of the magnetic field, fluid pressures, and the two-dimensional flow of ferrofluid to demonstrate the applicability of the methods coded in the numerical simulators. We present an example of the use of the simulator for a field-scale application of ferrofluids for barrier verification.

  16. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  17. Advanced simulations of optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumeyr, T.; Billing, M. G.; Bobb, L. M.; Bolzon, B.; Bravin, E.; Karataev, P.; Kruchinin, K.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.

    2015-04-01

    Charged particle beam diagnostics is a key task in modern and future accelerator installations. The diagnostic tools are practically the "eyes" of the operators. The precision and resolution of the diagnostic equipment are crucial to define the performance of the accelerator. Transition and diffraction radiation (TR and DR) are widely used for electron beam parameter monitoring. However, the precision and resolution of those devices are determined by how well the production, transport and detection of these radiation types are understood. This paper reports on simulations of TR and DR spatial-spectral characteristics using the physical optics propagation (POP) mode of the Zemax advanced optics simulation software. A good consistency with theory is demonstrated. Also, realistic optical system alignment issues are discussed.

  18. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Paul, Kevin; Mullowney, Paul J.; Messmer, Peter; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Leemans, Wim; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-22

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating >10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of {approx}2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  19. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  20. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  1. Flow Simulation of N2B Hybrid Wing Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoungjin; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    The N2B hybrid wing body aircraft was conceptually designed to meet environmental and performance goals for the N+2 generation transport set by the subsonic fixed wing project. In this study, flow fields around the N2B configuration is simulated using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver using unstructured meshes. Boundary conditions at engine fan face and nozzle exhaust planes are provided by response surfaces of the NPSS thermodynamic engine cycle model. The present flow simulations reveal challenging design issues arising from boundary layer ingestion offset inlet and nacelle-airframe interference. The N2B configuration can be a good test bed for application of multidisciplinary design optimization technology.

  2. DEM simulation of granular flow in a Couette device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyapati, Vidyapati; Kheripour Langrudi, M.; Tardos, Gabriel; Sun, Jin; Sundaresan, Sankaran; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2009-11-01

    We study the shear motion of granular material in an annular shear cell operated in batch and continuous modes. In order to quantitatively simulate shear behavior of granular material composed of spherical shaped grains, a 3D discrete element method (DEM) is used. The ultimate goal of the present work is to compare DEM results for the normal and shear stresses in stationary and moving granular beds confined in Couette device with experimental results. The DEM captures the experimental observation of transition behavior from quasi-- static (in batch mode operation) to rapid flow (in continuous mode operation) regime of granular flows. Although there are quantitative differences between DEM model predictions and experiments, the qualitative features are nicely reproduced. It is observed (both in experiments and in simulations) that the intermediate regime is broad enough to require a critical assessment of continuum models for granular flows.

  3. Numerical simulation of transitional flows with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kožíšek, Martin; Příhoda, Jaromír; Fürst, Jiří; Straka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The contribution deals with simulation of internal flows with the laminar/turbulent transition and heat transfer. The numerical modeling of incompressible flow on a heated flat plate was carried out partly by the k-kL-ω model of Walters and Cokljat [1] and partly by the algebraic transition model of Straka and Příhoda [2] connected with the EARSM turbulence model of Hellsten [3]. Transition models were tested by means of the skin friction and the Stanton number distribution. Used models of turbulent heat transfer were compared with the simplest model based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number. The k-kL-ω model is applied for the simulation of compressible flow through the VKI turbine blade cascade with heat transfer.

  4. Numerical simulations of unsteady reactive flows in a combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kailasanath, K.; Gardner, J.H.; Oran, E.S.; Boris, J.P. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on a potentially important source of large-pressure oscillations in combustors that is an instability induced by the interactions between large-scale vortex structures, acoustic waves, and chemical energy release. To study these interactions, we have performed time-dependent, compressible numerical simulations of the flow field in an idealized ramjet consisting of an axisymmetric inlet and combustor and a choked nozzle. Both reactive and nonreactive flows have been simulated. The nonreactive flow calculations show complex interactions among the natural instability frequency of the shear layer at the inlet-combustor junction and the acoustics of both the inlet and the combustor. Vortex shedding occurs at the natural instability frequency of the shear layer but vortex mergings are affected by the acoustic frequencies of the system. The entire flow oscillates at a low frequency that corresponds to that of a quarter-wave mode in the inlet. For the particular reactive flow case studies, energy release alters the flow field substantially.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Je, Jongdoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to suggest a proper boundary condition at the interface between a permeable block and turbulent channel flow and to investigate the characteristics of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls. The boundary condition suggested is an extended version of that applied to laminar channel flow by Beavers & Joseph (1967) and describes the behaviour of slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the permeable block and turbulent channel flow. With the proposed boundary condition, direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow that is bounded by the permeable wall are performed and significant skin-friction reductions at the permeable wall are obtained with modification of overall flow structures. The viscous sublayer thickness is decreased and the near-wall vortical structures are significantly weakened by the permeable wall. The permeable wall also reduces the turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress, and pressure and vorticity fluctuations throughout the channel except very near the wall. The increase of some turbulence quantities there is due to the slip-velocity fluctuations at the wall. The boundary condition proposed for the permeable wall is validated by comparing solutions with those obtained from a separate direct numerical simulation using both the Brinkman equation for the interior of a permeable block and the Navier Stokes equation for the main channel bounded by a permeable block.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a channel with different types of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnov, Igor A.

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) was performed for turbulent channel flow (Reτ = 400) for two types of wall surface roughness and well as smooth walls. The roughness elements of first type were assumed to be two-dimensional, transverse square rods positioned on both walls in a non-staggered arrangement. The height of the rods corresponds to y+ = 13.6 and thus extends in the buffer layer. The second type of roughness was represented by a set of hemispherical obstacles (height of y+ = 10) located on both channel walls and arranged on a square lattice. The presented simulations are part of benchmark problems defined by thermal-hydraulics focus area of the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL). This problem simulates the effect of the presence of growing bubbles on the walls of nuclear reactor fuel rods and aimed on evaluating CFD capabilities of various codes before applying them to more advanced problems. Mean turbulent quantities were computed and compared with available analytical and experimental results. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the performance of other LES and RANS codes on this benchmark problem. Supported by Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL).

  7. Sensitivity and variability redux in hot-Jupiter flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. Y.-K.; Polichtchouk, I.; Thrastarson, H. Th.

    2015-12-01

    We revisit the issues of sensitivity to initial flow and intrinsic variability in hot-Jupiter atmospheric flow simulations, issues originally investigated by Cho et al. and Thrastarson & Cho. The flow in the lower region (˜1 to 20 MPa) `dragged' to immobility and uniform temperature on a very short time-scale, as in Liu & Showman, leads to effectively a complete cessation of variability as well as sensitivity in three-dimensional (3D) simulations with traditional primitive equations. Such momentum (Rayleigh) and thermal (Newtonian) drags are, however, ad hoc for 3D giant planet simulations. For 3D hot-Jupiter simulations, which typically already employ a strong Newtonian drag in the upper region, sensitivity is not quenched if only the Newtonian drag is applied in the lower region, without the strong Rayleigh drag: in general, both sensitivity and variability persist if the two drags are not applied concurrently in the lower region. However, even when the drags are applied concurrently, vertically propagating planetary waves give rise to significant variability in the ˜0.05-0.5 MPa region, if the vertical resolution of the lower region is increased (e.g. here with 1000 layers for the entire domain). New observations on the effects of the physical setup and model convergence in `deep' atmosphere simulations are also presented.

  8. Density Weighted FDF Equations for Simulations of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we briefly revisit the formulation of density weighted filtered density function (DW-FDF) for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent reacting flows, which was proposed by Jaberi et al. (Jaberi, F.A., Colucci, P.J., James, S., Givi, P. and Pope, S.B., Filtered mass density function for Large-eddy simulation of turbulent reacting flows, J. Fluid Mech., vol. 401, pp. 85-121, 1999). At first, we proceed the traditional derivation of the DW-FDF equations by using the fine grained probability density function (FG-PDF), then we explore another way of constructing the DW-FDF equations by starting directly from the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. We observe that the terms which are unclosed in the traditional DW-FDF equations are now closed in the newly constructed DW-FDF equations. This significant difference and its practical impact on the computational simulations may deserve further studies.

  9. Toward the large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Speziale, C. G.; Zang, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    New subgrid-scale models for the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows are developed based on the Favre-filtered equations of motion for an ideal gas. A compressible generalization of the linear combination of the Smagorinsky model and scale-similarity model (in terms of Favre-filtered fields) is obtained for the subgrid-scale stress tensor. An analogous thermal linear combination model is also developed for the subgrid-scale heat flux vector. The three dimensionless constants associated with these subgrid-scale models are obtained by correlating with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence performed on a 96 to the third power grid using Fourier collocation methods. Extensive comparisons between the direct and modeled subgrid-scale fields are provided in order to validate the models. Future applications of these compressible subgrid-scale models to the large-eddy simulation of supersonic aerodynamic flows are discussed briefly.

  10. Advanced radiometric and interferometric milimeter-wave scene simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauss, B. I.; Moffa, P. J.; Steele, W. G.; Agravante, H.; Davidheiser, R.; Samec, T.; Young, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Smart munitions and weapons utilize various imaging sensors (including passive IR, active and passive millimeter-wave, and visible wavebands) to detect/identify targets at short standoff ranges and in varied terrain backgrounds. In order to design and evaluate these sensors under a variety of conditions, a high-fidelity scene simulation capability is necessary. Such a capability for passive millimeter-wave scene simulation exists at TRW. TRW's Advanced Radiometric Millimeter-Wave Scene Simulation (ARMSS) code is a rigorous, benchmarked, end-to-end passive millimeter-wave scene simulation code for interpreting millimeter-wave data, establishing scene signatures and evaluating sensor performance. In passive millimeter-wave imaging, resolution is limited due to wavelength and aperture size. Where high resolution is required, the utility of passive millimeter-wave imaging is confined to short ranges. Recent developments in interferometry have made possible high resolution applications on military platforms. Interferometry or synthetic aperture radiometry allows the creation of a high resolution image with a sparsely filled aperture. Borrowing from research work in radio astronomy, we have developed and tested at TRW scene reconstruction algorithms that allow the recovery of the scene from a relatively small number of spatial frequency components. In this paper, the TRW modeling capability is described and numerical results are presented.

  11. Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

  12. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  13. Graphics simulation and training aids for advanced teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.; Schenker, Paul S.; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1993-01-01

    Graphics displays can be of significant aid in accomplishing a teleoperation task throughout all three phases of off-line task analysis and planning, operator training, and online operation. In the first phase, graphics displays provide substantial aid to investigate work cell layout, motion planning with collision detection and with possible redundancy resolution, and planning for camera views. In the second phase, graphics displays can serve as very useful tools for introductory training of operators before training them on actual hardware. In the third phase, graphics displays can be used for previewing planned motions and monitoring actual motions in any desired viewing angle, or, when communication time delay prevails, for providing predictive graphics overlay on the actual camera view of the remote site to show the non-time-delayed consequences of commanded motions in real time. This paper addresses potential space applications of graphics displays in all three operational phases of advanced teleoperation. Possible applications are illustrated with techniques developed and demonstrated in the Advanced Teleoperation Laboratory at JPL. The examples described include task analysis and planning of a simulated Solar Maximum Satellite Repair task, a novel force-reflecting teleoperation simulator for operator training, and preview and predictive displays for on-line operations.

  14. Investigation of the Flow Physics Driving Stall-Side Flutter in Advanced Forward Swept Fan Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Albert J.; Liu, Jong S.; Panovsky, Josef; Bakhle, Milind A.; Stefko, George; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2003-01-01

    Flutter-free operation of advanced transonic fan designs continues to be a challenging task for the designers of aircraft engines. In order to meet the demands of increased performance and lighter weight, these modern fan designs usually feature low-aspect ratio shroudless rotor blade designs that make the task of achieving adequate flutter margin even more challenging for the aeroelastician. This is especially true for advanced forward swept designs that encompass an entirely new design space compared to previous experience. Fortunately, advances in unsteady computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques over the past decade now provide an analysis capability that can be used to quantitatively assess the aeroelastic characteristics of these next generation fans during the design cycle. For aeroelastic applications, Mississippi State University and NASA Glenn Research Center have developed the CFD code TURBO-AE. This code is a time-accurate three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes unsteady flow solver developed for axial-flow turbomachinery that can model multiple blade rows undergoing harmonic oscillations with arbitrary interblade phase angles, i.e., nodal diameter patterns. Details of the code can be found in Chen et al. (1993, 1994), Bakhle et al. (1997, 1998), and Srivastava et al. (1999). To assess aeroelastic stability, the work-per-cycle from TURBO-AE is converted to the critical damping ratio since this value is more physically meaningful, with both the unsteady normal pressure and viscous shear forces included in the work-per-cycle calculation. If the total damping (aerodynamic plus mechanical) is negative, then the blade is unstable since it extracts energy from the flow field over the vibration cycle. TURBO-AE is an integral part of an aeroelastic design system being developed at Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services for flutter and forced response predictions, with test cases from development rig and engine tests being used to validate its predictive

  15. Large eddy simulation study of spanwise spacing effects on secondary flows in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbarimiyanmahaleh, Mohammad; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    The structure of turbulent flow over a complex topography composed of streamwise-aligned rows of cones with varying spanwise spacing, s is studied with large-eddy simulation (LES). Similar to the experimental study of Vanderwel and Ganapathisubramani, 2015: J. Fluid Mech., we investigate the relationship between secondary flow and s, for 0 . 25 <= s / δ <= 5 . For cases with s / δ > 2 , domain-scale rollers freely exist. These had previously been called ``turbulent secondary flows'' (Willingham et al., 2014: Phys. Fluids; Barros and Christensen, 2014: J. Fluid Mech.; Anderson et al., 2015: J. Fluid Mech.), but closer inspection of the statistics indicates these are a turbulent tertiary flow: they only remain ``anchored'' to the conical roughness elements for s / δ > 2 . For s / δ < 2 , turbulent tertiary flows are prevented from occupying the domain by virtue of proximity to adjacent, counter-rotating tertiary flows. Turbulent secondary flows are associated with the conical roughness elements. These turbulent secondary flows emanate from individual conical topographic elements and set the roughness sublayer depth. The turbulent secondary flows remain intact for large and small spacing. For s / δ < 1 , a mean tertiary flow is not present. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Sci. Research, Young Inv. Program (PM: Dr. R. Ponnoppan and Ms. E. Montomery) under Grant # FA9550-14-1-0394. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Adv. Comp. Center at the Univ. of Texas.

  16. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.; Vidoni, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. In the efforts related to LES, we were concerned with developing reliable subgrid closures for modeling of the fluctuation correlations of scalar quantities in reacting turbulent flows. In the work on DNS, we focused our attention to further investigation of the effects of exothermicity in compressible turbulent flows. In our previous work, in the first year of this research, we have considered only 'simple' flows. Currently, we are in the process of extending our analyses for the purpose of modeling more practical flows of current interest at LaRC. A summary of our accomplishments during the third six months of the research is presented.

  17. Propulsion Simulations Using Advanced Turbulence Models with the Unstructured Grid CFD Tool, TetrUSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.; Deere, Karen A.; Pandya, Mohangna J.

    2004-01-01

    A computational investigation has been completed to assess the capability of TetrUSS for exhaust nozzle flows. Three configurations were chosen for this study (1) an axisymmetric supersonic jet, (2) a transonic axisymmetric boattail with solid sting operated at different Reynolds number and Mach number, and (3) an isolated non-axisymmetric nacelle with a supersonic cruise nozzle. These configurations were chosen because existing experimental data provided a means for measuring the ability of TetrUSS for simulating complex nozzle flows. The main objective of this paper is to validate the implementation of advanced two-equation turbulence models in the unstructured-grid CFD code USM3D for propulsion flow cases. USM3D is the flow solver of the TetrUSS system. Three different turbulence models, namely, Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), basic k epsilon, and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) are used in the present study. The results are generally in agreement with other implementations of these models in structured-grid CFD codes. Results indicate that USM3D provides accurate simulations for complex aerodynamic configurations with propulsion integration.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow and Sediment Transport over Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agegnehu, G.; Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the nature of flow over bedforms has a great importance in fluvial and coastal environments. For example, a bedform is one source of energy dissipation in water waves outside the surf zone in coastal environments. In rivers, the migration of dunes often affects the stability of the river bed and banks. In general, when a fluid flows over a sediment bed, the sediment transport generated by the interaction of the flow field with the bed results in the periodic deformation of the bed in the form of dunes. Dunes generally reach an equilibrium shape, and slowly propagate in the direction of the flow, as sand is lifted in the high shear regions, and redeposited in the separated flow areas. Different numerical approaches have been used in the past to study the flow and sediment transport over bedforms. In most research works, Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations are employed to study fluid motions over ripples and dunes. However, evidences suggests that these models can not represent key turbulent quantities in unsteady boundary layers. The use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) can resolve a much larger range of smaller scales than RANS. Moreover, unsteady simulations using LES give vital turbulent quantities which can help to study fluid motion and sediment transport over dunes. For this steady, we use a three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic model, OpenFOAM. It is a freely available tool which has different solvers to simulate specific problems in engineering and fluid mechanics. Our objective is to examine the flow and sediment transport from numerical stand point for bed geometries that are typical of fixed dunes. At the first step, we performed Large Eddy Simulation of the flow over dune geometries based on the experimental data of Nelson et al. (1993). The instantaneous flow field is investigated with special emphasis on the occurrence of coherent structures. To assess the effect of bed geometries on near bed turbulence, we considered different

  19. Sand waves in environmental flows: Insights gained by coupling large-eddy simulation with morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Khosronejad, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Sand waves arise in subaqueous and Aeolian environments as the result of the complex interaction between turbulent flows and mobile sand beds. They occur across a wide range of spatial scales, evolve at temporal scales much slower than the integral scale of the transporting turbulent flow, dominate river morphodynamics, undermine streambank stability and infrastructure during flooding, and sculpt terrestrial and extraterrestrial landscapes. In this paper, we present the vision for our work over the last ten years, which has sought to develop computational tools capable of simulating the coupled interactions of sand waves with turbulence across the broad range of relevant scales: from small-scale ripples in laboratory flumes to mega-dunes in large rivers. We review the computational advances that have enabled us to simulate the genesis and long-term evolution of arbitrarily large and complex sand dunes in turbulent flows using large-eddy simulation and summarize numerous novel physical insights derived from our simulations. Our findings explain the role of turbulent sweeps in the near-bed region as the primary mechanism for destabilizing the sand bed, show that the seeds of the emergent structure in dune fields lie in the heterogeneity of the turbulence and bed shear stress fluctuations over the initially flatbed, and elucidate how large dunes at equilibrium give rise to energetic coherent structures and modify the spectra of turbulence. We also discuss future challenges and our vision for advancing a data-driven simulation-based engineering science approach for site-specific simulations of river flooding.

  20. Numerical simulation of laminar flow in a curved duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations that were performed to study laminar flow through a square duct with a 900 bend. The purpose of this work was two fold. First, an improved understanding was desired of the flow physics involved in the generation of secondary vortical flows in three-dimensions. Second, adaptive gridding techniques for structured grids in three- dimensions were investigated for the purpose of determining their utility in low Reynolds number, incompressible flows. It was also of interest to validate the commercial computer code CFD-ACE. Velocity predictions for both non-adaptive and adaptive grids are compared with experimental data. Flow visualization was used to examine the characteristics of the flow though the curved duct in order to better understand the viscous flow physics of this problem. Generally, moderate agreement with the experimental data was found but shortcomings in the experiment were demonstrated. The adaptive grids did not produce the same level of accuracy as the non-adaptive grid with a factor of four more grid points.

  1. Simulation and study of stratified flows around finite bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, V. A.; Matyushin, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    The flows past a sphere and a square cylinder of diameter d moving horizontally at the velocity U in a linearly density-stratified viscous incompressible fluid are studied. The flows are described by the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. Variations in the spatial vortex structure of the flows are analyzed in detail in a wide range of dimensionless parameters (such as the Reynolds number Re = Ud/ ν and the internal Froude number Fr = U/( Nd), where ν is the kinematic viscosity and N is the buoyancy frequency) by applying mathematical simulation (on supercomputers of Joint Supercomputer Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences) and three-dimensional flow visualization. At 0.005 < Fr < 100, the classification of flow regimes for the sphere (for 1 < Re < 500) and for the cylinder (for 1 < Re < 200) is improved. At Fr = 0 (i.e., at U = 0), the problem of diffusion-induced flow past a sphere leading to the formation of horizontal density layers near the sphere's upper and lower poles is considered. At Fr = 0.1 and Re = 50, the formation of a steady flow past a square cylinder with wavy hanging density layers in the wake is studied in detail.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of A Shaped Hole Film Cooling Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The combustor exit temperatures in modern gas turbine engines are generally higher than the melting temperature of the turbine blade material. Film cooling, where cool air is fed through holes in the turbine blades, is one strategy which is used extensively in such engines to reduce heat transfer to the blades and thus reduce their temperature. While these flows have been investigated both numerically and experimentally, many features are not yet well understood. For example, the geometry of the hole is known to have a large impact on downstream cooling performance. However, the details of the flow in the hole, particularly for geometries similar to those used in practice, are generally know well-understood, both because it is difficult to experimentally observe the flow inside the hole and because much of the numerical literature has focused on round hole simulations. In this work, we show preliminary direct numerical simulation results for a film cooling flow passing through a shaped hole into a the boundary layer developing on a flat plate. The case has density ratio 1.6, blowing ratio 2.0, and the Reynolds number (based on momentum thickness) of incoming boundary layer is approximately 600. We compare the new simulations against both previous experiments and LES.

  3. Simulation of depth-integrated flow over a hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramenko, Anna; Agafonova, Oxana; Sorvari, Joonas; Haario, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    This paper details work conducted using the commercial CFD software package ANSYS Fluent to investigate the depth-integrated flow over a hill. The calculation of wake development is really important for the design of the layout and the operation of a wind farm. Simulating a wind farm with more than one fully detailed wind turbines and possibly complex terrain geometry requires significant computational power and time. For this reason the depth-integrated flow equations derived by integrating the original 3D flow equations over the depth are presented. The complex 3D geometry need not be modelled or discretized in the pre-processing state: instead, the geometry of the terrain is only described with source terms in the depth-integrated equations, which are then solved in a very simple and fixed 2D domain. This approach reduces the equations from 3D to 2D and decreases the elapsed time of CFD simulations from hours to minutes. Thus, it is very practicable modelling method in real time optimization work. 2D CFD simulations of flow over a hill with depth-integrated governing equations are compared with full 3D models. The depth-integrated model will be used in future to find the optimal position of wind turbines in the wind park.

  4. Advanced stability theory analyses for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent developments of the SALLY computer code for stability analysis of laminar flow control wings are summarized. Extensions of SALLY to study three dimensional compressible flows, nonparallel and nonlinear effects are discussed.

  5. Numerical simulation of tip clearance leakage vortex flow characteristic in axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, W. D.; Li, T. T.; Zhang, D. S.; Tian, F.; Zhang, G. J.

    2012-11-01

    Tip Leakage Vortex (TLV) in axial flow pump is mainly cased by the leakage flow entraining with the main stream of the blade suction side, which could interfere with the main flow field of the whole passage and the performance of pump. The low pressure area of vortex nuclear also cause the cavitation, which often induce the noise, vibration and cavitation erosion on the end wall of the impeller. The steady turbulent flow fields of the tip clearance region at different conditions with different blade tip clearance sizes (0.15 mm, 0.50 mm, 1.50 mm and 3.00mm) were simulated based on the ANSYS CFX software. The application of the different turbulent models were compared and analyzed in the whole passage flow simulation and choose a turbulent model which can adapt the tip leakage vortex flow in the axial flow pump. Furthermore, the flow fields under different tip clearance sizes were simulated, the relationship of the flow field structure and size of the tip clearance was analyzed. The numerical results show that: The SST k-ω turbulent model can predict the energy characteristics of the model pump accurately, adapt the shear flow of the adverse pressure gradient and predict the tip leakage flow very well; With the increase of the mass flow, the start position of the tip leakage vortex cores remove from near the leading edge to the trailing edge along the shroud of the blade, and the strength of the vortex cores decreased; The energy characteristic decrease with the increase of the tip clearance; The positive-slope point arrive earlier when the tip above the 1.5mm; With the increase of the tip clearance, the start position of the tip leakage vortex cores remove from near the leading edge to the trailing edge along the shroud of the blade, the pressure of the vortex cores decrease, the strength of the vortex entrainment is bigger; The leakage vortex within the tip clearance of the axial flow pump enhances as the blade tip clearance size is more than 0.50 mm, and the

  6. Vectorization of a particle simulation method for hypersonic rarefied flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.; Baganoff, Donald

    1988-01-01

    An efficient particle simulation technique for hypersonic rarefied flows is presented at an algorithmic and implementation level. The implementation is for a vector computer architecture, specifically the Cray-2. The method models an ideal diatomic Maxwell molecule with three translational and two rotational degrees of freedom. Algorithms are designed specifically for compatibility with fine grain parallelism by reducing the number of data dependencies in the computation. By insisting on this compatibility, the method is capable of performing simulation on a much larger scale than previously possible. A two-dimensional simulation of supersonic flow over a wedge is carried out for the near-continuum limit where the gas is in equilibrium and the ideal solution can be used as a check on the accuracy of the gas model employed in the method. Also, a three-dimensional, Mach 8, rarefied flow about a finite-span flat plate at a 45 degree angle of attack was simulated. It utilized over 10 to the 7th particles carried through 400 discrete time steps in less than one hour of Cray-2 CPU time. This problem was chosen to exhibit the capability of the method in handling a large number of particles and a true three-dimensional geometry.

  7. Very High Resolution Simulations of Compressible, Turbulent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P R; Porter, D H; Sytine, I; Anderson, S E; Mirin, A A; Curtis, B C; Cohen, R H; Dannevik, W P; Dimits, A M; Eliason, D E; Winkler, K-H; Hodson, S W

    2001-04-26

    The steadily increasing power of supercomputing systems is enabling very high resolution simulations of compressible, turbulent flows in the high Reynolds number limit, which is of interest in astrophysics as well as in several other fluid dynamical applications. This paper discusses two such simulations, using grids of up to 8 billion cells. In each type of flow, convergence in a statistical sense is observed as the mesh is refined. The behavior of the convergent sequences indicates how a subgrid-scale model of turbulence could improve the treatment of these flows by high-resolution Euler schemes like PPM. The best resolved case, a simulation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing layer in a shock tube experiment, also points the way toward such a subgrid-scale model. Analysis of the results of that simulation indicates a proportionality relationship between the energy transfer rate from large to small motions and the determinant of the deviatoric symmetric strain as well as the divergence of the velocity for the large-scale field.

  8. Numerical Simulations of High-Speed Flows Over Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Patrick Timothy

    The effects of surface roughness on the stability of hypersonic flow are of great importance to hypersonic vehicles. Surface roughness can greatly alter boundary-layer flow and cause transition to turbulence to occur much earlier compared to a smooth wall, which will result in a significant increase of wall heating and skin friction drag. The work presented in this dissertation was motivated by a desire to study the effects of isolated roughness elements on the stability of hypersonic boundary layers. A new code was developed which can perform high-order direct numerical simulations of high-speed flows over arbitrary geometries. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme was implemented to capture any steep gradients in the flow created by the geometries. The simulations are carried out on Cartesian grids with the geometries imposed by a third-order cut-cell method. A multi-zone refinement method is also implemented to provide extra resolution at locations with expected complex physics. The combination results in a globally fourth-order scheme. Results for two-dimensional and three-dimensional test cases show good agreement with previous results and will be presented. Results confirming the code's high order of convergence will also be shown. Two-dimensional simulations of flow over complex geometries will be presented to demonstrate the code's capabilities. Results for Mach 6 flow over a three-dimensional cylindrical roughness element will also be presented. The results will show that the code is a promising tool for the study of hypersonic roughness-induced transition.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Stable Channel Flow at Large Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwstadt, F. T. M.

    2005-08-01

    We consider a model for the stable atmospheric boundary at large stability, i.e. near the limit where turbulence is no longer able to survive. The model is a plane horizontally homogeneous channel flow, which is driven by a constant pressure gradient and which has a no-slip wall at the bottom and a free-slip wall at the top. At the lower wall a constant negative temperature flux is imposed. First, we consider a direct numerical simulation of the same channel flow. The simulation is computed with the neutral channel flow as initial condition and computed as a function of time for various values of the stability parameter h/L, where h is the channel height and L is related to the Obukhov length. We find that a turbulent solution is only possible for h/L < 1.25 and for larger values turbulence decays. Next, we consider a theoretical model for this channel flow based on a simple gradient transfer closure. The resulting equations allow an exact solution for the case of a stationary flow. The velocity profile for this solution is almost linear as a function of height in most of the channel. In the limit of infinite Reynolds number, the temperature profile has a logarithmic singularity at the upper wall of the channel. For the cases where a turbulent flow is maintained in the numerical simulation, we find that the velocity and temperature profiles are in good agreement with the results of the theoretical model when the effects of the surface layer on the exchange coefficients are taken into account.

  10. Inverse Simulation of Field Infiltration Experiment Counting Preferential Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumr, David; Snehota, Michal; Nemcova, Renata; Dohnal, Michal; Cislerova, Milena

    2010-05-01

    The field tension and ponded infiltration experiments were conducted to monitor and describe irregularities of moisture propagation and to estimate the soil hydraulic properties (Distric Cambisol, Korkusova Hut, Sumava). On these soils the preferential pathways have been observed in several scales with the use of dye tracers, MRI and CT imaging. Preferential behavior was detected also during laboratory infiltration experiments. The flow irregularities are credited to variable air entrapment at the beginning of infiltrations. The field infiltration experiment was carried out in a shallow pit for a period of one day. The upper boundary condition was controlled by the tension disk infiltrometer, the propagation of a water front was monitored by two tensiometers installed in two depths below the infiltration disk. The propagation of saline solution front during ponded infiltration was visualized with high resolution electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Infiltration experiments were monitored with TDR probes, tensiometers and ERT. Zones of preferential flow were determined through analyses of photographs taken during laboratory dye tracer infiltration experiments performed on undisturbed soil samples. Connectivity, volumetric ratio and spatial development of preferential pathways were evaluated as the necessary information for numerical simulations of flow using dual-permeability approach. 2D axisymetric numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate the results of the experiment. The parameter estimator PEST coupled with the simulation code S2D_DUAL (Vogel et al., 2000) were employed. Two different approaches were used: 1. Single-domain approach based on Richards' equation. 2. Dual-permeability approach based on two interacting water flow domains (matrix and preferential domains), each governed by one Richards' equation. Concerning the existence of preferential flow on investigated soil, the dual-permeability model gives a better picture of the flow regime. The

  11. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  12. Statistical Simulation of Gas Flows through Short Rough Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelov, G.; Stefanov, S.

    2011-11-01

    Rarefied gas flow though the rough microchannel is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). Deterministic and statistical methods of wall roughness deception have been applied. The well-known DSMC-based software, SMILE, allows one to model a flow through the channel with an arbitrary shape, here series of triangular obstacles has been modeled. A statistical approach is based on porous layer model of dusty gas and the model has been implemented in SMILE. Results obtained with two methods are compared and channel performance is presented for different pressure ratio and size of obstacles.

  13. COYOTE: A computer program for 2-D reactive flow simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1990-04-01

    We describe the numerical algorithm used in the COYOTE two- dimensional, transient, Eulerian hydrodynamics program for reactive flows. The program has a variety of options that provide capabilities for a wide range of applications, and it is designed to be robust and relatively easy to use while maintaining adequate accuracy and efficiency to solve realistic problems. It is based on the ICE method, and it includes a general species and chemical reaction network for simulating reactive flows. It also includes swirl, turbulence transport models, and a nonuniform mesh capability. We describe several applications of the program. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Numerical simulation of the flow field around a complete aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, J. S.; Scherr, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The present effort represents a first attempt of numerical simulation of the flow field around a complete aircraft-like, lifting configuration utilizing the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical solution generated for the experimental aircraft concept X24C-10D at a Mach number of 5.95 not only exhibited accurate prediction of detailed flow properties but also of the integrated aerodynamic coefficients. In addition, the present analysis demonstrated that a page structure of data collected into cyclic blocks is an efficient and viable means for processing the Navier-Stokes equations on the CRAY XMP-22 computer with external memory device.

  15. Numerical simulation of flow in mechanical heart valves: grid resolution and the assumption of flow symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Jones, S Casey; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Healy, Timothy M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2003-10-01

    A numerical method is developed for simulating unsteady, 3-D, laminar flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the leaflets fixed. The method employs a dual-time-stepping artificial-compressibility approach together with overset (Chimera) grids and is second-order accurate in space and time. Calculations are carried out for the full 3-D valve geometry under steady inflow conditions on meshes with a total number of nodes ranging from 4 x 10(5) to 1.6 x 10(6). The computed results show that downstream of the leaflets the flow is dominated by two pairs of counter-rotating vortices, which originate on either side of the central orifice in the aortic sinus and rotate such that the common flow of each pair is directed away from the aortic wall. These vortices intensify with Reynolds number, and at a Reynolds number of approximately 1200 their complex interaction leads to the onset of unsteady flow and the break of symmetry with respect to both geometric planes of symmetry. Our results show the highly 3-D structure of the flow; question the validity of computationally expedient assumptions of flow symmetry; and demonstrate the need for highly resolved, fully 3-D simulations if computational fluid dynamics is to accurately predict the flow in prosthetic mechanical heart valves.

  16. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  17. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-15

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  18. Geophysical Investigations at Hidden Dam, Raymond, California Flow Simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minsley, Burke J.; Ikard, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Numerical flow modeling and analysis of observation-well data at Hidden Dam are carried out to supplement recent geophysical field investigations at the site (Minsley and others, 2010). This work also is complementary to earlier seepage-related studies at Hidden Dam documented by Cedergren (1980a, b). Known seepage areas on the northwest right abutment area of the downstream side of the dam was documented by Cedergren (1980a, b). Subsequent to the 1980 seepage study, a drainage blanket with a sub-drain system was installed to mitigate downstream seepage. Flow net analysis provided by Cedergren (1980a, b) suggests that the primary seepage mechanism involves flow through the dam foundation due to normal reservoir pool elevations, which results in upflow that intersects the ground surface in several areas on the downstream side of the dam. In addition to the reservoir pool elevations and downstream surface topography, flow is also controlled by the existing foundation geology as well as the presence or absence of a horizontal drain in the downstream portion of the dam. The current modeling study is aimed at quantifying how variability in dam and foundation hydrologic properties influences seepage as a function of reservoir stage. Flow modeling is implemented using the COMSOL Multiphysics software package, which solves the partially saturated flow equations in a two-dimensional (2D) cross-section of Hidden Dam that also incorporates true downstream topography. Use of the COMSOL software package provides a more quantitative approach than the flow net analysis by Cedergren (1980a, b), and allows for rapid evaluation of the influence of various parameters such as reservoir level, dam structure and geometry, and hydrogeologic properties of the dam and foundation materials. Historical observation-well data are used to help validate the flow simulations by comparing observed and predicted water levels for a range of reservoir elevations. The flow models are guided by, and

  19. Optimizing the simulation of riverine species flow preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesel, Jens; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Guse, Björn; Kakouei, Karan; Jähnig, Sonja C.; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Riverine biota have distinct demands on the discharge regime. To quantify these demands, discharge time series are translated to ecohydrological indicators, e.g. magnitude, timing or duration of baseflow or peak flow events. These indicators are then related to species occurrence and/or absence to establish the feedback response of aquatic species to hydrological conditions. These links can be used in conjunction with hydrological simulations for predictions of species occurrences. If differences between observed and simulated ecohydrological indicator values are too high, such predictions can be wrong. Indicator differences can be due to poor input data quality and simplified model algorithms, but also depend on how the model was optimized. For instance, in case the model was optimised towards a single objective function, e.g. minimizing the difference between simulated and observed Q95, differences between simulated and observed high flow indicators will be smaller as compared to baseflow indicators. In this study, we are working towards assessing this error depending on the optimisation of the model. This assessment is based on a multi-objective vs. single-objective model optimization which we have realised in the following four-step approach: (1) sets of highly relevant ecohydrological indicators are defined; (2) the hydrologic model is optimised using a multi-objective function that combines all indicators; (3) the hydrologic model is optimised using single-objective functions with one optimisation round for each indicator and (4) the differences between all optimisation methods are calculated. By assessing these absolute (simulated vs observed) and relative (simulated vs simulated) differences, we can evaluate the magnitude of the possible error band when optimising a hydrological model towards different ecohydrological indicators. This assessment can be used to optimize hydrological models for depicting preferences of riverine biota more effectively and

  20. Bone Blood Flow During Simulated Microgravity: Physiological and Molecular Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Susan A.

    1999-01-01

    Blood flow to bone has been shown to affect bone mass and presumably bone strength. Preliminary data indicate that blood flow to the rat femur decreases after 14 days of simulated microgravity, using hindlimb suspension (HLS). If adult rats subjected to HLS are given dobutamine, a synthetic catecholamine which can cause peripheral vasodilation and increased blood flow, the loss of cortical bone area usually observed is prevented. Further, mechanisms exist at the molecular level to link changes in bone blood flow to changes in bone cell activity, particularly for vasoactive agents like nitric oxide (NO). The decreases in fluid shear stress created by fluid flow associated with the shifts of plasma volume during microgravity may result in alterations in expression of vasoactive agents such as NO, producing important functional effects on bone cells. The primary aim of this project is to characterize changes in 1) bone blood flow, 2) indices of bone mass, geometry, and strength, and 3) changes in gene expression for modulators of nitric oxide activity (e.g., nitric oxide synthase) and other candidate genes involved in signal transduction of mechanical loading after 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of HLS in the adult rat. Using a rat of at least 5 months of age avoids inadvertently studying effects of simulated microgravity on growing, rather than adult, bone. Utilizing the results of these studies, we will then define how altered blood flow contributes to changes in bone with simulated microgravity by administering a vasodilatory agent (which increases blood flow to tissues) during hindlimb suspension. In all studies, responses in the unloaded hindlimb bones (tibial shaft, femoral neck) will be compared with those in the weightbearing humeral shaft and the non-weightbearing calvarium (skull) from the same animal. Bone volumetric mineral density and geometry will be quantified by peripheral quantitative CT; structural and material properties of the long bones will be

  1. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    DOE PAGES

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges.more » In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.« less

  2. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    SciTech Connect

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges. In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.

  3. Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

    2007-07-01

    An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

  4. Modeling and simulation of DNA flow in a microfluidic-based pathogen detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H

    2005-01-31

    We present simulation results from a new computational model of DNA flow in microfluidic devices. This work is important because computational models are needed to design miniaturized biomedical devices that are becoming the state-of-the-art in many significant applications including pathogen detection as well as continuous monitoring and drug delivery. Currently advanced algorithms in design tools are non-existent but necessary to understand the complex fluid and polymer dynamics involved in biological flow at small scales. Our model is based on a fully coupled fluid-particle numerical algorithm with both stochastic and deterministic components in a bead-rod polymer representation. We have applied this work to DNA extraction configurations in a microfluidic PCR chamber used in a pathogen detection system. We demonstrate our method on the test problem of flow of a single DNA molecule in a 2D packed array microchannel. We are also investigating mechanisms for molecular ''sticking'' using short range forces.

  5. Toward the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Speziale, C. G.; Zang, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    New subgrid-scale models for the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows are developed and tested based on the Favre-filtered equations of motion for an ideal gas. A compressible generalization of the linear combination of the Smagorinsky model and scale-similarity model, in terms of Favre-filtered fields, is obtained for the subgrid-scale stress tensor. An analogous thermal linear combination model is also developed for the subgrid-scale heat flux vector. The two dimensionless constants associated with these subgrid-scale models are obtained by correlating with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence performed on a 96 (exp 3) grid using Fourier collocation methods. Extensive comparisons between the direct and modeled subgrid-scale fields are provided in order to validate the models. A large-eddy simulation of the decay of compressible isotropic turbulence (conducted on a coarse 32(exp 3) grid) is shown to yield results that are in excellent agreement with the fine-grid direct simulation. Future applications of these compressible subgrid-scale models to the large-eddy simulation of more complex supersonic flows are discussed briefly.

  6. Toward the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Speziale, C. G.; Zang, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    New subgrid-scale models for the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows are developed and tested based on the Favre-filtered equations of motion for an ideal gas. A compressible generalization of the linear combination of the Smagorinsky model and scale-similarity model, in terms of Favre-filtered fields, is obtained for the subgrid-scale stress tensor. An analogous thermal linear combination model is also developed for the subgrid-scale heat flux vector. The two dimensionless constants associated with these subgrid-scale models are obtained by correlating with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence performed on a 96(exp 3) grid using Fourier collocation methods. Extensive comparisons between the direct and modeled subgrid-scale fields are provided in order to validate the models. A large-eddy simulation of the decay of compressible isotropic turbulence (conducted on a coarse 32(exp 3) grid) is shown to yield results that are in excellent agreement with the fine grid direct simulation. Future applications of these compressible subgrid-scale models to the large-eddy simulation of more complex supersonic flows are discussed briefly.

  7. Direct simulation of hypersonic flows over blunt slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Cuda, V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a numerical study of low-density hypersonic flow about cylindrically blunted wedges and spherically blunted cones with body half angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg are presented. Most of the transitional flow regime encountered during entry between the free molecule and continuum regimes is simulated for a reentry velocity of 7.5 km/s by including freestream conditions of 70 to 100 km. The bodies are at zero angle of incidence and have diffuse and finite catalytic surfaces. Translational, thermodynamic, and chemical nonequilibrium effects are considered in the numerical simulation by utilizing the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The numerical simulations show that noncontinuum effects such as surface temperature jump, and velocity slip are evident for all cases considered. The onset of chemical dissociation occurs at a simulated altitude of 96 km for the two-dimensional configurations. Comparisons between the DSMC and continuum viscous shock-layer calculations highlight the significant difference in flowfield structure predicted by the two methods.

  8. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; Pritchett-Sheats, L. A.; Nourgaliev, R. R.

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carried out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.

  9. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; Pritchett-Sheats, L. A.; Nourgaliev, R. R.

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carriedmore » out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.« less

  10. Numerical Simulation of Subsonic and Transonic Propeller Flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Aaron

    1988-01-01

    The numerical simulation of 3-D transonic flow about a system of propeller blades is investigated. In particular, it is shown that the use of helical coordinates significantly simplifies the form of the governing equation when the propeller system is assumed to be surrounded by an irrotational flow field of an inviscid fluid. The unsteady small disturbance equation, valid for lightly loaded blades and expressed in helical coordinates, is derived from the general blade-fixed potential equation, given for an arbitrary coordinate system. The use of a coordinate system which inherently adapts to the mean flow results in a disturbance equation requiring relatively few terms to accurately model the physics of the flow. Furthermore, the helical coordinate system presented here is novel in that it is periodic in the circumferential direction while, simultaneously, maintaining orthogonal properties at the mean blade locations. The periodic characteristic allows a complete cascade of blades to be treated, and the orthogonality property affords straightforward treatment of blade boundary conditions. An ADI numerical scheme is used to compute the solution of the steady flow as an asymptotic limit of an unsteady flow. As an example of the method, solutions are presented for subsonic and transonic flow about a 5 percent thick bicircular arc blade of an 8-bladed cascade. Both high and low advance ratio cases are computed and include a lifting as well as nonlifting cases. The nonlifting solutions obtained are compared to solutions from a Euler code.

  11. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional self-gravitating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow of a self-gravitating fluid is numerically simulated using a Fourier pseudospectral method with a logarithmic variable formulation. Two cases with zero total angular momentum are studied in detail, a 323 simulation (Run B). Other than the grid size, the primary difference between the two cases are that Run A modeled atomic hydrogen and had considerably more compressible motion initially than Run B, which modeled molecular hydrogen. The numerical results indicate that gravitational collapse can proceed in a variety of ways. In the Run A, collapse led to an elongated tube-like structure, while in the Run B, collapse led to a flatter, disklike structure.

  12. Rapid Numerical Simulation of Viscous Axisymmetric Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been developed for rapid numerical simulation of axisymmetric flow fields, including flow fields with an azimuthal velocity component. The azimuthal-invariant Navier-Stokes equations in a cylindrical coordinate system are mapped to a general body-fitted coordinate system, with the streamwise viscous terms then neglected by applying the thin-layer approximation. Turbulence effects are modeled using an algebraic model, typically the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, although a modified Cebeci-Smith model can also be used. The equations are discretized using central finite differences and solved using a multistage Runge-Kutta algorithm with a spatially varying time step and implicit residual smoothing. Results are presented for calculations of supersonic flow over a waisted body-of-revolution, transonic flow through a normal shock wave in a straight circular duct of constant cross sectional area, swirling supersonic (inviscid) flow through a strong shock in a straight radial duct, and swirling subsonic flow in an annular-to-circular diffuser duct. Comparisons between computed and experimental results are in fair to good agreement, demonstrating that the viscous code can be a useful tool for practical engineering design and analysis work.

  13. Volumetric lattice Boltzmann simulation for blood flow in aorta arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Debanjan; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Teague, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    Complicated moving boundaries pose a major challenge in computational fluid dynamics for complex flows, especially in the biomechanics of both blood flow in the cardiovascular system and air flow in the respiratory system where the compliant nature of the vessels can have significant effects on the flow rate and wall shear stress. We develop a computation approach to treat arbitrarily moving boundaries using a volumetric representation of lattice Boltzmann method, which distributes fluid particles inside lattice cells. A volumetric bounce-back procedure is applied in the streaming step while momentum exchange between the fluid and moving solid boundary are accounted for in the collision sub-step. Additional boundary-induced migration is introduced to conserve fluid mass as the boundary moves across fluid cells. The volumetric LBM (VLBM) is used to simulate blood flow in both normal and dilated aorta arteries. We first compare flow structure and pressure distribution in steady state with results from Navier-Stokes based solver and good agreements are achieved. Then we focus on wall stress within the aorta for different heart pumping condition and present quantitative measurement of wall shear and normal stress.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent plane Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo

    1991-01-01

    Turbulent plane Couette flow was numerically simulated at a Reynolds number (U(sub w)h/nu) of 6000, where U(sub w) is the relative wall speed and h is half the channel-height. Unlike in Poiseuille flow, where the mean shear rate changes its sign at the centerline, the sign of mean shear rate in plane Couette flow remains the same across the whole channel. This difference is expected to yield several differences between the two flows, especially in the core region. The most significant and dramatic difference observed was the existence of large-scale structures in the core region of the plane Couette flow. The large eddies are extremely long in the flow direction and fill the entire channel (i.e., their vertical extent is 2h). The large-scale structures have the largest contribution from the wavenumber (k(sub x)h,k(sub z)h) = (0, plus or minus 1.5), corresponding to a wavelength lambda(sub z)/h is approximately equal to 4. The secondary motion associated with the k(sub x)h = 0 mode consists of the large-scale vortices. The large eddies contribute about 30 percent of turbulent kinetic energy.

  15. Flow measurements in semiconductor processing; New advances in measurement technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tison, S. A.; Calabrese, A. M.

    1998-11-01

    Gas flow measurement, control, and distribution are an integral part in meeting present and future semiconductor processing requirements (1). Changes in processing and environmental concerns have put additional pressure not only on accurate measurement of the gas flow, but also in reducing flows. To address the need for more accurate metering of gas flows, NIST has developed primary flow standards which have uncertainties of 0.1% of reading or better over the flow range of 10-9 mol/s to 10-3 mol/s (0.001 sccm to 1000 sccm). These standards have been used to test NIST-designed high repeatability flow transfer standards (2) which can be used to document and improve flow measurements in the semiconductor industry (3). In particular two flowmeters have been developed at NIST; the first is a pressure-based flow sensor and the second a Doppler-shift flowmeter, both of which can be used for in-situ calibration of thermal mass flow controllers or for direct metering of process gases.

  16. Neural network setpoint control of an advanced test reactor experiment loop simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, G.A.; Bryan, S.R.; Powell, R.H.; Chick, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the design, implementation, and application of artificial neural networks to achieve temperature and flow rate control for a simulation of a typical experiment loop in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The goal of the project was to research multivariate, nonlinear control using neural networks. A loop simulation code was adapted for the project and used to create a training set and test the neural network controller for comparison with the existing loop controllers. The results for three neural network designs are documented and compared with existing loop controller action. The neural network was shown to be as accurate at loop control as the classical controllers in the operating region represented by the training set. 9 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  18. Viscoelastic flow simulations through an array of cylinders.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, J J J

    2013-02-01

    Polymer solution flow is studied numerically in a periodic, hexagonal array of cylinders as a model for a porous medium. We use a lattice Boltzmann method supplemented by a polymer stress, where the polymers are modeled as finitely extensible, nonlinear, elastic dumbbells. The simulated, nonmonotonic behavior of the effective viscosity μ(eff) as a function of the Weissenberg number We is in qualitative agreement with experiments in the literature. An analytical model, which replaces the flexible polymers by rods and that replaces the flow field in the porous medium by a superposition of shear and elongation, correctly reproduces the simulated μ(eff) as a function of the polymer extensibility parameter b in the limit of large We.

  19. Unsteady Simulation of a Landing-Gear Flow Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents results of an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulation of a landing-gear flow field. The geometry of the four-wheel landing gear assembly consists of several of the fine details including the oleo-strut, two diagonal struts, a door, yokes/pin and a flat-plate simulating the wing surface. The computational results, obtained by using 13.3 million grid points, are presented with an emphasis on the characteristics of the unsteadiness ensuing from different parts of the landing-gear assembly, including vortex shedding patterns and frequencies of dominant oscillations. The results show that the presence of the diagonal struts and the door significantly influence the flow field. Owing to the induced asymmetry, vortices are shed only from one of the rear wheels and not the other. Present computations also capture streamwise vortices originating from the upstream corners of the door.

  20. Air-Flow Simulation in Realistic Models of the Trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, T; Schwartz, P; Trebotich, D

    2004-12-09

    In this article we present preliminary results from a new technique for flow simulation in realistic anatomical airways. The airways are extracted by means of Level-Sets methods that accurately model the complex and varying surfaces of anatomical objects. The surfaces obtained are defined at the sub-pixel level where they intersect the Cartesian grid of the image domain. It is therefore straightforward to construct embedded boundary representations of these objects on the same grid, for which recent work has enabled discretization of the Navier- Stokes equations for incompressible fluids. While most classical techniques require construction of a structured mesh that approximates the surface in order to extrapolate a 3D finite-element gridding of the whole volume, our method directly simulates the air-flow inside the extracted surface without losing any complicated details and without building additional grids.

  1. Numerical Methods and Simulations of Complex Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Peter

    Multiphase flows are an important part of many natural and technological phenomena such as ocean-air coupling (which is important for climate modeling) and the atomization of liquid fuel jets in combustion engines. The unique challenges of multiphase flow often make analytical solutions to the governing equations impossible and experimental investigations very difficult. Thus, high-fidelity numerical simulations can play a pivotal role in understanding these systems. This dissertation describes numerical methods developed for complex multiphase flows and the simulations performed using these methods. First, the issue of multiphase code verification is addressed. Code verification answers the question "Is this code solving the equations correctly?" The method of manufactured solutions (MMS) is a procedure for generating exact benchmark solutions which can test the most general capabilities of a code. The chief obstacle to applying MMS to multiphase flow lies in the discontinuous nature of the material properties at the interface. An extension of the MMS procedure to multiphase flow is presented, using an adaptive marching tetrahedron style algorithm to compute the source terms near the interface. Guidelines for the use of the MMS to help locate coding mistakes are also detailed. Three multiphase systems are then investigated: (1) the thermocapillary motion of three-dimensional and axisymmetric drops in a confined apparatus, (2) the flow of two immiscible fluids completely filling an enclosed cylinder and driven by the rotation of the bottom endwall, and (3) the atomization of a single drop subjected to a high shear turbulent flow. The systems are simulated numerically by solving the full multiphase Navier-Stokes equations coupled to the various equations of state and a level set interface tracking scheme based on the refined level set grid method. The codes have been parallelized using MPI in order to take advantage of today's very large parallel computational

  2. Multi-resolution flow simulations by smoothed particle hydrodynamics via domain decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    We present a methodology to concurrently couple particle-based methods via a domain decomposition (DD) technique for simulating viscous flows. In particular, we select two resolutions of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method as demonstration. Within the DD framework, a simulation domain is decomposed into two (or more) overlapping sub-domains, each of which has an individual particle scale determined by the local flow physics. Consistency of the two sub-domains is achieved in the overlap region by matching the two independent simulations based on Lagrangian interpolation of state variables and fluxes. The domain decomposition based SPH method (DD-SPH) employs different spatial and temporal resolutions, and hence, each sub-domain has its own smoothing length and time step. As a consequence, particle refinement and de-refinement are performed asynchronously according to individual time advancement of each sub-domain. The proposed strategy avoids SPH force interactions between different resolutions on purpose, so that coupling, in principle, can go beyond SPH - SPH, and may allow SPH to be coupled with other mesoscopic or microscopic particle methods. The DD-SPH method is validated first for a transient Couette flow, where simulation results base. US DOE Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4).

  3. Numerical simulation of the countercurrent flow in a gas centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.; Gentry, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A finite difference method is presented for the numerical simulation of the axisymmetric countercurrent flows in gas centrifuge. A time-marching technique is used to relax an arbitrary initial condition to the desired steady-state solution. All boundary layers may be resolved, and nonlinear effects may be included. Numerical examples are presented. It is concluded that this technique is capable of accurately predicting the performance of a wide variety of machines under all operating conditions of interest.

  4. Target Lagrangian kinematic simulation for particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Lightstone, M. F.; Tullis, S.

    2016-09-01

    The target Lagrangian kinematic simulation method was motivated as a stochastic Lagrangian particle model that better synthesizes turbulence structure, relative to stochastic separated flow models. By this method, the trajectories of particles are constructed according to synthetic turbulent-like fields, which conform to a target Lagrangian integral timescale. In addition to recovering the expected Lagrangian properties of fluid tracers, this method is shown to reproduce the crossing trajectories and continuity effects, in agreement with an experimental benchmark.

  5. GPU Accelerated Numerical Simulation of Viscous Flow Down a Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gygax, Remo; Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yuri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulations are an effective tool in natural risk analysis. They are useful to determine the propagation and the runout distance of gravity driven movements such as debris flows or landslides. To evaluate these processes an approach on analogue laboratory experiments and a GPU accelerated numerical simulation of the flow of a viscous liquid down an inclined slope is considered. The physical processes underlying large gravity driven flows share certain aspects with the propagation of debris mass in a rockslide and the spreading of water waves. Several studies have shown that the numerical implementation of the physical processes of viscous flow produce a good fit with the observation of experiments in laboratory in both a quantitative and a qualitative way. When considering a process that is this far explored we can concentrate on its numerical transcription and the application of the code in a GPU accelerated environment to obtain a 3D simulation. The objective of providing a numerical solution in high resolution by NVIDIA-CUDA GPU parallel processing is to increase the speed of the simulation and the accuracy on the prediction. The main goal is to write an easily adaptable and as short as possible code on the widely used platform MATLAB, which will be translated to C-CUDA to achieve higher resolution and processing speed while running on a NVIDIA graphics card cluster. The numerical model, based on the finite difference scheme, is compared to analogue laboratory experiments. This way our numerical model parameters are adjusted to reproduce the effective movements observed by high-speed camera acquisitions during the laboratory experiments.

  6. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  7. Unsteady Cavitation Simulation in Transient Process of Turbine Flow Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Liu, Shuhong; Cao, Guangjun

    In a turbine flow meter, cavitation will take place when local pressure falls below the vapor pressure of liquid products and it usually speeds up the rotor at the given high flow rate. In order to study its effects on meter factor, numerical simulation on transient unsteady turbulent flow is carried out based on the mixture homogeneous two phase cavitation model which is deduced from the theory of evaporation and condensation on a plane. The momentum source terms from the variation rotating speed of transient processes and the cavitation mass transport source terms are introduced into the transient unsteady governing equations. The results show that the meter factor grows with the increase of the cavitation number and meter factor will be affected by cavitation.

  8. A Boundary Condition for Simulation of Flow Over Porous Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Tinetti, Ana F.

    2001-01-01

    A new boundary condition is presented.for simulating the flow over passively porous surfaces. The model builds on the prior work of R.H. Bush to eliminate the need for constructing grid within an underlying plenum, thereby simplifying the numerical modeling of passively porous flow control systems and reducing computation cost. Code experts.for two structured-grid.flow solvers, TLNS3D and CFL3D. and one unstructured solver, USM3Dns, collaborated with an experimental porosity expert to develop the model and implement it into their respective codes. Results presented,for the three codes on a slender forebody with circumferential porosity and a wing with leading-edge porosity demonstrate a good agreement with experimental data and a remarkable ability to predict the aggregate aerodynamic effects of surface porosity with a simple boundary condition.

  9. Large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow: ILLIAC 4 calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Moin, P.

    1979-01-01

    The three-dimensional time dependent equations of motion were numerically integrated for fully-developed turbulent channel flow. A large scale flow field was obtained directly from the solution of these equations, and small scale field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model. The calculations were carried out on the ILLIAC 4 computer. The computed flow patterns show that the wall layer consists of coherent structures of low speed and high speed streaks alternating in the spanwise direction. These structures were absent in the regions away from the wall. Hot spots, small localized regions of very large turbulent shear stress, were frequently observed. The profiles of the pressure velocity-gradient correlations show a significant transfer of energy from the normal to the spanwise component of turbulent kinetic energy in the immediate neighborhood of the wall ('the splatting effect').

  10. Simulation of contaminant flow ina laboratory-scale porous system

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, M.

    1995-12-01

    The microscopic movement of contaminants in a porous medium has been simulated in an experiment. The approach has been to study the microscale transport processes using a novel nonintrusive fluorescence imaging technique developed in our laboratories. The system studied consists of a packed porous column with a refractive index-matched fluid seeded with fluorescent tracer particles (for flow measurements) or an organic dye (for contaminant concentration measurements). Microscopic measurements of contaminant concentration, contaminant velocity, and pore geometry were obtained in a full three-dimensional volume of the test section at a good accuracy and a high resolution. 3D plots of these measurements show the complex geometry of the porous medium. It is also seen that near the contaminant front there is a significant correlation between the flow and the contaminant concentration. The goal is to use these and future results toward better understanding of contaminant flow and report thorough natural porous media.

  11. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional transonic flows. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, J.; Steger, J.L.

    1988-03-01

    The three-dimensional flows over a projectile were computed using an implicit, approximately factored, partially flux-split algorithm. A simple composite grid scheme was developed in which a single grid is partitioned into a series of smaller grids for application that require an external large memory device such as the SSD of the CRAY X-MP/48 or multi-tasking. The accuracy and stability of the composite grid scheme was tested by numerically simulating the flow over an ellipsoid at angle of attack and comparing the solution with a single grid solution. The flow field over a projectile at M = 0.96, 1.1. and 4/sup 0/ angle of attack was computed using a fine grid and compared with experiment.

  12. Simulations of Moist Nearly Neutral Flow over a Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglietta, M. M.; Rotunno, R.

    2005-05-01

    Although a fairly common atmospheric condition in orographic-rain scenarios, there is relatively little known about moist neutral flows over a ridge from theory and modeling. Presented in this paper are numerical simulations of the orographic-flow modification occurring for a two-dimensional moist nearly neutral flow over a ridge in the regime where the Coriolis force can be neglected. If an initially saturated moist neutral flow were to remain everywhere saturated as it flows over an obstacle, then the expected solution would be the linear solution because the condition for linearity (hill height less than the ambient wind velocity/static stability) is always met. However, for higher mountains, the solutions indicate the development of areas of unsaturated air, with correspondingly larger values of local static stability. This internal switching from small to large values of static stability is an inherent nonlinearity, which has far-reaching consequences for understanding the orographic-flow modification in this regime. The sensitivity of the solution to the mountain height and to the initial cloud water content is analyzed here. The authors find that the solutions fall into three basic categories. If the mountain height is small enough, a saturated flow can be maintained everywhere given sufficient initial cloud water; for tall mountains the atmosphere upwind of the mountain is maintained in a saturated state and transitions to an unsaturated downslope flow on the lee side, which has characteristics associated with downslope windstorms; for mountains of intermediate height, the solutions show the existence of an upwind-propagating disturbance that has the effect of desaturating the atmosphere above the mountain.

  13. An Improved Simulation of the Diurnally Varying Street Canyon Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Kleissl, Jan; Paw U, Kyaw Tha

    2012-11-01

    The impact of diurnal variation of temperature distribution over building and ground surfaces on the wind flow and scalar transport in street canyons is numerically investigated using the PArallelized LES Model (PALM). The Temperature of Urban Facets Indoor-Outdoor Building Energy Simulator (TUF-IOBES) is used for predicting urban surface heat fluxes as boundary conditions for a modified version of PALM. TUF-IOBES dynamically simulates indoor and outdoor building surface temperatures and heat fluxes in an urban area taking into account weather conditions, indoor heat sources, building and urban material properties, composition of the building envelope (e.g. windows, insulation), and HVAC equipment. Temperature (and heat flux) distribution over urban surfaces of the 3-D raster-type geometry of TUF-IOBES makes it possible to provide realistic, high resolution boundary conditions for the numerical simulation of flow and scalar transport in an urban canopy. Compared to some previous analyses using uniformly distributed thermal forcing associated with urban surfaces, the present analysis shows that resolving non-uniform thermal forcings can provide more detailed and realistic patterns of the local air flow and pollutant dispersion in urban canyons.

  14. A new framework for simulating forced homogeneous buoyant turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Phares L.; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2015-06-01

    This work proposes a new simulation methodology to study variable density turbulent buoyant flows. The mathematical framework, referred to as homogeneous buoyant turbulence, relies on a triply periodic domain and incorporates numerical forcing methods commonly used in simulation studies of homogeneous, isotropic flows. In order to separate the effects due to buoyancy from those due to large-scale gradients, the linear scalar forcing technique is used to maintain the scalar variance at a constant value. Two sources of kinetic energy production are considered in the momentum equation, namely shear via an isotropic forcing term and buoyancy via the gravity term. The simulation framework is designed such that the four dimensionless parameters of importance in buoyant mixing, namely the Reynolds, Richardson, Atwood, and Schmidt numbers, can be independently varied and controlled. The framework is used to interrogate fully non-buoyant, fully buoyant, and partially buoyant turbulent flows. The results show that the statistics of the scalar fields (mixture fraction and density) are not influenced by the energy production mechanism (shear vs. buoyancy). On the other hand, the velocity field exhibits anisotropy, namely a larger variance in the direction of gravity which is associated with a statistical dependence of the velocity component on the local fluid density.

  15. MHD simulation studies of z-pinch shear flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Makhin, V.; Siemon, R. E.

    2003-10-01

    The development of the m=0 instability in a z-pinch in the presence of sheared plasma flows is investigated with the aid of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code (MHRDR). The linear growth rates are compared to the results obtained by solving the ideal MHD linearized equations [1] and to the results obtained using a 3D hybrid simulation code [2]. The instability development is followed into the nonlinear regime where its growth and saturation are examined. [1] V.I. Sotnikov, I. Paraschiv, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, J.-N. Leboeuf, and J.M. Dawson, "Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid mode", Phys. Plasmas 9, 913 (2002). [2] V.I. Sotnikov, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, P. Hellinger, P. Travnicek, V. Fiala, J.-N. Leboeuf, "Hybrid Simulations of Current-Carrying Instabilities in Z-pinch Plasmas with Sheared Axial Flow", AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 651, Dense Z-Pinches: 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, edited by J. Davis et al., page 396, June 2002.

  16. Simulations of Bluff Body Flow Interaction for Noise Source Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Medi R.; Lockard David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Neuhart, Dan H.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2006-01-01

    The current study is a continuation of our effort to characterize the details of flow interaction between two cylinders in a tandem configuration. This configuration is viewed to possess many of the pertinent flow features of the highly interactive unsteady flow field associated with the main landing gear of large civil transports. The present effort extends our previous two-dimensional, unsteady, Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computations to three dimensions using a quasilaminar, zonal approach, in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. Two distinct separation length-to-diameter ratios of L/D = 3.7 and 1.435, representing intermediate and short separation distances between the two cylinders, are simulated. The Mach 0.166 simulations are performed at a Reynolds number of Re = 1.66 105 to match the companion experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. Extensive comparisons with the measured steady and unsteady surface pressure and off-surface particle image velocimetry data show encouraging agreement. Both prominent and some of the more subtle trends in the mean and fluctuating flow fields are correctly predicted. Both computations and the measured data reveal a more robust and energetic shedding process at L/D = 3.7 in comparison with the weaker shedding in the shorter separation case of L/D = 1.435. The vortex shedding frequency based on the computed surface pressure spectra is in reasonable agreement with the measured Strouhal frequency.

  17. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Morris H., III; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    2004-01-01

    In this project on the first stage (2000-Ol), we continued to develop the previous joint research between the Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) at Hampton University (HU) and the Jet Noise Team (JNT) at the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC). At the second stage (2001-03), FM&AL team concentrated its efforts on solving of problems of interest to Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC), especially in the field of propulsion system enhancement. The NASA GRC R&D Directorate and LaRC Hyper-X Program specialists in a hypersonic technology jointly with the FM&AL staff conducted research on a wide region of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The last year the Hampton University School of Engineering & Technology was awarded the NASA grant, for creation of the Aeropropulsion Center, and the FM&AL is a key team of the project fulfillment responsible for research in Aeropropulsion and Acoustics (Pillar I). This work is supported by joint research between the NASA GRC/ FM&AL and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IMMSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The main areas of current scientific interest of the FM&AL include an investigation of the proposed and patented advanced methods for aircraft engine thrust and noise benefits. This is the main subject of our other projects, of which one is presented. The last year we concentrated our efforts to analyze three main problems: (a) new effective methods fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines; (b) new re-circulation method for mixing, heat transfer and combustion enhancement in propulsion systems and domestic industry application; (c) covexity flow The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines (see, for

  18. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  19. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science.

    PubMed

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-15

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  20. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    PubMed Central

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields. PMID:26370627

  1. SIPSON--simulation of interaction between pipe flow and surface overland flow in networks.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, S; Prodanović, D; Maksimović, C; Ivetić, M; Savić, D

    2005-01-01

    The new simulation model, named SIPSON, based on the Preissmann finite difference method and the conjugate gradient method, is presented in the paper. This model simulates conditions when the hydraulic capacity of a sewer system is exceeded, pipe flow is pressurized, the water flows out from the piped system to the streets, and the inlets cannot capture all the runoff. In the mathematical model, buried structures and pipelines, together with surface channels, make a horizontally and vertically looped network involving a complex interaction of flows. In this paper, special internal boundary conditions related to equivalent inlets are discussed. Procedures are described for the simulation of manhole cover loss, basement flooding, the representation of street geometry, and the distribution of runoff hydrographs between surface and underground networks. All these procedures are built into the simulation model. Relevant issues are illustrated on a set of examples, focusing on specific parameters and comparison with field measurements of flooding of the Motilal ki Chal catchment (Indore, India). Satisfactory agreement of observed and simulated hydrographs and maximum surface flooding levels is obtained. It is concluded that the presented approach is an improvement compared to the standard "virtual reservoir" approach commonly applied in most of the models.

  2. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of equatorial spread F including bottomside shear flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aveiro, H. C.; Hysell, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of plasma density irregularities in the postsunset equatorial F region ionosphere leading to equatorial spread F (ESF) is described. The simulation advances the plasma number density and electrostatic potential forward in time by enforcing the constraints of quasineutrality and momentum conservation for atomic and molecular species. The magnetic field lines are not modeled as equipotentials. Simulations are performed incorporating realistic background circulation including bottomside shear flow and strong vertical current. Generalized Rayleigh Taylor instability is found to combine with collisional shear instability to produce growing waveforms with characteristics that match observations more closely than either instability acting alone. The growth rate of the emergent instability, its mixing depth, and its overall morphology are compared with radar data from Jicamarca and Kwajalein.

  3. Recent Advances in Visualizing 3D Flow with LIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1998-01-01

    Line Integral Convolution (LIC), introduced by Cabral and Leedom in 1993, is an elegant and versatile technique for representing directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can equivalently be used to portray 3D flow through a volume. However, the popularity of LIC as a device for illustrating 3D flow has historically been limited both by the computational expense of generating and rendering such a 3D texture and by the difficulties inherent in clearly and effectively conveying the directional information embodied in the volumetric output textures that are produced. In an earlier paper, we briefly discussed some of the factors that may underlie the perceptual difficulties that we can encounter with dense 3D displays and outlined several strategies for more effectively visualizing 3D flow with volume LIC. In this article, we review in more detail techniques for selectively emphasizing critical regions of interest in a flow and for facilitating the accurate perception of the 3D depth and orientation of overlapping streamlines, and we demonstrate new methods for efficiently incorporating an indication of orientation into a flow representation and for conveying additional information about related scalar quantities such as temperature or vorticity over a flow via subtle, continuous line width and color variations.

  4. Research Advances: DRPS--Let The Blood Flow!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    A team from the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine has shown the potential for clinical use of the drag-reducing polymer (DRP) poly(N-vinylformamide), or PNVF. The high molecular weight PNVF is shown to reduce resistance to turbulent flow in a pipe and to enhance blood flow in animal models and it also…

  5. Shear flow simulations of biaxial nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten

    1997-08-01

    We have calculated the viscosities of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase of a variant of the Gay-Berne fluid [J. G. Gay and B. J. Berne, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 3316 (1981)] by performing molecular dynamics simulations. The equations of motion have been augmented by a director constraint torque that fixes the orientation of the directors. This makes it possible to fix them at different angles relative to the stream lines in shear flow simulations. In equilibrium simulations the constraints generate a new ensemble. One finds that the Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities become linear combinations of time correlation function integrals in this ensemble whereas they are complicated rational functions in the conventional canonical ensemble. We have evaluated these Green-Kubo relations for all the shear viscosities and all the twist viscosities. We have also calculated the alignment angles, which are functions of the viscosity coefficients. We find that there are three real alignment angles but a linear stability analysis shows that only one of them corresponds to a stable director orientation. The Green-Kubo results have been cross checked by nonequilibrium shear flow simulations. The results from the different methods agree very well. Finally, we have evaluated the Miesowicz viscosities [D. Baalss, Z. Naturforsch. Teil A 45, 7 (1990)]. They vary by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The viscosity is consequently highly orientation dependent.

  6. Advanced wellbore thermal simulator GEOTEMP2 user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Mondy, L.A.; Duda, L.E.

    1984-11-01

    GEOTEMP2 is a wellbore thermal simulator computer code designed for geothermal drilling and production applications. The code treats natural and forced convection and conduction within the wellbore and heat conduction within the surrounding rock matrix. A variety of well operations can be modeled including injection, production, forward, and reverse circulation with gas or liquid, gas or liquid drilling, and two-phase steam injection and production. Well completion with several different casing sizes and cement intervals can be modeled. The code allows variables suchas flow rate to change with time enabling a realistic treatment of well operations. This user manual describes the input required to properly operate the code. Ten sample problems are included which illustrate all the code options. Complete listings of the code and the output of each sample problem are provided.

  7. Numerical Simulation of a High Mach Number Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1993-01-01

    The recent efforts to develop accurate numerical schemes for transition and turbulent flows are motivated, among other factors, by the need for accurate prediction of flow noise. The success of developing high speed civil transport plane (HSCT) is contingent upon our understanding and suppression of the jet exhaust noise. The radiated sound can be directly obtained by solving the full (time-dependent) compressible Navier-Stokes equations. However, this requires computational storage that is beyond currently available machines. This difficulty can be overcome by limiting the solution domain to the near field where the jet is nonlinear and then use acoustic analogy (e.g., Lighthill) to relate the far-field noise to the near-field sources. The later requires obtaining the time-dependent flow field. The other difficulty in aeroacoustics computations is that at high Reynolds numbers the turbulent flow has a large range of scales. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) cannot obtain all the scales of motion at high Reynolds number of technological interest. However, it is believed that the large scale structure is more efficient than the small-scale structure in radiating noise. Thus, one can model the small scales and calculate the acoustically active scales. The large scale structure in the noise-producing initial region of the jet can be viewed as a wavelike nature, the net radiated sound is the net cancellation after integration over space. As such, aeroacoustics computations are highly sensitive to errors in computing the sound sources. It is therefore essential to use a high-order numerical scheme to predict the flow field. The present paper presents the first step in a ongoing effort to predict jet noise. The emphasis here is in accurate prediction of the unsteady flow field. We solve the full time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations by a high order finite difference method. Time accurate spatial simulations of both plane and axisymmetric jet are presented. Jet Mach

  8. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional self-gravitating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow of a self-gravitating fluid is numerically simulated using a Fourier pseudospectral method with a logarithmic variable formulation. Two cases with zero total angular momentum are studied in detail, a 32(exp 3) simulation (Run A) and a 64(exp 3) simulation (Run B). Other than the grid size, the primary differences between the two cases are that Run A modeled atomic hydrogen and had considerably more compressible motion initially than Run B, which modeled molecular hydrogen. ('Compressible motion' is that part of the velocity which has zero curl, but non-zero divergence). The numerical results indicate that gravitational collapse can proceed in a variety of ways. In Run A, collapse led to an elongated tube-like structure, while in Run B, collapse led to a flatter, disk-like structure.

  9. Repartitioning Strategies for Massively Parallel Simulation of Reacting Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Zheng, Angen; Givi, Peyman; Labrinidis, Alexandros; Chrysanthis, Panos

    2015-11-01

    The majority of parallel CFD simulators partition the domain into equal regions and assign the calculations for a particular region to a unique processor. This type of domain decomposition is vital to the efficiency of the solver. However, as the simulation develops, the workload among the partitions often become uneven (e.g. by adaptive mesh refinement, or chemically reacting regions) and a new partition should be considered. The process of repartitioning adjusts the current partition to evenly distribute the load again. We compare two repartitioning tools: Zoltan, an architecture-agnostic graph repartitioner developed at the Sandia National Laboratories; and Paragon, an architecture-aware graph repartitioner developed at the University of Pittsburgh. The comparative assessment is conducted via simulation of the Taylor-Green vortex flow with chemical reaction.

  10. Large eddy simulation of unsteady wind farm behavior using advanced actuator disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The present project aims at improving the level of fidelity of unsteady wind farm scale simulations through an effort on the representation and the modeling of the rotors. The chosen tool for the simulations is a Fourth Order Finite Difference code, developed at Universite catholique de Louvain; this solver implements Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The wind turbines are modeled as advanced actuator disks: these disks are coupled with the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM method) and also take into account the turbine dynamics and controller. A special effort is made here to reproduce the specific wake behaviors. Wake decay and expansion are indeed initially governed by vortex instabilities. This is an information that cannot be obtained from the BEM calculations. We thus aim at achieving this by matching the large scales of the actuator disk flow to high fidelity wake simulations produced using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method. It is obtained by adding a controlled excitation at the disk. We apply this tool to the investigation of atmospheric turbulence effects on the power production and on the wake behavior at a wind farm level. A turbulent velocity field is then used as inflow boundary condition for the simulations. We gratefully acknowledge the support of GDF Suez for the fellowship of Mrs Maud Moens.

  11. Numerical simulation of steady and unsteady asymmetric vortical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady, compressible, thin-layer, Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved to simulate steady and unsteady, asymmetric, vortical laminar flow around cones at high incidences and supersonic Mach numbers. The equations are solved by using an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting (FDS), finite-volume scheme. The locally conical flow assumption is used and the solutions are obtained by forcing the conserved components of the flowfield vector to be equal at two axial stations located at 0.95 and 1.0. Computational examples cover steady and unsteady asymmetric flows around a circular cone and its control using side strakes. The unsteady asymmetric flow solution around the circular cone has also been validated using the upwind, flux-vector splitting (FVS) scheme with the thin-layer NS equations and the upwind FDS with the full NS equations. The results are in excellent agreement with each other. Unsteady asymmetric flows are also presented for elliptic- and diamond-section cones, which model asymmetric vortex shedding around round- and sharp-edged delta winds.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Multi-Stage Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Shabbir, Aamir; Wellborn, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment is made of the predictive capability of the average passage flow model as applied to multi-stage axial flow compressors. The average passage flow model describes the time average flow field within a typical passage of a blade row embedded in a multi-stage configuration. In this work data taken within a four and one-half stage large low speed compressor will be used to assess the weakness and strengths of the predictive capabilities of the average passage flow model. The low speed compressor blading is of modern design and employs stators with end-bends. Measurements were made with slow and high response instrumentation. The high response measurements revealed the velocity components of both the rotor and stator wakes. Based on the measured wake profiles it will be argued that blade boundary layer transition is playing an important role in setting compressor performance. A model which mimics the effects of blade boundary layer transition within the frame work of the average passage model will be presented. Simulations which incorporated this model showed a dramatic improvement in agreement with data.

  13. GEOSIM: A numerical model for geophysical fluid flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Karen A.; Miller, Timothy L.; Lu, Huei-Iin

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model which simulates geophysical fluid flow in a wide range of problems is described in detail, and comparisons of some of the model's results are made with previous experimental and numerical studies. The model is based upon the Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations in spherical coordinates, which can be reduced to a cylindrical system when latitudinal walls are used near the pole and the ratio of latitudinal length to the radius of the sphere is small. The equations are approximated by finite differences in the meridional plane and spectral decomposition in the azimuthal direction. The user can specify a variety of boundary and initial conditions, and there are five different spectral truncation options. The results of five validation cases are presented: (1) the transition between axisymmetric flow and baroclinic wave flow in the side heated annulus; (2) the steady baroclinic wave of the side heated annulus; (3) the wave amplitude vacillation of the side heated annulus; (4) transition to baroclinic wave flow in a bottom heated annulus; and (5) the Spacelab Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (spherical) experiment.

  14. A flow-simulation model of the tidal Potomac River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    1987-01-01

    A one-dimensional model capable of simulating flow in a network of interconnected channels has been applied to the tidal Potomac River including its major tributaries and embayments between Washington, D.C., and Indian Head, Md. The model can be used to compute water-surface elevations and flow discharges at any of 66 predetermined locations or at any alternative river cross sections definable within the network of channels. In addition, the model can be used to provide tidal-interchange flow volumes and to evaluate tidal excursions and the flushing properties of the riverine system. Comparisons of model-computed results with measured watersurface elevations and discharges demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the model. Tidal-cycle flow volumes computed by the calibrated model have been verified to be within an accuracy of ? 10 percent. Quantitative characteristics of the hydrodynamics of the tidal river are identified and discussed. The comprehensive flow data provided by the model can be used to better understand the geochemical, biological, and other processes affecting the river's water quality.

  15. Macropore Flow in Soil Columns: Investigations with Computer Tomography and Lattice Boltzmann Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, M. G.; Tuller, M.; Guber, A.; Martin, M. A.; Martinez, F. S.; Pachepsky, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Soil structure greatly affects the ability of soil to transmit and to retain water, chemicals, and colloidal particles that can carry contaminants or be contaminants themselves, e.g. pathogenic microorganisms. No theory or empirical relationships have been developed to date to quantitatively relate parameters of soil structure and parameters of the contaminant transport in soils. The absence of theoretical advances in this area seriously hampers the ability to address issues of public concern, e.g. spread of contaminants introduced in the environment by agricultural activities. Recently, computer tomography of soils has become available to generate detailed images of soil pore space with high resolution and density. Successful applications of computer tomography in medical and material sciences show the great potential of this technique to create an exhaustive characterization of soil structure heterogeneity. In this presentation we investigate saturated flow through twelve undisturbed macroporous soil columns (7.62- cm sample diameter and 18-cm length) with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Saturated flow was measured for the complete columns, as well as on 2 cm sections for selected columns. Computed X-Ray tomography was performed on each of the columns, using the 420 kV X-ray source of a HYTEC FlashCT high-speed industrial CT scanner. The resolution was 116 microns per voxel, yielding a final tomography image of 656x656x1482 (~ 6.3 10E8) voxels. X-Ray CT observations typically provide "gray-scale" representations of the imaged object that must be segmented to yield discrete pore and particle geometry. Many segmentation algorithms are available, each yielding different final pore geometries thus potentially creating uncertainties in subsequent flow analyses. Lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations will be presented only for some of the columns as the simulations are extremely computationally intensive (each simulation requires ~ 60 GB of computer RAM at the observed

  16. Simulation of inertial fibre orientation in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njobuenwu, Derrick O.; Fairweather, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The spatial and orientational behaviour of fibres within a suspension influences the rheological and mechanical properties of that suspension. An Eulerian-Lagrangian framework to simulate the behaviour of fibres in turbulent flows is presented. The framework is intended for use in simulations of non-spherical particles with high Reynolds numbers, beyond the Stokesian regime, and is a computationally efficient alternative to existing Stokesian models for fibre suspensions in turbulent flow. It is based on modifying available empirical drag correlations for the translation of non-spherical particles to be orientation dependent, accounting for the departure in shape from a sphere. The orientational dynamics of a particle is based on the framework of quaternions, while its rotational dynamics is obtained from the solution of the Euler equation of rotation subject to external torques on the particle. The fluid velocity and turbulence quantities are obtained using a very high-resolution large eddy simulation with dynamic calibration of the sub-grid scale energy containing fluid motions. The simulation matrix consists of four different fibre Stokes numbers (St = 1, 5, 25, and 125) and five different fibre aspect ratios (λ = 1.001, 3, 10, 30, and 50), with results considered at four distances from a channel wall (in the viscous sub-layer, buffer, and fully turbulent regions), which are taken as a measure of the flow velocity gradient, all at a constant fibre to fluid density ratio (ρp/ρ = 760) and shear Reynolds number Reτ = 150. The simulated fibre orientation, concentration, and streakiness confirm previous experimentally observed characteristics of fibre behaviour in turbulence, and that of direct numerical simulations of fibres in Stokesian, or creeping flow, regimes. The fibres exhibit translational motion similar to spheres, where they tend to accumulate in the near-wall (viscous sub-layer and buffer) region and preferentially concentrate in regions of low

  17. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Pitsch, Heinz

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  18. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz Pitsch

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  19. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-05-21

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  20. Unstructured Mesh Methods for the Simulation of Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime; Bibb, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the research work undertaken at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The aim of this research is to identify effective algorithms and methodologies for the efficient and routine solution of hypersonic viscous flows about re-entry vehicles. For over ten years we have received support from NASA to develop unstructured mesh methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics. As a result of this effort a methodology based on the use, of unstructured adapted meshes of tetrahedra and finite volume flow solvers has been developed. A number of gridding algorithms flow solvers, and adaptive strategies have been proposed. The most successful algorithms developed from the basis of the unstructured mesh system FELISA. The FELISA system has been extensively for the analysis of transonic and hypersonic flows about complete vehicle configurations. The system is highly automatic and allows for the routine aerodynamic analysis of complex configurations starting from CAD data. The code has been parallelized and utilizes efficient solution algorithms. For hypersonic flows, a version of the, code which incorporates real gas effects, has been produced. One of the latest developments before the start of this grant was to extend the system to include viscous effects. This required the development of viscous generators, capable of generating the anisotropic grids required to represent boundary layers, and viscous flow solvers. In figures I and 2, we show some sample hypersonic viscous computations using the developed viscous generators and solvers. Although these initial results were encouraging, it became apparent that in order to develop a fully functional capability for viscous flows, several advances in gridding, solution accuracy, robustness and efficiency were required. As part of this research we have developed: 1) automatic meshing techniques and the corresponding computer codes have been delivered to NASA and implemented into the GridEx system, 2) a finite

  1. Advanced solid elements for sheet metal forming simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataix, Vicente; Rossi, Riccardo; Oñate, Eugenio; Flores, Fernando G.

    2016-08-01

    The solid-shells are an attractive kind of element for the simulation of forming processes, due to the fact that any kind of generic 3D constitutive law can be employed without any additional hypothesis. The present work consists in the improvement of a triangular prism solid-shell originally developed by Flores[2, 3]. The solid-shell can be used in the analysis of thin/thick shell, undergoing large deformations. The element is formulated in total Lagrangian formulation, and employs the neighbour (adjacent) elements to perform a local patch to enrich the displacement field. In the original formulation a modified right Cauchy-Green deformation tensor (C) is obtained; in the present work a modified deformation gradient (F) is obtained, which allows to generalise the methodology and allows to employ the Pull-Back and Push-Forwards operations. The element is based in three modifications: (a) a classical assumed strain approach for transverse shear strains (b) an assumed strain approach for the in-plane components using information from neighbour elements and (c) an averaging of the volumetric strain over the element. The objective is to use this type of elements for the simulation of shells avoiding transverse shear locking, improving the membrane behaviour of the in-plane triangle and to handle quasi-incompressible materials or materials with isochoric plastic flow.

  2. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  3. Laboratory Simulation of Flow through Single Fractured Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. K.; Singh, D. N.; Ranjith, P. G.

    2015-05-01

    Laboratory simulation on fluid flow through fractured rock is important in addressing the seepage/fluid-in-rush related problems that occur during the execution of any civil or geological engineering projects. To understand the mechanics and transport properties of fluid through a fractured rock in detail and to quantify the sources of non-linearity in the discharge and base pressure relationship, fluid flow experiments were carried out on a cylindrical sample of granite containing a `single rough walled fracture'. These experiments were performed under varied conditions of confining pressures, σ 3 (5-40 MPa), which can simulate the condition occurring about 1,000 m below in the earth crust, with elevated base pressure, b p (up to 25 MPa) and by changing fracture roughness. The details of the methodologies involved and the observations are discussed here. The obtained results indicate that most of the data in the Q verses b p plot, fall on the straight line and the flow through the single fracture in granite obeys Darcy's law or the well-known "cubic law" even at high value of b p (=4 MPa) and σ 3 (=5 MPa) combination. The Reynolds number is quite sensitive to the b p, σ 3 and fracture roughness, and there is a critical b p, beyond which transition in flow occurs from laminar to turbulent. It is believed that such studies will be quite useful in identifying the limits of applicability of well know `cubic law', which is required for precise calculation of discharge and/or aperture in any practical issues and in further improving theoretical/numerical models associated with fluid flow through a single fracture.

  4. Stochastic Simulation of Lagrangian Particle Transport in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangyuan

    This dissertation presents the development and validation of the One Dimensional Turbulence (ODT) multiphase model in the Lagrangian reference frame. ODT is a stochastic model that captures the full range of length and time scales and provides statistical information on fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport at low computational cost. The flow evolution is governed by a deterministic solution of the viscous processes and a stochastic representation of advection through stochastic domain mapping processes. The three algorithms for Lagrangian particle transport are presented within the context of the ODT approach. The Type-I and -C models consider the particle-eddy interaction as instantaneous and continuous change of the particle position and velocity, respectively. The Type-IC model combines the features of the Type-I and -C models. The models are applied to the multi-phase flows in the homogeneous decaying turbulence and turbulent round jet. Particle dispersion, dispersion coefficients, and velocity statistics are predicted and compared with experimental data. The models accurately reproduces the experimental data sets and capture particle inertial effects and trajectory crossing effect. A new adjustable particle parameter is introduced into the ODT model, and sensitivity analysis is performed to facilitate parameter estimation and selection. A novel algorithm of the two-way momentum coupling between the particle and carrier phases is developed in the ODT multiphase model. Momentum exchange between the phases is accounted for through particle source terms in the viscous diffusion. The source term is implemented in eddy events through a new kernel transformation and an iterative procedure is required for eddy selection. This model is applied to a particle-laden turbulent jet flow, and simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. The effect of particle addition on the velocities of the gas phase is investigated. The development of

  5. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Frankel, S. H.; Adumitroaie, V.; Sabini, G.; Madnia, C. K.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to extend current capabilities of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first two years of this research have been concentrated on a priori investigations of single-point Probability Density Function (PDF) methods for providing subgrid closures in reacting turbulent flows. In the efforts initiated in the third year, our primary focus has been on performing actual LES by means of PDF methods. The approach is based on assumed PDF methods and we have performed extensive analysis of turbulent reacting flows by means of LES. This includes simulations of both three-dimensional (3D) isotropic compressible flows and two-dimensional reacting planar mixing layers. In addition to these LES analyses, some work is in progress to assess the extent of validity of our assumed PDF methods. This assessment is done by making detailed companions with recent laboratory data in predicting the rate of reactant conversion in parallel reacting shear flows. This report provides a summary of our achievements for the first six months of the third year of this program.

  6. Large-eddy simulation of supercritical fluid flow and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Hongfa

    The present study focuses on the modeling and simulation of injection, mixing, and combustion of real fluids at supercritical conditions. The objectives of the study are: (1) to establish a unified theoretical framework that can be used to study the turbulent combustion of real fluids; (2) to implement the theoretical framework and conduct numerical studies with the aim of improving the understanding of the flow and combustion dynamics at conditions representative of contemporary liquid-propellant rocket engine operation; (3) to identify the key design parameters and the flow variables which dictate the dynamics characteristics of swirl- and shear- coaxial injectors. The theoretical and numerical framework is validated by simulating the Sandia Flame D. The calculated axial and radial profiles of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of major species are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental measurements. The conditionally averaged mass fraction profiles agree very well with the experimental results at different axial locations. The validated model is first employed to examine the flow dynamics of liquid oxygen in a pressure swirl injector at supercritical conditions. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the effects of external excitations on the dynamic response of the injector. The high-frequency fluctuations do not significantly affect the flow field as they are dissipated shortly after being introduced into the flow. However, the lower-frequency fluctuations are amplified by the flow. As a result, the film thickness and the spreading angle at the nozzle exit fluctuate strongly for low-frequency external excitations. The combustion of gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen in a high-pressure combustion chamber for a shear coaxial injector is simulated to assess the accuracy and the credibility of the computer program when applied to a sub-scale model of a combustor. The predicted heat flux profile is compared with the experimental and numerical studies. The

  7. Advances in Constitutive and Failure Models for Sheet Forming Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong Whan; Stoughton, Thomas B.

    2016-08-01

    Non-Associated Flow Rule (Non-AFR) can be used as a convenient way to account for anisotropic material response in metal deformation processes, making it possible for example, to eliminate the problem of the anomalous yielding in equibiaxial tension that is mistakenly attributed to limitations of the quadratic yield function, but may instead be attributed to the Associated Flow Rule (AFR). Seeing as in Non-AFR based models two separate functions can be adopted for yield and plastic potential, there is no constraint to which models are used to describe each of them. In this work, the flexible combination of two different yield criteria as yield function and plastic potential under Non-AFR is proposed and evaluated. FE simulations were carried so as to verify the accuracy of the material directionalities predicted using these constitutive material models. The stability conditions for non-associated flow connected with the prediction of yield point elongation are also reviewed. Anisotropic distortion hardening is further incorporated under non-associated flow. It has been found that anisotropic hardening makes the noticeable improvements for both earing and spring-back predictions. This presentation is followed by a discussion of the topic of the forming limit & necking, the evidence in favor of stress analysis, and the motivation for the development of a new type of forming limit diagram based on the polar effective plastic strain (PEPS) diagram. In order to connect necking to fracture in metals, the stress-based necking limit is combined with a stress- based fracture criterion in the principal stress, which provides an efficient method for the analysis of necking and fracture limits. The concept for the PEPS diagram is further developed to cover the path-independent PEPS fracture which is compatible with the stress-based fracture approach. Thus this fracture criterion can be utilized to describe the post-necking behavior and to cover nonlinear strain-path. Fracture

  8. Simulation of 3D flows past hypersonic vehicles in FlowVision software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitskiy, D. V.; Bartenev, G. Y.; Pokhilko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A new implicit velocity-pressure split method is discussed in the given presentation. The method implies using conservative velocities, obtained at the given time step, for integration of the momentum equation and other convection-diffusion equations. This enables simulation of super- and hypersonic flows with account of motion of solid boundaries. Calculations of known test cases performed in the FlowVision software are demonstrated. It is shown that the method allows one to carry out calculations at high Mach numbers with integration step essentially exceeding the explicit time step.

  9. Flow structure interaction around an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine: Experiments and CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Chamorro, L.; Hill, C.; Arndt, R.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2014-12-01

    We carry out large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine mounted on the bed of a straight rectangular open channel. The complex turbine geometry, including the rotor and all stationary components, is handled by employing the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1], and velocity boundary conditions near all solid surfaces are reconstructed using a wall model based on solving the simplified boundary layer equations [2]. In this study we attempt to directly resolve flow-blade interactions without introducing turbine parameterization methods. The computed wake profiles of velocities and turbulent stresses agree well with the experimentally measured values.

  10. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  11. Stochastic Rotation Dynamics simulations of wetting multi-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Brinkmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Multi-color Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRDmc) has been introduced by Inoue et al. [1,2] as a particle based simulation method to study the flow of emulsion droplets in non-wetting microchannels. In this work, we extend the multi-color method to also account for different wetting conditions. This is achieved by assigning the color information not only to fluid particles but also to virtual wall particles that are required to enforce proper no-slip boundary conditions. To extend the scope of the original SRDmc algorithm to e.g. immiscible two-phase flow with viscosity contrast we implement an angular momentum conserving scheme (SRD+mc). We perform extensive benchmark simulations to show that a mono-phase SRDmc fluid exhibits bulk properties identical to a standard SRD fluid and that SRDmc fluids are applicable to a wide range of immiscible two-phase flows. To quantify the adhesion of a SRD+mc fluid in contact to the walls we measure the apparent contact angle from sessile droplets in mechanical equilibrium. For a further verification of our wettability implementation we compare the dewetting of a liquid film from a wetting stripe to experimental and numerical studies of interfacial morphologies on chemically structured surfaces.

  12. Simulating unsteady flow and sediment transport in vegetated channel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Duan, Jennifer G.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional model for simulating flood routing and sediment transport over mobile alluvium in a vegetated channel network. The modified St. Venant equations together with the governing equations for suspended sediment and bed load transport were solved simultaneously to obtain flow properties and sediment transport rate. The Godunov-type finite volume method is employed to discretize the governing equations. Then, the Exner equation was solved for bed elevation change. Since sediment transport is non-equilibrium when bed is degrading or aggrading, a recovery coefficient for suspended sediment and an adaptation length for bed load transport were used to quantify the differences between equilibrium and non-equilibrium sediment transport rate. The influence of vegetation on floodplain and main channel was accounted for by adjusting resistance terms in the momentum equations for flow field. A procedure to separate the grain resistance from the total resistance was proposed and implemented to calculate sediment transport rate. The model was tested by a flume experiment case and an unprecedented flood event occurred in the Santa Cruz River, Tucson, Arizona, in July 2006. Simulated results of flow discharge and bed elevation changes showed satisfactory agreements with the measurements. The impacts of vegetation density on sediment transport and significance of non-equilibrium sediment transport model were discussed.

  13. Urban traffic-network performance: flow theory and simulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Performance models for urban street networks were developed to describe the response of a traffic network to given travel-demand levels. The three basic traffic flow variables, speed, flow, and concentration, are defined at the network level, and three model systems are proposed. Each system consists of a series of interrelated, consistent functions between the three basic traffic-flow variables as well as the fraction of stopped vehicles in the network. These models are subsequently compared with the results of microscopic simulation of a small test network. The sensitivity of one of the model systems to a variety of network features was also explored. Three categories of features were considered, with the specific features tested listed in parentheses: network topology (block length and street width), traffic control (traffic signal coordination), and traffic characteristics (level of inter-vehicular interaction). Finally, a fundamental issue concerning the estimation of two network-level parameters (from a nonlinear relation in the two-fluid theory) was examined. The principal concern was that of comparability of these parameters when estimated with information from a single vehicle (or small group of vehicles), as done in conjunction with previous field studies, and when estimated with network-level information (i.e., all the vehicles), as is possible with simulation.

  14. Large eddy simulation of boundary layer flow under cnoidal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin-Jun; Chen, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Ji-Fu; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Water waves in coastal areas are generally nonlinear, exhibiting asymmetric velocity profiles with different amplitudes of crest and trough. The behaviors of the boundary layer under asymmetric waves are of great significance for sediment transport in natural circumstances. While previous studies have mainly focused on linear or symmetric waves, asymmetric wave-induced flows remain unclear, particularly in the flow regime with high Reynolds numbers. Taking cnoidal wave as a typical example of asymmetric waves, we propose to use an infinite immersed plate oscillating cnoidally in its own plane in quiescent water to simulate asymmetric wave boundary layer. A large eddy simulation approach with Smagorinsky subgrid model is adopted to investigate the flow characteristics of the boundary layer. It is verified that the model well reproduces experimental and theoretical results. Then a series of numerical experiments are carried out to study the boundary layer beneath cnoidal waves from laminar to fully developed turbulent regimes at high Reynolds numbers, larger than ever studied before. Results of velocity profile, wall shear stress, friction coefficient, phase lead between velocity and wall shear stress, and the boundary layer thickness are obtained. The dependencies of these boundary layer properties on the asymmetric degree and Reynolds number are discussed in detail.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Formation in Co-Flowing Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, Ashraf A; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Riemer, Bernie

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of helium bubble formation and detachment at a submerged needle in stagnant and co-flowing mercury. Since mercury is opaque, visualization of internal gas bubbles was done with proton radiography (pRad) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE2). The acoustic waves emitted at the time of detachment and during subsequent oscillations of the bubble were recorded with a microphone. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) model was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection in mercury. The VOF model is validated by comparing detailed bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth and detachment, with the experimental measurements at different gas flow rates and mercury velocities. The experimental and computational results show a two-stage bubble formation. The first stage involves growing bubble around the needle, and the second follows as the buoyancy overcomes wall adhesion. The comparison of predicted and measured bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth and detachment is in good agreement.

  16. Numerical simulations of groundwater flow at New Jersey Shallow Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, Annick; Patterson, Fabian; Lofi, Johanna; Reiche, Sönke

    2016-04-01

    During IODP Expedition 313, three boreholes were drilled in the so-called New Jersey transect. Hydrochemical studies revealed the groundwater situation as more complex than expected, characterized by several sharp boundaries between fresh and saline groundwater. Two conflicting hypotheses regarding the nature of these freshwater reservoirs are currently debated. One hypothesis is that these reservoirs are connected with onshore aquifers and continuously recharged by seaward-flowing groundwater. The second hypothesis is that fresh groundwater was emplaced during the last glacial period. In addition to the petrophysical properties measured during IODP 313 expedition, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements were performed on samples from boreholes M0027, M0028 and M0029 in order to deduce porosities and permeabilities. These results are compared with data from alternative laboratory measurements and with petrophysical properties inferred from downhole logging data. We incorporate these results into a 2D numerical model that reflects the shelf architecture as known from drillings and seismic data to perform submarine groundwater flow simulations. In order to account for uncertainties related to the spatial distribution of physical properties, such as porosity and permeability, systematic variation of input parameters was performed during simulation runs. The target is to test the two conflicting hypotheses of fresh groundwater emplacements offshore New Jersey and to improve the understanding of fluid flow processes at marine passive margins.

  17. Uncertainty in simulated groundwater-quality trends in transient flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starn, J. Jeffrey; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios; Robbins, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    In numerical modeling of groundwater flow, the result of a given solution method is affected by the way in which transient flow conditions and geologic heterogeneity are simulated. An algorithm is demonstrated that simulates breakthrough curves at a pumping well by convolution-based particle tracking in a transient flow field for several synthetic basin-scale aquifers. In comparison to grid-based (Eulerian) methods, the particle (Lagrangian) method is better able to capture multimodal breakthrough caused by changes in pumping at the well, although the particle method may be apparently nonlinear because of the discrete nature of particle arrival times. Trial-and-error choice of number of particles and release times can perhaps overcome the apparent nonlinearity. Heterogeneous aquifer properties tend to smooth the effects of transient pumping, making it difficult to separate their effects in parameter estimation. Porosity, a new parameter added for advective transport, can be accurately estimated using both grid-based and particle-based methods, but predictions can be highly uncertain, even in the simple, nonreactive case.

  18. High-order filtering for control volume flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, G.; Denaro, F. M.; Riccardi, G.

    2001-12-01

    A general methodology is presented in order to obtain a hierarchy of high-order filter functions, starting from the standard top-hat filter, naturally linked to control volumes flow simulations. The goal is to have a new filtered variable better represented in its high resolved wavenumber components by using a suitable deconvolution. The proposed formulation is applied to the integral momentum equation, that is the evolution equation for the top-hat filtered variable, by performing a spatial reconstruction based on the approximate inversion of the averaging operator. A theoretical analysis for the Burgers' model equation is presented, demonstrating that the local de-averaging is an effective tool to obtain a higher-order accuracy. It is also shown that the subgrid-scale term, to be modeled in the deconvolved balance equation, has a smaller absolute importance in the resolved wavenumber range for increasing deconvolution order. A numerical analysis of the procedure is presented, based on high-order upwind and central fluxes reconstruction, leading to congruent control volume schemes. Finally, the features of the present high-order conservative formulation are tested in the numerical simulation of a sample turbulent flow: the flow behind a backward-facing step. Copyright

  19. Flow Simulation to Enable Patient Specific Virtual Surgical Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Kenneth; Taylor, Charles; Mueller, Jens

    2003-11-01

    The current paradigm for interventional and surgery planning for the treatment of cardiovascular disease relies exclusively on diagnostic imaging data to define the present state of the patient, empirical data to evaluate the efficacy of prior treatments for similar patients, and the judgement of the surgeon to decide on a preferred treatment. The individual variability and inherent complexity of human biological systems is such that diagnostic imaging and empirical data alone are insufficient to predict the outcome of a given treatment for an individual patient. We have proposed a new paradigm of predictive medicine in which the physician utilizes computational tools to construct and evaluate a combined anatomic/physiologic model to predict differential changes in blood flow for alternative treatment plans for an individual patient. Ideally, these systems would provide an integrated set of image segmentation, geometric solid modeling, automatic finite element mesh generation, computational mechanics and scientific visualization tools accessible through an intuitive human-computer interface. In this talk we focus on the flow simulation aspects of this project. Error estimators for transient flow analyses have been developed and implemented to focus computational resources on the areas where they may have provide the greatest improvement. We will describe these error estimators and apply them to adaptive as well as uniform refinement simulations and compare the accuracy and performance to available experimental data in porcine bypass models that have been carried out specifically for this purpose.

  20. Flow Cytometry with Gold Nanoparticles and their Clusters as scattering Contrast Agents: FDTD Simulation of Light-Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo; Pond, James; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    The formulation of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) approach is presented in the framework of its potential applications to in vivo flow cytometry based on light scattering. The consideration is focused on comparison of light scattering by a single biological cell alone in controlled refractive index matching conditions and by cells labeled by gold nanoparticles. The optical schematics including phase contrast (OPCM) microscopy as a prospective modality for in vivo flow cytometry is also analyzed. The validation of the FDTD approach for the simulation of flow cytometry may open a new avenue in the development of advanced cytometric techniques based on scattering effects from nanoscale targets. PMID:19670359

  1. Revised conceptualization of the North China Basin groundwater flow system: Groundwater age, heat and flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoliang; Han, Dongmei; Currell, Matthew J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flow in deep sedimentary basins results from complex evolution processes on geological timescales. Groundwater flow systems conceptualized according to topography and/or groundwater table configuration generally assume a near-equilibrium state with the modern landscape. However, the time to reach such a steady state, and more generally the timescales of groundwater flow system evolution are key considerations for large sedimentary basins. This is true in the North China Basin (NCB), which has been studied for many years due to its importance as a groundwater supply. Despite many years of study, there remain contradictions between the generally accepted conceptual model of regional flow, and environmental tracer data. We seek to reconcile these contractions by conducting simulations of groundwater flow, age and heat transport in a three dimensional model, using an alternative conceptual model, based on geological, thermal, isotope and historical data. We infer flow patterns under modern hydraulic conditions using this new model and present the theoretical maximum groundwater ages under such a flow regime. The model results show that in contrast to previously accepted conceptualizations, most groundwater is discharged in the vicinity of the break-in-slope of topography at the boundary between the piedmont and central plain. Groundwater discharge to the ocean is in contrast small, and in general there are low rates of active flow in the eastern parts of the basin below the central and coastal plain. This conceptualization is more compatible with geochemical and geothermal data than the previous model. Simulated maximum groundwater ages of ∼1 Myrs below the central and coastal plain indicate that residual groundwater may be retained in the deep parts of the basin since being recharged during the last glacial period or earlier. The groundwater flow system has therefore probably not reached a new equilibrium state with modern-day hydraulic conditions. The

  2. Simulation of Dilated Heart Failure with Continuous Flow Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajuan; Loghmanpour, Natasha; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Ferreira, Antonio; Keller, Bradley; Gorcsan, John; Antaki, James

    2014-01-01

    Lumped parameter models have been employed for decades to simulate important hemodynamic couplings between a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and the native circulation. However, these studies seldom consider the pathological descending limb of the Frank-Starling response of the overloaded ventricle. This study introduces a dilated heart failure model featuring a unimodal end systolic pressure-volume relationship (ESPVR) to address this critical shortcoming. The resulting hemodynamic response to mechanical circulatory support are illustrated through numerical simulations of a rotodynamic, continuous flow ventricular assist device (cfVAD) coupled to systemic and pulmonary circulations with baroreflex control. The model further incorporated septal interaction to capture the influence of left ventricular (LV) unloading on right ventricular function. Four heart failure conditions were simulated (LV and bi-ventricular failure with/without pulmonary hypertension) in addition to normal baseline. Several metrics of LV function, including cardiac output and stroke work, exhibited a unimodal response whereby initial unloading improved function, and further unloading depleted preload reserve thereby reducing ventricular output. The concept of extremal loading was introduced to reflect the loading condition in which the intrinsic LV stroke work is maximized. Simulation of bi-ventricular failure with pulmonary hypertension revealed inadequacy of LV support alone. These simulations motivate the implementation of an extremum tracking feedback controller to potentially optimize ventricular recovery. PMID:24465511

  3. Multi-resolution flow simulations by smoothed particle hydrodynamics via domain decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-01

    We present a methodology to concurrently couple particle-based methods via a domain decomposition (DD) technique for simulating viscous flows. In particular, we select two resolutions of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method as demonstration. Within the DD framework, a simulation domain is decomposed into two (or more) overlapping sub-domains, each of which has an individual particle scale determined by the local flow physics. Consistency of the two sub-domains is achieved in the overlap region by matching the two independent simulations based on Lagrangian interpolation of state variables and fluxes. The domain decomposition based SPH method (DD-SPH) employs different spatial and temporal resolutions, and hence, each sub-domain has its own smoothing length and time step. As a consequence, particle refinement and de-refinement are performed asynchronously according to individual time advancement of each sub-domain. The proposed strategy avoids SPH force interactions between different resolutions on purpose, so that coupling, in principle, can go beyond SPH-SPH, and may allow SPH to be coupled with other mesoscopic or microscopic particle methods. The DD-SPH method is validated first for a transient Couette flow, where simulation results based on proper coupling of spatial-temporal scales agree well with analytical solutions. In particular, we find that the size of the overlap region should be at least rc,1 + 2rc,2, where rc,1 and rc,2 are cut off radii in the two sub-domains with rc,1 ≤rc,2. Subsequently, a perturbation wave is considered traveling either parallel or perpendicular to the hybrid interface. Compressibility is significant if transient behavior at short sonic-time-scale is relevant, while the fluid can be treated as quasi-incompressible at sufficiently long time scale. To this end, we propose a coupling of density fields from the two sub-domains. Finally, a steady Wannier flow is simulated, where a rotating cylinder is placed next to a

  4. A reconstruction method of intra-ventricular blood flow using color flow ultrasound: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaeseong; Ahn, Chi Young; Jeon, Kiwan; Choi, Jung-il; Lee, Changhoon; Seo, Jin Keun

    2015-03-01

    A reconstruction method is proposed here to quantify the distribution of blood flow velocity fields inside the left ventricle from color Doppler echocardiography measurement. From 3D incompressible Navier- Stokes equation, a 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with a mass source term is derived to utilize the measurable color flow ultrasound data in a plane along with the moving boundary condition. The proposed model reflects out-of-plane blood flows on the imaging plane through the mass source term. For demonstrating a feasibility of the proposed method, we have performed numerical simulations of the forward problem and numerical analysis of the reconstruction method. First, we construct a 3D moving LV region having a specific stroke volume. To obtain synthetic intra-ventricular flows, we performed a numerical simulation of the forward problem of Navier-Stokes equation inside the 3D moving LV, computed 3D intra-ventricular velocity fields as a solution of the forward problem, projected the 3D velocity fields on the imaging plane and took the inner product of the 2D velocity fields on the imaging plane and scanline directional velocity fields for synthetic scanline directional projected velocity at each position. The proposed method utilized the 2D synthetic projected velocity data for reconstructing LV blood flow. By computing the difference between synthetic flow and reconstructed flow fields, we obtained the averaged point-wise errors of 0.06 m/s and 0.02 m/s for u- and v-components, respectively.

  5. Efficient simulation of detached flows at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Jose M.; Asensio, Victor; Herrero, Raul; Varas, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    A method is presented for the computationally efficient simulation of quasi-periodic detached flows in multi-parameter problems at very large Reynolds numbers, keeping in mind a variety of applications, including helicopter flight simulators, control and certification of unmanned aerial vehicles, control of wind turbines, conceptual design in aeronautics, and civil aerodynamics. In many of these applications, the large scale flows (ignoring the smaller turbulent scales) are at most quasi-periodic, namely the Fourier transform exhibits a finite set of concentrated peaks resulting from the nonlinear passive interaction of periodic wakes. The method consists in an offline preprocess and the online operation. In the preprocess, a standard CFD solver (such as URANS) is used in combination with several ingredients such as an iterative combination proper orthogonal decomposition and fast Fourier transform. The online operation is made with a combination of high order singular value decomposition and interpolation. The performance of the method is tested considering the ow over a fairly complex urban topography, for various free stream intensities and orientations, seeking real time online simulations.

  6. Fluid Flow Simulation and Energetic Analysis of Anomalocarididae Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2014-11-01

    While an abundance of animal locomotion simulations have been performed modeling the motions of living arthropods and aquatic animals, little quantitative simulation and reconstruction of gait parameters has been done to model the locomotion of extinct animals, many of which bear little physical resemblance to their modern descendants. To that end, this project seeks to analyze potential swimming patterns used by the anomalocaridid family, (specifically Anomalocaris canadensis, a Cambrian Era aquatic predator), and determine the most probable modes of movement. This will serve to either verify or cast into question the current assumed movement patterns and properties of these animals and create a bridge between similar flexible-bodied swimmers and their robotic counterparts. This will be accomplished by particle-based fluid flow simulations of the flow around the fins of the animal, as well as an energy analysis of a variety of sample gaits. The energy analysis will then be compared to the extant information regarding speed/energy use curves in an attempt to determine which modes of swimming were most energy efficient for a given range of speeds. These results will provide a better understanding of how these long-extinct animals moved, possibly allowing an improved understanding of their behavioral patterns, and may also lead to a novel potential platform for bio-inspired underwater autonomous vehicles (UAVs).

  7. Two-dimensional Numerical Simulations of Supercritical Accretion Flows Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Hong; Yuan, Feng; Ohsuga, Ken; Bu, De-Fu

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of super-Eddington accretion flows by performing two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Compared with previous works, in this paper we include the T θphi component of the viscous stress and consider various values of the viscous parameter α. We find that when T θphi is included, the rotational speed of the high-latitude flow decreases, while the density increases and decreases at the high and low latitudes, respectively. We calculate the radial profiles of inflow and outflow rates. We find that the inflow rate decreases inward, following a power law form of \\dot{M}_in\\propto r^s. The value of s depends on the magnitude of α and is within the range of ~0.4-1.0. Correspondingly, the radial profile of density becomes flatter compared with the case of a constant \\dot{M}(r). We find that the density profile can be described by ρ(r)vpropr -p and the value of p is almost same for a wide range of α ranging from α = 0.1 to 0.005. The inward decrease of inflow accretion rate is very similar to hot accretion flows, which is attributed to the mass loss in outflows. To study the origin of outflow, we analyze the convective stability of the slim disk. We find that depending on the value of α, the flow is marginally stable (when α is small) or unstable (when α is large). This is different from the case of hydrodynamical hot accretion flow, where radiation is dynamically unimportant and the flow is always convectively unstable. We speculate that the reason for the difference is because radiation can stabilize convection. The origin of outflow is thus likely because of the joint function of convection and radiation, but further investigation is required.

  8. Resin Flow of an Advanced Grid-Stiffened Composite Structure in the Co-Curing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qizhong; Ren, Mingfa; Chen, Haoran

    2013-06-01

    The soft-mold aided co-curing process which cures the skin part and ribs part simultaneously was introduced for reducing the cost of advanced grid-stiffened composite structure (AGS). The co-curing process for a typical AGS, preformed by the prepreg AS4/3501-6, was simulated by a finite element program incorporated with the user-subroutines `thermo-chemical' module and the `chemical-flow' module. The variations of temperature, cure degree, resin pressure and fiber volume fraction of the AGS were predicted. It shows that the uniform distributions of temperature, cure degree and viscosity in the AGS would be disturbed by the unique geometrical pattern of AGS. There is an alternation in distribution of resin pressure at the interface between ribs and skin, and the duration time of resin flow is sensitive to the thickness of the AGS. To obtain a desired AGS, the process parameters of the co-curing process should be determined by the geometry of an AGS and the kinds of resin.

  9. Proceedings of the Advanced Seminar on one-dimensional, open-channel Flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the increased use of mathematical/numerical simulation models, of the diversity of both model investigations and informational project objectives, and of the technical demands of complex model applications by U.S. Geological Survey personnel, an advanced seminar on one-dimensional open-channel flow and transport modeling was organized and held on June 15-18, 1987, at the National Space Technology Laboratory, Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Principal emphasis in the Seminar was on one-dimensional flow and transport model-implementation techniques, operational practices, and application considerations. The purposes of the Seminar were to provide a forum for the exchange of information, knowledge, and experience among model users, as well as to identify immediate and future needs with respect to model development and enhancement, user support, training requirements, and technology transfer. The Seminar program consisted of a mix of topical and project presentations by Geological Survey personnel. This report is a compilation of short papers that summarize the presentations made at the Seminar.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of the sea flows around blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushin, Pavel V.; Gushchin, Valentin A.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is the demonstration of the opportunities of the mathematical modeling of the separated flows of the sea water around blunt bodies on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) in the Boussinesq approximation. The 3D density stratified incompressible viscous fluid flows around a sphere have been investigated by means of the direct numerical simulation (DNS) on supercomputers and the visualization of the 3D vortex structures in the wake. For solving of NSE the Splitting on physical factors Method for Incompressible Fluid flows (SMIF) with hybrid explicit finite difference scheme (second-order accuracy in space, minimum scheme viscosity and dispersion, capable for work in wide range of the Reynolds (Re) and the internal Froude (Fr) numbers and monotonous) has been developed and successfully applied. The different transitions in sphere wakes with increasing of Re (10 < Re < 500) and decreasing of Fr (0.005 < Fr < 100) have been investigated in details. Thus the classifications of the viscous fluid flow regimes around a sphere have been refined.

  11. Numerical simulation of compressor endwall and casing treatment flow phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crook, A. J.; Greitzer, E. M.; Tan, C. S.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study is presented of the flow in the endwall region of a compressor blade row, in conditions of operation with both smooth and grooved endwalls. The computations are first compared to velocity field measurements in a cantilevered stator/rotating hub configuration to confirm that the salient features are captured. Computations are then interrogated to examine the tip leakage flow structure since this is a dominant feature of the endwall region. In particular, the high blockage that can exist near the endwalls at the rear of a compressor blade passage appears to be directly linked to low total pressure fluid associated with the leakage flow. The fluid dynamic action of the grooved endwall, representative of the casing treatments that have been most successful in suppressing stall, is then simulated computationally and two principal effects are identified. One is suction of the low total pressure, high blockage fluid at the rear of the passage. The second is energizing of the tip leakage flow, most notably in the core of the leakage vortex, thereby suppressing the blockage at its source.

  12. DSMC simulation of low Reynolds number nozzle flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelesnik, D.; Micci, M. M.; Long, L. N.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical analysis of low Reynolds number nozzle flows was performed to investigate the loss mechanisms involved and to determine the nozzle wall contour that minimizes these losses. DSMC was used to simulate flows through three different nozzle configurations at two different stagnation chamber temperatures so that the heat transfer losses could be separated from the wall contour effects on performance. A trumpet-shaped nozzle had 5 percent higher efficiency than a conical nozzle and a 3 percent higher efficiency than a bell-shaped nozzle with the unheated flow. With heated flow both the trumpet and bell-shaped nozzles had a 6.5 percent higher efficiency than the conical nozzle. The conical nozzle had the highest discharge coefficient of the three configurations, 0.92, and the trumpet-shaped nozzle had the lowest, 0.82. The discharge coefficient of each nozzle was unaffected by the change in stagnation temperature; however the increase in stagnation temperature increased the heat transfer and viscous losses in the boundary layer. These results suggest that the trumpet-shaped wall contour performed most efficiently except near the throat region, where it incurred large viscous losses. However, the bell-shaped nozzle may increase its overall performance with an increase in stagnation temperature.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of curved turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, R. D.; Moin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Low Reynolds number, mildly curved, turbulent channel flow has been simulated numerically without subgrid scale models. A new spectral numerical method developed for this problem was used, and the computations were performed with 2 million degrees of freedom. A variety of statistical and structural information has been extracted from the computed flow fields. These include mean velocity, turbulence stresses, velocity skewness, and flatness factors, space time correlations and spectra, all the terms in the Reynolds stress balance equations, and contour and vector plots of instantaneous velocity fields. The effects of curvature on this flow were determined by comparing the concave and convex sides of the channel. The observed effects are consistent with experimental observations for mild curvature. The most significant difference in the turbulence statistics between the concave and convex sides was in the Reynolds shear stress. This was accompanied by significant differences in the terms of the Reynolds shear stress balance equations. In addition, it was found that stationary Taylor-Gortler vortices were present and that they had a significant effect on the flow by contributing to the mean Reynolds shear stress, and by affecting the underlying turbulence.

  14. Numerical simulation of subaqueous chute flows of granular materials.

    PubMed

    Varsakelis, C; Papalexandris, M V

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we report on numerical studies of unsteady, gravity-driven flow of a subaqueous erodible granular bed on an inclined plane. According to our simulations, the evolution of the flow can be partitioned in three phases. In the first phase, due to the onset of an interfacial instability, the material interface deforms into a series of long waves. In the second phase, these waves are transformed to skewed vortex ripples that grow in time and eventually coalesce. The computed wavelengths of these ripples are in good agreement with previously reported experimental measurements. In the third phase of the flow evolution, the high fluid velocities wash out the vortex ripples and a layer of rapidly moving particles is formed at the material interface. The predicted granular velocities comprise two segments: a concave one at the vicinity of the material interface, where the maximum is attained, followed by a slightly convex one, where they decrease monotonically to zero. The same trend has been reported in experimental results for the corresponding steady flows. Finally, we investigate via a parametric study the effect of the configuration stresses, which represent contact forces between grains. As it turns out, such stresses have a stabilizing effect, in the sense that increasing their magnitude inhibits the formation of vortex ripples. PMID:25985944

  15. Rheological properties of simulated debris flows in the laboratory environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Chen, Cheng-lung; Jan, Chyan-Deng; ,

    1990-01-01

    Steady debris flows with or without a snout are simulated in a 'conveyor-belt' flume using dry glass spheres of a uniform size, 5 or 14 mm in diameter, and their rheological properties described quantitatively in constants in a generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model. Close agreement of the measured velocity profiles with the theoretical ones obtained from the GVF model strongly supports the validity of a GVF model based on the continuum-mechanics approach. Further comparisons of the measured and theoretical velocity profiles along with empirical relations among the shear stress, the normal stress, and the shear rate developed from the 'ring-shear' apparatus determine the values of the rheological parameters in the GVF model, namely the flow-behavior index, the consistency index, and the cross-consistency index. Critical issues in the evaluation of such rheological parameters using the conveyor-belt flume and the ring-shear apparatus are thus addressed in this study.

  16. F-14A aircraft high-speed flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppe, C. W.; Rosen, B. S.

    1985-01-01

    A model of the Grumman/Navy F-14A aircraft was developed for analyses using the NASA/Grumman Transonic Wing-Body Code. Computations were performed for isolated wing and wing fuselage glove arrangements to determine the extent of aerodynamic interference effects which propagate outward onto the main wing outer panel. Additional studies were conducted using the full potential analysis, FLO 22, to calibrate any inaccuracies that might accrue because of small disturbance code limitations. Comparisons indicate that the NASA/Grumman code provides excellent flow simulations for the range of wing sweep angles and flow conditions that will be of interest for the upcoming F-14 Variable Sweep Flight Transition Experiment.

  17. Toward faster OPC convergence: advanced analysis for OPC iterations and simulation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahnas, Mohamed; Al-Imam, Mohamed; Tawfik, Tamer

    2008-10-01

    Achieving faster Turn-Around-Time (TAT) is one of the most attractive objectives for the silicon wafer manufacturers despite the technology node they are processing. This is valid for all the active technology nodes from 130nm till the cutting edge technologies. There have been several approaches adopted to cut down the OPC simulation runtime without sacrificing the OPC output quality, among them is using stronger CPU power and Hardware acceleration which is a good usage for the advancing powerful processing technology. Another favorable approach for cutting down the runtime is to look deeper inside the used OPC algorithm and the implemented OPC recipe. The OPC algorithm includes the convergence iterations and simulation sites distribution, and the OPC recipe is in definition how to smartly tune the OPC knobs to efficiently use the implemented algorithm. Many previous works were exposed to monitoring the OPC convergence through iterations and analyze the size of the shift per iteration, similarly several works tried to calculate the amount of simulation capacity needed for all these iterations and how to optimize it for less amount. The scope of the work presented here is an attempt to decrease the number of optical simulations by reducing the number of control points per site and without affecting OPC accuracy. The concept is proved by many simulation results and analysis. Implementing this flow illustrated the achievable simulation runtime reduction which is reflected in faster TAT. For its application, it is not just runtime optimization, additionally it puts some more intelligence in the sparse OPC engine by eliminating the headache of specifying the optimum simulation site length.

  18. Multiscale Hydrologic Evaluation of Radar Rainfall for Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, Felipe; Krajewski, Witold; Seo, Bong-Chul; Mantilla, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    We made an evaluation of the performance of a hydrologic model to produce real-time flow forecasts. The model has been developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC), and it is implemented operationally to produce streamflow forecast for the communities of the State of Iowa in the United States. The model parameters are calibration-free. It has a parsimonious structure, that reproduces the more significant processes involved in the transformation from rainfall to runoff. The operational model uses a rainfall forcing produced by IFC, derived from the combination of rainfall fields of seven NEXRAD radars. However, this rainfall forcing does not include bias adjustment from rain gauges, due to the non-existence of a raingage network that enable the correction in real-time. In consideration, the model is also run offline using bias-adjusted rainfall products as Stage IV, and more recently MRMS. We used an extensive record of five years of IFC rainfall product and Stage IV, to evaluate the performance of the hydrologic model and the sensitivity of the flow simulations to model input. The model is not calibrated to any particular rainfall product. The distributed structure of the model allows to obtain results at any channel of the drainage network. We obtained simulated hydrographs at about 150 locations with different sub-basin spatial scales, where there are available USGS gages with streamflow observations. We obtained error metrics as Nash Sutcliffe efficiency and root mean square error, by comparing flow simulations to observations. We evaluated also the number of occurrences of hits and false alarms of discharge forecasts exceeding flood stage.

  19. Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees with renormalized numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, Stuart; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.

    2007-07-01

    High-Reynolds number flow over tree-like fractals is considered, with emphasis on the drag forces produced. Fractal objects display large scale-disparity and complexity while being amenable to a simple and standardized description. Hence, they offer an elegant idealization of the actual boundaries in practical applications where turbulence interacts with boundaries that are characterized by multiple length-scales. First, using large-eddy-simulation of flow over prefractal shapes with increasing numbers of branch generations, the dependence of the tree drag on the inner cutoff-scale of the fractal is studied. It is found that the convergence of the drag coefficient towards a value that is independent of inner cutoff-scale is very slow. In order to address this fundamental difficulty and avoid the need to resolve all the small-scale branches of the fractal, a new numerical modeling technique called renormalized numerical simulation (RNS) is introduced. RNS models the drag of the unresolved branches using drag coefficients measured from both resolved branches and unresolved branches as modeled in previous iterations of the procedure. The RNS technique and its convergence properties are tested by means of a series of simulations using different levels of resolution. Then, RNS is used to investigate the influence of the tree fractal dimension on the drag coefficient. The increase of the drag with fractal dimension is quantified for two types of tree geometry, in two flow configurations. Results illustrate that RNS enables numerical modeling of physical processes associated with fractal geometries using affordable computational resolution.

  20. Cutaneous microvascular flow in the foot during simulated variable gravities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. S.; Breit, G. A.; Styf, J. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Our objective was to understand how weight bearing with varying gravitational fields affects blood perfusion in the sole of the foot. Human subjects underwent whole body tilting at four angles: upright [1 gravitational vector from head to foot (Gz)], 22 degrees (0.38 Gz), 10 degrees (0.17 Gz), and supine (0 Gz), simulating the gravitational fields of Earth, Mars, Moon, and microgravity, respectively. Cutaneous capillary blood flow was monitored on the plantar surface of the heel by laser Doppler flowmetry while weight-bearing load was measured. At each tilt angle, subjects increased weight bearing on one foot in graded load increments of 1 kg beginning with zero. The weight bearing at which null flow first occurred was determined as the closing load. Subsequently, the weight bearing was reduced in reverse steps until blood flow returned (opening load). Mean closing loads for simulated Earth gravity, Mars gravity, Moon gravity, and microgravity were 9.1, 4.6, 4.4, and 3.6 kg, respectively. Mean opening loads were 7.9, 4.1, 3.5, and 3.1 kg, respectively. Mean arterial pressures in the foot (MAP(foot)) calculated for each simulated gravitational field were 192, 127, 106, and 87 mmHg, respectively. Closing load and opening load were significantly correlated with MAP(foot) (r =0.70, 0.72, respectively) and were significantly different (P < 0.001) from each other. The data suggest that decreased local arterial pressure in the foot lowers tolerance to external compression. Consequently, the human foot sole may be more prone to cutaneous ischemia during load bearing in microgravity than on Earth.

  1. Numerical simulations of the flow in the HYPULSE expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Sussman, Myles A.; Bakos, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical simulations with finite-rate chemistry are presented for two operating conditions in the HYPULSE expansion tube. The operating gas for these two cases is nitrogen and the computations are compared to experimental data. One test condition is at a total enthalpy of 15.2 MJ/Kg and a relatively low static pressure of 2 kPa. This case is characterized by a laminar boundary layer and significant chemical nonequilibrium in the acceleration gas. The second test condition is at a total enthalpy of 10.2 MJ/Kg and a static pressure of 38 kPa and is characterized by a turbulent boundary layer. For both cases, the time-varying test gas pressure predicted by the simulations is in good agreement with experimental data. The computations are also found to be in good agreement with Mirels' correlations for shock tube flow. It is shown that the nonuniformity of the test gas observed in the HYPULSE expansion tube is strongly linked to the boundary layer thickness. The turbulent flow investigated has a larger boundary layer and greater test gas nonuniformity. In order to investigate possibilities of improving expansion tube flow quality by reducing the boundary layer thickness, parametric studies showing the effect of density and turbulent transition point on the test conditions are also presented. Although an increase in the expansion tube operating pressure level would reduce the boundary layer thickness, the simulations indicate that the reduction would be less than what is predicted by flat plate boundary layer correlations.

  2. Cutaneous Microvascular Flow In the Foot During Simulated Variable Gravities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, David S.; Breit, Greg A.; Styf, Jorma R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Our objective was to elucidate how varying gravitational fields affect blood perfusion in the sole of the foot. Human subjects underwent whole-body tilting at four angles: upright (1 G(sub z), 22 deg (.38 G(sub z)), 10 deg (.17 G(sub z)), and supine (0 G(sub z)), simulating the gravitational fields of Earth, Mars, Moon, and microgravity, respectively. Cutaneous capillary blood flow was monitored on the plantar surface of the heel by laser Doppler flowmetry while weight bearing load was measured beneath the same foot with a calibrated scale. Foot mean arterial pressures (MAP) were calculated by adding estimated hydrostatic pressures to continuously recorded heart-level blood pressures for each subject. At each tilt angle, subjects increased weight bearing on one foot in graded load increments of one kilogram beginning with zero. The weight bearing at which null flow first occurred was determined as the closing load (CL). Subsequently, the weight bearing was reduced in reverse steps until blood flow returned (opening load, OL). CL and OL were normalized to each subject's body weight and expressed as percent of body weight. Mean CLs (SD in parentheses) for simulated Earth, Mars, Moon, and micro-gravities were 14 (5), 8 (2), 6 (2), and 5 (2) percent of body weight, respectively. OLs were 12 (3), 6 (1), 5 (2), and 4 (1), respectively. Calculated foot MAPs for each simulated gravitational field were 192 (19), 127 (12), 106 (10), and 87 (9) mm Hg, respectively. CL and OL were significantly correlated with foot MAP (r = 0.70, 0.72, respectively). Overall, CL and OL were significantly different (p is less than 0.001). The data suggest that decreased local arterial pressure in the foot lowers tolerance to external compression. Consequently, the human foot sole may be more prone to cutaneous ischernia during loading in microgravity than on Earth.

  3. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 1. Simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniel Buscombe,; Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1. In this, the first of a pair of papers which address the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted natural granular material, a method is presented for simulation of two-phase (solid, void) assemblages of discrete non-cohesive particles. The purpose is to have a flexible, yet computationally and theoretically simple, suite of tools with well constrained and well known statistical properties, in order to simulate realistic granular material as a discrete element model with realistic size and shape distributions, for a variety of purposes. The stochastic modeling framework is based on three-dimensional tessellations with variable degrees of order in particle-packing arrangement. Examples of sediments with a variety of particle size distributions and spatial variability in grain size are presented. The relationship between particle shape and porosity conforms to published data. The immediate application is testing new algorithms for automated measurements of particle properties (mean and standard deviation of particle sizes, and apparent porosity) from images of natural sediment, as detailed in the second of this pair of papers. The model could also prove useful for simulating specific depositional structures found in natural sediments, the result of physical alterations to packing and grain fabric, using discrete particle flow models. While the principal focus here is on naturally occurring sediment and sedimentary rock, the methods presented might also be useful for simulations of similar granular or cellular material encountered in engineering, industrial and life sciences.

  4. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  5. r.avaflow, the GIS simulation model for avalanche and debris flows: new developments and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergili, Martin; Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Krenn, Julia; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    We present the latest developments and discuss some of the key challenges with regard to the novel and unified computational tool r.avaflow, representing an advanced, comprehensive, GIS-based open source simulation environment for two-phase geophysical mass flows such as avalanches of snow or rock, flows of debris or mud, and related process chains. r.avaflow is freely available and adoptable as a raster module of the GRASS GIS software (http://www.avaflow.org). We focus on the following issues: (1) We back-calculate a laboratory-scale debris flow experiment with r.avaflow and thereby show that different types of drag may govern the evolving flow dynamics, depending on the initial flow configuratiuon. In particular, it appears necessary to consider viscous ambient drag in order to achieve simulation results in line with experimentally measurements. (2) We employ a set of well-documented rock avalanche events to illustrate the use of a built-in functionality for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization. To do so, we demonstrate possible strategies going beyond the deficient one-at-a-time simulation approach. They allow us to test three or more parameters at once with a limited number of model runs. Computational times are kept at an acceptable level by multi-core processing strategies and use of the Vienna Scientific Cluster. We further discuss a number of key issues with regard to (i) arbitrary mountain topography; and (ii) entrainment and deposition of material. Most tests indicate a good model performance when the affected areas predicted for a late stage of the flow simulation are compared with observed affected areas. However, we note that such a validation is not fully justified without the implementation of a physically correct model for the deposition process. Acknowledgement: The work was conducted as part of the international cooperation project "A GIS simulation model for avalanche and debris flows (avaflow)" supported by the Austrian Science Fund

  6. Mesoscopic Simulations of Microfluidic Flow in Irregular Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Slater, Gary W.

    2009-03-01

    Stochastic Rotation Dynamics, a particle-based model for mesoscopic fluid dynamics, is used to study two and three-dimensional flow in a variety of complex boundaries and for a range of low Reynolds numbers (between 10 and 200). The systems considered are of two types: they consist of either irregular geometries such as dimpled pipes or require adaptive boundary conditions such as particle impact on a solid boundary. We apply out techniques to microfluidic devices with complex channel walls such as those used for slalom chromatography and sinusoidal undulation surface patterning chromatography. Numerical results showing good agreement with experimental data and previous computational simulations are presented.

  7. Numerical simulation of fluid flow around a scramaccelerator projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.; Sobota, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the fluid motion and temperature distribution around a 'scramaccelerator' projectile are obtained for Mach numbers in the 5-10 range. A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for inviscid and viscous two-dimensional or axisymmetric compressible flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly, using bilinear isoparametric quadrilateral elements, mass lumping, and a shock-capturing Petrov-Galerkin formulation. Computed results indicate that maintaining on-design performance for controlling and stabilizing oblique detonation waves is critically dependent on projectile shape and Mach number.

  8. Two-phase flow measurements with advanced instrumented spool pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K.C.

    1980-09-01

    A series of two-phase, air-water and steam-water tests performed with instrumented piping spool pieces is described. The behavior of the three-beam densitometer, turbine meter, and drag flowmeter is discussed in terms of two-phase models. Results from application of some two-phase mass flow models to the recorded spool piece data are shown. Results of the study are used to make recommendations regarding spool piece design, instrument selection, and data reduction methods to obtain more accurate measurements of two-phase flow parameters. 13 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Advances in flow visualization using liquid-crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Obara, Clifford J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses a new four-part mixing method for visualizing boundary layer flows, including transitions, separation, and shock locations, by the use of liquid-crystal coatings. The method controls the event temperature and color-play bandwidth best suited to specific experimental conditions, and is easily learned. The method is applicable almost throughout the altitude and speed ranges for subsonic aircraft flight envelopes, and is also applicable to supersonic flow visualization and for general use in high- and low-speed wind tunnel and water tunnel testing.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Viscous Accretion Flow around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Jae; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Kumar, Rajiv; Hyung, Siek; Ryu, Dongsu

    2016-06-01

    We present shocked viscous accretion flow onto a black hole in a two dimensional cylindrical geometry, where initial conditions were chosen from analytical solutions. The simulation code used the Lagrangian Total Variation Diminishing (LTVD) and remap routine, which enabled us to attain high accuracy in capturing shocks and to handle the angular momentum distribution correctly. The steady state shocked solution in the inviscid, as well as in the viscous regime, matched theoretical predictions well, but increasing viscosity renders the accretion shock unstable. Large amplitude shock oscillation is accompanied by intermittent, transient inner multiple shocks. Such oscillation of the inner part of disk is interpreted as the source of QPO in hard X-rays observed in microquasars; and strong shock oscillation induces strong episodic jet emission. The periodicity of jets and shock oscillation are similar. Our simulation shows that the jets for higher viscosity parameter are evidently stronger and faster than that for lower viscosity.

  11. Material flow simulation in a nuclear chemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Mahgerefteh, M.

    1984-01-01

    At a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant the special nuclear materials (SNM) are received as constituents of spent fuel assemblies, are converted to liquid form, and undergo a series of chemical processes. Uncertainties in measurements of SNM at each stage of reprocessing limit the accuracy of simple material balance accounting as a safeguards method. To be effective, a formal safeguards program must take into account all sources of measurement error yet detect any diversion of SNM. An analytical method for assessing the accountability of selected constituent SNM is demonstrated. A combined discrete-continuous, time-dependent model using the GASP IV simulation language is developed to simulate mass flow, material accountability and measurement error at each stage of the reprocessing plant.

  12. Dislocation dynamics: simulation of plastic flow of bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D H

    2001-02-20

    This is the final report for the LDRD strategic initiative entitled ''Dislocation Dynamic: Simulation of Plastic Flow of bcc Metals'' (tracking code: 00-SI-011). This report is comprised of 6 individual sections. The first is an executive summary of the project and describes the overall project goal, which is to establish an experimentally validated 3D dislocation dynamics simulation. This first section also gives some information of LLNL's multi-scale modeling efforts associated with the plasticity of bcc metals, and the role of this LDRD project in the multiscale modeling program. The last five sections of this report are journal articles that were produced during the course of the FY-2000 efforts.

  13. Towards effective flow simulations in realistic discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrone, Stefano; Pieraccini, Sandra; Scialò, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We focus on the simulation of underground flow in fractured media, modeled by means of Discrete Fracture Networks. Focusing on a new recent numerical approach proposed by the authors for tackling the problem avoiding mesh generation problems, we further improve the new family of methods making a step further towards effective simulations of large, multi-scale, heterogeneous networks. Namely, we tackle the imposition of Dirichlet boundary conditions in weak form, in such a way that geometrical complexity of the DFN is not an issue; we effectively solve DFN problems with fracture transmissivities spanning many orders of magnitude and approaching zero; furthermore, we address several numerical issues for improving the numerical solution also in quite challenging networks.

  14. Numerical simulation of MPD thruster flows with anomalous transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldo, Giuliano; Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Kelly, Arnold J.; Jahn, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    Anomalous transport effects in an Ar self-field coaxial MPD thruster are presently studied by means of a fully 2D two-fluid numerical code; its calculations are extended to a range of typical operating conditions. An effort is made to compare the spatial distribution of the steady state flow and field properties and thruster power-dissipation values for simulation runs with and without anomalous transport. A conductivity law based on the nonlinear saturation of lower hybrid current-driven instability is used for the calculations. Anomalous-transport simulation runs have indicated that the resistivity in specific areas of the discharge is significantly higher than that calculated in classical runs.

  15. An Advanced Leakage Scheme for Neutrino Treatment in Astrophysical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A.; Cabezón, R. M.; Käppeli, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present an Advanced Spectral Leakage (ASL) scheme to model neutrinos in the context of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and compact binary mergers. Based on previous gray leakage schemes, the ASL scheme computes the neutrino cooling rates by interpolating local production and diffusion rates (relevant in optically thin and thick regimes, respectively) separately for discretized values of the neutrino energy. Neutrino trapped components are also modeled, based on equilibrium and timescale arguments. The better accuracy achieved by the spectral treatment allows a more reliable computation of neutrino heating rates in optically thin conditions. The scheme has been calibrated and tested against Boltzmann transport in the context of Newtonian spherically symmetric models of CCSNe. ASL shows a very good qualitative and a partial quantitative agreement for key quantities from collapse to a few hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. We have proved the adaptability and flexibility of our ASL scheme, coupling it to an axisymmetric Eulerian and to a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to simulate core collapse. Therefore, the neutrino treatment presented here is ideal for large parameter-space explorations, parametric studies, high-resolution tests, code developments, and long-term modeling of asymmetric configurations, where more detailed neutrino treatments are not available or are currently computationally too expensive.

  16. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters with application to advanced propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  17. Inviscid and viscous flow modelling of complex aircraft configurations using the CFD simulation system sauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peace, Andrew J.; May, Nicholas E.; Pocock, Mark F.; Shaw, Jonathon A.

    1994-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the flow modelling capabilities of an advanced CFD simulation system known by the acronym SAUNA. This system is aimed primarily at complex aircraft configurations and possesses a unique grid generation strategy in its use of block-structured, unstructured or hybrid grids, depending on the geometric complexity of the addressed configuration. The main focus of the paper is in demonstrating the recently developed multi-grid, block-structured grid, viscous flow capability of SAUNA, through its evaluation on a number of configurations. Inviscid predictions are also presented, both as a means of interpreting the viscous results and with a view to showing more completely the capabilities of SAUNA. It is shown that accuracy and flexibility are combined in an efficient manner, thus demonstrating the value of SAUNA in aerodynamic design.

  18. Direct simulation Monte Carlo and Navier-Stokes simulations of blunt body wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, James N.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Dogra, Virendra K.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1994-07-01

    Numerical results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo and Navier-Stokes methods are presented for a Mach-20 nitrogen flow about a 70-deg blunted cone. The flow conditions simulated are those that can be obtained in existing low-density hypersonic wind tunnels. Three sets of flow conditions are considered with freestream Knudsen numbers ranging from 0.03 to 0.001. The focus is on the wake structure: how the wake structure changes as a function of rare faction, what the afterbody levels of heating are, and to what limits the continuum models are realistic as rarefunction in the wake is progressively increased. Calculations are made with and without an afterbody sting. Results for the afterbody sting are emphasized in anticipation of an experimental study for the current flow conditions and model configuration. The Navier-Stokes calculations were made with and without slip boundary conditions. Comparisons of the results obtained with the two simulation methodologies are made for both flowfield structure and surface quantities.

  19. Direct simulation Monte Carlo and Navier-Stokes simulations of blunt body wake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Dogra, Virendra K.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo and Navier-Stokes methods are presented for a Mach-20 nitrogen flow about a 70-deg blunted cone. The flow conditions simulated are those that can be obtained in existing low-density hypersonic wind tunnels. Three sets of flow conditions are considered with freestream Knudsen numbers ranging from 0.03 to 0.001. The focus is on the wake structure: how the wake structure changes as a function of rare faction, what the afterbody levels of heating are, and to what limits the continuum models are realistic as rarefunction in the wake is progressively increased. Calculations are made with and without an afterbody sting. Results for the afterbody sting are emphasized in anticipation of an experimental study for the current flow conditions and model configuration. The Navier-Stokes calculations were made with and without slip boundary conditions. Comparisons of the results obtained with the two simulation methodologies are made for both flowfield structure and surface quantities.

  20. Fissile Flow and Enrichment Monitor for GCEP Advanced Safeguards Application

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, Jose A; Uckan, Taner

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data that demonstrate a concept for a {sup 235}U flow and enrichment monitor (FEMO) based on passive measurements of process equipment in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The primary goal of the FEMO is to prevent, without using pipe penetrations or active interrogation with external sources, the production and diversion of undeclared nuclear material. This FEMO concept utilizes: (1) calibrated measurements of {sup 235}U density in cascade headers, and (2) measurements of pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate, which are correlated to the electrical power consumed by the GCEP pumps that transport UF{sub 6} from the cascade to the condensation cylinders. The {sup 235}U density is measured by counting 186 keV emissions using a NaI gamma detector located upstream of the pump. The pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate are determined using a correlation that is a function of the measured pump operational parameters (e.g., electric power consumption and rotational frequency) and the pumping configuration. The concept has been demonstrated in a low-pressure flow loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  1. Recent advances in PDF modeling of turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Andrew D.; Dai, F.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation concludes that a Monte Carlo probability density function (PDF) solution successfully couples with an existing finite volume code; PDF solution method applied to turbulent reacting flows shows good agreement with data; and PDF methods must be run on parallel machines for practical use.

  2. Quadrature Moments Method for the Simulation of Turbulent Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Venkatramanan; Pitsch, Heinz; Fox, Rodney O.

    2003-01-01

    A sub-filter model for reactive flows, namely the DQMOM model, was formulated for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using the filtered mass density function. Transport equations required to determine the location and size of the delta-peaks were then formulated for a 2-peak decomposition of the FDF. The DQMOM scheme was implemented in an existing structured-grid LES solver. Simulations of scalar shear layer using an experimental configuration showed that the first and second moments of both reactive and inert scalars are in good agreement with a conventional Lagrangian scheme that evolves the same FDF. Comparisons with LES simulations performed using laminar chemistry assumption for the reactive scalar show that the new method provides vast improvements at minimal computational cost. Currently, the DQMOM model is being implemented for use with the progress variable/mixture fraction model of Pierce. Comparisons with experimental results and LES simulations using a single-environment for the progress-variable are planned. Future studies will aim at understanding the effect of increase in environments on predictions.

  3. Simulation and phases of macroscopic particles in vortex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Heath Eric

    Granular materials are an interesting class of media in that they exhibit many disparate characteristics depending on conditions. The same set of particles may behave like a solid, liquid, gas, something in-between, or something completely unique depending on the conditions. Practically speaking, granular materials are used in many aspects of manufacturing, therefore any new information gleaned about them may help refine these techniques. For example, learning of a possible instability may help avoid it in practical application, saving machinery, money, and even personnel. To that end, we intend to simulate a granular medium under tornado-like vortex airflow by varying particle parameters and observing the behaviors that arise. The simulation itself was written in Python from the ground up, starting from the basic simulation equations in Poschel [1]. From there, particle spin, viscous friction, and vertical and tangential airflow were added. The simulations were then run in batches on a local cluster computer, varying the parameters of radius, flow force, density, and friction. Phase plots were created after observing the behaviors of the simulations and the regions and borders were analyzed. Most of the results were as expected: smaller particles behaved more like a gas, larger particles behaved more like a solid, and most intermediate simulations behaved like a liquid. A small subset formed an interesting crossover region in the center, and under moderate forces began to throw a few particles at a time upward from the center in a fountain-like effect. Most borders between regions appeared to agree with analysis, following a parabolic critical rotational velocity at which the parabolic surface of the material dips to the bottom of the mass of particles. The fountain effects seemed to occur at speeds along and slightly faster than this division. [1] Please see thesis for references.

  4. A simulation of the unsteady interaction of a centrifugal impeller with its vaned diffuser: Flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, W.N.

    1995-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to help advance one`s understanding of the complex, three-dimensional, unsteady flow associated with the interaction of a splittered centrifugal impeller and its vaned diffuser. A time-resolved simulation is presented of the Krain stage performed using a time-accurate, three-dimensional, unstructured mesh, solution-adaptive Navier-Stokes solver. The predicted flowfield, compared with experiment where available, displays a complex, unsteady interaction, especially in the neighborhood of the diffuser entry zone, which experiences large periodic flow unsteadiness. Downstream of the throat, although the magnitude of this unsteadiness diminishes rapidly, the flow has a highly distorted three-dimensional character. The loss levels in the diffuser are then investigated to try and determine how time-mean loss levels compare with the levels expected from equivalent steady flow analysis performed by using the circumferentially averaged exit flow from the impeller as inlet to the diffuser. It is concluded that little loss could be attributed directly to unsteady effects but rather that the principal cause of the rather high loss levels observed in the diffuser is the strong spanwise distortion in swirl angle at inlet, which initiates a strong hub/corner stall.

  5. Simulation of the unsteady interaction of a centrifugal impeller with its vaned diffuser: flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, W. N.

    1995-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to help advance our understanding of the complex, three-dimensional, unsteady flow associated with the interaction of a splittered centrifugal impeller and its vaned diffuser. A time-resolved simulation is presented of the Krain stage performed using a time-accurate, three-dimensional, unstructured mesh, solution-adaptive Navier-Stokes solver. The predicted flowfield, compared with experiment where available, displays a complex, unsteady interaction, especially in the neighborhood of the diffuser entry zone, which experiences large periodic flow unsteadiness. Downstream of the throat, although the magnitude of this unsteadiness diminishes rapidly, the flow has a highly distorted three-dimensional character. The loss levels in the diffuser are then investigated to try and determine how time-mean loss levels compare with the levels expected from 'equivalent' steady flow analysis performed by using the circumferentially averaged exit flow from the impeller as inlet to the diffuser. It is concluded that little loss could be attributed directly to unsteady effects but rather that the principal cause of the rather high loss levels observed in the diffuser is the strong spanwise distortion in swirl angle at inlet, which initiates a strong hub/corner stall.

  6. Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a

  7. Current Advances in the Computational Simulation of the Formation of Low-Mass Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Inutsuka, S; Padoan, P; Tomisaka, K

    2005-10-24

    Developing a theory of low-mass star formation ({approx} 0.1 to 3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) remains one of the most elusive and important goals of theoretical astrophysics. The star-formation process is the outcome of the complex dynamics of interstellar gas involving non-linear interactions of turbulence, gravity, magnetic field and radiation. The evolution of protostellar condensations, from the moment they are assembled by turbulent flows to the time they reach stellar densities, spans an enormous range of scales, resulting in a major computational challenge for simulations. Since the previous Protostars and Planets conference, dramatic advances in the development of new numerical algorithmic techniques have been successfully implemented on large scale parallel supercomputers. Among such techniques, Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics have provided frameworks to simulate the process of low-mass star formation with a very large dynamic range. It is now feasible to explore the turbulent fragmentation of molecular clouds and the gravitational collapse of cores into stars self-consistently within the same calculation. The increased sophistication of these powerful methods comes with substantial caveats associated with the use of the techniques and the interpretation of the numerical results. In this review, we examine what has been accomplished in the field and present a critique of both numerical methods and scientific results. We stress that computational simulations should obey the available observational constraints and demonstrate numerical convergence. Failing this, results of large scale simulations do not advance our understanding of low-mass star formation.

  8. Calibrating Lattice Boltzmann flow simulations and estimating uncertainty in the permeability of complex porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosa, Aleksandra; Curtis, Andrew; Wood, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    A common way to simulate fluid flow in porous media is to use Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods. Permeability predictions from such flow simulations are controlled by parameters whose settings must be calibrated in order to produce realistic modelling results. Herein we focus on the simplest and most commonly used implementation of the LB method: the single-relaxation-time BGK model. A key parameter in the BGK model is the relaxation time τ which controls flow velocity and has a substantial influence on the permeability calculation. Currently there is no rigorous scheme to calibrate its value for models of real media. We show that the standard method of calibration, by matching the flow profile of the analytic Hagen-Poiseuille pipe-flow model, results in a BGK-LB model that is unable to accurately predict permeability even in simple realistic porous media (herein, Fontainebleau sandstone). In order to reconcile the differences between predicted permeability and experimental data, we propose a method to calibrate τ using an enhanced Transitional Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which is suitable for parallel computer architectures. We also propose a porosity-dependent τ calibration that provides an excellent fit to experimental data and which creates an empirical model that can be used to choose τ for new samples of known porosity. Our Bayesian framework thus provides robust predictions of permeability of realistic porous media, herein demonstrated on the BGK-LB model, and should therefore replace the standard pipe-flow based methods of calibration for more complex media. The calibration methodology can also be extended to more advanced LB methods.

  9. Approaches to the simulation of unconfined flow and perched groundwater flow in MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Niswonger, Richard G.; Kipp, Kenneth; Panday, Sorab; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to manage the nonlinearities associated with the unconfined flow equation and to simulate perched groundwater conditions using the MODFLOW family of codes. The approaches comprise a variety of numerical techniques to prevent dry cells from becoming inactive and to achieve a stable solution focused on formulations of the unconfined, partially-saturated, groundwater flow equation. Keeping dry cells active avoids a discontinuous head solution which in turn improves the effectiveness of parameter estimation software that relies on continuous derivatives. Most approaches implement an upstream weighting of intercell conductance and Newton-Raphson linearization to obtain robust convergence. In this study, several published approaches were implemented in a stepwise manner into MODFLOW for comparative analysis. First, a comparative analysis of the methods is presented using synthetic examples that create convergence issues or difficulty in handling perched conditions with the more common dry-cell simulation capabilities of MODFLOW. Next, a field-scale three-dimensional simulation is presented to examine the stability and performance of the discussed approaches in larger, practical, simulation settings.

  10. Numerical simulation of air flow in a model of lungs with mouth cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, Jakub; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The air flow in a realistic geometry of human lung is simulated with computational flow dynamics approach as stationary inspiration. Geometry used for the simulation includes oral cavity, larynx, trachea and bronchial tree up to the seventh generation of branching. Unsteady RANS approach was used for the air flow simulation. Velocities corresponding to 15, 30 and 60 litres/min of flow rate were set as boundary conditions at the inlet to the model. These flow rates are frequently used as a representation of typical human activities. Character of air flow in the model for these different flow rates is discussed with respect to future investigation of particle deposition.

  11. Discrete effects on boundary conditions for the lattice Boltzmann equation in simulating microscale gas flows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoli; Shi, Baochang; Zhao, T S; Zheng, Chuguang

    2007-11-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) has shown its promise in the simulation of microscale gas flows. One of the critical issues with this advanced method is to specify suitable slip boundary conditions to ensure simulation accuracy. In this paper we study two widely used kinetic boundary conditions in the LBE: the combination of the bounce-back and specular-reflection scheme and the discrete Maxwell's scheme. We show that (i) both schemes are virtually equivalent in principle, and (ii) there exist discrete effects in both schemes. A strategy is then proposed to adjust the parameters in the two kinetic boundary conditions such that an accurate slip boundary condition can be implemented. The numerical results demonstrate that the corrected boundary conditions are robust and reliable.

  12. Simulator test to study hot-flow problems related to a gas cooled reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Freeman, M. P.; Doak, K. W.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    An advance study of materials, fuel injection, and hot flow problems related to the gas core nuclear rocket is reported. The first task was to test a previously constructed induction heated plasma GCNR simulator above 300 kW. A number of tests are reported operating in the range of 300 kW at 10,000 cps. A second simulator was designed but not constructed for cold-hot visualization studies using louvered walls. A third task was a paper investigation of practical uranium feed systems, including a detailed discussion of related problems. The last assignment resulted in two designs for plasma nozzle test devices that could be operated at 200 atm on hydrogen.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kutler, Paul; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    1989-01-01

    A solution procedure was developed that solves the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and was used to numerically simulate viscous incompressible flow through a model of the Pennsylvania State artificial heart. The solution algorithm is based on the artificial compressibility method, and uses flux-difference splitting to upwind the convective terms; a line-relaxation scheme is used to solve the equations. The time-accuracy of the method is obtained by iteratively solving the equations at each physical time step. The artificial heart geometry involves a piston-type action with a moving solid wall. A single H-grid is fit inside the heart chamber. The grid is continuously compressed and expanded with a constant number of grid points to accommodate the moving piston. The computational domain ends at the valve openings where nonreflective boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics are applied. Although a number of simplifing assumptions were made regarding the geometry, the computational results agreed reasonably well with an experimental picture. The computer time requirements for this flow simulation, however, are quite extensive. Computational study of this type of geometry would benefit greatly from improvements in computer hardware speed and algorithm efficiency enhancements.

  14. Consistent and conservative framework for incompressible multiphase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owkes, Mark; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    We present a computational methodology for convection that handles discontinuities with second order accuracy and maintains conservation to machine precision. We use this method in the context of an incompressible gas-liquid flow to transport the phase interface, momentum, and scalars. Using the same methodology for all the variables ensures discretely consistent transport, which is necessary for robust and accurate simulations of turbulent atomizing flows with high-density ratios. The method achieves conservative transport by computing consistent fluxes on a refined mesh, which ensures all conserved quantities are fluxed with the same discretization. Additionally, the method seamlessly couples semi-Lagrangian fluxes used near the interface with finite difference fluxes used away from the interface. The semi-Lagrangian fluxes are three-dimensional, un-split, and conservatively handle discontinuities. Careful construction of the fluxes ensures they are divergence-free and no gaps or overlaps form between neighbors. We have tested and used the scheme for many cases and demonstrate a simulation of an atomizing liquid jet.

  15. Navier-Stokes simulations of unsteady transonic flow phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two classes of unsteady flows are obtained via the Navier-Stokes equations: a blast-wave/target interaction problem class and a transonic cavity flow problem class. The method developed for the viscous blast-wave/target interaction problem assumes a laminar, perfect gas implemented in a structured finite-volume framework. The approximately factored implicit scheme uses Newton subiterations to obtain the spatially and temporally second-order accurate time history of the blast-waves with stationary targets. The inviscid flux is evaluated using either of two upwind techniques, while the full viscous terms are computed by central differencing. Comparisons of unsteady numerical, analytical, and experimental results are made in two- and three-dimensions for Couette flows, a starting shock-tunnel, and a shock-tube blockage study. The results show accurate wave speed resolution and nonoscillatory discontinuity capturing of the predominantly inviscid flows. Viscous effects were increasingly significant at large post-interaction times. While the blast-wave/target interaction problem benefits from high-resolution methods applied to the Euler terms, the transonic cavity flow problem requires the use of an efficient scheme implemented in a geometrically flexible overset mesh environment. Hence, the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations implemented in a diagonal form are applied to the cavity flow class of problems. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are made in two-dimensions for free shear layers and both rectangular and quieted cavities, and in three-dimensions for Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) geometries. The acoustic behavior of the rectangular and three-dimensional cavity flows compare well with experiment in terms of frequency, magnitude, and quieting trends. However, there is a more rapid decrease in computed acoustic energy with frequency than observed experimentally owing to numerical

  16. Numerical Simulations of Complex Three-Dimensional Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    Four issues related to accurate numerical simulations of three-dimensional, viscous, compressible flows in complex -shaped geometries are addressed. First, a new formulation of the "compressible" Navier-Stokes equations for rotating reference frames was developed, which can easily be implemented into existing computer codes. The equations developed have the same form as the governing equations for inertial reference frames except for source terms that account for the effects of the rotation of the reference frame. The governing equations were tested by simulating the flow of air through a coolant passage inside a radial turbine blade. Second, new techniques were developed to enhance control over grid-point distribution in algebraic grid generation. These techniques are (a) a modified way to control orthogonality of the grid at boundaries, (b) a new interpolation function based on tension splines that improves control over grid-line curvature, and (c) multidimensional stretching functions that allow arbitrary clustering of grid points. Also, compatibility conditions were identified, which must be satisfied by the data that define the geometry and control grid-point distribution. The new techniques were used to generate a grid system for a complex-shaped coolant passage geometry with U-bends and pin fins. Third, several iterative techniques were developed for reducing or eliminating approximate-factorization errors in implicit finite-difference and finite-volume methods. The convergence of the iteration processes was analyzed. Also analyzed was the stability of the techniques when used with the ADI three-factored scheme. The techniques were tested by applying them to stabilize and accelerate convergence in the ADI three-factored scheme for the linear advection equation. Finally, three flux-vector splitting schemes were tested in a simulation of complex, low Mach number, viscous flow. The artificial dissipation created by these schemes at low Mach numbers was analyzed

  17. Simulations of Global Flows in Io’s Rarefied Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoey, William A.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.; Walker, A. C.

    2013-10-01

    The sulfur-rich Ionian atmosphere is populated through a number of mechanisms, the most notable of which include sublimation from insolated surface frost deposits, material sputtering due to the impact of energetic ions from the Jovian plasma torus, and plume emission related to volcanic activity. While local flows are collisional at low altitudes on portions of the moon’s dayside, densities rapidly tend toward the free-molecular limit with altitude, necessitating non-continuum (rarefied gas dynamic) modeling and analysis. While recent work has modestly constrained the relative contributions of sputtering, sublimation, and volcanism to Io’s atmosphere, dynamic wind patterns driven by dayside sublimation and nightside condensation remain poorly understood. This work moves toward the explanation of mid-infrared observations that indicate an apparent super-rotating wind in Io’s atmosphere. In the present work, the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is employed in the modeling of Io’s rarefied atmosphere; simulations are computed in parallel, on a three-dimensional domain that spans the moon’s entire surface and extends hundreds of kilometers vertically, into the exobase. A wide range of physical phenomena have been incorporated into the atmospheric model, including: [1] the effects of planetary rotation; [2] surface temperature, surface frost inhomogeneity, and thermal inertia; [3] plasma heating and sputtering; [4] gas plumes from superimposed volcanic hot spots; and [5] multi-species chemistry. Furthermore, this work improves upon previous efforts by correcting for non-inertial effects in a moon-fixed reference frame. The influence of such effects on the development of global flow patterns and cyclonic wind is analyzed. The case in which Io transits Jupiter is considered, with the anti-Jovian hemisphere as the dayside. We predict that a circumlunar flow develops that is asymmetric about the subsolar point, and drives atmosphere from the warmer, dayside

  18. Recent Advances in the Physics of Hot Flow Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) are events observed near planetary bow shocks that are characterized by greatly heated solar wind plasmas and substantial flow deflection. HFAs are universal phenomena that have been observed near the bow shock of Earth, Venus, Mars, and Saturn. HFAs are not stable structures and they evolve with time. Statistical study shows that both ion and electron spectra can be used to classify young and mature HFAs. Classifications according to ion and electron spectra are not absolutely consistent, which might be due to different heating mechanisms and efficiency for ions and electrons. HFAs were also classified into four categories ("-+", "+-", "M", and "W") according their dynamic pressure profile. Most "W" type HFAs are mature HFAs (according to ion spectra) and most "-+" and "+-" type HFAs are young HFAs. Half of the "M" type HFAs are mature HFAs. Mature HFAs are pressure balanced while the pressure is higher inside young HFAs than that outside.

  19. Characterization and Simulation of the Thermoacoustic Instability Behavior of an Advanced, Low Emissions Combustor Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive research is being done toward the development of ultra-low-emissions combustors for aircraft gas turbine engines. However, these combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities. This type of instability was recently observed in an advanced, low emissions combustor prototype installed in a NASA Glenn Research Center test stand. The instability produces pressure oscillations that grow with increasing fuel/air ratio, preventing full power operation. The instability behavior makes the combustor a potentially useful test bed for research into active control methods for combustion instability suppression. The instability behavior was characterized by operating the combustor at various pressures, temperatures, and fuel and air flows representative of operation within an aircraft gas turbine engine. Trends in instability behavior versus operating condition have been identified and documented, and possible explanations for the trends provided. A simulation developed at NASA Glenn captures the observed instability behavior. The physics-based simulation includes the relevant physical features of the combustor and test rig, employs a Sectored 1-D approach, includes simplified reaction equations, and provides time-accurate results. A computationally efficient method is used for area transitions, which decreases run times and allows the simulation to be used for parametric studies, including control method investigations. Simulation results show that the simulation exhibits a self-starting, self-sustained combustion instability and also replicates the experimentally observed instability trends versus operating condition. Future plans are to use the simulation to investigate active control strategies to suppress combustion instabilities and then to experimentally demonstrate active instability suppression with the low emissions combustor prototype, enabling full power, stable operation.

  20. Recent advances in two-phase flow numerics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Macian, R.

    1997-07-01

    The authors review three topics in the broad field of numerical methods that may be of interest to individuals modeling two-phase flow in nuclear power plants. The first topic is iterative solution of linear equations created during the solution of finite volume equations. The second is numerical tracking of macroscopic liquid interfaces. The final area surveyed is the use of higher spatial difference techniques.