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Sample records for advanced fluid-dynamics model

  1. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. ); Goutagny, L. . Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

    1990-09-01

    AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  2. AFDM: An advanced fluid-dynamics model. Volume 6: EOS-AFDM interface

    SciTech Connect

    Henneges, G.; Kleinheins, S.

    1994-01-01

    This volume of the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) documents the modeling of the equation of state (EOS) in the code. The authors present an overview of the basic concepts underlying the thermodynamics modeling and resulting EOS, which is a set of relations between the thermodynamic properties of materials. The AFDM code allows for multiphase-multimaterial systems, which they explore in three phase models: two-material solid, two-material liquid, and three-material vapor. They describe and compare two ways of specifying the EOS of materials: (1) as simplified analytic expressions, or (2) as tables that precisely describe the properties of materials and their interactions for mechanical equilibrium. Either of the two EOS models implemented in AFDM can be selected by specifying the option when preprocessing the source code for compilation. Last, the authors determine thermophysical properties such as surface tension, thermal conductivities, and viscosities in the model for the intracell exchanges of AFDM. Specific notations, routines, EOS data, plots, test results, and corrections to the code are available in the appendices.

  3. Advanced computational multi-fluid dynamics: a new model for understanding electrokinetic phenomena in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulamali, M. Y.; Saunders, J. H.; Jackson, M. D.; Pain, C. C.

    2009-04-01

    We present results from a new computational multi-fluid dynamics code, designed to model the transport of heat, mass and chemical species during flow of single or multiple immiscible fluid phases through porous media, including gravitational effects and compressibility. The model also captures the electrical phenomena which may arise through electrokinetic, electrochemical and electrothermal coupling. Building on the advanced computational technology of the Imperial College Ocean Model, this new development leads the way towards a complex multiphase code using arbitrary unstructured and adaptive meshes, and domains decomposed to run in parallel over a cluster of workstations or a dedicated parallel computer. These facilities will allow efficient and accurate modelling of multiphase flows which capture large- and small-scale transport phenomena, while preserving the important geology and/or surface topology to make the results physically meaningful and realistic. Applications include modelling of contaminant transport in aquifers, multiphase flow during hydrocarbon production, migration of carbon dioxide during sequestration, and evaluation of the design and safety of nuclear reactors. Simulations of the streaming potential resulting from multiphase flow in laboratory- and field-scale models demonstrate that streaming potential signals originate at fluid fronts, and at geologic boundaries where fluid saturation changes. This suggests that downhole measurements of streaming potential may be used to inform production strategies in oil and gas reservoirs. As water encroaches on an oil production well, the streaming-potential signal associated with the water front encompasses the well even when the front is up to 100 m away, so the potential measured at the well starts to change significantly relative to a distant reference electrode. Variations in the geometry of the encroaching water front could be characterized using an array of electrodes positioned along the well

  4. Advanced Multigrid Solvers for Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this project has been to support the development of multigrid techniques in computational fluid dynamics that can achieve "textbook multigrid efficiency" (TME), which is several orders of magnitude faster than current industrial CFD solvers. Toward that goal we have assembled a detailed table which lists every foreseen kind of computational difficulty for achieving it, together with the possible ways for resolving the difficulty, their current state of development, and references. We have developed several codes to test and demonstrate, in the framework of simple model problems, several approaches for overcoming the most important of the listed difficulties that had not been resolved before. In particular, TME has been demonstrated for incompressible flows on one hand, and for near-sonic flows on the other hand. General approaches were advanced for the relaxation of stagnation points and boundary conditions under various situations. Also, new algebraic multigrid techniques were formed for treating unstructured grid formulations. More details on all these are given below.

  5. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  6. Fluid-dynamical model for antisurfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Justin J. A.; Duffy, Brian R.; Pritchard, David; Wilson, Stephen K.; Halling, Peter J.; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    We construct a fluid-dynamical model for the flow of a solution with a free surface at which surface tension acts. This model can describe both classical surfactants, which decrease the surface tension of the solution relative to that of the pure solvent, and antisurfactants (such as many salts when added to water, and small amounts of water when added to alcohol) which increase it. We demonstrate the utility of the model by considering the linear stability of an infinitely deep layer of initially quiescent fluid. In particular, we predict the occurrence of an instability driven by surface-tension gradients, which occurs for antisurfactant, but not for surfactant, solutions.

  7. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  8. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards ‘digital patient’ or ‘virtual physiological human’ representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. PMID:26512019

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. PMID:26512019

  10. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark; Gera, Dinesh

    2001-11-06

    In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

  11. Advances in Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Two Phase Flow in a Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, Adrian; Lo, Simon; Ioilev, Andrey; Melnikov, Vladimir; Samigulin, Maskhud; Ustinenko, Vasily; Kozlov, Valentin

    2006-07-01

    A new code, CFD-BWR, is being developed for the simulation of two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. CFD-BWR is a specialized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. New models describing the inter-phase mass, momentum, and energy transfer phenomena specific for BWRs have been developed and implemented in the CFD-BWR module. A set of experiments focused on two-phase flow and phase-change phenomena has been identified for the validation of the CFD-BWR code and results of two experiment analyses focused on the radial void distribution are presented. The close agreement between the computed results, the measured data and the correlation results provides confidence in the accuracy of the models. (authors)

  12. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  13. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness and response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has (CFD) has played an increasing in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-couple equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows. We are now embarking on a development program to incorporate prognostic models to generate, in real-time, the meteorological fields for the dispersion models. In contrast to diagnostic models, prognostic models are physically-based and are capable of incorporating many physical processes to treat highly complex flow scenarios.

  15. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness & response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has played an increasing role in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-coupled, nonlinear equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Until recently, such computer power could be found only in CRAY-class supercomputers. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Atmospheric Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Such models have been the cornerstones of the ARAC operational system for the past ten years. Kamada (1992) provides a review of diagnostic models and their applications to dispersion problems. However, because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows.

  17. Modeling quantum fluid dynamics at nonzero temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Berloff, Natalia G.; Brachet, Marc; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the intricate dynamics of quantum fluids, in particular in the rapidly growing subfield of quantum turbulence which elucidates the evolution of a vortex tangle in a superfluid, requires an in-depth understanding of the role of finite temperature in such systems. The Landau two-fluid model is the most successful hydrodynamical theory of superfluid helium, but by the nature of the scale separations it cannot give an adequate description of the processes involving vortex dynamics and interactions. In our contribution we introduce a framework based on a nonlinear classical-field equation that is mathematically identical to the Landau model and provides a mechanism for severing and coalescence of vortex lines, so that the questions related to the behavior of quantized vortices can be addressed self-consistently. The correct equation of state as well as nonlocality of interactions that leads to the existence of the roton minimum can also be introduced in such description. We review and apply the ideas developed for finite-temperature description of weakly interacting Bose gases as possible extensions and numerical refinements of the proposed method. We apply this method to elucidate the behavior of the vortices during expansion and contraction following the change in applied pressure. We show that at low temperatures, during the contraction of the vortex core as the negative pressure grows back to positive values, the vortex line density grows through a mechanism of vortex multiplication. This mechanism is suppressed at high temperatures. PMID:24704874

  18. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimeters), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured, and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  19. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms. PMID:26594068

  20. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: PART 2 – COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2011-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  1. Advances in computational fluid dynamics solvers for modern computing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertenstein, Daniel; Humphrey, John R.; Paolini, Aaron L.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2013-05-01

    EM Photonics has been investigating the application of massively multicore processors to a key problem area: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). While the capabilities of CFD solvers have continually increased and improved to support features such as moving bodies and adjoint-based mesh adaptation, the software architecture has often lagged behind. This has led to poor scaling as core counts reach the tens of thousands. In the modern High Performance Computing (HPC) world, clusters with hundreds of thousands of cores are becoming the standard. In addition, accelerator devices such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi are being installed in many new systems. It is important for CFD solvers to take advantage of the new hardware as the computations involved are well suited for the massively multicore architecture. In our work, we demonstrate that new features in NVIDIA GPUs are able to empower existing CFD solvers by example using AVUS, a CFD solver developed by the Air Force Research Labratory (AFRL) and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The effort has resulted in increased performance and scalability without sacrificing accuracy. There are many well-known codes in the CFD space that can benefit from this work, such as FUN3D, OVERFLOW, and TetrUSS. Such codes are widely used in the commercial, government, and defense sectors.

  2. Supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Computational fluid dynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenwaks, Salman; Yacoby, Eyal; Waichman, Karol; Sadot, Oren; Barmashenko, Boris D.

    2015-10-01

    We report on recent progress on our three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), taking into account fluid dynamics and kinetic processes in the lasing medium. For a supersonic Cs DPAL with laser section geometry and resonator parameters similar to those of the 1-kW flowing-gas subsonic Cs DPAL [A.V. Bogachev et al., Quantum Electron. 42, 95 (2012)] the maximum achievable output power, ~ 7 kW, is 25% higher than that achievable in the subsonic case. Comparison between semi-analytical and 3D CFD models for Cs shows that the latter predicts much higher maximum achievable output power than the former. Optimization of the laser parameters using 3D CFD modeling shows that very high power and optical-to-optical efficiency, 35 kW and 82%, respectively, can be achieved in a Cs supersonic device pumped by a collimated cylindrical (0.5 cm diameter) beam. Application of end- or transverse-pumping by collimated rectangular (large cross section ~ 2 - 4 cm2) beam makes it possible to obtain even higher output power, > 250 kW, for ~ 350 kW pumping power. The main processes limiting the power of Cs supersonic DPAL are saturation of the D2 transition and large ~ 40% losses of alkali atoms due to ionization, whereas the influence of gas heating is negligibly small. For supersonic K DPAL both gas heating and ionization effects are shown to be unimportant and the maximum achievable power, ~ 40 kW and 350 kW, for pumping by ~ 100 kW cylindrical and ~ 700 kW rectangular beam, respectively, are higher than those achievable in the Cs supersonic laser. The power achieved in the supersonic K DPAL is two times higher than for the subsonic version with the same resonator and K density at the gas inlet, the maximum optical-to-optical efficiency being 82%.

  3. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and

  4. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  5. Modelling reacting localized air pollution using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, A. A.; Nolan, P. F.

    2011-02-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach is used to model reacting NO 2 dispersion of vehicle pollutants released from a dual carriageway in Maidstone, UK. The simulations are carried out over the course of one full day during January, 2008. The developed CFD model utilizes a modified k- ɛ turbulence model and Arrhenius reaction kinetics with source terms for the reactions which include a photo-stationary set with peroxy radicals. An approach is taken whereby the reactions are solved specific to the rush hour period corresponding to the availability of certain hydrocarbons released from the vehicles. The results of the simulation are compared with field measurements taken at the site which is made up of several, different sized buildings on varying terrain in Maidstone UK. The predictions and field measurements are considered over a 12 h period with averaged hourly results. It was found that the reactive pollutant approach greatly improves the predictions as compared to the experiments. Furthermore the effect of peroxy radicals during rush hour periods is found to be a major disturbance to the photo-stationary set and its inclusion improved the predictions further.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics framework for aerodynamic model assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallespin, D.; Badcock, K. J.; Da Ronch, A.; White, M. D.; Perfect, P.; Ghoreyshi, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out at the University of Liverpool to assess the use of CFD methods for aircraft flight dynamics applications. Three test cases are discussed in the paper, namely, the Standard Dynamic Model, the Ranger 2000 jet trainer and the Stability and Control Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle. For each of these, a tabular aerodynamic model based on CFD predictions is generated along with validation against wind tunnel experiments and flight test measurements. The main purpose of the paper is to assess the validity of the tables of aerodynamic data for the force and moment prediction of realistic aircraft manoeuvres. This is done by generating a manoeuvre based on the tables of aerodynamic data, and then replaying the motion through a time-accurate computational fluid dynamics calculation. The resulting forces and moments from these simulations were compared with predictions from the tables. As the latter are based on a set of steady-state predictions, the comparisons showed perfect agreement for slow manoeuvres. As manoeuvres became more aggressive some disagreement was seen, particularly during periods of large rates of change in attitudes. Finally, the Ranger 2000 model was used on a flight simulator.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Saltstone Vault 4 Vapor Sapce

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si Young

    2005-06-27

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns for vapor space inside the Saltstone Vault No.4 under different operating scenarios. The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations. A CFD model took three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the boundary conditions as provided by the customer. The present model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference baseline case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information.

  8. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rokkam, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  9. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  10. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of pollutant concentrations within roadway and building microenvironments is feasible using high performance computing. Unlike currently used regulatory air quality models, fine-scale CFD simulations are able to account rig...

  11. Advanced feedback control of indoor air quality using real-time computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, E.; Campbell, T.; Bradley, R.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the partial implementation of a novel method of controlling indoor air quality (IAQ) for critical applications. The proposed method uses a numerical modeling technique known as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for modeling the effect of variable ventilation rates for intelligent and rapid control of air contamination in space. This paper describes how a CFD model is made to run in real time linked to a feedback control loop. The technique was simulated in a graphical programming language. The simulation results indicate that a quasi-transient potential flow CFD model is a viable technique for feedback control of IAQ, and it is currently being implemented in an experimental validation.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics models and congenital heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pennati, Giancarlo; Corsini, Chiara; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful tool to investigate hemodynamics of the circulatory system. With improving imaging techniques and detailed clinical investigations, it is now possible to construct patient-specific models of reconstructive surgeries for the treatment of congenital heart diseases. These models can help clinicians to better understand the hemodynamic behavior of different surgical options for a treated patient. This review outlines recent advances in mathematical modeling in congenital heart diseases, the discoveries and limitations these models present, and future directions that are on the horizon. PMID:24432298

  13. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the Posterior Airway Space After Maxillomandibular Advancement For Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Waite, Peter D.; Shih, Alan M.; Cheng, Gary C.; Koomullil, Roy; Ito, Yasushi; Cure, Joel K; Harding, Susan M.; Litaker, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the soft tissue change of the upper airway after maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Materials and Methods Eight OSAS patients who required MMA were recruited into this study. All participants had pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) and underwent MMA by a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Upper airway CT data sets for these 8 participants were created with high-fidelity 3-D numerical models for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3-D models were simulated and analyzed to study how changes in airway anatomy affects pressure effort required for normal breathing. Airway dimensions, skeletal changes, Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI), and pressure efforts of pre- and post-operative 3-D models were compared and correlations interpreted. Results After MMA, laminar and turbulent air flow was significantly decreased at every level of the airway. The cross-sectional areas at the soft palate and tongue base were significantly increased. Conclusions This study shows that MMA increases airway dimensions by the increasing the occipital base (Base) - pogonion (Pg) distance. An increase of the Base-Pg distance showed a significant correlation with an AHI improvement and a decreased pressure effort of the upper airway. Decreasing the pressure effort will decrease the breathing workload. This improves the condition of OSAS. PMID:23642544

  15. Development of advanced computational fluid dynamics tools and their application to simulation of internal turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, V. N.; Karpenko, A. G.; Volkov, K. N.

    2015-06-01

    Modern graphics processing units (GPU) provide architectures and new programming models that enable to harness their large processing power and to design computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations at both high performance and low cost. Possibilities of the use of GPUs for the simulation of internal fluid flows are discussed. The finite volume method is applied to solve three-dimensional (3D) unsteady compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes. Compute Inified Device Architecture (CUDA) technology is used for programming implementation of parallel computational algorithms. Solution of some fluid dynamics problems on GPUs is presented and approaches to optimization of the CFD code related to the use of different types of memory are discussed. Speedup of solution on GPUs with respect to the solution on central processor unit (CPU) is compared with the use of different meshes and different methods of distribution of input data into blocks. Performance measurements show that numerical schemes developed achieve 20 to 50 speedup on GPU hardware compared to CPU reference implementation. The results obtained provide promising perspective for designing a GPU-based software framework for applications in CFD.

  16. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses a framework for fine-scale CFD modeling that may be developed to complement the present Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system which itself is a computational fluid dynamics model. A goal of this presentation is to stimulate discussions on w...

  17. REMOVAL OF TANK AND SEWER SEDIMENT BY GATE FLUSHING: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will discuss the application of a computational fluid dynamics 3D flow model to simulate gate flushing for removing tank/sewer sediments. The physical model of the flushing device was a tank fabricated and installed at the head-end of a hydraulic flume. The fl...

  18. Applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazineh, Dean; Auvinen, Jussi; Nahrgang, Marlene; Bass, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    At sufficiently high temperatures and densities, similar to the conditions found in the early universe, QCD matter forms a deconfined state called the quark gluon plasma (QGP). This state of matter can be created in collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy-ions, and RHIC data suggests that this QGP behaves similar to an ideal fluid. Viscous relativistic fluid dynamics therefore is one of the preferred theoretical tools to model the time-evolution and properties of the QGP. As the collision energy or the system size is decreased, the range of applicability of viscous fluid dynamics becomes smaller as the length scale of the interaction among the basic constituents is similar to the overall scale of the collision system itself. In order to investigate the validity of fluid-dynamical modeling of proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC and RHIC, we conduct an analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of the Knudsen number, i.e. the ratio of the microscopic mean free path to the macroscopic length scale of the system. We show results for large and small collision systems, as a function of the specific shear viscosity, and discuss the range of applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling in relativistic proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at different energies.

  19. Modeling the Fluid Dynamics in a Human Stomach to Gain Insight of Food Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Ferrua, MJ; Singh, RP

    2010-01-01

    During gastric digestion, food is disintegrated by a complex interaction of chemical and mechanical effects. Although the mechanisms of chemical digestion are usually characterized by using in vitro analysis, the difficulty in reproducing the stomach geometry and motility has prevented a good understanding of the local fluid dynamics of gastric contents. The goal of this study was to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to develop a 3-D model of the shape and motility pattern of the stomach wall during digestion, and use it to characterize the fluid dynamics of gastric contents of different viscosities. A geometrical model of an averaged-sized human stomach was created, and its motility was characterized by a series of antral-contraction waves of up to 80% relative occlusion. The flow field within the model (predicted using the software Fluent™) strongly depended on the viscosity of gastric contents. By increasing the viscosity, the formation of the 2 flow patterns commonly regarded as the main mechanisms driving digestion (i.e., the retropulsive jet-like motion and eddy structures) was significantly diminished, while a significant increase of the pressure field was predicted. These results were in good agreement with experimental data previously reported in the literature, and suggest that, contrary to the traditional idea of a rapid and complete homogenization of the meal, gastric contents associated with high viscous meals are poorly mixed. This study illustrates the capability of CFD to provide a unique insight into the fluid dynamics of the gastric contents, and points out its potential to develop a fundamental understanding and modeling of the mechanisms involved in the digestion process. Practical Application This study illustrates the capability of computational fluid dynamic techniques to provide a unique insight into the dynamics of the gastric contents, pointing out its potential to develop a fundamental understanding and modeling of the human

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Nickel Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullion, R.; Gu, W. B.; Wang, C. Y.; Timmerman, P.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical Ni-H2 battery model has been expanded to include thermal effects. A thermal energy conservation equation was derived from first principles. An electrochemical and thermal coupled model was created by the addition of this equation to an existing multiphase, electrochemical model. Charging at various rates was investigated and the results validated against experimental data. Reaction currents, pressure changes, temperature profiles, and concentration variations within the cell are predicted numerically and compared with available data and theory.

  1. Comparison of fluid dynamic numerical models for a clinical ventricular assist device and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiafeng; Zhang, Pei; Fraser, Katharine H.; Griffith, Bartley P.; Wu, Zhongjun J.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent advances in computer technology, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has become an important tool to design and improve blood contacting artificial organs, and to study the device-induced blood damage. Commercial CFD software packages are readily available, and multiple CFD models are provided by CFD software developers. However, the best approach of using CFD effectively to characterize fluid flow and to predict blood damage in these medical devices remains debatable. This study aimed to compare these CFD models and provide useful information on the accuracy of each model in modeling blood flow in circulatory assist devices. The laminar and five turbulence models (Spalart-Allmaras, k-ε (k-epsilon), k-ω (k-omega), SST (Menter’s Shear Stress Transport), and Reynolds Stress) were implemented to predict blood flow in a clinically used circulatory assist device, CentriMag® centrifugal blood pump (Thoratec, MA). In parallel, a transparent replica of the CentriMag® pump was constructed and selected views of the flow fields were measured with digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). CFD results were compared with the DPIV experimental results. Compared with the experiment, all the selected CFD models predicted the flow pattern fairly well except the area of the outlet. However, quantitatively, the laminar model results were the most deviated from the experimental data. On the other hand, k-ε RNG models and Reynolds Stress model are the most accurate. In conclusion, for the circulatory assist devices, turbulence models provide more accurate results than laminar model. Among the selected turbulence models, k-ε and Reynolds Stress Method models are recommended. PMID:23441681

  2. Comparison and experimental validation of fluid dynamic numerical models for a clinical ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiafeng; Zhang, Pei; Fraser, Katharine H; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2013-04-01

    With the recent advances in computer technology, computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) has become an important tool to design and improve blood-contacting artificial organs, and to study the device-induced blood damage. Commercial CFD software packages are readily available, and multiple CFD models are provided by CFD software developers. However, the best approach of using CFD effectively to characterize fluid flow and to predict blood damage in these medical devices remains debatable. This study aimed to compare these CFD models and provide useful information on the accuracy of each model in modeling blood flow in circulatory assist devices. The laminar and five turbulence models (Spalart-Allmaras, k-ε (k-epsilon), k-ω (k-omega), SST [Menter's Shear Stress Transport], and Reynolds Stress) were implemented to predict blood flow in a clinically used circulatory assist device, the CentriMag centrifugal blood pump. In parallel, a transparent replica of the CentriMag pump was constructed and selected views of the flow fields were measured with digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). CFD results were compared with the DPIV experimental results. Compared with the experiment, all the selected CFD models predicted the flow pattern fairly well except the area of the outlet. However, quantitatively, the laminar model results were the most deviated from the experimental data. On the other hand, k-ε renormalization group theory models and Reynolds Stress model are the most accurate. In conclusion, for the circulatory assist devices, turbulence models provide more accurate results than the laminar model. Among the selected turbulence models, k-ε and Reynolds Stress Method models are recommended. PMID:23441681

  3. Phantom model of physiologic intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2012-06-01

    We describe herein a novel life-size phantom model of the intracranial cavity and its validation. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) domains including ventricular, cysternal, and subarachnoid spaces were derived via magnetic resonance imaging. Brain mechanical properties and cranio-spinal compliance were set based on published data. Both bulk and pulsatile physiologic CSF flow were modeled. Model validation was carried out by comparisons of flow and pressure measurements in the phantom with published in vivo data of healthy subjects. Physiologic intracranial pressure with 10 mmHg mean and 0.4 mmHg peak pulse amplitude was recorded in the ventricles. Peak CSF flow rates of 0.2 and 2 ml/s were measured in the cerebral aqueduct and subarachnoid space, respectively. The phantom constitutes a first-of-its-kind approach to modeling physiologic intracranial dynamics in vitro. Herein, we describe the phantom design and manufacturing, definition and implementation of its operating parameters, as well as the validation of the modeled dynamics. PMID:22333981

  4. Mathematical modeling of fluid dynamics in pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Pennati, Giancarlo; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Laganà, Katia; Fumero, Roberto

    2004-02-01

    The design criteria of an extracorporeal circuit suitable for pulsatile flow are quite different and more entangled than for steady flow. The time and costs of the design process could be reduced if mutual influences between the pulsatile pump and other extracorporeal devices were considered without experimental trial-and-error activities. With this in mind, we have developed a new lumped-parameter mathematical model of the hydraulic behavior of the arterial side of an extracorporeal circuit under pulsatile flow conditions. Generally, components feature a resistant-inertant-compliant behavior and the most relevant nonlinearities are accounted for. Parameter values were derived either by experimental tests or by analytical analysis. The pulsatile pump is modeled as a pure pulsatile flow generator. Model predictions were compared with flow rate and pressure tracings measured during hydraulic tests on two different circuits at various flow rates and pulse frequencies. The normalized root mean square error did not exceed 24% and the model accurately describes the changes that occur in the basic features of the pressure and flow wave propagating from the pulsatile pump to the arterial cannula. PMID:14961960

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the John Day Dam Tailrace

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2010-07-08

    US Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District required that a two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged and a three-dimensional (3D) free-surface numerical models to be developed and validated for the John Day tailrace. These models were used to assess potential impact of a select group of structural and operational alternatives to tailrace flows aimed at improving fish survival at John Day Dam. The 2D model was used for the initial assessment of the alternatives in conjunction with a reduced-scale physical model of the John Day Project. A finer resolution 3D model was used to more accurately model the details of flow in the stilling basin and near-project tailrace hydraulics. Three-dimensional model results were used as input to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory particle tracking software, and particle paths and times to pass a downstream cross section were used to assess the relative differences in travel times resulting from project operations and structural scenarios for multiple total river flows. Streamlines and neutrally-buoyant particles were seeded in all turbine and spill bays with flows. For a Total River of 250 kcfs running with the Fish Passage Plan spill pattern and a spillwall, the mean residence times for all particles were little changed; however the tails of the distribution were truncated for both spillway and powerhouse release points, and, for the powerhouse releases, reduced the residence time for 75% of the particles to pass a downstream cross section from 45.5 minutes to 41.3 minutes. For a total river of 125 kcfs configured with the operations from the Fish Passage Plan for the temporary spillway weirs and for a proposed spillwall, the neutrally-buoyant particle tracking data showed that the river with a spillwall in place had the overall mean residence time increase; however, the residence time for 75% of the powerhouse-released particles to pass a downstream cross section was reduced from 102.4 min to 89 minutes.

  6. Singular Limits of Voigt Models in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coti Zelati, Michele; Gal, Ciprian G.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the long-term behavior, as a certain regularization parameter vanishes, of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes-Voigt model of a viscoelastic incompressible fluid. We prove the existence of global and exponential attractors of optimal regularity. We then derive explicit upper bounds for the dimension of these attractors in terms of the three-dimensional Grashof number and the regularization parameter. Finally, we also prove convergence of the (strong) global attractor of the 3D Navier-Stokes-Voigt model to the (weak) global attractor of the 3D Navier-Stokes equation. Our analysis improves and extends recent results obtained by Kalantarov and Titi (Chin Ann Math Ser B 30:697-714, 2009).

  7. Fluid dynamic modeling of nano-thermite reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, Karen S.; Zyskin, Maxim; Jenkins, Charles M.; Yuki Horie, Yasuyuki

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a direct numerical method based on gas dynamic equations to predict pressure evolution during the discharge of nanoenergetic materials. The direct numerical method provides for modeling reflections of the shock waves from the reactor walls that generates pressure-time fluctuations. The results of gas pressure prediction are consistent with the experimental evidence and estimates based on the self-similar solution. Artificial viscosity provides sufficient smoothing of shock wave discontinuity for the numerical procedure. The direct numerical method is more computationally demanding and flexible than self-similar solution, in particular it allows study of a shock wave in its early stage of reaction and allows the investigation of "slower" reactions, which may produce weaker shock waves. Moreover, numerical results indicate that peak pressure is not very sensitive to initial density and reaction time, providing that all the material reacts well before the shock wave arrives at the end of the reactor.

  8. Development and mathematical modeling of biomagnetic fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haik, Yousef

    In this study the human blood as a biomagnetic fluid and the blood flow under the influence of magnetic field is investigated. Experiments were performed to examine the effect of magnetic field on blood flow. The blood flow in a straight pipe when aligned to the magnetic field lines was reduced by 28% when the field strength was 10 tesla. The sedimentation rate of red blood cells in the stagnant container due to gravity was reduced when the whole blood was subjected to a horizontally imposed magnetic field from a permanent magnet of 1.2 tesla. The physical properties of whole blood under the influence of high magnetic field were also investigated. It was found that the magnetic susceptibility of whole blood is in the order of 10-6 when deoxygenated and 10-7 when oxygenated. In the present study the whole blood is treated as a single fluid. The governing equations for the flow under magnetic field are derived based on the modified Stokes' principle. The model coefficients were obtained by performing experiments on the whole blood. The mathematical model is simplified based on the equilibrium approximation and the experimental observations. Numerical simulations were obtained for the situations such as acceleration and retardation of blood flow, removal of blood thrombus from the vein wall by increasing the shear rate and the behavior of the blood in the aneurysm in the vicinity of a magnetic field. It is shown that the blood flow characteristic can change dramatically when the fluid is subjected to magnetic field. Finally different biomagnetic applications are proposed. Among these proposed applications is a device to separate the red blood cells from the whole blood for possible treatment of the white cells. Another proposed application is the Magnetic MEMS. Magnetic micro delivery systems that utilizes the magnetic force to deliver a micro machine to a specific site and magnetic micro rotary systems that uses the magnetic torque to drive the micromachine are

  9. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  10. Parallel technology for numerical modeling of fluid dynamics problems by high-accuracy algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    A parallel computation technology for modeling fluid dynamics problems by finite-volume and finite-difference methods of high accuracy is presented. The development of an algorithm, the design of a software implementation, and the creation of parallel programs for computations on large-scale computing systems are considered. The presented parallel technology is based on a multilevel parallel model combining various types of parallelism: with shared and distributed memory and with multiple and single instruction streams to multiple data flows.

  11. Computational structural mechanics and fluid dynamics: Advances and trends; Proceedings of the Symposium, Washington, DC, Oct. 17-19, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Editor); Dwoyer, Douglas L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in computational structural and fluid dynamics are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include fluid-structure interaction and aeroelasticity, CFD techniques for reacting flows, micromechanics, stability and eigenproblems, probabilistic methods and chaotic dynamics, and perturbation and spectral methods. Consideration is given to finite-element, finite-volume, and boundary-element methods; adaptive methods; parallel processing machines and applications; and visualization, mesh generation, and AI interfaces.

  12. Good modelling practice in applying computational fluid dynamics for WWTP modelling.

    PubMed

    Wicklein, Edward; Batstone, Damien J; Ducoste, Joel; Laurent, Julien; Griborio, Alonso; Wicks, Jim; Saunders, Stephen; Samstag, Randal; Potier, Olivier; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling in the wastewater treatment (WWT) field is continuing to grow and be used to solve increasingly complex problems. However, the future of CFD models and their value to the wastewater field are a function of their proper application and knowledge of their limits. As has been established for other types of wastewater modelling (i.e. biokinetic models), it is timely to define a good modelling practice (GMP) for wastewater CFD applications. An International Water Association (IWA) working group has been formed to investigate a variety of issues and challenges related to CFD modelling in water and WWT. This paper summarizes the recommendations for GMP of the IWA working group on CFD. The paper provides an overview of GMP and, though it is written for the wastewater application, is based on general CFD procedures. A forthcoming companion paper to provide specific details on modelling of individual wastewater components forms the next step of the working group. PMID:26942517

  13. Development of an innovative spacer grid model utilizing computational fluid dynamics within a subchannel analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramova, Maria

    In the past few decades the need for improved nuclear reactor safety analyses has led to a rapid development of advanced methods for multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses. These methods have become progressively more complex in order to account for the many physical phenomena anticipated during steady state and transient Light Water Reactor (LWR) conditions. The advanced thermal-hydraulic subchannel code COBRA-TF (Thurgood, M. J. et al., 1983) is used worldwide for best-estimate evaluations of the nuclear reactor safety margins. In the framework of a joint research project between the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and AREVA NP GmbH, the theoretical models and numerics of COBRA-TF have been improved. Under the name F-COBRA-TF, the code has been subjected to an extensive verification and validation program and has been applied to variety of LWR steady state and transient simulations. To enable F-COBRA-TF for industrial applications, including safety margins evaluations and design analyses, the code spacer grid models were revised and substantially improved. The state-of-the-art in the modeling of the spacer grid effects on the flow thermal-hydraulic performance in rod bundles employs numerical experiments performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Because of the involved computational cost, the CFD codes cannot be yet used for full bundle predictions, but their capabilities can be utilized for development of more advanced and sophisticated models for subchannel-level analyses. A subchannel code, equipped with improved physical models, can be then a powerful tool for LWR safety and design evaluations. The unique contributions of this PhD research are seen as development, implementation, and qualification of an innovative spacer grid model by utilizing CFD results within a framework of a subchannel analysis code. Usually, the spacer grid models are mostly related to modeling of the entrainment and deposition phenomena and the heat

  14. Studies of turbulence models in a computational fluid dynamics model of a blood pump.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinwei; Wood, Houston G; Day, Steven W; Olsen, Don B

    2003-10-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used widely in design of rotary blood pumps. The choice of turbulence model is not obvious and plays an important role on the accuracy of CFD predictions. TASCflow (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, U.S.A.) has been used to perform CFD simulations of blood flow in a centrifugal left ventricular assist device; a k-epsilon model with near-wall functions was used in the initial numerical calculation. To improve the simulation, local grids with special distribution to ensure the k-omega model were used. Iterations have been performed to optimize the grid distribution and turbulence modeling and to predict flow performance more accurately comparing to experimental data. A comparison of k-omega model and experimental measurements of the flow field obtained by particle image velocimetry shows better agreement than k-epsilon model does, especially in the near-wall regions. PMID:14616539

  15. An overset grid method for integration of fully 3D fluid dynamics and geophysics fluid dynamics models to simulate multiphysics coastal ocean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. S.; Qu, K.; Wu, X. G.

    2014-09-01

    It is now becoming important to develop our capabilities to simulate coastal ocean flows involved with distinct physical phenomena occurring at a vast range of spatial and temporal scales. This paper presents a hybrid modeling system for such simulation. The system consists of a fully three dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics model and a geophysical fluid dynamics model, which couple with each other in two-way and march in time simultaneously. Particularly, in the hybrid system, the solver for incompressible flow on overset meshes (SIFOM) resolves fully 3D small-scale local flow phenomena, while the unstructured grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) captures large-scale background flows. The integration of the two models are realized via domain decomposition implemented with an overset grid method. Numerical experiments on performance of the system in resolving flow patterns and solution convergence rate show that the SIFOM-FVCOM system works as intended, and its solutions compare reasonably with data obtained with measurements and other computational approaches. Its unparalleled capabilities to predict multiphysics and multiscale phenomena with high-fidelity are demonstrated by three typical applications that are beyond the reach of other currently existing models. It is anticipated that the SIFOM-FVCOM system will serve as a new platform to study many emerging coastal ocean problems.

  16. Modeling Potential Carbon Monoxide Exposure Due to Operation of a Major Rocket Engine Altitude Test Facility Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blotzer, Michael J.; Woods, Jody L.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews computational fluid dynamics as a tool for modelling the dispersion of carbon monoxide at the Stennis Space Center's A3 Test Stand. The contents include: 1) Constellation Program; 2) Constellation Launch Vehicles; 3) J2X Engine; 4) A-3 Test Stand; 5) Chemical Steam Generators; 6) Emission Estimates; 7) Located in Existing Test Complex; 8) Computational Fluid Dynamics; 9) Computational Tools; 10) CO Modeling; 11) CO Model results; and 12) Next steps.

  17. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations provide a number of unique opportunities for expanding and improving capabilities for modeling exposures to environmental pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been c...

  18. Bedrock Channel and Cave Evolution Models Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perne, M.; Covington, M. D.; Cooper, M.

    2014-12-01

    Models of bedrock channel cross-section evolution typically rely on simple approximations of boundary shear stress to calculate erosion rates across the channel. While such models provide a useful tool for gaining general insight into channel dynamics, they also exhibit a narrower range of behaviors than seen in nature and scale experiments. Recent computational advances enable use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to relax many of the assumptions used in these simple models by simulating the full 3D flow field and resulting erosion. We have developed a model of bedrock channel evolution at the reach scale, using CFD, that alternates flow simulation steps with channel evolution steps and evolves the channel in time according to shear stresses calculated from the CFD runs. Caves provide an ideal field setting for studying bedrock channel dynamics, because long records of incision are often preserved in the form of channel widths, meander patterns, and sculpted forms, such as scallops, that indicate flow velocity and direction. However, most existing numerical models of cave formation investigate processes on larger scales, treat conduits as simple shapes, such as cylinders, and deal with the early stages of speleogenesis when sediment transport and erosion mechanisms other than dissolution do not have to be taken into account. Therefore, initial applications of the CFD model focus on the dynamics of cave channels, and particularly on the controls of channel width. While discharge, base level, sediment supply, and the ratio of dissolution to mechanical erosion, are likely to play important roles in determining channel width, we lack a quantitative understanding for the importance of these various factors. Notches in passage walls are thought to result from lateral erosion during periods of increased sediment load when the bed is armored. Modeling is used to check the plausibility of this explanation, and examine whether other mechanisms may also produce notches

  19. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    PubMed Central

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition. PMID:25621085

  20. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition.

  1. Recent advances in the development of implicit schemes for the equations of fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, R. F.; Beam, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Innovations and extensions of implicit schemes for equations of fluid dynamics are presented. The notation and theory for linear multistep methods are reviewed, and extensions of work by Beam and Warming (1979) include the implementation of one-leg methods, ADI methods for equations with mixed derivatives, flux vector splitting, the P-dimensional wave equation, and boundary conditions. Numerical experiments indicate that implicit treatment of the boundary conditions is necessary for unconditional stability, and the improvement and implementation of the boundary condition theory should improve the implicit algorithms for gas dynamic equations.

  2. Technical Review of the CENWP Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of the John Day Dam Forebay

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) has developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the John Day forebay on the Columbia River to aid in the development and design of alternatives to improve juvenile salmon passage at the John Day Project. At the request of CENWP, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrology Group has conducted a technical review of CENWP's CFD model run in CFD solver software, STAR-CD. PNNL has extensive experience developing and applying 3D CFD models run in STAR-CD for Columbia River hydroelectric projects. The John Day forebay model developed by CENWP is adequately configured and validated. The model is ready for use simulating forebay hydraulics for structural and operational alternatives. The approach and method are sound, however CENWP has identified some improvements that need to be made for future models and for modifications to this existing model.

  3. Improvement performance of secondary clarifiers by a computational fluid dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghawi, Ali G.; Kriš, J.

    2011-12-01

    Secondary clarifier is one of the most commonly used unit operations in wastewater treatment plants. It is customarily designed to achieve the separation of solids from biologically treated effluents through the clarification of biological solids and the thickening of sludge. As treatment plants receive increasingly high wastewater flows, conventional sedimentation tanks suffer from overloading problems, which result in poor performance. Modification of inlet baffles through the use of an energy dissipating inlet (EDI) was proposed to enhance the performance in the circular clarifiers at the Al-Dewanyia wastewater treatment plant. A 3-dimensional fully mass conservative clarifier model, based on modern computational fluid dynamics theory, was applied to evaluate the proposed tank modification and to estimate the maximum capacity of the existing and modified clarifiers. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was formulated to describe the tank is performance, and design parameters were obtained based on the experimental results. The study revealed that velocity and (suspended solids) SS is a better parameter than TS (total solids), (Biochemical Oxygen Demand) BOD, (Chemical Oxygen Demand) COD to evaluate the performance of sedimentation tanks and that the removal efficiencies of the suspended solids, biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand were higher in the baffle.

  4. An advanced combustion research facility for validating computational fluid dynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, J. B.; Hurley, C. D.; Eccles, N. C.

    1991-12-01

    The Sector Combustion Rig (SCR), built to obtain experimental data which could be used to verify computational fluid dynamic programs and to investigate the formation and consumption of combustion products through a combustor, is described. This rig was designed to accommodate sectors of full size engine combustion chambers and to test them at real or simulated engine operating conditions. Changes made to improve the operating, measurement, and data handling capabilities of the rig as a result of experience from several years of operations are described together with some of the features which contribute to the uniqueness of the SCR. The SCR gas analysis system and instrumentation are described. Extracts from some results obtained during a recent program of tests on a Rolls-Royce RB211 combustor are given.

  5. Computational Modeling and Analysis of the Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat

    2009-11-01

    In order to swim efficiently and/or fast, a swimmer needs to master the subtle cause-and-effect relationship that exists between his/her movements and the surrounding fluid. This is what makes swimming one of the most technical of all sports. For the most part, science has played little if any role in helping swimmers and coaches improve swimming techniques or even to better understand the fluid dynamics of human swimming. Experiments of free swimming humans are extremely difficult to conduct and computational modeling approaches have, in the past, been unable to address this very complex problem. However, the development of a new class of numerical methods, coupled with unique animation and analysis tools is making it possible to analyze swimming strokes in all their complexity. The talk will focus on describing a relatively new numerical method that has been developed to solve flows with highly complex, moving/deforming boundaries. Numerical simulations are used to perform a detailed analysis of the dolphin kick. This stroke has emerged as an important component of competitive swimming in recent years and our analysis has allowed us to extract some useful insights into the fluid dynamics of this stroke. In addition, we also address the continuing debate about the role of lift versus drag in thrust production for human swimming.

  6. Comparison of emission models with computational fluid dynamic simulation and a proposed improved model.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James S; Feigley, Charles E; Khan, Jamil; Hosni, Mohammad H

    2003-01-01

    Understanding source behavior is important in controlling exposure to airborne contaminants. Industrial hygienists are often asked to infer emission information from room concentration data. This is not easily done, but models that make simplifying assumptions regarding contaminant transport are frequently used. The errors resulting from these assumptions are not yet well understood. This study compares emission estimates from the single-zone completely mixed (CM-1), two-zone completely mixed (CM-2), and uniform diffusivity (UD) models with the emissions set as boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of a workplace. The room airflow and concentration fields were computed using Fluent 4. These numerical experiments were factorial combinations of three source locations, five receptor locations, three dilution airflow rates, and two generation rate profiles, constant and time-varying. The aim was to compute plausible concentration fields, not to simulate exactly the processes in a real workroom. Thus, error is defined here as the difference between model and CFD predictions. For the steady-state case the UD model had the lowest error. When the source near-field contained the breathing zone receptor, the CM-2 model was applied. Then, in decreasing agreement with CFD were UD, CM-2, and CM-1. Averaging over all source and receptor locations (CM-2 applied for only one), in decreasing order of agreement with CFD were UD, CM-1, and CM-2. Source and receptor location had large effects on emission estimates using the CM-1 model and some effect using the UD model. A location-specific mixing factor (location factor) derived from steady-state concentration gradients was used to build a more accurate time-dependent emission model, CM-L. Total mass emitted from a time-varying source was modeled most accurately by CM-L, followed by CM-1 and CM-2. PMID:14674808

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li

    2008-05-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2008-10-15

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

  9. Combining Computational Fluid Dynamics and Agent-Based Modeling: A New Approach to Evacuation Planning

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joshua M.; Pankajakshan, Ramesh; Hammond, Ross A.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel hybrid of two fields—Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Agent-Based Modeling (ABM)—as a powerful new technique for urban evacuation planning. CFD is a predominant technique for modeling airborne transport of contaminants, while ABM is a powerful approach for modeling social dynamics in populations of adaptive individuals. The hybrid CFD-ABM method is capable of simulating how large, spatially-distributed populations might respond to a physically realistic contaminant plume. We demonstrate the overall feasibility of CFD-ABM evacuation design, using the case of a hypothetical aerosol release in Los Angeles to explore potential effectiveness of various policy regimes. We conclude by arguing that this new approach can be powerfully applied to arbitrary population centers, offering an unprecedented preparedness and catastrophic event response tool. PMID:21687788

  10. An integrated muscle mechanic-fluid dynamic model of lamprey swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; Tytell, Eric; Fauci, Lisa

    2009-11-01

    In an effort towards a detailed understanding of the generation and control of vertebrate locomotion, including the role of the CPG and its interactions with reflexive feedback, muscle mechanics, and external fluid dynamics, we study a simple vertebrate, the lamprey. Lamprey body undulations are a result of a wave of neural activation that passes from head to tail, causing a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are mediated by passive structural forces. We present recent results from a model that fully couples a viscous, incompressible fluid with nonlinear muscle mechanics. We measure the dependence of the phase lag between activation wave and mechanical wave as a function of model parameters, such as body stiffness and muscle strength. Simulation results are compared to experiments utilizing both real and synthetic lamprey.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, W.B.; Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, John.

    1999-06-11

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. The model accounts for not only transport of species and charge, but also the electrode porosity variations and the electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures are compared to the experimental data with excellent agreement. Moreover, the simulation results. in conjunction with computer visualization and animation techniques, confirm that cell utilization in the temperature and current range of interest is limited by pore plugging or clogging of the front side of the cathode as a result of LiCl precipitation. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulation also shows that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell header predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  12. The coupling of fluids, dynamics, and controls on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    This grant provided for the demonstration of coupled controls, body dynamics, and fluids computations in a workstation cluster environment; and an investigation of the impact of peer-peer communication on flow solver performance and robustness. The findings of these investigations were documented in the conference articles.The attached publication, 'Towards Distributed Fluids/Controls Simulations', documents the solution and scaling of the coupled Navier-Stokes, Euler rigid-body dynamics, and state feedback control equations for a two-dimensional canard-wing. The poor scaling shown was due to serialized grid connectivity computation and Ethernet bandwidth limits. The scaling of a peer-to-peer communication flow code on an IBM SP-2 was also shown. The scaling of the code on the switched fabric-linked nodes was good, with a 2.4 percent loss due to communication of intergrid boundary point information. The code performance on 30 worker nodes was 1.7 (mu)s/point/iteration, or a factor of three over a Cray C-90 head. The attached paper, 'Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment', documents the effect of several computational rate enhancing methods on convergence. For the cases shown, the highest throughput was achieved using boundary updates at each step, with the manager process performing communication tasks only. Constrained domain decomposition of the implicit fluid equations did not degrade the convergence rate or final solution. The scaling of a coupled body/fluid dynamics problem on an Ethernet-linked cluster was also shown.

  13. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Reid, Daniel A P; Hildenbrandt, H; Padding, J T; Hemelrijk, C K

    2012-02-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed analysis. Their insights may guide empirical work. Particularly the recently introduced multiparticle collision dynamics method may be suitable for the study of moving organisms because it is computationally fast, simple to implement, and has a continuous representation of space. As regards the study of hydrodynamics of moving organisms, the method has only been applied at low Reynolds numbers (below 120) for soft, permeable bodies, and static fishlike shapes. In the present paper we use it to study the hydrodynamics of an undulating fish at Reynolds numbers 1100-1500, after confirming its performance for a moving insect wing at Reynolds number 75. We measure (1) drag, thrust, and lift forces, (2) swimming efficiency and spatial structure of the wake, and (3) distribution of forces along the fish body. We confirm the resemblance between the simulated undulating fish and empirical data. In contrast to theoretical predictions, our model shows that for steadily undulating fish, thrust is produced by the rear 2/3 of the body and that the slip ratio U/V (with U the forward swimming speed and V the rearward speed of the body wave) correlates negatively (instead of positively) with the actual Froude efficiency of swimming. Besides, we show that the common practice of modeling individuals while constraining their sideways acceleration causes them to resemble unconstrained fish with a higher tailbeat frequency. PMID:22463238

  14. Fluid Dynamics of Underwater Flight in Sea Butterflies: Insights from Computational Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuoyu; Mittal, Rajat; Yen, Jeannette; Webster, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Sea butterflies such as Limacine helicina swim by flapping their wing-like parapodia, in a stroke that exhibits a clap-and-fling type kinematics as well as a strong interaction between the parapodia and the body of the animal at the end of downstroke. We used numerical simulations based on videogrammetric data to examine the fluid dynamics and force generation associated with this swimming motion. The unsteady lift-generating mechanism of clap-and-fling results in a sawtooth trajectory with a characteristic ``wobble'' in pitch. We employ coupled flow-body-dynamics simulations to model the free-swimming motion of the organism and explore the efficiency of propulsion as well the factors such as shell weight, that affect its sawtooth swimming trajectory. This work is funded by NSF Grant 1246317 from the Division of Polar Programs.

  15. Investigation of different modeling approaches for computational fluid dynamics simulation of high-pressure rocket combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, B.; Riedmann, H.; Frey, M.; Knab, O.; Karl, S.; Hannemann, K.

    2016-07-01

    The paper summarizes technical results and first highlights of the cooperation between DLR and Airbus Defence and Space (DS) within the work package "CFD Modeling of Combustion Chamber Processes" conducted in the frame of the Propulsion 2020 Project. Within the addressed work package, DLR Göttingen and Airbus DS Ottobrunn have identified several test cases where adequate test data are available and which can be used for proper validation of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. In this paper, the first test case, the Penn State chamber (RCM1), is discussed. Presenting the simulation results from three different tools, it is shown that the test case can be computed properly with steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approaches. The achieved simulation results reproduce the measured wall heat flux as an important validation parameter very well but also reveal some inconsistencies in the test data which are addressed in this paper.

  16. Modeling Juvenile Salmon Egress Conditions in The Dalles Dam Tailrace using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Schlenker, Stephen J.

    2009-07-27

    At The Dalles Dam, located between Oregon and Washington on the Columbia River, juvenile salmon passing over the spillway have a survival rate that is below acceptable levels. An important factor affecting survival is the egress route fish take through the immediate tailrace of the dam. Passage through the high-energy spillway and stilling basin environment can leave fish disoriented and vulnerable to predators. Egress conditions can be improved through structural and operational modifications that provide flow paths that move fish more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. We used the results from free-surface computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling combined with Lagrangian particle tracking to evaluate the tailrace egress conditions at The Dalles Dam for different alignments of a proposed guidance wall and for different spillway discharge scenarios.

  17. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  18. Numeric modeling approximation of the fluid dynamics in an optical fiber trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Zavala, J. E.; Cerecedo Nuñez, H. H.; Vigueras Zuñiga, M. O.; Padilla Sosa, P.

    2014-09-01

    This document presents a first approach to study the behavior of a static fluid radiated by infrared light (980nm,100mW) transmitted by a single-mode optical fiber, for this simulation temperature and radiation pressure are calculated based on the intensity delivered by a laser diode. The Computing Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results were based on a mesh Tet/Hybrid, TGrid for a Silica micro-particle and a mesh Hex/Wedge, Cooper for the beam. The results show that as the particle moves along the axis, temperature and pressure decreases, having the points of mayor temperature and pressure around the axis. The conclusion of this work is that it is possible to simulate the interactions between the beam, the micro-particle and the surrounding medium in terms of temperature, velocity and pressure using the energy and viscous model.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of left valvular heart diseases during atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca; Anselmino, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, frequently presents in patients with underlying valvular disease, its hemodynamic contributions are not fully understood. The present work aimed to computationally study how physical conditions imposed by pathologic valvular anatomy act on AF hemodynamics. Methods: We simulated AF with different severity grades of left-sided valvular diseases and compared the cardiovascular effects that they exert during AF, compared to lone AF. The fluid dynamics model used here has been recently validated for lone AF and relies on a lumped parameterization of the four heart chambers, together with the systemic and pulmonary circulation. The AF modelling involves: (i) irregular, uncorrelated and faster heart rate; (ii) atrial contractility dysfunction. Three different grades of severity (mild, moderate, severe) were analyzed for each of the four valvulopathies (AS, aortic stenosis, MS, mitral stenosis, AR, aortic regurgitation, MR, mitral regurgitation), by varying–through the valve opening angle–the valve area. Results: Regurgitation was hemodynamically more relevant than stenosis, as the latter led to inefficient cardiac flow, while the former introduced more drastic fluid dynamics variation. Moreover, mitral valvulopathies were more significant than aortic ones. In case of aortic valve diseases, proper mitral functioning damps out changes at atrial and pulmonary levels. In the case of mitral valvulopathy, the mitral valve lost its regulating capability, thus hemodynamic variations almost equally affected regions upstream and downstream of the valve. In particular, the present study revealed that both mitral and aortic regurgitation strongly affect hemodynamics, followed by mitral stenosis, while aortic stenosis has the least impact among the analyzed valvular diseases. Discussion: The proposed approach can provide new mechanistic insights as to which valvular pathologies merit more aggressive treatment of

  20. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester. PMID:21047058

  1. Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC)is a state-of-the-art hydrodynamic model that can be used to simulate aquatic systems in one, two, and three dimensions. It has evolved over the past two decades to become one of the most widely used and technically defensible hydrodyn...

  2. Description of fluid dynamics and coupled transports in models of a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Trávníčková, Tereza; Havlica, Jaromír; Ždímal, Vladimír

    2013-08-14

    The aim of this study is to assess how much the results of nucleation experiments in a laminar flow diffusion chamber (LFDC) are influenced by the complexity of the model of the transport properties. The effects of the type of fluid dynamic model (the steady state compressible Navier-Stokes system for an ideal gas/parabolic profile approximation) and the contributions of the coupled terms describing the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion on the predicted magnitude of the nucleation maxima and its location were investigated. This study was performed on the model of the homogeneous nucleation of an n-butanol-He vapor mixture in a LFDC. The isothermal dependencies of the nucleation rate on supersaturation were determined at three nucleation temperatures: 265 K, 270 K, and 280 K. For this purpose, the experimental LFDC data measured by A. P. Hyvärinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224304 (2006)] were reevaluated using transport models at different levels of complexity. Our results indicate that the type of fluid dynamical model affects both the position of the nucleation maxima in the LFDC and the maximum value of the nucleation rate. On the other hand, the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion perceptibly influence only the value of the maximal nucleation rate. Its position changes only marginally. The dependence of the maximum experimental nucleation rate on the saturation ratio and nucleation temperature was acquired for each case. Based on this dependence, we presented a method for the comparison and evaluation of the uncertainties of simpler models' solutions for the results, where we assumed that the model with Navier-Stokes equations and both coupled effects taken into account was the basis. From this comparison, it follows that an inappropriate choice of mathematical models could lead to relative errors of the order of several hundred percent in the maximum experimental nucleation rate. In the conclusion of this study, we also provide some general recommendations

  3. Benchmarking Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Application to Lava Flow Simulations and Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, H. R.; Lev, E.; Chen, J.; Cashman, K. V.; Honor, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent eruptions in Hawai'i, Iceland, and Cape Verde highlight the need for improved lava flow models for forecasting and hazard assessment. Existing models used for lava flow simulation range in assumptions, complexity, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess the capabilities of existing models and test the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flows, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, Flow3D, and COMSOL. Using new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (2015) as a guide, we model Newtonian, Herschel-Bulkley and cooling flows over inclined planes, obstacles, and digital elevation models with a wide range of source conditions. Results are compared to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Our study highlights the strengths and weakness of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection. We apply the best-fit codes to simulate the lava flows in Harrat Rahat, a predominately mafic volcanic field in Saudi Arabia. Input parameters are assembled from rheology and volume measurements of past flows using geochemistry, crystallinity, and present-day lidar and photogrammetric digital elevation models. With these data, we use our verified models to reconstruct historic and prehistoric events, in order to assess the hazards posed by lava flows for Harrat Rahat.

  4. Experimental Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of Copper Electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Martin J.; Philip Schwarz, M.

    2010-12-01

    The hydrodynamics that occur in the space between the electrode plates in copper electrowinning (EW) are simulated using a computational fluid dynamics model (CFD). The model solves for the phases of gas oxygen bubbles and electrolyte using the Navier-Stokes equations in a CFD framework. An oxygen source is added to the anode, which sets up a recirculation pattern. The gradients in copper near the cathode lead to buoyancy forces, which result in an uplift in the electrolyte close to the cathode. This study investigates the experimental validation of the CFD model using a small/medium-scale real EW system. The predicted fluid velocity profiles are compared with the experimental values, which have been measured along various cross sections of the gap between the anode and the cathode. The results show that the CFD model accurately predicts the velocity profile at several heights in the plate pair. The CFD model prediction of the gas hold-up and the recirculation pattern is compared with visualizations from the experiment. The CFD model prediction is shown to be good across several different operating conditions and geometries, showing that the fundamental underlying equations used in the CFD model transfer to these cases without adjusting the model parameters.

  5. Biomixing due to diel vertical migrations of zooplankton: Comparison of computational fluid dynamics model with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Cayla; Soloviev, Alexander; Hirons, Amy; Frank, Tamara; Wood, Jon

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies (Dewar et al., 2006; Wilhelmus and Dabiri, 2014) suggest that diel vertical migrations (DVM) of zooplankton (or other migrating organisms) may have an impact on ocean mixing, though details are not completely clear. Zooplankton that undergo DVM can have an impact on oil transport through the water column, and oil and dispersants can have a negative or even lethal effect on the organisms. Kunze et al. (2006) reported an increase of dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, ε, by four to five orders of magnitude during DVM of zooplankton over background turbulence in Saanich Inlet, British Columbia, Canada. However, the effect was not observed in the same area by Rousseau et al. (2010) and was later reassessed by Kunze (2011). In our work, an 11-month data set obtained in the Straits of Florida with a bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler revealed strong sound scattering layers undergoing DVM. We used a 3-D non-hydrostatic computational fluid dynamics model with Lagrangian particle injections (a proxy for migrating organisms) via a discrete phase model to simulate the effect of turbulence generation by DVM. We tested a range of organism concentrations from 1000 to 10,000 organisms/m3 based on measurements by Greenlaw (1979) and Mackie and Mills (1983) in Saanich Inlet. At a concentration close to the upper limit, the simulation showed an increase in ε by two to three orders of magnitude during DVM over background turbulence, 10-9 W kg-1. At a concentration of 1000 organisms/m3, almost no turbulence above the background level was produced in the model. These results suggest that the Kunze et al. (2006) observations could have been performed at a larger concentration of migrating zooplankton than those reported by Rousseau et al. (2010). No exact zooplankton concentrations data were provided in either work. The difference between observations and the model can, in part, be explained by the fact that Kunze et al. (2006) measured

  6. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Vortex Suppress Device Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2006-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used in an investigation into the suppression of a surface vortex that forms and the south-most spilling bay at The Dalles Project. The CFD work complemented work at the prototype and the reduced-scale physical models. The CFD model was based on a model developed for other work in the forebay but had additional resolution added near the spillway. Vortex suppression devices (VSDs) were to placed between pier noses and/or in the bulkhead slot of the spillway bays. The simulations in this study showed that placing VSD structures or a combination of structures to suppress the vortex would still result in near-surface flows to be entrained in a vortex near the downstream spillwall. These results were supported by physical model and prototype studies. However, there was a consensus of the fish biologists at the physical model that the fish would most likely move north and if the fish went under the VSD it would immediately exit the forebay through the tainter gate and not get trapped between VSDs or the VSDs and the tainter gate if the VSDs were deep enough.

  7. Hemodynamic Characteristics Regarding Recanalization of Completely Coiled Aneurysms: Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis Using Virtual Models Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wonhyoung; Song, Yunsun; Park, Kye Jin; Koo, Hae-Won; Yang, Kuhyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hemodynamic factors are considered to play an important role in initiation and progression of the recurrence after endosaccular coiling of the intracranial aneurysms. We made paired virtual models of completely coiled aneurysms which were subsequently recanalized and compared to identify hemodynamic characteristics related to the recurred aneurysmal sac. Materials and Methods We created paired virtual models of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in five aneurysms which were initially regarded as having achieved complete occlusion and then recurred during follow-up. Paired virtual models consisted of the CFD model of 3D rotational angiography obtained in the recurred aneurysm and the control model of the initial, parent artery after artificial removal of the coiled and recanalized aneurysm. Using the CFD analysis of the virtual model, we analyzed the hemodynamic characteristics on the neck of each aneurysm before and after its recurrence. Results High wall shear stress (WSS) was identified at the cross-sectionally identified aneurysm neck at which recurrence developed in all cases. A small vortex formation with relatively low velocity in front of the neck was also identified in four cases. The aneurysm recurrence locations corresponded to the location of high WSS and/or small vortex formation. Conclusion Recanalized aneurysms revealed increased WSS and small vortex formation at the cross-sectional neck of the aneurysm. This observation may partially explain the hemodynamic causes of future recanalization after coil embolization. PMID:26958410

  8. Bloodstain Pattern Analysis: implementation of a fluid dynamic model for position determination of victims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, Nick; de Bruin, Karla G.; Slenter, Denise; Wilhelm, Julie; Jermy, Mark; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Bloodstain Pattern Analysis is a forensic discipline in which, among others, the position of victims can be determined at crime scenes on which blood has been shed. To determine where the blood source was investigators use a straight-line approximation for the trajectory, ignoring effects of gravity and drag and thus overestimating the height of the source. We determined how accurately the location of the origin can be estimated when including gravity and drag into the trajectory reconstruction. We created eight bloodstain patterns at one meter distance from the wall. The origin’s location was determined for each pattern with: the straight-line approximation, our method including gravity, and our method including both gravity and drag. The latter two methods require the volume and impact velocity of each bloodstain, which we are able to determine with a 3D scanner and advanced fluid dynamics, respectively. We conclude that by including gravity and drag in the trajectory calculation, the origin’s location can be determined roughly four times more accurately than with the straight-line approximation. Our study enables investigators to determine if the victim was sitting or standing, or it might be possible to connect wounds on the body to specific patterns, which is important for crime scene reconstruction.

  9. Supersonic Retro-Propulsion Experimental Design for Computational Fluid Dynamics Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Laws, Christopher T.; Kleb, W. L.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Spells, Courtney; McCrea, Andrew C.; Truble, Kerry A.; Schauerhamer, Daniel G.; Oberkampf, William L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of supersonic retro-propulsion, an enabling technology for heavy payload exploration missions to Mars, is the primary focus for the present paper. A new experimental model, intended to provide computational fluid dynamics model validation data, was recently designed for the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Section 2. Pre-test computations were instrumental for sizing and refining the model, over the Mach number range of 2.4 to 4.6, such that tunnel blockage and internal flow separation issues would be minimized. A 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody, which accommodates up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, followed by a 10-in long cylindrical aftbody was developed for this study based on the computational results. The model was designed to allow for a large number of surface pressure measurements on the forebody and aftbody. Supplemental data included high-speed Schlieren video and internal pressures and temperatures. The run matrix was developed to allow for the quantification of various sources of experimental uncertainty, such as random errors due to run-to-run variations and bias errors due to flow field or model misalignments. Some preliminary results and observations from the test are presented, although detailed analyses of the data and uncertainties are still on going.

  10. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created for detailed analysis of a high-temperature electrolysis stack (solid oxide fuel cells operated as electrolyzers). Inlet and outlet plenum flow distributions are discussed. Maldistribution of plena flow show deviations in per-cell operating conditions due to non-uniformity of species concentrations. Models have also been created to simulate experimental conditions and for code validation. Comparisons between model predictions and experimental results are discussed. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the electrolysis mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution, and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition.

  11. A solution algorithm for the fluid dynamic equations based on a stochastic model for molecular motion

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, Patrick Torrilhon, Manuel; Heinz, Stefan

    2010-02-20

    In this paper, a stochastic model is presented to simulate the flow of gases, which are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, like in rarefied or micro situations. For the interaction of a particle with others, statistical moments of the local ensemble have to be evaluated, but unlike in molecular dynamics simulations or DSMC, no collisions between computational particles are considered. In addition, a novel integration technique allows for time steps independent of the stochastic time scale. The stochastic model represents a Fokker-Planck equation in the kinetic description, which can be viewed as an approximation to the Boltzmann equation. This allows for a rigorous investigation of the relation between the new model and classical fluid and kinetic equations. The fluid dynamic equations of Navier-Stokes and Fourier are fully recovered for small relaxation times, while for larger values the new model extents into the kinetic regime. Numerical studies demonstrate that the stochastic model is consistent with Navier-Stokes in that limit, but also that the results become significantly different, if the conditions for equilibrium are invalid. The application to the Knudsen paradox demonstrates the correctness and relevance of this development, and comparisons with existing kinetic equations and standard solution algorithms reveal its advantages. Moreover, results of a test case with geometrically complex boundaries are presented.

  12. Leatherbacks swimming in silico: modeling and verifying their momentum and heat balance using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Peter N; Bonazza, Riccardo; Jones, T Todd; Wyneken, Jeanette; Porter, Warren P

    2014-01-01

    As global temperatures increase throughout the coming decades, species ranges will shift. New combinations of abiotic conditions will make predicting these range shifts difficult. Biophysical mechanistic niche modeling places bounds on an animal's niche through analyzing the animal's physical interactions with the environment. Biophysical mechanistic niche modeling is flexible enough to accommodate these new combinations of abiotic conditions. However, this approach is difficult to implement for aquatic species because of complex interactions among thrust, metabolic rate and heat transfer. We use contemporary computational fluid dynamic techniques to overcome these difficulties. We model the complex 3D motion of a swimming neonate and juvenile leatherback sea turtle to find power and heat transfer rates during the stroke. We combine the results from these simulations and a numerical model to accurately predict the core temperature of a swimming leatherback. These results are the first steps in developing a highly accurate mechanistic niche model, which can assists paleontologist in understanding biogeographic shifts as well as aid contemporary species managers about potential range shifts over the coming decades. PMID:25354303

  13. Leatherbacks Swimming In Silico: Modeling and Verifying Their Momentum and Heat Balance Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Peter N.; Bonazza, Riccardo; Jones, T. Todd; Wyneken, Jeanette; Porter, Warren P.

    2014-01-01

    As global temperatures increase throughout the coming decades, species ranges will shift. New combinations of abiotic conditions will make predicting these range shifts difficult. Biophysical mechanistic niche modeling places bounds on an animal’s niche through analyzing the animal’s physical interactions with the environment. Biophysical mechanistic niche modeling is flexible enough to accommodate these new combinations of abiotic conditions. However, this approach is difficult to implement for aquatic species because of complex interactions among thrust, metabolic rate and heat transfer. We use contemporary computational fluid dynamic techniques to overcome these difficulties. We model the complex 3D motion of a swimming neonate and juvenile leatherback sea turtle to find power and heat transfer rates during the stroke. We combine the results from these simulations and a numerical model to accurately predict the core temperature of a swimming leatherback. These results are the first steps in developing a highly accurate mechanistic niche model, which can assists paleontologist in understanding biogeographic shifts as well as aid contemporary species managers about potential range shifts over the coming decades. PMID:25354303

  14. A new approach for fluid dynamics simulation: The Short-lived Water Cuboid Particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Changjian; Li, Jiansong; Tian, Zongshun

    2016-09-01

    There are many researches to simulate the fluid which adopt the traditional particle-based approach and the grid-based approach. However, it needs massive storage in the traditional particle-based approach and it is very complicated to design the grid-based approach with the Navier-Stokes Equations or the Shallow Water Equations (SWEs) because of the difficulty of solving equations. This paper presents a new model called the Short-lived Water Cuboid Particle model. It updates the fluid properties (mass and momentum) recorded in the fixed Cartesian grids by computing the weighted sum of the water cuboid particles with a time step life. Thus it is a two-type-based approach essentially, which not only owns efficient computation and manageable memory like the grid-based approach, but also deals with the discontinuous water surface (wet/dry fronts, boundary conditions, etc.) with high accuracy as well as the particle-based approach. The proposed model has been found capable to simulate the fluid excellently for three laboratory experimental cases and for the field case study of the Malpasset dam-break event occurred in France in 1959. The obtained results show that the model is proved to be an alternative approach to simulate the fluid dynamics with a fair accuracy.

  15. Dust emission modelling around a stockpile by using computational fluid dynamics and discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshani, S. M.; Schott, D. L.; Lodewijks, G.

    2013-06-01

    Dust emissions can have significant effects on the human health, environment and industry equipment. Understanding the dust generation process helps to select a suitable dust preventing approach and also is useful to evaluate the environmental impact of dust emission. To describe these processes, numerical methods such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are widely used, however nowadays particle based methods like Discrete Element Method (DEM) allow researchers to model interaction between particles and fluid flow. In this study, air flow over a stockpile, dust emission, erosion and surface deformation of granular material in the form of stockpile are studied by using DEM and CFD as a coupled method. Two and three dimensional simulations are respectively developed for CFD and DEM methods to minimize CPU time. The standard κ-ɛ turbulence model is used in a fully developed turbulent flow. The continuous gas phase and the discrete particle phase link to each other through gas-particle void fractions and momentum transfer. In addition to stockpile deformation, dust dispersion is studied and finally the accuracy of stockpile deformation results obtained by CFD-DEM modelling will be validated by the agreement with the existing experimental data.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of impeller designs for the HeartQuest left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Curtas, Anthony R; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E; McDaniel, James C; Day, Steven W; Olsen, Don B

    2002-01-01

    To finalize the design of the next generation of the HeartQuest left ventricular assist device, a suitable impeller had to be designed and tested. The new prototype was based on calculations and test results of previous designs, but required several changes to decrease the size. For most pump designs, this is a simple matter of altering impeller geometry and rotational speed to achieve the desired pressure rise and flow rate. However, this particular pump was limited by housing geometry and the magnetic bearings that support the impeller. Without much freedom in the overall impeller size, the only parameters open to the designers were the blade profiles and the rotating speed. Rather than build several candidates and test them in a rig at enormous cost, computational models of several designs were tested and analyzed. This not only saved money, but also sped up the development time for the project. The computer models were developed in TASCflow, a computational fluid dynamics software package from AEA Technologies. This paper analyzes the data from several of the selected models, paying close attention to pumping performance and general trends from specific design changes. PMID:12296578

  17. The non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of a simple geophysical fluid dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkley, Wim; Severijns, Camiel

    2014-05-01

    Lorenz [1] has devised a dynamical system that has proved to be very useful as a benchmark system in geophysical fluid dynamics. The system in its simplest form consists of a periodic array of variables that can be associated with an atmospheric field on a latitude circle. The system is driven by a constant forcing, is damped by linear friction and has a simple advection term that causes the model to behave chaotically if the forcing is large enough. Our aim is to predict the statistics of Lorenz' model on the basis of a given average value of its total energy - obtained from a numerical integration - and the assumption of statistical stationarity. Our method is the principle of maximum entropy [2] which in this case reads: the information entropy of the system's probability density function shall be maximal under the constraints of normalization, a given value of the average total energy and statistical stationarity. Statistical stationarity is incorporated approximately by using `stationarity constraints', i.e., by requiring that the average first and possibly higher-order time-derivatives of the energy are zero in the maximization of entropy. The analysis [3] reveals that, if the first stationarity constraint is used, the resulting probability density function rather accurately reproduces the statistics of the individual variables. If the second stationarity constraint is used as well, the correlations between the variables are also reproduced quite adequately. The method can be generalized straightforwardly and holds the promise of a viable non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of the forced-dissipative systems of geophysical fluid dynamics. [1] E.N. Lorenz, 1996: Predictability - A problem partly solved, in Proc. Seminar on Predictability (ECMWF, Reading, Berkshire, UK), Vol. 1, pp. 1-18. [2] E.T. Jaynes, 2003: Probability Theory - The Logic of Science (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge). [3] W.T.M. Verkley and C.A. Severijns, 2014: The maximum entropy

  18. Application of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models to complex ecological stream flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Diplas, Panayiotis

    2008-01-01

    SummaryComplex flow patterns generated by irregular channel topography, such as boulders, submerged large woody debris, riprap and spur dikes, provide unique habitat for many aquatic organisms. Numerical modeling of the flow structures surrounding these obstructions is challenging, yet it represents an important tool for aquatic habitat assessment. In this study, the ability of two- (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics models to reproduce these localized complex flow features is examined. The 3-D model is validated with laboratory data obtained from the literature for the case of a flow around a hemisphere under emergent and submerged conditions. The performance of the 2-D and 3-D models is then evaluated by comparing the numerical results with field measurements of flow around several boulders located at a reach of the Smith River, a regulated mountainous stream, obtained at base and peak flows. Close agreement between measured values and the velocity profiles predicted by the two models is obtained outside the wakes behind the hemisphere and boulders. However, the results suggest that in the vicinity of these obstructions the 3-D model is better suited for reproducing the circulation flow behavior at both low and high discharges. Application of the 2-D and 3-D models to meso-scale stream flows of ecological significance is furthermore demonstrated by using a recently developed spatial hydraulic metric to quantify flow complexity surrounding a number of brown trout spawning sites. It is concluded that the 3-D model can provide a much more accurate description of the heterogeneous velocity patterns favored by many aquatic species over a broad range of flows, especially under deep flow conditions when the various obstructions are submerged. Issues pertaining to selection of appropriate models for a variety of flow regimes and potential implication of the 3-D model on the development of better habitat suitability criteria are discussed. The

  19. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Behavior Guidance System Siting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2005-03-10

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were developed to support the siting and design of a behavioral guidance system (BGS) structure in The Dalles Dam (TDA) forebay on the Columbia River. The work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP). The CFD results were an invaluable tool for the analysis, both from a Regional and Agency perspective (for the fish passage evaluation) and a CENWP perspective (supporting the BGS design and location). The new CFD model (TDA forebay model) included the latest bathymetry (surveyed in 1999) and a detailed representation of the engineered structures (spillway, powerhouse main, fish, and service units). The TDA forebay model was designed and developed in a way that future studies could easily modify or, to a large extent, reuse large portions of the existing mesh. This study resulted in these key findings: (1) The TDA forebay model matched well with field-measured velocity data. (2) The TDA forebay model matched observations made at the 1:80 general physical model of the TDA forebay. (3) During the course of this study, the methodology typically used by CENWP to contour topographic data was shown to be inaccurate when applied to widely-spaced transect data. Contouring methodologies need to be revisited--especially before such things as modifying the bathymetry in the 1:80 general physical model are undertaken. Future alignments can be evaluated with the model staying largely intact. The next round of analysis will need to address fish passage demands and navigation concerns. CFD models can be used to identify the most promising locations and to provide quantified metrics for biological, hydraulic, and navigation criteria. The most promising locations should then be further evaluated in the 1:80 general physical model.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of bun baking process under different oven load conditions.

    PubMed

    Tank, A; Chhanwal, N; Indrani, D; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2014-09-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to study the temperature profile of the bun during baking process. Evaporation-condensation mechanism and effect of the latent heat during phase change of water was incorporated in this model to represent actual bun baking process. Simulation results were validated with experimental measurements of bun temperature at two different positions. Baking process is completed within 20 min, after the temperature of crumb become stable at 98 °C. Further, this study was extended to investigate the effect of partially (two baking trays) loaded and fully loaded (eight baking trays) oven on temperature profile of bun. Velocity and temperature profile differs in partially loaded and fully loaded oven. Bun placed in top rack showed rapid baking while bun placed in bottom rack showed slower baking due to uneven temperature distribution in the oven. Hence, placement of bun inside the oven affects temperature of bun and consequently, the quality of the product. PMID:25190860

  1. Wind Turbine Modeling for Computational Fluid Dynamics: December 2010 - December 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Tossas, L. A. M.; Leonardi, S.

    2013-07-01

    With the shortage of fossil fuel and the increasing environmental awareness, wind energy is becoming more and more important. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind farms are becoming larger. Current utility-scale turbines extend a significant distance into the atmospheric boundary layer. Therefore, the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbines and their wakes needs to be better understood. The turbulent wakes of upstream turbines affect the flow field of the turbines behind them, decreasing power production and increasing mechanical loading. With a better understanding of this type of flow, wind farm developers could plan better-performing, less maintenance-intensive wind farms. Simulating this flow using computational fluid dynamics is one important way to gain a better understanding of wind farm flows. In this study, we compare the performance of actuator disc and actuator line models in producing wind turbine wakes and the wake-turbine interaction between multiple turbines. We also examine parameters that affect the performance of these models, such as grid resolution, the use of a tip-loss correction, and the way in which the turbine force is projected onto the flow field.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Zinc Slag Fuming Process in Top-Submerged Lance Smelting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, Geoffrey; Reuter, Markus A.; Matusewicz, Robert W.

    2012-02-01

    Slag fuming is a reductive treatment process for molten zinciferous slags for extracting zinc in the form of metal vapor by injecting or adding a reductant source such as pulverized coal or lump coal and natural gas. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to study the zinc slag fuming process from imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slag in a top-submerged lance furnace and to investigate the details of fluid flow, reaction kinetics, and heat transfer in the furnace. The model integrates combustion phenomena and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with a number of user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model is based on three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian multiphase flow approach, and it predicts the velocity and temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence, and vortex and plume shape at the lance tip. The model also predicts the mass fractions of slag and gaseous components inside the furnace. The model predicted that the percent of ZnO in the slag bath decreases linearly with time and is consistent broadly with the experimental data. The zinc fuming rate from the slag bath predicted by the model was validated through macrostep validation process against the experimental study of Waladan et al. The model results predicted that the rate of ZnO reduction is controlled by the mass transfer of ZnO from the bulk slag to slag-gas interface and rate of gas-carbon reaction for the specified simulation time studied. Although the model is based on zinc slag fuming, the basic approach could be expanded or applied for the CFD analysis of analogous systems.

  3. Techno-economic and Fluid Dynamics Analysis for Growing Microalgae with the Intent of Producing Biofuel Using a System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaeli, Leah R.

    Techno-economic and systems studies on microalgal growth scenarios to date are abbreviated and missing a number of important variables. By including these variables in a detailed model integrating biology, chemistry, engineering, and financial aspects, a more defined systems analysis is possible. Through optimizing the model productivity based on the resulting net profit, the system analysis results in a more accurate assessment of environmental and economic sustainability of specific algal growth scenarios. Photobioreactor algal growth scenario optimization in the system model has resulted in realistic engineering design requirements based on algal growth requirements and fluid dynamics analysis. Results show feasibility for photobioreactor growth scenarios to be economically sustainable when co-products are included, but definite technological advancements and productivity improvements must be made. The main factors inhibiting a cost effective photobioreactor growth scenario are culture density, temperature, and lighting distribution for solar illuminated photobioreactors, and lighting cost for artificially illuminated photobioreactors. Open pond algal growth scenarios do not show any prospect of economic or environmental sustainability with current technology due to the large amount of surface area required, inefficient water use, and low culture density. All algal growth scenarios are inferior to petro-diesel regarding energy inputs, carbon emissions, and environmental sustainability. No algal growth scenarios analyzed in this study meet the U.S. requirement of biofuel emitting at least 20% less carbon emissions than diesel from crude oil.

  4. Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2006-11-01

    Fluid dynamics is fundamental to our understanding of the atmosphere and oceans. Although many of the same principles of fluid dynamics apply to both the atmosphere and oceans, textbooks tend to concentrate on the atmosphere, the ocean, or the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD). This textbook provides a comprehensive unified treatment of atmospheric and oceanic fluid dynamics. The book introduces the fundamentals of geophysical fluid dynamics, including rotation and stratification, vorticity and potential vorticity, and scaling and approximations. It discusses baroclinic and barotropic instabilities, wave-mean flow interactions and turbulence, and the general circulation of the atmosphere and ocean. Student problems and exercises are included at the end of each chapter. Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics: Fundamentals and Large-Scale Circulation will be an invaluable graduate textbook on advanced courses in GFD, meteorology, atmospheric science and oceanography, and an excellent review volume for researchers. Additional resources are available at www.cambridge.org/9780521849692. Includes end of chapter review questions to aid understanding Unified and comprehensive treatment of both atmospheric and oceanic fluid dynamics Covers many modern topics and provides up to date knowledge

  5. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  6. Stable Small Animal Mechanical Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.

    2011-11-08

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require 3D images to be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle, with no breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements result in long imaging times ({approx}90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, can gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward drift in peak inspiratory pressure or by changes in the pressure waveform and/or lung volume over the course of the experiment. We demonstrate highly repeatable mechanical ventilation in anesthetized rats over a long duration for pulmonary CT imaging throughout the dynamic breathing cycle. We describe significant updates to a basic commercial ventilator that was acquired for these experiments. Key to achieving consistent results was the implementation of periodic deep breaths, or sighs, of extended duration to maintain lung recruitment. In addition, continuous monitoring of breath-to-breath pressure and volume waveforms and long-term trends in peak inspiratory pressure and flow provide diagnostics of changes in breathing mechanics.

  7. Stable Small Animal Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Richard E.; Lamm, Wayne J.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require that three-dimensional images be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle without breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements can result in long imaging times (∼90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, may gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward drift in peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) or by changes in the pressure waveform and/or lung volume over the course of the experiment. We demonstrate highly repeatable mechanical ventilation in anesthetized rats over a long duration for dynamic lung x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. We describe significant updates to a basic commercial ventilator that was acquired for these experiments. Key to achieving consistent results was the implementation of periodic deep breaths, or sighs, of extended duration to maintain lung recruitment. In addition, continuous monitoring of breath-to-breath pressure and volume waveforms and long-term trends in PIP and flow provide diagnostics of changes in breathing mechanics. PMID:22087338

  8. Computational fluid dynamic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Deabreu-Garcia, Alex

    1989-01-01

    A general technique is presented for modeling fluid, or gas, dynamic systems specifically for the development of control systems. The numerical methods which are generally used in computational fluid dynamics are borrowed to create either continuous-time or discrete-time models of the particular fluid system. The resulting equations can be either left in a nonlinear form, or easily linearized about an operating point. As there are typically very many states in these systems, the usual linear model reduction methods can be used on them to allow a low-order controller to be designed. A simple example is given which typifies many internal flow control problems. The resulting control is termed computational fluid dynamic control.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin

    PubMed Central

    Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin’s lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides. PMID:25642134

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P.

    2013-04-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin's lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-13

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  12. Modeling hydroxyl radical distribution and trialkyl phosphates oxidation in UV-H2O2 photoreactors using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Raisee, Mehrdad; Moghaddami, Mostafa; Ducoste, Joel; Sasges, Micheal; Liberti, Lorenzo; Notarnicola, Michele

    2010-08-15

    Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) promoted by ultraviolet light are innovative and potentially cost-effective solutions for treating persistent pollutants recalcitrant to conventional water and wastewater treatment. While several studies have been performed during the past decade to improve the fundamental understanding of the UV-H(2)O(2) AOP and its kinetic modeling, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has only recently emerged as a powerful tool that allows a deeper understanding of complex photochemical processes in environmental and reactor engineering applications. In this paper, a comprehensive kinetic model of UV-H(2)O(2) AOP was coupled with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations using CFD to predict the oxidation of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and tri(2-chloroethtyl) phosphate (TCEP) in two different photoreactors: a parallel- and a cross-flow UV device employing a UV lamp emitting primarily 253.7 nm radiation. CFD simulations, obtained for both turbulent and laminar flow regimes and compared with experimental data over a wide range of UV doses, enabled the spatial visualization of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical distributions in the photoreactor. The annular photoreactor displayed consistently better oxidation performance than the cross-flow system due to the absence of recirculation zones, as confirmed by the hydroxyl radical dose distributions. Notably, such discrepancy was found to be strongly dependent on and directly correlated with the hydroxyl radical rate constant becoming relevant for conditions approaching diffusion-controlled reaction regimes (k(C,OH) > 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). PMID:20704221

  13. Verification Benchmarks to Assess the Implementation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Hemolysis Prediction Models.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; D'Souza, Gavin; Horner, Marc; Malinauskas, Richard A; Myers, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop verification and validation (V&V) standards for using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the evaluation of medical devices, we have developed idealized flow-based verification benchmarks to assess the implementation of commonly cited power-law based hemolysis models in CFD. Verification process ensures that all governing equations are solved correctly and the model is free of user and numerical errors. To perform verification for power-law based hemolysis modeling, analytical solutions for the Eulerian power-law blood damage model (which estimates hemolysis index (HI) as a function of shear stress and exposure time) were obtained for Couette and inclined Couette flow models, and for Newtonian and non-Newtonian pipe flow models. Subsequently, CFD simulations of fluid flow and HI were performed using Eulerian and three different Lagrangian-based hemolysis models and compared with the analytical solutions. For all the geometries, the blood damage results from the Eulerian-based CFD simulations matched the Eulerian analytical solutions within ∼1%, which indicates successful implementation of the Eulerian hemolysis model. Agreement between the Lagrangian and Eulerian models depended upon the choice of the hemolysis power-law constants. For the commonly used values of power-law constants (α  = 1.9-2.42 and β  = 0.65-0.80), in the absence of flow acceleration, most of the Lagrangian models matched the Eulerian results within 5%. In the presence of flow acceleration (inclined Couette flow), moderate differences (∼10%) were observed between the Lagrangian and Eulerian models. This difference increased to greater than 100% as the beta exponent decreased. These simplified flow problems can be used as standard benchmarks for verifying the implementation of blood damage predictive models in commercial and open-source CFD codes. The current study only used power-law model as an illustrative example to emphasize the need

  14. Physical and computational fluid dynamics models for the hemodynamics of the artiodactyl carotid rete.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Haley D; Bourke, Jason

    2015-12-01

    In the mammalian order Artiodactyla, the majority of arterial blood entering the intracranial cavity is supplied by a large arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This vascular structure functionally replaces the internal carotid artery. Extensive experimentation has demonstrated that the artiodactyl carotid rete drives one of the most effective selective brain cooling mechanisms among terrestrial vertebrates. Less well understood is the impact that the unique morphology of the carotid rete may have on the hemodynamics of blood flow to the cerebrum. It has been hypothesized that, relative to the tubular internal carotid arteries of most other vertebrates, the highly convoluted morphology of the carotid rete may increase resistance to flow during extreme changes in cerebral blood pressure, essentially protecting the brain by acting as a resistor. We test this hypothesis by employing simple and complex physical models to a 3D surface rendering of the carotid rete of the domestic goat, Capra hircus. First, we modeled the potential for increased resistance across the carotid rete using an electrical circuit analog. The extensive branching of the rete equates to a parallel circuit that is bound in series by single tubular arteries, both upstream and downstream. This method calculated a near-zero increase in resistance across the rete. Because basic equations do not incorporate drag, shear-stress, and turbulence, we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate the impact of these computationally intensive factors on resistance. Ultimately, both simple and complex models demonstrated negligible changes in resistance and blood pressure across the arterial meshwork. We further tested the resistive potential of the carotid rete by simulating blood pressures known to occur in giraffes. Based on these models, we found resistance (and blood pressure mitigation as a whole) to be an unlikely function for the artiodactyl carotid rete. PMID:26403501

  15. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of particle deposition in large-scale, multigenerational lung models.

    PubMed

    Walters, D Keith; Luke, William H

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has emerged as a useful tool for the prediction of airflow and particle transport within the human lung airway. Several published studies have demonstrated the use of Eulerian finite-volume CFD simulations coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking methods to determine local and regional particle deposition rates in small subsections of the bronchopulmonary tree. However, the simulation of particle transport and deposition in large-scale models encompassing more than a few generations is less common, due in part to the sheer size and complexity of the human lung airway. Highly resolved, fully coupled flowfield solution and particle tracking in the entire lung, for example, is currently an intractable problem and will remain so for the foreseeable future. This paper adopts a previously reported methodology for simulating large-scale regions of the lung airway (Walters, D. K., and Luke, W. H., 2010, "A Method for Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Simulations of Large-Scale Regions of the Human Lung Airway," ASME J. Fluids Eng., 132(5), p. 051101), which was shown to produce results similar to fully resolved geometries using approximate, reduced geometry models. The methodology is extended here to particle transport and deposition simulations. Lagrangian particle tracking simulations are performed in combination with Eulerian simulations of the airflow in an idealized representation of the human lung airway tree. Results using the reduced models are compared with those using the fully resolved models for an eight-generation region of the conducting zone. The agreement between fully resolved and reduced geometry simulations indicates that the new method can provide an accurate alternative for large-scale CFD simulations while potentially reducing the computational cost of these simulations by several orders of magnitude. PMID:21186893

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of laboratory flames and an industrial flare.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kanwar Devesh; Gangadharan, Preeti; Chen, Daniel H; Lou, Helen H; Li, Xianchang; Richmond, Peyton

    2014-11-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology for simulating the combustion process has been validated with experimental results. Three different types of experimental setups were used to validate the CFD model. These setups include an industrial-scale flare setups and two lab-scale flames. The CFD study also involved three different fuels: C3H6/CH/Air/N2, C2H4/O2/Ar and CH4/Air. In the first setup, flare efficiency data from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) 2010 field tests were used to validate the CFD model. In the second setup, a McKenna burner with flat flames was simulated. Temperature and mass fractions of important species were compared with the experimental data. Finally, results of an experimental study done at Sandia National Laboratories to generate a lifted jet flame were used for the purpose of validation. The reduced 50 species mechanism, LU 1.1, the realizable k-epsilon turbulence model, and the EDC turbulence-chemistry interaction model were usedfor this work. Flare efficiency, axial profiles of temperature, and mass fractions of various intermediate species obtained in the simulation were compared with experimental data and a good agreement between the profiles was clearly observed. In particular the simulation match with the TCEQ 2010 flare tests has been significantly improved (within 5% of the data) compared to the results reported by Singh et al. in 2012. Validation of the speciated flat flame data supports the view that flares can be a primary source offormaldehyde emission. PMID:25509554

  17. Computational fluid dynamics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Suresh; Jones, Kenneth; Hassan, Hassan; Mcrae, David Scott

    1992-01-01

    The focus of research in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) area is two fold: (1) to develop new approaches for turbulence modeling so that high speed compressible flows can be studied for applications to entry and re-entry flows; and (2) to perform research to improve CFD algorithm accuracy and efficiency for high speed flows. Research activities, faculty and student participation, publications, and financial information are outlined.

  18. Perspectives in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, G. K.; Moffatt, H. K.; Worster, M. G.

    2002-12-01

    With applications ranging from modelling the environment to automotive design and physiology to astrophysics, conventional textbooks cannot hope to give students much information on what topics in fluid dynamics are currently being researched, or how to choose between them. This book rectifies matters. It consists of eleven chapters that introduce and review different branches of the subject for graduate-level courses, or for specialists seeking introductions to other areas. Hb ISBN (2001): 0-521-78061-6

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows with sensitivity to streamline curvature and rotational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Varun

    Modeling of complex flows involving the combined effects of flow transition and streamline curvature using two advanced turbulence models, one in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) category and the other in the hybrid RANS-Large eddy simulation (LES) category is considered in this research effort. In the first part of the research, a new scalar eddy-viscosity model (EVM) is proposed, designed to exhibit physically correct responses to flow transition, streamline curvature, and system rotation effects. The four equation model developed herein is a curvature-sensitized version of a commercially available three-equation transition-sensitive model. The physical effects of rotation and curvature (RC) enter the model through the added transport equation, analogous to a transverse turbulent velocity scale. The eddy-viscosity has been redefined such that the proposed model is constrained to reduce to the original transition-sensitive model definition in nonrotating flows or in regions with negligible RC effects. In the second part of the research, the developed four-equation model is combined with a LES technique using a new hybrid modeling framework, dynamic hybrid RANS-LES. The new framework is highly generalized, allowing coupling of any desired LES model with any given RANS model and addresses several deficiencies inherent in most current hybrid models. In the present research effort, the DHRL model comprises of the proposed four-equation model for RANS component and the MILES scheme for LES component. Both the models were implemented into a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver and tested on a number of engineering and generic flow problems. Results from both the RANS and hybrid models show successful resolution of the combined effects of transition and curvature with reasonable engineering accuracy, and for only a small increase in computational cost. In addition, results from the hybrid model indicate significant levels of turbulent

  20. Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-06-01

    To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  2. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  3. State-of-the-art review of computational fluid dynamics modeling for fluid-solids systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyczkowski, R. W.; Bouillard, J. X.; Ding, J.; Chang, S. L.; Burge, S. W.

    1994-05-01

    As the result of 15 years of research (50 staff years of effort) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), through its involvement in fluidized-bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamics, and a variety of environmental programs, has produced extensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software and models to predict the multiphase hydrodynamic and reactive behavior of fluid-solids motions and interactions in complex fluidized-bed reactors (FBR's) and slurry systems. This has resulted in the FLUFIX, IRF, and SLUFIX computer programs. These programs are based on fluid-solids hydrodynamic models and can predict information important to the designer of atmospheric or pressurized bubbling and circulating FBR, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and slurry units to guarantee optimum efficiency with minimum release of pollutants into the environment. This latter issue will become of paramount importance with the enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1995. Solids motion is also the key to understanding erosion processes. Erosion rates in FBR's and pneumatic and slurry components are computed by ANL's EROSION code to predict the potential metal wastage of FBR walls, intervals, feed distributors, and cyclones. Only the FLUFIX and IRF codes will be reviewed in the paper together with highlights of the validations because of length limitations. It is envisioned that one day, these codes with user-friendly pre- and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale, and biomass as energy sources; to retain energy security; and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  4. A microfluidic model to study fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture in small lung airways

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John; Filoche, Marcel; White, Joshua; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture is important to understand mucus clearance in lung airways and potential effects of mucus plug rupture on epithelial cells at lung airway walls. We established a microfluidic model to study mucus plug rupture in a collapsed airway of the 12th generation. Mucus plugs were simulated using Carbopol 940 (C940) gels at concentrations of 0.15%, 0.2%, 0.25%, and 0.3%, which have non-Newtonian properties close to healthy and diseased lung mucus. The airway was modeled with a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic channel. Plug motion was driven by pressurized air. Global strain rates and shear stress were defined to quantitatively describe plug deformation and rupture. Results show that a plug needs to overcome yield stress before deformation and rupture. The plug takes relatively long time to yield at the high Bingham number. Plug length shortening is the more significant deformation than shearing at gel concentration higher than 0.15%. Although strain rates increase dramatically at rupture, the transient shear stress drops due to the shear-thinning effect of the C940 gels. Dimensionless time-averaged shear stress, Txy, linearly increases from 3.7 to 5.6 times the Bingham number as the Bingham number varies from 0.018 to 0.1. The dimensionless time-averaged shear rate simply equals to Txy/2. In dimension, shear stress magnitude is about one order lower than the pressure drop, and one order higher than yield stress. Mucus with high yield stress leads to high shear stress, and therefore would be more likely to cause epithelial cell damage. Crackling sounds produced with plug rupture might be more detectable for gels with higher concentration. PMID:26392827

  5. Advances in Fluid Dynamics of Subsurface Flow of Groundwater, Hydrocarbons, and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, the chemical methods of contaminant hydrogeology have dominated much of hydrogeological thinking. In their wake, understanding the physics of subsurface fluid flow and its application to practice and science seemingly has played a secondary role and it often has been replaced by numerical modelling only. Building an understanding of the actual physics of subsurface flow beyond numerical modelling, however, is a confusing experience exposing one to conflicting statements from the sides of engineers, hydrogeologists, and, for a decade or more, by the followers of free convection and density-driven flow. Within the physics of subsurface flow a number of questions arise, such as: Is water really incompressible as assumed in engineering hydraulics? How does buoyancy work? Are underground buoyancy forces generally directed vertically upwards or downwards? What is the consequential difference between hydrostatic and hydrodynamic conditions? What are the force fields causing subsurface flow for water, hydrocarbons and CO2? Is fluid flow really driven by pressure gradients as assumed in reservoir engineering? What is the effect of geothermal gradients on subsurface flow? Do convection cells and free convection exist on-shore? How does variable density flow work? Can today's numerical codes adequately determine variable density flow? Does saltwater really sink to the bottom of geologic systems due to its higher density? Aquitards create confining conditions and thereby confine fluid movements to aquifers? Does more water flow in aquifers than aquitards? The presentation will shed light on the maze of conflicting statements issued within engineering hydraulics and groundwater dynamics. It will also present a field case and its numerical modelling of variable density flow at a major industrial landfill site. The presentation will thereby foster the understanding of the correct physics involved and how this physics can be beneficially applied to practical cases

  6. Moving Domain Computational Fluid Dynamics to Interface with an Embryonic Model of Cardiac Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhyun; Moghadam, Mahdi Esmaily; Kung, Ethan; Cao, Hung; Beebe, Tyler; Miller, Yury; Roman, Beth L.; Lien, Ching-Ling; Chi, Neil C.; Marsden, Alison L.; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2013-01-01

    Peristaltic contraction of the embryonic heart tube produces time- and spatial-varying wall shear stress (WSS) and pressure gradients (∇P) across the atrioventricular (AV) canal. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are a genetically tractable system to investigate cardiac morphogenesis. The use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP)y1 transgenic embryos allowed for delineation and two-dimensional reconstruction of the endocardium. This time-varying wall motion was then prescribed in a two-dimensional moving domain computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, providing new insights into spatial and temporal variations in WSS and ∇P during cardiac development. The CFD simulations were validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV) across the atrioventricular (AV) canal, revealing an increase in both velocities and heart rates, but a decrease in the duration of atrial systole from early to later stages. At 20-30 hours post fertilization (hpf), simulation results revealed bidirectional WSS across the AV canal in the heart tube in response to peristaltic motion of the wall. At 40-50 hpf, the tube structure undergoes cardiac looping, accompanied by a nearly 3-fold increase in WSS magnitude. At 110-120 hpf, distinct AV valve, atrium, ventricle, and bulbus arteriosus form, accompanied by incremental increases in both WSS magnitude and ∇P, but a decrease in bi-directional flow. Laminar flow develops across the AV canal at 20-30 hpf, and persists at 110-120 hpf. Reynolds numbers at the AV canal increase from 0.07±0.03 at 20-30 hpf to 0.23±0.07 at 110-120 hpf (p< 0.05, n=6), whereas Womersley numbers remain relatively unchanged from 0.11 to 0.13. Our moving domain simulations highlights hemodynamic changes in relation to cardiac morphogenesis; thereby, providing a 2-D quantitative approach to complement imaging analysis. PMID:24009714

  7. Development and verification of a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics model of canine nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Craven, Brent A; Paterson, Eric G; Settles, Gary S; Lawson, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    The canine nasal cavity contains a complex airway labyrinth, dedicated to respiratory air conditioning, filtering of inspired contaminants, and olfaction. The small and contorted anatomical structure of the nasal turbinates has, to date, precluded a proper study of nasal airflow in the dog. This study describes the development of a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the canine nasal airway from a three-dimensional reconstruction of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans of the canine anatomy. Unstructured hexahedral grids are generated, with large grid sizes ((10-100) x 10(6) computational cells) required to capture the details of the nasal airways. High-fidelity CFD solutions of the nasal airflow for steady inspiration and expiration are computed over a range of physiological airflow rates. A rigorous grid refinement study is performed, which also illustrates a methodology for verification of CFD calculations on complex unstructured grids in tortuous airways. In general, the qualitative characteristics of the computed solutions for the different grid resolutions are fairly well preserved. However, quantitative results such as the overall pressure drop and even the regional distribution of airflow in the nasal cavity are moderately grid dependent. These quantities tend to converge monotonically with grid refinement. Lastly, transient computations of canine sniffing were carried out as part of a time-step study, demonstrating that high temporal accuracy is achievable using small time steps consisting of 160 steps per sniff period. Here we demonstrate that acceptable numerical accuracy (between approximately 1% and 15%) is achievable with practical levels of grid resolution (approximately 100 x 10(6) computational cells). Given the popularity of CFD as a tool for studying flow in the upper airways of humans and animals, based on this work we recommend the necessity of a grid dependence study and quantification of numerical error when

  8. Aerosol-computational fluid dynamics modeling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Gong, S. L.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R.; Stroud, C. A.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J. R.; Jia, C. Q.

    2014-12-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion, and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-computational fluid dynamics (CFD) coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary conditions is proposed to model pollutant dispersion and dynamics in one unified domain from the tailpipe level to the ambient near-road environment. This approach significantly reduces the size of the computational domain, and therefore allows fast simulation of multiple scenarios. The model is validated against measured turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and horizontal gradient of pollution concentrations perpendicular to a major highway. Through a model sensitivity analysis, the relative importance of individual aerosol dynamical processes on the total particle number concentration (N) and particle number-size distribution (PSD) near a highway is investigated. The results demonstrate that (1) coagulation has a negligible effect on N and particle growth, (2) binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H2SO4-H2O is likely responsible for elevated N closest to the road, and (3) N and particle growth are very sensitive to the condensation of semi-volatile organics (SVOCs), particle dry deposition, and the interaction between these processes. The results also indicate that, without the proper treatment of the atmospheric boundary layer (i.e., its wind profile and turbulence quantities), the nucleation rate would be underestimated by a factor of 5 in the vehicle wake region due to overestimated dilution. Therefore, introducing atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) conditions to activity-based emission models may potentially improve their performance in estimating UFP traffic emissions.

  9. Progress in geophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Allan R.

    today are powerful enough to allow realistic simulations of turbulent and planetary flows. A school of scientists and philosophers regard such simulations of computational physics as representing the first major advance in scientific methodology in centuries; scientific enterprise is now tripartite, with simulation on a par with theory and experimentation. Data assimilation involves the continual blending of observational data with dynamical model output for the best overall representation of reality. The conceptual model of nature implied is novel. The named discipline of geophysical fluid dynamics is barely three decades old. Scientifically it is an interesting time in the history of human development on earth as aspects of the dynamics of our atmosphere and oceans become solved problems. Geophysical fluid dynamicists are ready to deal with interactive and whole-earth problems, and to continue to expand the horizons of their science via the opportunities provided by space exploration. Progress is occurring in understanding climate and climate change processes which involve dynamical coupling of the oceans and the atmosphere and which cause profound biological and economic effects. Applied geophysical fluid dynamics is essential for the potential success of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program which seeks to unite earth scientists in the next decade in the pursuit of global change research dedicated to a more habitable planet.

  10. Integrating aerodynamic surface modeling for computational fluid dynamics with computer aided structural analysis, design, and manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorp, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a NASA Geometry Exchange Specification for transferring aerodynamic surface geometry between LeRC systems and grid generation software used for computational fluid dynamics research. The proposed specification is based on a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). The presentation will include discussion of how the NASA-IGES standard will accommodate improved computer aided design inspection methods and reverse engineering techniques currently being developed. The presentation is in viewgraph format.

  11. National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

    1998-02-01

    This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

  12. Biennial Fluid Dynamics Symposium on Advanced Problems and Methods in Fluid Mechanics, 19th, Kozubnik, Poland, Sept. 3-8, 1989, Selected Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent advances in experimental and computational fluid mechanics are discussed in a series of review essays. Topics addressed include transitions to complex flow in thermal convection, optimum hypersonic wings and wave riders, relativistic hydrodynamics, and wind-tunnel wall corrections for unsteady flow (steady wall adaptation and CFD techniques). Consideration is given to axisymmetric laminar interacting boundary layers, differential forms and fluid dynamics, breaking water waves, strong temperature gradients in turbulent wakes, and liquid-crystal 'blue' phases.

  13. Construction of Hierarchical Models for Fluid Dynamics in Earth and Planetary Sciences : DCMODEL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y. O.; Takehiro, S.; Sugiyama, K.; Odaka, M.; Ishiwatari, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Nishizawa, S.; Ishioka, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    ) is a collection of various sample programs using ``SPML''. These sample programs provide the basekit for simple numerical experiments of geophysical fluid dynamics. For example, SPMODEL includes 1-dimensional KdV equation model, 2-dimensional barotropic, shallow water, Boussinesq models, 3-dimensional MHD dynamo models in rotating spherical shells. These models are written in the common style in harmony with SPML functions. ``Deepconv'' (Sugiyama et al., 2010) and ``Dcpam'' are a cloud resolving model and a general circulation model for the purpose of applications to the planetary atmospheres, respectively. ``Deepconv'' includes several physical processes appropriate for simulations of Jupiter and Mars atmospheres, while ``Dcpam'' does for simulations of Earth, Mars, and Venus-like atmospheres. ``Rdoc-f95'' is a automatic generator of reference manuals of Fortran90/95 programs, which is an extension of ruby documentation tool kit ``rdoc''. It analyzes dependency of modules, functions, and subroutines in the multiple program source codes. At the same time, it can list up the namelist variables in the programs.

  14. Fluvial Bank Erosion in the Meandering River Asker, UK: Insights from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, S. E.; Rinaldi, M.; Rossi Romanelli, L.; Spyropoulos, E.

    2003-12-01

    River bank erosion often significantly contributes to the catchment sediment yield. Knowledge of the rates & controls on bank erosion events is therefore important in understanding sediment flux. In recent years progress has been made in understanding processes controlling large-scale mass failure (MF) of stream banks, but less attention has been paid to the role that direct fluvial erosion (FE) plays in bank retreat. This is an important omission, not only because FE is a significant process in its own right, but because FE also often triggers mass failure. FE models are typically of the form: E = k(τ - τ c)b where E is the bank erosion rate, τ is the applied fluid shear stress, τ c is the critical stress for entrainment of the bank material, k is an empirically-derived erodibility parameter, and b is an empirically-derived exponent, often assumed to be close to unity. To apply this model, accurate observations of applied fluid stresses, FE rates & bank erodibility are required. Recent developments in bank erosion monitoring technology [e.g. Lawler, 1993], and in the quantification of the bank erodibility parameters k and τ c using jet-testing devices [e.g. Hanson and Simon, 2001; Dapporto, 2001], offer the means of determining FE rates and bank erodibility. Nevertheless, the problem of collecting the high-resolution spatially-distributed data needed to characterise near-bank fluid stresses remains. One possible solution is to use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models as a substitute for empirical data. CFD simulations potentially offer a means of acquiring near-bank, distributed, boundary shear stress data at very high spatial resolution. In contrast, empirical data sets of comparable spatial extent and resolution are very difficult to obtain, particularly during the large (competent) flows of interest here. The critical question is therefore whether CFD-derived data are sufficiently accurate for this purpose. Herein we evaluate a series of 3-dimensional

  15. Evaluation of source model coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the dispersion of airborne contaminants in a work environment.

    PubMed

    Salim, S M; Viswanathan, Shekar; Ray, Madhumita Bhowmick

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne contaminants in indoor air was evaluated employing physical measurement, empirical models, and computer simulation methods. Field data collected from a tray of evaporating solvent in the laboratory were compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations coupled with evaporation models. The results indicated that mathematical models of evaporation can be coupled with CFD simulations to produce reasonable qualitative predictions of airborne contaminant levels. The airflow pattern within a room is primarily determined by the room layout and the position of the air supply diffusers. Variations in ventilation rate did not alter the airflow pattern, thus generating a characteristic concentration profile of the airborne contaminants. PMID:17050350

  16. Relativistic fluid dynamics. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anile, A. M.; Choquet-Bruhat, Y.

    Contents: 1. Covariant theory of conductivity in ideal fluid or solid media (B. Carter). 2. Hamiltonian techniques for relativistic fluid dynamics and stability theory (D. D. Holm). 3. Covariant fluid mechanics and thermodynamics: an introduction (W. Israel). 4. Relativistic plasmas (H. Weitzner). 5. An improved relativistic warm plasma model (A. M. Anile, S. Pennisi). 6. Relativistic extended thermodynamics II (I. Müller). 7. Relativistic extended thermodynamics: general assumptions and mathematical procedure (T. Ruggeri). 8. Relativistic hydrodynamics and heavy ion reactions (D. Strottman). 9. Some problems in relativistic hydrodynamics (C. G. van Weert).

  17. Quantitative comparison of hemodynamics in simulated and 3D angiography models of cerebral aneurysms by use of computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saho, Tatsunori; Onishi, Hideo

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated hemodynamics using simulated models and determined how cerebral aneurysms develop in simulated and patient-specific models based on medical images. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was analyzed by use of OpenFOAM software. Flow velocity, stream line, and wall shear stress (WSS) were evaluated in a simulated model aneurysm with known geometry and in a three-dimensional angiographic model. The ratio of WSS at the aneurysm compared with that at the basilar artery was 1:10 in simulated model aneurysms with a diameter of 10 mm and 1:18 in the angiographic model, indicating similar tendencies. Vortex flow occurred in both model aneurysms, and the WSS decreased in larger model aneurysms. The angiographic model provided accurate CFD information, and the tendencies of simulated and angiographic models were similar. These findings indicate that hemodynamic effects are involved in the development of aneurysms. PMID:25911446

  18. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cyclist aerodynamics: performance of different turbulence-modelling and boundary-layer modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2010-08-26

    This study aims at assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for applications in sports aerodynamics, for example for drag predictions of swimmers, cyclists or skiers, by evaluating the applied numerical modelling techniques by means of detailed validation experiments. In this study, a wind-tunnel experiment on a scale model of a cyclist (scale 1:2) is presented. Apart from three-component forces and moments, also high-resolution surface pressure measurements on the scale model's surface, i.e. at 115 locations, are performed to provide detailed information on the flow field. These data are used to compare the performance of different turbulence-modelling techniques, such as steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), with several k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models, and unsteady large-eddy simulation (LES), and also boundary-layer modelling techniques, namely wall functions and low-Reynolds number modelling (LRNM). The commercial CFD code Fluent 6.3 is used for the simulations. The RANS shear-stress transport (SST) k-omega model shows the best overall performance, followed by the more computationally expensive LES. Furthermore, LRNM is clearly preferred over wall functions to model the boundary layer. This study showed that there are more accurate alternatives for evaluating flow around bluff bodies with CFD than the standard k-epsilon model combined with wall functions, which is often used in CFD studies in sports. PMID:20488446

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine Flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Russell L.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic techniques are used to study the flowfield of a fixed geometry Rocket Based Combined Cycle engine operating in rocket ejector mode. Heat addition resulting from the combustion of injected fuel causes the subsonic engine flow to choke and go supersonic in the slightly divergent combustor-mixer section. Reacting flow computations are undertaken to predict the characteristics of solutions where the heat addition is determined by the flowfield. Here, adaptive gridding is used to improve resolution in the shear layers. Results show that the sonic speed is reached in the unheated portions of the flow first, while the heated portions become supersonic later. Comparison with results from another code show reasonable agreement. The coupled solutions show that the character of the combustion-based thermal choking phenomenon can be controlled reasonably well such that there is opportunity to optimize the length and expansion ratio of the combustor-mixer.

  20. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Micci, Michael M; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16K×8K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity. PMID:26465581

  1. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micci, Michael M.; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16 K ×8 K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity.

  2. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic scaling or dimensional analysis reveals that certain scales of geophysical fluid flows (such as stellar, ocean, and planetary atmosphere circulations) can be accurately modeled in the laboratory using a procedure which differs from conventional engineering modeling. Rather than building a model to obtain numbers for a specific design problem, the relative effects of the significant forces are systematically varied in an attempt to deepen understanding of the effects of these forces. Topics covered include: (1) modeling a large-scale planetary atmospheric flow in a rotating cylindrical annulus; (2) achieving a radial dielectric body force; (3) spherical geophysical fluid dynamics experiments for Spacelab flights; (4) measuring flow and temperature; and (5) the possible effect of rotational or precessional disturbances on the flow in the rotating spherical containers.

  3. Using 3D infrared imaging to calibrate and refine computational fluid dynamic modeling for large computer and data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Gregory R.

    2011-05-01

    Over the last 10 years, very large government, military, and commercial computer and data center operators have spent millions of dollars trying to optimally cool data centers as each rack has begun to consume as much as 10 times more power than just a few years ago. In fact, the maximum amount of data computation in a computer center is becoming limited by the amount of available power, space and cooling capacity at some data centers. Tens of millions of dollars and megawatts of power are being annually spent to keep data centers cool. The cooling and air flows dynamically change away from any predicted 3-D computational fluid dynamic modeling during construction and as time goes by, and the efficiency and effectiveness of the actual cooling rapidly departs even farther from predicted models. By using 3-D infrared (IR) thermal mapping and other techniques to calibrate and refine the computational fluid dynamic modeling and make appropriate corrections and repairs, the required power for data centers can be dramatically reduced which reduces costs and also improves reliability.

  4. A protocol for the use of computational fluid dynamics as a supportive tool for wastewater treatment plant modelling.

    PubMed

    Laurent, J; Samstag, R W; Ducoste, J M; Griborio, A; Nopens, I; Batstone, D J; Wicks, J D; Saunders, S; Potier, O

    2014-01-01

    To date, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been primarily used for evaluation of hydraulic problems at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). A potentially more powerful use, however, is to simulate integrated physical, chemical and/or biological processes involved in WWTP unit processes on a spatial scale and to use the gathered knowledge to accelerate improvement in plant models for everyday use, that is, design and optimized operation. Evolving improvements in computer speed and memory and improved software for implementing CFD, as well as for integrated processes, has allowed for broader usage of this tool for understanding, troubleshooting, and optimal design of WWTP unit processes. This paper proposes a protocol for an alternative use of CFD in process modelling, as a way to gain insight into complex systems leading to improved modelling approaches used in combination with the IWA activated sludge models and other kinetic models. PMID:25429444

  5. Otto Laporte Lecture: Fluid Dynamics Prize Talk: Simple Models for Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    2009-11-01

    We focus on the modeling of two turbulent flows: dispersion from a line source in grid turbulence; and, a lifted non-premixed turbulent jet flame. Stochastic Lagrangian models and PDF methods are described, and are shown to model these flows satisfactorily. For the line source, a Lagrangian approach is taken, with the Langevin equation modeling the velocity following a fluid particle, and with a simple relaxation model for the particle temperature. Comparison with experimental data shows that the resulting model describes accurately the dispersion from single and multiple line sources. These simple stochastic Lagrangian models are then applied to the much more challenging case of a lifted non-premixed jet flame. The stochastic Lagrangian models form the basis for a particle/mesh numerical method for solving a modeled transport equation for the Eulerian joint probability density function (PDF) of velocity and composition. The PDF calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, and exhibit the observed extreme sensitivity of the flame to the temperature of the co-flow. The PDF model calculations presented clearly demonstrate that simple models can be very useful, even though aspects of their behavior may be inaccurate or incomplete. The shortcomings of the Langevin equation are examined, and more advanced models (designed to overcome some of these shortcomings) are described. These include models for fluid-particle acceleration, including the effects of intermittency; models accounting for mean shear, which are correct in the rapid- distortion limit; and models designed for use in conjunction with large-eddy simulations (LES).

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics model of avian tracheal temperature control as a model for extant and extinct animals.

    PubMed

    Sverdlova, N S; Arkali, F; Witzel, U; Perry, S F

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory evaporative cooling is an important mechanism of temperature control in bird. A computational simulation of the breathing cycle, heat and water loss in anatomical avian trachea/air sac model has not previously been conducted. We report a first attempt to simulate a breathing cycle in a three-dimensional model of avian trachea and air sacs (domestic fowl) using transient computational fluid dynamics. The airflow in the trachea of the model is evoked by changing the volume of the air sacs based on the measured tidal volume and inspiratory/expiratory times for the domestic fowl. We compare flow parameters and heat transfer results with in vivo data and with our previously reported results for a two-dimensional model. The total respiratory heat loss corresponds to about 13-19% of the starvation metabolic rate of domestic fowl. The present study can lend insight into a possible thermoregulatory function in species with long necks and/or a very long trachea, as found in swans and birds of paradise. Assuming the structure of the sauropod dinosaur respiratory system was close to avian, the simulation of the respiratory temperature control (using convective and evaporative cooling) in the extensively experimentally studied domestic fowl may also help in making simulations of respiratory heat control in these extinct animals. PMID:23797184

  9. Advances in three-dimensional coronary imaging and computational fluid dynamics: is virtual fractional flow reserve more than just a pretty picture?

    PubMed

    Poon, Eric K W; Hayat, Umair; Thondapu, Vikas; Ooi, Andrew S H; Ul Haq, Muhammad Asrar; Moore, Stephen; Foin, Nicolas; Tu, Shengxian; Chin, Cheng; Monty, Jason P; Marusic, Ivan; Barlis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has shown a high success rate in the treatment of coronary artery disease. The decision to perform PCI often relies on the cardiologist's visual interpretation of coronary lesions during angiography. This has inherent limitations, particularly due to the low resolution and two-dimensional nature of angiography. State-of-the-art modalities such as three-dimensional quantitative coronary angiography, optical coherence tomography and invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) may improve clinicians' understanding of both the anatomical and physiological importance of coronary lesions. While invasive FFR is the gold standard technique for assessment of the haemodynamic significance of coronary lesions, recent studies have explored a surrogate for FFR derived solely from three-dimensional reconstruction of the invasive angiogram, and therefore eliminating need for a pressure wire. Utilizing advanced computational fluid dynamics research, this virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR) has demonstrated reasonable correlation with invasive measurements and remains an intense area of ongoing study. However, at present, several limitations and computational fluid dynamic assumptions may preclude vFFR from widespread clinical use. This review demonstrates the tight integration of advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques and vFFR in assessing coronary artery disease, reviews the advantages and disadvantages of such techniques and attempts to provide a glimpse of how such advances may benefit future clinical decision-making during PCI. PMID:26247271

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products. PMID:26927234

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Symposium on Aeropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the considerable advances that have been made in computational fluid dynamics, the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored this symposium with the objective of providing a forum for exchanging information regarding recent developments in numerical methods, physical and chemical modeling, and applications. This conference publication is a compilation of 4 invited and 34 contributed papers presented in six sessions: algorithms one and two, turbomachinery, turbulence, components application, and combustors. Topics include numerical methods, grid generation, chemically reacting flows, turbulence modeling, inlets, nozzles, and unsteady flows.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics symposium on aeropropulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the considerable advances that have been made in computational fluid dynamics, the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored this symposium with the objective of providing a forum for exchanging information regarding recent developments in numerical methods, physical and chemical modeling, and applications. This conference publication is a compilation of 4 invited and 34 contributed papers presented in six sessions: algorithms one and two, turbomachinery, turbulence, components application, and combustors. Topics include numerical methods, grid generation, chemically reacting flows, turbulence modeling, inlets, nozzles, and unsteady flows.

  13. Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE): Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) Capillary Fluid Dynamic Restriction Effects on Gas Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Marianne; Quinn, Jacqueline; Captain, Janine; Santiago-Bond, Josephine; Starr, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Prospector (RP) mission with the Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload aims to show the presence of water in lunar regolith, and establish a proving ground for NASAs mission to Mars. One of the analysis is performed by the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem, which consists of a fluid network that facilitates the transport of volatile samples to a gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instrument. The understanding of fluid dynamics directed from the GC to the MS is important due to the influence of flow rates and pressures that affect the accuracy of and prevent the damage to the overall GC-MS instrument. The micro-scale capillary fluid network within the GC alone has various lengths and inner-diameters; therefore, determination of pressure differentials and flow rates are difficult to model computationally, with additional complexity from the vacuum conditions in space and lack of a lunar atmosphere. A series of tests were performed on an experimental set-up of the system where the inner diameters of the GC transfer line connecting to the MS were varied. The effect on chromatography readings were also studied by applying these lines onto a GC instrument. It was found that a smaller inner diameter transfer line resulted in a lower flow rate, as well as a lower pressure differential across the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) unit of the GC and a negligible pressure drop across the mock-up capillary column. The chromatography was affected with longer retention times and broader peak integrations. It was concluded that a 0.050 mm inner diameter line still proved most suitable for the systems flow rate preferences. In addition, it was evident that this small transfer line portrayed some expense to GC signal characteristics and the wait time for steady-state operation.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics uses in fluid dynamics/aerodynamics education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for the purpose of fluid dynamics physics education. Because of the tremendous wealth of information available from numerical simulation, certain fundamental concepts can be efficiently communicated using an interactive graphical interrogation of the appropriate numerical simulation data base. In other situations, a large amount of aerodynamic information can be communicated to the student by interactive use of simple CFD tools on a workstation or even in a personal computer environment. The emphasis in this presentation is to discuss ideas for how this process might be implemented. Specific examples, taken from previous publications, will be used to highlight the presentation.

  15. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  16. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model of shear stress distribution during neotissue growth in a perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Y; Luyten, F P; Schrooten, J; Papantoniou, I; Geris, L

    2015-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies use flow through perfusion bioreactors to apply mechanical stimuli to cells seeded on porous scaffolds. Cells grow on the scaffold surface but also by bridging the scaffold pores leading a fully filled scaffold following the scaffold's geometric characteristics. Current computational fluid dynamic approaches for tissue engineering bioreactor systems have been mostly carried out for empty scaffolds. The effect of 3D cell growth and extracellular matrix formation (termed in this study as neotissue growth), on its surrounding fluid flow field is a challenge yet to be tackled. In this work a combined approach was followed linking curvature driven cell growth to fluid dynamics modeling. The level-set method (LSM) was employed to capture neotissue growth driven by curvature, while the Stokes and Darcy equations, combined in the Brinkman equation, provided information regarding the distribution of the shear stress profile at the neotissue/medium interface and within the neotissue itself during growth. The neotissue was assumed to be micro-porous allowing flow through its structure while at the same time allowing the simulation of complete scaffold filling without numerical convergence issues. The results show a significant difference in the amplitude of shear stress for cells located within the micro-porous neo-tissue or at the neotissue/medium interface, demonstrating the importance of taking along the neotissue in the calculation of the mechanical stimulation of cells during culture.The presented computational framework is used on different scaffold pore geometries demonstrating its potential to be used a design as tool for scaffold architecture taking into account the growing neotissue. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 2591-2600. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26059101

  17. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  18. Can a stepwise steady flow computational fluid dynamics model reproduce unsteady particulate matter separation for common unit operations?

    PubMed

    Pathapati, Subbu-Srikanth; Sansalone, John J

    2011-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is emerging as a model for resolving the fate of particulate matter (PM) by unit operations subject to rainfall-runoff loadings. However, compared to steady flow CFD models, there are greater computational requirements for unsteady hydrodynamics and PM loading models. Therefore this study examines if integrating a stepwise steady flow CFD model can reproduce PM separation by common unit operations loaded by unsteady flow and PM loadings, thereby reducing computational effort. Utilizing monitored unit operation data from unsteady events as a metric, this study compares the two CFD modeling approaches for a hydrodynamic separator (HS), a primary clarifier (PC) tank, and a volumetric clarifying filtration system (VCF). Results indicate that while unsteady CFD models reproduce PM separation of each unit operation, stepwise steady CFD models result in significant deviation for HS and PC models as compared to monitored data; overestimating the physical size requirements of each unit required to reproduce monitored PM separation results. In contrast, the stepwise steady flow approach reproduces PM separation by the VCF, a combined gravitational sedimentation and media filtration unit operation that provides attenuation of turbulent energy and flow velocity. PMID:21644537

  19. Development and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Prediction of Heat Transfer and Thermal Microenvironments of Corals

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Robert H.; King, Andrew J. C.; Mullins, Benjamin J.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Caley, M. Julian

    2012-01-01

    We present Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models of the coupled dynamics of water flow, heat transfer and irradiance in and around corals to predict temperatures experienced by corals. These models were validated against controlled laboratory experiments, under constant and transient irradiance, for hemispherical and branching corals. Our CFD models agree very well with experimental studies. A linear relationship between irradiance and coral surface warming was evident in both the simulation and experimental result agreeing with heat transfer theory. However, CFD models for the steady state simulation produced a better fit to the linear relationship than the experimental data, likely due to experimental error in the empirical measurements. The consistency of our modelling results with experimental observations demonstrates the applicability of CFD simulations, such as the models developed here, to coral bleaching studies. A study of the influence of coral skeletal porosity and skeletal bulk density on surface warming was also undertaken, demonstrating boundary layer behaviour, and interstitial flow magnitude and temperature profiles in coral cross sections. Our models compliment recent studies showing systematic changes in these parameters in some coral colonies and have utility in the prediction of coral bleaching. PMID:22701582

  20. Modeling the fluid-dynamics and oxygen consumption in a porous scaffold stimulated by cyclic squeeze pressure.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Marco; Giusti, Serena; Nascimento, Diana; Silva, Ana; Boschetti, Federica; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2016-08-01

    The architecture and dynamic physical environment of tissues can be recreated in-vitro by combining 3D porous scaffolds and bioreactors able to apply controlled mechanical stimuli on cells. In such systems, the entity of the stimuli and the distribution of nutrients within the engineered construct depend on the micro-structure of the scaffolds. In this work, we present a new approach for optimizing computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) models for the investigation of fluid-induced forces generated by cyclic squeeze pressure within a porous construct, coupled with oxygen consumption of cardiomyocytes. A 2D axial symmetric macro-scaled model of a squeeze pressure bioreactor chamber was used as starting point for generating time dependent pressure profiles. Subsequently the fluid movement generated by the pressure fields was coupled with a complete 3D micro-scaled model of a porous protein cryogel. Oxygen transport and consumption inside the scaffold was evaluated considering a homogeneous distribution of cardiomyocytes throughout the structure, as confirmed by preliminary cell culture experiments. The results show that a 3D description of the system, coupling a porous geometry and time dependent pressure driven flow with fluid-structure-interaction provides an accurate and meaningful description of the microenvironment in terms of shear stress and oxygen distribution than simple stationary 2D models. PMID:27189671

  1. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  2. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  3. Multidimensional modeling of biofilm development and fluid dynamics in a hydrogen-based, membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR).

    PubMed

    Martin, Kelly J; Picioreanu, Cristian; Nerenberg, Robert

    2013-09-01

    A two-dimensional, particle-based biofilm model coupled with mass transport and computational fluid dynamics was developed to simulate autotrophic denitrification in a spiral-wound membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR), where hydrogen is supplied via hollow-fiber membrane fabric. The spiral-wound configuration consists of alternating layers of plastic spacer net and membrane fabric that create rows of flow channels, with the top and bottom walls comprised of membranes. The transversal filaments of the spacer partially obstruct the channel flow, producing complex mixing and shear patterns that require multidimensional representation. This study investigated the effect of hydrogen and nitrate concentrations, as well as spacer configuration, on biofilm development and denitrification fluxes. The model results indicate that the cavity spacer filaments, which rest on the bottom membranes, cause uneven biofilm growth. Most biofilm resided on the bottom membranes, only in the wake of the filaments where low shear zones formed. In this way, filament configuration may help achieve a desired biofilm thickness. For the conditions tested in this study, the highest nitrate fluxes were attained by minimizing the filament diameter and maximizing the filament spacing. This lowered the shear stress at the top membranes, allowing for more biofilm growth. For the scenarios studied, biomass limitation at the top membranes hindered performance more significantly than diffusion limitation in the thick biofilms at the bottom membranes. The results also highlighted the importance of two-dimensional modeling to capture uneven biofilm growth on a substratum with geometrical complexity. PMID:23774188

  4. Nondeterministic computational fluid dynamics modeling of Escherichia coli inactivation by peracetic acid in municipal wastewater contact tanks.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Crapulli, Ferdinando; Raisee, Mehrdad; Raspa, Giuseppe; Haas, Charles N

    2015-06-16

    Wastewater disinfection processes are typically designed according to heuristics derived from batch experiments in which the interaction among wastewater quality, reactor hydraulics, and inactivation kinetics is often neglected. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was conducted in a nondeterministic (ND) modeling framework to predict the Escherichia coli inactivation by peracetic acid (PAA) in municipal contact tanks fed by secondary settled wastewater effluent. The extent and variability associated with the observed inactivation kinetics were both satisfactorily predicted by the stochastic inactivation model at a 95% confidence level. Moreover, it was found that (a) the process variability induced by reactor hydraulics is negligible when compared to the one caused by inactivation kinetics, (b) the PAA dose required for meeting regulations is dictated equally by the fixed limit of the microbial concentration as well as its probability of occurrence, and (c) neglecting the probability of occurrence during process sizing could lead to an underestimation of the PAA dose required by as much as 100%. Finally, the ND-CFD model was used to generate sizing information in the form of probabilistic disinfection curves relating E. coli inactivation and probability of occurrence with the average PAA dose and PAA residual concentration at the outlet of the contact tank. PMID:25938730

  5. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately. PMID:25181553

  6. Modeling Tools for Propulsion Analysis and Computational Fluid Dynamics on the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muss, J. A.; Johnson, C. W.; Gotchy, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    The existing RocketWeb(TradeMark) Internet Analysis System (httr)://www.iohnsonrockets.com/rocketweb) provides an integrated set of advanced analysis tools that can be securely accessed over the Internet. Since these tools consist of both batch and interactive analysis codes, the system includes convenient methods for creating input files and evaluating the resulting data. The RocketWeb(TradeMark) system also contains many features that permit data sharing which, when further developed, will facilitate real-time, geographically diverse, collaborative engineering within a designated work group. Adding work group management functionality while simultaneously extending and integrating the system's set of design and analysis tools will create a system providing rigorous, controlled design development, reducing design cycle time and cost.

  7. Understanding pharmacokinetics using realistic computational models of fluid dynamics: biosimulation of drug distribution within the CSF space for intrathecal drugs.

    PubMed

    Kuttler, Andreas; Dimke, Thomas; Kern, Steven; Helmlinger, Gabriel; Stanski, Donald; Finelli, Luca A

    2010-12-01

    We introduce how biophysical modeling in pharmaceutical research and development, combining physiological observations at the tissue, organ and system level with selected drug physiochemical properties, may contribute to a greater and non-intuitive understanding of drug pharmacokinetics and therapeutic design. Based on rich first-principle knowledge combined with experimental data at both conception and calibration stages, and leveraging our insights on disease processes and drug pharmacology, biophysical modeling may provide a novel and unique opportunity to interactively characterize detailed drug transport, distribution, and subsequent therapeutic effects. This innovative approach is exemplified through a three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics model of the spinal canal motivated by questions arising during pharmaceutical development of one molecular therapy for spinal cord injury. The model was based on actual geometry reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging data subsequently transformed in a parametric 3D geometry and a corresponding finite-volume representation. With dynamics controlled by transient Navier-Stokes equations, the model was implemented in a commercial multi-physics software environment established in the automotive and aerospace industries. While predictions were performed in silico, the underlying biophysical models relied on multiple sources of experimental data and knowledge from scientific literature. The results have provided insights into the primary factors that can influence the intrathecal distribution of drug after lumbar administration. This example illustrates how the approach connects the causal chain underlying drug distribution, starting with the technical aspect of drug delivery systems, through physiology-driven drug transport, then eventually linking to tissue penetration, binding, residence, and ultimately clearance. Currently supporting our drug development projects with an improved understanding of systems

  8. Space Shuttle and Launch Pad Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Lift-off Debris Transport Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Sam; West, Jeff; Droege, Alan; Wilson, Josh; Liever, Peter; Slaby, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the Space Shuttle Lift-off CFD model developed for potential Lift-off Debris transport for return-to-flight. The Lift-off portion of the flight is defined as the time starting with tanking of propellants until tower clear, approximately T0+6 seconds, where interactions with the launch pad cease. A CFD model containing the Space Shuttle and launch Pad geometry has been constructed and executed. Simplifications required in the construction of the model are presented and discussed. A body-fitted overset grid of up to 170 million grid points was developed which allowed positioning of the Vehicle relative to the Launch Pad over the first six seconds of Climb-Out. The CFD model works in conjunction with a debris particle transport model and a debris particle impact damage tolerance model. These models have been used to assess the interactions of the Space Shuttle plumes, the wind environment, and their interactions with each other and the Launch Pad and their ultimate effect on potential debris during Lift-off.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of gas dispersion in multi impeller bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Ubaid; Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Pandey, Ashok; Sivaraman, Savithri

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, experiments have been carried out to identify various flow regimes in a dual Rushton turbines stirred bioreactor for different gas flow rates and impeller speeds. The hydrodynamic parameters like fractional gas hold-up, power consumption and mixing time have been measured. A two fluid model along with MUSIG model to handle polydispersed gas flow has been implemented to predict the various flow regimes and hydrodynamic parameters in the dual turbines stirred bioreactor. The computational model has been mapped on commercial solver ANSYS CFX. The flow regimes predicted by numerical simulations are validated with the experimental results. The present model has successfully captured the flow regimes as observed during experiments. The measured gross flow characteristics like fractional gas hold-up, and mixing time have been compared with numerical simulations. Also the effect of gas flow rate and impeller speed on gas hold-up and power consumption have been investigated. PMID:20471599

  10. Constraints on geomagnetic secular variation modeling from electromagnetism and fluid dynamics of the Earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A spherical harmonic representation of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation for epoch 1980, designated GSFC(9/84), is derived and evaluated. At three epochs (1977.5, 1980.0, 1982.5) this model incorporates conservation of magnetic flux through five selected patches of area on the core/mantle boundary bounded by the zero contours of vertical magnetic field. These fifteen nonlinear constraints are included like data in an iterative least squares parameter estimation procedure that starts with the recently derived unconstrained field model GSFC (12/83). Convergence is approached within three iterations. The constrained model is evaluated by comparing its predictive capability outside the time span of its data, in terms of residuals at magnetic observatories, with that for the unconstrained model.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of the operation of a flame ionization sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, E.D.; Chorpening, B.; Thornton, J.

    2007-01-01

    The sensors and controls research group at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is continuing to develop the Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor (CCADS) for gas turbine applications. CCADS measures the electrical conduction of the charged species generated during the combustion process to detect flashback and combustion instabilities, and to monitor equivalence ratio. As part of this effort, combustion models are being developed which include the interaction between the electric field and the transport processes of the charged species. The primary combustion process is computed using a flame wrinkling model developed by Weller et al. (1998). A sub-model for the transport of charged species is attached to this model. The formulation of the charged-species model is similar to that applied by Penderson and Brown (1993) for the simulation of laminar flames. Using the above procedure, numerical simulations are performed and the results are compared with experimental current measurements. Quantitative agreement with experiment was not obtained, however the model does display similar sensitivity to flow and operating conditions as observed in experiments.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Operation of a Flame Ionization Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, E.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-03-01

    The sensors and controls research group at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is continuing to develop the Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor (CCADS) for gas turbine applications. CCADS uses the electrical conduction of the charged species generated during the combustion process to detect combustion instabilities and monitor equivalence ratio. As part of this effort, combustion models are being developed which include the interaction between the electric field and the transport of charged species. The primary combustion process is computed using a flame wrinkling model (Weller et. al. 1998) which is a component of the OpenFOAM toolkit (Jasak et. al. 2004). A sub-model for the transport of charged species is attached to this model. The formulation of the charged-species model similar that applied by Penderson and Brown (1993) for the simulation of laminar flames. The sub-model consists of an additional flux due to the electric field (drift flux) added to the equations for the charged species concentrations and the solution the electric potential from the resolved charge density. The subgrid interactions between the electric field and charged species transport have been neglected. Using the above procedure, numerical simulations are performed and the results compared with several recent CCADS experiments.

  13. Synchronized Chaos in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and in the Predictive Modeling of Natural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duane, Gregory S.

    2008-03-01

    The ubiquitous phenomenon of synchronization among regular oscillators in Nature has been shown, in the past two decades, to extend to chaotic systems. Despite sensitive dependence on initial conditions, two chaotic systems will commonly fall into synchronized motion along their strange attractors when only some of the many degrees of freedom of one system are coupled to corresponding variables in the other. In geophysical fluid models, synchronization can mediate scale interactions, so that coupling of degrees of freedom that describe medium-scale components of the flow can result in synchronization, or partial synchronization, at all scales. Chaos synchronization has been used to interpret non-local "teleconnection" patterns in the Earth's climate system and to predict new ones. In the realm of practical meteorology, the fact that two PDE systems, conceived as "truth" and "model", respectively, can be made to synchronize when coupled at only a discrete set of points, explains how observations at a discrete set of weather stations can be sufficient for weather prediction by a synchronously coupled model. Minimizing synchronization error leads to general recipes for assimilation of observed data into a running model that systematize the treatment of nonlinearities in the dynamical equations. Equations can generally be added to adapt parameters as well as states as the model is running, so that the model "learns". The synchronization view of predictive modelling extends to any translationally- any PDE with constant coefficients, the general form of physical theories. The reliance on synchronicity as an organizing principle in Nature, alternative to causality, has philosophical roots in the collaboration of Carl Jung and Wolfgang Pauli, on the one hand, and in traditions outside of European science, on the other.

  14. Multidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Dispersion of White Oak Creek Contaminants in the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Platfoot, J.H.; Wendel, M.W.; Williams, P.T.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the simulation of the dispersion and dilution of dissolved or finely suspended contaminants entering the Clinch river from White Oak Creek. The work is accomplished through the application of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. This study assumes that contaminants originating in the White Oak Creed watershed, which drains Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will eventually reach the mouth of White Oak Creek and be discharged into the clinch River. The numerical model was developed to support the analysis of the off-site consequences of releases from the ORNL liquid low-level waste system. The system contains storage tanks and transfer lines in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley. Under certain failure modes, liquid low-level waste could be released to White Oak Creek or Melton Branch to White Oak Creek and eventually be discharged to the Clinch River. Since the Clinch River has unrestricted access by the public and water usage from the Clinch River is not controlled by the Department of Energy, such a liquid low-level waste spill would create the possibility of public exposure to the contaminant. This study is limited to the dispersion of the contaminants downstream of the confluence of White Oak Creek.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) activities at the Langley Research Center is given. The role of supercomputers in CFD research, algorithm development, multigrid approaches to computational fluid flows, aerodynamics computer programs, computational grid generation, turbulence research, and studies of rarefied gas flows are among the topics that are briefly surveyed.

  16. Helicon thruster plasma modeling: Two-dimensional fluid-dynamics and propulsive performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahedo, Eduardo; Navarro-Cavallé, Jaume

    2013-04-01

    An axisymmetric macroscopic model of the magnetized plasma flow inside the helicon thruster chamber is derived, assuming that the power absorbed from the helicon antenna emission is known. Ionization, confinement, subsonic flows, and production efficiency are discussed in terms of design and operation parameters. Analytical solutions and simple scaling laws for ideal plasma conditions are obtained. The chamber model is then matched with a model of the external magnetic nozzle in order to characterize the whole plasma flow and assess thruster performances. Thermal, electric, and magnetic contributions to thrust are evaluated. The energy balance provides the power conversion between ions and electrons in chamber and nozzle, and the power distribution among beam power, ionization losses, and wall losses. Thruster efficiency is assessed, and the main causes of inefficiency are identified. The thermodynamic behavior of the collisionless electron population in the nozzle is acknowledged to be poorly known and crucial for a complete plasma expansion and good thrust efficiency.

  17. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  18. Helicon thruster plasma modeling: Two-dimensional fluid-dynamics and propulsive performances

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, Eduardo; Navarro-Cavalle, Jaume

    2013-04-15

    An axisymmetric macroscopic model of the magnetized plasma flow inside the helicon thruster chamber is derived, assuming that the power absorbed from the helicon antenna emission is known. Ionization, confinement, subsonic flows, and production efficiency are discussed in terms of design and operation parameters. Analytical solutions and simple scaling laws for ideal plasma conditions are obtained. The chamber model is then matched with a model of the external magnetic nozzle in order to characterize the whole plasma flow and assess thruster performances. Thermal, electric, and magnetic contributions to thrust are evaluated. The energy balance provides the power conversion between ions and electrons in chamber and nozzle, and the power distribution among beam power, ionization losses, and wall losses. Thruster efficiency is assessed, and the main causes of inefficiency are identified. The thermodynamic behavior of the collisionless electron population in the nozzle is acknowledged to be poorly known and crucial for a complete plasma expansion and good thrust efficiency.

  19. Fluid dynamic modelling of renal pelvic pressure during endoscopic stone removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oratis, Alexandros; Subasic, John; Bird, James; Eisner, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic kidney stone removal procedures are known to increase internal pressure in the renal pelvis, the kidney's urinary collecting system. High renal pelvic pressure incites systemic absorption of irrigation fluid, which can increase the risk of postoperative fever and sepsis or the unwanted absorption of electrolytes. Urologists choose the appropriate surgical procedure based on patient history and kidney stone size. However, no study has been conducted to compare the pressure profiles of each procedure, nor is there a precise sense of how the renal pelvic pressure scales with various operational parameters. Here we develop physical models for the flow rates and renal pelvic pressure for various procedures. We show that the results of our models are consistent with existing urological data on each procedure and that the models can predict pressure profiles where data is unavailable.

  20. Response Surface Modeling of Combined-Cycle Propulsion Components using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Three examples of response surface modeling with CFD are presented for combined cycle propulsion components. The examples include a mixed-compression-inlet during hypersonic flight, a hydrogen-fueled scramjet combustor during hypersonic flight, and a ducted-rocket nozzle during all-rocket flight. Three different experimental strategies were examined, including full factorial, fractionated central-composite, and D-optimal with embedded Plackett-Burman designs. The response variables have been confined to integral data extracted from multidimensional CFD results. Careful attention to uncertainty assessment and modeling bias has been addressed. The importance of automating experimental setup and effectively communicating statistical results are emphasized.

  1. Applying a Computational Fluid Dynamics model to understand flow structures in a large river: the Rio Paraná

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandbach, S. D.; Hardy, R. J.; Lane, S. N.; Ashworth, P. J.; Parsons, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of large rivers is limited due to the difficulties in obtaining field data at these large scales. Data rich results may be obtained using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models permitting the investigation of detailed flow patterns that would otherwise not be available. However, the application of these models to large rivers is not without its own complications and has yet to be fully developed. This is the result of two limiting factors, our inability; i) to design numerically stable meshes for complex topographies at these spatial resolutions; and; ii) to collect high resolution data appropriate for the boundary conditions of the numerical scheme. Here, we demonstrate a five-term mass-flux scaling algorithm (MFSA) for including bed topography in a very large river, where the discretised form of the mass and momentum equations are modified using a numerical blockage. Converged solutions were obtained using the Reynolds-averaged Navier stokes (RANS) equations modelling turbulence with a κ-ɛ RNG turbulence model. The boundary conditions were supplied from a field investigation of the Rio Paraná upstream of the Paraguay-Paraná confluence. A 38 km long reach was investigated where topographic and velocity data was collected using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) and a single beam echo sounder. The model was validated against the aDcp data and in general showed good agreement. The model was then used to explore the impacts of roughness height upon key characteristics of the 3D flow field in large rivers. The results demonstrate the importance of topographic forcing on determining flow structures including the detection of large helical flow structures.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of the upper airway of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in steady flow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun; Sin, SangHun; McDonough, Joseph M; Udupa, Jayaram K; Guez, Allon; Arens, Raanan; Wootton, David M

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was used to model the effect of airway geometry on internal pressure in the upper airway of three children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and three controls. Model geometry was reconstructed from magnetic resonance images obtained during quiet tidal breathing, meshed with an unstructured grid, and solved at normative peak resting flow. The unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved with steady flow boundary conditions in inspiration and expiration, using a two-equation low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Model results were validated using an in-vitro scale model, unsteady flow simulation, and reported nasal resistance measurements in children. Pharynx pressure drop strongly correlated to airway area restriction. Inspiratory pressure drop was primarily proportional to the square of flow, consistent with pressure losses due to convective acceleration caused by area restriction. On inspiration, in OSAS pressure drop occurred primarily between the choanae and the region where the adenoids overlap the tonsils (overlap region) due to airway narrowing, rather than in the nasal passages; in controls the majority of pressure drop was in the nasal passages. On expiration, in OSAS the majority of pressure drop occurred between the oropharynx (posterior to the tongue) and overlap region, and local minimum pressure in the overlap region was near atmospheric due to pressure recovery in the anterior nasopharynx. The results suggest that pharyngeal airway shape in children with OSAS significantly affects internal pressure distribution compared to nasal resistance. The model may also help explain regional dynamic airway narrowing during expiration. PMID:16098533

  3. Nanoparticle scattering characterization and mechanistic modelling of UV-TiO2 photocatalytic reactors using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Turolla, Andrea; Santoro, Domenico; de Bruyn, John R; Crapulli, Ferdinando; Antonelli, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to describe the process performance of a semi-batch annular TiO2-UV photoreactor in an Eulerian framework. The model accounted for the optical behaviour of titanium dioxide (TiO2) suspensions, the flow distribution and the oxalic acid degradation in the reactor. The scattering component of the optical model, explicitly included in the CFD simulations using a TiO2-specific scattering phase function integrated in the radiative transfer equation, was calibrated using an optical goniometer by comparing simulated scattering light profiles against irradiance measurements collected for various TiO2 concentrations and UV wavelengths and subsequently solved by the discrete ordinate (DO) radiation model. Several scattering phase functions were tested against the goniometric measurements confirming that the Henyey-Greenstein (HG) equation was the most appropriate angular distribution function at 254 and 355 nm, irrespective of the TiO2 concentration. Using the calibrated HG function, a new approach for quantifying the absolute values of absorption and scattering coefficients in TiO2 suspensions was proposed. It consists of iteratively solving, using the DO model, the radiative transfer equation for various combinations of absorption and scattering coefficients until the error between observed and predicted angular irradiance measurements is minimized. The accuracy of the optical parameters was verified with independent CFD simulations carried out for an annular photoreactor and already available in the literature. Predicted and simulated irradiance and oxalic acid degradation data were found to be in excellent agreement, confirming the considerable potential of the integrated modelling approach presented in this paper for the design, optimization and scale-up of photocatalytic technologies for water and wastewater treatment applications. PMID:26476682

  4. Kinetic-fluid dynamics modeling of I{sub 2} dissociation in supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Waichman, K.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2009-09-15

    The mechanism of I{sub 2} dissociation in supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) is studied applying kinetic-fluid dynamics modeling, where pathways involving the excited species I{sub 2}(X {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},10<=v<25), I{sub 2}(X {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},25<=v<=47), I{sub 2}(A{sup '} {sup 3}PI{sub 2u}), I{sub 2}(A {sup 3}PI{sub 1u}), O{sub 2}(X {sup 3}SIGMA{sub g}{sup -},v), O{sub 2}(a {sup 1}DELTA{sub g},v), O{sub 2}(b {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},v), and I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) as intermediate reactants are included. The gist of the model is adding the first reactant and reducing the contribution of the second as compared to previous models. These changes, recently suggested by Azyazov, et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104306 (2009)], significantly improve the agreement with the measurements of the gain in a low pressure supersonic COIL for all I{sub 2} flow rates that have been tested in the experiments. In particular, the lack of agreement for high I{sub 2} flow rates, which was encountered in previous models, has been eliminated in the present model. It is suggested that future modeling of the COIL operation should take into account the proposed contribution of the above mentioned reactants.

  5. Λ polarization in an exact fluid dynamical model for heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yilong

    2016-05-01

    Λ polarization is calculated in an exact analytical, rotating model based on parameters from a high resolution (3+1)D Particle-in-Cell Relativistic hydrodynamics calculation. The polarization is attributed to effects from thermal vorticity and for the first time the effects of the radial and axial acceleration are also studied separately.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of airflow inside lungs using heterogenous anisotropic lung tissue elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Li, Ziang; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the airflow inside lungs during breathing and its fluid-structure interaction with the lung tissues and the lung tumor using subject-specific elastic properties. The fluid-structure interaction technique simultaneously simulates flow within the airway and anisotropic deformation of the lung lobes. The three-dimensional (3D) lung geometry is reconstructed from the end-expiration 3D CT scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The lung is modeled as a poro-elastic medium with anisotropic elastic property (non-linear Young's modulus) obtained from inverse lung elastography of 4D CT scans for the same patients. The predicted results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation along with the airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effect is also presented of anisotropic elasticity on both the spatio-temporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:22356987

  7. Energy loss and coronary flow simulation following hybrid stage I palliation: a hypoplastic left heart computational fluid dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H.; Niehaus, Justin; Gottliebson, William; Abdallah, Shaaban

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The theoretical differences in energy losses as well as coronary flow with different band sizes for branch pulmonary arteries (PA) in hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) remain unknown. Our objective was to develop a computational fluid dynamic model (CFD) to determine the energy losses and pulmonary-to-systemic flow rates. This study was done for three different PA band sizes. METHODS Three-dimensional computer models of the hybrid procedure were constructed using the standard commercial CFD softwares Fluent and Gambit. The computer models were controlled for bilateral PA reduction to 25% (restrictive), 50% (intermediate) and 75% (loose) of the native branch pulmonary artery diameter. Velocity and pressure data were calculated throughout the heart geometry using the finite volume numerical method. Coronary flow was measured simultaneously with each model. Wall shear stress and the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic volume flow rates were calculated. Computer simulations were compared at fixed points utilizing echocardiographic and catheter-based metric dimensions. RESULTS Restricting the PA band to a 25% diameter demonstrated the greatest energy loss. The 25% banding model produced an energy loss of 16.76% systolic and 24.91% diastolic vs loose banding at 7.36% systolic and 17.90% diastolic. Also, restrictive PA bands had greater coronary flow compared with loose PA bands (50.2 vs 41.9 ml/min). Shear stress ranged from 3.75 Pascals with restrictive PA banding to 2.84 Pascals with loose banding. Intermediate PA banding at 50% diameter achieved a Qp/Qs (closest to 1) at 1.46 systolic and 0.66 diastolic compared with loose or restrictive banding without excess energy loss. CONCLUSIONS CFD provides a unique platform to simulate pressure, shear stress as well as energy losses of the hybrid procedure. PA banding at 50% provided a balanced pulmonary and systemic circulation with adequate coronary flow but without extra energy losses incurred. PMID:23660734

  8. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  9. Coupled Heat Transfer and Fluid Dynamics Modeling of InSb Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinschi, Paul; Barvinschi, Floricica

    2011-10-01

    A method for the directional solidification of melted InSb in a silica ampoule is presented and solved with COMSOL Multiphysics. The configuration and initial boundary settings of the model resemble those used in a de-wetting vertical Bridgman configuration [1]. A slightly modified version of the method presented by Voller and Prakash [2] is used to account for solidification of the liquid phase, including convection and conduction heat transfer with mushy region phase change. Axial-symmetric numerical simulations of temperature and velocity fields, under normal gravity, are carried out using different thermal conditions.

  10. Fluid dynamic modeling and numerical simulation of low-density hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. K.; Wong, Eric Y.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of a viscous shock-layer and several related versions of continuum theories/methods are examined for their adequacy as a viable framework to study flow physics and aerothermodynamics of relevance to sustained hypersonic flights. Considering the flat plate at angle of attack, or the wedge, as a generic example for the major aerodynamic component of a hypersonic vehicle, the relative importance of the molecular-transport effects behind the shock (in the form of the 'shock slip') and the wall-slip effects are studied. In the flow regime where the shock-transition-zone thickness remains small compared to the shock radius of curvature, a quasi-one-dimensional shock structure under the Burnett/thirteen-moment approximation, as well as particulate/collisional models, can be consistently developed. The fully viscous version of the shock-layer model is shown to provide the crucial boundary condition downstream the shock in this case. The gas-kinetic basis of the continuum description for the flow behind the bow shock, and certain features affecting the non-equilibrium flow chemistry, are also discussed.

  11. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of gas flow characteristics in a high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, S.; Eastwick, C. N.; Simmons, K. A.; McCartney, D. G.

    2001-09-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict gas dynamic behavior in a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun in which premixed oxygen and propylene are burnt in a 12 mm combustion chamber linked to a parallel-sided nozzle. The CFD analysis is applied to investigate axisymmetric, steady-state, turbulent, compressible, and chemically combusting flow both within the gun and in a free jet region between the gun and the substrate to be coated. The combustion of oxygen and propylene is modeled using a single-step, finite-rate chemistry model that also allows for dissociation of the reaction products. Results are presented to show the effect of (1) fuel-to-oxygen gas ratio and (2) total gas flow rate on the gas dynamic behavior. Along the centerline, the maximum temperature reached is insensitive to the gas ratio but depends on the total flow. However, the value attained (˜2500 K) is significantly lower than the maximum temperature (˜3200 K) of the annular flame in the combustion chamber. By contrast, the centerline gas velocity depends on both total flow and gas ratio, the highest axial gas velocity being attained with the higher flow and most fuel-rich mixture. The gas Mach number increases through the gun and reaches a maximum value of approximately 1.6 around 5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. The numerical calculations also show that the residual oxygen level is principally dependent on the fuel-to-oxygen ratio and decreases by approximately fivefold as the ratio is varied from 90 to 69% of the stoichiometric requirement. The CFD model is also used to investigate the effect of changes in combustion chamber size and geometry on gas dynamics, and the results are compared with the nominal 12 mm chamber baseline calculations.

  12. Modeling of Interior Ballistic Gas-Solid Flow Using a Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2013-05-01

    In conventional models for two-phase reactive flow of interior ballistic, the dynamic collision phenomenon of particles is neglected or empirically simplified. However, the particle collision between particles may play an important role in dilute two-phase flow because the distribution of particles is extremely nonuniform. The collision force may be one of the key factors to influence the particle movement. This paper presents the CFD-DEM approach for simulation of interior ballistic two-phase flow considering the dynamic collision process. The gas phase is treated as a Eulerian continuum and described by a computational fluid dynamic method (CFD). The solid phase is modeled by discrete element method (DEM) using a soft sphere approach for the particle collision dynamic. The model takes into account grain combustion, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, interphase drag and heat transfer between gas and solid phases. The continuous gas phase equations are discretized in finite volume form and solved by the AUSM+-up scheme with the higher order accurate reconstruction method. Translational and rotational motions of discrete particles are solved by explicit time integrations. The direct mapping contact detection algorithm is used. The multigrid method is applied in the void fraction calculation, the contact detection procedure, and CFD solving procedure. Several verification tests demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this approach. The simulation of an experimental igniter device in open air shows good agreement between the model and experimental measurements. This paper has implications for improving the ability to capture the complex physics phenomena of two-phase flow during the interior ballistic cycle and to predict dynamic collision phenomena at the individual particle scale. PMID:24891728

  13. Multiplicity fluctuations at the quark-hadron phase transition from a fluid dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Christoph; Nahrgang, Marlene; Yan, Yupeng; Kobdaj, Chinorat

    2015-04-01

    The region of large net-baryon densities in the QCD phase diagram is expected to exhibit a first-order phase transition. Experimentally, its study will be one of the primary objectives for the upcoming FAIR accelerator. We model the transition between quarks and hadrons in a heavy-ion collision using a fluid which is coupled to the explicit dynamics of the chiral order parameter and a dilaton field. This allows us to investigate signals stemming from the nonequilibrium evolution during the expansion of the hot plasma. Special emphasis is put on an event-by-event analysis of baryon number fluctuations which have long since been claimed to be sensitive to a critical point.

  14. Modeling-gas phase reactions in indoor environments using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Weschler, Charles J.

    This CFD modeling study examines the concentrations of two gaseous compounds that react in an indoor setting to produce a hypothetical product. The reactants are ozone and either d-limonene or α-terpinene (which reacts with ozone about 40 times faster than d-limonene). In addition to two different terpenes, the scenarios include two air exchange rates (0.5 and 2.0 h-1). The terpene is introduced as a floor source with an emission pattern similar to a floor-care product. These four scenarios have been set in a fairly large two-dimensional room (13.6×40.6 m) with a supply at the top of the left wall and an exhaust at the bottom of the right wall. The room has been deliberately scaled so that the Reynolds numbers for key flow regimes match those of a room in which the calculated flow field has been validated against measured data. It has been further assumed that ozone interacts with room surfaces while the terpenes do not. The results show that for all four scenarios, under steady-state conditions, there are large concentration gradients within the room for both reactants and product. To some extent this is due to imperfect mixing. However, it also reflects that reactions occur at different rates across the room (because of varying reactant concentrations) and that the time available for reactions to occur varies with the room location (because the "age of the air" varies from point to point). Locally, within the room, the concentrations calculated by the CFD method differ significantly from those calculated by a one-compartment mass-balance model assuming perfect mixing.

  15. Fluid Dynamics of the Heart and its Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskin, Charles S.

    1997-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of the heart involve the interaction of blood, a viscous incompressible fluid, with the flexible, elastic, fiber-reinforced heart valve leaflets that are immersed in that fluid. Neither the fluid motion nor the valve leaflet motion are known in advance: both must be computed simultaneously by solving their coupled equations of motion. This can be done by the immersed boundary method(Peskin CS and McQueen DM: A general method for the computer simulation of biological systems interacting with fluids. In: Biological Fluid Dynamics (Ellington CP and Pedley TJ, eds.), The Company of Biologists Limited, Cambridge UK, 1995, pp. 265-276.), which can be extended to incorporate the contractile fiber architecture of the muscular heart walls as well as the valve leaflets and the blood. In this way we arrive at a three-dimensional computer model of the heart(Peskin CS and McQueen DM: Fluid dynamics of the heart and its valves. In: Case Studies in Mathematical Modeling: Ecology, Physiology, and Cell Biology (Othmer HG, Adler FR, Lewis MA, and Dallon JC, eds.), Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs NJ, 1996, pp. 309-337.), which can be used as a test chamber for the design of prosthetic cardiac valves, and also to study the function of the heart in health and in disease. Numerical solutions of the equations of cardiac fluid dynamics obtained by the immersed boundary method will be presented in the form of a video animation of the beating heart.

  16. Implementing fluid dynamics obtained from GeoPET in reactive transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Eichelbaum, Sebastian; Kulenkampff, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Flow and transport simulations in geomaterials are commonly conducted on high-resolution tomograms (μCT) of the pore structure or stochastic models that are calibrated with measured integral quantities, like break through curves (BTC). Yet, there existed virtually no method for experimental verification of the simulated velocity distribution results. Positron emission tomography (PET) has unrivaled sensitivity and robustness for non-destructive, quantitative, spatio-temporal measurement of tracer concentrations in body tissue. In the past decade, we empowered PET for its applicability in opaque/geological media - GeoPET (Kulenkampff et al.; Kulenkampff et al., 2008; Zakhnini et al., 2013) and have developed detailed correction schemes to bring the images into sharp focus. Thereby it is the appropriate method for experimental verification and calibration of computer simulations of pore-scale transport by means of the observed propagation of a tracer pulse, c_PET(x,y,z,t). In parallel, we aimed at deriving velocity and porosity distributions directly from our concentration time series of fluid flow processes in geomaterials. This would allow us to directly benefit from lab scale observations and to parameterize respective numerical transport models. For this we have developed a robust spatiotemporal (3D+t) parameter extraction algorithm. Here, we will present its functionality, and demonstrate the use of obtained velocity distributions in finite element simulations of reactive transport processes on drill core scale. Kulenkampff, J., Gruendig, M., Zakhnini, A., Gerasch, R., and Lippmann-Pipke, J.: Process tomography of diffusion with PET for evaluating anisotropy and heterogeneity, Clay Minerals, in press. Kulenkampff, J., Gründig, M., Richter, M., and Enzmann, F.: Evaluation of positron emission tomography for visualisation of migration processes in geomaterials, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 33, 937-942, 2008. Zakhnini, A., Kulenkampff, J., Sauerzapf, S

  17. Modeling and analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo- hydrodynamic events using computational fluid dynamics and high performance computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.; Froehle, P.; Wang, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2004-01-01

    This work has explored the preliminary design of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool for the analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events using high performance computing platforms. The goal of this tool will be to extend the capabilities of an existing established CFD code, STAR-CD, allowing the car manufacturers to analyze the impact of transient operational events on the underhood thermal management by exploiting the computational efficiency of modern high performance computing systems. In particular, the project has focused on the CFD modeling of the radiator behavior during a specified transient. The 3-D radiator calculations were performed using STAR-CD, which can perform both steady-state and transient calculations, on the cluster computer available at ANL in the Nuclear Engineering Division. Specified transient boundary conditions, based on experimental data provided by Adapco and DaimlerChrysler were used. The possibility of using STAR-CD in a transient mode for the entire period of time analyzed has been compared with other strategies which involve the use of STAR-CD in a steady-state mode at specified time intervals, while transient heat transfer calculations would be performed for the rest of the time. The results of these calculations have been compared with the experimental data provided by Adapco/DaimlerChrysler and recommendations for future development of an optimal strategy for the CFD modeling of transient thermo-hydrodynamic events have been made. The results of this work open the way for the development of a CFD tool for the transient analysis of underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events, which will allow the integrated transient thermal analysis of the entire cooling system, including both the engine block and the radiator, on high performance computing systems.

  18. Modeling and analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo - hydrodynamic events using computational fluid dynamics and high performance computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Froehle, P.; Tentner, A.; Wang, C.

    2003-09-05

    This work has explored the preliminary design of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool for the analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events using high performance computing platforms. The goal of this tool will be to extend the capabilities of an existing established CFD code, STAR-CD, allowing the car manufacturers to analyze the impact of transient operational events on the underhood thermal management by exploiting the computational efficiency of modern high performance computing systems. In particular, the project has focused on the CFD modeling of the radiator behavior during a specified transient. The 3-D radiator calculations were performed using STAR-CD, which can perform both steady-state and transient calculations, on the cluster computer available at ANL in the Nuclear Engineering Division. Specified transient boundary conditions, based on experimental data provided by Adapco and DaimlerChrysler were used. The possibility of using STAR-CD in a transient mode for the entire period of time analyzed has been compared with other strategies which involve the use of STAR-CD in a steady-state mode at specified time intervals, while transient heat transfer calculations would be performed for the rest of the time. The results of these calculations have been compared with the experimental data provided by Adapco/DaimlerChrysler and recommendations for future development of an optimal strategy for the CFD modeling of transient thermo-hydrodynamic events have been made. The results of this work open the way for the development of a CFD tool for the transient analysis of underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events, which will allow the integrated transient thermal analysis of the entire cooling system, including both the engine block and the radiator, on high performance computing systems.

  19. Imaging and modeling of flow in porous media using clinical nuclear emission tomography systems and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.; O'Neil, James P.; Budinger, Thomas F.; Nico, Peter S.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Saloner, David A.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Moses, William W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling aspects of applying nuclear emission tomography to study fluid flow in laboratory packed porous media columns of the type frequently used in geophysics, geochemistry and hydrology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are used as non-invasive tools to obtain dynamic 3D images of radioactive tracer concentrations. Dynamic sequences obtained using 18F-FDG PET are used to trace flow through a 5 cm diameter × 20 cm tall sand packed column with and without an impermeable obstacle. In addition, a custom-made rotating column setup placed in a clinical two-headed SPECT camera is used to image 99mTc-DTPA tracer propagation in a through-flowing column (10 cm diameter × 30 cm tall) packed with recovered aquifer sediments. A computational fluid dynamics software package FLUENT is used to model the observed flow dynamics. Tracer distributions obtained in the simulations in the smaller column uniformly packed with sand and in the column with an obstacle are remarkably similar to the reconstructed images in the PET experiments. SPECT results demonstrate strongly non-uniform flow patterns for the larger column slurry-packed with sub-surface sediment and slow upward flow. In the numerical simulation of the SPECT study, two symmetric channels with increased permeability are prescribed along the column walls, which result in the emergence of two well-defined preferential flow paths. Methods and results of this work provide new opportunities in hydrologic and biogeochemical research. The primary target application for developed technologies is non-destructive, non-perturbing, quantitative imaging of flow dynamics within laboratory scale porous media systems.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T. J.

    2002-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used to study and solve complex fluid flow and heat transfer problems. This comprehensive text ranges from elementary concepts for the beginner to state-of-the-art CFD for the practitioner. It discusses and illustrates the basic principles of finite difference (FD), finite element (FE), and finite volume (FV) methods, with step-by-step hand calculations. Chapters go on to examine structured and unstructured grids, adaptive methods, computing techniques, and parallel processing. Finally, the author describes a variety of practical applications to problems in turbulence, reacting flows and combustion, acoustics, combined mode radiative heat transfer, multiphase flows, electromagnetic fields, and relativistic astrophysical flows. Students and practitioners--particularly in mechanical, aerospace, chemical, and civil engineering--will use this authoritative text to learn about and apply numerical techniques to the solution of fluid dynamics problems.

  1. Integration of biological kinetics and computational fluid dynamics to model the growth of Nannochloropsis salina in an open channel raceway.

    PubMed

    Park, Stephen; Li, Yebo

    2015-05-01

    Microalgal growth and systemic productivity is not only affected by environmental conditions such as temperature, irradiance, and nutrient concentrations, but also by physical processes such as fluid flow and particulate sedimentation. Modeling and simulating the system is a cost-effective way to predict the growth behavior under various environmental and physical conditions while determining effective engineering approaches to maximize productivity. Many mathematical models have been proposed to describe microalgal growth, while computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to model the behavior of many fluid systems. Integrating the growth kinetics into a CFD model can help researchers understand the impact of a variety of parameters and determine what measures can be taken to overcome some obstacles in the aquaculture industry--self-shading, biomass sedimentation, and contamination--which prevent the production of high biomass yields. The aim of this study was to integrate physical and environmental effects to predict space- and time-dependent algal growth in industrial scale raceways. A commercial CFD software, ANSYS-Fluent 14.5, was used to solve the proposed models in regards to fluid flow, heat transfer, and nutrient balance. User-defined functions written in C language were used to incorporate the kinetic equations into a three-dimensional standard k-ε turbulence model of an open channel raceway system driven by a single paddlewheel. Simulated results were compared with light intensity, temperature, nutrient concentration, and algal biomass data acquired for 56 day from an industrial scale raceway pond constructed for the growth of Nannochloropsis salina and were observed to be in good agreement with one another. There was up to a 17.6% increase in simulated productivity when the incoming CO2 concentration was increased from 0.0006 to 0.150 g L(-1), while the effect of paddlewheel velocity was not significant. Sensitivity analysis showed that the model

  2. Space Shuttle Propulsion Systems Plume Modeling and Simulation for the Lift-Off Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, L. L.; Dougherty, N. S.; Liever, P. A.; West, J. S.; Smith, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper details advances being made in the development of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes numerical simulation tools, models, and methods for the integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle at launch. The conceptual model and modeling approach described includes the development of multiple computational models to appropriately analyze the potential debris transport for critical debris sources at Lift-Off. The conceptual model described herein involves the integration of propulsion analysis for the nozzle/plume flow with the overall 3D vehicle flowfield at Lift-Off. Debris Transport Analyses are being performed using the Shuttle Lift-Off models to assess the risk to the vehicle from Lift-Off debris and appropriately prioritized mitigation of potential debris sources to continue to reduce vehicle risk. These integrated simulations are being used to evaluate plume-induced debris environments where the multi-plume interactions with the launch facility can potentially accelerate debris particles toward the vehicle.

  3. The use of computers for instruction in fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val

    1987-01-01

    Applications for computers which improve instruction in fluid dynamics are examined. Computers can be used to illustrate three-dimensional flow fields and simple fluid dynamics mechanisms, to solve fluid dynamics problems, and for electronic sketching. The usefulness of computer applications is limited by computer speed, memory, and software and the clarity and field of view of the projected display. Proposed advances in personal computers which will address these limitations are discussed. Long range applications for computers in education are considered.

  4. A method for the modelling of porous and solid wind tunnel walls in computational fluid dynamics codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutner, Thomas John

    1993-01-01

    Porous wall wind tunnels have been used for several decades and have proven effective in reducing wall interference effects in both low speed and transonic testing. They allow for testing through Mach 1, reduce blockage effects and reduce shock wave reflections in the test section. Their usefulness in developing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes has been limited, however, by the difficulties associated with modelling the effect of a porous wall in CFD codes. Previous approaches to modelling porous wall effects have depended either upon a simplified linear boundary condition, which has proven inadequate, or upon detailed measurements of the normal velocity near the wall, which require extensive wind tunnel time. The current work was initiated in an effort to find a simple, accurate method of modelling a porous wall boundary condition in CFD codes. The development of such a method would allow data from porous wall wind tunnels to be used more readily in validating CFD codes. This would be beneficial when transonic validations are desired, or when large models are used to achieve high Reynolds numbers in testing. A computational and experimental study was undertaken to investigate a new method of modelling solid and porous wall boundary conditions in CFD codes. The method utilized experimental measurements at the walls to develop a flow field solution based on the method of singularities. This flow field solution was then imposed as a pressure boundary condition in a CFD simulation of the internal flow field. The effectiveness of this method in describing the effect of porosity changes on the wall was investigated. Also, the effectiveness of this method when only sparse experimental measurements were available has been investigated. The current work demonstrated this approach for low speed flows and compared the results with experimental data obtained from a heavily instrumented variable porosity test section. The approach developed was simple, computationally

  5. Automatic Generation of Individual Finite-Element Models for Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Structure Mechanics Simulations in the Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, D.; Schmidt, E.; Unterhinninghofen, R.; Richter, G. M.; Dillmann, R.

    2009-08-01

    Abnormal hemodynamics and biomechanics of blood flow and vessel wall conditions in the arteries may result in severe cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases result from complex flow pattern and fatigue of the vessel wall and are prevalent causes leading to high mortality each year. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structure Mechanics (CSM) and Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) have become efficient tools in modeling the individual hemodynamics and biomechanics as well as their interaction in the human arteries. The computations allow non-invasively simulating patient-specific physical parameters of the blood flow and the vessel wall needed for an efficient minimally invasive treatment. The numerical simulations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and require exact and individual mesh models to be provided. In the present study, we developed a numerical tool to automatically generate complex patient-specific Finite Element (FE) mesh models from image-based geometries of healthy and diseased vessels. The mesh generation is optimized based on the integration of mesh control functions for curvature, boundary layers and mesh distribution inside the computational domain. The needed mesh parameters are acquired from a computational grid analysis which ensures mesh-independent and stable simulations. Further, the generated models include appropriate FE sets necessary for the definition of individual boundary conditions, required to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations governed by the fluid and solid domains. Based on the results, we have performed computational blood flow and vessel wall simulations in patient-specific aortic models providing a physical insight into the pathological vessel parameters. Automatic mesh generation with individual awareness in terms of geometry and conditions is a prerequisite for performing fast, accurate and realistic FEM-based computations of hemodynamics and biomechanics in the

  6. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    The fluid kaleidoscope of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere churns and sparkles with jets, gyres, eddies, waves, streams, and cyclones. These vast circulations, essential elements of the physical environment that support human life, are given a special character by the Earth's rotation and by their confinement to a shallow surficial layer, thin relative to the solid Earth in roughly the same proportion as an apple skin is to an apple. Geophysical fluid dynamics exploits this special character to develop a unified theoretical approach to the physics of the ocean and atmosphere.With Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Rick Salmon has added an insightful and provocative volume to the handful of authoritative texts currently available on the subject. The book is intended for first-year graduate students, but advanced students and researchers also will find it useful. It is divided into seven chapters, the first four of these adapted from course lectures. The book is well written and presents a fresh and stimulating perspective that complements existing texts. It would serve equally well either as the main text for a core graduate curriculum or as a supplementary resource for students and teachers seeking new approaches to both classical and contemporary problems. A lively set of footnotes contains many references to very recent work. The printing is attractive, the binding is of high quality, and typographical errors are few.

  7. Body fluid dynamics: back to the future.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Gautam; Neilson, Eric G

    2011-12-01

    Pioneering investigations conducted over a half century ago on tonicity, transcapillary fluid exchange, and the distribution of water and solute serve as a foundation for understanding the physiology of body fluid spaces. With passage of time, however, some of these concepts have lost their connectivity to more contemporary information. Here we examine the physical forces determining the compartmentalization of body fluid and its movement across capillary and cell membrane barriers, drawing particular attention to the interstitium operating as a dynamic interface for water and solute distribution rather than as a static reservoir. Newer work now supports an evolving model of body fluid dynamics that integrates exchangeable Na(+) stores and transcapillary dynamics with advances in interstitial matrix biology. PMID:22034644

  8. Body Fluid Dynamics: Back to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Gautam; Neilson, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering investigations conducted over a half century ago on tonicity, transcapillary fluid exchange, and the distribution of water and solute serve as a foundation for understanding the physiology of body fluid spaces. With passage of time, however, some of these concepts have lost their connectivity to more contemporary information. Here we examine the physical forces determining the compartmentalization of body fluid and its movement across capillary and cell membrane barriers, drawing particular attention to the interstitium operating as a dynamic interface for water and solute distribution rather than as a static reservoir. Newer work now supports an evolving model of body fluid dynamics that integrates exchangeable Na+ stores and transcapillary dynamics with advances in interstitial matrix biology. PMID:22034644

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Bonneville Project: Tailrace Spill Patterns for Low Flows and Corner Collector Smolt Egress

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    In 2003, an extension of the existing ice and trash sluiceway was added at Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2). This extension started at the existing corner collector for the ice and trash sluiceway adjacent to Bonneville Powerhouse 2 and the new sluiceway was extended to the downstream end of Cascade Island. The sluiceway was designed to improve juvenile salmon survival by bypassing turbine passage at B2, and placing these smolt in downstream flowing water minimizing their exposure to fish and avian predators. In this study, a previously developed computational fluid dynamics model was modified and used to characterized tailrace hydraulics and sluiceway egress conditions for low total river flows and low levels of spillway flow. STAR-CD v4.10 was used for seven scenarios of low total river flow and low spill discharges. The simulation results were specifically examined to look at tailrace hydraulics at 5 ft below the tailwater elevation, and streamlines used to compare streamline pathways for streamlines originating in the corner collector outfall and adjacent to the outfall. These streamlines indicated that for all higher spill percentage cases (25% and greater) that streamlines from the corner collector did not approach the shoreline at the downstream end of Bradford Island. For the cases with much larger spill percentages, the streamlines from the corner collector were mid-channel or closer to the Washington shore as they moved downstream. Although at 25% spill at 75 kcfs total river, the total spill volume was sufficient to "cushion" the flow from the corner collector from the Bradford Island shore, areas of recirculation were modeled in the spillway tailrace. However, at the lowest flows and spill percentages, the streamlines from the B2 corner collector pass very close to the Bradford Island shore. In addition, the very flow velocity flows and large areas of recirculation greatly increase potential predator exposure of the spillway passed smolt. If there is

  10. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 1: Theory and Computational Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, B.D.; Mueller, C.; Necker, G.A.; Travis, J.R.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Royl, P.; Redlinger, R.; Wilson, T.L.

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containments and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior (1) in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and (2) during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included

  11. CFD [computational fluid dynamics] And Safety Factors. Computer modeling of complex processes needs old-fashioned experiments to stay in touch with reality.

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Poirier, Michael R.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Ervin, Robert C.; Giddings, Billy J.; Stefanko, David B.; Harp, Keith D.; Fowley, Mark D.; Van Pelt, William B.

    2012-10-07

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is recognized as a powerful engineering tool. That is, CFD has advanced over the years to the point where it can now give us deep insight into the analysis of very complex processes. There is a danger, though, that an engineer can place too much confidence in a simulation. If a user is not careful, it is easy to believe that if you plug in the numbers, the answer comes out, and you are done. This assumption can lead to significant errors. As we discovered in the course of a study on behalf of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, CFD models fail to capture some of the large variations inherent in complex processes. These variations, or scatter, in experimental data emerge from physical tests and are inadequately captured or expressed by calculated mean values for a process. This anomaly between experiment and theory can lead to serious errors in engineering analysis and design unless a correction factor, or safety factor, is experimentally validated. For this study, blending times for the mixing of salt solutions in large storage tanks were the process of concern under investigation. This study focused on the blending processes needed to mix salt solutions to ensure homogeneity within waste tanks, where homogeneity is required to control radioactivity levels during subsequent processing. Two of the requirements for this task were to determine the minimum number of submerged, centrifugal pumps required to blend the salt mixtures in a full-scale tank in half a day or less, and to recommend reasonable blending times to achieve nearly homogeneous salt mixtures. A full-scale, low-flow pump with a total discharge flow rate of 500 to 800 gpm was recommended with two opposing 2.27-inch diameter nozzles. To make this recommendation, both experimental and CFD modeling were performed. Lab researchers found that, although CFD provided good estimates of an average blending time, experimental blending times varied

  12. Initial Results of Coupling the Output of a Regional Weather Model and a Localized Computational Fluid Dynamics Model at the Atlantic City International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trout, Joseph; Manson, J. Russell; Rios, Manny; King, David; Decicco, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Wake Vortex Turbulence is the turbulence generated by an aircraft in flight. This turbulence is created by vortices at the tips of the wing that may decay slowly and persist for several minutes after creation. The strength, formation and lifetime of the turbulence and vortices are effected by many things including the weather. Here we present the preliminary results of an investigation of low level wind fields generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model and an analysis of historical data. The simulations are used as inputs for the computational fluid dynamics model (OpenFoam) that will be used to investigate the effect of weather on wake turbulence. The initial results of the OpenFoam model are presented elsewhere. Presented here are the initial results from a research grant, ``A Pilot Project to Investigate Wake Vortex Patterns and Weather Patterns at the Atlantic City Airport by the Richard Stockton College of NJ and the FAA''.

  13. Computational model of the fluid dynamics of a cannula inserted in a vessel: incidence of the presence of side holes in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; Morbiducci, U; D'Avenio, G; Di Benedetto, G; Del Gaudio, C; Barbaro, V

    2002-12-01

    Vascular access methods, performed by the insertion of cannulae into vessels, may disturb the physiological flow of blood, giving rise to non-physiological pressure variations and shear stresses. To date, the hydrodynamic behaviour of the cannulae has been evaluated comparing their pressure loss-flow rate relationships, as obtained from in vitro experiments using a monodimensional approach; this methodology neither furnish information about the local fluid dynamics nor the established flow field in specific clinical work conditions. Since the shear stress is a critical factor in the design of artificial circulatory devices, more knowledge should be necessary about the local values assumed by the haemodynamic parameters during cannulation. An alternative way to investigate the fluid dynamic as accurately as possible is given by numeric studies. A 3D model of cannula concentrically placed in a rigid wall vessel is presented, with the finite element methodology used to numerically simulate the steady-state flow field in two different venous cannulation case studies, with two cannulae having a central hole and two or four side holes, respectively, with the same boundary conditions. Lower velocity and shear stress peak values have been computed for the model with four side holes upstream of the central hole, in the region of the cannula where the inlet flows meet and towards cannula's outlet, due to the increased flow symmetry and inlet area with respect to the model with two side holes. Starting from the investigation of different cannula designs, numerically assessing the local fluid dynamics, indications can be drawn to support both the design phase and the device optimal clinical use, in order to limit risks of biomechanical origin. Thus the presence of four side holes implied, as a consequence of the greater inlet area and of the increased symmetry, a less disturbed blood flow, together with reduced shear stress values. Furthermore, results show that the numerical

  14. Computational fluid dynamics in oil burner design

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    In Computational Fluid Dynamics, the differential equations which describe flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are approximately solved using a very laborious numerical procedure. Flows of practical interest to burner designs are always turbulent, adding to the complexity of requiring a turbulence model. This paper presents a model for burner design.

  15. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  16. Dynamic modelling of an adsorption storage tank using a hybrid approach combining computational fluid dynamics and process simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mota, J.P.B.; Esteves, I.A.A.C.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package has been coupled with the dynamic process simulator of an adsorption storage tank for methane fuelled vehicles. The two solvers run as independent processes and handle non-overlapping portions of the computational domain. The codes exchange data on the boundary interface of the two domains to ensure continuity of the solution and of its gradient. A software interface was developed to dynamically suspend and activate each process as necessary, and be responsible for data exchange and process synchronization. This hybrid computational tool has been successfully employed to accurately simulate the discharge of a new tank design and evaluate its performance. The case study presented here shows that CFD and process simulation are highly complementary computational tools, and that there are clear benefits to be gained from a close integration of the two. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Library

    2005-03-04

    CFDLib05 is the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics LIBrary. This is a collection of hydrocodes using a common data structure and a common numerical method, for problems ranging from single-field, incompressible flow, to multi-species, multi-field, compressible flow. The data structure is multi-block, with a so-called structured grid in each block. The numerical method is a Finite-Volume scheme employing a state vector that is fully cell-centered. This means that the integral form of the conservation lawsmore » is solved on the physical domain that is represented by a mesh of control volumes. The typical control volume is an arbitrary quadrilateral in 2D and an arbitrary hexahedron in 3D. The Finite-Volume scheme is for time-unsteady flow and remains well coupled by means of time and space centered fluxes; if a steady state solution is required, the problem is integrated forward in time until the user is satisfied that the state is stationary.« less

  18. Application of computational fluid dynamics methods to improve thermal hydraulic code analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentell, Dennis Shannon, Jr.

    A computational fluid dynamics code is used to model the primary natural circulation loop of a proposed small modular reactor for comparison to experimental data and best-estimate thermal-hydraulic code results. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics code modeling capabilities make them attractive alternatives to the current conservative approach of coupled best-estimate thermal hydraulic codes and uncertainty evaluations. The results from a computational fluid dynamics analysis are benchmarked against the experimental test results of a 1:3 length, 1:254 volume, full pressure and full temperature scale small modular reactor during steady-state power operations and during a depressurization transient. A comparative evaluation of the experimental data, the thermal hydraulic code results and the computational fluid dynamics code results provides an opportunity to validate the best-estimate thermal hydraulic code's treatment of a natural circulation loop and provide insights into expanded use of the computational fluid dynamics code in future designs and operations. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine those physical phenomena most impactful on operations of the proposed reactor's natural circulation loop. The combination of the comparative evaluation and sensitivity analysis provides the resources for increased confidence in model developments for natural circulation loops and provides for reliability improvements of the thermal hydraulic code.

  19. Simulation of the Velocity and Temperature Distribution of Inhalation Thermal Injury in a Human Upper Airway Model by Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yang; Zhao, Xiao-zhuo; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Fang-gang; Zhang, Guo-an

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation injury is an important cause of death after thermal burns. This study was designed to simulate the velocity and temperature distribution of inhalation thermal injury in the upper airway in humans using computational fluid dynamics. Cervical computed tomography images of three Chinese adults were imported to Mimics software to produce three-dimensional models. After grids were established and boundary conditions were defined, the simulation time was set at 1 minute and the gas temperature was set to 80 to 320°C using ANSYS software (ANSYS, Canonsburg, PA) to simulate the velocity and temperature distribution of inhalation thermal injury. Cross-sections were cut at 2-mm intervals, and maximum airway temperature and velocity were recorded for each cross-section. The maximum velocity peaked in the lower part of the nasal cavity and then decreased with air flow. The velocities in the epiglottis and glottis were higher than those in the surrounding areas. Further, the maximum airway temperature decreased from the nasal cavity to the trachea. Computational fluid dynamics technology can be used to simulate the velocity and temperature distribution of inhaled heated air. PMID:25412055

  20. Effect of turbulence modelling to predict combustion and nanoparticle production in the flame assisted spray dryer based on computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, Eka Lutfi; Widiyastuti, W.; Winardi, Sugeng; Machmudah, Siti; Nurtono, Tantular; Kusdianto

    2016-02-01

    Flame assisted spray dryer are widely uses for large-scale production of nanoparticles because of it ability. Numerical approach is needed to predict combustion and particles production in scale up and optimization process due to difficulty in experimental observation and relatively high cost. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can provide the momentum, energy and mass transfer, so that CFD more efficient than experiment due to time and cost. Here, two turbulence models, k-ɛ and Large Eddy Simulation were compared and applied in flame assisted spray dryer system. The energy sources for particle drying was obtained from combustion between LPG as fuel and air as oxidizer and carrier gas that modelled by non-premixed combustion in simulation. Silica particles was used to particle modelling from sol silica solution precursor. From the several comparison result, i.e. flame contour, temperature distribution and particle size distribution, Large Eddy Simulation turbulence model can provide the closest data to the experimental result.

  1. Detailed Simulations of Atmospheric Flow and Dispersion in Urban Downtown Areas by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models - An Application of Five CFD Models to Manhattan

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S R; Brown, M J; Camelli, F E; Chan, S T; Coirier, W J; Hansen, O R; Huber, A H; Kim, S; Reynolds, R M

    2006-03-06

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model simulations of urban boundary layers have improved so that they are useful in many types of flow and dispersion analyses. The study described here is intended to assist in planning emergency response activities related to releases of chemical or biological agents into the atmosphere in large cities such as New York City. Five CFD models (CFD-Urban, FLACS, FEM3MP, FEFLO-Urban, and Fluent-Urban) have been applied by five independent groups to the same 3-D building data and geographic domain in Manhattan, using approximately the same wind input conditions. Wind flow observations are available from the Madison Square Garden March 2005 (MSG05) field experiment. It is seen from the many side-by-side comparison plots that the CFD models simulations of near-surface wind fields generally agree with each other and with field observations, within typical atmospheric uncertainties of a factor of two. The qualitative results shown here suggest, for example, that transport of a release at street level in a large city could reach a few blocks in the upwind and crosswind directions. There are still key differences seen among the models for certain parts of the domain. Further quantitative examinations of differences among the models and the observations are necessary to understand causal relationships.

  2. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Mi. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines (HATTs). First, an HATT blade was designed using the blade element momentum method in conjunction with a genetic optimization algorithm. Several unstructured computational grids were generated using this blade geometry and steady CFD simulations were used to perform a grid resolution study. Transient simulations were then performed to determine the effect of time-dependent flow phenomena and the size of the computational timestep on the numerical solution. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of mass transfer behavior in a bioreactor for hairy root culture. I. Model development and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Sun, Wei; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on a porous media model and a discrete population balance model was established to investigate the hydrodynamics and mass transfer behavior in an airlift bioreactor for hairy root culture.During the hairy root culture of Echinacea purpurea, liquid and gas velocity, gas holdup, mass transfer rate, as well as oxygen concentration distribution in the airlift bioreactor were simulated by this CFD model. Simulative results indicated that liquid flow and turbulence played a dominant role in oxygen mass transfer in the growth domain of the hairy root culture. The dissolved oxygen concentration in the hairy root clump increased from the bottom to the top of the bioreactor cultured with the hairy roots, which was verified by the experimental detection of dissolved oxygen concentration in the hairy root clump. This methodology provided insight understanding on the complex system of hairy root culture and will help to eventually guide the bioreactor design and process intensification of large-scale hairy root culture. PMID:22238770

  4. Development of computational fluid dynamics--habitat suitability (CFD-HSI) models to identify potential passage--Challenge zones for migratory fishes in the Penobscot River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haro, Alexander J.; Dudley, Robert W.; Chelminski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-habitat suitability (CFD–HSI) model was developed to identify potential zones of shallow depth and high water velocity that may present passage challenges for five anadromous fish species in the Penobscot River, Maine, upstream from two existing dams and as a result of the proposed future removal of the dams. Potential depth-challenge zones were predicted for larger species at the lowest flow modeled in the dam-removal scenario. Increasing flows under both scenarios increased the number and size of potential velocity-challenge zones, especially for smaller species. This application of the two-dimensional CFD–HSI model demonstrated its capabilities to estimate the potential effects of flow and hydraulic alteration on the passage of migratory fish.

  5. Fluid Dynamics with Free Surfaces

    1992-02-01

    RIPPLE is a two-dimensional, transient, free surface incompressible fluid dynamics program. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion forces and has a partial cell treatment which allows curved boundaries and interior obstacles.

  6. Fluid dynamics of heart development.

    PubMed

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Miller, Laura A

    2011-09-01

    The morphology, muscle mechanics, fluid dynamics, conduction properties, and molecular biology of the developing embryonic heart have received much attention in recent years due to the importance of both fluid and elastic forces in shaping the heart as well as the striking relationship between the heart's evolution and development. Although few studies have directly addressed the connection between fluid dynamics and heart development, a number of studies suggest that fluids may play a key role in morphogenic signaling. For example, fluid shear stress may trigger biochemical cascades within the endothelial cells of the developing heart that regulate chamber and valve morphogenesis. Myocardial activity generates forces on the intracardiac blood, creating pressure gradients across the cardiac wall. These pressures may also serve as epigenetic signals. In this article, the fluid dynamics of the early stages of heart development is reviewed. The relevant work in cardiac morphology, muscle mechanics, regulatory networks, and electrophysiology is also reviewed in the context of intracardial fluid dynamics. PMID:21327946

  7. The Variety of Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Francis; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses three research topics which are concerned with eminently practical problems and deal at the same time with fundamental fluid dynamical problems. These research topics come from the general areas of chemical and biological engineering, geophysics, and pure mathematics. (HM)

  8. Blood flow volume of uterine arteries in human pregnancies determined using 3D and bi-dimensional imaging, angio-Doppler, and fluid-dynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Rigano, S; Ferrazzi, E; Boito, S; Pennati, G; Padoan, A; Galan, H

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of this pilot study was to study uterine artery (UtA) blood flow volume in uneventful human pregnancies delivered at term, at mid and late gestation by means of 3D and bi-dimensional ultrasound imaging with angio-Doppler combined with fluid-dynamic modeling. Secondary aims were to correlate flow volume to placental site and to UtA Pulsatility Index (PI). Women with singleton, low-risk pregnancies were examined at mid and late gestation. The structure and course of the uterine artery (UtA) was studied in each patient by means of 3D-angio-Doppler and included vessel diameter D, blood flow velocity and PI (measured along the UtA). Fetal weight estimation and placental insertion site were assessed by ultrasound. A robust fluid-dynamic modeling was applied to calculate absolute flow and flow per unit fetal weight. Mean UtA diameter and blood flow velocity increased significantly (p < 0.0001) from mid-gestation to late gestation from 2.6 mm and 67.5 cm/s, to 3.0 mm and 85.3 cm/s, respectively, yielding an increasing absolute flow troughout gestation. h coefficient, derived by fluid-dynamic modeling to calculate mean velocity, increased significantly from 0.52 at mid-gestation to 0.57 at late gestation. UtA blood flow volume ml/min/kg-fetal weight was significantly higher at mid-gestation than at late gestation (535 ml/min/kg vs 193 ml/min/kg; p < 0.0001). In cases with strictly lateral placentas the ipsilateral UtA accommodates at mid and late gestation 63% and 67% of the total UtA flow. In central placentas UtA flow was evenly distributed between the two vessels. An inverse correlation was observed between PI and blood flow volume ml/min/kg (Pearson's coefficient r = -0.54). Our work confirms the technological and methodological limitations in the measurement of uterine artery blood flow. However, Doppler measurements supported by three-dimensional angio imaging of the uterine vessel, high resolution imaging and diameter measurement, and a robust

  9. Fundamentals of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, James C.

    2006-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere and oceans exhibit complex patterns of fluid motion over a vast range of space and time scales. These patterns combine to establish the climate in response to solar radiation that is inhomogeneously absorbed by the materials comprising air, water, and land. Spontaneous, energetic variability arises from instabilities in the planetary-scale circulations, appearing in many different forms such as waves, jets, vortices, boundary layers, and turbulence. Geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) is the science of all these types of fluid motion. This textbook is a concise and accessible introduction to GFD for intermediate to advanced students of the physics, chemistry, and/or biology of Earth's fluid environment. The book was developed from the author's many years of teaching a first-year graduate course at the University of California, Los Angeles. Readers are expected to be familiar with physics and mathematics at the level of general dynamics (mechanics) and partial differential equations. Covers the essential GFD required for atmospheric science and oceanography courses Mathematically rigorous, concise coverage of basic theory and applications to both oceans and atmospheres Author is a world expert; this book is based on the course he has taught for many years Exercises are included, with solutions available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org

  10. Computational fluid dynamics - The coming revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The development of aerodynamic theory is traced from the days of Aristotle to the present, with the next stage in computational fluid dynamics dependent on superspeed computers for flow calculations. Additional attention is given to the history of numerical methods inherent in writing computer codes applicable to viscous and inviscid analyses for complex configurations. The advent of the superconducting Josephson junction is noted to place configurational demands on computer design to avoid limitations imposed by the speed of light, and a Japanese projection of a computer capable of several hundred billion operations/sec is mentioned. The NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator is described, showing capabilities of a billion operations/sec with a memory of 240 million words using existing technology. Near-term advances in fluid dynamics are discussed.

  11. Comparison of Fractional Flow Reserve Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Using Coronary Angiographic Vessel Morphology Versus Invasively Measured Fractional Flow Reserve.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Achenbach, Stephan; Röther, Jens; Redel, Thomas; Scheuering, Michael; Winneberger, David; Klingenbeck, Klaus; Itu, Lucian; Passerini, Tiziano; Kamen, Ali; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin; Schlundt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fractional flow reserve (FFRinvasive), although gold standard to identify hemodynamically relevant coronary stenoses, is time consuming and potentially associated with complications. We developed and evaluated a new approach to determine lesion-specific FFR on the basis of coronary anatomy as visualized by invasive coronary angiography (FFRangio): 100 coronary lesions (50% to 90% diameter stenosis) in 73 patients (48 men, 25 women; mean age 67 ± 9 years) were studied. On the basis of coronary angiograms acquired at rest from 2 views at angulations at least 30° apart, a PC-based computational fluid dynamics modeling software used personalized boundary conditions determined from 3-dimensional reconstructed angiography, heart rate, and blood pressure to derive FFRangio. The results were compared with FFRinvasive. Interobserver variability was determined in a subset of 25 narrowings. Twenty-nine of 100 coronary lesions were hemodynamically significant (FFRinvasive ≤ 0.80). FFRangio identified these with an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 94%, positive predictive value of 85%, and negative predictive value of 92%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.93. Correlation between FFRinvasive (mean: 0.84 ± 0.11) and FFRangio (mean: 0.85 ± 0.12) was r = 0.85. Interobserver variability of FFRangio was low, with a correlation of r = 0.88. In conclusion, estimation of coronary FFR with PC-based computational fluid dynamics modeling on the basis of lesion morphology as determined by invasive angiography is possible with high diagnostic accuracy compared to invasive measurements. PMID:26596195

  12. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.

    1999-01-14

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been fully investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop unimproved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verify and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Desulfurization Behavior in Gas-Stirred Systems Based on Computation Fluid Dynamics-Simultaneous Reaction Model (CFD-SRM) Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2014-10-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-simultaneous reaction model (CFD-SRM) coupled model has been proposed to describe the desulfurization behavior in a gas-stirred ladle. For the desulfurization thermodynamics, different models were investigated to determine sulfide capacity and oxygen activity. For the desulfurization kinetic, the effect of bubbly plume flow, as well as oxygen absorption and oxidation reactions in slag eyes are considered. The thermodynamic and kinetic modification coefficients are proposed to fit the measured data, respectively. Finally, the effects of slag basicity and gas flow rate on the desulfurization efficiency are investigated. The results show that as the interfacial reactions (Al2O3)-(FeO)-(SiO2)-(MnO)-[S]-[O] simultaneous kinetic equilibrium is adopted to determine the oxygen activity, and the Young's model with the modification coefficient R th of 1.5 is adopted to determine slag sulfide capacity, the predicted sulfur distribution ratio LS agrees well with the measured data. With an increase of the gas blowing time, the predicted desulfurization rate gradually decreased, and when the modification parameter R k is 0.8, the predicted sulfur content changing with time in ladle agrees well with the measured data. If the oxygen absorption and oxidation reactions in slag eyes are not considered in this model, then the sulfur removal rate in the ladle would be overestimated, and this trend would become more obvious with an increase of the gas flow rate and decrease of the slag layer height. With the slag basicity increasing, the total desulfurization ratio increases; however, the total desulfurization ratio changes weakly as the slag basicity exceeds 7. With the increase of the gas flow rate, the desulfurization ratio first increases and then decreases. When the gas flow rate is 200 NL/min, the desulfurization ratio reaches a maximum value in an 80-ton gas-stirred ladle.

  14. Fluid Dynamics of Human Phonation and Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of the fluid dynamics, flow-structure interactions, and acoustics associated with human phonation and speech. Our voice is produced through the process of phonation in the larynx, and an improved understanding of the underlying physics of this process is essential to advancing the treatment of voice disorders. Insights into the physics of phonation and speech can also contribute to improved vocal training and the development of new speech compression and synthesis schemes. This article introduces the key biomechanical features of the laryngeal physiology, reviews the basic principles of voice production, and summarizes the progress made over the past half-century in understanding the flow physics of phonation and speech. Laryngeal pathologies, which significantly enhance the complexity of phonatory dynamics, are discussed. After a thorough examination of the state of the art in computational modeling and experimental investigations of phonatory biomechanics, we present a synopsis of the pacing issues in this arena and an outlook for research in this fascinating subject.

  15. Silverton Conference on Applications of the Zero Gravity Space Shuttle Environment to Problems in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisner, M. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The possible utilization of the zero gravity resource for studies in a variety of fluid dynamics and fluid-dynamic related problems was investigated. A group of experiments are discussed and described in detail; these include experiments in the areas of geophysical fluid models, fluid dynamics, mass transfer processes, electrokinetic separation of large particles, and biophysical and physiological areas.

  16. Rheology and density of glucose syrup and honey: Determining their suitability for usage in analogue and fluid dynamic models of geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2011-06-01

    Analogue models of lithospheric deformation and fluid dynamic models of mantle flow mostly use some kind of syrup such as honey or glucose syrup to simulate the low-viscosity sub-lithospheric mantle. This paper describes detailed rheological tests and density measurements of three brands of glucose syrup and three brands of honey. Additional tests have been done for one brand of glucose syrup that was diluted with water to various degrees (2%, 5% and 10% by weight). The rheological tests have been done to test the effect of shear strain, shear rate and temperature on the dynamic viscosity of the syrup. The results show that the viscosity of all glucose syrups and honeys is independent of shear strain (i.e. no strain hardening or softening). The viscosity of the glucose syrups is independent of shear rate (γ˙), i.e. linear-viscous or Newtonian, in the range γ˙=10-4-10 s with stress exponents that are almost identical to one ( n = 0.995-1.004). All the honeys show a very weak, but consistent, decrease in viscosity with increasing shear rate of 7-14% from 10 -3 to 10 0 s -1 and have stress exponents more distinct from one ( n = 1.007-1.026). All syrups have a viscosity that is strongly dependent on temperature in the range 0-50 °C, where viscosity decreases with increasing temperature. Such decrease can be fitted with exponential and Arrhenius functions, with the latter giving the best results. Furthermore, the viscosity of glucose syrup decreases approximately exponentially with increasing water content. Oscillation tests indicate that the rheology of all the syrups is entirely dominated by viscous behaviour and not by elastic behaviour at frequencies of 10 -3-10 2 Hz. Finally, the density investigations show that the density of glucose syrup and honey decreases approximately linearly with increasing temperature in the range 10-70 °C, with coefficients of thermal volumetric expansion at 20 °C of 3.89-3.95 × 10 -4 °C -1 and 4.57-4.81 × 10 -4 °C -1 for

  17. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics )CFD) models to address environmental engineering challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant source emissions, atmospheric dispersion and resulting human exposure. CFD simulations ...

  18. Boundary conditions of patient-specific fluid dynamics modelling of cavopulmonary connections: possible adaptation of pulmonary resistances results in a critical issue for a virtual surgical planning

    PubMed Central

    Pennati, Giancarlo; Corsini, Chiara; Cosentino, Daria; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Luisi, Vincenzo S.; Dubini, Gabriele; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Cavopulmonary connections are surgical procedures used to treat a variety of complex congenital cardiac defects. Virtual pre-operative planning based on in silico patient-specific modelling might become a powerful tool in the surgical decision-making process. For this purpose, three-dimensional models can be easily developed from medical imaging data to investigate individual haemodynamics. However, the definition of patient-specific boundary conditions is still a crucial issue. The present study describes an approach to evaluate the vascular impedance of the right and left lungs on the basis of pre-operative clinical data and numerical simulations. Computational fluid dynamics techniques are applied to a patient with a bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis, who later underwent a total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). Multi-scale models describing the surgical region and the lungs are adopted, while the flow rates measured in the venae cavae are used at the model inlets. Pre-operative and post-operative conditions are investigated; namely, TCPC haemodynamics, which are predicted using patient-specific pre-operative boundary conditions, indicates that the pre-operative balanced lung resistances are not compatible with the TCPC measured flows, suggesting that the pulmonary vascular impedances changed individually after the surgery. These modifications might be the consequence of adaptation to the altered pulmonary blood flows. PMID:22670201

  19. MRI-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics in Experimental Vascular Models: Toward the Development of an Approach for Prediction of Cardiovascular Changes During Prolonged Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirka, T. A.; Myers, J. G.; Setser, R. M.; Halliburton, S. S.; White, R. D.; Chatzimavroudis, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    A priority of NASA is to identify and study possible risks to astronauts health during prolonged space missions [l]. The goal is to develop a procedure for a preflight evaluation of the cardiovascular system of an astronaut and to forecast how it will be affected during the mission. To predict these changes, a computational cardiovascular model must be constructed. Although physiology data can be used to make a general model, a more desirable subject-specific model requires anatomical, functional, and flow data from the specific astronaut. MRI has the unique advantage of providing images with all of the above information, including three-directional velocity data which can be used as boundary conditions in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program [2,3]. MRI-based CFD is very promising for reproduction of the flow patterns of a specific subject and prediction of changes in the absence of gravity. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of this approach by reconstructing the geometry of MRI-scanned arterial models and reproducing the MRI-measured velocities using CFD simulations on these geometries.

  20. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott, H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features. PMID:21666881

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  2. Fundamentals and recent advances in X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) applied on thermal-fluid dynamics and multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-known technique nowadays, since its first practical application by Sir. G. Hounsfield (Nobel price for medicine 1979) has continually benefited from optimising improvements, especially in medical applications. Indeed, also application of CT in various engineering research fields provides fundamental informations on a wide range of applications, considering that the technique is not destructive, allowing 3D visualization without perturbation of the analysed material. Nowadays, it is technologically possible to design and realize an equipment that achieve a micrometric resolution and even improve the sensibility in revealing differences in materials having very radiotransparency, allowing i.e. to distinguish between different fluids (with different density) or states of matter (like with two-phase flows). At the University of Bergamo, a prototype of an X-ray microCT system was developed since 2008, so being fully operative from 2012, with specific customizations for investigations in thermal-fluid dynamics and multiphase flow researches. A technical session held at the UIT International Conference in L'Aquila (Italy), at which this paper is referring, has presented some microCT fundamentals, to allow the audience to gain basics to follow the “fil-rouge” that links all the instrumentation developments, till the recent applications. Hereinafter are reported some applications currently developed at Bergamo University at the X-ray computed micro-tomography laboratory.

  3. Fluid dynamics modeling for synchronizing surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance as tools for biomolecular and targeted drug delivery studies.

    PubMed

    Viitala, Tapani; Liang, Huamin; Gupta, Mayur; Zwinger, Thomas; Yliperttula, Marjo; Bunker, Alex

    2012-07-15

    We have used computational fluid dynamics modeling (CFD) to synchronize the flow conditions in the flow channels of two complementary surface-sensitive characterization techniques: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Since the footprint of the flow channels of the two devices is specified by their function, the flow behavior can only be varied either by altering the height of the flow channel, or altering the volumetric rate of flow (flow rate) through the channel. The relevant quantity that must be calibrated is the shear strain on the measurement surface (center and bottom) of the flow channel. Our CFD modeling shows that the flow behavior is in the Stokes flow regime. We were thus able to generate a scaling expression with parameters for flow rate and flow channel height for each of the two devices: f(QCM)=2.64f(SPR)(h(QCM)/h(SPR)(2), where f(QCM) and f(SPR) are the flow rates in the SPR and QCM flow channels, respectively, and h(QCM)/h(SPR) is the ratio of the heights of the two channels. We demonstrate the success of our calibration procedure through the combined use of commercially available SPR and QCM flow channel devices on both a biomolecular interaction system of surface immobilized biotin and streptavidin and a targeted drug delivery model system of biotinylated liposomes interacting with a streptavidin functionalized surface. PMID:22579516

  4. [Pressure-dependent outflow resistance in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics: evaluation a calculation model for diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus in an animal experiment with H-Tx rats].

    PubMed

    Meier, U; Kiefer, M

    2001-04-01

    The internationally accepted methods of calculating cerebrospinal fluid dynamics proceed from the assumption of a pressure-independent resistance to CSF outflow. Our new model focusses on the pressure-dependency of this resistance. In it, we monitor the entire pressure course over time, p(t) during and after infusion. A comparison of the pressure rise, On(p), during infusion, and the decrease, Off(p), to the same pressure level, permits the creation of all the formulas for C(p) and R(p). The simultaneous measurement of resistance and compliance during a single intervention allows us to minimize patient exertion. In contrast to the classical methods, it is not necessary for the ICP to reach a plateau. Our mathematical model differs from the static examination model by describing a pressure-dependent slope of the function for the resistance. This has been demonstrated in a study using H-Tx rats. In this way, we are able to take the non-linearity of the CSF resorption into consideration. PMID:11388039

  5. Fluid Dynamic Verification Experiments on STS-70

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid dynamic experiments were flown on STS-70 as phase two of the engineering evaluation of the first bioreactor Engineering Development Unit (EDU#1). The phase one experiments were comparative cell cultures in identical units on earth and onboard STS-70. In phase two, two types of fluid dynamic experiments were performed. Qualitative comparisons of the basic flow patterns were evaluated with the use of 'dye' streaklines formed from alternate injections of either a mild acid or base solution into the external flow loop that was then perfused into the vessel. The presence of Bromothymol Blue in the fluid then caused color changes from yellow to blue or vice versa, indicating the basic fluid motions. This reversible change could be repeated as desired. In the absence of significant density differences in the fluid, the flow patterns in space should be the same as on earth. Video tape records of the flow patterns for a wide range of operating conditions were obtained. The second type of fluid dynamic experiment was the quantitative evaluation of the trajectories of solid beads of various densities and sizes. The beads were introduced into the vessel and the paths recorded on video tape, with the vessel operated at various rotation rates and flow perfusion rates. Because of space limitations, the video camera was placed as close as possible to the vessel, resulting in significant optical distortion. This report describes the analysis methods to obtain comparisons between the in-flight fluid dynamics and numerical models of the flow field. The methods include optical corrections to the video images and calculation of the bead trajectories for given operating conditions and initial bead locations.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung-Kwon

    2011-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a mechanical engineering field for analyzing fluid flow, heat transfer, and associated phenomena, using computer-based simulation. CFD is a widely adopted methodology for solving complex problems in many modern engineering fields. The merit of CFD is developing new and improved devices and system designs, and optimization is conducted on existing equipment through computational simulations, resulting in enhanced efficiency and lower operating costs. However, in the biomedical field, CFD is still emerging. The main reason why CFD in the biomedical field has lagged behind is the tremendous complexity of human body fluid behavior. Recently, CFD biomedical research is more accessible, because high performance hardware and software are easily available with advances in computer science. All CFD processes contain three main components to provide useful information, such as pre-processing, solving mathematical equations, and post-processing. Initial accurate geometric modeling and boundary conditions are essential to achieve adequate results. Medical imaging, such as ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used for modeling, and Doppler ultrasound, pressure wire, and non-invasive pressure measurements are used for flow velocity and pressure as a boundary condition. Many simulations and clinical results have been used to study congenital heart disease, heart failure, ventricle function, aortic disease, and carotid and intra-cranial cerebrovascular diseases. With decreasing hardware costs and rapid computing times, researchers and medical scientists may increasingly use this reliable CFD tool to deliver accurate results. A realistic, multidisciplinary approach is essential to accomplish these tasks. Indefinite collaborations between mechanical engineers and clinical and medical scientists are essential. CFD may be an important methodology to understand the pathophysiology of the development and

  7. A multiscale 0-D/3-D approach to patient-specific adaptation of a cerebral autoregulation model for computational fluid dynamics studies of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Kaufmann, Tim A S

    2014-06-01

    Neurological complication often occurs during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). One of the main causes is hypoperfusion of the cerebral tissue affected by the position of the cannula tip and diminished cerebral autoregulation (CA). Recently, a lumped parameter approach could describe the baroreflex, one of the main mechanisms of cerebral autoregulation, in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of CPB. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) was overestimated and the physiological meaning of the variables and their impact on the model was unknown. In this study, we use a 0-D control circuit representation of the Baroreflex mechanism, to assess the parameters with respect to their physiological meaning and their influence on CBF. Afterwards the parameters are transferred to 3D-CFD and the static and dynamic behavior of cerebral autoregulation is investigated. The parameters of the baroreflex mechanism can reproduce normotensive, hypertensive and impaired autoregulation behavior. Further on, the proposed model can mimic the effects of anesthetic agents and other factors controlling dynamic CA. The CFD simulations deliver similar results of static and dynamic CBF as the 0-D control circuit. This study shows the feasibility of a multiscale 0-D/3-D approach to include patient-specific cerebral autoregulation into CFD studies. PMID:24746017

  8. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of the effect of ventilation mode and tracheal tube position on air flow in the large airways.

    PubMed

    Lumb, A B; Burns, A D; Figueroa Rosette, J A; Gradzik, K B; Ingham, D B; Pourkashanian, M

    2015-05-01

    We have used computational fluid dynamic modelling to study the effects of tracheal tube size and position on regional gas flow in the large airways. Using a three-dimensional mathematical model, we simulated flow with and without a tracheal tube, replicating both physiological and artificial breathing. Ventilation through a tracheal tube increased proportional flow to the left lung from 39.5% with no tube to 43.1-47.2%, depending on tube position. Ventilation mode and tube distance from the carina had no effect on flow. Lateral displacement and deflection of the tube increased ventilation to the ipsilateral lung; for example, when deflected 10° to the left of centre, flow to the left lung increased from 43.8 to 53.7%. Because of the small diameter of a tracheal tube relative to the trachea, gas exits a tube at high velocity such that regional ventilation may be affected by changes in the position and angle of the tube. PMID:25581493

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of mass-transfer behavior in a bioreactor for hairy root culture. II. Analysis of ultrasound-intensified process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Sun, Wei; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Recently, cichoric acid production from hairy roots of Echinacea purpurea was significantly improved by ultrasound stimulation in an airlift bioreactor. In this article, the possible mechanism on ultrasound-intensified hairy root culture of E. purpurea in the bioreactor was elucidated with the help of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, membrane permeability detection, dissolved oxygen concentration detection, confocal laser-scanning microscopy (LSM) observation, and phenylalanine ammonium lyase (PAL) activity analysis. The CFD model developed in Part I was used to simulate the hydrodynamics and oxygen mass transfer in hairy root bioreactor culture stimulated by ultrasound. A dynamic mesh model combined with a changing Schmidt number method was used for the simulation of the ultrasound field. Simulation results and experimental data illustrated that ultrasound intensified oxygen mass transfer in the hairy root clump, which subsequently stimulated root growth and cichoric acid biosynthesis. Ultrasound increased the hairy root membrane permeability, and a high root membrane permeability of 0.359 h(-1) was observed at the bottom region in the bioreactor. LSM observation showed that the change in the membrane permeability recovered to normal in the further culture after ultrasound stimulation. PAL activity in the hairy roots was stimulated by ultrasound increase and was correlated well to cichoric acid accumulation in the hairy roots of E. purpurea. PMID:21850671

  10. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  11. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  12. KINETIC MODELING OF A FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTION OVER A COBALT CATALYST IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR FOR INCORPORATION INTO A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasia Gribik; Doona Guillen, PhD; Daniel Ginosar, PhD

    2008-09-01

    Currently multi-tubular fixed bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors, and slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) are used in commercial Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis. There are a number of advantages of the SBCR compared to fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The main advantage of the SBCR is that temperature control and heat recovery are more easily achieved. The SBCR is a multiphase chemical reactor where a synthesis gas, comprised mainly of H2 and CO, is bubbled through a liquid hydrocarbon wax containing solid catalyst particles to produce specialty chemicals, lubricants, or fuels. The FT synthesis reaction is the polymerization of methylene groups [-(CH2)-] forming mainly linear alkanes and alkenes, ranging from methane to high molecular weight waxes. The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the FT process in a SBCR. This paper discusses the incorporation of absorption and reaction kinetics into the current hydrodynamic model. A phased approach for incorporation of the reaction kinetics into a CMFD model is presented here. Initially, a simple kinetic model is coupled to the hydrodynamic model, with increasing levels of complexity added in stages. The first phase of the model includes incorporation of the absorption of gas species from both large and small bubbles into the bulk liquid phase. The driving force for the gas across the gas liquid interface into the bulk liquid is dependent upon the interfacial gas concentration in both small and large bubbles. However, because it is difficult to measure the concentration at the gas-liquid interface, coefficients for convective mass transfer have been developed for the overall driving force between the bulk concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. It is assumed that there are no temperature effects from mass transfer of the gas phases to the bulk liquid phase, since there are only small amounts of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. The product from the

  13. User's manual for master: Modeling of aerodynamic surfaces by 3-dimensional explicit representation. [input to three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    A system of computer programs was developed to model general three dimensional surfaces. Surfaces are modeled as sets of parametric bicubic patches. There are also capabilities to transform coordinates, to compute mesh/surface intersection normals, and to format input data for a transonic potential flow analysis. A graphical display of surface models and intersection normals is available. There are additional capabilities to regulate point spacing on input curves and to compute surface/surface intersection curves. Input and output data formats are described; detailed suggestions are given for user input. Instructions for execution are given, and examples are shown.

  14. Product gas evolution above planar microstructured model catalysts--A combined scanning mass spectrometry, Monte Carlo, and Computational Fluid Dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, M.; Bansmann, J.; Behm, R. J.; Zhang, D.; Deutschmann, O.

    2010-09-07

    The transport and distribution of reaction products above catalytically active Pt microstructures was studied by spatially resolved scanning mass spectrometry (SMS) in combination with Monte Carlo simulation and fluid dynamics calculations, using the oxidation of CO as test reaction. The spatial gas distribution above the Pt fields was measured via a thin quartz capillary connected to a mass spectrometer. Measurements were performed in two different pressure regimes, being characteristic for ballistic mass transfer and diffusion involving multiple collisions for the motion of CO{sub 2} product molecules between the sample and the capillary tip, and using differently sized and shaped Pt microstructures. The tip height dependent lateral resolution of the SMS measurements as well as contributions from shadowing effects, due to the mass transport limitations between capillary tip and sample surface at close separations, were evaluated and analyzed. The data allow to define measurement and reaction conditions where effects induced by the capillary tip can be neglected (''minimal invasive measurements'') and provide a basis for the evaluation of catalyst activities on microstructured model systems, e.g., for catalyst screening or studies of transport effects.

  15. Product gas evolution above planar microstructured model catalysts—A combined scanning mass spectrometry, Monte Carlo, and Computational Fluid Dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, M.; Bansmann, J.; Zhang, D.; Deutschmann, O.; Behm, R. J.

    2010-09-01

    The transport and distribution of reaction products above catalytically active Pt microstructures was studied by spatially resolved scanning mass spectrometry (SMS) in combination with Monte Carlo simulation and fluid dynamics calculations, using the oxidation of CO as test reaction. The spatial gas distribution above the Pt fields was measured via a thin quartz capillary connected to a mass spectrometer. Measurements were performed in two different pressure regimes, being characteristic for ballistic mass transfer and diffusion involving multiple collisions for the motion of CO2 product molecules between the sample and the capillary tip, and using differently sized and shaped Pt microstructures. The tip height dependent lateral resolution of the SMS measurements as well as contributions from shadowing effects, due to the mass transport limitations between capillary tip and sample surface at close separations, were evaluated and analyzed. The data allow to define measurement and reaction conditions where effects induced by the capillary tip can be neglected ("minimal invasive measurements") and provide a basis for the evaluation of catalyst activities on microstructured model systems, e.g., for catalyst screening or studies of transport effects.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Richard A; Minard, Kevin R; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R; Kuprat, Andrew P; harkema, J R; Kimbell, Julia; Gargas, M L; Kinzell, John H

    2009-06-01

    The percentages of total airflows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were calculated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These airflows calculations, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, monkeys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the fine structures of the nasal turbinates and airflows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired airflows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (airflows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These differences in regional airflows can have significant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  17. NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference. Volume 1: Sessions 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Presentations given at the NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, March 7-9, 1989 are given. Topics covered include research facility overviews of CFD research and applications, validation programs, direct simulation of compressible turbulence, turbulence modeling, advances in Runge-Kutta schemes for solving 3-D Navier-Stokes equations, grid generation and invicid flow computation around aircraft geometries, numerical simulation of rotorcraft, and viscous drag prediction for rotor blades.

  18. AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics in Aeronautics: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Fluid Dynamics Panel of AGARD arranged a Symposium on Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics in Aeronautics, on 7 to 10 April 1986 in Aix-en-Provence, France. The purpose of the Symposium was to provide an assessment of the status of CFD in aerodynamic design and analysis, with an emphasis on emerging applications of advanced computational techniques to complex configurations. Sessions were devoted specifically to grid generation, methods for inviscid flows, calculations of viscous-inviscid interactions, and methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The 31 papers presented at the meeting are published in AGARD Conference Proceedings CP-412 and are listed in the Appendix of this report. A brief synopsis of each paper and some general conclusions and recommendations are given.

  19. Development, Verification and Use of Gust Modeling in the NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics Code FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of gust modeling capability in the CFD code FUN3D. The gust capability is verified by computing the response of an airfoil to a sharp edged gust. This result is compared with the theoretical result. The present simulations will be compared with other CFD gust simulations. This paper also serves as a users manual for FUN3D gust analyses using a variety of gust profiles. Finally, the development of an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) reduced order gust model using a gust with a Gaussian profile in the FUN3D code is presented. ARMA simulated results of a sequence of one-minus-cosine gusts is shown to compare well with the same gust profile computed with FUN3D. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is combined with the ARMA modeling technique to predict the time varying pressure coefficient increment distribution due to a novel gust profile. The aeroelastic response of a pitch/plunge airfoil to a gust environment is computed with a reduced order model, and compared with a direct simulation of the system in the FUN3D code. The two results are found to agree very well.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics for modeling the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Guillén, I.; Xamán, J.; Álvarez, G.; Arce, J.; Hernández-Pérez, I.; Gijón-Rivera, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the modeling of the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney (SC-DC) and its comparison with a single air-channel solar chimney (SC-C). Prediction of the mass flow and the thermal behavior of the SC-DC were obtained under three different climates of Mexico during one summer day. The climates correspond to: tropical savannah (Mérida), arid desert (Hermosillo) and temperate with warm summer (Mexico City). A code based on the Finite Volume Method was developed and a k‑ω turbulence model has been used to model air turbulence in the solar chimney (SC). The code was validated against experimental data. The results indicate that during the day the SC-DC extracts about 50% more mass flow than the SC-C. When the SC-DC is located in Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, the air-changes extracted along the day were 60, 63 and 52, respectively. The air temperature at the outlet of the chimney increased up to 33%, 38% and 61% with respect to the temperature it has at the inlet for Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, respectively.

  1. Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics in Blood Vessel Models: Toward Developing a Prognostic Tool to Assess Cardiovascular Function Changes in Prolonged Space Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatzimavroudis, George P.; Spirka, Thomas A.; Setser, Randolph M.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2004-01-01

    One of NASA's objectives is to be able to perform a complete, pre-flight, evaluation of cardiovascular changes in astronauts scheduled for prolonged space missions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has shown promise as a method for estimating cardiovascular function during reduced gravity conditions. For this purpose, MRI can provide geometrical information, to reconstruct vessel geometries, and measure all spatial velocity components, providing location specific boundary conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of MRI-based model reconstruction and measured boundary conditions for CFD simulations. An aortic arch model and a carotid bifurcation model were scanned in a 1.5T Siemens MRI scanner. Axial MRI acquisitions provided images for geometry reconstruction (slice thickness 3 and 5 mm; pixel size 1x1 and 0.5x0.5 square millimeters). Velocity acquisitions provided measured inlet boundary conditions and localized three-directional steady-flow velocity data (0.7-3.0 L/min). The vessel walls were isolated using NIH provided software (ImageJ) and lofted to form the geometric surface. Constructed and idealized geometries were imported into a commercial CFD code for meshing and simulation. Contour and vector plots of the velocity showed identical features between the MRI velocity data, the MRI-based CFD data, and the idealized-geometry CFD data, with less than 10% differences in the local velocity values. CFD results on models reconstructed from different MRI resolution settings showed insignificant differences (less than 5%). This study illustrated, quantitatively, that reliable CFD simulations can be performed with MRI reconstructed models and gives evidence that a future, subject-specific, computational evaluation of the cardiovascular system alteration during space travel is feasible.

  2. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  3. Relations between winter precipitation and atmospheric circulation simulated by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J., Jr.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    General circulation model (GCM) simulations of atmospheric circulation are more reliable than GCM simulations of temperature and precipitation. In this study, temporal correlations between 700 hPa height anomalies simulated winter precipitation at eight locations in the conterminous United States are compared with corresponding correlations in observations. The objectives are to 1) characterize the relations between atmospheric circulation and winter precipitation simulated by the GFDL, GCM for selected locations in the conterminous USA, ii) determine whether these relations are similar to those found in observations of the actual climate system, and iii) determine if GFDL-simulated precipitation is forced by the same circulation patterns as in the real atmosphere. -from Authors

  4. A physical framework for implementing virtual models of intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in hydrocephalus shunt testing.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Pranav; Browd, Samuel R; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The surgical placement of a shunt designed to resolve the brain's impaired ability to drain excess CSF is one of the most common treatments for hydrocephalus. The use of a dynamic testing platform is an important part of shunt testing that can faithfully reproduce the physiological environment of the implanted shunts. METHODS A simulation-based framework that serves as a proof of concept for enabling the application of virtual intracranial pressure (ICP) and CSF models to a physical shunt-testing system was engineered. This was achieved by designing hardware and software that enabled the application of dynamic model-driven inlet and outlet pressures to a shunt and the subsequent measurement of the resulting drainage rate. RESULTS A set of common physiological scenarios was simulated, including oscillations in ICP due to respiratory and cardiac cycles, changes in baseline ICP due to changes in patient posture, and transient ICP spikes caused by activities such as exercise, coughing, sneezing, and the Valsalva maneuver. The behavior of the Strata valve under a few of these physiological conditions is also demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS Testing shunts with dynamic ICP and CSF simulations can facilitate the optimization of shunts to be more failure resistant and better suited to patient physiology. PMID:27203135

  5. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics - Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design - The secondary clarifier.

    PubMed

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-10-15

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models - computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective is to develop a new 1-D framework, referred to as interpreted CFD (iCFD) models, in which statistical meta-models are used to calculate the pseudo-dispersion coefficient (D) as a function of design and flow boundary conditions. The method - presented in a straightforward and transparent way - is illustrated using the example of a circular secondary settling tank (SST). First, the significant design and flow factors are screened out by applying the statistical method of two-level fractional factorial design of experiments. Second, based on the number of significant factors identified through the factor screening study and system understanding, 50 different sets of design and flow conditions are selected using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). The boundary condition sets are imposed on a 2-D axi-symmetrical CFD simulation model of the SST. In the framework, to degenerate the 2-D model structure, CFD model outputs are approximated by the 1-D model through the calibration of three different model structures for D. Correlation equations for the D parameter then are identified as a function of the selected design and flow boundary conditions (meta-models), and their accuracy is evaluated against D values estimated in each numerical experiment. The evaluation and validation of the iCFD model structure is carried out using scenario simulation results obtained with parameters sampled from the corners of the LHS experimental region. For the studied SST, additional iCFD model development was carried out in terms of (i) assessing different density current sub-models; (ii) implementation of a combined flocculation, hindered, transient and compression settling velocity function; and (iii

  6. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts.

    PubMed

    Corley, Richard A; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P; Carson, James P; Jacob, Richard E; Minard, Kevin R; Teeguarden, Justin G; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein. PMID:25858911

  7. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Richard E.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein. PMID:25858911

  8. Performance of a thrombectomy device for aspiration of thrombus with various sizes based on a computational fluid dynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Sajjad; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    It is important to thoroughly remove the thrombus within the course of aspiration thrombectomy; otherwise, it may lead to further embolization. The performance of the aspiration thrombectomy device with a generic geometry is studied through the computational approach. In order to model the thrombus aspiration, a real left coronary artery is chosen while thrombi with various sizes are located at the bifurcation area of the coronary artery and, depending on the size of the thrombus, it is stretched toward the side branches. The thrombus occupies the artery resembling the blood current obstruction in the coronary vessel similar to the situation that leads to heart attack. It is concluded that the aspiration ability of the thrombectomy device is not linked to the thrombus size; it is rather linked to the aspiration pressure and thrombus age (organized versus fresh thrombus). However, the aspiration time period correlates to the thrombus size. The minimum applicable aspiration pressure is also investigated in this study. PMID:26351782

  9. Approach of Computational Fluid Dynamics of VOF Model in Two Phase flow through Porous Medium under Microgravity Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Raisul

    2016-07-01

    In this research paper firstly theoretical analysis and design of the porous matrix for filtration and selection of associated liquid (highly viscous and low viscous liquid) is carried out. Hence, porosity of the bed has been found out followed by a detailed CFD analysis of the flow to identify displacement structure (fingering: due to the nonlinear interactions among viscous, capillary and gravitational forces). Moreover, an experiment will be with synthetic porous medium consists of a single layer of glass beads which are then positioned homogeneously or non-homogeneously between two Perspex sheets and then fluid displacement structure/fingering will be photographed. Then the effort will be made to validate results with the experiment based photograph and then the CFD model will be extended to microgravity condition KEYWORDS: CFD, Fingering, microgravity, Non-homogeneously, Capillary .

  10. Solar Pond Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of the solar pond research was to obtain an indepth understanding of solar pond fluid dynamics and heat transfer. The key product was the development of a validated one-dimensional computer model with the capability to accurately predict time-dependent solar pond temperature, salinities, and interface motions. Laboratory scale flow visualization experiments were conducted to better understand layer motion. Two laboratory small-scale ponds and a large-scale outdoor solar pond were designed and built to provide quantitative data. This data provided a basis for validating the model and enhancing the understanding of pond dynamic behavior.

  11. Lab-on-a-chip sample preparation using laminar fluid diffusion interfaces--computational fluid dynamics model results and fluidic verification experiments.

    PubMed

    Weigl, B H; Bardell, R L; Kesler, N; Morris, C J

    2001-09-01

    Microfluidic structures for the generation of laminar fluid diffusion interfaces (LFDIs) for sample preparation and analysis are discussed. Experimental data and the results of fluid modeling are shown. LFDIs are generated when two or more streams flow in parallel in a single microfluidic structure without any mixing of the fluids other than by diffusion of particles across the diffusion interface. It has been shown that such structures can be used for diffusion-based separation and detection applications. The method has been applied to DNA desalting, the extraction of small proteins from whole blood samples, and the detection of various constituents in whole blood, among other examples. In this paper the design and manufacture of self-contained microfluidic cartridges for the extraction of small molecules from a mixture of small and large molecules by diffusion is demonstrated. The cards are operated without any external instrumentation, and use hydrostatic pressure as the driving force. The performance of the cartridges is illustrated by separating fluorescein from a mixture of fluorescein and dextran of molecular weight 2 x 10(6). In a single pass, 98.6% of dextran was retained in the product whereas 43.1% of fluorescein was removed. The method is adjustable for different separation requirements, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are shown that demonstrate the tuning of various microfluidic parameters to optimize separation performance. Other applications of LFDIs for establishment of stable concentration gradients, and the exposure of chemical constituents or biological particles to these concentration gradients are shown qualitatively. Microfluidic chips have been designed for high-throughput screening applications that enable the uniform and controlled exposure of cells to lysing agents, thus enabling the differentiation of cells by their sensitivity to specific agents in an on-chip cytometer coupled directly to the lysing structure. PMID:11678205

  12. Modeling Tool Advances Rotorcraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Continuum Dynamics Inc. (CDI), founded in 1979, specializes in advanced engineering services, including fluid dynamic modeling and analysis for aeronautics research. The company has completed a number of SBIR research projects with NASA, including early rotorcraft work done through Langley Research Center, but more recently, out of Ames Research Center. NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants on helicopter wake modeling resulted in the Comprehensive Hierarchical Aeromechanics Rotorcraft Model (CHARM), a tool for studying helicopter and tiltrotor unsteady free wake modeling, including distributed and integrated loads, and performance prediction. Application of the software code in a blade redesign program for Carson Helicopters, of Perkasie, Pennsylvania, increased the payload and cruise speeds of its S-61 helicopter. Follow-on development resulted in a $24 million revenue increase for Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, of Stratford, Connecticut, as part of the company's rotor design efforts. Now under continuous development for more than 25 years, CHARM models the complete aerodynamics and dynamics of rotorcraft in general flight conditions. CHARM has been used to model a broad spectrum of rotorcraft attributes, including performance, blade loading, blade-vortex interaction noise, air flow fields, and hub loads. The highly accurate software is currently in use by all major rotorcraft manufacturers, NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy.

  13. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Hideaki; ORIHARA, Hideo; SATO, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author’s laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship’s motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process. PMID:25311139

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of The Dalles Project: Effects of Spill Flow Distribution Between the Washington Shore and the Tailrace Spillwall

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District (CENWP) has ongoing work to improve the survival of juvenile salmonids (smolt) migrating past The Dalles Dam. As part of that effort, a spillwall was constructed to improve juvenile egress through the tailrace downstream of the stilling basin. The spillwall was designed to improve smolt survival by decreasing smolt retention time in the spillway tailrace and the exposure to predators on the spillway shelf. The spillwall guides spillway flows, and hence smolt, more quickly into the thalweg. In this study, an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was modified and used to characterize tailrace hydraulics between the new spillwall and the Washington shore for six different total river flows. The effect of spillway flow distribution was simulated for three spill patterns at the lowest total river flow. The commercial CFD solver, STAR-CD version 4.1, was used to solve the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations together with the k-epsilon turbulence model. Free surface motion was simulated using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique. The model results were used in two ways. First, results graphics were provided to CENWP and regional fisheries agency representatives for use and comparison to the same flow conditions at a reduced-scale physical model. The CFD results were very similar in flow pattern to that produced by the reduced-scale physical model but these graphics provided a quantitative view of velocity distribution. During the physical model work, an additional spill pattern was tested. Subsequently, that spill pattern was also simulated in the numerical model. The CFD streamlines showed that the hydraulic conditions were likely to be beneficial to fish egress at the higher total river flows (120 kcfs and greater, uniform flow distribution). At the lowest flow case, 90 kcfs, it was necessary to use a non-uniform distribution. Of the three distributions tested, splitting the flow evenly between

  15. Comparison between knife-edge and frisbee-shaped surrogate surfaces for making dry deposition measurements: Wind tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Liu, Ying; Holsen, Thomas M.

    2011-08-01

    Dry deposition is a major pathway for atmospheric contaminant movement from the atmosphere to the earth surface. Despite its importance, there is no generally accepted direct method to measure dry deposition. Recently, the interest in using surrogate surfaces to measure dry deposition is growing, primarily because of their ease of use. However, a problem with these surfaces is extrapolating the results obtained to natural surfaces. There are two popular surrogate plates used to measure dry deposition. One had a sharp leading edge (knife-edge) (KSS), and the other has a smooth-edge (frisbee-shaped) (FSS). In this study, the performances of these two surrogate surfaces to directly measure gas dry deposition were explored using wind tunnel experiments and two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models. Although the fluid fields above these two plates were different, both created laminar boundary layers (distance above the surface where the velocity gradient is constant) with a constant thickness after approximately five cm. In the wind tunnel, gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) deposition to gold-coated filters was used to measure deposition velocities ( Vd) in part because for this combination deposition is air-side controlled. The GEM Vd to both surfaces increased with increasing wind speeds. Based on both measurements and CFD simulations, the Vds to the FSS were approximately 30% higher and more variable than to the KSS when the wind flow was parallel to the surfaces. However, when the angle between the surfaces and the wind was varied the Vds to the FSS were less dependent on the incident angle than to the KSS.

  16. Potential applications of computational fluid dynamics to biofluid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.; Kwak, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was developed to the stage where it has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. In view of advances made in aerospace applications, the computational approach can be used for biofluid mechanics research. Several flow simulation methods developed for aerospace problems are briefly discussed for potential applications to biofluids, especially to blood flow analysis.

  17. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena—the Gulf Stream, for example—something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future. PMID:27616918

  18. Variational principles for stochastic fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Darryl D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper derives stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for fluid dynamics from a stochastic variational principle (SVP). The paper proceeds by taking variations in the SVP to derive stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations; writing their Itô representation; and then investigating the properties of these stochastic fluid models in comparison with each other, and with the corresponding deterministic fluid models. The circulation properties of the stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations are found to closely mimic those of the deterministic ideal fluid models. As with deterministic ideal flows, motion along the stochastic Stratonovich paths also preserves the helicity of the vortex field lines in incompressible stochastic flows. However, these Stratonovich properties are not apparent in the equivalent Itô representation, because they are disguised by the quadratic covariation drift term arising in the Stratonovich to Itô transformation. This term is a geometric generalization of the quadratic covariation drift term already found for scalar densities in Stratonovich's famous 1966 paper. The paper also derives motion equations for two examples of stochastic geophysical fluid dynamics; namely, the Euler–Boussinesq and quasi-geostropic approximations.

  19. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Outreach Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Schwarz, J. W.; Noguez, G.

    2012-12-01

    Here we will present high definition films of laboratory experiments demonstrating basic fluid motions similar to those occurring in atmospheres and oceans. In these experiments, we use water to simulate the fluid dynamics of both the liquid (oceans) and gaseous (atmospheric) envelopes. To simulate the spinning of the earth, we carry out the experiments on a rotating table. For each experiment, we begin by looking at our system first without the effects of rotation. Then, we include rotation to see how the behavior of the fluid changes due to the Coriolis accelerations. Our hope is that by viewing these experiments one will develop a sense for how fluids behave both in rotating and non-rotating systems. By noting the differences between the experiments, it should then be possible to establish a basis to think about large-scale fluid motions that exist in Earth's oceans and atmospheres as well as on planets other than Earth.Plan view image of vortices in a rotating tank of fluid. Movies of such flows make accessible the often difficult to comprehend fluid dynamical processes that occur in planetary atmospheres and oceans.

  20. Verification and validation in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2002-04-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess accuracy and reliability in computational simulations. This paper presents an extensive review of the literature in V&V in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), discusses methods and procedures for assessing V&V, and develops a number of extensions to existing ideas. The review of the development of V&V terminology and methodology points out the contributions from members of the operations research, statistics, and CFD communities. Fundamental issues in V&V are addressed, such as code verification versus solution verification, model validation versus solution validation, the distinction between error and uncertainty, conceptual sources of error and uncertainty, and the relationship between validation and prediction. The fundamental strategy of verification is the identification and quantification of errors in the computational model and its solution. In verification activities, the accuracy of a computational solution is primarily measured relative to two types of highly accurate solutions: analytical solutions and highly accurate numerical solutions. Methods for determining the accuracy of numerical solutions are presented and the importance of software testing during verification activities is emphasized. The fundamental strategy of validation is to assess how accurately the computational results compare with the experimental data, with quantified error and uncertainty estimates for both. This strategy employs a hierarchical methodology that segregates and simplifies the physical and coupling phenomena involved in the complex engineering system of interest. A hypersonic cruise missile is used as an example of how this hierarchical structure is formulated. The discussion of validation assessment also encompasses a number of other important topics. A set of guidelines is proposed for designing and conducting validation experiments, supported by an explanation of how validation experiments are different

  1. Computational fluid dynamics: Transition to design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, R. G.; Bhateley, I. C.; Howell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of aerospace vehicles, over the years, was an evolutionary process in which engineering progress in the aerospace community was based, generally, on prior experience and data bases obtained through wind tunnel and flight testing. Advances in the fundamental understanding of flow physics, wind tunnel and flight test capability, and mathematical insights into the governing flow equations were translated into improved air vehicle design. The modern day field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a continuation of the growth in analytical capability and the digital mathematics needed to solve the more rigorous form of the flow equations. Some of the technical and managerial challenges that result from rapidly developing CFD capabilites, some of the steps being taken by the Fort Worth Division of General Dynamics to meet these challenges, and some of the specific areas of application for high performance air vehicles are presented.

  2. Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations in Urban Environments and Experiments Designed to Aid the Development and Evaluation of these Models

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J; Gouveia, F J

    2001-08-22

    Progress in development of CFD models has shown their great potential for prediction of air flow, heat dissipation, and dispersion of air pollutants in the urban environment. Work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has progressed using the finite element code FEM3 which has been ''massively parallelized'' to produce flow fields and pollutant dispersion in a grid encompassing many city blocks and with high resolution. While it may be argued that urban CFD models are not yet economical for emergency response applications, there are many applications in assessments and air quality management where CFD models are unrivaled in the level of detail that they provide. We have conducted field experiments to define the flow field and air tracer dispersion around buildings as a means of critiquing and evaluating the CFD models. The first experiment, the ''B170 study'', was a study of flow field, turbulence, and tracer dispersion in separation zones around a complex, single building. The second was the URBAN 2000 experiment in downtown Salt Lake City where flow fields and tracers were studied in nested resolution from the single building scale up to larger scales of 25 city blocks, and out to 6 km. For the future an URBAN 2003 experiment is being planned. We review the salient features of these experiments. A ''breakthrough'' technology in urban diffusion modeling is the use of modified computational fluid dynamics models (CFD) that use the meteorological conventions of large eddy simulation to represent the flow field. These CFD models have been initialized from the output of mesoscale atmospheric models with 4 km grid resolution, apparently with no problems although questions remain about aliasing and sources of bias. While more work remains, it is clear that should progress continue a remarkable tool should be available for such applications as: (1) Vulnerability studies for chemical, biological, and nuclear terrorism; (2) Assessments of air quality for urban

  3. Research on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Preconditioning matrices for Chebyshev derivative operators in several space dimensions; the Jacobi matrix technique in computational fluid dynamics; and Chebyshev techniques for periodic problems are discussed.

  4. Visualization of Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael; Hultquist, Jeff; Bryson, Steve; Kenwright, David; Lane, David; Walatka, Pamela; Clucas, Jean; Watson, Velvin; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Scientific visualization serves the dual purpose of exploration and exposition of the results of numerical simulations of fluid flow. Along with the basic visualization process which transforms source data into images, there are four additional components to a complete visualization system: Source Data Processing, User Interface and Control, Presentation, and Information Management. The requirements imposed by the desired mode of operation (i.e. real-time, interactive, or batch) and the source data have their effect on each of these visualization system components. The special requirements imposed by the wide variety and size of the source data provided by the numerical simulation of fluid flow presents an enormous challenge to the visualization system designer. We describe the visualization system components including specific visualization techniques and how the mode of operation and source data requirements effect the construction of computational fluid dynamics visualization systems.

  5. Fluid-dynamic and aeroacoustic investigations of shrouded jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerasamy, V.

    1980-08-01

    The fluid dynamic and aeroacoustic characteristics of a high subsonic jet discharging from a shrouded nozzle were investigated theoretically and experimentally to explore the possibility of jet noise reduction and thrust augmentation for STOL/VTOL aircraft. The preliminary design calculations of an adiabatic shrouded nozzle were performed by solving iteratively the one dimensional fluid dynamic equations governing the compressible flow. A two dimensional flow model, consisting of second order partial differential equations of a parabolic type, was used to find the effect of shroud length on the ejector performance. This model consists of the conservation laws with thin shear layer assumptions incorporating the Prandtl's mixing length hypothesis for turbulence closure. A numerical integration method was used to solve the governing fluid dynamic equations of motion. The aeroacoustic characteristics of the shrouded jet were analyzed based on the Lighthill's V(8) law.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics of reaction injection moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, Artur; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Bártolo, Paulo

    2012-09-01

    The modern approach to the development of moulds for injection moulding (Reaction Injection Moulding - RIM, Thermoplastic Injection Moulding - TIM and others) differs from the conventional approach based exclusively on the designer's experience and hypotheses. The increasingly complexityof moulds and the requirement by the clients for the improvement of their quality, shorter delivery times, and lower prices, demand the development of novel approaches to developed optimal moulds and moulded parts. The development of more accurate computational tools is fundamental to optimize both, the injection mouldingprocesses and the design, quality and durability of the moulds. This paper focuses on the RIM process proposing a novel thermo-rheo-kinetic model. The proposed model was implemented in generalpurpose Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. The model enables to accurately describe both flow and curing stages. Simulation results were validated against experimental results.

  7. Domain decomposition algorithms and computation fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    In the past several years, domain decomposition was a very popular topic, partly motivated by the potential of parallelization. While a large body of theory and algorithms were developed for model elliptic problems, they are only recently starting to be tested on realistic applications. The application of some of these methods to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics are investigated. Some examples are two dimensional convection-diffusion problems and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. The construction and analysis of efficient preconditioners for the interface operator to be used in the iterative solution of the interface solution is described. For the convection-diffusion problems, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is discussed.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code development, scientific visualization, advanced surface representation, volume grid generation, and numerical optimization. Next, the discipline of CFD is briefly discussed and related to other areas of research at NASA Ames including experimental fluid dynamics, computer science research, computational chemistry, and numerical aerodynamic simulation. These areas combine with CFD to form a larger area of research, which might collectively be called computational technology. The ultimate goal of computational technology research at NASA Ames is to increase the physical understanding of the world in which we live, solve problems of national importance, and increase the technical capabilities of the aerospace community. Next, the major programs at NASA Ames that either use CFD technology or perform research in CFD are listed and discussed. Briefly, this list includes turbulent/transition physics and modeling, high-speed real gas flows, interdisciplinary research, turbomachinery demonstration computations, complete aircraft aerodynamics, rotorcraft applications, powered lift flows, high alpha flows, multiple body aerodynamics, and incompressible flow applications. Some of the individual problems actively being worked in each of these areas is listed to help define the breadth or extent of CFD involvement in each of these major programs. State-of-the-art examples of various CFD applications are presented to highlight most of these areas. The main emphasis of this portion of the presentation is on examples which will not otherwise be treated at this conference by the individual presentations. Finally, a list of principal current limitations and expected future directions is given.

  9. Kinetic foundations of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denicol, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this contribution we discuss in detail the most widespread formalisms employed to derive relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics from the Boltzmann equation: Chapman-Enskog expansion and Israel-Stewart theory. We further point out the drawbacks of each theory and explain possible ways to circumvent them. Recent developments in the derivation of fluid dynamics from the Boltzmann equation are also discussed.

  10. Domain decomposition methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1992-01-01

    The divide-and-conquer paradigm of iterative domain decomposition, or substructuring, has become a practical tool in computational fluid dynamic applications because of its flexibility in accommodating adaptive refinement through locally uniform (or quasi-uniform) grids, its ability to exploit multiple discretizations of the operator equations, and the modular pathway it provides towards parallelism. These features are illustrated on the classic model problem of flow over a backstep using Newton's method as the nonlinear iteration. Multiple discretizations (second-order in the operator and first-order in the preconditioner) and locally uniform mesh refinement pay dividends separately, and they can be combined synergistically. Sample performance results are included from an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube implementation.

  11. Domain decomposition methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The divide-and-conquer paradigm of iterative domain decomposition, or substructuring, has become a practical tool in computational fluid dynamic applications because of its flexibility in accommodating adaptive refinement through locally uniform (or quasi-uniform) grids, its ability to exploit multiple discretizations of the operator equations, and the modular pathway it provides towards parallelism. These features are illustrated on the classic model problem of flow over a backstep using Newton's method as the nonlinear iteration. Multiple discretizations (second-order in the operator and first-order in the preconditioner) and locally uniform mesh refinement pay dividends separately, and they can be combined synergistically. Sample performance results are included from an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube implementation.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics of airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P.; Mcfadden, G.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that transonic flow is one of the fields where computational fluid dynamics turns out to be most effective. Codes for the design and analysis of supercritical airfoils and wings have become standard tools of the aircraft industry. The present investigation is concerned with mathematical models and theorems which account for some of the progress that has been made. The most successful aerodynamics codes are those for the analysis of flow at off-design conditions where weak shock waves appear. A major breakthrough was achieved by Murman and Cole (1971), who conceived of a retarded difference scheme which incorporates artificial viscosity to capture shocks in the supersonic zone. This concept has been used to develop codes for the analysis of transonic flow past a swept wing. Attention is given to the trailing edge and the boundary layer, entropy inequalities and wave drag, shockless airfoils, and the inverse swept wing code.

  13. Fluid Dynamics of a Pressure Reducing Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Instruments for the monitoring of hazardous gases in and near the space shuttle collect sample gas at pressures on the order of one atmosphere and analyze their properties in an ultra-high vacuum by means of a quadrupole-mass-spectrometer partial pressure transducer. Sampling systems for such devices normally produce the required pressure reduction through combinations of vacuum pumps, fluid Tees and flow restrictors (e.g. orifices, sintered metal frits or capillaries). The present work presents an analytical model of the fluid dynamics of such a pressure reduction system which enables the calculation of the pressure in the receiver vessal in terms of system parameters known from the specifications for a given system (e.g. rated pumping speeds of the pumping hardware and the diameters of two orifices situated in two branches of a fluid Tee). The resulting formulas will expedite the fine tuning of instruments now under development and the design of later generations of such devices.

  14. Fluid dynamical description of relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, J. R.; Strottman, D.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of both a conventional relativistic nuclear fluid dynamic model and a two fluid generalization that takes into account the interpenetration of the target and projectile upon contact, collisions between heavy nuclei moving at relativistic speeds are calculated. This is done by solving the relevant equations of motion numerically in three spatial dimensions by use of particle in cell finite difference computing techniques. The effect of incorporating a density isomer, or quasistable state, in the nuclear equation of state at three times normal nuclear density, and the effect of doubling the nuclear compressibility coefficient are studied. For the reaction 20Ne + 238U at a laboratory bombarding energy per nucleon of 393 MeV, the calculated distributions in energy and angle of outgoing charged particles are compared with recent experimental data both integrated over all impact parameters and for nearly central collisions.

  15. Electro-Fluid Dynamic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Nicholas

    2014-11-01

    The success of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators as flow control devices in transducing electrical energy directly into near instantaneous fluid motion has been limited due to momentum loss near the wall. To increase the feasibility of these devices, they have been used to drive a channel flow, creating a jet under quiescent conditions. Electrostatic Fluid Accelerators (EFA) have also been shown to drive internal gas flows. The present work draws on the success of the DBD driven plasma channels, while exploring a new electrode configuration that stems from EFA designs, in order to actuate more of the bulk fluid. Major parameters, applied voltage and operating frequency as well as electrode gap and choice of electrode (material, shape, size); were experimentally investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry to obtain time averaged, 2D velocity fields. Results indicate significant variation of performance with these parameters and suggest that in comparison to surface DBD actuators an order magnitude improvement in efficiency is possible. Furthermore, the qualitative aspect of an electro-fluid dynamic jet shows greater versatility in application for use as both boundary layer flow control and driving internal gas flows.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code V. 1 0.0 (Beta)

    2015-10-20

    The DOE has funded Sandia National Labs (SNL) to develop an open-source modeling tool to guide the design and layout of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) arrays to maximize power production while minimizing environmental effects. This modeling framework simulates flows through and around MHK arrays while quantifying environmental responses. As an augmented version of US EPA's Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), SNL-EFDC includes: (1) a new module that simulates energy conversion (momentum withdrawal) by MHK devices withmore » commensurate changes in the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, (2) new, advanced sediment dynamics routines, and (3) augmented water quality modules.« less

  17. Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code V. 1 0.0 (Beta)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    The DOE has funded Sandia National Labs (SNL) to develop an open-source modeling tool to guide the design and layout of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) arrays to maximize power production while minimizing environmental effects. This modeling framework simulates flows through and around MHK arrays while quantifying environmental responses. As an augmented version of US EPA's Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), SNL-EFDC includes: (1) a new module that simulates energy conversion (momentum withdrawal) by MHK devices with commensurate changes in the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, (2) new, advanced sediment dynamics routines, and (3) augmented water quality modules.

  18. Application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, R; Athavale, M M; Makhijani, V B; Przekwas, A J

    1996-06-01

    Present-day computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques can be used to analyze the behavior of fluid flow in a variety of pumps. CFD can be a powerful tool during the design stage for rapid virtual prototyping of different designs, analyzing performance parameters, and making design improvements. Computational flow solutions provide information such as the location and size of stagnation zones and the local shear rate. These parameters can be correlated to the extent of hemolysis and thrombus formation and are critical to the success of a blood pump. CFD-ACE, an advanced commercial CFD code developed by CFD Research Corporation, has been applied to fluid flows in rotary machines, such as axial flow pumps and inducers. Preprocessing and postprocessing tools for efficient grid generation and advanced graphical flow visualization are integrated seamlessly with CFD-ACE. The code has structured multiblock grid capability, non-Newtonian fluid treatment, a variety of turbulence models, and an Eulerian-Langrangian particle tracking model. CFD-ACE has been used successfully to study the flow characteristics in an axial flow blood pump. An unstructured flow solver that greatly automates the process of grid generation and speeds up the flow simulation is under development. PMID:8817950

  19. Current capabilities and future directions in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A summary of significant findings is given, followed by specific recommendations for future directions of emphasis for computational fluid dynamics development. The discussion is organized into three application areas: external aerodynamics, hypersonics, and propulsion - and followed by a turbulence modeling synopsis.

  20. Spectral Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1994-01-01

    As a tool for large-scale computations in fluid dynamics, spectral methods were prophesized in 1944, born in 1954, virtually buried in the mid-1960's, resurrected in 1969, evangalized in the 1970's, and catholicized in the 1980's. The use of spectral methods for meteorological problems was proposed by Blinova in 1944 and the first numerical computations were conducted by Silberman (1954). By the early 1960's computers had achieved sufficient power to permit calculations with hundreds of degrees of freedom. For problems of this size the traditional way of computing the nonlinear terms in spectral methods was expensive compared with finite-difference methods. Consequently, spectral methods fell out of favor. The expense of computing nonlinear terms remained a severe drawback until Orszag (1969) and Eliasen, Machenauer, and Rasmussen (1970) developed the transform methods that still form the backbone of many large-scale spectral computations. The original proselytes of spectral methods were meteorologists involved in global weather modeling and fluid dynamicists investigating isotropic turbulence. The converts who were inspired by the successes of these pioneers remained, for the most part, confined to these and closely related fields throughout the 1970's. During that decade spectral methods appeared to be well-suited only for problems governed by ordinary diSerential eqllations or by partial differential equations with periodic boundary conditions. And, of course, the solution itself needed to be smooth. Some of the obstacles to wider application of spectral methods were: (1) poor resolution of discontinuous solutions; (2) inefficient implementation of implicit methods; and (3) drastic geometric constraints. All of these barriers have undergone some erosion during the 1980's, particularly the latter two. As a result, the applicability and appeal of spectral methods for computational fluid dynamics has broadened considerably. The motivation for the use of spectral

  1. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Modeling of the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Processing of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Isac, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys have shown exceptional potential as structural materials for transportation applications. These alloys have proved to be good candidates to be processed as thin strips via the horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) process. The HSBC process is a near-net-shape casting technology, which involves casting molten metal directly into thin strips, close to the final product thickness, at higher cooling rates than conventional continuous casting and thin-slab casting processes. It offers an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly approach to the production of metal strips. Fluid mechanics and associated heat transfer are important aspects of any casting process, and the novel HSBC process is no exception. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 were performed, in order to assess the importance and effects of the various operational conditions of the HSBC process. This enabled process parameter optimization. Numerical predictions were validated against experimental casting results.

  2. Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

  3. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  4. Degradation of pharmaceuticals in UV (LP)/H₂O₂ reactors simulated by means of kinetic modeling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

    PubMed

    Wols, B A; Harmsen, D J H; Wanders-Dijk, J; Beerendonk, E F; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2015-05-15

    UV/H2O2 treatment is a well-established technique to degrade organic micropollutants. A CFD model in combination with an advanced kinetic model is presented to predict the degradation of organic micropollutants in UV (LP)/H2O2 reactors, accounting for the hydraulics, fluence rate, complex (photo)chemical reactions in the water matrix and the interactions between these processes. The model incorporates compound degradation by means of direct UV photolysis, OH radical and carbonate radical reactions. Measurements of pharmaceutical degradations in pilot-scale UV/H2O2 reactors are presented under different operating conditions. A comparison between measured and modeled degradation for a group of 35 pharmaceuticals resulted in good model predictions for most of the compounds. The research also shows that the degradation of organic micropollutants can be dependent on temperature, which is relevant for full-scale installations that are operated at different temperatures over the year. PMID:25746958

  5. A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

  6. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-01

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems. PMID:27276553

  7. Role of computational fluid dynamics in unsteady aerodynamics for aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1989-01-01

    In the last two decades there have been extensive developments in computational unsteady transonic aerodynamics. Such developments are essential since the transonic regime plays an important role in the design of modern aircraft. Therefore, there has been a large effort to develop computational tools with which to accurately perform flutter analysis at transonic speeds. In the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), unsteady transonic aerodynamics are characterized by the feature of modeling the motion of shock waves over aerodynamic bodies, such as wings. This modeling requires the solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. Most advanced codes such as XTRAN3S use the transonic small perturbation equation. Currently, XTRAN3S is being used for generic research in unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity of almost full aircraft configurations. Use of Euler/Navier Stokes equations for simple typical sections has just begun. A brief history of the development of CFD for aeroelastic applications is summarized. The development of unsteady transonic aerodynamics and aeroelasticity are also summarized.

  8. Object Orientated Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Gavin; Weller, Henry; Jasak, Hrvoje; Fureby, Christer

    1997-11-01

    We outline the aims of the FOAM code, a Finite Volume Computational Fluid Dynamics code written in C++, and discuss the use of Object Orientated Programming (OOP) methods to achieve these aims. The intention when writing this code was to make it as easy as possible to alter the modelling : this was achieved by making the top level syntax of the code as close as possible to conventional mathematical notation for tensors and partial differential equations. Object orientation enables us to define classes for both types of objects, and the operator overloading possible in C++ allows normal symbols to be used for the basic operations. The introduction of features such as automatic dimension checking of equations helps to enforce correct coding of models. We also discuss the use of OOP techniques such as data encapsulation and code reuse. As examples of the flexibility of this approach, we discuss the implementation of turbulence modelling using RAS and LES. The code is used to simulate turbulent flow for a number of test cases, including fully developed channel flow and flow around obstacles. We also demonstrate the use of the code for solving structures calculations and magnetohydrodynamics.

  9. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  10. Coupling of high temperature heat transfer and supersonic fluid dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kevin Drew

    1998-11-01

    A numerical investigation of time dependent, high speed convective heat transfer has been conducted. A state-of- the-art finite volume fluid dynamic flow solver was selected for modification to predict the effects of convective heat transfer on the surface boundary layer. A finite volume heat transfer program was developed based on the same methodology as the fluid flow solver. These two codes were tied together in a time accurate, weakly coupled form that makes use of an advanced message passaging technique. This message passaging technique passes information at the boundary interface between the two computer codes in a structured format. This information contains the data needed to control the operation of each code in a time accurate mode. The primary objective of the current research program was to understand the time accurate, unsteady, characteristics of a supersonic boundary layer in the presence of convective heat transfer. This research could be used in conjunction with infrared imaging sensors that are mounted in the nose cone of a missile. These sensors receive information that passes through a changing thermal boundary, which affects what the sensor detects. If the boundary layer and the thermal profile of the imaging window could be predicted as a function of time, then the appropriate correction could be made to the imaging sensor. The ability to model a time accurate boundary layer in the presence of heat transfer is demonstrated in this research. Both the fluid flow solver and the heat conduction code are modeled against steady and unsteady theoretical examples. Together, these codes are combined into one working module and validated against a sample case. The sample case modeled is that of a typical sensor window found on a endo-atmospheric interceptor. The surface of the window experiences high temperature stagnating flow, resulting in heat flowing into the sensor window. The window is cooled by an internal layer of cold flowing nitrogen

  11. Isoscalar compression modes within fluid dynamic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomietz, V. M.; Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3366 ; Shlomo, S.

    2000-06-01

    We study the nuclear isoscalar monopole and dipole compression modes in nuclei within the fluid dynamic approach (FDA) with and without the effect of relaxation. For a wide region of the medium and heavy nuclei, the FDA predicts that the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) and the isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR) exhaust about 90% of the corresponding model-independent sum rules. In the case of neglecting the effect of relaxation, the FDA, when adjusted to reproduce the centroid energy E0 of the ISGMR, results with centroid energy E1 of the ISGDR which is in agreement with the predictions of the self-consistent Hartree-Fock random-phase approximation calculations and the scaling model but significantly larger than the experimental value. We also show that the FDA leads to the correct hydrodynamic limit for the ratio (E1/E0){sub FDA}. We find that the ratio (E1/E0){sub FDA} depends on the relaxation time and approaches the preliminary experimental value (E1/E0){sub exp}=1.5{+-}0.1 in a short relaxation time limit. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  12. Verification and Validation in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    OBERKAMPF, WILLIAM L.; TRUCANO, TIMOTHY G.

    2002-03-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess accuracy and reliability in computational simulations. This paper presents an extensive review of the literature in V and V in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), discusses methods and procedures for assessing V and V, and develops a number of extensions to existing ideas. The review of the development of V and V terminology and methodology points out the contributions from members of the operations research, statistics, and CFD communities. Fundamental issues in V and V are addressed, such as code verification versus solution verification, model validation versus solution validation, the distinction between error and uncertainty, conceptual sources of error and uncertainty, and the relationship between validation and prediction. The fundamental strategy of verification is the identification and quantification of errors in the computational model and its solution. In verification activities, the accuracy of a computational solution is primarily measured relative to two types of highly accurate solutions: analytical solutions and highly accurate numerical solutions. Methods for determining the accuracy of numerical solutions are presented and the importance of software testing during verification activities is emphasized.

  13. Fluid Dynamic of Pressurized Coal Gasifiers.

    SciTech Connect

    Louge, M.T.

    1997-11-01

    Pressurized, entrained gasification is a promising new technology for the clean and efficient combustion of coal. Its principle is to operate a coal gasifier at a high inlet gas velocity to increase the inflow of reactants, and at an elevated pressure to raise the overall efficiency of the process. Unfortunately, because of the extraordinary difficulties involved in performing measurements in hot, pressurized, high-velocity pilot plants, its fluid dynamics are largely unknown. Thus the designer cannot predict with certainty crucial phenomena like erosion, heat transfer and solid capture. In this context, we have conducted a study of the fluid dynamics of Pressurized Entrained Coal Gasifiers (PECGs). The idea was to simulate the flows in generic industrial PECGs using dimensional similitude. To this end, we employed a unique entrained gas-solid flow facility with the flexibility to recycle -rather than discard- gases other than air. By matching five dimensionless parameters, experiments employing plastic and glass powders fluidized with mixtures of sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide, helium and air at ambient temperature and pressure achieved hydrodynamic similarity with generic high-temperature risers of variable scale operating at 1 and 8 atm. We interpreted our results in the upper riser using steady, fully developed momentum balances for the gas and solid phases. This analysis showed that, for a wide range of experiments, two parameters capture the dependence of the pressure gradients upon the ratio of the mean gas and solid mass flow rates. The first is the ratio of the mean particle slip and superficial gas velocities. The second represents spatial correlations between the radial profiles of interstitial gas velocity and voidage. Variations of the first with dimensionless parameters indicated that our `atmospheric` and `pressurized` experiments conformed to distinct viscous and inertial regimes. In this study, we established also that the descending velocity

  14. The Future with Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    many contributions to Cryogenics. As long ago as 1992, he first proposed in his "History and Origins of Cryogenics" that the temperature range for Cryogenics should be extended up to the ice-point at 273K. This paper expands on this proposal with the implicit assumption that Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics can provide a universal basis for modelling heat transfer and convective fluid behaviour of all fluids, at all temperatures, below the ice-point at 273K; or below 250K if you wish to exclude refrigeration engineering."

  15. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The current computing environment that most researchers are using for the calculation of 3D unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is a super-computer class machine. The Massively Parallel Processors (MPP's) such as the 160 node IBM SP2 at NAS and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (like NAS's SGI Power-Challenge array) provide the required computation bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. Work is in progress on a set of software tools designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these super-computer-like environments. The visualization is concurrently executed with the CFD solver. The parallel version of Visual3, pV3 required splitting up the unsteady visualization task to allow execution across a network of workstation(s) and compute servers. In this computing model, the network is almost always the bottleneck so much of the effort involved techniques to reduce the size of the data transferred between machines.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation: Practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, J. R.

    The potential of computation fluid dynamics (CFD) for conceiving ventilation systems is shown through the simulation of five practical cases. The following examples are considered: capture of pollutants on a surface treating tank equipped with a unilateral suction slot in the presence of a disturbing air draft opposed to suction; dispersion of solid aerosols inside fume cupboards; performances comparison of two general ventilation systems in a silkscreen printing workshop; ventilation of a large open painting area; and oil fog removal inside a mechanical engineering workshop. Whereas the two first problems are analyzed through two dimensional numerical simulations, the three other cases require three dimensional modeling. For the surface treating tank case, numerical results are compared to laboratory experiment data. All simulations are carried out using EOL, a CFD software specially devised to deal with air quality problems in industrial ventilated premises. It contains many analysis tools to interpret the results in terms familiar to the industrial hygienist. Much experimental work has been engaged to validate the predictions of EOL for ventilation flows.

  17. Computer animation challenges for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines, Mauricio; Lee, Won-Sook; Mavriplis, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    Computer animation requirements differ from those of traditional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigations in that visual plausibility and rapid frame update rates trump physical accuracy. We present an overview of the main techniques for fluid simulation in computer animation, starting with Eulerian grid approaches, the Lattice Boltzmann method, Fourier transform techniques and Lagrangian particle introduction. Adaptive grid methods, precomputation of results for model reduction, parallelisation and computation on graphical processing units (GPUs) are reviewed in the context of accelerating simulation computations for animation. A survey of current specific approaches for the application of these techniques to the simulation of smoke, fire, water, bubbles, mixing, phase change and solid-fluid coupling is also included. Adding plausibility to results through particle introduction, turbulence detail and concentration on regions of interest by level set techniques has elevated the degree of accuracy and realism of recent animations. Basic approaches are described here. Techniques to control the simulation to produce a desired visual effect are also discussed. Finally, some references to rendering techniques and haptic applications are mentioned to provide the reader with a complete picture of the challenges of simulating fluids in computer animation.

  18. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations. PMID:25529139

  19. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1995-10-01

    The current computing environment that most researchers are using for the calculation of 3D unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is a super-computer class machine. The Massively Parallel Processors (MPP's) such as the 160 node IBM SP2 at NAS and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (like NAS's SGI Power-Challenge array) provide the required computation bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. Work is in progress on a set of software tools designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these super-computer-like environments. The visualization is concurrently executed with the CFD solver. The parallel version of Visual3, pV3 required splitting up the unsteady visualization task to allow execution across a network of workstation(s) and compute servers. In this computing model, the network is almost always the bottleneck so much of the effort involved techniques to reduce the size of the data transferred between machines.

  20. Fluid dynamic factors in tracheal pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Chang, H K; Mortola, J P

    1981-07-01

    Because tracheal pressure measurement generally involves the use of a cannula or an endotracheal tube, fluid dynamic factors may cause a considerable artifact. We present a theoretical explanation of the observed apparent paradox in which the resistance of a tracheal cannula or an endotracheal tube is isolation was found to exceed the resistance of the airways plus the cannula or the tube in situ. By estimating the viscous dissipation and the kinetic energy change in a conduit with sudden variation of cross-sectional area, a predictive model is derived. The predictions are verified by a series of in vitro experiments with both steady and oscillatory flows. The experiments showed that the pressure recorded from the sidearm of a tracheal cannula or endotracheal tube contains an error which, in general, increased with the mean Reynolds' number of the through flow and also depends on the diameter ratio between the trachea and the tube or cannula, the position of the pressure tap, and the frequency of ventilation. When feasible, direct measurement with a needle in the trachea is suggested as a way to avoid the possible artifacts arising from the use fo a side tap of the cannula. Theoretical considerations, as well as in vitro and animal experiments, indicate that adding a properly chosen expansion to the tracheal cannula makes it possible to alter inspiratory and expiratory pressures selectively. This device may prove useful in control of breathing studies. PMID:7263418

  1. An electro-fluid-dynamic simulator for the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Felipini, Celso Luiz; de Andrade, Aron José Pazin; Lucchi, Júlio César; da Fonseca, Jeison Willian Gomes; Nicolosi, Denys

    2008-04-01

    This work presents the initial studies and the proposal for a cardiovascular system electro-fluid-dynamic simulator to be applied in the development of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). The simulator, which is being developed at University Sao Judas Tadeu and at Institute Dante Pazzanese of Cardiology, is composed of three modules: (i) an electrical analog model of the cardiovascular system operating in the PSpice electrical simulator environment; (ii) an electronic controller, based on laboratory virtual instrumentation engineering workbench (LabVIEW) acquisition and control tool, which will act over the physical simulator; and (iii) the physical simulator: a fluid-dynamic equipment composed of pneumatic actuators and compliance tubes for the simulation of active cardiac chambers and big vessels. The physical simulator (iii) is based on results obtained from the electrical analog model (i) and physiological parameters. PMID:18370952

  2. Computational fluid dynamics - A personal view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a personal view of computational fluid dynamics. The main theme is divided into two categories - one dealing with algorithms and engineering applications and the other with scientific investigations. The former category may be termed computational aerodynamics, with the objective of providing reliable aerodynamic or engineering predictions. The latter category is essentially basic research, where the algorithmic tools are used to unravel and elucidate fluid-dynamic phenomena hard to obtain in a laboratory. A critique of the numerical solution techniques for both compressible and incompressible flows is included. The discussion on scientific investigations deals in particular with transition and turbulence.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics. [numerical methods and algorithm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This collection of papers was presented at the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at Ames Research Center in California on March 12 through 14, 1991. It is an overview of CFD activities at NASA Lewis Research Center. The main thrust of computational work at Lewis is aimed at propulsion systems. Specific issues related to propulsion CFD and associated modeling will also be presented. Examples of results obtained with the most recent algorithm development will also be presented.

  4. Forced fluid dynamics from gravity in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, T.

    2014-03-01

    We consider long wavelength solutions to the Einstein-dilaton system with negative cosmological constant which are dual, under the AdS/CFT correspondence, to solutions of the conformal relativistic Navier-Stokes equations with a dilaton-dependent forcing term. Certain forced fluid flows are known to exhibit turbulence; holographic duals of forced fluid dynamics are therefore of particular interest as they may aid efforts towards an explicit model of holographic steady state turbulence. In recent work, Bhattacharyya et al. have constructed long wavelength asymptotically locally AdS5 bulk space-times with a slowly varying boundary dilaton field which are dual to forced fluid flows on the 4-dimensional boundary. In this paper, we generalise their work to arbitrary space-time dimensions; we explicitly compute the dual bulk metric, the fluid dynamical stress tensor and Lagrangian to second order in a boundary derivative expansion.

  5. Nonlinear astrophysical fluid dynamics: the video.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, M. L.

    A videotape has been assembled containing animations shown by speakers at the Nonlinear Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics Conference. This videotape forms a useful supplement to the conference proceedings. The videotape is available from the National Center for Supercomputing Applications for the cost of materials (6 for 1/2″tapes; 12.50 for 3/4″tapes) and shipping.

  6. Event-by-event fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Csernai, L. P.; KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest, ; Lazar, Zs. I.; Department of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, M. Kogalniceanu 1, 3400 Cluj-Napoca, ; Lazar, I. A.; Molnar, D.; Pipek, J.; Strottman, D. D.

    2000-01-01

    Coarse grained Langevin-type effective field equations may provide some guidance for the analysis of mesoscopic or microscopic molecular systems exhibiting fluctuations, or for systems of hundreds to thousands of atomic or subatomic particles produced in atomic or high-energy nuclear collisions. Suggestions for consistent realization of random fluctuations in discretized fluid dynamics will be presented. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. Fluid Dynamics in an Ecological Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Fluid dynamics has long been an invaluable tool in the study of biological mechanics, helping to explain how animals swim and fly, how blood is pumped, gases are exchanged, and propagules are dispersed. The goal of understanding how the physics of fluids has affected the evolution of individual organisms provides strong impetus for teaching and learning fluid mechanics; a viable alternative to the more traditional goals of engineering. In recent years, a third alternative has arisen. The principles of fluid dynamics can be used to specify when and where individual organisms will exceed their physical capabilities, information that can in turn be used to predict species-specific survivorship in a given environment. In other words, biological fluid dynamics can be extended beyond the study of individual organisms to play an important role in our understanding of ecological dynamics. In a world where environmental change is of increasing concern, fluid dynamic aspect of ``ecomechanics'' may be of considerable practical importance. Teaching fluid mechanics in ecology will be discussed in the context of wave-swept rocky shores. Various wave theories can be used to predict the maximum water velocities and accelerations impinging on specific surf-zone plants and animals. Theories of lift, drag, and accelerational forces can then be used to predict the maximum loads imposed on these organisms, loads that can be compared to the organisms' structural limits to predict the fraction of the species that will be dislodged or damaged. Taken across relevant species, this information goes far towards explaining shoreline community dynamics. .

  8. Computational fluid dynamics applications at McDonnel Douglas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Representative examples are presented of applications and development of advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for aerodynamic design at the McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC). Transonic potential and Euler codes, interactively coupled with boundary layer computation, and solutions of slender-layer Navier-Stokes approximation are applied to aircraft wing/body calculations. An optimization procedure using evolution theory is described in the context of transonic wing design. Euler methods are presented for analysis of hypersonic configurations, and helicopter rotors in hover and forward flight. Several of these projects were accepted for access to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility at the NASA-Ames Research Center.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics applications at McDonnel Douglas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkinen, R. J.

    1987-03-01

    Representative examples are presented of applications and development of advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for aerodynamic design at the McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC). Transonic potential and Euler codes, interactively coupled with boundary layer computation, and solutions of slender-layer Navier-Stokes approximation are applied to aircraft wing/body calculations. An optimization procedure using evolution theory is described in the context of transonic wing design. Euler methods are presented for analysis of hypersonic configurations, and helicopter rotors in hover and forward flight. Several of these projects were accepted for access to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility at the NASA-Ames Research Center.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective was the development of nonequilibrium radiation and chemistry models suitable for engineering applications associated with the flow fields about aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), the aero-assisted flight experiment vehicle (AFE), and other vehicles operating at superorbital velocities and very high attitudes.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1988-03-01

    Approximations applicable to the radiating, reacting, and conducting stagnation region of a hypervelocity vehicle were incorporated into a method for rapidly obtaining approximate solutions. This solution utilizes a coordinate system based upon the origin of the radiative losses and includes in a phenomenologically correct manner the effects of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium, and nonequilibrium, nongray radiative transfer. Results were presented which demonstrate the usefulness of the method and indicate which radiation parameters require further study and definition. Excellent comparisons were obtained with published results for the Fire2 data. An axisymmetric nonequilibrium inverse method was modified and extended and used to investigate and compare various vibration dissociation chemistry coupling models and radiative heat transfer approximations. The similarities, differences, and consequences of using these models in the Aero-assist Orbital Transfer Vehicles flight regime will be discussed.

  12. Attractors of equations of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagin, V. G.; Kondrat'ev, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    This survey describes a version of the trajectory-attractor method, which is applied to study the limit asymptotic behaviour of solutions of equations of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The trajectory-attractor method emerged in papers of the Russian mathematicians Vishik and Chepyzhov and the American mathematician Sell under the condition that the corresponding trajectory spaces be invariant under the translation semigroup. The need for such an approach was caused by the fact that for many equations of mathematical physics for which the Cauchy initial-value problem has a global (weak) solution with respect to the time, the uniqueness of such a solution has either not been established or does not hold. In particular, this is the case for equations of fluid dynamics. At the same time, trajectory spaces invariant under the translation semigroup could not be constructed for many equations of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. In this connection, a different approach to the construction of trajectory attractors for dissipative systems was proposed in papers of Zvyagin and Vorotnikov without using invariance of trajectory spaces under the translation semigroup and is based on the topological lemma of Shura-Bura. This paper presents examples of equations of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics (the Jeffreys system describing movement of the Earth's crust, the model of motion of weak aqueous solutions of polymers, a system with memory) for which the aforementioned construction is used to prove the existence of attractors in both the autonomous and the non-autonomous cases. At the beginning of the paper there is also a brief exposition of the results of Ladyzhenskaya on the existence of attractors of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes system and the result of Vishik and Chepyzhov for the case of attractors of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes system. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  13. The fluid dynamics of the chocolate fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Adam K.; Wilson, Helen J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the fluid dynamics of the chocolate fountain. Molten chocolate is a mildly shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid. Dividing the flow into three main domains—the pumped flow up the centre, the film flow over each dome, and the freely falling curtain flow between the domes—we generate a wide-ranging study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. The central pumped flow is a benchmark to elucidate the effects of shear-thinning. The dome flow can be modelled as a thin-film flow with the leading-order effects being a simple balance of gravity and viscosity. Finally, the curtain flow is analytically intractable but is related to the existing theory of water bells (both inviscid and viscous). In pipe flow, Newtonian fluids exhibit a parabolic velocity profile; shear-thinning makes the profile more blunted. In thin-film flow over the dome, gravitational and viscous effects balance and the dome shape is not important beyond the local slope. We find that the chocolate thins and slows down as it travels down the dome. Finally, in the curtain flow, we predict the shape of the falling sheet for an inviscid fluid, and compare this with the literature to predict the shape for a viscous fluid, having shown that viscous forces are too great to ignore. We also find that the primary effect driving the shape of the curtain (which falls inwards towards the axis of the fountain) is surface tension. We find that the three domains provide excellent introductions to non-Newtonian mechanics, the important mathematical technique of scaling, and how to manipulate existing data to make our own predictions. We also find that the topic generates interest among the public in our engagement work.

  14. Hypersonic Magneto-Fluid-Dynamic Compression in Cylindrical Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, Joseph S.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic magneto-fluid-dynamic interaction has been successfully performed as a virtual leading-edge strake and a virtual cowl of a cylindrical inlet. In a side-by-side experimental and computational study, the magnitude of the induced compression was found to be depended on configuration and electrode placement. To better understand the interacting phenomenon the present investigation is focused on a direct current discharge at the leading edge of a cylindrical inlet for which validating experimental data is available. The present computational result is obtained by solving the magneto-fluid-dynamics equations at the low magnetic Reynolds number limit and using a nonequilibrium weakly ionized gas model based on the drift-diffusion theory. The numerical simulation provides a detailed description of the intriguing physics. After validation with experimental measurements, the computed results further quantify the effectiveness of a magnet-fluid-dynamic compression for a hypersonic cylindrical inlet. At a minuscule power input to a direct current surface discharge of 8.14 watts per square centimeter of electrode area produces an additional compression of 6.7 percent for a constant cross-section cylindrical inlet.

  15. Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

  16. New developments in relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muronga, Azwinndini

    2010-09-01

    The recent notion of the perfect fluid created at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) has been embraced by many experimentalists and theorists alike. However, much of the evidence to this notion has been based on the success of describing some experimental observables by non-viscous hydrodynamics or by small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio. Developments on viscous hydrodynamics evolved from (0+1) dimensions (Bjorken scaling solution) over (1+1) dimensions (Bjorken + transverse flow) to (2+1) dimensions (elliptic flow) and currently (3+1) dimensions. There still exist some formal issues concerning the allowed form of the relativistic viscous hydrodynamic equations and what effects the new additional or higher order terms will have on the spacetime evolution and the experimental observables. Starting with a brief introduction of the basics of relativsitic fluid dynamics, I will discuss our current knowledge of relativistic theory of fluid dynamics in the presence of dissipative fluxes.

  17. Fluid dynamics of cytotoxic safety cabinets.

    PubMed

    Braconnier, R; Bonthoux, F

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the specific fluid dynamics characteristics of cytotoxic safety cabinets (CSC), particularly those used in cancer drug reconstitution operations. Measurements taken on site were used to derive characteristic data for these cabinets. An in-depth laboratory investigation of airflows inside another CSC was also conducted. Anemometric values recorded on these two installations enabled the experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics methods applied to CSC. The digital flow simulations conducted provide a better understanding of the detailed flow structure inside a CSC and made it possible to study the influence of different operating parameters on the air velocity distribution inside the cabinet front opening: recycled air temperature, product protection airflow rate, suction openings spatial distribution, air compensation mode and draughts, operator arm penetration, and operator presence in front of the cabinet. PMID:20007340

  18. Fluid dynamics in porous media with Sailfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Rodrigo C. V.; Neumann, Rodrigo F.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we show the application of Sailfish to the study of fluid dynamics in porous media. Sailfish is an open-source software based on the lattice-Boltzmann method. This application of computational fluid dynamics is of particular interest to the oil and gas industry and the subject could be a starting point for an undergraduate or graduate student in physics or engineering. We built artificial samples of porous media with different porosities and used Sailfish to simulate the fluid flow through them in order to calculate their permeability and tortuosity. We also present a simple way to obtain the specific superficial area of porous media using Python libraries. To contextualise these concepts, we analyse the applicability of the Kozeny–Carman equation, which is a well-known permeability–porosity relation, to our artificial samples.

  19. The Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Mark, Russell; Hutchison, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Nowhere in sport is performance so dependent on the interaction of the athlete with the surrounding medium than in competitive swimming. As a result, understanding (at least implicitly) and controlling (explicitly) the fluid dynamics of swimming are essential to earning a spot on the medal stand. This is an extremely complex, highly multidisciplinary problem with a broad spectrum of research approaches. This review attempts to provide a historical framework for the fluid dynamics-related aspects of human swimming research, principally conducted roughly over the past five decades, with an emphasis on the past 25 years. The literature is organized below to show a continuous integration of computational and experimental technologies into the sport. Illustrations from the authors' collaborations over a 10-year period, coupling the knowledge and experience of an elite-level coach, a lead biomechanician at USA Swimming, and an experimental fluid dynamicist, are intended to bring relevance and immediacy to the review.

  20. Education and research in fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López González-Nieto, P.; Redondo, J. M.; Cano, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    Fluid dynamics constitutes an essential subject for engineering, since auronautic engineers (airship flights in PBL, flight processes), industrial engineers (fluid transportation), naval engineers (ship/vessel building) up to agricultural engineers (influence of the weather conditions on crops/farming). All the above-mentioned examples possess a high social and economic impact on mankind. Therefore, the fluid dynamics education of engineers is very important, and, at the same time, this subject gives us an interesting methodology based on a cycle relation among theory, experiments and numerical simulation. The study of turbulent plumes -a very important convective flow- is a good example because their theoretical governing equations are simple; it is possible to make experimental plumes in an aesy way and to carry out the corresponding numerical simulatons to verify experimental and theoretical results. Moreover, it is possible to get all these aims in the educational system (engineering schools or institutions) using a basic laboratory and the "Modellus" software.

  1. Fluid Dynamics of Pressurized, Entrained Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Pressurized, entrained gasification is a promising new technology for the clean and efficient combustion of coal. Its principle is to operate a coal gasifier at a high inlet gas velocity to increase the inflow of reactants, and at an elevated pressure to raise the overall efficiency of the process. Unfortunately, because of the extraordinary difficulties involved in performing measurements in hot, pressurized, high-velocity pilot plants, its fluid dynamics are largely unknown. Thus the designer cannot predict with certainty crucial phenomena like erosion, heat transfer and solid capture. In this context, we are conducting a study of the fluid dynamics of Pressurized Entrained Coal Gasifiers (PECGs). The idea is to simulate the flows in generic industrial PECGs using dimensional similitude. To this end, we employ a unique entrained gas-solid flow facility with the flexibility to recycle -rather than discard- gases other than air. By matching five dimensionless parameters, suspensions in mixtures of helium, carbon dioxide and sulfur hexafluoride simulate the effects of pressure and scale-up on the fluid dynamics of PECGS. Because it operates under cold, atmospheric conditions, the laboratory facility is ideal for detailed measurements. These activities are conducted with Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., which is a member of a consortium that includes Foster Wheeler and Deutsche Babcock Energie- und Umwelttechnik AG.

  2. Visualization of Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The current compute environment that most researchers are using for the calculation of 3D unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is a super-computer class machine. The Massively Parallel Processors (MPP's) such as the 160 node IBM SP2 at NAS and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (like NAS's SGI Power-Challenge array and the J90 cluster) provide the required computation bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. If we follow the traditional computational analysis steps for CFD (and we wish to construct an interactive visualizer) we need to be aware of the following: (1) Disk space requirements. A single snap-shot must contain at least the values (primitive variables) stored at the appropriate locations within the mesh. For most simple 3D Euler solvers that means 5 floating point words. Navier-Stokes solutions with turbulence models may contain 7 state-variables. (2) Disk speed vs. Computational speeds. The time required to read the complete solution of a saved time frame from disk is now longer than the compute time for a set number of iterations from an explicit solver. Depending, on the hardware and solver an iteration of an implicit code may also take less time than reading the solution from disk. If one examines the performance improvements in the last decade or two, it is easy to see that depending on disk performance (vs. CPU improvement) may not be the best method for enhancing interactivity. (3) Cluster and Parallel Machine I/O problems. Disk access time is much worse within current parallel machines and cluster of workstations that are acting in concert to solve a single problem. In this case we are not trying to read the volume of data, but are running the solver and the solver outputs the solution. These traditional network interfaces must be used for the file system. (4) Numerics of particle traces. Most visualization tools can work upon a single snap shot of the data but some visualization tools for transient

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Molten Steel Flow Patterns and Particle-Wall Interactions Inside a Slide-Gate Nozzle by a Hybrid Turbulent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi-Ghaleni, Mahdi; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Smith, Jeffrey D.; O'Malley, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    Melt flow patterns and turbulence inside a slide-gate throttled submerged entry nozzle (SEN) were studied using Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) model, which is a combination of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models. The DES switching criterion between RANS and LES was investigated to closely reproduce the flow structures of low and high turbulence regions similar to RANS and LES simulations, respectively. The melt flow patterns inside the nozzle were determined by k-ɛ (a RANS model), LES, and DES turbulent models, and convergence studies were performed to ensure reliability of the results. Results showed that the DES model has significant advantages over the standard k-ɛ model in transient simulations and in regions containing flow separation from the nozzle surface. Moreover, due to applying a hybrid approach, DES uses a RANS model at wall boundaries which resolves the extremely fine mesh requirement of LES simulations, and therefore it is computationally more efficient. Investigation of particle distribution inside the nozzle and particle adhesion to the nozzle wall also reveals that the DES model simulations predict more particle-wall interactions compared to LES model.

  4. Dissertation Defense: Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional validation by test only mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions.Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations. This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions

  5. Dissertation Defense Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional "validation by test only" mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis E.

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This proposal describes an approach to validate the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft. The research described here is absolutely cutting edge. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional"validation by test only'' mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computationaf Fluid Dynamics can be used to veritY these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. The proposed research project includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT and OPEN FOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid . . . Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around

  7. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Highly Efficient Lattice Boltzmann Model for Compressible Fluids: Two-Dimensional Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Gan, Yan-Biao; Cheng, Tao; Li, Ying-Jun

    2009-10-01

    We present a highly efficient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating compressible flows. This model is based on the combination of an appropriate finite difference scheme, a 16-discrete-velocity model [Kataoka and Tsutahara, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 035701(R)] and reasonable dispersion and dissipation terms. The dispersion term effectively reduces the oscillation at the discontinuity and enhances numerical precision. The dissipation term makes the new model more easily meet with the von Neumann stability condition. This model works for both high-speed and low-speed flows with arbitrary specific-heat-ratio. With the new model simulation results for the well-known benchmark problems get a high accuracy compared with the analytic or experimental ones. The used benchmark tests include (i) Shock tubes such as the Sod, Lax, Sjogreen, Colella explosion wave, and collision of two strong shocks, (ii) Regular and Mach shock reflections, and (iii) Shock wave reaction on cylindrical bubble problems. With a more realistic equation of state or free-energy functional, the new model has the potential tostudy the complex procedure of shock wave reaction on porous materials.

  8. Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for many applications in fluid mechanics research and aerospace vehicle design. A few applications being explored at NASA Ames Research Center will be presented and discussed. The examples presented will range in speed from hypersonic to low speed incompressible flow applications. Most of the results will be from numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes or Euler equations in three space dimensions for general geometry applications. Computational results will be used to highlight the presentation as appropriate. Advances in computational facilities including those associated with NASA's CAS (Computational Aerosciences) Project of the Federal HPCC (High Performance Computing and Communications) Program will be discussed. Finally, opportunities for future research will be presented and discussed. All material will be taken from non-sensitive, previously-published and widely-disseminated work.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of pipe elbow flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, Gregory Francis

    2004-08-01

    One problem facing today's nuclear power industry is flow-accelerated corrosion and erosion in pipe elbows. The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing experiments in their Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) test loop to better characterize these phenomena, and develop advanced sensor technologies for the condition monitoring of critical elbows on a continuous basis. In parallel with these experiments, Sandia National Laboratories is performing Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the flow in one elbow of the FAC test loop. The simulations are being performed using the FLUENT commercial software developed and marketed by Fluent, Inc. The model geometry and mesh were created using the GAMBIT software, also from Fluent, Inc. This report documents the results of the simulations that have been made to date; baseline results employing the RNG k-e turbulence model are presented. The predicted value for the diametrical pressure coefficient is in reasonably good agreement with published correlations. Plots of the velocities, pressure field, wall shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy adjacent to the wall are shown within the elbow section. Somewhat to our surprise, these indicate that the maximum values of both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy occur near the elbow entrance, on the inner radius of the bend. Additional simulations were performed for the same conditions, but with the RNG k-e model replaced by either the standard k-{var_epsilon}, or the realizable k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The predictions using the standard k-{var_epsilon} model are quite similar to those obtained in the baseline simulation. However, with the realizable k-{var_epsilon} model, more significant differences are evident. The maximums in both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy now appear on the outer radius, near the elbow exit, and are {approx}11% and 14% greater, respectively, than those predicted in the baseline calculation

  10. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  11. Scaling of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid dynamics without inertia for quantitative modelling of rock flow due to gravity (including the concept of rheological similarity)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, Ruud; Schmeling, Harro

    1986-09-01

    Scale model theory for constructing dynamically scaled analogue models of rock flowing in the solid state has until now assumed that the natural and model flows were both viscous. In viscous flows, at the very low Reynolds numbers ( Re ≪ 1) common in solid rocks, geometrical similarity is sufficient to achieve dynamic similarity between a homogeneous material (scale) model and its natural prototype. However, experiments on the rheology of natural rocks suggest that they flow predominantly as non-Newtonian strain rate softening materials at the characteristic geological strain rate 10 -14 s -1. Non-dimensionalisation of both the equation of motion and the constitutive flow law of non-Newtonian flows is carried out to investigate what criteria are required to achieve dynamic similarity. It is shown that dynamic similarity of non-Newtonian flows at low inertia (e.g., a rock with Re ≪ 1 and its model analogue) can only be attained if the steady-state flow curves of the model materials and the various rocks in the prototype have mutually similar shapes and slopes, and if these flows operate on similar parts of their respective flow curves. We term this the requirement of rheological similarity. Dynamic similarity of low inertia flows ( Re ≪ 1) in non-Newtonian continua is achieved if they are rheologically and geometrically similar. Additional criteria for dynamic similarity of low inertia flows in inhomogeneous media (with Newtonian or non-Newtonian subregions, or both) are formulated in section 5. Scaling of thermal properties is not included. Steady-state flow curves of common rocks are compiled in log stress-log strain rate space together with analogue materials suitable for modelling of solid state rock deformation. This compilation aids the selection of model materials with flow curves geometrically similar to those of rocks in the prototype. Laboratory scale models of rock flow should generally be constructed of materials which strain rate soften during

  12. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS Three-Dimensional Lattice Boltzmann Model for High-Speed Compressible Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Li, Ying-Jun

    2010-12-01

    A highly efficient three-dimensional (3D) Lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for high-speed compressible flows is proposed. This model is developed from the original one by Kataoka and Tsutahara [Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 056702]. The convection term is discretized by the Non-oscillatory, containing No free parameters and Dissipative (NND) scheme, which effectively damps oscillations at discontinuities. To be more consistent with the kinetic theory of viscosity and to further improve the numerical stability, an additional dissipation term is introduced. Model parameters are chosen in such a way that the von Neumann stability criterion is satisfied. The new model is validated by well-known benchmarks, (i) Riemann problems, including the problem with Lax shock tube and a newly designed shock tube problem with high Mach number; (ii) reaction of shock wave on droplet or bubble. Good agreements are obtained between LB results and exact ones or previously reported solutions. The model is capable of simulating flows from subsonic to supersonic and capturing jumps resulted from shock waves.

  13. Advanced Concept Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaput, Armand; Johns, Zachary; Hodges, Todd; Selfridge, Justin; Bevirt, Joeben; Ahuja, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Concepts Modeling software validation, analysis, and design. This was a National Institute of Aerospace contract with a lot of pieces. Efforts ranged from software development and validation for structures and aerodynamics, through flight control development, and aeropropulsive analysis, to UAV piloting services.

  14. Executive Summary: Special Section on Credible Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1998-01-01

    This summary presents the motivation for the Special Section on the credibility of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, its objective, its background and context, its content, and its major conclusions. Verification and validation (V&V) are the processes for establishing the credibility of CFD simulations. Validation assesses whether correct things are performed and verification assesses whether they are performed correctly. Various aspects of V&V are discussed. Progress is made in verification of simulation models. Considerable effort is still needed for developing a systematic validation method that can assess the credibility of simulated reality.

  15. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Entropy and Entanglement in Master Equation of Effective Hamiltonian for Jaynes-Cummings Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessian, H. A.; Mohammed, F. A.; Mohamed, A.-B. A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we analytically solve the master equation for Jaynes-Cummings model in the dispersive regime including phase damping and the field is assumed to be initially in a superposition of coherent states. Using an established entanglement measure based on the negativity of the eigenvalues of the partially transposed density matrix we find a very strong sensitivity of the maximally generated entanglement to the amount of phase damping. Qualitatively this behavior is also reflected in alternative entanglement measures, but the quantitative agreement between different measures depends on the chosen noise model. The phase decoherence for this model results in monotonic increase in the total entropy while the atomic sub-entropy keeps its periodic behaviour without any effect.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics-habitat suitability index (CFD-HSI) modelling as an exploratory tool for assessing passability of riverine migratory challenge zones for fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haro, Alexander J.; Chelminski, Michael; Dudley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed two-dimensional computational fluid hydraulics-habitat suitability index (CFD-HSI) models to identify and qualitatively assess potential zones of shallow water depth and high water velocity that may present passage challenges for five major anadromous fish species in a 2.63-km reach of the main stem Penobscot River, Maine, as a result of a dam removal downstream of the reach. Suitability parameters were based on distribution of fish lengths and body depths and transformed to cruising, maximum sustained and sprint swimming speeds. Zones of potential depth and velocity challenges were calculated based on the hydraulic models; ability of fish to pass a challenge zone was based on the percent of river channel that the contiguous zone spanned and its maximum along-current length. Three river flows (low: 99.1 m3 sec-1; normal: 344.9 m3 sec-1; and high: 792.9 m3 sec-1) were modelled to simulate existing hydraulic conditions and hydraulic conditions simulating removal of a dam at the downstream boundary of the reach. Potential depth challenge zones were nonexistent for all low-flow simulations of existing conditions for deeper-bodied fishes. Increasing flows for existing conditions and removal of the dam under all flow conditions increased the number and size of potential velocity challenge zones, with the effects of zones being more pronounced for smaller species. The two-dimensional CFD-HSI model has utility in demonstrating gross effects of flow and hydraulic alteration, but may not be as precise a predictive tool as a three-dimensional model. Passability of the potential challenge zones cannot be precisely quantified for two-dimensional or three-dimensional models due to untested assumptions and incomplete data on fish swimming performance and behaviours.

  17. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Deformation and Motion of a Red Blood Cell in a Shear Flow Simulated by a Lattice Boltzmann Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Juan; Qiu, Bing; Tan, Hui-Li

    2009-06-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model is presented to simulate the deformation and motions of a red blood cell (RBC) in a shear flow. The curvatures of the membrane of a static RBC with different chemical potential drops calculated by our model agree with those computed by a shooting method very well. Our simulation results show that in a shear flow, a biconcave RBC becomes highly flattened and undergoes tank-treading motion. With intrinsically parallel dynamics, this lattice Boltzmann method is expected to find wide applications to both single and multi-vesicles suspension as well as complex open membranes in various fluid flows for a wide range of Reynolds numbers.

  18. ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2004-05-01

    The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

  19. Advancements in engineering turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    Some new developments in two-equation models and second order closure models are presented. Two-equation models (k-epsilon models) have been widely used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for engineering problems. Most of low-Reynolds number two-equation models contain some wall-distance damping functions to account for the effect of wall on turbulence. However, this often causes the confusion and difficulties in computing flows with complex geometry and also needs an ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. A set of modified two-equation models is proposed to remove the aforementioned shortcomings. The calculations using various two-equation models are compared with direct numerical simulations of channel flow and flat boundary layers. Development of a second order closure model is also discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All the existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the 3-D effect of mean flow on the turbulence (e.g. decrease in the shear stress caused by the cross flow in the boundary layer). The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model is described and is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of 3-D mean flow on the turbulence.

  20. Fluid dynamic and thermodynamic analysis of a model pertaining to cryogenic fluid management in low gravity environments for a system with dynamically induced settling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, J.

    1982-01-01

    The settling behavior of the liquid and gaseous phases of a fluid in a propellant and in a zero-g environment, when such settling is induced through the use of a dynamic device, in this particular case, a helical screw was studied. Particular emphasis was given to: (1) the description of a fluid mechanics model which seems applicable to the system under consideration, (2) a First Law of Thermodynamics analysis of the system, and (3) a discussion of applicable scaling rules.

  1. Expanding Participation in Fluid Dynamics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randall

    2015-11-01

    Two legacies provided by great scientists are scientific discoveries and more scientists. Is there a way that these impacts can be magnified? Examples using the Taylor-Couette experiment and other fluid dynamics problems will demonstrate that indeed more people can fruitfully engage in open and even bold investigation. Participants include high school students, teachers, undergraduates, artists, business developers and interested laypersons. With imagination, good training, and a suitable lab space, a special tribute can be given to those who mentor us by scaling up the breadth of their influence.

  2. Two-phase computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.

    1991-07-26

    The results of the project illustrate the feasibility of multiphase computerized fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Existing CFD software is capable of simulating particle fields, certain droplet fields, and certain free surface flows, and does so routinely in engineering applications. Stratified flows can be addressed by a multiphase CFD code, once one is developed with suitable capabilities. The groundwork for such a code has been laid. Calculations performed for stratified flows demonstrate the accuracy achievable and the convergence of the methodology. Extension of the stratified flow methodology to other segregated flows such as slug or annular faces no inherent limits. The research has commercial application in the development of multiphase CFD computer programs.

  3. Kinematics and Fluid Dynamics of Jellyfish Maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laura; Hoover, Alex

    2014-11-01

    Jellyfish propel themselves through the water through periodic contractions of their elastic bells. Some jellyfish, such as the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita and the upside down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana, can perform turns via asymmetric contractions of the bell. The fluid dynamics of jellyfish forward propulsion and turning is explored here by analyzing the contraction kinematics of several species and using flow visualization to quantify the resulting flow fields. The asymmetric contraction and structure of the jellyfish generates asymmetries in the starting and stopping vortices. This creates a diagonal jet and a net torque acting on the jellyfish. Results are compared to immersed boundary simulations

  4. The Fluid Dynamics Demo Kit: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underhill, Patrick; Fix, Hannah; Haines, Timothy; Prestridge, Kathy; Flack, Karen

    2012-11-01

    This talk will focus on the current contents and efforts building a fluid dynamics demonstration/experiment kit through the APS-DFD Mentoring and Outreach Committee and with funding from the APS DFD. The current experiments include predicting how far the water from a water gun will go, predicting how long a Heron's fountain will run, measuring the viscosity of corn syrup by measuring terminal velocity, and measuring the flow rate through a siphon. We will discuss the testing and development of these experiments and the results of field testing. Ideas for future experiments will also be discussed.

  5. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Haworth, D.C.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  6. Shallow Chamber & Conduit Behavior of Silicic Magma: A Thermo- and Fluid- Dynamic Parameterization Model of Physical Deformation as Constrained by Geodetic Observations: Case Study; Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn de Rosas, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat (SHV) is an active, mainly andesitic and well-studied stratovolcano situated at the northern end of the Lesser Antilles Arc subduction zone in the Caribbean Sea. The goal of our research is to create a high resolution 3D subsurface model of the shallow and deeper aspects of the magma storage and plumbing system at SHV. Our model will integrate inversions using continuous and campaign geodetic observations at SHV from 1995 to the present as well as local seismic records taken at various unrest intervals to construct a best-fit geometry, pressure point source and inflation rate and magnitude. We will also incorporate a heterogeneous media in the crust and use the most contemporary understanding of deep crustal- or even mantle-depth 'hot-zone' genesis and chemical evolution of silicic and intermediate magmas to inform the character of the deep edifice influx. Our heat transfer model will be constructed with a modified 'thin shell' enveloping the magma chamber to simulate the insulating or conducting influence of heat-altered chamber boundary conditions. The final forward model should elucidate observational data preceding and proceeding unrest events, the behavioral suite of magma transport in the subsurface environment and the feedback mechanisms that may contribute to eruption triggering. Preliminary hypotheses suggest wet, low-viscosity residual melts derived from 'hot zones' will ascend rapidly to shallower stall-points and that their products (eventually erupted lavas as well as stalled plutonic masses) will experience and display two discrete periods of shallow evolution; a rapid depressurization crystallization event followed by a slower conduction-controlled heat transfer and cooling crystallization. These events have particular implications for shallow magma behaviors, notably inflation, compressibility and pressure values. Visualization of the model with its inversion constraints will be affected with Com

  7. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  8. Flow Velocities After Carotid Artery Stenting: Impact of Stent Design. A Fluid Dynamics Study in a Carotid Artery Model with Laser Doppler Anemometry

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, Oliver Kleinschmidt, Thomas; Weiss, Wolfgang; Wolf, Oliver; Heider, Peter; Schaffner, Silvio; Gianotti, Marc; Schmid, Thomas; Liepsch, Dieter; Berger, Hermann

    2005-01-15

    Purpose. To study the influence of a newly developed membrane stent design on flow patterns in a physiologic carotid artery model. Methods. Three different stents were positioned in silicone models of the carotid artery: a stainless steel stent (Wall-stent), a nitinol stent (SelfX), and a nitinol stent with a semipermeable membrane (MembraX). To increase the contact area of the membrane with the vessel wall, another MembranX model was modified at the outflow tract. The membrane consists of a biocompatible silicone-polyurethane copolymer (Elast-Eon) with a pore size of 100 {mu}m. All stents were deployed across the bifurcation and the external carotid artery origin. Flow velocity measurements were performed with laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), using pulsatile flow conditions (Re = 220; flow 0.39 l/min; flow rate ratio ICA:ECA = 70:30) in hemodynamically relevant cross-sections. The hemodynamic changes were analyzed by comparing velocity fluctuations of corresponding flow profiles. Results. The flow rate ratio ICA:ECA shifted significantly from 70/30 to 73.9/26.1 in the MembraX and remained nearly unchanged in the SelfX and Wallstent. There were no changes in the flow patterns at the inflow proximal to the stents. In the stent no relevant changes were found in the SelfX. In the Wallstent the separation zone shifted from the orifice of the ICA to the distal end of the stent. Four millimeters distal to the SelfX and the Wallstent the flow profile returned to normal. In the MembraX an increase in the central slipstreams was found with creation of a flow separation distal to the stent. With a modification of the membrane this flow separation vanished. In the ECA flow disturbances were seen at the inner wall distal to the stent struts in the SelfX and the Wallstent. With the MembraX a calming of flow could be observed in the ECA with a slight loss of flow volume. Conclusions. Stent placement across the carotid artery bifurcation induces alterations of the physiologic flow

  9. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, A; Garg, R; Tong, C; Shahnam, M; Guenther, C

    2013-07-01

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  10. The fluid dynamics of human birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Andrea; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates the fluid dynamics associated with the human birth process. Specifically, we investigate the role of the viscosity of the amniotic fluid in transferring force from the contracting uterus to the fetus during delivery. This experimental work uses an approximate uterus and dilated cervix-fabricated with liquid latex-filled with a fluid of known viscosity and an oblong solid fetus. The force required to extract the fetus is recorded for several values of amniotic viscosity. The study looks at both pull-out force values (where the fetus is pulled from outside the uterus) and push-out force values (where pressure in the experimental uterus is used to remove the fetus). In addition to the viscosity study, we also investigate the increased force required to deliver an offset fetus by tilting the major axis of the oblong fetus and repeating the pull-and push-out experiments. This study will provide knowledge about the fundamental fluid dynamic processes involved in human birth.

  11. Measuring Visual Expertise in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean; Curran, Tim; Goodman, Katherine

    2014-11-01

    What role does visual expertise play in the learning of abstract physics? In surveys for the Flow Visualization course at the University of Colorado, Boulder, students often commented positively about a new awareness of fluid dynamics in everyday life. Could this new awareness, termed visual expertise, be measured in some way? Working with research psychologists at CU Boulder, who had already been working in this area on projects such as face recognition, a study was developed. This study had subjects with no prior fluid dynamics expertise classify flow images as either turbulent or laminar. The first group was given error-driven learning; that is, they had to guess the correct category for each image, were given feedback as to whether they had guessed correctly, and after a period of training, were tested on both the training images and a set of similar but new images. A second group was given simple instruction for the training images; that is, they were shown the image along with the name of the correct category, before being tested on both training images and new images. Preliminary results of the pilot study are presented, along with next steps. This work is supported by NSF Grant Number 1240294.

  12. Numerical, analytical, experimental study of fluid dynamic forces in seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, William; Artiles, Antonio; Aggarwal, Bharat; Walowit, Jed; Athavale, Mahesh M.; Preskwas, Andrzej J.

    1992-04-01

    NASA/Lewis Research Center is sponsoring a program for providing computer codes for analyzing and designing turbomachinery seals for future aerospace and engine systems. The program is made up of three principal components: (1) the development of advanced three dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics codes, (2) the production of simpler two dimensional (2-D) industrial codes, and (3) the development of a knowledge based system (KBS) that contains an expert system to assist in seal selection and design. The first task has been to concentrate on cylindrical geometries with straight, tapered, and stepped bores. Improvements have been made by adoption of a colocated grid formulation, incorporation of higher order, time accurate schemes for transient analysis and high order discretization schemes for spatial derivatives. This report describes the mathematical formulations and presents a variety of 2-D results, including labyrinth and brush seal flows. Extensions of 3-D are presently in progress.

  13. Numerical, analytical, experimental study of fluid dynamic forces in seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, William; Artiles, Antonio; Aggarwal, Bharat; Walowit, Jed; Athavale, Mahesh M.; Preskwas, Andrzej J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA/Lewis Research Center is sponsoring a program for providing computer codes for analyzing and designing turbomachinery seals for future aerospace and engine systems. The program is made up of three principal components: (1) the development of advanced three dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics codes, (2) the production of simpler two dimensional (2-D) industrial codes, and (3) the development of a knowledge based system (KBS) that contains an expert system to assist in seal selection and design. The first task has been to concentrate on cylindrical geometries with straight, tapered, and stepped bores. Improvements have been made by adoption of a colocated grid formulation, incorporation of higher order, time accurate schemes for transient analysis and high order discretization schemes for spatial derivatives. This report describes the mathematical formulations and presents a variety of 2-D results, including labyrinth and brush seal flows. Extensions of 3-D are presently in progress.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics for the CFBR : challenges that lie ahead /

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, B. A.; Yang, Wen-ching,

    2001-01-01

    The potential of Computational Fluid Dynamics as a tool for design and analysis of the Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor is considered. The ruminations are largely philosophical in nature, and are based mainly on experience. An assessment of where CFD may, or may not, be a helpful tool for developing the needed understanding, is furnished. To motivate this assessment, a clarification of what composes a CFD analysis is provided. Status of CFD usage in CFBR problems is summarized briefly. Some successes and failures of CFD in CFBR analysis are also discussed; this suggests a practical way to proceed toward the goal of adding CFD as a useful tool, to be used in combination with well-defined experiments, for CFBR needs. The conclusion is that there remains substantial hope that CFD could be very useful in this application. In order to make the hope a reality, nontrivial, and achievable, advances in multiphase flow theory must be made.

  15. Overview of Fluid Dynamics Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa W.; Wang, Ten-See

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has had the need to maintain and advance state-of-the-art flow analysis and cold-flow testing capability to support its roles and missions. This overview discusses the recent organizational changes that have occurred at MSFC with emphasis on the resulting three groups that form the core of fluid dynamics expertise at MSFC: the Fluid Physics and Dynamics Group, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, and the Experimental Fluid Dynamics Group. Recently completed activities discussed include the analysis and flow testing in support of the Fastrac engine design, the X-33 vehicle design, and the X34 propulsion system design. Ongoing activities include support of the RLV vehicle design, Liquid Fly Back Booster aerodynamic configuration definition, and RLV focused technologies development. Other ongoing activities discussed are efforts sponsored by the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to develop an advanced incompressible flow code and to develop optimization techniques. Recently initiated programs and their anticipated required fluid dynamics support are discussed. Based on recent experiences and on the anticipated program needs, required analytical and experimental technique improvements are presented. Due to anticipated budgetary constraints, there is a strong need to leverage activities and to pursue teaming arrangements in order to advance the state-of-the-art and to adequately support concept development. Throughout this overview there is discussion of the lessons learned and of the capabilities demonstrated and established in support of the hardware development programs.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Dual Bell Nozzle Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, Kalen; Garcia, Christian; Ruf, Joseph; Bui, Trong

    2015-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) are working together to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the dual bell nozzle concept. Dual bell nozzles are a form of altitude compensating nozzle that consists of two connecting bell contours. At low altitude the nozzle flows fully in the first, relatively lower area ratio, nozzle. The nozzle flow separates from the wall at the inflection point which joins the two bell contours. This relatively low expansion results in higher nozzle efficiency during the low altitude portion of the launch. As ambient pressure decreases with increasing altitude, the nozzle flow will expand to fill the relatively large area ratio second nozzle. The larger area ratio of the second bell enables higher Isp during the high altitude and vacuum portions of the launch. Despite a long history of theoretical consideration and promise towards improving rocket performance, dual bell nozzles have yet to be developed for practical use and have seen only limited testing. One barrier to use of dual bell nozzles is the lack of control over the nozzle flow transition from the first bell to the second bell during operation. A method that this team is pursuing to enhance the controllability of the nozzle flow transition is manipulation of the film coolant that is injected near the inflection between the two bell contours. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is being run to assess the degree of control over nozzle flow transition generated via manipulation of the film injection. A cold flow dual bell nozzle, without film coolant, was tested over a range of simulated altitudes in 2004 in MSFC's nozzle test facility. Both NASA centers have performed a series of simulations of that dual bell to validate their computational models. Those CFD results are compared to the experimental results within this paper. MSFC then proceeded to add film injection to the CFD grid of the dual bell nozzle. A series of

  17. Helicopter fuselage drag - combined computational fluid dynamics and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A.; Kusyumov, A.; Mikhailov, S.; Pakhov, V.; Sungatullin, A.; Valeev, M.; Zherekhov, V.; Barakos, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, wind tunnel experiments are combined with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) aiming to analyze the aerodynamics of realistic fuselage configurations. A development model of the ANSAT aircraft and an early model of the AKTAI light helicopter were employed. Both models were tested at the subsonic wind tunnel of KNRTU-KAI for a range of Reynolds numbers and pitch and yaw angles. The force balance measurements were complemented by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigations for the cases where the experimental force measurements showed substantial unsteadiness. The CFD results were found to be in fair agreement with the test data and revealed some flow separation at the rear of the fuselages. Once confidence on the CFD method was established, further modifications were introduced to the ANSAT-like fuselage model to demonstrate drag reduction via small shape changes.

  18. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1994-01-01

    A brief summary of the computer environment used for calculating three dimensional unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is presented. This environment requires a super computer as well as massively parallel processors (MPP's) and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (by concurrently working on the same task) provide the required computational bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. The cluster of reduced instruction set computers (RISC) is a recent advent based on the low cost and high performance that workstation vendors provide. The cluster, with the proper software can act as a multiple instruction/multiple data (MIMD) machine. A new set of software tools is being designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these environments. Three user's manuals for the parallel version of Visual3, pV3, revision 1.00 make up the bulk of this report.

  19. Graphics supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Goang S.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this project is to purchase a state-of-the-art graphics supercomputer to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) research capability at Alabama A & M University (AAMU) and to support the Air Force research projects. A cutting-edge graphics supercomputer system, Onyx VTX, from Silicon Graphics Computer Systems (SGI), was purchased and installed. Other equipment including a desktop personal computer, PC-486 DX2 with a built-in 10-BaseT Ethernet card, a 10-BaseT hub, an Apple Laser Printer Select 360, and a notebook computer from Zenith were also purchased. A reading room has been converted to a research computer lab by adding some furniture and an air conditioning unit in order to provide an appropriate working environments for researchers and the purchase equipment. All the purchased equipment were successfully installed and are fully functional. Several research projects, including two existing Air Force projects, are being performed using these facilities.

  20. Shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Park, O. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Additional results and a revised and improved computer program listing from the shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics formulations are presented. Numerical calculations for the flame zone of solid propellants are carried out using the Galerkin finite elements, with perturbations expanded to the zeroth, first, and second orders. The results indicate that amplification of oscillatory motions does indeed prevail in high frequency regions. For the second order system, the trend is similar to the first order system for low frequencies, but instabilities may appear at frequencies lower than those of the first order system. The most significant effect of the second order system is that the admittance is extremely oscillatory between moderately high frequency ranges.

  1. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1994-11-01

    A brief summary of the computer environment used for calculating three dimensional unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is presented. This environment requires a super computer as well as massively parallel processors (MPP's) and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (by concurrently working on the same task) provide the required computational bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. The cluster of reduced instruction set computers (RISC) is a recent advent based on the low cost and high performance that workstation vendors provide. The cluster, with the proper software can act as a multiple instruction/multiple data (MIMD) machine. A new set of software tools is being designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these environments. Three user's manuals for the parallel version of Visual3, pV3, revision 1.00 make up the bulk of this report.

  2. Study of ebullated bed fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. J.; Rundell, D. N.; Shou, J. K.

    1983-07-01

    The fluid dynamics occurring in a coal liquefaction reactor is measured and compared with cold flow fluidization results. Catalyst bed expansions and gas holdups are higher in the Process Development Unit (PDU) than those observed in the cold flow tests for slurries having the same nominal viscosity. Comparison of PDU results with cold flow results shows that the bulk of the operating reactor gas flow lies in the ideal bubbly regime. Existence of churn turbulent behavior during these two experiments is consistent with trends observed in earlier cold flow experiments. Two and three phase fluidization experiments are carried out. Bed expansion is primarily a function of slurry velocity, with gas velocity having only a weak effect. A viscometer is adapted for measurement of the viscosity of coal slurries at high temperature and pressure. A significant degree of backmixing occurs in the H-Coal system.

  3. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  4. B-spline Method in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botella, Olivier; Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    B-spline functions are bases for piecewise polynomials that possess attractive properties for complex flow simulations : they have compact support, provide a straightforward handling of boundary conditions and grid nonuniformities, and yield numerical schemes with high resolving power, where the order of accuracy is a mere input parameter. This paper reviews the progress made on the development and application of B-spline numerical methods to computational fluid dynamics problems. Basic B-spline approximation properties is investigated, and their relationship with conventional numerical methods is reviewed. Some fundamental developments towards efficient complex geometry spline methods are covered, such as local interpolation methods, fast solution algorithms on cartesian grid, non-conformal block-structured discretization, formulation of spline bases of higher continuity over triangulation, and treatment of pressure oscillations in Navier-Stokes equations. Application of some of these techniques to the computation of viscous incompressible flows is presented.

  5. Manufacturing in space: Fluid dynamics numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.; Spradley, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Natural convection in a spherical container with cooling at the center was numerically simulated using the Lockheed-developed General Interpolants Method (GIM) numerical fluid dynamic computer program. The numerical analysis was simplified by assuming axisymmetric flow in the spherical container, with the symmetry axis being a sphere diagonal parallel to the gravity vector. This axisymmetric spherical geometry was intended as an idealization of the proposed Lal/Kroes growing experiments to be performed on board Spacelab. Results were obtained for a range of Rayleigh numbers from 25 to 10,000. For a temperature difference of 10 C from the cooling sting at the center to the container surface, and a gravitional loading of 0.000001 g a computed maximum fluid velocity of about 2.4 x 0.00001 cm/sec was reached after about 250 sec. The computed velocities were found to be approximately proportional to the Rayleigh number over the range of Rayleigh numbers investigated.

  6. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  7. Development and Use of Engineering Standards for Computational Fluid Dynamics for Complex Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hyung B.; Ghia, Urmila; Bayyuk, Sami; Oberkampf, William L.; Roy, Christopher J.; Benek, John A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Powers, Joseph M.; Bush, Robert H.; Mani, Mortaza

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) methods are increasingly relied on for predictive performance, reliability and safety of engineering systems. Analysts, designers, decision makers, and project managers, who must depend on simulation, need practical techniques and methods for assessing simulation credibility. The AIAA Guide for Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations (AIAA G-077-1998 (2002)), originally published in 1998, was the first engineering standards document available to the engineering community for verification and validation (V&V) of simulations. Much progress has been made in these areas since 1998. The AIAA Committee on Standards for CFD is currently updating this Guide to incorporate in it the important developments that have taken place in V&V concepts, methods, and practices, particularly with regard to the broader context of predictive capability and uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods and approaches. This paper will provide an overview of the changes and extensions currently underway to update the AIAA Guide. Specifically, a framework for predictive capability will be described for incorporating a wide range of error and uncertainty sources identified during the modeling, verification, and validation processes, with the goal of estimating the total prediction uncertainty of the simulation. The Guide's goal is to provide a foundation for understanding and addressing major issues and concepts in predictive CFD. However, this Guide will not recommend specific approaches in these areas as the field is rapidly evolving. It is hoped that the guidelines provided in this paper, and explained in more detail in the Guide, will aid in the research, development, and use of CFD in engineering decision-making.

  8. The Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Development of Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Katharine H.; Taskin, M. Ertan; Griffith, Bartley P.; Wu, Zhongjun J.

    2010-01-01

    Progress in the field of prosthetic cardiovascular devices has significantly contributed to the rapid advancements in cardiac therapy during the last four decades. The concept of mechanical circulatory assistance was established with the first successful clinical use of heart-lung machines for cardiopulmonary bypass. Since then a variety of devices have been developed to replace or assist diseased components of the cardiovascular system. Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are basically mechanical pumps designed to augment or replace the function of one or more chambers of the failing heart. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an attractive tool in the development process of VADs, allowing numerous different designs to be characterized for their functional performance virtually, for a wide range of operating conditions, without the physical device being fabricated. However, VADs operate in a flow regime which is traditionally difficult to simulate; the transitional region at the boundary of laminar and turbulent flow. Hence different methods have been used and the best approach is debatable. In addition to these fundamental fluid dynamic issues, blood consists of biological cells. Device-induced biological complications are a serious consequence of VAD use. The complications include blood damage (haemolysis, blood cell activation), thrombosis and emboli. Patients are required to take anticoagulation medication constantly which may cause bleeding. Despite many efforts blood damage models have still not been implemented satisfactorily into numerical analysis of VADs, which severely undermines the full potential of CFD. This paper reviews the current state of the art CFD for analysis of blood pumps, including a practical critical review of the studies to date, which should help device designers choose the most appropriate methods; a summary of blood damage models and the difficulties in implementing them into CFD; and current gaps in knowledge and areas for future

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Fan

    2006-08-09

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  10. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of hybrid rocket combustor flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, S.; Merkle, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with solid-phase pyrolysis, gas-phase combustion, turbulence and radiation are performed to study hybrid rocket combustor flowfields. The computational study is closely co-ordinated with a companion experimental program using a planar slab burner configuration with HTPB as fuel and gaseous oxygen. Computational predictions agree reasonably well with measurement data of fuel regression rates and surface temperatures. Additionally, most of the parametric trends predicted by the model are in general agreement with experimental trends. The computational model is applied to extend the results from the lab-scale to a full-scale axisymmetric configuration. The numerical predictions indicate that the full-scale configuration burns at a slower rate than the lab-scale combustor under identical specific flow rate conditions. The results demonstrate that detailed CFD analyses can play a useful role in the design of hybrid combustors.

  11. Phase portrait methods for verifying fluid dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, H.B.

    1989-01-01

    As computing resources become more powerful and accessible, engineers more frequently face the difficult and challenging engineering problem of accurately simulating nonlinear dynamic phenomena. Although mathematical models are usually available, in the form of initial value problems for differential equations, the behavior of the solutions of nonlinear models is often poorly understood. A notable example is fluid dynamics: while the Navier-Stokes equations are believed to correctly describe turbulent flow, no exact mathematical solution of these equations in the turbulent regime is known. Differential equations can of course be solved numerically, but how are we to assess numerical solutions of complex phenomena without some understanding of the mathematical problem and its solutions to guide us

  12. [Fluid dynamics of supercritical helium within internally cooled cabled superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1995-06-01

    The Applied Superconductivity Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison proposes to conduct research on low temperature helium fluid dynamics as it applies to the cooling of internally cooled cabled superconductors (ICCS). Such conductors are used in fusion reactor designs including most of the coils in ITER. The proposed work is primarily experimental involving measurements of transient and steady state pressure drop in a variety of conductor configurations. Both model and prototype conductors for actual magnet designs will be investigated. The primary goal will be to measure and model the friction factor for these complex geometries. In addition, an effort will be made to study transient processes such as heat transfer and fluid expulsion associated with quench conditions.

  13. Wind tunnel requirements for computational fluid dynamics code verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.

    1987-01-01

    The role of experiment in the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for aerodynamic flow field prediction is discussed. Requirements for code verification from two sources that pace the development of CFD are described for: (1) development of adequate flow modeling, and (2) establishment of confidence in the use of CFD to predict complex flows. The types of data needed and their accuracy differs in detail and scope and leads to definite wind tunnel requirements. Examples of testing to assess and develop turbulence models, and to verify code development, are used to establish future wind tunnel testing requirements. Versatility, appropriate scale and speed range, accessibility for nonintrusive instrumentation, computerized data systems, and dedicated use for verification were among the more important requirements identified.

  14. Some Aspects of uncertainty in computational fluid dynamics results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.

    1991-01-01

    Uncertainties are inherent in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). These uncertainties need to be systematically addressed and managed. Sources of these uncertainty analysis are discussed. Some recommendations are made for quantification of CFD uncertainties. A practical method of uncertainty analysis is based on sensitivity analysis. When CFD is used to design fluid dynamic systems, sensitivity-uncertainty analysis is essential.

  15. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  16. Fluid dynamics and vibration of tube banks in fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zukauskas, A.; Ulinskas, R.; Katinas, V.

    1988-01-01

    This work presents results derived in fluid dynamics, hydraulic drag and flow-induced vibrations within transverse and yawed tube banks. The studies encompass banks of smooth, rough and finned tubes at Reynolds numbers from 1 to 2x10/sup 6/. Highlighted in the text are fluid dynamic parameters of tube banks measured at inter-tube spaces and tube surfaces.

  17. Utilizing parallel optimization in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkolaras, Michael

    1998-12-01

    General problems of interest in computational fluid dynamics are investigated by means of optimization. Specifically, in the first part of the dissertation, a method of optimal incremental function approximation is developed for the adaptive solution of differential equations. Various concepts and ideas utilized by numerical techniques employed in computational mechanics and artificial neural networks (e.g. function approximation and error minimization, variational principles and weighted residuals, and adaptive grid optimization) are combined to formulate the proposed method. The basis functions and associated coefficients of a series expansion, representing the solution, are optimally selected by a parallel direct search technique at each step of the algorithm according to appropriate criteria; the solution is built sequentially. In this manner, the proposed method is adaptive in nature, although a grid is neither built nor adapted in the traditional sense using a-posteriori error estimates. Variational principles are utilized for the definition of the objective function to be extremized in the associated optimization problems, ensuring that the problem is well-posed. Complicated data structures and expensive remeshing algorithms and systems solvers are avoided. Computational efficiency is increased by using low-order basis functions and concurrent computing. Numerical results and convergence rates are reported for a range of steady-state problems, including linear and nonlinear differential equations associated with general boundary conditions, and illustrate the potential of the proposed method. Fluid dynamics applications are emphasized. Conclusions are drawn by discussing the method's limitations, advantages, and possible extensions. The second part of the dissertation is concerned with the optimization of the viscous-inviscid-interaction (VII) mechanism in an airfoil flow analysis code. The VII mechanism is based on the concept of a transpiration velocity

  18. Fluid Dynamics and Solidification of Molten Solder Droplets Impacting on a Substrate in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulikakos, Dimos; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Vedha-Nayagam, M.

    1996-01-01

    This program investigates the fluid dynamics and simultaneous solidification of molten solder droplets impacting on a flat substrate. The problem of interest is directly relevant to the printing of microscopic solder droplets in surface mounting of microelectronic devices. The study consists of a theoretical and an experimental component. The theoretical work uses axisymmetric Navier-Stokes models based on finite element techniques. The experimental work is performed in microgravity to allow for the use of larger solder droplets that make feasible the performance of accurate measurements while maintaining similitude of the relevant fluid dynamics groups (Re, We) and keeping the effect of gravity negligible.

  19. Fluid Dynamics and Solidification of Molten Solder Droplets Impacting on a Substrate in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megardis, C. M.; Poulikakos, D.; Diversiev, G.; Boomsma, K.; Xiong, B.; Nayagam, V.

    1999-01-01

    This program investigates the fluid dynamics and simultaneous solidification of molten solder droplets impacting on a flat smooth substrate. The problem of interest is directly relevant to the printing of microscopic solder droplets in surface mounting of microelectronic devices. The study consists of a theoretical and an experimental component. The theoretical work uses axisymmetric Navier-Stokes models based on finite element techniques. The experimental work will be ultimately performed in microgravity in order to allow for the use of larger solder droplets which make feasible the performance of accurate measurements, while maintaining similitude of the relevant fluid dynamics groups (Re, We).

  20. Code System for Two-Dinensional Sn-Neutronics and Fluid Dynamics.

    2003-07-28

    Version 00 SIMMERII is designed to predict the neutronic and fluid-dynamic behavior of an LMFBR during a hypothetical core-disruptive accident. Cross sections depend on temperature and background cross sections. The structure, liquid, and vapor fields are modeled to predict the fluid-dynamic behavior of the reactor. Each field consists of density components to follow the material motion and energy components to predict the material temperatures. For typical accident calculations, the materials are fertile fuel, fissile fuel,more » stainless steel, sodium, control material, and fission gas. Heat, mass, and momentum transfer among the three fields and their components are calculated.« less

  1. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  2. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Joshua A; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26864793

  3. Fluid dynamics of airlift reactors; Two-phase friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Calvo, E. )

    1992-10-01

    Airlift loop reactors (ALR) are useful equipment in biotechnology in a wide range of uses, however their design is not a simple task since prediction of fluid dynamics in these reactors is difficult. Most of the different strategies found in the literature in order to predict two main parameters, namely, gas holdup and liquid velocity, are based on energy or momentum balances. The balances include frictional effects, and it is not yet clear how to predict these effects. The objective of this article is to show how criteria corresponding to one-phase flow may be used in order to predict the frictional effects in ALRs. Based on a model proposed by Garcia-Calvo (1989, 1991), we simulated experimental data of liquid velocity profiles and gas holdup obtained by Young et al. in an ALR with two different configurations. Experimental data obtained in other three external ALRs with different shapes and sizes are also simulated.

  4. Use of computational fluid dynamics in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández Tena, Ana; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a computer-based tool for simulating fluid movement. The main advantages of CFD over other fluid mechanics studies include: substantial savings in time and cost, the analysis of systems or conditions that are very difficult to simulate experimentally (as is the case of the airways), and a practically unlimited level of detail. We used the Ansys-Fluent CFD program to develop a conducting airway model to simulate different inspiratory flow rates and the deposition of inhaled particles of varying diameters, obtaining results consistent with those reported in the literature using other procedures. We hope this approach will enable clinicians to further individualize the treatment of different respiratory diseases. PMID:25618456

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of the Madison Dynamo Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehn, N. S.; Forest, C. B.; Weber, C. R.; Kendrick, R. D.; Taylor, N. Z.; Oakley, J. G.; Bonazza, R.; Spence, Erik

    2007-11-01

    The Madison Dynamo Experiment is designed to study a self-generated magnetic field called a dynamo. The flow characteristics of a water experiment that is dimensionally similar to the liquid sodium experiment has been modeled using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software Fluent. Results from the CFD simulations are used to confirm flow characteristics measured experimentally by both Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). Simulations can also give insight into the flow characteristics in regions of the experiment which are not accessible via the LDV and PIV systems. The results from the simulations are also used as input for a MHD code to predict the threshold for Dynamo onset. The CFD simulations -- in conjunction with the MHD dynamo prediction code -- can be used to design modifications to the experiment to minimize costly changes. The CFD code has shown that the addition of an equatorial baffle along with several poloidal baffles can lower the threshold for Dynamo onset.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics of left ventricular ejection.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, J G; Wang, M; Pasipoularides, A

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation addresses the effects of simple geometric variations on intraventricular ejection dynamics, by methods from computational fluid dynamics. It is an early step in incorporating more and more relevant characteristics of the ejection process, such as a continuously changing irregular geometry, in numerical simulations. We consider the effects of varying chamber eccentricities and outflow valve orifice-to-inner surface area ratios on instantaneous ejection gradients along the axis of symmetry of the left ventricle. The equation of motion for the streamfunction was discretized and solved iteratively with specified boundary conditions on a boundary-fitted adaptive grid, using an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) algorithm. The unsteady aspects of the ejection process were subsequently introduced into the numerical simulation. It was shown that for given chamber volume and outflow orifice area, higher chamber eccentricities require higher ejection pressure gradients for the same velocity and local acceleration values at the aortic anulus than more spherical shapes. This finding is referable to the rise in local acceleration effects across the outflow axis. This is to be contrasted with the case of outflow orifice stenosis, in which it was shown that it is the convective acceleration effects that are intensified strongly. PMID:1562106

  7. The Fluid Dynamics Demo Kit: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Karen; Underhill, Patrick; Prestridge, Kathy

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a fluid dynamics demonstration/experiment kit that can be used by professors and graduate students at high school outreach events. The demonstrations in the kit will be easy to use and true crowd pleasers in order to inspire understanding and pique curiosity about the physics of flow. The kits will be inexpensive, containing readily available materials so that teachers can duplicate the demonstrations and experiments. The kits will be left with the teachers as a gift from the American Physics Society. The experiments and demonstrations cover the concepts of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, Bernoulli's equation, frictional losses and the ideal gas law. For each experiment, the teachers will receive presentation material, access to instructional videos, plus a worksheet that can be used in a high school physics classroom. This kit has been developed through the efforts of the APS-DFD Mentoring and Outreach Committee and has received funding from the APS-DFD. Work funded by the APS-DFD.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics - Applications in Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beninati, Maria Laura; Kathol, Austin; Ziemian, Constance

    2012-11-01

    A new Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) exercise has been developed for the undergraduate introductory fluid mechanics course at Bucknell University. The goal is to develop a computational exercise that students complete which links the manufacturing processes course and the concurrent fluid mechanics course in a way that reinforces the concepts in both. In general, CFD is used as a tool to increase student understanding of the fundamentals in a virtual world. A ``learning factory,'' which is currently in development at Bucknell seeks to use the laboratory as a means to link courses that previously seemed to have little correlation at first glance. A large part of the manufacturing processes course is a project using an injection molding machine. The flow of pressurized molten polyurethane into the mold cavity can also be an example of fluid motion (a jet of liquid hitting a plate) that is applied in manufacturing. The students will run a CFD process that captures this flow using their virtual mold created with a graphics package, such as SolidWorks. The laboratory structure is currently being implemented and analyzed as a part of the ``learning factory''. Lastly, a survey taken before and after the CFD exercise demonstrate a better understanding of both the CFD and manufacturing process.

  9. Fluid dynamics of ventricular filling in the embryonic heart.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laura A

    2011-09-01

    The vertebrate embryonic heart first forms as a valveless tube that pumps blood using waves of contraction. As the heart develops, the atrium and ventricle bulge out from the heart tube, and valves begin to form through the expansion of the endocardial cushions. As a result of changes in geometry, conduction velocities, and material properties of the heart wall, the fluid dynamics and resulting spatial patterns of shear stress and transmural pressure change dramatically. Recent work suggests that these transitions are significant because fluid forces acting on the cardiac walls, as well as the activity of myocardial cells that drive the flow, are necessary for correct chamber and valve morphogenesis. In this article, computational fluid dynamics was used to explore how spatial distributions of the normal forces acting on the heart wall change as the endocardial cushions grow and as the cardiac wall increases in stiffness. The immersed boundary method was used to simulate the fluid-moving boundary problem of the cardiac wall driving the motion of the blood in a simplified model of a two-dimensional heart. The normal forces acting on the heart walls increased during the period of one atrial contraction because inertial forces are negligible and the ventricular walls must be stretched during filling. Furthermore, the force required to fill the ventricle increased as the stiffness of the ventricular wall was increased. Increased endocardial cushion height also drastically increased the force necessary to contract the ventricle. Finally, flow in the moving boundary model was compared to flow through immobile rigid chambers, and the forces acting normal to the walls were substantially different. PMID:21336589

  10. Advanced Production Planning Models

    SciTech Connect

    JONES,DEAN A.; LAWTON,CRAIG R.; KJELDGAARD,EDWIN A.; WRIGHT,STEPHEN TROY; TURNQUIST,MARK A.; NOZICK,LINDA K.; LIST,GEORGE F.

    2000-12-01

    >This report describes the innovative modeling approach developed as a result of a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The overall goal of this project was to provide an effective suite of solvers for advanced production planning at facilities in the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). We focused our development activities on problems related to operations at the DOE's Pantex Plant. These types of scheduling problems appear in many contexts other than Pantex--both within the NWC (e.g., Neutron Generators) and in other commercial manufacturing settings. We successfully developed an innovative and effective solution strategy for these types of problems. We have tested this approach on actual data from Pantex, and from Org. 14000 (Neutron Generator production). This report focuses on the mathematical representation of the modeling approach and presents three representative studies using Pantex data. Results associated with the Neutron Generator facility will be published in a subsequent SAND report. The approach to task-based scheduling described here represents a significant addition to the literature for large-scale, realistic scheduling problems in a variety of production settings.

  11. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2002-11-10

    The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  13. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of chemical looping fuel reactors utilizing gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalatkar, K.; Kuhlman, J.; Huckaby, E.D.; O'Brien, T.

    2011-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic(CFD) model for the fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion technology has been developed,withspecialfocusonaccuratelyrepresentingtheheterogeneous chemicalreactions.Acontinuumtwo-fluidmodelwasusedtodescribeboththegasandsolidphases. Detailedsub-modelstoaccountforfluid–particleandparticle–particleinteractionforceswerealso incorporated.Twoexperimentalcaseswereanalyzedinthisstudy(Son andKim,2006; Mattisonetal., 2001). SimulationswerecarriedouttotestthecapabilityoftheCFDmodeltocapturechangesinoutletgas concentrationswithchangesinnumberofparameterssuchassuperficialvelocity,metaloxide concentration,reactortemperature,etc.Fortheexperimentsof Mattissonetal.(2001), detailedtime varyingoutletconcentrationvalueswerecompared,anditwasfoundthatCFDsimulationsprovideda reasonablematchwiththisdata.

  14. Non-Traditional Fluid Dynamics: Adventures Outside the Realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary S.

    1998-11-01

    External forces have recently prompted a "revolution" in the APS, leading to the formation of the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics and to increased emphasis on non-traditional topics and careers. What does this mean for fluid dynamics? It means more attention to industrial applications, for one thing, but the point of this lecture is that non-traditional fluid dynamics means more than just industrial applications. Something else is also needed: a certain willingness to broaden one's attitude, awareness, and approach. For those in danger of over-specialization, this also offers the opportunity for career redefinition. In fact, a rude career awakening can have the unexpected benefit of encouraging one toward novel and unconventional research interests. These points are made mainly by example, including several alternative fields where fluid dynamics is important, but which are beyond the periphery of our normal vision. These include external bio-fluid dynamics, fluid dynamics in security and forensics, and fluid dynamics in the entertainment industry. Alternative applications of some of our traditional topics, including vortex rings, high-speed jets and capillary waves, are also addressed. The lecture concludes with some advice on broadening one's fluid dynamic perspectives based on strategies that worked and a few lessons learned the hard way.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Matthew; Francois, Marianne M.

    2012-09-05

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  16. The Direct Effect of Flexible Walls on Fontan Connection Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tree, Mike; Fagan, Kiley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-11-01

    The current standard treatment for sufferers of congenital heart defects is the palliative Fontan procedure. The Fontan procedure results in an anastomosis of major veins directly to the branched pulmonary arteries bypassing the dysfunctional ventricle. This total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) extends life past birth, but Fontan patients still suffer long-term complications like decreased exercise capacity, protein-losing enteropathy, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). These complications have direct ties to fluid dynamics within the connection. Previous experimental and computation studies of Fontan connection fluid dynamics employed rigid vessel models. More recent studies utilize flexible models, but a direct comparison of the fundamental fluid dynamics between rigid and flexible vessels only exists for a computational model, without a direct experimental validation. Thus, this study was a direct comparison of fluid dynamics within a rigid and two compliant idealized TCPCs. 2D particle image velocimetry measurements were collected at the connection center plane. Results include power loss, hepatic flow distribution, fluid shear stress, and flow structure recognition. The effect of flexible walls on these values and clinical impact will be discussed.

  17. Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Conference publication includes 79 abstracts and presentations and 3 invited presentations given at the Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion held at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, April 20-22, 1993. The purpose of the workshop is to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion. The workshop is an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics are discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  18. Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Krishnasamy; Ra, youngchul; Reitz, Rolf; Bunting, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

  19. INFLUENCES OF CARTILAGINOUS RINGS ON TRACHEOBRONCHIAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluid dynamics patterns within tracheobronchial airways reflect interactions between cartilaginous rings and inspiratory flow rates. The results of supercomputer simulations performed herein were complex, yet systematic. The effects of cartilaginous rings upon tracheobronchial fl...

  20. Fluid dynamics of competitive swimming: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, T.; Voorhees, A.; Mark, R.; Mittal, R.

    2004-11-01

    The world of competitive swimming is dynamic. Swimmers today are bigger, stronger and faster than they ever have been. The training regimen of an elite athlete includes not only endless practice of his or her skills, but also a carefully planned diet, strength and endurance training, and hours of mental preparation. Within this framework, researchers from Rutgers and George Washington Universities have teamed with USA Swimming to develop advanced, fluid dynamics based training and analysis tools for current and future Olympic swimmers. The focus of this presentation will be on the objectives, methodologies and early outcomes of DPIV measurements of flow around swimmers. Testing was conducted at the Olympic training center in Colorado Springs and focussed specifically on the dolphin kick, an undulating motion swimmers use at the beginning of a race and after pushing off from the wall during a turn. Movies of flow measurements around swimmers, including Beth Botsford, the 1996 Olympic Gold Medalist in the 100 m backstroke, will be presented.

  1. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  2. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  3. Some anticipated contributions to core fluid dynamics from the GRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanvorhies, C.

    1985-01-01

    It is broadly maintained that the secular variation (SV) of the large scale geomagnetic field contains information on the fluid dynamics of Earth's electrically conducting outer core. The electromagnetic theory appropriate to a simple Earth model has recently been combined with reduced geomagnetic data in order to extract some of this information and ascertain its significance. The simple Earth model consists of a rigid, electrically insulating mantle surrounding a spherical, inviscid, and perfectly conducting liquid outer core. This model was tested against seismology by using truncated spherical harmonic models of the observed geomagnetic field to locate Earth's core-mantle boundary, CMB. Further electromagnetic theory has been developed and applied to the problem of estimating the horizontal fluid motion just beneath CMB. Of particular geophysical interest are the hypotheses that these motions: (1) include appreciable surface divergence indicative of vertical motion at depth, and (2) are steady for time intervals of a decade or more. In addition to the extended testing of the basic Earth model, the proposed GRM provides a unique opportunity to test these dynamical hypotheses.

  4. Control of fluid dynamics by nanoparticles in laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Xu, Jiaquan; Zhao, Jingzhou; Li, Xiaochun

    2015-03-01

    Effective control of fluid dynamics is of remarkable scientific and practical significance. It is hypothesized that nanoparticles could offer a novel means to control fluid dynamics. In this study, laser melting was used to investigate the feasibility of tuning fluid dynamics by nanoparticles and possibly breaking existing limits of conventional laser processing techniques. Alumina nanoparticles reinforced nickel samples, fabricated through electrocodeposition, were used for laser melting experiments. Since the melt pool surface is controlled by the fluid dynamics, surface topographies were carefully studied to reveal the nanoparticle effect on the fluid dynamics. Characterizations of surface topographies and microstructures of pure Ni and Ni/Al2O3 nanocomposite were carried out before and after laser melting. The surface roughness of the Ni/Al2O3 nanocomposite sample was reduced significantly by laser melting, which broke the existing limit of laser surface polishing of pure Ni. It is believed that the nanoparticles increased the viscosity of the molten metal, thereby enhancing the viscous damping of the capillary oscillations in the melt pool, to produce a much smoother surface. Moreover, the experimental study also revealed that the viscosity enhancement by the nanoparticles effectively suppressed the thermocapillary flows which would introduce artificial asperities on a surface. The experimental results suggest that nanoparticles are effective in controlling melt pool dynamics and overcoming the existing limits of laser processing. The new methodology, fluid dynamics control by nanoparticles, opens a new pathway to enrich liquid based processes for broad applications.

  5. Including aortic valve morphology in computational fluid dynamics simulations: initial findings and application to aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Wendell, David C; Samyn, Margaret M; Cava, Joseph R; Ellwein, Laura M; Krolikowski, Mary M; Gandy, Kimberly L; Pelech, Andrew N; Shadden, Shawn C; LaDisa, John F

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations quantifying thoracic aortic flow patterns have not included disturbances from the aortic valve (AoV). 80% of patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) which may cause adverse flow patterns contributing to morbidity. Our objectives were to develop a method to account for the AoV in CFD simulations, and quantify its impact on local hemodynamics. The method developed facilitates segmentation of the AoV, spatiotemporal interpolation of segments, and anatomic positioning of segments at the CFD model inlet. The AoV was included in CFD model examples of a normal (tricuspid AoV) and a post-surgical CoA patient (BAV). Velocity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results were compared to equivalent simulations using a plug inlet profile. The plug inlet greatly underestimated TKE for both examples. TAWSS differences extended throughout the thoracic aorta for the CoA BAV, but were limited to the arch for the normal example. OSI differences existed mainly in the ascending aorta for both cases. The impact of AoV can now be included with CFD simulations to identify regions of deleterious hemodynamics thereby advancing simulations of the thoracic aorta one step closer to reality. PMID:22917990

  6. The impact of CFD on development test facilities - A National Research Council projection. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkegi, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a National Research Council study on the effect that advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will have on conventional aeronautical ground testing are reported. Current CFD capabilities include the depiction of linearized inviscid flows and a boundary layer, initial use of Euler coordinates using supercomputers to automatically generate a grid, research and development on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, and preliminary research on solutions to the full N-S equations. Improvements in the range of CFD usage is dependent on the development of more powerful supercomputers, exceeding even the projected abilities of the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (1 BFLOP/sec). Full representation of the Re-averaged N-S equations will require over one million grid points, a computing level predicted to be available in 15 yr. Present capabilities allow identification of data anomalies, confirmation of data accuracy, and adequateness of model design in wind tunnel trials. Account can be taken of the wall effects and the Re in any flight regime during simulation. CFD can actually be more accurate than instrumented tests, since all points in a flow can be modeled with CFD, while they cannot all be monitored with instrumentation in a wind tunnel.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics: A two-edged sword

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A.J.; Kelso, R.M.; Gordon, E.B.; Roy, S.; Schaub, E.G.

    1997-08-01

    This article examines computational fluid dynamics (CFD) limitations as a design tool. Two decades have passed since the first paper was published in the ASHRAE Transactions suggesting the use of CFD for quantitative prediction of room air motion. CFD is an emerging methodology, with roots in the defense/aerospace industry, wherein a mathematical model of fluid flow is converted into a digital computational procedure, yielding numbers that approximate the solution of this modeled system, hence the genuine flow state. CFD methodology has indeed brought bright glimmers of an ability to establish firm quantitative data regarding how room air moves. In fact, CFD can predict fluid levels and pressure differences to very low levels, that are essentially impossible to experimentally measure. However, a CFD model constitutes the culmination of a large number of assumptions and approximations, such that the answers produced are essentially never correct. Further, it is the very approximation process in CFD theory that leads to intrinsic error mechanisms that can range from benign to pathological. The ASHRAE professional who seeks to use CFD to assist in system design needs to be fully aware of these two edges of the CFD sword.

  8. NASA Trapezoidal Wing Computations Including Transition and Advanced Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing is computed with several turbulence models by using grids from the first High Lift Prediction Workshop in an effort to advance understanding of computational fluid dynamics modeling for this type of flowfield. Transition is accounted for in many of the computations. In particular, a recently-developed 4-equation transition model is utilized and works well overall. Accounting for transition tends to increase lift and decrease moment, which improves the agreement with experiment. Upper surface flap separation is reduced, and agreement with experimental surface pressures and velocity profiles is improved. The predicted shape of wakes from upstream elements is strongly influenced by grid resolution in regions above the main and flap elements. Turbulence model enhancements to account for rotation and curvature have the general effect of increasing lift and improving the resolution of the wing tip vortex as it convects downstream. However, none of the models improve the prediction of surface pressures near the wing tip, where more grid resolution is needed.

  9. Introduction to finite-difference methods for numerical fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, E.; Harlow, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    This work is intended to be a beginner`s exercise book for the study of basic finite-difference techniques in computational fluid dynamics. It is written for a student level ranging from high-school senior to university senior. Equations are derived from basic principles using algebra. Some discussion of partial-differential equations is included, but knowledge of calculus is not essential. The student is expected, however, to have some familiarity with the FORTRAN computer language, as the syntax of the computer codes themselves is not discussed. Topics examined in this work include: one-dimensional heat flow, one-dimensional compressible fluid flow, two-dimensional compressible fluid flow, and two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow with additions of the equations of heat flow and the {Kappa}-{epsilon} model for turbulence transport. Emphasis is placed on numerical instabilities and methods by which they can be avoided, techniques that can be used to evaluate the accuracy of finite-difference approximations, and the writing of the finite-difference codes themselves. Concepts introduced in this work include: flux and conservation, implicit and explicit methods, Lagrangian and Eulerian methods, shocks and rarefactions, donor-cell and cell-centered advective fluxes, compressible and incompressible fluids, the Boussinesq approximation for heat flow, Cartesian tensor notation, the Boussinesq approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor, and the modeling of transport equations. A glossary is provided which defines these and other terms.

  10. Fluid dynamics of aortic root dilation in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Fortini, Stefania; Espa, Stefania; Costantini, Martina; Sorgini, Francesca

    2014-09-22

    Aortic root dilation and propensity to dissection are typical manifestations of the Marfan Syndrome (MS), a genetic defect leading to the degeneration of the elastic fibres. Dilation affects the structure of the flow and, in turn, altered flow may play a role in vessel dilation, generation of aneurysms, and dissection. The aim of the present work is the investigation in-vitro of the fluid dynamic modifications occurring as a consequence of the morphological changes typically induced in the aortic root by MS. A mock-loop reproducing the left ventricle outflow tract and the aortic root was used to measure time resolved velocity maps on a longitudinal symmetry plane of the aortic root. Two dilated model aortas, designed to resemble morphological characteristics typically observed in MS patients, have been compared to a reference, healthy geometry. The aortic model was designed to quantitatively reproduce the change of aortic distensibility caused by MS. Results demonstrate that vorticity released from the valve leaflets, and possibly accumulating in the root, plays a fundamental role in redirecting the systolic jet issued from the aortic valve. The altered systolic flow also determines a different residual flow during the diastole. PMID:25001203

  11. Methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification/validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.; Aeschliman, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    The issues of verification, calibration, and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes has been receiving increasing levels of attention in the research literature and in engineering technology. Both CFD researchers and users of CFD codes are asking more critical and detailed questions concerning the accuracy, range of applicability, reliability and robustness of CFD codes and their predictions. This is a welcomed trend because it demonstrates that CFD is maturing from a research tool to the world of impacting engineering hardware and system design. In this environment, the broad issue of code quality assurance becomes paramount. However, the philosophy and methodology of building confidence in CFD code predictions has proven to be more difficult than many expected. A wide variety of physical modeling errors and discretization errors are discussed. Here, discretization errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential equations to algebraic equations, and their solution. Boundary conditions for both the partial differential equations and the discretized equations will be discussed. Contrasts are drawn between the assumptions and actual use of numerical method consistency and stability. Comments are also made concerning the existence and uniqueness of solutions for both the partial differential equations and the discrete equations. Various techniques are suggested for the detection and estimation of errors caused by physical modeling and discretization of the partial differential equations.

  12. Design of airborne wind turbine and computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbreen, Faiqa

    Wind energy is a promising alternative to the depleting non-renewable sources. The height of the wind turbines becomes a constraint to their efficiency. Airborne wind turbine can reach much higher altitudes and produce higher power due to high wind velocity and energy density. The focus of this thesis is to design a shrouded airborne wind turbine, capable to generate 70 kW to propel a leisure boat with a capacity of 8-10 passengers. The idea of designing an airborne turbine is to take the advantage of higher velocities in the atmosphere. The Solidworks model has been analyzed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software StarCCM+. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Simulation (URANS) with K-epsilon turbulence model has been selected, to study the physical properties of the flow, with emphasis on the performance of the turbine and the increase in air velocity at the throat. The analysis has been done using two ambient velocities of 12 m/s and 6 m/s. At 12 m/s inlet velocity, the velocity of air at the turbine has been recorded as 16 m/s. The power generated by the turbine is 61 kW. At inlet velocity of 6 m/s, the velocity of air at turbine increased to 10 m/s. The power generated by turbine is 25 kW.

  13. An Assessment of Supercavitation Transition using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronzeo, Melissa; Kinzel, Michael

    2015-11-01

    A computational fluid dynamics approach is used to improve the understanding of supercavitation and its physical characteristics. A ventilated disk cavitator is used in several studies to evaluate these physics. The first study focuses on twin vortex cavities, specifically to understand correlation between cavity shape and pressure. The study uses validated measurements (in the CFD model) of the cavity shape and pressure for various ventilation rates and Fr numbers. The data is used to evaluate the semi-empirical formula of L.A Epstein, where results indicate a potentially improved correlation. In addition, the detailed measurements of the CFD model yield insight on improved experimental measurement techniques for cavity pressure. The second study uses unsteady detached eddy simulations (DES) to predict hysteresis in the transition behavior of the cavity closure from toroidal vortex to twin-vortex regimes. The solution is initialized as a toroidal-type cavity (low gas ventilation rate), then the ventilation rate is slowly increased until a twin-vortex cavity is formed. In addition, the opposite process is also performed. The data is analyzed to develop an understanding of the unknown physical mechanisms involved in the transition process.

  14. Aircraft T-tail flutter predictions using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attorni, A.; Cavagna, L.; Quaranta, G.

    2011-02-01

    The paper presents the application of computational aeroelasticity (CA) methods to the analysis of a T-tail stability in transonic regime. For this flow condition unsteady aerodynamics show a significant dependency from the aircraft equilibrium flight configuration, which rules both the position of shock waves in the flow field and the load distribution on the horizontal tail plane. Both these elements have an influence on the aerodynamic forces, and so on the aeroelastic stability of the system. The numerical procedure proposed allows to investigate flutter stability for a free-flying aircraft, iterating until convergence the following sequence of sub-problems: search for the trimmed condition for the deformable aircraft; linearize the system about the stated equilibrium point; predict the aeroelastic stability boundaries using the inferred linear model. An innovative approach based on sliding meshes allows to represent the changes of the computational fluid domain due to the motion of control surfaces used to trim the aircraft. To highlight the importance of keeping the linear model always aligned to the trim condition, and at the same time the capabilities of the computational fluid dynamics approach, the method is applied to a real aircraft with a T-tail configuration: the P180.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Framework for Turbine Biological Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Cada, G. F.

    2011-05-04

    In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment is introduced to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising designs. Discussion here is focused on Kaplan-type turbines, although the method could be extended to other designs. Following the description of the general methodology, we will present sample risk assessment calculations based on CFD data from a model of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the USA.

  16. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations. PMID:24525420

  17. Development of a CFD Code for Analysis of Fluid Dynamic Forces in Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh M.; Przekwas, Andrzej J.; Singhal, Ashok K.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to develop a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for the analysis of fluid flow in cylindrical seals and evaluation of the dynamic forces on the seals. This code is expected to serve as a scientific tool for detailed flow analysis as well as a check for the accuracy of the 2D industrial codes. The features necessary in the CFD code are outlined. The initial focus was to develop or modify and implement new techniques and physical models. These include collocated grid formulation, rotating coordinate frames and moving grid formulation. Other advanced numerical techniques include higher order spatial and temporal differencing and an efficient linear equation solver. These techniques were implemented in a 2D flow solver for initial testing. Several benchmark test cases were computed using the 2D code, and the results of these were compared to analytical solutions or experimental data to check the accuracy. Tests presented here include planar wedge flow, flow due to an enclosed rotor, and flow in a 2D seal with a whirling rotor. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results for an annular seal and a 7-cavity labyrinth seal are also included.

  18. Assessment of Surgical Effects on Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gary C.; Koomullil, Roy P.; Ito, Yasushi; Shih, Alan M.; Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Waite, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is one of the most common sleep disorders. To treat patients with this health problem, it is important to detect the severity of this syndrome and occlusion sites in each patient. The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that the cure of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by maxillomandibular advancement surgery can be predicted by analyzing the effect of anatomical airway changes on the pressure effort required for normal breathing using a high-fidelity, 3-D numerical model. The employed numerical model consists of: 1) 3-D upper airway geometry construction from patient-specific computed tomographic scans using an image segmentation technique, 2) mixed-element mesh generation of the numerically constructed airway geometry for discretizing the domain of interest, and 3) computational fluid dynamics simulations for predicting the flow field within the airway and the degree of severity of breathing obstruction. In the present study, both laminar and turbulent flow simulations were performed to predict the flow field in the upper airway of the selected patients before and after maxillomandibular advancement surgery. Patients of different body mass indices were also studied to assess their effects. The numerical results were analyzed to evaluate the pressure gradient along the upper airway. The magnitude of the pressure gradient is regarded as the pressure effort required for breathing, and the extent of reduction of the pressure effort is taken to measure the success of the surgery. The description of the employed numerical model, numerical results from simulations of various patients, and suggestion for future work are detailed in this paper. PMID:25530663

  19. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Becausemore » it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.« less

  20. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc. PMID:22582815

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Canadian Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassat, Mohammad; Bailey, Joanne; Yetisir, Metin

    2015-11-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation was performed on the proposed design for the Canadian SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR). The proposed Canadian SCWR is a 1200 MW(e) supercritical light-water cooled nuclear reactor with pressurized fuel channels. The reactor concept uses an inlet plenum that all fuel channels are attached to and an outlet header nested inside the inlet plenum. The coolant enters the inlet plenum at 350 C and exits the outlet header at 625 C. The operating pressure is approximately 26 MPa. The high pressure and high temperature outlet conditions result in a higher electric conversion efficiency as compared to existing light water reactors. In this work, CFD simulations were performed to model fluid flow and heat transfer in the inlet plenum, outlet header, and various parts of the fuel assembly. The ANSYS Fluent solver was used for simulations. Results showed that mass flow rate distribution in fuel channels varies radially and the inner channels achieve higher outlet temperatures. At the outlet header, zones with rotational flow were formed as the fluid from 336 fuel channels merged. Results also suggested that insulation of the outlet header should be considered to reduce the thermal stresses caused by the large temperature gradients.

  2. Assessing abdominal aorta narrowing using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Al-Rawi, Mohammad; Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the effect of developing arterial blockage at the abdominal aorta on the blood pressure waves at an externally accessible location suitable for invasive measurements such as the brachial and the femoral arteries. Arterial blockages are created surgically within the abdominal aorta of healthy Wistar rats to create narrowing resemblance conditions. Blood pressure is measured using a catheter inserted into the right femoral artery. Measurements are taken at the baseline healthy condition as well as at four different severities (20, 50, 80 and 100 %) of arterial blockage. In vivo and in vitro measurements of the lumen diameter and wall thickness are taken using magnetic resonance imaging and microscopic techniques, respectively. These data are used to validate a 3D computational fluid dynamics model which is developed to generalize the outcomes of this work and to determine the arterial stress and strain under the blockage conditions. This work indicates that an arterial blockage in excess of 20 % of the lumen diameter significantly influences the pressure wave and reduces the systolic blood pressure at the right femoral artery. High wall shear stresses and low circumferential strains are also generated at the blockage site. PMID:26319006

  3. Development of new flux splitting schemes. [computational fluid dynamics algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Maximizing both accuracy and efficiency has been the primary objective in designing a numerical algorithm for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is especially important for solutions of complex three dimensional systems of Navier-Stokes equations which often include turbulence modeling and chemistry effects. Recently, upwind schemes have been well received for their capability in resolving discontinuities. With this in mind, presented are two new flux splitting techniques for upwind differencing. The first method is based on High-Order Polynomial Expansions (HOPE) of the mass flux vector. The second new flux splitting is based on the Advection Upwind Splitting Method (AUSM). The calculation of the hypersonic conical flow demonstrates the accuracy of the splitting in resolving the flow in the presence of strong gradients. A second series of tests involving the two dimensional inviscid flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil demonstrates the ability of the AUSM to resolve the shock discontinuity at transonic speed. A third case calculates a series of supersonic flows over a circular cylinder. Finally, the fourth case deals with tests of a two dimensional shock wave/boundary layer interaction.

  4. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  5. Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1997-09-01

    Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Demonstration of Rigid Bodies in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarena, Ernesto; Vu, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    The Design Analysis Branch (NE-Ml) at the Kennedy Space Center has not had the ability to accurately couple Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). OVERFLOW-D is a flow solver that has been developed by NASA to have the capability to analyze and simulate dynamic motions with up to six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF). Two simulations were prepared over the course of the internship to demonstrate 6DOF motion of rigid bodies under aerodynamic loading. The geometries in the simulations were based on a conceptual Space Launch System (SLS). The first simulation that was prepared and computed was the motion of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) as it separates from its core stage. To reduce computational time during the development of the simulation, only half of the physical domain with respect to the symmetry plane was simulated. Then a full solution was prepared and computed. The second simulation was a model of the SLS as it departs from a launch pad under a 20 knot crosswind. This simulation was reduced to Two Dimensions (2D) to reduce both preparation and computation time. By allowing 2-DOF for translations and 1-DOF for rotation, the simulation predicted unrealistic rotation. The simulation was then constrained to only allow translations.

  7. Fluid Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Vapor Phase Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.

    1985-01-01

    The ground-based research effort under this program is concerned with systematic studies of the effects of variations: (1) of the relative importance of buoyancy-driven convection, and (2) of diffusion and viscosity conditions on crystal properties. These experimental studies are supported by thermodynamic characterizations of the systems, based on which fluid dynamic parameters can be determined. The specific materials under investigation include: the GeSe-GeI4, Ge-GeI4, HgTe-HgI2, and Hg sub (1-x)Cd sub (x) Te-HgI2 systems. Mass transport rate studies of the GeSe-GeI system as a function of orientation of the density gradient relative to the gravity vector demonstrated the validity of flux anomalies observed in earlier space experiments. The investigation of the effects of inert gases on mass flux yielded the first experimental evidence for the existence of a boundary layer in closed ampoules. Combined with a thorough thermodynamic analysis, a transport model for diffusive flow including chemical vapor transport, sublimation, and Stefan flow was developed.

  8. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  9. Remote Visualization and Remote Collaboration On Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A new technology has been developed for remote visualization that provides remote, 3D, high resolution, dynamic, interactive viewing of scientific data (such as fluid dynamics simulations or measurements). Based on this technology, some World Wide Web sites on the Internet are providing fluid dynamics data for educational or testing purposes. This technology is also being used for remote collaboration in joint university, industry, and NASA projects in computational fluid dynamics and wind tunnel testing. Previously, remote visualization of dynamic data was done using video format (transmitting pixel information) such as video conferencing or MPEG movies on the Internet. The concept for this new technology is to send the raw data (e.g., grids, vectors, and scalars) along with viewing scripts over the Internet and have the pixels generated by a visualization tool running on the viewer's local workstation. The visualization tool that is currently used is FAST (Flow Analysis Software Toolkit).

  10. Advanced Turbulence Modeling Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    The ZCET program developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is to study hydrogen/air injection concepts for aircraft gas turbine engines that meet conventional gas turbine performance levels and provide low levels of harmful NOx emissions. A CFD study for ZCET program has been successfully carried out. It uses the most recently enhanced National combustion code (NCC) to perform CFD simulations for two configurations of hydrogen fuel injectors (GRC- and Sandia-injector). The results can be used to assist experimental studies to provide quick mixing, low emission and high performance fuel injector designs. The work started with the configuration of the single-hole injector. The computational models were taken from the experimental designs. For example, the GRC single-hole injector consists of one air tube (0.78 inches long and 0.265 inches in diameter) and two hydrogen tubes (0.3 inches long and 0.0226 inches in diameter opposed at 180 degree). The hydrogen tubes are located 0.3 inches upstream from the exit of the air element (the inlet location for the combustor). To do the simulation, the single-hole injector is connected to a combustor model (8.16 inches long and 0.5 inches in diameter). The inlet conditions for air and hydrogen elements are defined according to actual experimental designs. Two crossing jets of hydrogen/air are simulated in detail in the injector. The cold flow, reacting flow, flame temperature, combustor pressure and possible flashback phenomena are studied. Two grid resolutions of the numerical model have been adopted. The first computational grid contains 0.52 million elements, the second one contains over 1.3 million elements. The CFD results have shown only about 5% difference between the two grid resolutions. Therefore, the CFD result obtained from the model of 1.3-million grid resolution can be considered as a grid independent numerical solution. Turbulence models built in NCC are consolidated and well tested. They can handle both coarse and

  11. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a centrifugal blood pump with washout holes.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Y; Ito, K; Sawairi, T; Konishi, Y; Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Masuzawa, T; Tsukiya, T; Endo, S; Taenaka, Y

    2000-08-01

    The authors studied avoidance of coagulation occurrence using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis from the fluid dynamical point of view. Concerning centrifugal pumps, blood coagulation sometimes occurs at the region behind the impeller where the flow is generally stagnant. Therefore, we conducted a thorough study with the specimen pump with and without washout holes, mocking up the Nikkiso HPM-15. As the result, the model with washout holes indicated that the fluid rotates rapidly at the vicinity of the shaft and generates washout effects near the stationary rear casing. On the other hand, the model without washout holes showed that fluid cannot be quickly shipped out of the area behind the impeller and rotates mildly around the shaft. To clarify the moving relations between the impeller and the fluid, validation studies by comparing the results of CFD analysis and flow visualization experiments are ongoing; thus far, the studies show that CFD results are similar to the results from flow visualization experiments. PMID:10971255

  12. Computational fluid dynamics - Current capabilities and directions for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has made great strides in the detailed simulation of complex fluid flows, including some of those not before understood. It is now being routinely applied to some rather complicated problems and starting to affect the design cycle of aerospace flight vehicles and their components. It is being used to complement, and is being complemented by, experimental studies. Several examples are presented in the paper to illustrate the current state of the art. Included is a discussion of the barriers to accomplishing the basic objective of numerical simulation. In addition, the directions for the future in the discipline of computational fluid dynamics are addressed.

  13. Application of wave mechanics theory to fluid dynamics problems: Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krzywoblocki, M. Z. V.

    1974-01-01

    The application of the basic formalistic elements of wave mechanics theory is discussed. The theory is used to describe the physical phenomena on the microscopic level, the fluid dynamics of gases and liquids, and the analysis of physical phenomena on the macroscopic (visually observable) level. The practical advantages of relating the two fields of wave mechanics and fluid mechanics through the use of the Schroedinger equation constitute the approach to this relationship. Some of the subjects include: (1) fundamental aspects of wave mechanics theory, (2) laminarity of flow, (3) velocity potential, (4) disturbances in fluids, (5) introductory elements of the bifurcation theory, and (6) physiological aspects in fluid dynamics.

  14. A computational fluid dynamics simulation of the hypersonic flight of the Pegasus(TM) vehicle using an artificial viscosity model and a nonlinear filtering method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, John Cadiz

    1995-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code, PARC3D, is tested to see if its use of non-physical artificial dissipation affects the accuracy of its results. This is accomplished by simulating a shock-laminar boundary layer interaction and several hypersonic flight conditions of the Pegasus(TM) launch vehicle using full artificial dissipation, low artificial dissipation, and the Engquist filter. Before the filter is applied to the PARC3D code, it is validated in one-dimensional and two-dimensional form in a MacCormack scheme against the Riemann and convergent duct problem. For this explicit scheme, the filter shows great improvements in accuracy and computational time as opposed to the nonfiltered solutions. However, for the implicit PARC3D code it is found that the best estimate of the Pegasus experimental heat fluxes and surface pressures is the simulation utilizing low artificial dissipation and no filter. The filter does improve accuracy over the artificially dissipative case but at a computational expense greater than that achieved by the low artificial dissipation case which has no computational time penalty and shows better results. For the shock-boundary layer simulation, the filter does well in terms of accuracy for a strong impingement shock but not as well for weaker shock strengths. Furthermore, for the latter problem the filter reduces the required computational time to convergence by 18.7 percent.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics in a marine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Arthur D.

    1987-01-01

    The introduction of the supercomputer and recent advances in both Reynolds averaged, and large eddy simulation fluid flow approximation techniques to the Navier-Stokes equations, have created a robust environment for the exploration of problems of interest to the Navy in general, and the Naval Underwater Systems Center in particular. The nature of problems that are of interest, and the type of resources needed for their solution are addressed. The goal is to achieve a good engineering solution to the fluid-structure interaction problem. It is appropriate to indicate that a paper by D. Champman played a major role in developing the interest in the approach discussed.

  16. Fluid dynamics: Turbulence spreads like wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Michael D.

    2015-10-01

    A simple model captures the key features of the transition from smooth to turbulent flow for a fluid in a pipe. The findings pave the way for more-complex models and may have engineering ramifications. See Letter p.550

  17. Analysis of haemodynamic factors involved in carotid atherosclerosis using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martin, D; Zaman, A; Hacker, J; Mendelow, D; Birchall, D

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis presents a massive healthcare burden in both the developing and developed world. There is mounting evidence relating to the involvement of haemodynamic factors in the pathogenesis of this process. This article aims to review the current understandings that have developed in this area, and to present a demonstrative case study obtained using state of the art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to model and analyse haemodynamic factors within the atheromatous carotid artery bifurcation. PMID:20348534

  18. Amplification without instability: applying fluid dynamical insights in chemistry and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Jonathan H.

    2013-11-01

    While amplification of small perturbations often arises from instability, transient amplification is possible locally even in asymptotically stable systems. That is, knowledge of a system's stability properties can mislead one's intuition for its transient behaviors. This insight, which has an interesting history in fluid dynamics, has more recently been rediscovered in ecology. Surprisingly, many nonlinear fluid dynamical and ecological systems share linear features associated with transient amplification of noise. This paper aims to establish that these features are widespread in many other disciplines concerned with noisy systems, especially chemistry, cell biology and molecular biology. Here, using classic nonlinear systems and the graphical language of network science, we explore how the noise amplification problem can be reframed in terms of activatory and inhibitory interactions between dynamical variables. The interaction patterns considered here are found in a great variety of systems, ranging from autocatalytic reactions and activator-inhibitor systems to influential models of nerve conduction, glycolysis, cell signaling and circadian rhythms.

  19. Parallel simulation of subsonic fluid dynamics on a cluster of workstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skordos, Panayotis A.

    1994-11-01

    An effective approach of simulating fluid dynamics on a cluster of non-dedicated workstations is presented. The approach uses local interaction algorithms, small communication capacity, and automatic migration of parallel processes from busy hosts to free hosts. The approach is well-suited for simulating subsonic flow problems which involve both hydrodynamics and acoustic waves, for example, the flow of air inside wind musical instruments. Typical simulations achieve 80% parallel efficiency (speedup/processors) using 20 HP-Apollo workstations. Detailed measurements of the parallel efficiency of 2D and 3D simulations are presented, and a theoretical model of efficiency is developed which fits closely the measurements. Two numerical methods of fluid dynamics are tested: explicit finite differences, and the lattice Boltzmann method.

  20. Fluid dynamics in developmental biology: moving fluids that shape ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H.E.; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2009-01-01

    Human conception, indeed fertilization in general, takes place in a fluid, but what role does fluid dynamics have during the subsequent development of an organism? It is becoming increasingly clear that the number of genes in the genome of a typical organism is not sufficient to specify the minutiae of all features of its ontogeny. Instead, genetics often acts as a choreographer, guiding development but leaving some aspects to be controlled by physical and chemical means. Fluids are ubiquitous in biological systems, so it is not surprising that fluid dynamics should play an important role in the physical and chemical processes shaping ontogeny. However, only in a few cases have the strands been teased apart to see exactly how fluid forces operate to guide development. Here, we review instances in which the hand of fluid dynamics in developmental biology is acknowledged, both in human development and within a wider biological context, together with some in which fluid dynamics is notable but whose workings have yet to be understood, and we provide a fluid dynamicist’s perspective on possible avenues for future research. PMID:19794816

  1. Computational fluid dynamics development and validation at Bell Helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narramore, J. C.

    1995-08-01

    An overview of the development of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology at Bell Helicopter Textron is given. As new technologies have been developed their functionality has been assessed by their ability to reproduce wind tunnel measurements in a timely manner. Examples of some of these correlation study results are provided.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics applications to improve crop production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), numerical analysis and simulation tools of fluid flow processes have emerged from the development stage and become nowadays a robust design tool. It is widely used to study various transport phenomena which involve fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, providing det...

  3. Morphological stability and fluid dynamics of vapor crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    Research on morphological stability and fluid dynamics of crystal growth is discussed. Interfacial heat and mass transfer research is discussed. The finding of surface roughening is a precursor to a solid-solid phase transition was further quantified. Progress was obtained with the mass spectroscopic characterization of GeSe-Ge I sub 4.

  4. Derivation of anisotropic dissipative fluid dynamics from the Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Etele; Niemi, Harri; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2016-06-01

    Fluid-dynamical equations of motion can be derived from the Boltzmann equation in terms of an expansion around a single-particle distribution function which is in local thermodynamical equilibrium, i.e., isotropic in momentum space in the rest frame of a fluid element. However, in situations where the single-particle distribution function is highly anisotropic in momentum space, such as the initial stage of heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies, such an expansion is bound to break down. Nevertheless, one can still derive a fluid-dynamical theory, called anisotropic dissipative fluid dynamics, in terms of an expansion around a single-particle distribution function, f^0 k, which incorporates (at least parts of) the momentum anisotropy via a suitable parametrization. We construct such an expansion in terms of polynomials in energy and momentum in the direction of the anisotropy and of irreducible tensors in the two-dimensional momentum subspace orthogonal to both the fluid velocity and the direction of the anisotropy. From the Boltzmann equation we then derive the set of equations of motion for the irreducible moments of the deviation of the single-particle distribution function from f^0 k. Truncating this set via the 14-moment approximation, we obtain the equations of motion of anisotropic dissipative fluid dynamics.

  5. Lagrangian fluid dynamics using the Voronoi-Delauanay mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Dukowicz, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    A Lagrangian technique for numerical fluid dynamics is described. This technique makes use of the Voronoi mesh to efficiently locate new neighbors, and it uses the dual (Delaunay) triangulation to define computational cells. This removes all topological restrictions and facilitates the solution of problems containing interfaces and multiple materials. To improve computational accuracy a mesh smoothing procedure is employed.

  6. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  7. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  8. Computational fluid dynamics combustion analysis evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Chen, C. P.; Ziebarth, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    This study involves the development of numerical modelling in spray combustion. These modelling efforts are mainly motivated to improve the computational efficiency in the stochastic particle tracking method as well as to incorporate the physical submodels of turbulence, combustion, vaporization, and dense spray effects. The present mathematical formulation and numerical methodologies can be casted in any time-marching pressure correction methodologies (PCM) such as FDNS code and MAST code. A sequence of validation cases involving steady burning sprays and transient evaporating sprays will be included.

  9. The Direction of Fluid Dynamics for Liquid Propulsion at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    2012-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-designated center for the development of space launch systems. MSFC is particularly known for propulsion system development. Many engineering skills and technical disciplines are needed to accomplish this mission. This presentation will focus on the work of the Fluid Dynamics Branch (ER42). ER42 resides in the Propulsion Systems Department at MSFC. The branch is responsible for all aspects of the discipline of fluid dynamics applied to propulsion or propulsion-induced loads and environments. This work begins with design trades and parametric studies, and continues through development, risk assessment, anomaly investigation and resolution, and failure investigations. Applications include the propellant delivery system including the main propulsion system (MPS) and turbomachinery; combustion devices for liquid engines and solid rocket motors; coupled systems; and launch environments. An advantage of the branch is that it is neither analysis nor test centric, but discipline centric. Fluid dynamics assessments are made by analysis, from lumped parameter modeling through unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD); testing, which can be cold flow or hot fire; or a combination of analysis and testing. Integration of all discipline methods into one branch enables efficient and accurate support to the projects. To accomplish this work, the branch currently employs approximately fifty engineers divided into four teams -- Propellant Delivery CFD, Combustion Driven Flows CFD, Unsteady and Experimental Flows, and Acoustics and Stability. This discussion will highlight some of the work performed in the branch and the direction in which the branch is headed.

  10. Fluid dynamics of liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Kumbár, Vojtěch; Strnková, Jana; Nedomová, Šárka; Buchar, Jaroslav

    2015-06-01

    The rheological behavior of liquid egg products (egg yolk, egg white, and whole liquid egg) was studied using a concentric cylinder viscometer. Eggs of three poultry specimens were used: hen (Isa Brown), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), and goose (Anser anser f. domestica). Rheological behavior was pseudoplastic and flow curves fitted by the power law model (Herschel-Bulkley and Ostwald-De Waele). The meaning of rheological parameters on friction factors and velocity profiles during flow of liquid egg products in tube has been shown. PMID:25761859

  11. Fluctuations and Response in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio

    The climate is a complex, chaotic, non-equilibrium system featuring a limited horizon of predictability, variability on a vast range of temporal and spatial scales, instabilities resulting into energy transformations, and mixing and dissipative processes resulting into entropy production. Despite great progresses, we still do not have a complete theory of climate dynamics able to account for instabilities, equilibration processes, response to changing parameters of the system, and multiscale effects. We will outline some possible applications of the response theory developed by Ruelle for non-equilibrium statistical mechanical systems, showing how it allows for setting on firm ground and on a coherent framework concepts like climate sensitivity, climate response, and climate tipping points, and to construct parametrizations for unresolved processes. We will show results for comprehensive global climate models. The results are promising in terms of suggesting new ways for approaching the problem of climate change prediction and for using more efficiently the enormous amounts of data produced by modeling groups around the world. Ref: V. Lucarini, R. Blender, C. Herbert, F. Ragone, S. Pascale, J. Wouters, Mathematical and Physical Ideas for Climate Science, Reviews of Geophysics 52, 809-859 (2014)

  12. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of aerosol deposition in pebble beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhosi, Margaret Msongi

    2007-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor is a high temperature gas cooled reactor which uses helium gas as a coolant. The reactor uses spherical graphite pebbles as fuel. The fuel design is inherently resistant to the release of the radioactive material up to high temperatures; therefore, the plant can withstand a broad spectrum of accidents with limited release of radionuclides to the environment. Despite safety features of the concepts, these reactors still contain large inventories of radioactive materials. The transport of most of the radioactive materials in an accident occurs in the form of aerosol particles. In this dissertation, the limits of applicability of existing computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT to the prediction of aerosol transport have been explored. The code was run using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models to determine the effects of different turbulence models on the prediction of aerosol particle deposition. Analyses were performed for up to three unit cells in the orthorhombic configuration. For low flow conditions representing natural circulation driven flow, the laminar flow model was used and the results were compared with existing experimental data for packed beds. The results compares well with experimental data in the low flow regime. For conditions corresponding to normal operating of the reactor, analyses were performed using the standard k-ɛ turbulence model. From the inertial deposition results, a correlation that can be used to estimate the deposition of aerosol particles within pebble beds given inlet flow conditions has been developed. These results were converted into a dimensionless form as a function of a modified Stokes number. Based on results obtained in the laminar regime and for individual pebbles, the correlation developed for the inertial impaction component of deposition is believed to be credible. The form of the correlation developed also allows these results to be applied to pebble beds of different

  13. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  14. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  15. Fluid dynamical niches of phytoplankton types.

    PubMed

    d'Ovidio, Francesco; De Monte, Silvia; Alvain, Séverine; Dandonneau, Yves; Lévy, Marina

    2010-10-26

    The biogeochemical role of phytoplanktonic organisms strongly varies from one plankton type to another, and their relative abundance and distribution have fundamental consequences at the global and climatological scales. In situ observations find dominant types often associated to specific physical and chemical water properties. However, the mechanisms and spatiotemporal scales by which marine ecosystems are organized are largely not known. Here we investigate the spatiotemporal organization of phytoplankton communities by combining multisatellite data, notably high-resolution ocean-color maps of dominant types and altimetry-derived Lagrangian diagnostics of the surface transport. We find that the phytoplanktonic landscape is organized in (sub-)mesoscale patches (10-100 km) of dominant types separated by physical fronts induced by horizontal stirring. These physical fronts delimit niches supported by water masses of similar history and whose lifetimes are comparable with the timescale of the bloom onset (few weeks). The resonance between biological activity and physical processes suggest that the spatiotemporal (sub-)mesoscales associated to stirring are determinant in the observation and modeling of marine ecosystems. PMID:20974927

  16. The Effective Field Theory Approach to Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endlich, Solomon George Shamsuddin Osman

    In this thesis we initiate a systematic study of fluid dynamics using the effective field theory (EFT) program. We consider the canonical quantization of an ordinary fluid in an attempt to discover if there is some kind of quantum mechanical inconsistency with ordinary fluids at zero temperature. The system exhibits a number of peculiarities associated with the vortex degrees of freedom. We also study the dynamics of a nearly incompressible fluid via (classical) effective field theory. In the kinematical regime corresponding to near incompressibility (small fluid velocities and accelerations), compressional modes are, by definition, difficult to excite, and can be dealt with perturbatively. We systematically outline the corresponding perturbative expansion, which can be thought of as an expansion in the ratio of fluid velocity and speed of sound. This perturbation theory allows us to compute many interesting quantities associated with sound-flow interactions. Additionally, we also improve on the so-called vortex filament model, by providing a local field theory describing the dynamics of vortex-line systems and their interaction with sound, to all orders in perturbation theory. Next, we develop a cosmological model where primordial inflation is driven by a 'solid'. The low energy EFT describing such a system is just a less symmetric version of the action of a fluid---it lacks the volume preserving diffeomorphism. The symmetry breaking pattern of this system differs drastically from that of standard inflationary models: time translations are unbroken. This prevents our model from fitting into the standard effective field theory description of adiabatic perturbations, with crucial consequences for the dynamics of cosmological perturbations. And finally, we introduce dissipative effects in the effective field theory of hydrodynamics. We do this in a model-independent fashion by coupling the long-distance degrees of freedom explicitly kept in the effective field theory

  17. Fluid Dynamic Experiments on Mush Column Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan-Brown, R. E.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    A vertically extensive stack of sills interconnected by pipe-like conduits extending from the mantle through the lithosphere and capped by a volcanic center is a magmatic mush column. At any instant at various locations it contains fractionated and primitive melts as pools of nearly crystal-free magma, pools of crystal-rich magma, thick beds of cumulates, open conduits, and conduits congested by cognate and wall debris. All boundaries of the system are sheathed by solidification fronts. With the wide range of local, characteristic length scales there is a commensurate range of solidification time scales. This creates a complicated series of resistances to magma flow and provides a variety of distinct local physical environments for the chemical modification of magma. The system is driven by over-pressure from the addition of new melt from below. The over-pressure propagates upward by moving magma which flushes conduits, disrupts cumulate beds, and pools or purges sills. A critical aspect of this process is the entrainment, transport, and deposition of crystals throughout the system. Picritic lavas charges with entrained (tramp) olivine of a wide compositional range erupted at many systems (e.g. Jan Mayen, Kilauea, Reunion, etc.) are the final expression of this process. That the size and abundance of these crystals is correlated with eruptive flux (Murata & Richter, AJS, 1966) suggests an important indicator of the overall dynamics of the mush column. A mush column of this basic nature is observed is observed in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica and is inferred beneath Hawaii and the ocean ridges. We have attempted to model this process by studying the entrainment, transport, and deposition of particles in a vertical stack of sills (Plexiglas tanks) connected by resistive conduits (check valves), over-pressured from the base, and open at the top. The system is about two meters in height with water and oil as fluids and particles with Reynolds numbers

  18. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  19. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  20. The aerospace plane design challenge - Credible computational fluid dynamics results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1990-01-01

    In order to establish the credibility of CFD results utilized in aerospace plane design, the following topics are discussed: CFD validation in relation to 'measureable' fluid dynamics (MFD) validation, credibility requirements, responsibility for credibility, and a guide for establishing credibility. What is of paramount concern for fluid dynamic design is not CFD code validation but qualification of CFD unknowns so that their magnitude is greatly reduced and that these uncertainties are employed for designing with margin. The designers must be trained to properly use CFD if they are to produce good designs. In approximately 70 percent of the flight envelopes of SSTO aerospace planes with supersonic combustion, CFD will be necessary to determine dynamics performance and specifications.

  1. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  2. Vectorization of computer programs with applications to computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentzsch, W.

    Techniques for adapting serial computer programs to the architecture of modern vector computers are presented and illustrated with examples, mainly from the field of computational fluid dynamics. The limitations of conventional computers are reviewed; the vector computers CRAY-1S and CDC-CYBER 205 are characterized; and chapters are devoted to vectorization of FORTRAN programs, sample-program vectorization on five different vector and parallel-architecture computers, restructuring of basic linear-algebra algorithms, iterative methods, vectorization of simple numerical algorithms, and fluid-dynamics vectorization on CRAY-1 (including an implicit beam and warming scheme, an implicit finite-difference method for laminar boundary-layer equations, the Galerkin method and a direct Monte Carlo simulation). Diagrams, charts, tables, and photographs are provided.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Icing: a Predictive Tool for In-Flight Icing Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppetelli, Danial

    In-flight icing is a hazard that continues to afflict the aviation industry, despite all the research and efforts to mitigate the risks. The recurrence of these types of accidents has given renewed impetus to the development of advanced analytical predictive tools to study both the accretion of ice on aircraft components in flight, and the aerodynamic consequences of such ice accumulations. In this work, an in-depth analysis of the occurrence of in-flight icing accidents and incidents was conducted to identify high-risk flight conditions. To investigate these conditions more thoroughly, a computational fluid dynamics model of a representative airfoil was developed to recreate experiments from the icing wind tunnel that occurred in controlled flight conditions. The ice accumulations and resulting aerodynamic performance degradations of the airfoil were computed for a range or pitch angles and flight speeds. These simulations revealed substantial performance losses such as reduced maximum lift, and decreased stall angle. From these results, an icing hazard analysis tool was developed, using risk management principles, to evaluate the dangers of in-flight icing for a specific aircraft based on the atmospheric conditions it is expected to encounter, as well as the effectiveness of aircraft certification procedures. This method is then demonstrated through the simulation of in-flight icing scenarios based on real flight data from accidents and incidents. The risk management methodology is applied to the results of the simulations and the predicted performance degradation is compared to recorded aircraft performance characteristics at the time of the occurrence. The aircraft performance predictions and resulting risk assessment are found to correspond strongly to the pilot's comments as well as to the severity of the incident.

  4. Fluid dynamics and solidification of levitated drops and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid dynamic investigaton of simple free liquid drops is described based on ground-based and low-gravity experimental results. The behavior of compound drops and liquid shells as described in recent theoretical and experimental studies is discussed. Experimental investigations using both levitation devices and drop tubes are considered in the case of 1-g laboratory investigations, highlighting the advantages and drawbacks of both techniques.

  5. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  6. Parallel Domain Decomposition Preconditioning for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Chan, Tony F.; Tang, Wei-Pai; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the parallel domain decomposition preconditioning for computational fluid dynamics. Details are given on some difficult fluid flow problems, stabilized spatial discretizations, and Newton's method for solving the discretized flow equations. Schur complement domain decomposition is described through basic formulation, simplifying strategies (including iterative subdomain and Schur complement solves, matrix element dropping, localized Schur complement computation, and supersparse computations), and performance evaluation.

  7. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2001-01-01

    Considerable progress over the past thirty years has been made in the development of large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Computations are used routinely to design the cruise shapes of transport aircraft through complex-geometry simulations involving the solution of 25-100 million equations; in this arena the number of wind-tunnel tests for a new design has been substantially reduced. However, simulations of the entire flight envelope of the vehicle, including maximum lift, buffet onset, flutter, and control effectiveness have not been as successful in eliminating the reliance on wind-tunnel testing. These simulations involve unsteady flows with more separation and stronger shock waves than at cruise. The main reasons limiting further inroads of CFD into the design process are: (1) the reliability of turbulence models; and (2) the time and expense of the numerical simulation. Because of the prohibitive resolution requirements of direct simulations at high Reynolds numbers, transition and turbulence modeling is expected to remain an issue for the near term. The focus of this paper addresses the latter problem by attempting to attain optimal efficiencies in solving the governing equations. Typically current CFD codes based on the use of multigrid acceleration techniques and multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping schemes are able to converge lift and drag values for cruise configurations within approximately 1000 residual evaluations. An optimally convergent method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME), meaning the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in the discretized system of equations (residual equations). In this paper, a distributed relaxation approach to achieving TME for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RNAS) equations are discussed along with the foundations that form the

  8. An evaluation of three two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics codes including low Reynolds numbers and transonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Raymond M.; Cliff, Susan E.

    1991-01-01

    Full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were evaluated for use in analyzing the flow field about airfoils sections operating at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 0.60 and Reynolds numbers from 500,000 to 2,000,000. The potential code (LBAUER) includes weakly coupled integral boundary layer equations for laminar and turbulent flow with simple transition and separation models. The Navier-Stokes code (ARC2D) uses the thin-layer formulation of the Reynolds-averaged equations with an algebraic turbulence model. The Euler code (ISES) includes strongly coupled integral boundary layer equations and advanced transition and separation calculations with the capability to model laminar separation bubbles and limited zones of turbulent separation. The best experiment/CFD correlation was obtained with the Euler code because its boundary layer equations model the physics of the flow better than the other two codes. An unusual reversal of boundary layer separation with increasing angle of attack, following initial shock formation on the upper surface of the airfoil, was found in the experiment data. This phenomenon was not predicted by the CFD codes evaluated.

  9. On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.

    SciTech Connect

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Koopman, Ronald P.; Ermak, Donald

    2006-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

  10. Advanced Modeling of Micromirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Sene, Darren E.; Bright, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    The flexure-beam micromirror device (FBMD) is a phase only piston style spatial light modulator demonstrating properties which can be used for phase adaptive corrective optics. This paper presents a complete study of a square FBMD, from advanced model development through final device testing and model verification. The model relates the electrical and mechanical properties of the device by equating the electrostatic force of a parallel-plate capacitor with the counter-acting spring force of the device's support flexures. The capacitor solution is derived via the Schwartz-Christoffel transformation such that the final solution accounts for non-ideal electric fields. The complete model describes the behavior of any piston-style device, given its design geometry and material properties. It includes operational parameters such as drive frequency and temperature, as well as fringing effects, mirror surface deformations, and cross-talk from neighboring devices. The steps taken to develop this model can be applied to other micromirrors, such as the cantilever and torsion-beam designs, to produce an advanced model for any given device. The micromirror devices studied in this paper were commercially fabricated in a surface micromachining process. A microscope-based laser interferometer is used to test the device in which a beam reflected from the device modulates a fixed reference beam. The mirror displacement is determined from the relative phase which generates a continuous set of data for each selected position on the mirror surface. Plots of this data describe the localized deflection as a function of drive voltage.

  11. Effects of Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Interactions in Resonators: Applications in Thermoacoustic Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antao, Dion Savio

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems have gained increased importance in cryogenic cooling technologies and improvements are needed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the current cryogenic refrigeration devices. These improvements in performance require a re-examination of the fundamental acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in the acoustic resonators that comprise a thermoacoustic refrigerator. A comprehensive research program of the pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerator (PTR) and arbitrarily shaped, circular cross-section acoustic resonators was undertaken to develop robust computational models to design and predict the transport processes in these systems. This effort was divided into three main focus areas: (a) studying the acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in consonant and dissonant acoustic resonators, (b) experimentally investigating thermoacoustic refrigeration systems attaining cryogenic levels and (c) computationally studying the transport processes and energy conversion through fluid-solid interactions in thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigeration devices. To investigate acoustic-fluid dynamic interactions in resonators, a high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model was developed and used to simulate the flow, pressure and temperature fields generated in consonant cylindrical and dissonant conical resonators. Excitation of the acoustic resonators produced high-amplitude standing waves in the conical resonator. The generated peak acoustic overpressures exceeded the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. The harmonic response in the conical resonator system was observed to be dependent on the piston amplitude. The resultant strong acoustic streaming structures in the cone resonator highlighted its potential over a cylindrical resonator as an efficient mixer. Two pulse tube cryogenic refrigeration (PTR) devices driven by a linear motor (a pressure wave generator) were designed, fabricated and tested. The characterization

  12. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  13. High Order Approximations for Compressible Fluid Dynamics on Unstructured and Cartesian Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy (Editor); Deconinck, Herman (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The development of high-order accurate numerical discretization techniques for irregular domains and meshes is often cited as one of the remaining challenges facing the field of computational fluid dynamics. In structural mechanics, the advantages of high-order finite element approximation are widely recognized. This is especially true when high-order element approximation is combined with element refinement (h-p refinement). In computational fluid dynamics, high-order discretization methods are infrequently used in the computation of compressible fluid flow. The hyperbolic nature of the governing equations and the presence of solution discontinuities makes high-order accuracy difficult to achieve. Consequently, second-order accurate methods are still predominately used in industrial applications even though evidence suggests that high-order methods may offer a way to significantly improve the resolution and accuracy for these calculations. To address this important topic, a special course was jointly organized by the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel of NATO's Research and Technology Organization (RTO), the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, and the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Division at the NASA Ames Research Center. The NATO RTO sponsored course entitled "Higher Order Discretization Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics" was held September 14-18, 1998 at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics in Belgium and September 21-25, 1998 at the NASA Ames Research Center in the United States. During this special course, lecturers from Europe and the United States gave a series of comprehensive lectures on advanced topics related to the high-order numerical discretization of partial differential equations with primary emphasis given to computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Additional consideration was given to topics in computational physics such as the high-order discretization of the Hamilton-Jacobi, Helmholtz, and elasticity equations. This volume consists

  14. Wind Turbine Wake Characterization with Remote Sensing and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Matthew Lawrence

    Because of the dense arrays at most wind farms, the region of disturbed flow downstream of an individual turbine leads to reduced power production and increased structural loading for its leeward counterparts. Currently, wind farm wake modeling, and hence turbine layout optimization, suffer from an unacceptable degree of uncertainty, largely because of a lack of adequate experimental data for model verification. Accordingly, wake measurements were taken in two separate experiments, (1) using the ground-based High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and (2) using nacelle-based long-range lidar at a wind farm in the western United States. The vantage point from the nacelle is favorable in that scans can more consistently transect the central part of the wake. The work presented here outlines a set of quantitative procedures for determining critical parameters from these extensive datasets---such as the velocity deficit, the size of the wake boundary, and the location of the wake centerline---and the results are categorized by ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability. Despite specific reference to lidar, the methodology is general and can be applied to extract wake characteristics from other remote sensor datasets, as well as output from numerical simulations. In an effort to help advance computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of wind turbine wake dynamics, experimental results are compared to a large eddy simulation (LES) of a turbine operating in the stable boundary layer using the actuator disk parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. With the wake characteristics described above as metrics for model verification, the simulations show good agreement with the observations. Moreover, new features---namely rotor tilt and drag from the

  15. Incorporating geometrically complex vegetation in a computational fluid dynamic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothroyd, Richard; Hardy, Richard; Warburton, Jeff; Rosser, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is known to have a significant influence on the hydraulic, geomorphological, and ecological functioning of river systems. Vegetation acts as a blockage to flow, thereby causing additional flow resistance and influencing flow dynamics, in particular flow conveyance. These processes need to be incorporated into flood models to improve predictions used in river management. However, the current practice in representing vegetation in hydraulic models is either through roughness parameterisation or process understanding derived experimentally from flow through highly simplified configurations of fixed, rigid cylinders. It is suggested that such simplifications inadequately describe the geometric complexity that characterises vegetation, and therefore the modelled flow dynamics may be oversimplified. This paper addresses this issue by using an approach combining field and numerical modelling techniques. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) with waveform processing has been applied to collect a sub-mm, 3-dimensional representation of Prunus laurocerasus, an invasive species to the UK that has been increasingly recorded in riparian zones. Multiple scan perspectives produce a highly detailed point cloud (>5,000,000 individual data points) which is reduced in post processing using an octree-based voxelisation technique. The method retains the geometric complexity of the vegetation by subdividing the point cloud into 0.01 m3 cubic voxels. The voxelised representation is subsequently read into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model using a Mass Flux Scaling Algorithm, allowing the vegetation to be directly represented in the modelling framework. Results demonstrate the development of a complex flow field around the vegetation. The downstream velocity profile is characterised by two distinct inflection points. A high velocity zone in the near-bed (plant-stem) region is apparent due to the lack of significant near-bed foliage. Above this, a zone of reduced velocity is

  16. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  17. Fluid dynamics and noise emission associated with supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Methods have long been sought to find an efficient means for reduction of jet noise using either active or passive turbulence control measures. Progress in this area is limited by unclear understanding of the physical supersonic jet noise source mechanisms as they relate to the jet plume turbulence structure. These mechanisms have been extensively studied using round jets. This paper shows that jets with nonround jet exit geometry can provide beneficial noise reduction relative to round jets. Both the fluid dynamic structure and noise of several nonround jets are examined in the paper.

  18. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  19. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System Fluid Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture