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Sample records for advanced gastric cancers

  1. Advances in gastric cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Antonio; Cito, Letizia

    2012-09-10

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial neoplastic pathology numbering among its causes both environmental and genetic predisposing factors. It is mainly diffused in South America and South-East Asia, where it shows the highest morbility percentages and it is relatively scarcely diffused in Western countries and North America. Although molecular mechanisms leading to gastric cancer development are only partially known, three main causes are well characterized: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mutations. Unhealthy diet and H. pylori infection are able to induce in stomach cancer cells genotypic and phenotypic transformation, but their effects may be crossed by a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits. Various authors have recently focused their attention on the importance of a well balanced diet, suggesting a necessary dietary education starting from childhood. A constant surveillance will be necessary in people carrying E-cadherin mutations, since they are highly prone in developing gastric cancer, also within the inner stomach layers. Above all in the United States, several carriers decided to undergo a gastrectomy, preferring changing their lifestyle than living with the awareness of the development of a possible gastric cancer. This kind of choice is strictly personal, hence a decision cannot be suggested within the clinical management. Here we summarize the key points of gastric cancer prevention analyzing possible strategies referred to the different predisposing factors. We will discuss about the effects of diet, H. pylori infection and E-cadherin mutations and how each of them can be handled. PMID:23061031

  2. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-08-14

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  3. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  4. PIVKA-II-producing advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Takano, Shigetsugu; Honda, Ichiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Soda, Hiroaki; Nagata, Matsuo; Hoshino, Isamu; Takenouchi, Toshinao; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2004-08-01

    We describe the case of a 68-year-old man with primary advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach, who displayed extremely high plasma levels of protein induced by vitamin K antagonist (PIVKA)-II (15 600 mAU/ml) and normal levels of alphafetoprotein (AFP) (4 ng/ml). Ultrasonography and dynamic computed tomography ruled out hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastasis. After preoperative chemotherapy, pancreatico-spleno total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy was performed. Postoperatively, plasma levels of PIVKA-II returned to within the normal range (29 mAU/ml). Microscopic examination revealed stomach adenocarcinoma showing various histological types, such as moderately to poorly differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma, but hepatoid differentiation of gastric adenocarcinoma was not detected. Localization of PIVKA-II and AFP within tumor cells was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies. These results indicate that tumor cells from gastric cancer may produce PIVKA-II. Some cases of PIVKA-II- and AFP-producing advanced gastric cancer with liver metastasis have been reported, but this is the first report of gastric cancer without liver metastasis producing PIVKA-II alone.

  5. Ramucirumab: A Review in Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Greig, Sarah L; Keating, Gillian M

    2015-10-01

    Ramucirumab (Cyramza(®)), an intravenously administered, monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, is approved in the USA, EU and Japan (either as a single agent or in combination with paclitaxel) as second-line treatment in adults with advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. In two phase III trials (REGARD and RAINBOW) in this indication, overall survival and progression-free survival were significantly prolonged with ramucirumab 8 mg/kg every 2 weeks compared with placebo, and with ramucirumab 8 mg/kg every 2 weeks plus weekly paclitaxel compared with placebo plus paclitaxel. Ramucirumab had a generally acceptable tolerability profile in phase III trials; hypertension was the most common non-haematological adverse event of grade 3 or higher with ramucirumab (either alone or with paclitaxel). As the first antiangiogenic agent to provide significant survival benefit in patients with advanced gastric cancer, ramucirumab is a valuable option in the second-line treatment of advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

  6. Surgical management of advanced gastric cancer: An evolving issue.

    PubMed

    Marano, L; Polom, K; Patriti, A; Roviello, G; Falco, G; Stracqualursi, A; De Luca, R; Petrioli, R; Martinotti, M; Generali, D; Marrelli, D; Di Martino, N; Roviello, F

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, gastric cancer represents the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Although the overall 5-year survival for resectable disease was more than 70% in Japan due to the implementation of screening programs resulting in detection of disease at earlier stages, in Western countries more than two thirds of gastric cancers are usually diagnosed in advanced stages reporting a 5-year survival rate of only 25.7%. Anyway surgical resection with extended lymph node dissection remains the only curative therapy for non-metastatic advanced gastric cancer, while neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapies can improve the outcomes aimed at the reduction of recurrence and extension of survival. High-quality research and advances in technologies have contributed to well define the oncological outcomes and have stimulated many clinical studies testing multimodality managements in the advanced disease setting. This review article aims to outline and discuss open issues in current surgical management of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26632080

  7. Molecular targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration; the median survival is approximately 7 to 11 months, and survival at 2 years is exceptionally > 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, many molecular targeting agents have been evaluated in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2-positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only ~20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2-positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of molecular predictive and prognostic markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies. PMID:23525404

  8. Early Gastric Cancer: Current Advances of Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linlin; Qin, Jinyu; Wang, Jin; Guo, Tianjiao; Wang, Zijing; Yang, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy is a major method for early gastric cancer screening because of its high detection rate, but its diagnostic accuracy depends heavily on the availability of endoscopic instruments. Many novel endoscopic techniques have been shown to increase the diagnostic yield of early gastric cancer. With the improved detection rate of EGC, the endoscopic treatment has become widespread due to advances in the instruments available and endoscopist's experience. The aim of this review is to summarize frequently-used endoscopic diagnosis and treatment in early gastric cancer (EGC). PMID:26884753

  9. Clinical utility of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Matthew Mk; Sjoquist, Katrin M; Zalcberg, John R

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Prognosis remains poor with most patients presenting with advanced or metastatic disease. A better understanding of angiogenesis has led to the investigation of drugs that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway including anti-VEGF antibody therapy (eg, bevacizumab), inhibitors of angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (eg, sunitinib, sorafenib, apatinib, regorafenib), and inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) (eg, ramucirumab). Ramucirumab, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, is the first anti-angiogenic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of advanced gastric cancers. This review will focus on the clinical utility and potential use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer.

  10. Advanced gastric cancer: Current treatment landscape and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Wagner, Anna Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer currently ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the western world, it is most often diagnosed at an advanced stage, after becoming metastatic at distant sites. Patients with advanced disease (locally advanced or metastatic) have a somber prognosis, with a median overall survival of 10-12 mo, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, novel approaches using inhibition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with overexpression of HER2. In addition, both second-line chemotherapy and treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-inhibitor ramucirumab demonstrated significant benefits in terms of overall survival, compared with best supportive care, in randomized studies. Moreover, ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy demonstrated further significant benefits in terms of progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in second-line treatment for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. A recently published molecular classification of gastric cancer is expected to improve patient stratification and selection for clinical trials and provide a roadmap for future drug development. Nevertheless, despite these developments the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. In this review we discuss current standards of care and outline major topics of drug development in gastric cancer. PMID:26937129

  11. Borrmann Type 4 Advanced Gastric Cancer: Focus on the Development of Scirrhous Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Park, Moo In; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Seun Ja

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Borrmann type 4 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is very important for improving the prognosis of AGC patients. Because there is no definite mass in most cases of Borrmann type 4 AGC, its accurate diagnosis via endoscopy requires an understanding of its pathogenesis and developmental process. Moreover, many people confuse linitis plastica (LP) type gastric cancer (GC), scirrhous GC, and Borrmann type 4 AGC. To distinguish each of these cancers, knowledge of their endoscopic and pathological differences is necessary, especially for LP type GCs in the developmental stage. In conclusion, diagnosis of pre-stage or latent LP type GC before progression to typical LP type GC requires the detection of IIc-like lesions in the fundic gland area. It is also crucial to identify any abnormalities such as sclerosis of the gastric wall and hypertrophy of the mucosal folds during endoscopy. PMID:27456608

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection induced gastric cancer; advance in gastric stem cell research and the remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of gastric cancer, which remains an important health care challenge. Recent investigation in gastric stem cell or progenitor cell biology has uncovered valuable information in understanding the gastric gland renewal and maintenance of homeostasis, they also provide clues for further defining the mechanisms by which gastric cancer may originate and progress. Lgr5, Villin-promoter, TFF2-mRNA and Mist have recently been identified as gastric stem/progenitor cell markers; their identification enriched our understanding on the gastric stem cell pathobiology during chronic inflammation and metaplasia. In addition, advance in gastric cancer stem cell markers such as CD44, CD90, CD133, Musashi-1 reveal novel information on tumor cell behavior and disease progression implicated for therapeutics. However, two critical questions remain to be of considerable challenges for future exploration; one is how H. pylori or chronic inflammation affects gastric stem cell or their progenitors, which give rise to mucus-, acid-, pepsinogen-, and hormone-secreting cell lineages. Another one is how bacterial infection or inflammation induces oncogenic transformation and propagates into tumors. Focus on the interactions of H. pylori with gastric stem/progenitor cells and their microenvironment will be instrumental to decipher the initiation and origin of gastric cancer. Future studies in these areas will be critical to uncover molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammation-mediated oncogenic transformation and provide options for cancer prevention and intervention. We review recent progress and discuss future research directions in these important research fields. PMID:23217022

  13. [A Case of Isolated Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis from Advanced Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Ji, Jung Geun; Chung, Joo Won; Nam, Seung Woo; Choi, Seung Kyu; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dae In; Jeon, Byung Gwan; Shin, Yun Jae

    2016-08-25

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is rare metastatic form of gastric cancer. Most cases are diagnosed in the final stage after multiple distant metastasis. An 84-year-old woman was admitted with melena, headache and vomiting. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed an ulceroinfiltrating lesion at the stomach (Borrmann class III), and biopsy revealed a signet ring cell carcinoma. The abdominal-pelvic CT showed no evidence of metastasis. A sudden decrease of consciousness was noted, but the brain CT showed no active lesion while the brain MRI revealed enhancement of leptomeninges. A lumbar puncture was performed and the cerebrospinal fluid study revealed malignant neoplastic cells. With family consent, no further evaluation and treatment were administered and she died six weeks after the diagnosis of gastric cancer. We report an extremely rare case of a patient who initially presented with neurologic symptoms, and was diagnosed LMC from advanced gastric cancer without any evidence of metastasis in abdomen and pelvis. PMID:27554216

  14. [Molecular targeting agents for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Nozomu

    2012-10-01

    The combination of fluoropyrimidine and platinum with or without epirubicin or docetaxel has been regarded as standard chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients. Recently, trastuzumab with conventional chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor(HER)2 positive gastric cancer patients was proved to be effective in terms of survival benefit and has become one of standard treatment options. Other molecular target agents, such as HER1, HER2, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met, fibroblast growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors were and are being evaluated in clinical trials. However, no agents other than trastuzumab have shown clear survival benefit. The predictive biomarker seems to be necessary for developing new molecular targeting agents for gastric cancer with heterogeneity.

  15. Evaluation of rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Han; Deng, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Based upon studies from randomized clinical trials, the extended (D2) lymph node dissection is now recommended as a standard procedure for local advanced gastric cancer worldwide. However, the rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer has remained a topic of debate in the past decades. Due to the limitation of low metastatic rate in para-aortic nodes (PAN) in JCOG9501, the clinical benefit of D2+ para-aortic nodal dissection (PAND) for patients with stage T4 and/or stage N3 disease, which is very common in China and other countries except Japan and Korea, cannot be determined. Furthermore, the role of splenectomy for complete resection of No.10 and No.11 nodes has been controversial, and however, the final results from the randomized trial of JCOG0110 have yet to be completed. Gastric cancer with the No.14 and No.13 lymph node metastasis is defined as M1 stage in the current version of the Japanese classification. We propose that D2+No.14v and +No.13 lymphadenectomy may be an option in a potentially curative gastrectomy for tumors with apparent metastasis to the No.6 nodes or infiltrate to duodenum. The examined lymph node and extranodal metastasis are significantly associated with the survival of gastric cancer patients. PMID:27647967

  16. Evaluation of rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Han; Deng, Jingyu

    2016-08-01

    Based upon studies from randomized clinical trials, the extended (D2) lymph node dissection is now recommended as a standard procedure for local advanced gastric cancer worldwide. However, the rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer has remained a topic of debate in the past decades. Due to the limitation of low metastatic rate in para-aortic nodes (PAN) in JCOG9501, the clinical benefit of D2+ para-aortic nodal dissection (PAND) for patients with stage T4 and/or stage N3 disease, which is very common in China and other countries except Japan and Korea, cannot be determined. Furthermore, the role of splenectomy for complete resection of No.10 and No.11 nodes has been controversial, and however, the final results from the randomized trial of JCOG0110 have yet to be completed. Gastric cancer with the No.14 and No.13 lymph node metastasis is defined as M1 stage in the current version of the Japanese classification. We propose that D2+No.14v and +No.13 lymphadenectomy may be an option in a potentially curative gastrectomy for tumors with apparent metastasis to the No.6 nodes or infiltrate to duodenum. The examined lymph node and extranodal metastasis are significantly associated with the survival of gastric cancer patients. PMID:27647967

  17. Requirement for a standardised definition of advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    DE SOL, ANGELO; TRASTULLI, STEFANO; GRASSI, VERONICA; CORSI, ALESSIA; BARILLARO, IVAN; BOCCOLINI, ANDREA; DI PATRIZI, MICOL SOLE; DI ROCCO, GIORGIO; SANTORO, ALBERTO; CIROCCHI, ROBERTO; BOSELLI, CARLO; REDLER, ADRIANO; NOYA, GIUSEPPE; KONG, SEONG-HO

    2014-01-01

    Each year, ~988,000 new cases of stomach cancer are reported worldwide. Uniformity for the definition of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is required to ensure the improved management of patients. Various classifications do actually exist for gastric cancer, but the classification determined by lesion depth is extremely important, as it has been shown to correlate with patient prognosis; for example, early gastric cancer (EGC) has a favourable prognosis when compared with AGC. In the literature, the definition of EGC is clear, however, there is heterogeneity in the definition of AGC. In the current study, all parameters of the TNM classification for AGC reported in each previous study were individually analysed. It was necessary to perform a comprehensive systematic literature search of all previous studies that have reported a definition of ACG to guarantee homogeneity in the assessment of surgical outcome. It must be understood that the term ‘advanced gastric cancer’ may implicate a number of stages of disease, and studies must highlight the exact clinical TNM stages used for evaluation of the study. PMID:24348842

  18. Recent advances in chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Gwang; Chung, Ho Young; Yu, Wansik

    2010-07-15

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the choice of optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration, with a median survival of approximately 7-11 mo and survival at 2 years rarely more than 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, several molecular targeting agents are now under evaluation in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2 positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only about 20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2 positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of predictive and prognostic molecular markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies.

  19. Exome sequencing identifies early gastric carcinoma as an early stage of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guhyun; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Do, In-Gu; Wang, Kai; Kang, So Young; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Kang, Won Ki; Jang, Jiryeon; Choi, Min-Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Sung; Kim, Min Ji; Kim, Seonwoo; Park, Cheol Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2013-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early detection and treatment leads to an excellent prognosis in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC), whereas the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor. It is unclear whether EGCs and AGCs are distinct entities or whether EGCs are the beginning stages of AGCs. We performed whole exome sequencing of four samples from patients with EGC and compared the results with those from AGCs. In both EGCs and AGCs, a total of 268 genes were commonly mutated and independent mutations were additionally found in EGCs (516 genes) and AGCs (3104 genes). A higher frequency of C>G transitions was observed in intestinal-type compared to diffuse-type carcinomas (P = 0.010). The DYRK3, GPR116, MCM10, PCDH17, PCDHB1, RDH5 and UNC5C genes are recurrently mutated in EGCs and may be involved in early carcinogenesis.

  20. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  1. Estrogen receptors in gastric cancer: Advances and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Cao, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies with high mortality. Various aspects of the development and progression of gastric cancer continue to be extensively investigated in order to further our understanding and provide more effective means for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are steroid hormone receptors that regulate cellular activities in many physiological and pathological processes in different tissues. There are two distinct forms of ERs, namely ERα and ERβ, with several alternative-splicing isoforms for each. They show distinct tissue distribution patterns and exert different biological functions. Dysregulation of ERs has been found to be associated closely with many diseases, including cancer. A number of studies have been conducted to investigate the role of ERs in gastric cancer, the possible mechanisms underlying these roles, and the clinical relevance of deregulated ERs in gastric cancer patients. To date, inconsistent associations of different ERs with gastric cancer have been reported. These inconsistencies may be caused by variations in in vitro cell models and clinical samples, including assay conditions and protocols with regard to different forms of ERs. Given the potential of the deregulated ERs as diagnostic/prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for gastric cancer, it will be important to identify/confirm the association of each ER isoform with gastric cancer, to determine the specific roles and interactions that these individual ER isoforms play under specific conditions in the development and/or progression of gastric cancer, and to elucidate precisely these mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the achievements from early ER studies in gastric cancer to the most up-to-date discoveries, with an effort to provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ERs roles in gastric cancer and its possible mechanisms. Furthermore, we propose directions for future

  2. Analysis of circulating tumor cells derived from advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Kosei; Hayashi, Akira; Kashiwagi, Masahide; Hayashi, Naoko; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Baba, Yoshifumi; Baba, Hideo; Ohta, Yoshikazu

    2015-08-15

    Studies in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have proceeded to be accepted as prognostic markers in several types of cancers. But they are still limited because many are mainly from enumeration of CTCs. Here, we tried to evaluate the tumorigenicity of CTCs from advanced gastric cancer patients (n = 42). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the patients were separated into CD45 negative and positive fractions and both were subcutaneously injected into immunodeficient mice. Within 5 months nine tumor-like-structures from six patients but not from healthy volunteers were established. They were durable for passages and all had been confirmed human origin. Eight of the nine tumor-like-structures were from nonauthorized CTC containing cells expressing CD45 and B-cell markers. On the contrary, one of them was developed from CD45(-) PBMC fraction of a patient with bone marrow metastasis reflecting authorized CTCs. Histopathology showed common features with that of original gastric tumor. The cells isolated from the tumor-like-structure expressed EpCAM and CEA further supporting they were from the original tumor. Moreover the cells were CD44 positive to varying degree and a limiting dilution study showed that the CD44(+/high) fraction had tumorigenicity. The CD44 was dominantly in the form of CD44 variant 8-10. The CD44(+/high) cells had higher expression of the glutamate/cysteine transporter xCT compared with the CD44(-/low) cells. Our results showed the existence of tumor-initiating cells in blood of advanced gastric cancer patients and they could be a therapeutic target and prospective tool for further investigations.

  3. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wenbo; Bai, Bing; Sheng, Liang; Li, Yan; Yue, Ping; Li, Xun; Qiao, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers of digestive system globally and Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is believed to be a major risk factor. HP can be classified into different types based on the presence and expression level of CagA and VacA, and, when exposed to adverse environment, HP changes its phenotype from helical type to coccoid type, with each having different pathogenicity. The mechanisms of HP-induced gastric carcinogenesis and progression are complicated, including DNA nitration and oxidation induced by mutagenic factors, HP-induced epigenetic modifications, HP-induced disruption of the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, and HP-induced cancer cell invasion and metastasis. HP may also affect the biological function of cancer stem cells and induction of cell autophagy. The lipopolysaccharide produced by HP can act through toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) to induce gastric mucosal inflammation and is thereby linked to the development of gastric cancer.

  4. Measuring patient-reported outcomes in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianming; Evans, TR Jeffry; Coon, Cheryl; Copley-Merriman, Kati; Su, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer (GC), one of the most common cancers in the world, is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and associated with a poor prognosis. Quality of life and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are important considerations when treating GC patients. The aim of this study was to identify existing PRO instruments that would be appropriate for use in GC trials. Methods Data were obtained from a systematic literature review and interviews with clinical experts. A literature search was conducted using OVID (EMBASE and MEDLINE) and yielded 1,008 abstracts; 92 assessed PROs in an advanced GC. Results Key symptoms and functional impacts identified through the literature and expert input included abdominal pain or pain at the site of distant metastases, dysphagia and other symptoms related to eating, and digestive symptoms. The liver and lungs were the most frequent locations of metastases, leading to dyspnea, abdominal fullness, and jaundice. Symptoms related to changes in bowel habits appeared to be more frequent and pronounced in Asian patients, possibly due to the higher prevalence of GC in the body of the stomach in this population. The five most commonly used PRO instruments were identified, but their validity in advanced-stage GC patients remains unclear. Conclusions The symptoms and functional impacts identified here should be confirmed with robust input from advanced-stage GC patients. Optimal measurement of PROs in GC should account for patient burden and possible differences between Asian and non-Asian patients. PMID:24062809

  5. [News and perspectives in the treatment of advanced gastric and colorectal cancers].

    PubMed

    Diciolla, A; Cristina, V; De Micheli, R; Digklia, A; Wagner, A D

    2015-05-20

    Colorectal and gastric cancers are the fourth and third leading causes of cancer death world-wide. Unfortunately, gastric cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage after becoming metastatic in distant sites, so that palliative therapy is the mainstay of treatment. Major progress in the understanding of the biology, the development of valid biomarkers and molecular targeted drugs have improved the treatment options and prognosis of both cancers significantly in the last years. Here, we review the current standards of care for patients with advanced and metastatic colorectal and gastric cancer and outline the perspectives for the future.

  6. The progress of targeted therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although palliative chemotherapy has been shown to prolong survival and improve quality of life, the survival of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients remains poor. With the advent of targeted therapy, many molecular targeted agents have been evaluated in clinical studies. Trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, has shown activity against HER2-positive AGC and becomes the first targeted agent approved in AGC. Drugs that target epidermal growth factor receptor, including monoclonal antibody and tyrosine kinase inhibitor, do not bring survival benefit to patients with AGC. Additionally, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors are also under investigation. Ramucirumab has shown promising result. Other targeted agents are in preclinical or early clinical development, such as mammalian target of rapamycinm inhibitors and c-MET inhibitors. PMID:24330856

  7. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for high-grade advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Y; Sawa, T; Kinoshita, K; Matsuki, N; Fushida, S; Tanaka, S; Ohoyama, S; Takashima, T; Kimura, H; Kamata, T

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with high-grade advanced gastric cancer in whom the presence of stage IV was confirmed by preoperative diagnostic imaging were treated with PMUE therapy by a combined use of cisplatin (CDDP) 75 mg/m2, mitomycin C (MMC) 10 mg/body, etoposide 150 mg/body, and UFT (a combination of 1-(2-tetrahydrofuryl)-5-fluorouracil and uracil in a molar ratio of 1:4) 400 mg/day. CDDP and MMC was administered intravenously on the first day, followed by etoposide 50 mg/day on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th days. All the patients had measurable lesions that were evaluated by computed tomography scanning before and after the treatments. These patients were allocated randomly to two groups. Of these cases, 29 belonged to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) group to whom PMUE therapy was given preoperatively; the remaining 26 patients underwent operation first and received PMUE thereafter (control group). Background factors did not differ significantly between the two groups. The response rate was higher in the NAC group than in the control group (62% in the former versus 35% in the latter). The resectability rates were 79% and 88% in the NAC and control groups, respectively. However, the rate of potentially curable cases was higher in the NAC group than in the control group (38% in the former versus 15% in the latter). Among the nonresection cases, the prognosis was highly unfavorable in both groups. In the resection cases, however, the survival rate was significantly better in the NAC group than in the control group. These results may indicate that in patients with high-grade, advanced gastric cancer initial chemotherapy (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and then surgery should be considered. PMID:8511923

  8. The mutational burdens and evolutionary ages of early gastric cancers are comparable to those of advanced gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Min; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Baek, In-Pyo; Park, Sung-Won; Lee, Sung Hak; Lee, Han Hong; Kim, Sung Soo; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2014-11-01

    Early gastric cancers (EGCs) precede advanced gastric cancers (AGCs), with a favourable prognosis compared to AGC. To understand the progression mechanism of EGC to AGC, it is required to disclose EGC and AGC genomes in mutational and evolutionary perspectives. We performed whole-exome sequencing and copy number profiling of nine microsatellite (MS)-unstable (MSI-H) (five EGCs and four AGCs) and eight MS-stable (MSS) gastric cancers (four EGCs and four AGCs). In the cancers, we observed well-known driver mutations (TP53, APC, PIK3CA, ARID1A, and KRAS) that were enriched in cancer-related pathways, including chromatin remodelling and tyrosine kinase activity. The MSI-H genomes harboured ten times more mutations, but were largely depleted of copy number alterations (CNAs) compared to the MSS cancers. Interestingly, EGC genomes showed a comparable level of mutations to AGC in terms of the number, sequence composition, and functional consequences (potential driver mutations and affected pathways) of mutations. Furthermore, the CNAs between EGC and AGC genomes were not significantly different in either MSI-H and MSS. Evolutionary analyses using somatic mutations and MSI as molecular clocks further identified that EGC genomes were as old as AGC genomes in both MSS and MSI-H cancers. Our results suggest that the genetic makeup for gastric cancer may already be achieved in EGC genomes and that the time required for transition to AGC may be relatively short. Also, the data suggest a possibility that the mutational profiles obtained from early biopsies may be useful in the clinical settings for the molecular diagnosis and therapeutics of gastric cancer patients.

  9. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  10. Advanced gastric cancer: What we know and what we still have to learn

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Cima, Simona; Valli, Maria Carla; Nita, Gabriela E; Heyer, Arianna; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a common neoplastic disease and, more precisely, is the third leading cause of cancer death in the world, with differences amongst geographic areas. The definition of advanced gastric cancer is still debated. Different stadiating systems lead to slightly different stadiation of the disease, thus leading to variations between the single countries in the treatment and outcomes. In the present review all the possibilities of treatment for advanced gastric cancer have been analyzed. Surgery, the cornerstone of treatment for advanced gastric cancer, is analyzed first, followed by an investigation of the different forms and drugs of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. New frontiers in treatment suggest the growing consideration for intraperitoneal administration of chemotherapeutics and combination of traditional drugs with new ones. Moreover, the necessity to prevent the relapse of the disease leads to the consideration of administering intraperitoneal chemotherapy earlier in the therapeutical algorithm. PMID:26811653

  11. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective. PMID:27803929

  12. [A case of early gastric cancer completely responding to adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Nakano, Mae; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Nakano, Masato; Ishikawa, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shinichi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Koyama, Yu; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-11-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with ascending colon cancer (cT3N1M0, Stage IIIa), which was found during examinations following a positive fecal occult blood test. The patient was also diagnosed with early gastric cancer (cT1a, N0, M0, Stage IA)during a preoperative gastroscopy examination. A laparoscopically assisted right colectomy and D3 lymphadenectomy was performed for the ascending colon cancer. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was Stage IIIb (pT3N2), he was administered in combination with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CapeOX) as adjuvant chemotherapy before the treatment for the colon cancer. After 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, we were unable to detect any gastric lesions at the same location using gastroscopy, and so diagnosed a clinical complete response. A follow-up gastroscopy 6 months later showed the same findings. The patient has had no recurrence of gastric cancer for 18 months after the initial operation. He will continue to be followed up closely using gastroscopy. In this case, CapeOX as adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer was also effective for early gastric cancer.

  13. Current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer: improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Pedro Nazareth; Muniz, Thiago Pimentel; Miranda, Raelson Rodrigues; Tadokoro, Hakaru; Forones, Nora Manoukian; Monteiro, Ines-de-Paula; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Mello, Ramon Andrade de

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we review the literature on the current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer aimed at improving patient care. We conclude that the key to guiding targeted therapy is individual biomarkers, which are not completely elucidated. HER2 overexpression is the only predictive biomarker currently in use. Furthermore, it is necessary to understand that gastric tumors are heterogeneous; therefore, is impossible to evaluate a novel biological compound without evaluating personal biomarkers. The selection of patients who are able to receive each treatment is paramount for improving advanced gastric cancer survival and reducing unnecessary costs.

  14. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Changwon; Lee, Yejin; Lee, J Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed remarkable technological advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The development of proteomics techniques has enabled the reliable analysis of complex proteomes, leading to the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins in gastric cancer cells, tissues, and sera. This quantitative information has been used to profile the anomalies in gastric cancer and provide insights into the pathogenic mechanism of the disease. In this review, we mainly focus on the advances in mass spectrometry and quantitative proteomics that were achieved in the last five years and how these up-and-coming technologies are employed to track biochemical changes in gastric cancer cells. We conclude by presenting a perspective on quantitative proteomics and its future applications in the clinic and translational gastric cancer research. PMID:27729735

  15. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  16. Advanced endoscopic imaging for gastric cancer assessment: new insights with new optics?

    PubMed

    Serrano, M; Kikuste, I; Dinis-Ribeiro, M

    2014-12-01

    The most immediate strategy for improving survival of gastric cancer patients is secondary prevention through diagnosis of early gastric cancer either through screening or follow-up of individuals at high risk. Endoscopy examination is therefore of paramount importance and two general steps are to be known in assessing gastric mucosa - detection and characterization. Over the past decade, the advent of advanced endoscopic imaging technology led to diverse descriptions of these modalities reporting them to be useful in this setting. In this review, we aim at summarizing the current evidence on the use of advance imaging in individuals at high-risk (i.e., advance stages of gastric atrophy/intestinal metaplasia) and in those harbouring neoplastic lesions, and address its potential usefulness providing the readers a framework to use in daily practice. Further research is also suggested.

  17. Preoperative treatment with radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastroesophageal junction cancer and unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ratosa, Ivica; Oblak, Irena; Anderluh, Franc; Velenik, Vaneja; But-Hadzic, Jasna; Ermenc, Ajra Secerov; Jeromen, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background. To purpose of the study was to analyze the results of preoperative radiochemotherapy in patients with unresectable gastric or locoregionally advanced gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer treated at a single institution. Patients and methods. Between 1/2004 and 6/2012, 90 patients with locoregionally advanced GEJ or unresectable gastric cancer were treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. Planned treatment schedule consisted of induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin, followed by concomitant radiochemotherapy four weeks later. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy was delivered by dual energy (6 and 15 MV) linear accelerator in 25 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy in 5 weeks with two additional cycles of chemotherapy repeated every 28 days. Surgery was performed 4–6 weeks after completing radiochemotherapy. Following the surgery, multidisciplinary advisory team reassessed patients for the need of adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoints were histopathological R0 resection rate and pathological response rate. The secondary endpoints were toxicity of preoperative radiochemotherapy and survival. Results. Treatment with preoperative radiochemotherapy was completed according to the protocol in 84 of 90 patients (93.3%). Twenty patients (22.2%) did not undergo the surgery because of the disease progression, serious comorbidity, poor performance status or still unresectable tumour. In 13 patients (14.4%) only exploration was performed because the tumour was assessed as unresectable or diffuse peritoneal carcinomatosis was established. Fifty-seven patients (63.4%) underwent surgery with the aim of complete removal of the tumour. Radical resection was achieved in 50 (55.6%) patients and the remaining seven (7.8%) patients underwent non-radical surgery (R1 in five and R2 in two patients). In this group of patients (n = 57), pathological complete response of tumour was achieved in five

  18. Geographic differences in approach to advanced gastric cancer: Is there a standard approach?

    PubMed

    Kim, Richard; Tan, Ann; Choi, Minsig; El-Rayes, Bassel F

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Regional differences in gastric cancer are evident between Asian and Western societies with respect to etiology, prevalence, clinicopathologic features as well as treatment pattern of the disease. For patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC), chemotherapy has been found to improve survival and quality of life compared to best supportive care alone. But contrast to other tumors such as colon or pancreatic cancer, there are regional differences in outcome in gastric cancer. Various geographic/ethnic, biology and treatment strategies may contribute to these differences. In the first line setting, cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine based therapies remain the backbone of treatment for advanced gastric cancer in Asian and Western patients, although there is preference for S1 in Asia and 5FU in the West. A third agent may be added in patients with good performance status. Recent trials from Asia and Europe demonstrate an advantage for second line chemotherapy. Irinotecan and taxanes are the most commonly used agents. The introduction of trastuzumab into the frontline therapy of AGC has ushered the age of targeted therapy and personalized medicine in this disease. In this article, we will review the various first and second line chemotherapy regimens in AGC, taking into account regional differences including potential biomarkers.

  19. [Intermediate gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Fontán, A N; Marzano, C A; Martínez, M M; Palau, G; Rubio, H H

    1980-01-01

    Gastric Cancer comprises two basic types: Advanced Gastric Cancer (A.G.C.) and Early Gastric Cancer (E.G.C.). A.G.C. extends beyond the proper muscle layer with a 5 to 17%, five years survival rate after surgery. E.G.C. does not extend beyond the submucosa (with or without metastasis to regional lymph nodes) and has a 80 - 95% five years survival rate. Intermediate Gastric Cancer, PM G.C. (Gastric cancer of the proper muscle layer) does not surpass the proper muscle layer and offers a five years life expectance of near 60% after adequate surgical treatment, with peculiar features in radiology, endoscopy and evolutivity. We report a case of PM G.C., "depressed" and "protruded". The proper muscle layer was invaded by the depressed lesion". Both lesions were continguous.

  20. [Utility of the WallFlexTM duodenal stent for unresectable advanced gastric cancer related to gastric outlet obstruction].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Taro; Hyuga, Satoshi; Kato, Aya; Chono, Teruhiro; Watanabe, Risa; Komori, Takamichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takachi, Kou; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Uemura, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    Duodenal stenting for malignant disease related to gastric outlet obstruction(GOO) has been covered by health insurance in Japan since April 2010. We inserted WallFlexTM duodenal stents(WDS) in 4 patients with GOO caused by unresectable gastric cancer. WDS insertion was successful in all 4 cases. Duodenal perforation occurred in 1 case. One case each of stent obstruction and stent migration occurred. All patients could eat a soft-food diet for 3-6 months (median, 5.3 months). Survival time ranged between 5 and 14 months (median, 6 months). Three patients underwent S-1 combination chemotherapy. Duodenal stenting is expected to be effective for advanced gastric cancer related to GOO.

  1. Recent advances in the molecular diagnostics of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world, representing a major global health issue. Although the incidence of GC is declining, the outcomes for GC patients remain dismal because of the lack of effective biomarkers to detect early GC and predict both recurrence and chemosensitivity. Current tumor markers for GC, including serum carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9, are not ideal due to their relatively low sensitivity and specificity. Recent improvements in molecular techniques are better able to identify aberrant expression of GC-related molecules, including oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, and DNA methylation, as novel molecular markers, although the molecular pathogenesis of GC is complicated by tumor heterogeneity. Detection of genetic and epigenetic alterations from gastric tissue or blood samples has diagnostic value in the management of GC. There are high expectations for molecular markers that can be used as new screening tools for early detection of GC as well as for patient stratification towards personalized treatment of GC through prediction of prognosis and drug-sensitivity. In this review, the studies of potential molecular biomarkers for GC that have been reported in the publicly available literature between 2012 and 2015 are reviewed and summarized, and certain highlighted papers are examined. PMID:26379391

  2. Endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer: Standard techniques and recent advances in ESD

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-known endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer. ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precision of histologic diagnosis and can also reduce the recurrence rate. However, the drawback of ESD is its technical difficulty, and, consequently, it is associated with a high rate of complications, the need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. Various advances in the devices and techniques used for ESD have contributed to overcoming these drawbacks. PMID:24914364

  3. Ramucirumab for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kohei; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, various molecular target agents have been investigated for gastric cancer. VEGF is one of the most potent angiogenic factors and is a signaling molecule secreted by many solid tumors. High VEGF expression is one of the characteristic features of gastric carcinomas, thus targeting VEGF is considered a promising strategy for gastric cancer. Ramucirumab, an anti-VEGF receptor antibody, has proven to be effective for previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Details of ramucirumab, including two pivotal Phase III studies, will be discussed in this review. Ramucirumab, with or without chemotherapy, improved survival in gastric cancer after previous systemic chemotherapy, thus becoming the standard of care for this patient population. Optimal timing of ramucirumab use and adequate biomarkers for patient selection as well as mechanism of resistance should be explored in future research.

  4. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  5. Strategies and Advancements in Harnessing the Immune System for Gastric Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Yeo, Mei Shi; Tan, Woei Loon; Yong, Wei Peng

    2015-01-01

    In cancer biology, cells and molecules that form the fundamental components of the tumor microenvironment play a major role in tumor initiation, and progression as well as responses to therapy. Therapeutic approaches that would enable and harness the immune system to target tumor cells mark the future of anticancer therapy as it could induce an immunological memory specific to the tumor type and further enhance tumor regression and relapse-free survival in cancer patients. Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortalities that has a modest survival benefit from existing treatment options. The advent of immunotherapy presents us with new approaches in gastric cancer treatment where adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, and antibody therapies have all been used with promising outcomes. In this paper, we review the current advances and prospects in the gastric cancer immunotherapy. Special focus is laid on new strategies and clinical trials that attempt to enhance the efficacy of various immunotherapeutic modalities in gastric cancer. PMID:26579545

  6. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced gastric cancer: does tumor histology matter?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hilda

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease which may be divided into subgroups based on histological, anatomical, epidemiological and molecular classifications. Distinct molecular drivers and tumor biology, and thus different treatment targets and predictive biomarkers, may be implicated in each subtype. However, there is little evidence in the literature regarding the correlation among these different classifications, and particularly the molecular aberrations present in each subtype. In this review, we approach advanced gastric cancer (AGC) by presenting aberrant molecular pathways and their potential therapeutic targets in gastric cancer according to histological and anatomical classification, dividing gastric cancer into proximal nondiffuse, distal nondiffuse and diffuse disease. Several pathways are involved predominantly, although not exclusively, in different subtypes. This may help to explain the disappointing results of many published AGC trials in which study populations were heterogeneous regardless of clinicopathological characteristics of the primary tumor. Histological and anatomical classification may provide insights into tumor biology and facilitate selection of an enriched patient population for targeted agents in future studies and in the clinic. However, some molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer have not been studied in correlation with histological or anatomical subtypes. Further studies are necessary to confirm the suggestion that such classification may predict tumor biology and facilitate selection of an enriched patient population for targeted agents in future studies and in the clinic. PMID:23320047

  7. Critical evaluation of ramucirumab in the treatment of advanced gastric and gastroesophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    ElHalawani, Hesham; Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Gastric (GC) and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancers are two global health problems with a relatively high mortality, particularly in the advanced stage. Inhibition of angiogenesis is now contemplated as a classic treatment preference for myriad tumor types encompassing renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, glioblastoma, and ovarian cancer, among others. Bevacizumab and ramucirumab have been widely investigated in GC and GEJ cancer, with some controversy about their therapeutic role. Ramucirumab is a monoclonal antibody for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, with demonstrated activity both as a monotherapy and as a part of combination strategy in the management of advanced GC/GEJ cancer. In this review article, we present a critical evaluation of the preclinical and clinical data underlying the use of this drug in this indication. Moreover, we provide a spotlight on the future perspectives in systemic therapy for advanced GC/GEJ cancer.

  8. Critical evaluation of ramucirumab in the treatment of advanced gastric and gastroesophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    ElHalawani, Hesham; Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Gastric (GC) and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancers are two global health problems with a relatively high mortality, particularly in the advanced stage. Inhibition of angiogenesis is now contemplated as a classic treatment preference for myriad tumor types encompassing renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, glioblastoma, and ovarian cancer, among others. Bevacizumab and ramucirumab have been widely investigated in GC and GEJ cancer, with some controversy about their therapeutic role. Ramucirumab is a monoclonal antibody for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, with demonstrated activity both as a monotherapy and as a part of combination strategy in the management of advanced GC/GEJ cancer. In this review article, we present a critical evaluation of the preclinical and clinical data underlying the use of this drug in this indication. Moreover, we provide a spotlight on the future perspectives in systemic therapy for advanced GC/GEJ cancer. PMID:26251608

  9. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  10. Current Molecular Targeted Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Therapeutic Mechanism, Clinical Trials, and Practical Application

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaichun; Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great progress in the treatment of gastric cancer, it is still the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients often miss the opportunity for a surgical cure, because the cancer has already developed into advanced cancer when identified. Compared to best supportive care, chemotherapy can improve quality of life and prolong survival time, but the overall survival is often short. Due to the molecular study of gastric cancer, new molecular targeted drugs have entered the clinical use. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), can significantly improve survival in advanced gastric cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer with ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, has been proved to provide a beneficial effect. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, apatinib, can improve the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients after second-line chemotherapy failure. Unfortunately, none of the EGFR targeting antibodies (cetuximab or panitumumab), VEGF targeting monoclonal antibodies (bevacizumab), mTOR inhibitor (everolimus), or HGF/MET pathway targeting drugs has a significant survival benefit. Many other clinical trials based on molecular markers are underway. This review will summarize targeted therapies for advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26880889

  11. Targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer: A review of current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Kanat, Ozkan; O’Neil, Bert; Shahda, Safi

    2015-01-01

    In the West in particular, the vast majority of gastric cancer (GC) patients present with advanced-stage disease. Although combination chemotherapy is still the most important component of treatment for these patients, it confers a modest survival advantage. Recently, increased knowledge of the key molecular signaling pathways involved in gastric carcinogenesis has led to the discovery of specific molecular-targeted therapeutic agents. Some of these agents such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab have changed the treatment paradigm for this disease. In this paper, we will summarize the current clinical status of targeted drug therapy in the management of GC. PMID:26690491

  12. Prognostic Factors for Node-Negative Advanced Gastric Cancer after Curative Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Woo; Koo, Ho-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lymph node (LN) metastasis is the best prognostic indicator in non-distant metastatic advanced gastric cancer. This study aimed to assess the prognostic value of various clinicopathologic factors in node-negative advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 254 patients with primary node-negative stage T2~4 gastric cancer. These patients were selected from a pool of 1,890 patients who underwent radical resection at Memorial Jin-Pok Kim Korea Gastric Cancer Center, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Results Of the 254 patients, 128 patients (50.4%), 88 patients (34.6%), 37 patients (14.6%), and 1 patient (0.4%) had T2, T3, T4a, and T4b tumors, respectively. In a univariate analysis, operation type, T-stage, venous invasion, tumor size, and less than 15 LNs significantly correlated with tumor recurrence and cumulative overall survival. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, tumor size, venous invasion, and less than 15 LNs significantly and independently correlated with recurrence. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, tumor size (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.926; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.173~7.300; P=0.021), venous invasion (HR: 3.985; 95% CI: 1.401~11.338; P=0.010), and less than 15 LNs (HR: 0.092; 95% CI: 0.029~0.290; P<0.001) significantly correlated with overall survival. Conclusions Node-negative gastric cancers recurred in 8.3% of the patients in our study. Tumor size, venous invasion, and less than 15 LNs reliably predicted recurrence as well as survival. Aggressive postoperative treatments and timely follow-ups should be considered in cases with these characteristics. PMID:27752393

  13. Clinical management of advanced gastric cancer: The role of new molecular drugs

    PubMed Central

    De Vita, Ferdinando; Di Martino, Natale; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Petrillo, Angelica; Gambardella, Valentina; Sforza, Vincenzo; Marano, Luigi; Auricchio, Annamaria; Galizia, Gennaro; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Orditura, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm and the second leading cause of death for cancer in Western countries with more than 20000 new cases yearly diagnosed in the United States. Surgery represents the main approach for this disease but, notwithstanding the advances in surgical techniques, we observed a minimal improvement in terms of overall survival with a significant increasing of relapsing disease rates. Despite the development of new drugs has significantly improved the effectiveness of chemotherapy, the prognosis of patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma remains poor. Recently, several molecular target agents have been investigated; in particular, trastuzumab represents the first target molecule showing improvements in overall survival in human epithelial growth factor 2-positive gastric cancer patients. New molecules targeting vascular epithelial growth factor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and anti hepatocyte growth factor-c-Met pathway are also under investigation, with interesting results. Anyway, it seems necessary to select more accurately the population to treat with new agents by the identification of new biomarkers in order to optimize the results. In this paper we review the actual “scenario” of targeted treatments, also focusing on the new agents in development for gastric cancer and gastro-esophageal carcinoma, discussing their efficacy and potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:25356019

  14. Paclitaxel-based regimens as first-line treatment in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zengqing; Wang, Xiaojie; Lin, Rongbo; Chen, Ling; Fan, Nanfeng; Chen, Yu; Lin, Jinyuan; Yu, Jiami

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of paclitaxel-based regimens as first-line treatments in advanced gastric cancer. We reviewed 397 previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer, who non-randomly received one of three paclitaxel-based regimens: paclitaxel plus fluorouracil/leucovorin (PF), paclitaxel plus oxaliplatin (PO), and paclitaxel plus oxaliplatin plus fluorouracil/leucovorin (POF) between January 2003 and December 2010. The PF, PO, and POF response rates were 47.13, 52.08, and 63.78%, respectively. Overall survivals (OS) were 11.2, 11.7, and 11.7 months, respectively. Progression-free survivals (PFS) were 6.6, 7.2, and 7.1 months, respectively. Leucopenia was higher on the triplet regimen than the doublet regimens. The paclitaxel-based regimens appeared to be effective in patients with advanced gastric cancer. The triplet regimen produced a higher response rate than either doublet regimen with more side effects, while survivals were similar among all three treatments.

  15. [Research advances of K-ras mutation in the prognosis and targeted therapy of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Wei, J; Liu, B R

    2016-02-01

    K-ras mutations have been described in 30% of human cancers with significantly different mutation frequencies. High K-ras mutation frequency is found in many cancers such as pancreas and lung cancers, whereas, gastric cancer has a relatively low K-ras mutation frequency. In recent years, numerous researches have focused on the K-ras mutation in gastric cancer. This review summarizes the K-ras mutation frequency in gastric cancer, the relationship of K-ras mutation with clinicopathologic features and prognosis of gastric cancer patients, targeted therapy for K-ras mutated gastric cancer, some small-molecular inhibitors of K-ras, and development of targeted therapy drugs for K-ras signaling pathway in gastric cancer.

  16. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer: Long-term results of a phase I trial

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Peyer, Raymond de; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term results of radiation therapy (RT) when added preoperatively to systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer received two cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} d1, 5FU 800 mg/m{sup 2} d1-4, and Leucovorin 60 mg twice daily d1-4; one cycle before and one concomitantly with hyperfractionated RT (median dose, 38.4; range, 31.2-45.6 Gy). All patients underwent a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node resection. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 completed the neoadjuvant therapeutic program. All patients were subsequently operated and no fatality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 8 years for the surviving patients, no severe late toxicity was observed. The 5-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival were of 85%, 41%, and 35%, respectively. The peritoneum was the most frequent site of relapse. Among long terms survivors, no severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-4) late complication was reported. Conclusions: The present neoadjuvant treatment does not seem to increase the operative risk, nor the late side effects. The encouraging locoregional control rate suggests that the neoadjuvant approach should be considered for future trials in locally advanced gastric cancer. Also, the frequency of peritoneal recurrence stresses the need for a more efficient systemic or intraperitoneal treatment.

  17. Novel targets in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer: a perspective review

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Elisa; Smyth, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is responsible for a high burden of disease globally. Although more extensive use of chemotherapy together with the recent introduction of the two targeted agents trastuzumab and ramucirumab have contributed to marginal outcome prolongation, overall survival for patients with advanced stage disease remains poor. Over the last decade, a number of novel agents have been examined in clinical trials with largely disappointing results. Potential explanations for this are the absence of molecularly selected trial populations or weak predictive biomarkers within the context of a highly heterogeneous disease. In the recently published gastric cancer The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project a new classification of four different tumour subtypes according to different molecular characteristics has been proposed. With some overlap, several relatively distinct and potentially targetable pathways have been identified for each subtype. In this perspective review we match recent trial results with the subtypes described in the gastric cancer TCGA aiming to highlight data regarding novel agents under evaluation and to discuss whether this publication might provide a framework for future drug development. PMID:26929787

  18. [A case report-highly advanced gastric cancer leading to perforation during neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and S-1].

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koki; Egawa, Tomohisa; Kemmochi, Takeshi; Irino, Tomoyuki; Okamura, Akihiko; Inaba, Yusaku; Eto, Eiichi; Segami, Kenki; Ito, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Shinobu; Nagashima, Atsushi

    2011-11-01

    A 70-year-old man was found to have advanced gastric cancer with a deep ulcer and multiple lymph-node metastases. Although the tumor was resectable, we predicted that the patient would have a poor outcome. We therefore administered neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and S-1 to improve the prognosis before curative resection. On day 15 of chemotherapy, sudden abdominal pain occurred, and we performed an emergency surgery for a diagnosis of panperitonitis due to gastric cancer perforation. The defect in the gastric wall was about 2 cm in diameter and was located in the anterior wall of the antrum, consistent with the center of the tumor. The operative findings suggested that the perforation was caused by chemotherapy-induced necrosis of gastric cancer cells. We saved the patient's life, but intensive care with high-dose catecholamine therapy was needed for several days after the surgery. Gastric cancer perforation induced by neoadjuvant chemotherapy appeared to be more severe than perforation caused by other factors. The adverse effects of chemotherapy apparently increased the severity. Our findings suggest that the risk of gastric cancer perforation should be borne in mind when we administer neoadjuvant chemotherapy to patients who have advanced gastric cancer with a deep ulcer.

  19. Clinical Outcome of Palliative Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Symptomatic Gastric Cancer in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Jeremy; Choo, Bok Ai; Leong, Cheng Nang; Loy, En Yun; Wong, Lea Choung; Lim, Keith; Lu, Jiade Jay; Koh, Wee Yao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of patients with symptomatic locally advanced/recurrent gastric cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) using modern 3-dimensional conformal techniques. We retrospectively reviewed patients who had palliative RT for index symptoms of gastric bleeding, pain, and obstruction. Study endpoints included symptom response, median survival, and treatment toxicity. Of 115 patients with median age of 77 years, 78 (67.8%) patients had metastatic disease at the time of treatment. Index symptoms were gastric bleeding, pain, and obstruction in 89.6%, 9.2%, and 14.3% of patients, respectively. Dose fractionation regimen ranged from 8-Gy single fraction to 40 Gy in 16 fractions. One hundred eleven patients (93.3%) were computed tomography (CT) planned. Median follow-up was 85 days. Response rates for bleeding, pain, and obstruction were 80.6% (83/103), 45.5% (5/11), and 52.9% (9/17), respectively, and median duration of response was 99 days, 233 days, and 97 days, respectively. Median survival was 85 days. Actuarial 12-month survival was 15.3%. There was no difference in response rates between low (≤39 Gy) and high (>39 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED) regimens (α/β ratio = 10). Median survival was significantly longer in patients who responded to RT compared with patients who did not (113.5 vs 47 days, P < 0.001). Three patients (2.6%) had grade 3 Common Toxicity Criteria equivalent toxicity (nausea/vomiting/anorexia). External beam RT delivered using 3-dimensional conformal techniques is highly effective and well tolerated in the local palliation of gastric cancer, with palliation lasting the majority of patient’s lives. Short (≤39 Gy BED) RT schedules are adequate for effective symptom palliation. A phase II study of palliative gastric RT is ongoing. PMID:25396330

  20. Exceptional Response to Systemic Therapy in Advanced Metastatic Gastric Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion; Manning, Maria A; Carroll, John E; Xiu, Joanne; Smaglo, Brandon G; Mikhail, Sameh; Salem, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas represent one of the top five most common types of cancer worldwide. Despite significant advancement, it is still not known which first-line chemotherapy option is best matched to an individual patient. The vast advances in molecular biology have led to the discovery of many potential predictive biomarkers, such as HER-2 neu, thymidylate synthase (TS), excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and topoisomerase-1 (TOPO1). These markers could allow us to select treatment based on an individual’s tumor profile, resulting in an improvement of outcome. Our report highlights two patients with metastatic gastric cancer that achieved an exceptional response with traditional therapy and provides insights into the future perspectives of molecular profile-directed chemotherapy. PMID:26918225

  1. Strategies of laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymph node dissection for advanced proximal gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi-Yue; Huang, Chang-Ming; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Lu, Jun; Cao, Long-Long; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong; Hong, Zhi-Liang

    2016-01-01

    For advanced proximal gastric cancer (GC), splenic hilar (No. 10) lymph nodes (LN) are crucial links in lymphatic drainage. According to the 14th edition of the Japanese GC treatment guidelines, a D2 lymphadenectomy is the standard surgery for advanced GC, and No. 10 LN should be dissected for advanced proximal GC. In recent years, the preservation of organ function and the use of minimally invasive technology are being accepted by an increasing number of clinicians. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar LN dissection has become more accepted and is gradually being used in operations. However, because of the complexity of splenic hilar anatomy, mastering the strategies for laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar LN dissection is critical for successfully completing the operation. PMID:27358672

  2. Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins in Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer in Poland.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Białek, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mutations in DNA of mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in failure to repair errors that occur during DNA replication in microsatellites, resulting in accumulation of frameshift mutations in these genes and leading to DNA mismatch replication errors and microsatellite instability. Gastric cancers (GCs) with high MSI (MSI-H) are a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathological features. In this study we investigated the rate of MSI and the correlation between MSI status and clinicopathological features of GC. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 107 patients with GCs: 61 with advanced gastric cancers (AGC) and 46 with early gastric cancer (EGC). MSI deficiency in GCs was assessed by the immunohistochemical analysis of expression of MMR proteins - MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 - using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. RESULTS A total of 6 (5.6%) MSI-H were observed. The loss of MMR proteins expression was associated with the intestinal type of GC in Lauren classification, and tubular and papillary architecture in WHO classification. There was no statistically significant association between negative MMR expression and other selected clinical parameters: age, sex, tumor location, depth of invasion (EGC and AGC), lymph nodes status, presence of the ulceration, and lymphocytic infiltrate. CONCLUSIONS In the present era of personalized medicine, the histological type of GC and MMR proteins status in cancer cells are very important for the proper surveillance of patients with familial GC and sporadic GCs, as well as for selecting the proper follow-up and treatment. Larger collaborative studies are needed to verify the features of MSI-H GCs in Poland. PMID:27527654

  3. Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins in Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Białek, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in DNA of mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in failure to repair errors that occur during DNA replication in microsatellites, resulting in accumulation of frameshift mutations in these genes and leading to DNA mismatch replication errors and microsatellite instability. Gastric cancers (GCs) with high MSI (MSI-H) are a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathological features. In this study we investigated the rate of MSI and the correlation between MSI status and clinicopathological features of GC. Material/Methods The study included 107 patients with GCs: 61 with advanced gastric cancers (AGC) and 46 with early gastric cancer (EGC). MSI deficiency in GCs was assessed by the immunohistochemical analysis of expression of MMR proteins – MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 – using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. Results A total of 6 (5.6%) MSI-H were observed. The loss of MMR proteins expression was associated with the intestinal type of GC in Lauren classification, and tubular and papillary architecture in WHO classification. There was no statistically significant association between negative MMR expression and other selected clinical parameters: age, sex, tumor location, depth of invasion (EGC and AGC), lymph nodes status, presence of the ulceration, and lymphocytic infiltrate. Conclusions In the present era of personalized medicine, the histological type of GC and MMR proteins status in cancer cells are very important for the proper surveillance of patients with familial GC and sporadic GCs, as well as for selecting the proper follow-up and treatment. Larger collaborative studies are needed to verify the features of MSI-H GCs in Poland. PMID:27527654

  4. Advanced gastric cancer (GC) and cancer of the gastro-oesophageal junction (GEJ): focus on targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Cappetta, Alessandro; Lonardi, Sara; Pastorelli, Davide; Bergamo, Francesca; Lombardi, Giuseppe; Zagonel, Vittorina

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in surgical techniques and chemotherapy treatments, locally advanced/metastatic gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) and gastric cancer (GC) are still associated with poor clinical outcome. However, increased understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis and its implementation in the treatment of breast, colon, lung, and other cancers in recent years have spurred focus on the development and incorporation of targeted agents in current therapeutic options for this difficult-to-treat disease. Such agents have the ability to target a variety of cancer relevant targets, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor. In this review, we describe the current status of targeted therapies in the treatment of advanced GC and GEJ cancer, focusing on pre-clinical and clinical data available on monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors acting in these pathways, including completed and ongoing phase III studies.

  5. [Recurrence and survival rate of advanced gastric cancer after preoperative intraarterial EAP I injection therapy].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Taniguchi, H; Miyata, K; Koyama, H; Tanaka, H; Ueshima, Y; Okano, S; Oguro, A; Itoh, A; Sawai, K

    1993-08-01

    In our department, curative operations were performed for 32 patients with advanced gastric cancer from April 1989 to August 1990. Preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy with etoposide (100 mg), pirarubicin (20 mg) and cisplatin (20 mg) was given 18 patients. Recurrence and survival rate were investigated. The survival rate of patients with preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy 45 months after operation was 59.2%, while that of patients without preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy was 75.8%. There were no significant differences between these two groups. Three lymph node recurrences were seen in patients with preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy (recurrence rate, 16.7%). Four recurrences were observed in patients without preoperative injection therapy (peritoneal dissemination 2, liver 1, local 1; recurrence rate, 28.6%). We earlier reported that preoperative intra-arterial cisplatin (40 or 60 mg) injection therapy may reduce the incidence of lymph node recurrence and liver metastasis but may not be effective to prevent postoperative peritoneal recurrence, while no peritoneal dissemination was observed in patients with preoperative intra-arterial EAP I injection therapy. Thus, it was concluded that further study of combination and dose of anti-cancer drug may improve effectiveness of preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy for gastric cancer.

  6. [Gastric cancer in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Wu, M S; Lin, J T; Lee, W J; Yu, S C; Wang, T H

    1994-09-01

    The study of gastric cancer is important in clinical medicine as well as in public health. Environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis and thus primary prevention is feasible after improvement of these factors. The 5-year survival rate of resected early gastric cancer is over 90% and this provides an excellent paradigm for secondary prevention. Though its mortality rate has declined since 1970, gastric cancer remains common and carries a high mortality in Taiwan where about 2,000 patients die of gastric cancer annually. The age-adjusted mortality is 16.54 and 8.16/100,000 for male and female, ranking the third and fourth cancer death respectively. Epidemiologic data disclose a positive association between gastric cancer and some dietary factors in Taiwan. However, the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and hereditary susceptibility should be elucidated in the future. Endoscopy with biopsy is an excellent method of the diagnosis of gastric cancer. However, its invasiveness makes it impractical as a screening tool and thus the proportion of early gastric cancer to gastric cancer remains as low as 30% in most reports. The value of lymph node dissection remains controversial although surgery is one of the most effective methods of eradicating gastric cancer. Overall, the 5 year survival rate is 24.5% to 54%. Laser therapy is usually reserved for patients with high operative risk and specific types of gastric cancer. To improve the survival results, development of a simple and economic screening program based on the epidemiologic results and utilization of noninvasive examinations such as serologic markers to diagnose and treat gastric cancer at its earliest stage deserves further study.

  7. Sequence-dependence of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in advanced and recurrent gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Wasaburo; Kurihara, Minoru; Hasegawa, Koichi; Chonan, Akimichi; Kubo, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Ryuichiro; Iwasaki, Ryozo; Sasai, Tadashi; Fukuyama, Yoshio; Ishikawa, Kunitsugu; Miyoshi, Kazuo; Yasutake, Koichi; Hayakawa, Makoto

    2004-09-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial was designed to compare the safety and effectiveness of different sequences of treatment with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with unresectable advanced and post-operative recurrent gastric cancer. Patients with unresectable advanced or post-operative recurrent gastric cancer were randomly assigned by a registration center to group A or B. Group A received CDDP (80 mg/m(2)) as a continuous 2-h intravenous infusion on day 1 and 5-FU (700 mg/m(2)) as a continuous intravenous infusion on days 2-5. Group B was given 5-FU (700 mg/m(2)) as a continuous intravenous infusion on days 1-4, followed by CDDP (80 mg/m(2)) as a continuous 2-h intravenous infusion on day 5. Each course of chemotherapy was repeated every 28 days. A total of 74 patients were enrolled. One patient died accidentally, and 5 could not be evaluated. Response was assessable in 68 patients. The response rate was 31.3% (10/32) in group A as compared with 13.9% (5/36) in group B. Although the response rate was higher in Group A, the difference was not significant (p=0.085). The response rate in patients with diffuse type tumors was significantly lower in group B. There was no difference between the groups in response among patients with intestinal type tumors. The median overall survival was 239 and 174 days and time to progression was 175 and 140 days in group A and group B, respectively. Although there were trends toward longer survival and time to progression in group A, the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. There was also no difference in the type or incidence of adverse reactions. The results of this controlled study indicate that the overall response rate was slightly but not significantly higher in patients who received CDDP before 5-FU. Among patients with diffuse type tumors, the response rate was significantly lower when 5-FU was administered before CDDP. Our results suggest that CDDP should be given

  8. [A case of advanced gastric cancer showing high serum CYFRA21-1 level responding to chemotherapy with S-1].

    PubMed

    Hara, Akihito; Watanabe, Hiroaki

    2008-12-01

    The patient was a 75-year-old man whose complaint was back pain and appetite loss. He was diagnosed with unresectable advanced gastric cancer due to multiple liver metastases and direct invasion of pancreas and spleen. He underwent gastrostomy because of esophageal stenosis, and we administered S-1 80 mg/body(4 weeks administration and 2 weeks rest)to the patient through a gastrostogavage tube. On blood examination, the serum level of CYFRA21- 1 was significantly high, while those of CEA and CA19-9 were within normal ranges. After the first course of this chemotherapy, the serum CYFRA21-1 level significantly decreased with reduction of the cancer. After the second course, it sensitively increased before image views detected the progression of the cancer. This case shows that CYFRA21- 1 could be a useful tumor marker of advanced gastric cancer.

  9. [Administration of S-1 Monotherapy as Adjuvant Chemotherapy in a Patient with Advanced Gastric Cancer with HIV Infection].

    PubMed

    Amaki, Misato; Yajima, Kazuhito; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Ken, Yuu; Oohinata, Ryouki; Imamura, Akifumi

    2016-08-01

    A 64-year-old man with advanced gastric cancer presented with chief complaints of chest pain. His preoperative blood examination revealed positive results for serum HIV-antibody. His HIV-RNA level was 1.0×10 / 5 copies/mL, and his CD4lymphocyte count was 491 cell/mL; the patient was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer and HIV infection. Distal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy and Roux-en-Y reconstruction were performed for treatment of the gastric cancer. Pathological examination revealed T3(SS)N3aM0, Stage III C cancer. After surgery, the patient was administered S-1 monotherapy as adjuvant treatment with antiretroviral therapy including tenofovir/emtricitabine and raltegravir. He completed 8 courses of S- 1 chemotherapy with no adverse events, such as a decrease in the CD4lymphocyte count or an increase in the HIV-RNA level. This patient with gastric cancer and HIV infection was safely treated using both antiretroviral therapy and chemotherapy owing to treatment intervention by chemotherapy and infectious diseases specialists. PMID:27539043

  10. Clinical benefits of combined chemotherapy with S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel in advanced gastric cancer patients with palliative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Feng, Ye; Gao, Yongjian; Hou, Ruizhi

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Advanced gastric cancer accounts for a substantial portion of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Surgical intervention is the curative therapeutic approach, but patients with advanced gastric cancer are not eligible for the radical resection. The present work aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of palliative surgery combined with S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Method A total of 20 patients who underwent palliative resection of gastric cancer in China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University from 2010 to 2011 were evaluated. Days 20–30 postoperative, these patients started to receive chemotherapy of S-1 (40 mg/m2, oral intake twice a day) and intravenous infusion of oxaliplatin (135 mg/m2) and docetaxel (75 mg/m2). After three cycles of chemotherapy (21 days/cycle), patients were evaluated, and only those who responded toward the treatment continued to receive six to eight cycles of the treatment and were included in end point evaluation. Patients’ survival time and adverse reactions observed along the treatment were compared with those treated with FOLFOX. Results Out of 20 patients evaluated, there was one case of complete response, nine cases of partial response, six cases of stable disease, and four cases of progressive disease. The total efficacy (complete response + partial response) and clinical benefit rates were 50% and 80%, respectively. Of importance, the treatment achieved a significantly longer survival time compared to FOLFOX, despite the fact that both regimens shared common adverse reactions. The adverse reactions were gastrointestinal reaction, reduction in white blood cells, and peripheral neurotoxicity. All of them were mild, having no impact on the treatment. Conclusion Combination therapy of S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel improves the survival of gastric cancer patients treated with palliative resection, with adverse reactions being

  11. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the syndrome is recommended. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HDGC? Not everyone who ... the lifetime risk for diffuse gastric cancer is estimated to be 70% to 80% for men and ...

  12. c-Met targeting in advanced gastric cancer: An open challenge.

    PubMed

    Marano, Luigi; Chiari, Rita; Fabozzi, Alessio; De Vita, Ferdinando; Boccardi, Virginia; Roviello, Giandomenico; Petrioli, Roberto; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco; Patriti, Alberto

    2015-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in systemic chemotherapy over the last two decades, the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (GC) remains poor. Because of molecular heterogeneity, it is essential to classify tumors based on the underlying oncogenic pathways and to develop targeted therapies acting on individual tumors. High-quality research and advances in technology have contributed to the elucidation of molecular pathways underlying disease progression and have stimulated many clinical studies testing target therapies in an advanced disease setting. In particular, strong preclinical evidence for the aberrant activation of the HGF/c-Met signaling pathways in GC cancers exists. This review will cover the c-Met pathway, the mechanisms of c-Met activation and the different strategies of its inhibition. Next, we will focus on the current state of the art in the clinical evaluation of c-Met-targeted therapies and the description of ongoing randomized trials with the idea that in this disease, high quality translational research to identify and validate biomarkers is a priority task. PMID:26049023

  13. Phase II study of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alex Yuang-Chi; Foo, Kian Fong; Koo, Wen-Hsin; Ong, Simon; So, Jimmy; Tan, Daniel; Lim, Khong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves survival of locally advanced gastric cancer patients. However, benefit is limited and the best regimen remains controversial. Objectives Our primary objective of this prospective, multicenter phase 2 study was to evaluate the pathological complete response rate (PCR) with 2 cycles of docetaxel and capecitabine. Methods To be eligible, patients had to have histologically documented gastric cancer, a ECOG performance status 0 or 1, T3or4 Nany M0 staging after oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), CT scan of thorax and abdomen, and negative laparoscopic examination and peritoneal washing. Eligible patients received two cycles of intravenous docetaxel 60 mg/m2 on day 1 and oral capecitabine 900 mg/m2 two times per day from day 1 to day 14 every 3 weeks. We evaluated the response by CT scan and EUS. The patients underwent curative resection with D2 lymphadenectomy subsequently. Results 18 patients were enrolled in the study: 66% were male and the median age was 60 years. 17 patients had T3 disease at diagnosis. There was no pCR noted. 4 patients had a partial response of 22% (95% CI: 7–42%), 8 patients had stable disease and 3 patients had disease progression. The median survival was 17.1 months with 3 long-term survivors after at least 3 years of follow-up. The treatment was well tolerated with neutropenia being the most common toxicity. We observed 22% grade III and 33% grade IV neutropenia, but no neutropenic fever or death was observed from chemotherapy. Conclusion Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and capecitabine has limited activity against GC. More effective treatment regimens are needed urgently. Trial registration number NCT00414271.

  14. Phase II study of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alex Yuang-Chi; Foo, Kian Fong; Koo, Wen-Hsin; Ong, Simon; So, Jimmy; Tan, Daniel; Lim, Khong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves survival of locally advanced gastric cancer patients. However, benefit is limited and the best regimen remains controversial. Objectives Our primary objective of this prospective, multicenter phase 2 study was to evaluate the pathological complete response rate (PCR) with 2 cycles of docetaxel and capecitabine. Methods To be eligible, patients had to have histologically documented gastric cancer, a ECOG performance status 0 or 1, T3or4 Nany M0 staging after oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), CT scan of thorax and abdomen, and negative laparoscopic examination and peritoneal washing. Eligible patients received two cycles of intravenous docetaxel 60 mg/m2 on day 1 and oral capecitabine 900 mg/m2 two times per day from day 1 to day 14 every 3 weeks. We evaluated the response by CT scan and EUS. The patients underwent curative resection with D2 lymphadenectomy subsequently. Results 18 patients were enrolled in the study: 66% were male and the median age was 60 years. 17 patients had T3 disease at diagnosis. There was no pCR noted. 4 patients had a partial response of 22% (95% CI: 7–42%), 8 patients had stable disease and 3 patients had disease progression. The median survival was 17.1 months with 3 long-term survivors after at least 3 years of follow-up. The treatment was well tolerated with neutropenia being the most common toxicity. We observed 22% grade III and 33% grade IV neutropenia, but no neutropenic fever or death was observed from chemotherapy. Conclusion Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and capecitabine has limited activity against GC. More effective treatment regimens are needed urgently. Trial registration number NCT00414271. PMID:27648294

  15. Ramucirumab: successfully targeting angiogenesis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Javle, Milind; Smyth, Elizabeth C; Chau, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally and represents the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality. Early detection, aggressive surgical resection, and postoperative adjuvant therapy have led to survival improvement for early-stage gastric cancer, particularly in Asian countries. Unfortunately, advanced gastric cancer continues to pose a formidable challenge with few gains being reported recently. Trastuzumab was the first targeted agent to be approved for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer in 2010. The failure of the AVAGAST trial was a setback for antiangiogenic therapy for this disease. Ramucirumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-R2 and prevents its activation. The recent REGARD trial was a randomized phase III trial of ramucirumab vs. placebo for patients with advanced, pretreated gastric cancer that met its primary endpoint of increased overall survival. The toxicity of ramucirumab was modest in this setting, with an increased risk of grade 3 or higher hypertension (8% vs. 3%, with ramucirumab and placebo, respectively). The subsequent RAINBOW trial of paclitaxel plus ramucirumab vs. paclitaxel plus placebo for advanced pretreated gastric cancer confirmed the survival advantage of this antiangiogenic agent in gastric cancer. Ramucirumab is the first FDA-approved therapy for advanced gastric cancer after prior chemotherapy.

  16. Time-Dependent Effects of Prognostic Factors in Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jin-Ok; Min, Jae-Seok; Kim, Min-Suk; Lee, Hae-Won; Park, Sunhoo; Yu, Hang-Jong; Bang, Ho-Yoon; Lee, Jong-Inn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to identify time-dependent prognostic factors and demonstrate the time-dependent effects of important prognostic factors in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated 3,653 patients with AGC who underwent curative standard gastrectomy between 1991 and 2005 at the Korea Cancer Center Hospital. Multivariate survival analysis with Cox proportional hazards regression was used in the analysis. A non-proportionality test based on the Schoenfeld residuals (also known as partial residuals) was performed, and scaled Schoenfeld residuals were plotted over time for each covariate. Results The multivariate analysis revealed that sex, depth of invasion, metastatic lymph node (LN) ratio, tumor size, and chemotherapy were time-dependent covariates violating the proportional hazards assumption. The prognostic effects (i.e., log of hazard ratio [LHR]) of the time-dependent covariates changed over time during follow-up, and the effects generally diminished with low slope (e.g., depth of invasion and tumor size), with gentle slope (e.g., metastatic LN ratio), or with steep slope (e.g., chemotherapy). Meanwhile, the LHR functions of some covariates (e.g., sex) crossed the zero reference line from positive (i.e., bad prognosis) to negative (i.e., good prognosis). Conclusions The time-dependent effects of the prognostic factors of AGC are clearly demonstrated in this study. We can suggest that time-dependent effects are not an uncommon phenomenon among prognostic factors of AGC. PMID:26819803

  17. [Recurrence and survival rate of advanced gastric cancer after preoperative EAP-II intra-arterial infusion therapy].

    PubMed

    Masuyama, M; Taniguchi, H; Takeuchi, K; Miyata, K; Koyama, H; Tanaka, H; Higashida, T; Koishi, Y; Mugitani, T; Yamaguchi, T

    1994-09-01

    Ninety-eight patients with advanced gastric cancers underwent gastrectomy from Jan. 1989 to Dec. 1991. For these patients, preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy using EAP-II (etoposide 100 mg, epirubicin 20 mg, carboplatin 100 mg) was given to 24 patients. In this report, the recurrence and survival rate of these patients were investigated. After curative resection, the survival rate of patients with EAP-II 36 months after operation was 76.9%, while that of patients without EAP-II was 78.6%. There were no significant differences between these two groups. Two peritoneal carcinomatoses and two liver metastases were seen in patients with EAP-II (recurrence rate, 30.7%). Eight recurrences were observed in patients without preoperative injection therapy (peritoneal dissemination, 4; local recurrence, 3; lymph node recurrence, 1). Previously, we reported that drugs were remarkably accumulated in gastric cancer tissue and regional lymph nodes after EAP-II intra-arterial injection therapy. This high accumulation might cause no local or lymph node recurrence was seen in patient with EAP-II. Thus, it was concluded that preoperative EAP-II intra-arterial injection may prevent local and lymph node recurrences, and that further study of the combination and dose of anti-cancer drug needed to improve the postoperative survival rate in advanced gastric cancer patients.

  18. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  19. The journey of personalizing gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the fourth most prevalent malignancy yet it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Every year, gastric cancer adds nearly 1 million new cancer cases, and 723,000 or 10% of cancer deaths to the global cancer burden. Approximately, 405,000 or 43% of the new cases and 325,000 or 45% of the deaths are in China, making gastric cancer a particularly challenging malignancy. This thematic series discusses the molecular classifications of gastric cancer by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) as well as the implications in personalized therapeutic choices; discusses the evolution of gastric surgery and presents perspectives on surgical techniques in treating gastric cancer; and reviews current and emerging targeted agents as well as immunotherapies in treating gastric cancer. With these advancements in molecular characterization, surgical intervention, and targeted and immunotherapies, gastric cancer will enter a personalized medicine era in the next 5 years. PMID:27581614

  20. [A Case of HER2-Positive Stage IV Advanced Gastric Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy Combined with Trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Takaya, Kai; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Honma, Satoru; Horii, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Hagiwara, Motohisa; Chin, Masahiro; Hashizume, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of human epidermal growth factor receptor(HER)2 positive stage IV advanced gastric cancer successfully treated with chemotherapy combined with trastuzumab. A 50-year-old man was diagnosed with type 3 gastric cancer complicated by liver and lymph node metastases. Owing to a HER2 immunohistochemistry tumor score of 3+, we initiated capecitabine plus CDDP plus trastuzumab chemotherapy. After 6 chemotherapy courses, computed tomography showed the liver metastasis had disappeared and the paraaortic lymph nodes had shrunk. We continued the capecitabine plus trastuzumab chemotherapy, which resulted in a progression free survival of 31 months. After 38 chemotherapy courses, the primary tumor progressed; therefore, the patient underwent surgery. Chemotherapy combined with trastuzumab can allow for resec- tion of the primary tumor. PMID:27628555

  1. Gastric cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hilmar; Marques, Miguel S; Zietlow, Rike; Meyer, Thomas F; Machado, Jose C; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) results from a multistep process that is influenced by Helicobacter pylori infection, genetic susceptibility of the host, as well as of other environmental factors. GC results from the accumulation of numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, leading to dysregulation of multiple signaling pathways, which disrupt the cell cycle and the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. For this special issue, we have selected to review last year's advances related to three main topics: the cell of origin that initiates malignant growth in GC, the mechanisms of direct genotoxicity induced by H. pylori infection, and the role of aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs in GC transformation. The understanding of the molecular basis of GC development is of utmost importance for the identification of novel targets for GC prevention and treatment. PMID:27531537

  2. Breath Analysis Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensors Distinguishes Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients from Healthy Persons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunsheng; Zhang, Yixia; Pan, Fei; Liu, Jie; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Chunlei; Cheng, Shangli; Lu, Lungen; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng; Zhi, Xiao; Zhang, Qian; Alfranca, Gabriel; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Chen, Di; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-09-27

    Fourteen volatile organic compound (VOC) biomarkers in the breath have been identified to distinguish early gastric cancer (EGC) and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients from healthy persons by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with solid phase microextraction (SPME). Then, a breath analysis approach based on a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor was developed to detect these biomarkers. Utilizing hydrazine vapor adsorbed in graphene oxide (GO) film, the clean SERS sensor is facilely prepared by in situ formation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) without any organic stabilizer. In the SERS sensor, RGO can selectively adsorb and enrich the identified biomarkers from breath as an SPME fiber, and AuNPs well dispersed on RGO endow the SERS sensor with an effective detection of adsorbed biomarkers. Fourteen Raman bands associated with the biomarkers are selected as the fingerprints of biomarker patterns to distinguish persons in different states. The approach has successfully analyzed and distinguished different simulated breath samples and 200 breath samples of clinical patients with a sensitivity of higher than 83% and a specificity of more than 92%. In conclusion, the VOC biomarkers and breath analysis approach in this study can not only diagnose gastric cancer but also distinguish EGC and AGC. This work has great potential for clinical translation in primary screening diagnosis and stage determination of stomach cancer in the near future.

  3. Gastric cancer and trastuzumab: first biologic therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna S.; Woo, Yanghee; Beaubier, Nike; Remotti, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains difficult to cure and has a poor overall prognosis. Chemotherapy and multimodality therapy has shown some benefit in the treatment of gastric cancer. Current therapies for gastric cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in need of newer treatment options including targeted therapies. Here, we review the biologic therapy with trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ gastric cancer. PMID:23450234

  4. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. Doublet Versus Single Agent as Second-Line Treatment for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Ma, Bing; Huang, Xiao-Tian; Li, Yan-Song; Wang, Yu; Liu, Zhou-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the efficacy and safety of doublet versus single agent as second-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify relevant RCTs. All clinical studies were independently identified by 2 authors for inclusion. Demographic data, treatment regimens, objective response rate (ORR), and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were extracted and analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software (Version 2.0). Ten RCTs involving 1698 pretreated AGC patients were ultimately identified. The pooled results demonstrated that doublet combination therapy as second-line treatment for AGC significantly improved OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78–0.97, P = 0.011), PFS (HR 0.79, 95% CI: 0.72–0.87, P < 0.001), and ORR (relative risk [RR] 1.57, 95% CI: 1.27–1.95, P < 0.001). Sub-group analysis according to treatment regimens also showed that targeted agent plus chemotherapy significantly improve OS, PFS, and ORR. However, no significant survival benefits had been observed in doublet cytotoxic chemotherapy when compared with single cytotoxic agent. Additionally, more incidences of grade 3 or 4 myelosuppression toxicities, diarrhea, and fatigue were observed in doublet combination groups, while equivalent frequencies of grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia and nausea were found between the 2 groups. In comparison with single cytotoxic agent alone, the addition of targeted agent to mono-chemotherapy as salvage treatment for pretreated AGC patients provide substantial survival benefits, while no significant survival benefits were observed in doublet cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26937908

  6. Optimal indications for second-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hiroko; Fujitani, Kazumasa; Nakazuru, Shoichi; Hirao, Motohiro; Mita, Eiji; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa

    2012-04-01

    As it remains uncertain whether patients with advanced gastric cancer who progress after first-line chemotherapy should receive second-line chemotherapy, we attempted to identify the optimal indications for second-line chemotherapy. In this retrospective study, 101 patients were included in univariate and multivariate analyses to identify clinicopathological variables independently associated with longer survival postprogression (SPP), defined as the time from recognition of disease progression on first-line chemotherapy to death from any cause or last follow-up. The median SPP was 340 days. On multivariate analysis, performance status 2 [hazard ratio (HR), 14.234; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.766-73.258], serum albumin level less than 3.5 g/dl (HR, 2.088; 95% CI, 1.047-4.060) at initiation of second-line chemotherapy, and time to progression less than 170 days on first-line chemotherapy (HR, 2.497; 95% CI, 1.227-5.083) were identified as independent prognostic factors associated with shorter SPP. The median SPP was 496, 375, and 232 days in patients with 0, 1, and 2 of these 3 negative prognostic factors, respectively (P=0.0002). The present study suggests that second-line chemotherapy would not be beneficial in patients with two or more of the following three negative prognostic factors: performance status 2, serum albumin less than 3.5 g/dl at initiation of second-line chemotherapy and time to progression less than 170 days on first-line chemotherapy.

  7. [Tumor markers in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Hisanao

    2002-04-01

    There are two markers, pepsinogen isoenzymes and antibody against Helicobactor pyroli, for screening of high-risk group for gastric cancer. Most of markers are used in diagnosis, staging, monitoring and differentiating subgroups of gastric cancer. Markers in ascitic fluid are used for diagnosing peritoneal invasion of gastric cancer. PMID:11977555

  8. Worldwide practice in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brenkman, Hylke JF; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the current status of gastric cancer surgery worldwide. METHODS: An international cross-sectional survey on gastric cancer surgery was performed amongst international upper gastro-intestinal surgeons. All surgical members of the International Gastric Cancer Association were invited by e-mail to participate. An English web-based survey had to be filled in with regard to their surgical preferences. Questions asked included hospital volume, the use of neoadjuvant treatment, preferred surgical approach, extent of the lymphadenectomy and preferred anastomotic technique. The invitations were sent in September 2013 and the survey was closed in January 2014. RESULTS: The corresponding specific response rate was 227/615 (37%). The majority of respondents: originated from Asia (54%), performed > 21 gastrectomies per year (79%) and used neoadjuvant chemotherapy (73%). An open surgical procedure was performed by the majority of surgeons for distal gastrectomy for advanced cancer (91%) and total gastrectomy for both early and advanced cancer (52% and 94%). A minimally invasive procedure was preferred for distal gastrectomy for early cancer (65%). In Asia surgeons preferred a minimally invasive procedure for total gastrectomy for early cancer also (63%). A D1+ lymphadenectomy was preferred in early gastric cancer (52% for distal, 54% for total gastrectomy) and a D2 lymphadenectomy was preferred in advanced gastric cancer (93% for distal, 92% for total gastrectomy) CONCLUSION: Surgical preferences for gastric cancer surgery vary between surgeons worldwide. Although the majority of surgeons use neoadjuvant chemotherapy, minimally invasive techniques are still not widely adapted. PMID:27099448

  9. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79

  10. Evaluation of a trastuzumab-containing treatment regimen for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAMIKAWA, TSUTOMU; MUNEKAGE, ERI; MUNEKAGE, MASAYA; MAEDA, HIROMICHI; YATABE, TOMOAKI; KITAGAWA, HIROYUKI; SAKAMOTO, KOUICHI; OBATAKE, MASAYUKI; KOBAYASHI, MICHIYA; HANAZAKI, KAZUHIRO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of trastuzumab plus chemotherapy for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. A retrospective analysis of 213 patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent gastric cancer who received systemic chemotherapy, including 15 patients who were also administered trastuzumab, at Kochi Medical School between 2007 and 2013 was performed. The overall survival was compared between patients who received trastuzumab plus chemotherapy and patients who received chemotherapy alone, and the safety and efficacy of the trastuzumab-containing regimen was evaluated. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 status was examined in 86 patients, of whom 15 (17.4%) exhibited strong positive HER2 expression. The rate of strong positive HER2 expression was significantly higher for intestinal type tumors compared with diffuse type tumors [23.6 (13/55) vs. 6.5% (2/31); P=0.044]. The median overall survival of the patients treated with trastuzumab was significantly longer compared with that for patients who were not treated with trastuzumab (22.9 vs. 11.6 months; P=0.014). The objective response rate and disease control rate for trastuzumab plus chemotherapy were 46.7 and 86.7%, respectively. Frequently encountered grade 3–4 toxicities included neutropenia (26.7%; 4/15), anemia (13.3%; 2/15) and fatigue (13.3%; 2/15). Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy is effective for patients with HER2-positive advanced or recurrent gastric cancer, and the frequencies of hematological and non-hematological toxicities experienced by patients in the present study indicated that it can be safely administered clinically. PMID:27330770

  11. Clinical evaluation of cetuximab combined with an S-1 and oxaliplatin regimen for Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer is poor. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of cetuximab and S-1 combined with oxaliplatin (SOX) in Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer. Methods For patients in the experimental group (cetuximab in combination with SOX (Ce-SOX), 30 patients), once-weekly cetuximab (400 mg/m2 at the first infusion then 250 mg/m2 every week) was administered. For patients in both the control (SOX alone, 26 patients) and experimental groups, oxaliplatin (100 mg/m2) was administered intravenously on day 1, while S-1 (80 mg/m2/day) was given orally twice daily for 14 days. The endpoints of this study included progression-free survival, response rate, and disease-control rate. Results There was no statistically significant difference in response rate between the Ce-SOX and SOX groups (54.8% versus 44%, P = 0.225). The difference in disease-control rate was also statistically insignificant between the two groups (87.1% versus 76%, P = 0.162). Median progression-free survival in the Ce-SOX group was significantly higher than that in the SOX group (12.8 versus 10.1 months, P = 0.007). The median overall survival of the Ce-SOX group and SOX group was 14.0 and 12.2 months, respectively (P = 0.043). The one-year survival rate for the Ce-SOX group was 57% compared to 40% in the SOX group. There was no statistical difference in the grade 3 or 4 adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that the cetuximab combined with SOX regimen is feasible and shows promising efficacy with tolerable adverse effects in Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:24758484

  12. [A case of S-1/CDDP chemotherapy for inoperable advanced gastric cancer which led to gastrectomy with histological complete response].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenji; Tanizaki, Keiko; Aoki, Taro; Takachi, Kou; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Matsumoto, Takashi; Komori, Takamichi; Chono, Teruhiro; Kato, Aya; Hyuga, Satoshi; Watanabe, Risa; Uemura, Yoshio

    2011-11-01

    As the treatment for inoperable advanced gastric cancer, S-1/CDDP combination therapy (SP chemotherapy) has become a standard treatment. In our hospital, a second course of chemotherapy was performed on an outpatient basis in order to improve a traditional QOL. In this case, it showed remarkable effects in 15 months after starting chemotherapy. Then gastrectomy was performed. Histological findings of the resected specimens confirmed pCR in all tumors. We report on progress of this case and explain about the ingenuity of SP chemotherapy.

  13. Gastric Cancer: New Drugs – New Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Nadine; Ebert, Matthias P.; Härtel, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. There are large geographic variations in the incidence of these tumors, with 60% occurring in East Asia. For patients with resectable disease, surgery and perioperative treatment can be effective. For patients with advanced gastric cancer, chemotherapy regimens result in a median survival of 9-11 months. In general, the prognosis for advanced disease is poor and 5-year overall survival rates are around 15%. Combination therapies yield better survival rates, albeit with increased toxicity. Therefore, more effective and less toxic treatment regimens are needed. Summary The molecular aberrations that characterize the different subgroups of gastric cancer have been used as therapeutic targets. However, the heterogeneity and complexity of gastric cancers is a major challenge for the development of effective targeted therapies. This review examines the main molecular targets in the treatment of gastric cancer, namely the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Key Message The molecular aberrations characteristic of gastric cancer are being explored for the development of targeted therapies, including the VEGF, HER2, HGF/c-Met, EGFR and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Practical Implications Trastuzumab, an antibody which targets HER2, is the first approved targeted therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer. However, trastuzumab is only effective in HER2-positive tumors (about 10-20% of all gastric cancers). Ramucirumab, which targets the VEGF receptor 2, has yielded benefits with respect to overall survival in a phase III trial and is an effective treatment for advanced gastric cancer with approval in second-line treatment. Apatinib and rilotumumab are another two promising new agents currently under

  14. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    León-Barúa, R; Recavarren-Arce, S; Berendson, R; Gilman, R H

    1995-01-01

    A review is done on the evidence in favor of a link between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer of the intestinal type. In countries at high risk of gastric cancer, like Perú, Hp infection begins early in life and is highly frequent and persistent. When Hp colonizes the gastric mucosa, it causes active chronic gastritis. Initially, the gastritis is of the superficial type. With time, and probably as a result of the concurrent action of nutritional, epidemiologic and immunologic modulating factors, chronic superficial gastritis may give rise to a progressive gastric pathology that leads to gastric premalignant lesions (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa) and increases the predisposition to gastric cancer. The principal modulating factors are described. The epidemiology of gastric premalignant lesions in Perú is also described. Finally, a discussion is done on the effect that eradication of Hp infection might have on the prevalence of gastric cancer.

  15. New utility of an old marker: serum low-density lipoprotein predicts histopathological response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ji-Chun; Guo, Ju-Feng; Teng, Rong-Yue; Wang, Qin-Chuan; Wang, Ji; Wei, Qun; Li, Zi-Duo; Shen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Lin-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the correlation between metabolic abnormality and gastric cancer has been extensively investigated, the question of whether metabolic parameters might influence the efficacy of chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer is still unanswered. In our present study, we investigated the relationship between serum fasting glucose, lipid levels, and histopathological response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in locally advanced gastric cancers. Patients and methods A total of 128 patients were identified from a prospectively maintained database of patients with locally advanced gastric cancer who received NAC between July 2004 and December 2012. Histopathological response after NAC was analyzed according to Becker’s tumor-regression grade. Univariate analyses and multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine the correlation between tumor size, differentiation, fasting glucose, lipid levels, and tumor histopathological response after NAC. Results Univariate analysis revealed that low-density lipoprotein level and total cholesterol, as well as tumor size and differentiation, correlated significantly with histopathological response. Low-density lipoprotein levels and tumor size were found to be independent predictors for histopathological response, according to multivariable regression analyses. Conclusion In this observational, hypothesis-generating study, serum low-density lipoprotein measurement was found to be useful in predicting chemosensitivity to locally advanced gastric cancer patients undergoing NAC. Incorporation of serum low-density lipoprotein levels into individualized treatment protocols could be considered in clinical practice. PMID:27574445

  16. The low-abundance transcriptome reveals novel biomarkers, specific intracellular pathways and targetable genes associated with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bizama, Carolina; Benavente, Felipe; Salvatierra, Edgardo; Gutiérrez-Moraga, Ana; Espinoza, Jaime A; Fernández, Elmer A; Roa, Iván; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Sagredo, Eduardo A; Gidekel, Manuel; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2014-02-15

    Studies on the low-abundance transcriptome are of paramount importance for identifying the intimate mechanisms of tumor progression that can lead to novel therapies. The aim of the present study was to identify novel markers and targetable genes and pathways in advanced human gastric cancer through analyses of the low-abundance transcriptome. The procedure involved an initial subtractive hybridization step, followed by global gene expression analysis using microarrays. We observed profound differences, both at the single gene and gene ontology levels, between the low-abundance transcriptome and the whole transcriptome. Analysis of the low-abundance transcriptome led to the identification and validation by tissue microarrays of novel biomarkers, such as LAMA3 and TTN; moreover, we identified cancer type-specific intracellular pathways and targetable genes, such as IRS2, IL17, IFNγ, VEGF-C, WISP1, FZD5 and CTBP1 that were not detectable by whole transcriptome analyses. We also demonstrated that knocking down the expression of CTBP1 sensitized gastric cancer cells to mainstay chemotherapeutic drugs. We conclude that the analysis of the low-abundance transcriptome provides useful insights into the molecular basis and treatment of cancer. PMID:23907728

  17. Phase II trial of 4'-epi-doxorubicin in locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cazap, E; Estevez, R; Bruno, M; Levy, D; Algamiz, C; Chacon, R; Badano, C; Romero, A; Desimone, G; Roca, E

    1988-06-30

    Patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma received an i.v. bolus of 4'-epi-doxorubicin, 75/mg/m2/cycle, every 21 days. Partial responses were observed in 5 of 23 evaluable patients (21.7%). Treatment was generally well tolerated and toxicity was mild. The response rate to epirubicin appears to be very similar to that reported for doxorubicin. Larger doses of epirubicin could be safely used in future studies, and further evaluation of epirubicin in phase III trials is indicated.

  18. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  19. Trousseau’s syndrome in a patient with advanced stage gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Tai-Long; Rau, Kung-Ming; Chung, Wen-Jung; Tai, Wei-Chen; Wang, Shih-Ho; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Yen-Hao; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cancer are at high risk for thrombotic events, which are known collectively as Trousseau’s syndrome. Herein, we report a 66-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with terminal stage gastric cancer and liver metastasis and who had an initial clinical presentation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute ischemia of the left lower leg that resulted in gangrenous changes occurred during admission. Subsequent angiography of the left lower limb was then performed. This procedure revealed arterial thrombosis of the left common iliac artery with extension to the external iliac artery, the left common iliac artery, the posterior tibial artery, and the peroneal artery, which were occluded by thrombi. Aspiration of the thrombi demonstrated that these were not tumor thrombi. The interesting aspect of our case was that the disease it presented as arterial thrombotic events, which may correlate with gastric adenocarcinoma. In summary, we suggested that the unexplained thrombotic events might be one of the initial presentations of occult malignancy and that thromboprophylaxis should always be considered. PMID:26379411

  20. Gastric cancer review

    PubMed Central

    Carcas, Lauren Peirce

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Despite an overall decline in incidence over the last several decades, gastric cancer remains the fourth most common type of cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This review aims to discuss the global distribution of the disease and the trend of decreasing incidence of disease, delineate the different pathologic subtypes and their immunohistochemical (IHC) staining patterns and molecular signatures and mutations, explore the role of the pathogen H. pylori in tumorgenesis, discuss the increasing incidence of the disease in the young, western populations and define the role of biologic agents in the treatment of the disease. PMID:25589897

  1. Surrounding Gastric Mucosa Findings Facilitate Diagnosis of Gastric Neoplasm as Gastric Adenoma or Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miike, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Shojiro; Miyata, Yoshifumi; Hirata, Tomoya; Noda, Yuko; Noda, Takaho; Suzuki, Sho; Takeda, Sachiko; Natsuda, Shuichiro; Sakaguchi, Mai; Maemura, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Kanna; Yamaji, Takumi; Abe, Hiroo; Iwakiri, Hisayoshi; Tahara, Yoshihiro; Hasuike, Satoru; Nagata, Kenji; Kitanaka, Akira; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. It is difficult to master the skill of discriminating gastric adenoma from early gastric cancer by conventional endoscopy or magnifying endoscopy combined with narrow-band imaging, because the colors and morphologies of these neoplasms are occasionally similar. We focused on the surrounding gastric mucosa findings in order to determine how to discriminate between early gastric cancer and gastric adenoma by analyzing the characteristics of the gastric background mucosa. Methods. We retrospectively examined 146 patients who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric neoplasm between October 2009 and January 2015. The boundary of atrophic gastritis was classified endoscopically according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification system. Of 146 lesions, 63 early gastric cancers and 21 gastric adenomas were ultimately evaluated and assessed. Results. Almost all gastric adenomas were accompanied by open-type gastritis, whereas 47 and 16 early gastric cancers were accompanied by open-type and closed-type gastritis, respectively (p = 0.037). Conclusions. The evaluation of the boundary of atrophic gastritis associated with gastric neoplasms appears to be useful for discrimination between early gastric cancer and gastric adenoma. When gastric neoplasm is present in the context of surrounding localized gastric atrophy, gastric cancer is probable but not certain. PMID:26858751

  2. Isoprenaline Induces Periostin Expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xiao; Xi, Hong-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Yan-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Periostin mediates critical steps in gastric cancer and is involved in various signaling pathways. However, the roles of periostin in promoting gastric cancer metastasis are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance between periostin expression and gastric cancer progression and the role of stress-related hormones in the regulation of cancer development and progression. Materials and Methods Normal, cancerous and metastatic gastric tissues were collected from patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer. The in vivo expression of periostin was evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines MKN-45 and BGC-803 were used to detect the in vitro expression of periostin by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. Results Periostin is expressed in the stroma of the primary gastric tumors and metastases, but not in normal gastric tissue. In addition, we observed that periostin is located mainly in pericryptal fibroblasts, but not in the tumor cells, and strongly correlated to the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Furthermore, the distribution patterns of periostin were broader as the clinical staging of tumors progressed. We also identified a role of stress-related signaling in promoting cancer development and progression, and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that the distribution pattern of periostin was broader as the clinical staging of the tumor progressed and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26996552

  3. Relationship between CIP2A expression, and prognosis and MDR-related proteins in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Shi; Wu, Bin-Bin; Bao, Hai-Li; Du, Ji-Mei; Zhang, Sheng-Chu; Zheng, Yi-Hu

    2015-01-01

    CIP2A is highly expressed in a variety of malignancies. We determined the expression and clinical significance of CIP2A in patients with advanced gastric cancer. CIP2A protein was expressed in 25 of 37 cancer tissue specimens. There was no correlation between CIP2A and PGP, GST-π, Topo-II, and LRP expression. Survival analysis showed significant differences between the survival rate of the CIP2A protein-positive and -negative groups (χ2=4.509, P=0.034), but the degree of positive expression was unrelated to survival time (χ2=4.639, P=0.098). CIP2A expression may have no prospective value for optimizing chemotherapy regimens, but it can be an indicator for patient prognosis. PMID:26823836

  4. Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Asahiro; Gong, Jian; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapeutic agents are constantly being developed and have been shown to be effective in various clinical trials. One group of representative targeted oncogenic kinases, the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), has been associated with gastric cancer development. Trastuzumab, an inhibitor of ERBB2, has been approved for the treatment of gastric cancer, although other receptor tyrosine kinases, such as epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, c-Met, IGF-1R and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, are also activated in gastric cancer. The promising results of the trastuzumab clinical trial for gastric cancer resulted in the approval of trastuzumab-based therapy as a first-line treatment for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive patients. On the other hand, the trial examining bevacizumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy did not meet its primary goal of increasing the overall survival time of gastric cancer patients; however, a significantly higher response rate and a longer progression-free survival were observed in the bevacizumab arm of the trial. Other clinical trials, especially phase III trials that have tested drugs targeting RTKs, such as cetuximab, panitumumab, gefitinib, erlotinib, figitumumab, sorafenib, sunitinib and lapatinib, have shown that these drugs have modest effects against gastric cancer. This review summarizes the recent results from the clinical trials of molecularly targeted drugs and suggests that further improvements in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer can be achieved through the combination of conventional drugs with the new molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:24782606

  5. Primary gastric tuberculosis mimicking gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eray, İsmail Cem; Rencüzoğulları, Ahmet; Yalav, Orçun; Dalcı, Kubilay; Kakil, Erdem; Bağır, Emine; Parsak, Cem Kaan

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old female patient with no previous known diseases who had complaints of postprandial epigastric pain and weight loss and who could not be diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy, although gastric cancer was suspected radiologically and endoscopically, was diagnosed with primary gastric tuberculosis by laparotomy and frozen section. Following anti-tuberculosis treatment, a complete clinical, radiological, and endoscopic response was achieved. PMID:26504425

  6. Gastric cancer and family history

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Identifying individuals at high risk is important for surveillance and prevention of gastric cancer. Having first-degree relatives diagnosed with gastric cancer is a strong and consistent risk factor for gastric cancer, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this familial aggregation are unclear. Against this background, we reviewed the risk factors for gastric cancer in those with a first-degree relative with gastric cancer, and the possible causes for familial clustering of gastric cancer including bacterial factors, inherited genetic susceptibility, environmental factors or a combination thereof. Among individuals with a family history, current or past Helicobacter pylori infection, having two or more first-degree affected relatives or female gender was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. To date, no specific single nucleotide polymorphism has been shown to be associated with familial clustering of gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is the most important strategy for preventing gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients, particularly those in their 20s and 30s. Early H. pylori eradication could prevent the progression to intestinal metaplasia and reduce the synergistic effect on gastric carcinogenesis in individuals with both H. pylori infection and a family history. Endoscopic surveillance is also expected to benefit individuals with a family history. Further large-scale, prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and optimal time point for endoscopy in this population. Moreover, genome-wide association studies that incorporate environmental and dietary factors on a ‘big data’ basis will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:27809451

  7. Ramucirumab for advanced gastric cancer or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Smyth, Elizabeth; Chau, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Ramucirumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, is the first targeted agent to have demonstrated an improvement in survival, as a single agent or in combination, in a molecularly unselected population in gastro-oesophageal cancer. Now that second-line treatment is routinely considered for patients with advanced gastro-oesophageal cancer, ramucirumab, with its favourable toxicity profile compared with cytotoxic treatment, provides a valuable additional treatment option.

  8. Pulmonary Resection for Metastatic Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Hirohiko; Atari, Maiko; Fukuhara, Mitsuro; Nakajima, Yuki; Kinosita, Hiroyasu; Uramoto, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary metastasectomy has come to be recognized as an effective treatment for selected patients with some malignancies. On the other hand, the role of pulmonary metastasectomy for gastric cancer is still unknown. Metastasectomy is rarely indicated in cases of pulmonary metastasis from gastric cancer, because in most cases, the metastasis occurs in the form of lymphangitic carcinomatosis and the lesions are numerous. The purpose of this study was to determine the surgical outcomes and prognostic factors for survival after pulmonary metastasectomy. Methods: From 1985 to 2012, 10 patients underwent pulmonary metastasectomy for gastric cancer at Saitama Cancer Center, Japan. The overall survival rate was examined by the Kaplan-Meier method and univariate analysis was carried out to identify prognostic factors. Results: The overall 3-year survival rate was 30.0%. The median follow-up period was 26.8 months (range, 6.5–96.6) after the pulmonary metastasectomy. Univariate analysis revealed an advanced pathological stage of the gastric cancer and occurrence of extrapulmonary metastasis before the pulmonary metastasectomy as unfavorable prognostic factors. Conclusion: Pulmonary metastasectomy should be considered in selected patients with lung metastasis from gastric cancer. An advanced pathological stage of gastric cancer and occurrence of extrapulmonary metastasis before the pulmonary metastasectomy are unfavorable prognostic factors. PMID:27118522

  9. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists ... stomach (gastric) cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel ...

  10. [Effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for a patient with local recurrence of advanced gastric cancer followed by curable gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Natsume, Soichiro; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Yajima, Kazuhito; Yuu, Ken; Oohinata, Ryouki; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Takahashi, Keiichi; Maeda, Yoshiharu

    2014-11-01

    We report here the effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for a patient with local recurrence followed by curable gastrectomy. A 57-year-old man presented with a history of total gastrectomy with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, D2 lymphadenectomy, and Roux-en-Y reconstruction for advanced gastric cancer arising from the cardia. Esophageal intramural metastasis and lymph node metastasis around the right recurrent nerve were detected by chest-abdominal computed tomography and gastrointestinal endoscopy 27 months after the initial gastrectomy. Stable disease was achieved following 7 courses of chemotherapy using S-1 plus CDDP. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy including administration of S-1 and radiation of total 50 Gy (2 Gy/25 Fr) was selected for local tumor control. The patient was not able to eat solid food because of esophageal stenosis from regrowth of intramural metastasis of the esophagus 60 months after the chemotherapy. A WallFlex™ Duodenal Stent was placed to improve the dysphagia 67 months after chemotherapy. The patient died from recurrence of gastric cancer 69 months after completion of the initial chemotherapy and 2 months after the stent insertion.

  11. Usefulness of Photodynamic Diagnosis and Therapy using Talaporfin Sodium for an Advanced-aged Patient with Inoperable Gastric Cancer (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: In Japan the rise in the average life expectancy has caused an increase in the proportion of the population who are classed as geriatric. Accordingly, the number of elderly people being treated for cancer is increasing concomitantly. However, with the increase in age, the numbers of prior complications also increase. This is especially so in the advanced-aged patients, defined in Japan as those over the age of 85. Such complications may be too high risk for radical surgery and a less invasive treatment is warranted. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment approved by the Japanese National Health Insurance for the treatment of early stage superficial type esophageal and gastric cancers, early stage uterine cervical cancers and dysplasia, and early and advanced lung cancer. We report herein on the efficacy of palliative PDT using talaporfin sodium (Laserphyrin®) for a case of inoperable gastric cancer. Material and methods: The patient was an 87-year-old-man, a diabetic with histories of diabetic nephropathy, cerebral infarction and myocardial infarction. This patient was first diagnosed as having gastric cancer in 2007 but surgery and chemotherapy were contraindicated due to his poor physical status and poor renal function, respectively, owing to the anticipated side effects. The patient was referred to our institution after hearing of PDT in 2009. He was treated with 1 course of porfimer sodium PDT and 3 courses of talaporfin sodium PDT with photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) during the period from September, 2009 to June, 2011. Results: The massive gastric cancer located in the cardia was successfully treated with 4 PDT sessions without any serious complications; therefore the patient was able to orally ingest food until his death due to natural causes other than the cancer, in October, 2011. Conclusion: Talaporfin sodium PDT is safe and effective treatment for advanced-aged patients suffering from inoperable gastric cancer. PMID

  12. Not all gastric masses are gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, Michael; Tsai, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer metastasising to the gastrointestinal tract normally does not occur. However, as clinicians, we must be aware that lung adenocarcinoma, as in all cancers, can and will metastasise to any part of the body. We describe a case of a patient with a presumed primary gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with shortness of breath due to pleural effusion. Pathology from the pleural effusion was positive for primary lung adenocarcinoma. Further investigation revealed that the patient's gastric mass was misdiagnosed as gastric adenocarcinoma. We correctly diagnosed the mass as metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. This was very significant because the patient was transitioning to palliative care with possible tube feeding. After the correct diagnosis, her management drastically changed and her health improved. Clinical, pathological and medical management of lung cancer metastasis to the stomach are discussed. PMID:26976833

  13. Somatic DNA Hypomethylation in H. pylori-Associated High-Risk Gastritis and Gastric Cancer: Enhanced Somatic Hypomethylation Associates with Advanced Stage Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leodolter, Andreas; Alonso, Sergio; González, Beatriz; Ebert, Matthias P; Vieth, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Wex, Thomas; Peitz, Ullrich; Malfertheiner, Peter; Perucho, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Helicobacter pylori-related high-risk gastritis (HRG) is a severe risk factor for gastric cancer (GC). The link between HRG and long-term risk for GC may involve genetic and epigenetic alterations underlying a field defect, i.e. a region of the mucosa prone to cancer development. Global DNA hypomethylation is a pervasive alteration in GC that associates with chromosomal instability and poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the chronology of this alteration along the progression of HRG to GC, to test the hypothesis that it occurs early in the chronology of this pathway and plays a mechanistic role in the long-term cancer risk. Methods: We comparatively measured the genomic methylation level in gastric biopsies from 94 GC patients and 16 of their cancer-free relatives, 38 HRG patients, and 17 GERD patients, using a quantitative enzymatic method. Results: GC biopsies were hypomethylated compared to their matching non-tumor mucosa (P=9.4 × 10−12), irrespective of the tumor location or patients' country of origin. Genome-wide hypomethylation was also found in gastric mucosa of GC (P=1.5 × 10−5) and HRG (P=0.004) patients compared with healthy donors and GC relatives, regardless of the biopsy location within the stomach or previous H. pylori eradication therapy. An enhanced hypomethylation, distinguished by a bi-slope distribution of the differences in methylation between tumor and normal tissues, associated with a more invasive (P=0.005) and advanced stage (P=0.017) type of GC. Conclusions: Universal DNA demethylation in normal gastric mucosa in GC patients appears sporadic rather than familial. Genomic hypomethylation in HRG possibly contributes to a field defect for cancerization that is not reversed by bacterial eradication. Enhanced somatic hypomethylation may stratify GC for prognostic purposes. PMID:25928808

  14. Clinicopathological significance of N-cadherin and VEGF in advanced gastric cancer brain metastasis and the effects of metformin in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Jun, Kyong-Hwa; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Se Hoon; Jung, Ji-Han; Choi, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Young Il; Chin, Hyung-Min; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although brain metastasis is a rare complication of gastric cancer, no standard therapy for gastric cancer brain metastasis has been established. We attempted to identify biological markers that predict brain metastasis, and investigated how to modulate such markers. A case-control study of patients newly diagnosed with gastric cancer who had developed brain metastasis during follow-up, was conducted. These patients were compared with patients who had advanced gastric cancer but no evidence of brain metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, MSS1, claudin-3, claudin-4, Glut1, clusterin, ITGB4, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and p53. The expression of VEGF tended to be higher in the case group (33.3 vs. 0%, p=0.055). Median survival was significantly correlated with vascular invasion (12 vs. 33 months, p=0.008) and N-cadherin expression (36 vs. 12 months, p=0.027). We also investigated the effects of metformin in tumor-bearing mouse models. VEGF expression was decreased and E-cadherin increased in the metformin‑treated group when compared with the control group. The expression of the mesenchymal marker MMP9 was decreased in the metformin-treated group. Brain metastasis of advanced gastric cancer was associated with the expression of VEGF. Metformin treatment may be useful for modulating the metastatic capacity by reducing VEGF expression and blocking epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  15. How Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers Are Transforming Our Understanding and Management of Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Karen; Spratlin, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer (GC) is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. GC is a heterogeneous disease in terms of histology, anatomy, and epidemiology. There is also wide variability in how GC is treated in both the resectable and unresectable settings. Identification of prognostic and predictive biomarkers is critical to help direct and tailor therapy for this deadly disease. Methods. A literature search was done using Medline and MeSH terms for GC and predictive biomarkers and prognostic biomarkers. The search was limited to human subjects and the English language. There was no limit on dates. Published data and unpublished abstracts with clinical relevance were included. Results. Many potential prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been assessed for GC, some of which are becoming practice changing. This review is focused on clinically relevant biomarkers, including EGFR, HER2, various markers of angiogenesis, proto-oncogene MET, and the mammalian target of rapamycin. Conclusion. GC is a deadly and heterogeneous disease for which biomarkers are beginning to change our understanding of prognosis and management. The recognition of predictive biomarkers, such as HER2 and vascular endothelial growth factor, has been an exciting development in the management of GC, validating the use of targeted drugs trastuzumab and ramucirumab. MET is another potential predictive marker that may be targeted in GC with drugs such as rilotumumab, foretinib, and crizotinib. Further identification and validation of prognostic and predictive biomarkers has the potential transform how this deadly disease is managed. PMID:25142842

  16. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  17. Oncologic value of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aurello, Paolo; Sagnotta, Andrea; Terrenato, Irene; Berardi, Giammauro; Nigri, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Francesco; Ramacciato, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The oncologic validity of laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains controversial. This study is a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available evidence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A comprehensive search was performed between 2008 and 2014 to identify comparative studies evaluating morbidity/mortality, oncologic surgery-related outcomes, recurrence and survival rates. Data synthesis and statistical analysis were carried out using RevMan 5.2 software. RESULTS: Eight studies with a total of 1456 patients were included in this analysis. The complication rate was lower in LADG [odds ratio (OR) 0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.42-0.83; P < 0.002]. The in-hospital mortality rate was comparable (OR 1.22; 95% CI = 0.28-5-29, P = 0.79). There was no significant difference in the number of harvested lymph nodes, resection margins, cancer recurrence rate, cancer-related mortality or overall and disease-free survival (OS and DFS, respectively) rates between the laparoscopic and the open groups (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The current study supports the view that LADG for AGC is a feasible, safe and effective procedure in selected patients. Adequate lymphadenectomy, resection margins, recurrence, cancer-related mortality and long-term outcomes appear equivalent to open distal gastrectomy (ODG). PMID:27279389

  18. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With S-1 and Low-Dose Cisplatin for Inoperable Advanced Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saikawa, Yoshiro Kubota, Tetsuro; Kumagai, Koshi; Nakamura, Rieko; Kumai, Koichiro; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi; Kitajima, Masaki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: The results of a pilot study using S-1/low-dose cisplatin/radiotherapy led us to hypothesize that the initial chemoradiotherapy regimen would induce a 70% efficacy rate with a 10% pathologic complete response rate. Patients and Methods: Only patients with unresectable or incurable advanced gastric cancer were eligible. The patients received induction S-1 and cisplatin therapy with radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy alone. Results: Of the 30 patients recruited and assessed, 29 were eligible for clinical evaluation of measurable lesions. The response rate was 65.5%, with 19 with a partial response, 8 with no change, and 2 with progressive disease of 29 patients. Of the 30 patients recruited, 10 (33.3%) underwent stomach resection and D2 LN dissections. The pathologic complete response rate was 13.3% (4 patients), and the R0 resection rate was 100% (10 patients). The survival analysis showed a median survival time of 25 months. Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 66.7% for leukocytopenia, 33.3% for thrombocytopenia, 23.3% for nausea and appetite loss, and 6.7% for anemia, diarrhea, and renal dysfunction. Although all the patients had been hospitalized with a poor performance status with a giant tumor, 97% (29 of 30) could be discharged after the first cycle, resulting in an improvement in quality of life. Conclusion: Chemoradiotherapy could be a powerful regimen for controlling tumor progression in advanced gastric cancer, improving patients' quality of life with tolerable toxicity. A complete histologic response rate of >10% would be expected, even for large tumors with metastatic lesions.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Song, Bong-Il; Cho, Kwang Bum; Bae, Sung Uk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative screening for synchronous colorectal neoplasia (CRN) has been recommended in patients with gastric cancer because patients with gastric cancer are at increased risk for synchronous CRN. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 256 patients who underwent colonoscopy and 18F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative staging were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of focal colonic 18F-FDG uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT image was made based on histopathologic results from the colonoscopic biopsy. The 18F-FDG PET/CT result was considered as true positive for advanced CRN when focal 18F-FDG uptake matched colorectal carcinoma or adenoma with high-grade dysplasia in the same location on colonoscopy. Synchronous advanced CRN was detected in 21 of the 256 patients (4.7%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT were 76.2%, 96.2%, and 94.5%. The size of CRN with a true positive result was significantly larger than that with a false negative result. 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. Colonoscopy is recommended as the next diagnostic step for further evaluation of a positive 18F-FDG PET/CT result in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27603371

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Song, Bong-Il; Cho, Kwang Bum; Bae, Sung Uk

    2016-09-01

    Preoperative screening for synchronous colorectal neoplasia (CRN) has been recommended in patients with gastric cancer because patients with gastric cancer are at increased risk for synchronous CRN. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer.A total of 256 patients who underwent colonoscopy and F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative staging were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of focal colonic F-FDG uptake on F-FDG PET/CT image was made based on histopathologic results from the colonoscopic biopsy. The F-FDG PET/CT result was considered as true positive for advanced CRN when focal F-FDG uptake matched colorectal carcinoma or adenoma with high-grade dysplasia in the same location on colonoscopy.Synchronous advanced CRN was detected in 21 of the 256 patients (4.7%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of F-FDG PET/CT were 76.2%, 96.2%, and 94.5%. The size of CRN with a true positive result was significantly larger than that with a false negative result.F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. Colonoscopy is recommended as the next diagnostic step for further evaluation of a positive F-FDG PET/CT result in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27603371

  1. Epigenetic mechanisms in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2012-06-01

    Cancer is considered one of the major health issues worldwide, and gastric cancer accounted for 8% of total cases and 10% of total deaths in 2008. Gastric cancer is considered an age-related disease, and the total number of newly diagnosed cases has been increasing as a result of the higher life expectancy. Therefore, the basic mechanisms underlying gastric tumorigenesis is worth investigation. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling complex and miRNA, involved in gastric cancer. As the studies in gastric cancer continue, the mapping of an epigenome code is not far for this disease. In conclusion, an epigenetic therapy might appear in the not too distant future.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics in gastric cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko; Eguchi, Hidetaka

    2009-05-20

    Despite extensive efforts, treatment of gastric cancer by chemotherapy, the globally accepted standard, is yet undetermined, and uncertainty remains regarding the optimal regimen. Recent introduction of active "new generation agents" offers hope for improving patient outcomes. Current chemotherapeutic trials provided several regimens that may become a possible standard treatment, including docetaxel/cisplatin/5-FU (TCF) and cisplatin/S-1 for advanced and metastatic cancer and S-1 monotherapy in the adjuvant setting. Along with the development of novel active regimens, individual optimization of cancer chemotherapy has been attempted in order to reduce toxicity and enhance tumor response. Unlike the rare and limited contribution of pharmacokinetic studies, pharmacogenomic studies are increasing the potential to realize the therapeutics against gastric cancer. Despite the limited data, pharmacogenomics in gastric cancer have provided a number of putative biomarkers for the prediction of tumor response to chemotherapies and of toxicity.

  3. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  4. Trastuzumab: a novel standard option for patients with HER-2-positive advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, David

    2012-01-01

    The human epidermal receptor-2 (HER-2) is amplified in up to 25% of patients with gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. Although the presence of this amplification does not appear to confer a poor prognosis, it provides a valuable novel therapeutic target for this group of patients. Trastuzumab is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody directed at HER-2 which binds the external domain of the receptor and exerts its action via a combination of antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, reduced shedding of the extracellular domain, inhibition of dimerization and possibly receptor downregulation. The ToGA trial was an international multicentre randomized phase III study which evaluated the addition of trastuzumab to a cisplatin plus fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy doublet in 594 patients with HER-2-positive advanced gastric or oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma. The combination of the antibody with chemotherapy significantly improved response rate, median progression-free survival and median overall survival without additional toxicity or adversely affecting quality of life. Accordingly, trastuzumab plus chemotherapy is now a standard first-line treatment option for patients with advanced HER-2-positive gastroesophageal cancer. Unfortunately, many patients with HER-2-positive cancer exhibit primary resistance to trastuzumab and the remainder will acquire resistance to the antibody; therefore, urgent investigation into novel agents which may circumvent resistance mechanisms is warranted. Small molecule inhibitors of HER-2, which commonly also target other members of the HER family of receptors, such as EGFR and HER-3, are currently undergoing evaluation in gastroesophageal cancer as first-line alternatives to trastuzumab and second-line salvage treatments for trastuzumab-resistant disease. Extrapolating the successful use of trastuzumab in the advanced disease setting, clinical trials are underway to assess the role of this antibody in the perioperative and adjuvant settings

  5. Recent developments and innovations in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanli, Mehmet; Ilhan, Enver; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Alemdar, Ali; Demir, Uygar

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer has an important place in the worldwide incidence of cancer and cancer-related deaths. It can metastasize to the lymph nodes in the early stages, and lymph node metastasis is an important prognostic factor. Surgery is a very important part of gastric cancer treatment. A D2 lymphadenectomy is the standard surgical treatment for cT1N+ and T2-T4 cancers, which are potentially curable. Recently, the TNM classification system was reorganized, and the margins for gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy were revised. Endoscopic, laparoscopic and robotic treatments of gastric cancer have progressed rapidly with development of surgical instruments and techniques, especially in Eastern countries. Different endoscopic resection techniques have been identified, and these can be divided into two main categories: endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection. Minimally invasive surgery has been reported to be safe and effective for early gastric cancer, and it can be successfully applied to advanced gastric cancer with increasing experience. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermıc intraperıtoneal chemotherapy were developed as a combined treatment modality from the results of experimental and clinical studies. Also, hyperthermia increases the antitumor activity and penetration of chemotherapeutics. Trastuzumab which is a monoclonal antibody interacts with human epidermal growth factor (HER) 2 and is related to gastric carcinoma. The anti-tumor mechanism of trastuzumab is not clearly known, but mechanisms such as interruption of the HER2-mediated cell signaling pathways and cell cycle progression have been reported previously. H. pylori is involved in 90% of all gastric malignancies and Japanese guidelines strongly recommend that all H. pylori infections should be eradicated regardless of the associated disease. In this review, we present innovations discussed in recent studies. PMID:27158199

  6. Tumor Heterogeneity in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Positive Advanced Gastric Cancer Assessed by CT Texture Analysis: Association with Survival after Trastuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sung Hyun; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Jihoon; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Bohyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Image texture analysis is a noninvasive technique for quantifying intratumoral heterogeneity, with derived texture features reported to be closely related to the treatment outcome of tumors. Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although trastuzumab is associated with a survival gain among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric cancer, optimal patient selection is challenging. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CT texture features of HER2-positive gastric cancer were related to the survival rate after trastuzumab treatment. Methods and Findings Patients diagnosed with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer from February 2007 to August 2014 were retrospectively selected. Using in-house built software, histogram features (kurtosis and skewness) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) features (angular second moment [ASM], contrast, entropy, variance, and correlation) were derived from the CT images of HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer in 26 patients. All the patients were followed up for more than 6 months, with no confirmed deaths. The patients were dichotomized into a good and poor survival group based on cutoff points of overall survival of 12 months. A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to test the ability of each texture parameter to identify the good survival group. Kaplan–Meier curves for patients above and below each threshold were constructed. Using a threshold of >265.8480 for contrast, >488.3150 for variance, and ≤0.1319×10−3. for correlation, all of the area under the ROC curves showed fair accuracy (>0.7). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed statistically significant survival difference between two groups according to optimal cutoff values of contrast, variance, correlation and ASM. However, as this study had a small number of patients, a further study with a larger

  7. Photodynamic therapy of gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharnas, Sergey S.; Kuzin, N. M.; Zavodnov, Victor Y.; Sclyanskaya, Olga A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Torshina, Nadezgda L.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the use of laser endoscopic spectrum analyzer (LESA-5), the spectral-analyzing video-imaging system, Kr laser and various types of catheters for different tumor localizations, and Phthalocyanine aluminum photosensitizers in patients with gastric cancer was discussed. PDT was carried out in fifteen patients with gastric cancer. There were the following indications for PDT: early gastric cancer (3 patients), malignant stenosis of the cardia or pyloric portion of the stomach (4 patients), cancer of gastric stump with stenosis of gastrojejunal anastomosis (1 patient), preoperative treatment of patients with large but probably resectable gastric tumor size (7 patients). Usually we used 3 - 4 seances of laser treatment 10 - 30 minutes long. Concentration of photosensitizer in normal and malignant tissue was controlled by LESA-5. Treatment was monitored by spectral-analyzing video- imaging system in fluorescent light. The results show high efficiency of PDT especially in patients with early gastric cancer (necrosis of all tumor mass, i.e. complete regression of tumor). For all other patients we obtained partial regression of gastric cancer.

  8. [A Case of Resected Advanced Gastric Cancer Exhibiting Pathological Complete Response after Neoadjuvant Che-motherapy(DTX/CDDP/S-1:DCS)].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kunisaki, Chikara; Tsuburaya, Akira; Ohshima, Takashi; Yukawa, Norio; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-11-01

    A 71-year-old man was diagnosed with gastric cancer (LM, Less, type 2, T4aN2M0, cStageⅢb). A diagnostic laparoscopic surgery revealed serosal invasion without peritoneal dissemination. Two courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for locally advanced gastric cancer using DCS (DTX: 20 mg/m2 on day 1, CDDP: 50 mg/m2 on day 1, S-1: 120 mg/day, twice a day on days 1-14) was performed, which resulted in a clinical partial response. Consequently, distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection, and BillrothⅠreconstruction were carried out. Histopathological examination revealed no residual cancer cells both in the primary lesion and in the lymph nodes, indicating a pathological complete response (grade 3). Six courses of S-1 (120 mg/day on days 1-28, followed by 2 weeks of rest) were administered as adjuvant chemotherapy. At the 2 years 10 months follow-up after adjuvant therapy, the patient has had no recurrence. Combination chemotherapy with NAC-DCS can be a safe and effective regimen for locally advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26805259

  9. Decreased FOXP3+ and GARP+ Tregs to neoadjuvant chemotherapy associated with favorable prognosis in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Chen, Fuchao; Xie, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has been an increasingly used therapeutic strategy to improve the outcome of advanced gastric cancer (GC) over the past few decades. Lymphocytic infiltration has been reported to be associated with response to NACT, but the immune cell subpopulation and its prognosis contributing to response in GC have not been clarified yet. In the current study, the tumor infiltration of FOXP3+ and GARP+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs, marked by FOXP3 and GARP) response to NACT in advanced GC and their correlation with prognosis were evaluated. The infiltration of FOXP3+ and GARP+ Tregs in 102 patients with advanced GC who were treated with or without NACT was measured using immunohistochemical method. The infiltration of FOXP3+ and GARP+ Tregs was significantly decreased in the NACT group than in the non-NACT group (P=0.023 and P=0.012, respectively) and significantly associated with tumor, node, metastasis stage (P=0.019 and P=0.011, respectively). There was no significant difference in patient’s overall survival between the NACT and non-NACT groups (P=0.166); however, patients in the NACT group with decreased infiltration of FOXP3+ and GARP+ Tregs had longer overall survival (P=0.002 and P<0.001, respectively). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that the infiltration of GARP+ Tregs and lymph node metastasis were independent prognostic factors (P=0.038 and P=0.013, respectively). The results demonstrated that NACT could decrease the infiltration of FOXP3+ and GARP+ Tregs, and that the infiltration of GARP+ Tregs may serve as a new prognostic factor of human GC response to NACT. PMID:27366089

  10. The future of gastric cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Correa, Pelayo; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Camargo, M Constanza

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical treatment and chemotherapy, gastric cancer remains a major global health burden. The most recent estimates show that it is the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Various etiologic factors have been linked with the disease. It is widely accepted that Helicobacter pylori infection and high salt intake are positively associated with this neoplastic process. Controversial associations have been found with smoking or drinking habits. In contrast, there is convincing evidence that the adequate consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables reduces the risk of gastric cancer. Prevention intervention trials involving antioxidant supplements and anti- H. pylori treatment have shown beneficial effects in preventing the progression of pathologic changes in the gastric mucosa. On the other hand, recent advances related to differences in the genotypes of the bacteria and in human cytokine polymorphisms would allow the design and implementation of large-scale screening programs to identify subjects at the highest risk of gastric cancer. Curing the infection in such subjects and supplying adequate amounts of antioxidants should prevent a neoplastic outcome, and this intervention should be monitored by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:15052434

  11. [Current standards in the treatment of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Hacker, Ulrich; Lordick, Florian

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic resection is established in the treatment of early gastric cancer. More advanced gastric cancer requires gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Perioperative chemotherapy improves overall survival in locally advanced gastric cancer representing a standard of care. Locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction can alternatively be treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy. In metastatic disease, systemic chemotherapy improves survival, quality of life and symptom control. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy should be used together with first-line chemotherapy in HER2 positive gastric cancer patients. Second- and third-line therapy is now well established. The anti-VEGFR2 antibody Ramucirumab improves survival in second line treatment both as a monotherapy and in combination with paclitaxel and represents a novel treatment option.

  12. Phenytoin toxicity in a patient receiving concomitant use of phenytoin and S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kida, Kazutoshi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kuboi, Youichi; Kano, Hisao; Amano, Sadao

    2011-06-01

    A 61-year-old man had been receiving phenytoin(225mg/day)and valproate(600mg/day)for several years as the treatment for seizures. He was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer,and S-1 plus cisplatin treatment was administered as neoadjuvant chemotherapy because bulky lymph node metastases were found at the time of the initial diagnosis. He complained of weakness of the lower extremities,light -headedness,and trembling of the upper extremities 2 months after the start of concomitant treatment with S-1 plus cisplatin. The serum phenytoin concentration increased to 21. 2mg/mL. Head computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any intracranial lesion such as brain metastasis. Therefore, we diagnosed phenytoin toxicity due to concomitant use of S-1 and phenytoin,and the dose of phenytoin was then decreased to 150 mg. Although the weakness of the lower extremities improved,light -headedness remained. Phenytoin and valproate treatments were stopped,and he was able to walk 7 days after the termination of therapy. It is important to predict the timing of phenytoin toxicity due to S-1,and therapeutic drug monitoring should be performed in patients receiving S-1 plus cisplatin and phenytoin. PMID:21677496

  13. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do. PMID:26566288

  14. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do.

  15. Akt Inhibitor MK2206, Lapatinib Ditosylate, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast , Gastric, or Gastroesophageal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  16. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Ramos, Alberto; Sánchez Sánchez, Rolando

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery and identification in gastric tissue by Marshall and Warren in 1983, our knowledge about the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection has grown considerably. Its role in the multifactorial pathology of peptic ulcer disease (gastrodudodenal ulcer disease), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma is now widely accepted while its involvement in extraintestinal disease is still controversial.The correlation between the colonization of the stomach by H. pylori and gastric lymphoma has been demonstrated in multiple studies. Between 65 and 80% of distal gastric adenocarcinomas are attributed to H. pylori infection. However, gastric carcinogenesis cannot be explained by H. pylori infection alone. Among those individuals infected by this bacteria, only a small percentage (2-5%) ever develops gastric cancer, the majority exhibit benign lesions. There is a wide individual variation in the outcome of this infection in patients. This individual and population specific variation is due to the intricate relationship between genetics, the environment, bacterial virulence, diet, and socio-economic status and it explains the multiple outcomes of this infection. In this article, we conduct a review of the widely accepted theories regarding gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori, the correlations and enigmas between them, the reported geographical variations, and the various proposed hypotheses on the carcinogenic mechanism of Helicobacter pylori.

  17. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  18. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  19. Gastric cancer: The times they are a-changin’

    PubMed Central

    Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Buffoni, Lucio; Spadi, Rosella; Roato, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Even though during these last decades gastric cancer incidence decreased in Western countries, it remains endemic and with a high incidence in Eastern countries. The survival in advanced and metastatic stage of gastric cancer is still very poor. Recently the Cancer Genoma Atlas Research Network identified four subtypes with different molecular profiles to classify gastric cancer in order to offer the optimal targeted therapies for pre-selected patients. Indeed, the key point is still the selection of patients for the right treatment, on basis of molecular tumor characterization. Since chemotherapy reached a plateau of efficacy for gastric cancer, the combination between cytotoxic therapy and biological agents gets a better prognosis and decreases chemotherapeutic toxicity. Currently, Trastuzumab in combination with platinum and fluorouracil is the only approved targeted therapy in the first line for c-erbB2 positive patients, whereas Ramucirumab is the only approved targeted agent for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. New perspectives for an effective treatment derived from the immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we report an overview on gastric cancer treatments, with particular attention to recent advances in targeted therapies and in immunotherapeutic approach. PMID:26600930

  20. S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Zhou, Yan; Min, Ke; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Ni

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). METHODS: We extracted reported endpoints, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time-to-treatment failure (TTF), objective response rate (ORR) and adverse effects, from randomized controlled trials identified in PubMed, the Cochrane library, Science Direct, EMBASE and American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings. Stata software was used to calculate the pooled values. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials involving 2176 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Compared to non-S-1-based regimens, the use of S-1-based regimens were associated with an increase in ORR (RR = 1.300; 95%CI: 1.028-1.645); OS (HR = 0.89; 95%CI: 0.81-0.99; P = 0.025), TTF (HR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.75-0.92; P = 0.000), and a lower risk of febrile neutropenia (RR = 0.225; P = 0.000) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032). OS, PFS and TTF were prolonged, especially in the Asian population. In subgroup analysis, statistically significant increases in ORR (RR = 1.454; P = 0.029), OS (HR = 0.895; P = 0.041) and TTF (HR = 0.832; P = 0.000) were found when S-1-based chemotherapy was compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. The incidence of leukopenia (RR = 0.584; P = 0.002) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032) was higher in the 5-FU-based arm. S-1-based regimens had no advantage in ORR, OS, PFS, TTF and grade 3 or 4 adverse events over capecitabine-based regimens. CONCLUSION: S-1-based chemotherapy may be a good choice for AGC because of longer survival times, better tolerance and more convenient use. PMID:25206296

  1. [Potentiality of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors for Advanced Esophageal and Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Muro, Kei

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors which have been currently approved on malignant melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer in Japan, are having completely different mechanism from the conventional anti-neoplastic agents such as cytotoxic anticancer agents or molecular targeting agents. Therefore, although the response rate is not so high, the patterns of anti-tumor effect such as long-term survival or durable response and unique toxicity profiles to stimulate autoimmune response are quite distinguished. It has been found to be significantly different from conventional anti-neoplastic agents. The results of current clinical trials using immune checkpoint inhibitors for gastrointestinal tract cancers, promises to gain new promising treatment options near future. The clarification of the biomarkers and development of combination therapy is strongly warranted in the future. PMID:27628545

  2. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  3. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  4. Comparative effectiveness and safety between oxaliplatin-based and cisplatin-based therapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanjie; Huang, Jiale; Liu, Yanna; Zhao, Liying; Li, Zhijia; Liu, Hao; Wang, Qi-long; Qi, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Platinum-based drugs are the most significant chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer. The study aims to compare the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin-based therapy versus cisplatin-based therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods An adequate literature search in EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) was conducted. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared effectiveness and safety between oxaliplatin-based and cisplatin-based therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer were eligible. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The second endpoint was the adverse events. Results Five phase II or III RCTs involving a total of 2,046 patients were identified. The results showed that there were no significant difference in ORR (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.98–1.40, p = 0.08, I2 = 0%), PFS (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.84–1.01, p = 0.09, I2 = 0%) and OS (HR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.82–1.01, p = 0.07, I2 = 0%) between oxaliplatin-based therapy and cisplatin-based therapy. In addition, oxaliplatin-based therapy had lower risk of neutropenia, anemia, nausea, alopecia, thromboembolism, stomatitis and creatinine increased at all grades, and neutropenia, anemia, leukopenia and alopecia at 3–4 grades than cisplatin-based therapy. However, oxaliplatin-based therapy was associated with increased risk of neurosensory toxicity and thrombocytopenia. Conclusions Our meta-analysis showed that there were no significant difference in ORR, PFS and OS between oxaliplatin-based therapy and cisplatin-based therapy. The oxaliplatin-based therapy could generally decrease the risk of adverse effects except neurosensory toxicity and thrombocytopenia. PMID:27166187

  5. Etiology and Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous malignant disease associated with environmental and genetic predisposing factors. While gastric cancer incidence and mortality fell greatly globally over the past decades, it remains the fourth cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Thus, prevention of gastric cancer is still a major strategy for improvement of gastric cancer prognosis. Summary Helicobacter pylori infection has been demonstrated to be a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Unhealthy diet and lifestyle, including high-salt food, smoking and drinking, are able to induce genotypic and phenotypic transformation of gastric epithelial cells. Gene mutations (such as E-cadherin) in stomach epithelial cells are major genetic causes for gastric cancer. The eradication of H. pylori has been demonstrated to be an effective approach for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Increased intake of a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits as well as smoking cessation have been shown to reduce the incidence of gastric cancer. The secondary prevention strategy is to screen premalignant gastric lesions by endoscopy. Biomarker tests are also reliable methods to identify gastric precancerous lesions. Endoscopy screening is still the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Key Message H. pylori infection, a diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, as well as gene mutations are major risk factors for the development of gastric cancer. Practical Implications The eradication of H. pylori is a major primary preventive strategy of gastric cancer. A healthy lifestyle, including increased intake of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, reduced intake of salted and smoked food and red meat, a reduction of alcohol intake as well as smoking cessation will be effective approaches for the prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27722154

  6. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials on the role of targeted therapy in the management of advanced gastric cancer: Evidence does not translate?

    PubMed Central

    Ciliberto, Domenico; Staropoli, Nicoletta; Caglioti, Francesca; Gualtieri, Simona; Fiorillo, Lucia; Chiellino, Silvia; De Angelis, Antonina Maria; Mendicino, Francesco; Botta, Cirino; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2015-01-01

    Summary It is still uncertain if targeted therapy-based regimens in advanced gastric cancer actually produce survival benefit. To shed light on this important question, we performed a systematic review and meta-analyses on each relevant targeted-pathway. By searching literature databases and proceedings of major cancer meetings in the time-frame 2005–2014, 22 randomized clinical trials exploring targeted therapy for a total of 7022 advanced gastric cancer patients were selected and included in the final analysis. Benefit was demonstrated for antiangiogenic agents in terms of overall survival (HR 0.759; 95%CI 0.655–0.880; p < 0.001). Conversely no benefit was found for EGFR pathway (HR 1.077; 95%CI 0.847–1.370; p = 0.543). Meta-analysis of HER-2 pathway confirmed improvement in terms of survival outcome, already known for this class of drugs (HR 0.823; 95%CI 0.722–0.939; p = 0.004). Pooled analysis demonstrated a significant survival benefit (OS: HR 0.823; PFS: HR 0.762) with acceptable tolerability profile for targeted-based therapies as compared to conventional treatments. This finding conflicts with the outcome of most individual studies, probably due to poor trial design or patients selection. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a significant survival benefit for targeted therapy in its whole, which can be ascribed to anti-angiogenic and anti-HER2 agents. PMID:26061272

  7. Companion diagnostics for the targeted therapy of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Changhoon; Park, Young Soo

    2015-10-21

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and represents a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. With recent biomedical advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of gastric cancer, many genetic alterations have been identified as potential targets for its treatment. Multiple novel agents are currently under development as the demand for active agents that improve the survival of gastric cancer patients constantly increases. Based on lessons from previous trials of targeted agents, it is now widely accepted that the establishment of an optimal diagnostic test to select molecularly defined patients is of equal importance to the development of active agents against targetable genetic alterations. Herein, we highlight the current status and future perspectives of companion diagnostics in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  8. Gastric Cancer with Peritoneal Tuberculosis: Challenges in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Amer Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a 39-year-old female patient presenting with gastric cancer and tuberculous peritonitis. The differential diagnosis between advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis and early gastric cancer with peritoneal tuberculosis (TB), and the treatment of these two diseases, were challenging in this case. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion for peritoneal TB if the patient has a history of this disease, especially in areas with a high incidence of TB, such as South Korea. An early diagnosis is critical for patient management and prognosis. A surgical approach including tissue biopsy or laparoscopic exploration is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27433397

  9. Functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged intracellular organelles. Perturbations in autophagy are found in gastric cancer. In host gastric cells, autophagy can be induced by Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori) infection, which is associated with the oncogenesis of gastric cancer. In gastric cancer cells, autophagy has both pro-survival and pro-death functions in determining cell fate. Besides, autophagy modulates gastric cancer metastasis by affecting a wide range of pathological events, including extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, and tumor microenvironment. In addition, some of the autophagy-related proteins, such as Beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3), and p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) have certain prognostic values for gastric cancer. In this article, we review the recent studies regarding the functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer. PMID:26910278

  10. A Meta-analysis Reveals S-1-based Chemotherapy Improves the Survival of Patients With Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang-Lan; Lu, De-Cheng; Ying, Yan-Ping; Huang, Jin-Jiao; Zhou, Ai-Min; Jiang, Dun-Ke; Chen, Mao-Wei; Yang, Xi; Zhou, Jia; Huang, Hui-Qiao; Zeng, Hong-Yan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of S-1-based therapy versus non-S-1-based therapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients.Eligible studies stratifying objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and adverse events (AEs) in AGC patients were identified from Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. The STATA package (version 11.0) was used to pool the data from the eligible studies.Fifteen studies with 2973 AGC cases, of which 1497 (50.4%) received S-1-based therapy and 1476 (49.6%) received non-S-1-based therapy, were identified in the meta-analysis. AGC patients who had received S-1-based therapy had a higher median OS, median PFS, and ORR than those who had received 5-fluorouracil (FU)-based therapy (OS: hazard ratio [HR] 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-0.98, P = 0.015; PFS: HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, P = 0.016; ORR: OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, P = 0.003, respectively). S-1-based therapy had similar efficacy to capecitabine-based therapy in terms of median OS (HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.91-1.41, P = 0.253), median PFS (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.82-1.25, P = 0.927), and ORR (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.63-1.12, P = 0.226). Subgroup analysis for grade 3 to 4 toxicity showed higher incidence of neutropenia (relative risk [RR] = 0.827, P = 0.006), nausea (RR = 0.808, P = 0.040), and lower diarrhea (RR = 1.716, P = 0.012) in 5-FU-based arm, and higher diarrhea (RR = 0.386, P = 0.007) in capecitabine-based arm.S-1-based chemotherapy is favorable to AGC patients with better clinical benefit than 5-FU-based chemotherapy and with equivalent antitumor compare with capecitabine-based therapy. PMID:25906091

  11. [Chemotherapy selection through the process of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Shu

    2012-02-01

    The role of chemotherapy has become more and more important in the whole process of gastric cancer. S-1 or XELOX regimen is regarded as the standard treatment option in adjuvant chemotherapy. First-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer has been established to improve survival, and the benefit from second-line chemotherapy is being acknowledged. More studies are needed to assess the neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  12. Early cancer of the gastric remnant.

    PubMed Central

    Pointner, R; Schwab, G; Königsrainer, A; Bodner, E; Schmid, K W

    1988-01-01

    Early carcinoma of the gastric remnant was diagnosed in 19 patients between January 1976 and January 1986. In all patients early cancer was suspected at endoscopy and confirmed by biopsy and histology. The main reason for endoscopic examination was diffuse epigastric pain suggestive of stump gastritis. The surgical procedure was stump gastrectomy. Two of the 19 patients were not operated on because of advanced age. In contrast with the poor prognosis of patients with cancers of the gastric remnant of tumour stages T2 to T4 according to the TNM-classification regardless of their NM-stage, patients with tumour stage T1N0 and T1N1 have a good prognosis. PMID:3356360

  13. Gastric cancer-molecular and clinical dimensions.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Roopma; Song, Shumei; Lee, Ju-Seog; Yao, Yixin; Wei, Qingyi; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer imposes a considerable health burden around the globe despite its declining incidence. The disease is often diagnosed in advanced stages and is associated with a poor prognosis for patients. An in-depth understanding of the molecular underpinnings of gastric cancer has lagged behind many other cancers of similar incidence and morbidity, owing to our limited knowledge of germline susceptibility traits for risk and somatic drivers of progression (to identify novel therapeutic targets). A few germline (PLCE1) and somatic (ERBB2, ERBB3, PTEN, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, FGF, TP53, CDH1 and MET) alterations are emerging and some are being pursued clinically. Novel somatic gene targets (ARID1A, FAT4, MLL and KMT2C) have also been identified and are of interest. Variations in the therapeutic approaches dependent on geographical region are evident for localized gastric cancer-differences that are driven by preferences for the adjuvant strategies and the extent of surgery coupled with philosophical divides. However, greater uniformity in approach has been noted in the metastatic cancer setting, an incurable condition. Having realized only modest successes, momentum is building for carrying out more phase III comparative trials, with some using biomarker-based patient selection strategies. Overall, rapid progress in biotechnology is improving our molecular understanding and can help with new drug discovery. The future prospects are excellent for defining biomarker-based subsets of patients and application of specific therapeutics. However, many challenges remain to be tackled. Here, we review representative molecular and clinical dimensions of gastric cancer.

  14. [A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Severe Jaundice from Multiple Liver Metastases That Was Significantly Improved after Capecitabine plus Oxaliplatin Treatment].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroaki; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Nishino, Takaaki; Mihara, Hiroshi; Yoshita, Hiroki; Nakada, Naokatsu; Nanjo, Sohachi; Miura, Yoshiaki; Kajiura, Shinya; Fujinami, Haruka; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old man with advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital. His liver function was impaired(total bilirubin 1.6mg/dL)with multiple liver metastases. He was treated with chemotherapy of S-1 plus cisplatin but it was discon- tinued due to severe diarrhea(CTCAE Grade 3)on day 6 and his liver dysfunction progressed(total bilirubin 10.3mg/dL). After his diarrhea improved, he was treated with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin(capecitabine 3,600mg/day on day 1-14, oxaliplatin 130mg/m2 on day 1, q3 weeks). His severe jaundice and general condition improved without severe non-hematological toxicity, and he was ultimately discharged. He achieved a partial response(RECIST v1.1)after capecitabine plus oxaliplatin treatment, and this therapy has been continued for 15 months. This case suggests that capecitabine plus oxaliplatin may be beneficial even in advanced gastric cancer patients with impaired liver function from multiple liver metastases. PMID:27628556

  15. Overexpression of neuritin in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, MING; LI, YONGJUN; ZHONG, CHEN; LI, YONGKANG; NIU, JIANHUA; GONG, JIANPING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of neuritin in gastric cancer tissues, in order to explore the association between the expression of neuritin and the occurrence and development of gastric cancer. Tissue specimens were collected from 58 patients with gastric cancer. Immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to determine the expression of neuritin in the gastric cancer and corresponding adjacent normal gastric tissues. The expression rate of neuritin in gastric cancer tissues was 96.55% (56/58), demonstrating no statistically significant difference from the expression rate in the adjacent normal tissues (94.83%) (P>0.05). However, the rate of strong neuritin expression in gastric cancer tissues (82.76%) was significantly increased compared with the rate in the adjacent normal tissues (15.52%) (P<0.05). Neuritin expression exhibited no correlation with the gender or age of patients, tumor-node-metastasis staging, tumor depth, presence of lymph node metastasis, histological or pathological type of the tumor or presence of distant metastasis (P>0.05). As determined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis, the mRNA expression of neuritin in gastric cancer tissues was markedly increased compared with the expression in the adjacent normal tissues. In conclusion, neuritin is highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues, suggesting that neuritin may act as a novel potential target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26788217

  16. Non-coding RNAs and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-Fei; Chen, Sheng-Can; Xia, Tian; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Shao, Yong-Fu; Xiao, Bing-Xiu; Guo, Jun-Ming

    2014-05-14

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play key roles in development, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Altered ncRNA expression is associated with gastric cancer occurrence, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is significantly related to gastric cancer tumor stage, size, differentiation and metastasis. MiRNAs interrupt cellular signaling pathways, inhibit the activity of tumor suppressor genes, and affect the cell cycle in gastric cancer cells. Some miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-106a and miR-421, could be potential markers for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new research hotspot among cancer-associated ncRNAs, play important roles in epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Several gastric cancer-associated lncRNAs, such as CCAT1, GACAT1, H19, and SUMO1P3, have been explored. In addition, Piwi-interacting RNAs, another type of small ncRNA that is recognized by gastroenterologists, are involved in gastric carcinogenesis, and piR-651/823 represents an efficient diagnostic biomarker of gastric cancer that can be detected in the blood and gastric juice. Small interfering RNAs also function in post-transcriptional regulation in gastric cancer and might be useful in gastric cancer treatment. PMID:24833871

  17. Treatment Patterns, Costs, and Survival among Medicare-Enrolled Elderly Patients Diagnosed with Advanced Stage Gastric Cancer: Analysis of a Linked Population-Based Cancer Registry and Administrative Claims Database

    PubMed Central

    Karve, Sudeep; Liepa, Astra M; Hess, Lisa M; Kaye, James A; Calingaert, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess real-world treatment patterns, health care utilization, costs, and survival among Medicare enrollees with locally advanced/unresectable or metastatic gastric cancer receiving standard first-line chemotherapy. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database (2000~2009). The inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) first diagnosed with locally advanced/unresectable or metastatic gastric cancer between July 1, 2000 and December 31, 2007 (first diagnosis defined the index date); (2) ≥65 years of age at index; (3) continuously enrolled in Medicare Part A and B from 6 months before index through the end of follow-up, defined by death or the database end date (December 31, 2009), whichever occurred first; and (4) received first-line treatment with fluoropyrimidine and/or a platinum chemo-therapy agent. Results In total, 2,583 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age at index was 74.8±6.0 years. Over 90% of patients died during follow-up, with a median survival of 361 days for the overall post-index period and 167 days for the period after the completion of first-line chemotherapy. The mean total gastric cancer-related cost per patient over the entire post-index follow-up period was United States dollar (USD) 70,808±56,620. Following the completion of first-line chemotherapy, patients receiving further cancer-directed treatment had USD 25,216 additional disease-related costs versus patients receiving supportive care only (P<0.001). Conclusions The economic burden of advanced gastric cancer is substantial. Extrapolating based on published incidence estimates and staging distributions, the estimated total disease-related lifetime cost to Medicare for the roughly 22,200 patients expected to be diagnosed with this disease in 2014 approaches USD 300 millions. PMID:26161282

  18. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Cate's Story: Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Megan

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and is thought to be responsible for about 10% of cancer-related deaths across the globe. A small proportion of all gastric cancers arise because of a known hereditary syndrome, the most common of which is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). This is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an increased risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer at a young age. The gene responsible for HDGC is CDH1, also known as E-cadherin, a germline mutation conferring an 80% risk of developing gastric cancer during the lifetime of the carrier. Females with germline CDH1 mutations face an additional risk of developing lobular breast cancer, with a reported cumulative risk of 60% by the age of 80 years.
.

  20. Current and emerging therapies in unresectable and recurrent gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Erin; Rajdev, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide despite many advances and options in therapy. As it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, prognosis is poor with a median overall survival of less than twelve months. Chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for these patients but it confers only a moderate survival advantage. There remains a need for new targeted treatment options and a way to better define patient populations who will benefit from these agents. In the past few years, there has been a better understanding of the biology, molecular profiling, and heterogeneity of gastric cancer. Our increased knowledge has led to the identification of gastric cancer subtypes and to the development of new targeted therapeutic agents. There are now two new targeted agents, trastuzumab and ramucirumab, that have recently been approved for the treatment of advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. There are also many other actively investigated targets, including epidermal growth factor receptor, the phosphatadylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, c-Met, poly ADP-ribose polymerase, and immune checkpoint inhibition. In this review, we discuss the current management of advanced gastric cancer as well as emerging targeted therapies and immunotherapy. PMID:27239108

  1. The role of leptin in gastric cancer: Clinicopathologic features and molecular mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Choi, Ho Soon; Yang, Sun Young; Park, Hyun Ki; Lee, Young Yiul; Lee, Oh Young; Yoon, Byung Chul; Hahm, Joon Soo; Paik, Seung Sam

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Leptin and Ob-R are expressed in gastric adenoma and early and advanced cancer. • Leptin is more likely associated with differentiated gastric cancer or cardia cancer. • Leptin proliferates gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways. - Abstract: Obesity is associated with certain types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, it is still unclear whether obesity-related cytokine, leptin, is implicated in gastric cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of leptin in gastric cancer. The expression of leptin and its receptor, Ob-R, was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and was compared in patients with gastric adenoma (n = 38), early gastric cancer (EGC) (n = 38), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (n = 38), as a function of their clinicopathological characteristics. Gastric cancer cell lines were studied to investigate the effects of leptin on the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways using MTT assays, immunoblotting, and inhibition studies. Leptin was expressed in gastric adenomas (42.1%), EGCs (47.4%), and AGCs (43.4%). Ob-R expression tended to increase from gastric adenoma (2%), through EGC (8%), to AGC (18%). Leptin induced the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by activating STAT3 and ERK1/2 and up-regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Blocking Ob-R with pharmacological inhibitors and by RNAi decreased both the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 and the leptin-induced expression of VEGF. Leptin plays a role in gastric cancer by stimulating the proliferation of gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways.

  2. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of stomach cancer. Some studies show that eating fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin C and beta carotene may lower the risk ... take can prevent cancer. These may include eating fruits and vegetables, exercising, ... vitamins, minerals, or food supplements. New ways to prevent ...

  3. Current Perspectives on Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marqués-Lespier, Juan M; González-Pons, María; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is third leading cause of cancer-related death. Only 28.3% of new GC cases survive more than 5 years. Although incidence has declined in the United States, an increase is estimated for 2016. Risk factors include sex (risk is higher in men), Helicobacter pylori infection, heredity, and lifestyle. GC is usually diagnosed between the ages of 60-80 years. Prognosis of GC is largely dependent on the tumor stage at diagnosis and classification as intestinal or diffuse type; diffuse-type GC has worse prognosis. Chemoprevention has been shown to decrease risk, but is currently not used clinically. PMID:27546840

  4. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach Cancer or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  5. Gastric cancer: new genetic developments.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Grady, William; Suriano, Gianpaolo; Huntsman, David

    2005-06-01

    Gastric cancer's (GC) incidence shows large geographic differences worldwide with the lowest rates occurring in most Western industrialized countries including the United States and the United Kingdom; in contrast, relatively high rates of GC occur in Japan, Korea, China, and South America, particularly Chile. The Laurén classification system classifies GC under two major histopathological variants: 1) an intestinal type and 2) a diffuse type. The intestinal type is more common in the general population, more likely to be sporadic and related to environmental factors such as diet, particularly salted fish and meat as well as smoked foods, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use. It exhibits components of glandular, solid, or intestinal architecture, as well as tubular structures. On the other hand, the diffuse type is more likely to have a primary genetic etiology, a subset of which, known as hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), is due to the E-cadherin (CDH1) germline mutation. The diffuse type pathology is characterized by poorly cohesive clusters of cells which infiltrate the gastric wall, leading to its widespread thickening and rigidity of the gastric wall, known as linitis plastica. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with risk for both the intestinal and diffuse varieties of gastric cancer. Germline truncating mutations of the CDH1 gene, which codes for the E-cadherin protein, were initially identified in three Maori families from New Zealand that were predisposed to diffuse GC. Since then, similar mutations have been described in more than 40 additional HDGC families of diverse ethnic backgrounds. It is noteworthy that two-thirds of HDGC families reported to date have proved negative for the CDH1 germline mutation. A number of candidate genes have been identified through analysis of the molecular biology of E-cadherin. Patients with evidence of the CDH1 germline mutation in the context of a family history of HDGC must be considered as candidates

  6. Changing strategies for target therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a worldwide decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer, this malignancy still remains one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Great efforts have been made to improve treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, and the introduction of trastuzumab has greatly improved the overall survival. The trastuzumab treatment took its first step in opening the era of molecular targeted therapy, however several issues still need to be resolved to increase the efficacy of targeted therapy. Firstly, many patients with metastatic gastric cancer who receive trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapeutic agents develop resistance to the targeted therapy. Secondly, many clinical trials testing novel molecular targeted agents with demonstrated efficacy in other malignancies have failed to show benefit in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, suggesting the importance of the selection of appropriate indications according to molecular characteristics in application of targeted agents. Herein, we review the molecular targeted agents currently approved and in use, and clinical trials in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, and demonstrate the limitations and future direction in treatment of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26811656

  7. Molecular targeted therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenting; Yang, Zhen; Lu, Nonghua

    2016-01-04

    Despite the global decline in the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer, it remains one of the most common malignant tumors of the digestive system. Although surgical resection is the preferred treatment for gastric cancer, chemotherapy is the preferred treatment for recurrent and advanced gastric cancer patients who are not candidates for reoperation. The short overall survival and lack of a standard chemotherapy regimen make it important to identify novel treatment modalities for gastric cancer. Within the field of tumor biology, molecular targeted therapy has attracted substantial attention to improve the specificity of anti-cancer efficacy and significantly reduce non-selective resistance and toxicity. Multiple clinical studies have confirmed that molecular targeted therapy acts on various mechanisms of gastric cancer, such as the regulation of epidermal growth factor, angiogenesis, immuno-checkpoint blockade, the cell cycle, cell apoptosis, key enzymes, c-Met, mTOR signaling and insulin-like growth factor receptors, to exert a stronger anti-tumor effect. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that underlie molecular targeted therapies will provide new insights into gastric cancer treatment.

  8. Current role of minimally invasive approaches in the treatment of early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    El-Sedfy, Abraham; Brar, Savtaj S; Coburn, Natalie G

    2014-01-01

    Despite declining incidence, gastric cancer remains one of the most common cancers worldwide. Early detection in population-based screening programs has increased the number of cases of early gastric cancer, representing approximately 50% of newly detected gastric cancer cases in Asian countries. Endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection have become the preferred therapeutic techniques in Japan and Korea for the treatment of early gastric cancer patients with a very low risk of lymph node metastasis. Laparoscopic and robotic resections for early gastric cancer, including function-preserving resections, have propagated through advances in technology and surgeon experience. The aim of this paper is to discuss the recent advances in minimally invasive approaches in the treatment of early gastric cancer. PMID:24833843

  9. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management. PMID:27126070

  10. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management.

  11. [Early gastric cancer--two case reports].

    PubMed

    Neziha, Belkahla; Houneida, Bouzi; Mohamed, Jouini; Hajer, Ouerghi; Nadia, Maamouri; Imed, Cheikh; Faouzi, Chebbi; Saadia, Bouraoui; Nidhameddine, Kchir; Ahmed, Ben Ammar

    2005-11-01

    Gastric cancer is a serious disease with a high mortality rate. Early diagnosis of the disease improves its prognosis. We report two cases of early gastric cancer and we specify the clinical, endoscopic, histologic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. This study is about two female patients, respectively, 36 and 70 years old. The diagnosis of early gastric cancer was based on pathologic examination of the resected stomach. The two patients are in remission 2 years and 6 months later, respectively. The diagnosis of early gastric cancer is often made on nonspecific symptoms. Oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy shows gastric mucosal anomalies. Pathologic examination of gastric biopsies confirm the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound is essential; it specifies the submucosal infiltration and evaluates the lymph node invasion. Surgery is the primary treatment but in some cases endoscopic mucosal resection provides good long-term results. Early diagnosis of adenocarcinoma improves the prognosis of the disease, which remains poor nowadays.

  12. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed. PMID:26814181

  13. Gastric cancer: Prevention, screening and early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasechnikov, Victor; Chukov, Sergej; Fedorov, Evgeny; Kikuste, Ilze; Leja, Marcis

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be an important healthcare problem from a global perspective. Most of the cases in the Western world are diagnosed at late stages when the treatment is largely ineffective. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a well-established carcinogen for gastric cancer. While lifestyle factors are important, the efficacy of interventions in their modification, as in the use of antioxidant supplements, is unconvincing. No organized screening programs can be found outside Asia (Japan and South Korea). Although several screening approaches have been proposed, including indirect atrophy detection by measuring pepsinogen in the circulation, none of them have so far been implemented, and more study data is required to justify any implementation. Mass eradication of H. pylori in high-risk areas tends to be cost-effective, but its adverse effects and resistance remain a concern. Searches for new screening biomarkers, including microRNA and cancer-autoantibody panels, as well as detection of volatile organic compounds in the breath, are in progress. Endoscopy with a proper biopsy follow-up remains the standard for early detection of cancer and related premalignant lesions. At the same time, new advanced high-resolution endoscopic technologies are showing promising results with respect to diagnosing mucosal lesions visually and targeting each biopsy. New histological risk stratifications (classifications), including OLGA and OLGIM, have recently been developed. This review addresses the current means for gastric cancer primary and secondary prevention, the available and emerging methods for screening, and new developments in endoscopic detection of early lesions of the stomach. PMID:25320521

  14. Perioperative chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer: MAGIC and beyond.

    PubMed

    Choi, Audrey H; Kim, Joseph; Chao, Joseph

    2015-06-28

    Over the last 15 years, there have been major advances in the multimodal treatment of gastric cancer, in large part due to several phase III studies showing the treatment benefits of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation protocols. The objective of this editorial is to review the current high-level evidence supporting the use of chemotherapy, chemoradiation and anti-HER2 agents in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings, as well as to provide a clinical framework for use of this data based on our own institutional protocol for gastric cancer. Major studies reviewed include the SWOG/INT 0116, Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy (MAGIC), CLASSIC, ACTS-GC, Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Stomach Cancer (ARTIST) and Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer trials. Although these studies have demonstrated that multiple approaches in terms of the timing and therapy for gastric cancer are effective, no standard of care is widely accepted and questions regarding the optimal timing of chemotherapy, the benefit of radiotherapy, the minimum required extent of lymphadenectomy and optimal chemotherapy regimen still exist. Protocols from the upcoming ARTIST II, CRITICS, TOPGEAR, Neo-AEGIS and MAGIC-B studies are outlined, and results from these studies will provide critical information regarding optimal timing and treatment regimen. Additionally, the future directions of gastric cancer research predicated on molecular profiling and tailored therapies based on targetable genetic alterations in individual patient's tumors are addressed.

  15. Gastric cancer detection in gastric ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mountford, R A; Brown, P; Salmon, P R; Alvarenga, C; Neumann, C S; Read, A E

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study has been performed of all cases of gastric ulcer diagnosed or investigated within the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Medicine, Bristol, over a three year period (1974-76). The average length of follow-up was two years. Two hundred and sixty five cases of gastric ulcer were studied of which 37 proved to be malignant (14%). Presenting complaints of anorexia, weight loss, nausea and/or vomiting, and multiple (greater than 3) symptoms, were commoner in the malignant ulcer group. Ulcer site and the presence of coexisting duodenal ulceration were largely unhelpful in deciding the status of an ulcer. Malignant ulcers tended to be large (greater than 1 cm diameter). Radiology was highly unreliable in distinguishing benign from malignant ulcers. Visual inspection at endoscopy was more reliable, but associated with a tendency to over-diagnose malignancy. False positive biopsies were uncommon (two cases). Three cases of clinically unsuspected superficial gastric carcinoma were revealed. Repeated endoscopy and biopsy of all gastric ulcers until they are completely healed is advised. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7364322

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in AREG and EREG are prognostic biomarkers in locally advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients after surgery with curative intent

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Takeru; Stintzing, Sebastian; Zhang, Wu; Yang, Dongyun; Azuma, Mizutomo; Ning, Yan; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Volz, Nico B.; Sunakawa, Yu; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Watanabe, Masahiko; Barzi, Afsaneh; El Khoueiry, Anthony B; Shah, Manish A; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Objective Amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG) are important ligands to the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) which is involved in the regulation of progression and stemness in gastric cancer (GC). This study investigated whether frequent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of AREG and EREG are associated with recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (GC). Methods SNPs with a minor allele frequency of ≥10% were analyzed using direct DNA sequencing in two independent study populations. Results The minor allele of AREG rs1615111 was associated with a significant higher 3-year recurrence rate and lower 3-year survival rate (HR= 2.21 and 2.35 respectively) when compared to patients homozygous for the dominant allele G. The value for overall survival could be validated with a HR of 2.54 (P= 0.018) in an independent cohort. Patients homozygous for the minor allele A of EREG rs12641042 had a significant higher 3-year survival rate than patients having allele C (HR 0.48; P=0.034), but significance was lost in multivariable analysis (P=0.066). Value of rs12641042 could not be validated (P=0.98). Exploratory multivariable subgroup analysis revealed the strongest prognostic value for rs1615111 in tumors with a diffuse histology (Pfor interaction = 0.004). Conclusions AREG rs1615111, located in the AREG genomic region is able to significantly define different prognostic cohorts in locally advanced GC. This value is most evident in GC patients with diffuse histology which might be relevant as none of the trials testing EGFR-inhibitors has been enriched for diffuse histology or a molecularly defined population. PMID:25203737

  17. Long-term survival in an advanced gastric cancer patient treated with cetuximab in association with FOLFIRI: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Adua, Daniela; Di Fabio, Francesca; Rojas Llimpe, Fabiola Lorena; Pini, Sara

    2014-01-01

    In December 2004, a 52-year-old woman with metastatic gastric cancer was enrolled in the phase II clinical trial FOLCETUX, receiving cetuximab at an initial dose of 400 mg/m2 i.v. followed by weekly doses of 250 mg/m2, irinotecan 180 mg/m2 i.v. on day 1, LFA 100 mg/m2 i.v. followed by 5-FU 400 mg/m2 i.v. bolus and 600 mg/m2 i.v. 22-h continuous infusion on days 1 and 2 every two weeks, to a total of 17 cycles. CT and PET-CT performed after six weeks treatment failed to show any residual disease, with complete radiological response in accord to RECIST criteria and complete metabolic response. A total of 24 maintenance administrations with cetuximab alone (250 mg/m2 weekly) were performed, as foreseen by the protocol in responders. In November 2012 a clinical, radiological (CT) and metabolic (PET-CT) patient examination proved negative for recurrent disease, signifying 95 months’ progression free survival. PMID:24490046

  18. Seom guidelines for the treatment of gastric cancer 2015.

    PubMed

    Martin-Richard, M; Custodio, A; García-Girón, C; Grávalos, C; Gomez, C; Jimenez-Fonseca, P; Manzano, J L; Pericay, C; Rivera, F; Carrato, A

    2015-12-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth cause of death by cancer in Spain and a significant medical problem. Molecular biology results evidence that gastroesophageal junction tumors and gastric cancer should be considered as two independent entities with a different prognosis and treatment approach. Endoscopic resection in very early tumors is feasible. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy in locally advanced resectable tumor increase overall survival and should be considered standard treatments. In stage IV tumors, platinum-fluoropyrimidine-based schedule, with trastuzumab in HER2-overexpressed tumors, is the first-line treatment. Different therapies in second line have demonstrated in randomized studies their clear benefit in survival improvement.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-Jia; Gao, Jin-Bo

    2016-09-15

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Chemotherapy is one of the major treatments for gastric cancer, but drug resistance limits the effectiveness of chemotherapy, which results in treatment failure. Resistance to chemotherapy can be present intrinsically before the administration of chemotherapy or it can develop during chemotherapy. The mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance in gastric cancer are complex and multifactorial. A variety of factors have been demonstrated to be involved in chemoresistance, including the reduced intracellular concentrations of drugs, alterations in drug targets, the dysregulation of cell survival and death signaling pathways, and interactions between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance in gastric cancer and on recent studies that have sought to overcome the underlying mechanisms of chemoresistance. PMID:27672425

  20. Molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wen-Jia; Gao, Jin-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Chemotherapy is one of the major treatments for gastric cancer, but drug resistance limits the effectiveness of chemotherapy, which results in treatment failure. Resistance to chemotherapy can be present intrinsically before the administration of chemotherapy or it can develop during chemotherapy. The mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance in gastric cancer are complex and multifactorial. A variety of factors have been demonstrated to be involved in chemoresistance, including the reduced intracellular concentrations of drugs, alterations in drug targets, the dysregulation of cell survival and death signaling pathways, and interactions between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance in gastric cancer and on recent studies that have sought to overcome the underlying mechanisms of chemoresistance.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wen-Jia; Gao, Jin-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Chemotherapy is one of the major treatments for gastric cancer, but drug resistance limits the effectiveness of chemotherapy, which results in treatment failure. Resistance to chemotherapy can be present intrinsically before the administration of chemotherapy or it can develop during chemotherapy. The mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance in gastric cancer are complex and multifactorial. A variety of factors have been demonstrated to be involved in chemoresistance, including the reduced intracellular concentrations of drugs, alterations in drug targets, the dysregulation of cell survival and death signaling pathways, and interactions between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance in gastric cancer and on recent studies that have sought to overcome the underlying mechanisms of chemoresistance. PMID:27672425

  2. Gastric cancer - clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Venerito, Marino; Link, Alexander; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) ranks fifth for cancer incidence and second for cancer deaths. Epidemiological data showed that survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma and patients with pernicious anemia etiologically linked to autoimmune gastritis are at increased risk of GC. Screening of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease by means of pepsinogen (PG) I and PG I/II detected autoimmune gastritis with oxyntic gastric atrophy in one of four patients and may be recommended for GC prevention purposes. The International Agency for Research on Cancer reported a positive association between consumption of processed meet and increased GC risk. A new GC risk prediction model based on biological markers, age, gender, smoking status, family history of GC, and consumption of highly salted food showed good predictive performance, and might prompt individuals to modify their lifestyle habits, attend regular check-up visits or participate in screening programs. A novel GC classification based on gene expression of primary resected cancers correlated with clinicopathological features. Noncoding RNA for GC screening remains the focus of multiple studies. Patients with early GC undergoing endoscopic resection are more likely to develop metachronous lesions than patients undergoing surgery and endoscopic surveillance is warranted in this special cohort. The addition of gastrectomy to chemotherapy did not improve survival of patients with advanced GC and a single noncurable factor. Apatinib, a novel oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved the median overall survival of patients with advanced GC and progressive disease after two or more lines of prior chemotherapy of nearly 3 months. PMID:27531538

  3. Treatment of esophageal-gastric double primary cancer by pedunculated remnant gastric interposition, esophageal-gastric anastomosis and gastrojejunal Billroth II anastomosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAO TIAN; WANG, WEI; ZHU, QIANG; CAO, MING; JIANG, ZHONG MIN; ZANG, QI

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous advancement of clinical diagnostic techniques, including imaging technology, the incidence of confirmed multiple primary cancers or double primary carcinoma increases yearly. However, studies reporting synchronization surgery performed for primary dual esophageal gastric cancer are rare. The present study reports the case of a patient with double primary esophageal-gastric cancer, located in the thoracic cavity segment of the esophagus and gastric antrum of the stomach, respectively. The gastric cancer was diagnosed by endoscopy biopsy with concomitant esophageal cancer. The patient underwent gastric cancer resection, and pedunculated remnant gastric interposition esophagogastric side anastomosis was performed with gastrojejunostomy Billroth II anastomosis behind the colon. Abdominal cavity lymph node dissection was also performed. The esophageal-gastric double primary cancer was simultaneously excised and the gastric regions were used in the construction of the upper gastrointestinal tract: The surgery was successful. However, two weeks after surgery, upper gastrointestinal imaging revealed esophagogastric anastomotic leakage. Subsequently, an esophageal stent was inserted and antibiotics and additional treatment was administered. Follow-up one year after surgery revealed that the patient was well and remained in a stable condition. PMID:26622590

  4. Updates on esophageal and gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Amy; Cha, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancers are both common and deadly. Patients present most often after disease progression and survival is therefore poor. Due to demographic variability and recent changes in disease incidence, much emphasis has been placed on studying risk factors for both esophageal and gastric cancers. However, with increasing understanding of these diseases, low survival rates persist and continued intensive studies are necessary to optimize treatment plans. This review article discusses updates in the evolving epidemiology, clinical presentation, risk factors, and diagnostic and treatment modalities of esophageal and gastric cancers. PMID:16718845

  5. Molecular Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Norihiko; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays a crucial role in gastric carcinogenesis. H pylori exerts oncogenic effects on gastric mucosa through complex interaction between bacterial virulence factors and host inflammatory responses. On the other hand, gastric cancer develops via stepwise accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in H pylori-infected gastric mucosa. Recent comprehensive analyses of gastric cancer genomes indicate a multistep process of genetic alterations as well as possible molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Both genetic processes of gastric cancer development and molecular oncogenic pathways related to H pylori infection are important to completely understand the pathogenesis of H pylori-related gastric cancer.

  6. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1), pepsinogen 2 (PG2) and gastrin 17 (G17) offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation), degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy) and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status). Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003). The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058). The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p < 0.01). Laurén-specific analysis revealed that this is only true for intestinal type tumors. Univariate ANOVA revealed atrophy and CagA-status as the only independent factors for low PG1 and a low PG1/2-ratio. Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer. PMID:22289789

  7. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: Indian enigma.

    PubMed

    Misra, Vatsala; Pandey, Renu; Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium which resides in the mucous linings of the stomach. It has been implicated in the causation of various gastric disorders including gastric cancer. The geographical distribution and etiology of gastric cancer differ widely in different geographical regions and H. pylori, despite being labeled as a grade I carcinogen, has not been found to be associated with gastric cancer in many areas. Studies in Asian countries such as Thailand, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabian countries, Israel and Malaysia, have reported a high frequency of H. pylori infection co-existing with a low incidence of gastric cancer. In India, a difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer has been noted even in different regions of the country leading to a puzzle when attempting to find the causes of these variations. This puzzle of H. pylori distribution and gastric cancer epidemiology is known as the Indian enigma. In this review we have attempted to explain the Indian enigma using evidence from various Indian studies and from around the globe. This review covers aspects of epidemiology, the various biological strains present in different parts of the country and within individuals, the status of different H. pylori-related diseases and the molecular pathogenesis of the bacterium. PMID:24587625

  8. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: Indian enigma.

    PubMed

    Misra, Vatsala; Pandey, Renu; Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium which resides in the mucous linings of the stomach. It has been implicated in the causation of various gastric disorders including gastric cancer. The geographical distribution and etiology of gastric cancer differ widely in different geographical regions and H. pylori, despite being labeled as a grade I carcinogen, has not been found to be associated with gastric cancer in many areas. Studies in Asian countries such as Thailand, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabian countries, Israel and Malaysia, have reported a high frequency of H. pylori infection co-existing with a low incidence of gastric cancer. In India, a difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer has been noted even in different regions of the country leading to a puzzle when attempting to find the causes of these variations. This puzzle of H. pylori distribution and gastric cancer epidemiology is known as the Indian enigma. In this review we have attempted to explain the Indian enigma using evidence from various Indian studies and from around the globe. This review covers aspects of epidemiology, the various biological strains present in different parts of the country and within individuals, the status of different H. pylori-related diseases and the molecular pathogenesis of the bacterium.

  9. History, Pathogenesis, and Management of Familial Gastric Cancer: Original Study of John XXIII's Family

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Giovanni; Roncalli, Fabrizio; Marrelli, Daniele; Carneiro, Fátima; Roviello, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is associated with the E-cadherin germline mutations, but genetic determinants have not been identified for familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. The guidelines for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer are clearly established; however, there are no defined recommendations for the management of familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. Methods. In this study we describe Pope John XXIII's pedigree that harboured gastric cancer as well as six other family members. Family history was analysed according to the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium criteria, and gastric tumours were classified in accord with the last Japanese guidelines. Results. Seven out of 109 members in this pedigree harboured gastric cancer, affecting two consecutive generations. John XXIII's clinical tumour (cTN) was classified as cT4bN3a (IV stage). In two other cases, gastric carcinomas were classified as intestinal histotype and staged as pT1bN0 and pT2N2, respectively. Conclusions. Pope John XXIII's family presents a strong aggregation for gastric cancer affecting almost seven members; it spreads through two consecutive generations. In absence of defined genetic causes and considering the increased risk of gastric cancer's development in these families, as well as the high mortality rates and advanced stages, we propose an intensive surveillance protocol for asymptomatic members. PMID:23484115

  10. Efficacy and safety of cord blood-derived dendritic cells plus cytokine-induced killer cells combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer: a randomized Phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ying; Wang, Wei-hua; Xie, Jia-ping; Zhang, Ying-xin; Yang, Ya-pei; Zhou, Chang-hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Cellular immunotherapy has been widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. However, the clinical application of cord blood-derived dendritic cells and cytokine-induced killer cells (CB-DC-CIK) for the treatment of gastric cancer has not been frequently reported. In this study, the efficacy and safety of CB-DC-CIK for the treatment of gastric cancer were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods The phenotypes, cytokines, and cytotoxicity of CB-DC-CIK were detected in vitro. Patients with advanced gastric cancer were divided into the following two groups: the experimental group (CB-DC-CIK combined with chemotherapy) and the control group (chemotherapy alone). The curative effects and immune function were compared between the two groups. Results First, the results showed that combination therapy significantly increased the overall disease-free survival rate (P=0.0448) compared with chemotherapy alone. The overall survival rate (P=0.0646), overall response rate (P=0.410), and disease control rate (P=0.396) were improved in the experimental group, but these changes did not reach statistical significance. Second, the percentage of T-cell subsets (CD4+, CD3−CD56+, and CD3+CD56+) and the levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, which reflect immune function, were significantly increased (P<0.05) after immunotherapy. Finally, no serious side effects appeared in patients with gastric cancer after the application of cellular immunotherapy based on CB-DC-CIK. Conclusion CB-DC-CIK combined with chemotherapy is effective and safe for the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:27524915

  11. [New insights in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E P M; Boot, H; Cats, A; van Coevorden, F; Zoetmulder, F A N; Verheij, M

    2004-12-18

    The current standard treatment of patients with gastric cancer is partial or total stomach resection and dissection of the draining lymph nodes. This approach, however, results in a rather low survival rate, partly because the diagnosis is often established in an advanced stage. Various strategies, including adjuvant radiotherapy, chemotherapy or more extensive surgical procedures, have resulted mainly in increased morbidity without improving survival. In a recent randomised trial, concurrent postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy prolonged survival and reduced the chance of a local recurrence at an acceptable toxicity. Although several aspects of combined radiochemotherapy require further study, this new treatment concept appears to be a promising addition to the therapeutic arsenal for gastric cancer.

  12. Regional but fatal: Intraperitoneal metastasis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia; Wu, Nan-Die; Liu, Bao-Rui

    2016-09-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis appears to be the most common pattern of metastasis or recurrence and is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Many efforts have been made to improve the survival in patients with peritoneal metastasis. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy remains a widely accepted strategy in the treatment of peritoneal dissemination. Several phase II-III studies confirmed that the combined cytoreducitve surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy resulted in longer survival in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In addition, proper selection and effective regional treatment in patients with high risk of peritoneal recurrence after resection will further improve prognosis in local advanced gastric cancer patients. PMID:27672270

  13. Regional but fatal: Intraperitoneal metastasis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Wu, Nan-Die; Liu, Bao-Rui

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis appears to be the most common pattern of metastasis or recurrence and is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Many efforts have been made to improve the survival in patients with peritoneal metastasis. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy remains a widely accepted strategy in the treatment of peritoneal dissemination. Several phase II-III studies confirmed that the combined cytoreducitve surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy resulted in longer survival in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In addition, proper selection and effective regional treatment in patients with high risk of peritoneal recurrence after resection will further improve prognosis in local advanced gastric cancer patients. PMID:27672270

  14. Regional but fatal: Intraperitoneal metastasis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Wu, Nan-Die; Liu, Bao-Rui

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis appears to be the most common pattern of metastasis or recurrence and is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Many efforts have been made to improve the survival in patients with peritoneal metastasis. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy remains a widely accepted strategy in the treatment of peritoneal dissemination. Several phase II-III studies confirmed that the combined cytoreducitve surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy resulted in longer survival in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In addition, proper selection and effective regional treatment in patients with high risk of peritoneal recurrence after resection will further improve prognosis in local advanced gastric cancer patients.

  15. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. METHODS: A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. RESULTS: Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P < 0.0001). When stratified by age, the prevalence was highest among young patients, and tended to decrease in patients aged 50 years or older. The anti-East-Asian CagA-specific antibody was negative in 99.4% of H. pylori-positive Mongolian patients. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity, glandular atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia scores were significantly lower in Mongolian compared to Japanese H. pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001), with the exception of the intestinal

  16. Angiogenesis inhibitors in gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

    PubMed

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Petrioli, Roberto; Marano, Luigi; Polom, Karol; Marrelli, Daniele; Perrella, Armando; Roviello, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in systemic chemotherapy during the past two decades, the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma remains poor. Because of molecular heterogeneity, it is essential to classify tumors based on the underlying oncogenic pathways and to develop targeted therapies acting on individual tumors. Unfortunately, although a number of molecular targets have been studied, very few of these agents can be used in a clinical setting. In this review, we summarize the available data on anti-angiogenic agents in advanced/metastatic gastric cancer. PMID:26329368

  17. Epigenetic alterations in gastric cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Fu, Du-Guan

    2015-09-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common types of cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. An increasing number of recent studies have confirmed that gastric cancer is a multistage pathological state that arises from environmental factors; dietary factors in particulary are considered to play an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer. Improper dietary habits are one of the primary concerns as they influence key molecular events associated with the onset of gastric carcinogenesis. In the field of genetics, anticancer research has mainly focused on the various genetic markers and genetic molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of this of this disease. Some of this research has proven to be very fruitful, providing insight into the possible mechamisms repsonsible for this disease and into possible treatment modalities. However, the mortality rate associated with gastric cancer remains relatively high. Thus, epigenetics has become a hot topic for research, whereby genetic markers are bypassed and this research is directed towards reversible epigenetic events, such as methylation and histone modifications that play a crucial role in carcinogenesis. The present review focuses on the epigenetic events which play an important role in the development and progression of this deadly disease, gastric cancer.

  18. Familial Clustering of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Jang, Woncheol; Seo, Bochang; Oh, Sooyeon; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This comprehensive cross-sectional study aimed to identify factors contributing to familial aggregation of gastric cancer (GC). A total of 1058 GC patients and 1268 controls were analyzed separately according to the presence or absence of a first-degree relative of GC (GC-relative). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, residence during childhood, smoking, alcohol intake, monthly income, spicy food ingestion, Helicobacter pylori status and host cytokine polymorphisms was performed. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) positivity was a distinctive risk factor for GC in the family history (FH)-positive group (odds ratio [OR], 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42–4.00), while current/ex-smoker, moderate to strong spicy food ingestion, and non-B blood types were more closely associated with GC in the FH-negative group. Among the FH-positive group, alcohol consumption showed a synergistic carcinogenic effect in the at least 2 GC-relatives group compared to the 1 GC-relative group (1.71 vs. 9.58, P for interaction = 0.026), and this was dose-dependent. In the subjects with ≥2 GC-relatives, TGFB1-509T/T was a risk factor for GC (OR 23.74; 95% CI 1.37–410.91), as were rural residency in childhood, alcohol consumption, spicy food ingestion, and cagA positivity. These results suggest that subjects with FH may be a heterogeneous group in terms of gastric cancer susceptibility. Especially, subjects with ≥2 GC-relatives should undergo risk stratification including TGFB1-509T/T and alcohol consumption. PMID:27196462

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... JT, van Hillegersberg R, Dekker E, Oliveira C, Cats A, Hoogerbrugge N; Dutch Working Group on Hereditary ... JH, van Hillegersberg R, Ligtenberg M, Bleiker E, Cats A; Dutch Working Group on Hereditary Gastric Cancer. ...

  20. [Cancer of the gastric stump: our experience].

    PubMed

    Vecchioni, R; Rossi, M

    1990-01-01

    The experienced gained over the past few years in the Verona University Institute of Surgical Pathology has revealed a slow, though progressive, increase in the number of gastric stump cancers, reflecting a trend emerging in the literature. There can be no doubt that an important factor in the enhanced detection of such cancers is the adoption of digestive endoscopy in routine clinical practice. Silent symptoms, barely noticeable clinical signs and the particular aggressiveness of the tumours often lead to an excessively late diagnosis, which, unfortunately, limits the efficacy of surgical therapy. We therefore recommend, as a single solution to the problem, the endoscopic screening of all patients who have undergone gastric resection ten or more years ago in order to detect early stump cancer. Obviously, and fortunately, in a few years time gastric stump cancer will be a rare phenomenon, in view of the exponential drop in gastric resections for ulcer disease over the past decade.

  1. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  2. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  3. Learning Curve of the Application of Huang Three-Step Maneuver in a Laparoscopic Spleen-Preserving Splenic Hilar Lymphadenectomy for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ze-Ning; Huang, Chang-Ming; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Lu, Jun; Chen, Qi-Yue; Cao, Long-Long; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the learning curve of the application of Huang 3-step maneuver, which was summarized and proposed by our center for the treatment of advanced upper gastric cancer. From April 2012 to March 2013, 130 consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (LSPL) by a single surgeon who performed Huang 3-step maneuver were retrospectively analyzed. The learning curve was analyzed based on the moving average (MA) method and the cumulative sum method (CUSUM). Surgical outcomes, short-term outcomes, and follow-up results before and after learning curve were contrastively analyzed. A stepwise multivariate logistic regression was used for a multivariable analysis to determine the factors that affect the operative time using Huang 3-step maneuver. Based on the CUSUM, the learning curve for Huang 3-step maneuver was divided into phase 1 (cases 1-40) and phase 2 (cases 41-130). The dissection time (DT) (P < 0.001), blood loss (BL) (P < 0.001), and number of vessels injured in phase 2 were significantly less than those in phase 1. There were no significant differences in the clinicopathological characteristics, short-term outcomes, or major postoperative complications between the learning curve phases. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that body mass index (BMI), short gastric vessels (SGVs), splenic hilar artery (SpA) type, and learning curve phase were significantly associated with DT. In the entire group, 124 patients were followed for a median time of 23.0 months (range, 3-30 months). There was no significant difference in the survival curve between phases. AUGC patients with a BMI less than 25 kg/m², a small number of SGVs, and a concentrated type of SpA are ideal candidates for surgeons who are in phase 1 of the learning curve.

  4. Learning Curve of the Application of Huang Three-Step Maneuver in a Laparoscopic Spleen-Preserving Splenic Hilar Lymphadenectomy for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ze-Ning; Huang, Chang-Ming; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Lu, Jun; Chen, Qi-Yue; Cao, Long-long; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the learning curve of the application of Huang 3-step maneuver, which was summarized and proposed by our center for the treatment of advanced upper gastric cancer. From April 2012 to March 2013, 130 consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (LSPL) by a single surgeon who performed Huang 3-step maneuver were retrospectively analyzed. The learning curve was analyzed based on the moving average (MA) method and the cumulative sum method (CUSUM). Surgical outcomes, short-term outcomes, and follow-up results before and after learning curve were contrastively analyzed. A stepwise multivariate logistic regression was used for a multivariable analysis to determine the factors that affect the operative time using Huang 3-step maneuver. Based on the CUSUM, the learning curve for Huang 3-step maneuver was divided into phase 1 (cases 1–40) and phase 2 (cases 41–130). The dissection time (DT) (P < 0.001), blood loss (BL) (P < 0.001), and number of vessels injured in phase 2 were significantly less than those in phase 1. There were no significant differences in the clinicopathological characteristics, short-term outcomes, or major postoperative complications between the learning curve phases. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that body mass index (BMI), short gastric vessels (SGVs), splenic hilar artery (SpA) type, and learning curve phase were significantly associated with DT. In the entire group, 124 patients were followed for a median time of 23.0 months (range, 3–30 months). There was no significant difference in the survival curve between phases. AUGC patients with a BMI less than 25 kg/m2, a small number of SGVs, and a concentrated type of SpA are ideal candidates for surgeons who are in phase 1 of the learning curve. PMID:27043698

  5. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    Findings in epidemiological studies of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer have been inconsistent: many studies have yielded a positive relationship, whereas several studies have shown no relationship. The inconsistency arises because of the occurrence of seroreversion during the period between the time that H. pylori exerts a carcinogenic effect and the time of blood sampling. When this seroreversion is taken into account, there is an epidemiologically positive association between H. pylori status and the risk for gastric cancer. In addition to the epidemiological evidence, experimental studies using Mongolian gerbils have shown that H. pylori infection elevates the risk for gastric cancer. It is concluded that H. pylori is a causal factor for gastric cancer. In the creation of preventive strategies against gastric cancer by the eradication of H. pylori, determination of the time at which H. pylori plays a role as a carcinogen is important. Three hypotheses have been proposed in regard to this timing: that H. pylori infection in childhood or the teenage years acts as a factor that produces precancerous lesions with irreversible damage in the gastric mucosa, that in adulthood it acts as an initiator, and also in adulthood, that it acts as a promoter. As these hypotheses are not mutually exclusive, the extent to which each hypothesis plays a part in explaining gastric carcinogenesis should be evaluated. Only a small proportion of subjects infected with H. pylori have gastric cancer during their lifetime. Interleukin-1 polymorphism, a host factor, and CagA, a virulence factor of H. pylori, are suspected to be risk factors for gastric cancer in subjects with H. pylori infection. Dietary factors, especially vitamin C, and patterns of precancerous lesions also seem to influence the relationship between H. pylori and gastric cancer. H. pylori seems to reduce the risk for esophageal and for some gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. This finding, as

  6. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chia, N-Y; Tan, P

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), a heterogeneous disease characterized by epidemiologic and histopathologic differences across countries, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Treatment of GC patients is currently suboptimal due to patients being commonly treated in a uniform fashion irrespective of disease subtype. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, GCs are now being investigated in great detail at the molecular level. High-throughput technologies now allow a comprehensive study of genomic and epigenomic alterations associated with GC. Gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, differential gene expression and epigenetic alterations are some of the genetic/epigenetic influences on GC pathogenesis. In addition, integrative analyses of molecular profiling data have led to the identification of key dysregulated pathways and importantly, the establishment of GC molecular classifiers. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network proposed a four subtype classification scheme for GC based on the underlying tumor molecular biology of each subtype. This landmark study, together with other studies, has expanded our understanding on the characteristics of GC at the molecular level. Such knowledge may improve the medical management of GC in the future. PMID:26861606

  7. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer. PMID:27573782

  8. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Procopiuc, Livia; Tudor, Ştefan; Mănuc, Mircea; Diculescu, Mircea; Vasilescu, Cătălin

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer is a relatively new research field, with convincing results mostly stemming from Asian countries. The use of the robotic surgery platform, thus far assessed as a safe procedure, which is also easier to learn, sets the background for a wider spread of minimally invasive technique in the treatment of gastric cancer. This review will cover the literature published so far, analyzing the pros and cons of robotic surgery and highlighting the remaining study questions. PMID:26798433

  9. A phase II study of paclitaxel, weekly, 24-hour continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsberger, C; Quietzsch, D; Haag, C; Lingenfelser, T; Schroeder, M; Hartmann, J T; Baronius, W; Hempel, V; Clemens, M; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel, cisplatin and 24 h continuous infusion of 5-FU/folinic acid in patients (pts) with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. Forty-five chemotherapy-naive pts (28 male and 17 female) with a median age of 60 years (range 35–74) were enrolled. 5-FU 2 g/m2was given weekly over 24 h i.v. preceded by folinic acid 500 mg/m2as a 2 h infusion. Paclitaxel 175 mg/m2was administered as a 3 h-infusion on days 1 and 22 and cisplatin 50 mg/m2as 1 h infusion on days 8 and 29. Six weeks of therapy (days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36) followed by 2 weeks rest were considered one cycle. A median of 3 cycles (range 1–4) were administered to 45 pts assessable for response, survival and toxicity. Five pts (11%) obtained a CR and 18 pts (40%) a PR (ORR 51%; 95% Cl: 35.8–66.3%). Responses were achieved in the liver, lymph nodes, lungs and at the site of the primary tumour. Nine pts (20%) had stable disease. Thirteen pts (29%) were considered to have failed treatment, 8 pts (18%) due to progressive disease and 5 pts (11%) who did not receive one complete cycle of therapy due to acute non-haematologic toxicity. The median progression-free and overall survival times were 9 months (range 1–36+) and 14 months (range 2–36+), respectively. Neutropenia WHO III°/IV° occurred in 7 pts (15%) with only 1 pt having grade IV. Additional non-haematologic WHO III°/IV° toxicities included nausea/vomiting in 5 (11%), alopecia in 22 (49%), and diarrhoea in 1 patient each (2%). Dose reductions or treatment delays were necessary in 8 pts (17%), mainly due to neutropenia. All pts were treated on an outpatient basis. The combination of paclitaxel, cisplatin and continuously infused 5-FU/folinic acid appears to be a highly active regimen for the treatment of pts with advanced gastric cancer. While the overall acceptable toxicity allows its use in the palliative setting, it may also be an attractive

  10. Slit2 expression and its correlation with subcellular localization of β-catenin in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rongliang; Liu, Weiyan; Liu, Bingya; Xu, Ziping; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Ziping

    2013-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. Several signaling pathways are involved in gastric cancer development and progression. Slit2 was recently found to be involved in cancer; however, its expression pattern in gastric cancer has not been discovered yet. In the present study, we investigated the expression of Slit2 in human gastric cancer and its correlation with the expression and subcellular localization of β-catenin. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining revealed that Slit2 was highly expressed in human gastric cancer tissues, while it was low or weakly expressed in normal gastric tissues. The differences in clinicopathological features between different groups were determined using Pearson's χ2 test. Slit2 levels were significantly associated with differentiation, Lauren's classification, lymph node metastasis and TNM staging. Slit2 levels were positively correlated with β-catenin level in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. High levels of Slit2 were correlated with the membrane localization of β-catenin, and low levels of Slit2 were correlated with nuclear translocation of β-catenin in both gastric cancer tissues and cell lines assayed by IHC and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. Our data suggest that Slit2 was highly expressed in gastric cancer patients with less advanced clinicopathological features. Slit2 levels were correlated with β-catenin level and subcellular localization.

  11. Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Early Gastric Cancer in the West: A Changing Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Justin M.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains the fifth leading cancer diagnosis worldwide, and it is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The incidence of gastric cancer within the United States, however, has remained substantially lower than elsewhere, which has led to a lack of screening and surveillance in clinical practice. Patients with known premalignant lesions, such as gastric intestinal metaplasia, which can increase the risk of gastric cancer by as much as 6-fold, might benefit from surveillance guidelines to detect gastric cancer at an earlier, potentially curative stage. Chro-moendoscopy with optical magnification, narrow-band imaging, and other image-enhanced endoscopic techniques are commercially available to assist in the diagnosis of premalignant gastric lesions and early gastric cancer. Furthermore, endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection have become more widely available and offer potentially curative endoscopic resection for dysplastic lesions of the stomach and early gastric cancers, which is an alternative to traditional surgical resection. PMID:25013389

  12. Preoperative administration of polysaccharide Kureha and reduced plasma transforming growth factor-β in patients with advanced gastric cancer: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, KEISHI; SAKURAMOTO, SHINICHI; MIENO, HIROAKI; NEMOTO, MASAYUKI; SHIBATA, TOMOTAKA; KATADA, NATSUYA; OHTSUKI, SHIGEAKI; SAKAMOTO, YASUTOSHI; HOSHI, KEIKA; WANG, GUOQIN; HEMMI, OSAMU; SATOH, TOSHIHIKO; KIKUCHI, SHIRO; WATANABE, MASAHIKO

    2015-01-01

    Systemic abrogation of TGF-β signaling results in tumor reduction through cytotoxic T lymphocytes activity in a mouse model. The administration of polysaccharide-Kureha (PSK) into tumor-bearing mice also showed tumor regression with reduced TGF-β. However, there have been no studies regarding the PSK administration to cancer patients and the association with plasma TGF-β. PSK (3 g/day) was administered as a neoadjuvant therapy for 2 weeks before surgery. In total, 31 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients were randomly assigned to group A (no neoadjuvant PSK; n=14) or B (neoadjuvant PSK therapy; n=17). Plasma TGF-β was measured pre- and postoperatively. The allocation factors were clinical stage (cStage) and gender. Plasma TGF-β ranged from 1.85–43.5 ng/ml (average, 9.50 ng/ml) in AGC, and 12 patients (38.7%) had a high value, >7.0 ng/ml. These patients were largely composed of poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma with pathological stage III/IV. All the six elevated cases in group B showed a significant reduction of plasma TGF-β (from 21.6 to 4.5 ng/ml, on average), whereas this was not exhibited in group A. The cases within the normal limits of TGF-β remained unchanged irrespective of PSK treatment. Analysis of variance showed a statistically significant reduction in the difference of plasma TGF-β between groups A and B (P=0.019). PSK reduced the plasma TGF-β in AGC patients when the levels were initially high. The clinical advantage of PSK may, however, be restricted to specific histological types of AGC. Perioperative suppression of TGF-β by PSK may antagonize cancer immune evasion and improve patient prognosis in cases of AGC. PMID:26137253

  13. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients.

  14. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  15. Bursectomy for gastric cancer: What does the evidence indicate?

    PubMed

    Barreto, S G; Perwaiz, A; Singh, A; Singh, T; Chaudhary, A

    2015-01-01

    Radical resection of the bursa omentalis (radical bursectomy) as part of a curative resection for gastric cancer has been advised for close to a century. However, the postulated associated morbidity and lack of a clear benefit in terms of survival preclude its routine use. To objectively review the available evidence on the role of bursectomy as part of a curative resection for gastric cancer. A systematic search of the scientific literature was carried out using Embase, PubMed, MedLine and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials for the years 1965-2013 to obtain access to all publications, especially randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews and meta-analyses involving bursectomy in gastric cancer with the appropriate specific search terms, namely, "bursectomy," "stomach cancer," "gastric cancer," "survival," "morbidity," "outcomes" and "RCTs". Using the above search strategy, a total of 29 publications was retrieved of which five publications were identified describing bursectomy and its outcomes in gastric cancer. These included three retrospective cohort studies and two publications from a single RCT. Bursectomy do not appear to add the morbidity or mortality of the overall surgery. However, it did not appear to significantly improve overall survival neither in the retrospective cohort studies nor in the only RCT. The evidence to date is insufficient to suggest any additional benefit of routine bursectomy to a radical gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Results of an on-going RCT are awaited to determine if bursectomy may further improve overall survival in patients with advanced T-stage of disease. PMID:26837966

  16. Clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with stage III/IV (M(0)) advanced gastric cancer, according to HER2 status assessed by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Min A; Jordan, Bruce; Pickl, Marlene; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Kim, Tae-You; Kim, Woo Ho; Yang, Han-Kwang; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2011-06-01

    Despite recent advances in chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients with advanced gastric cancer (GC) or gastroesophageal junction cancer remains poor. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a novel target for biologic therapy in metastatic GC. We analyzed the association between HER2 overexpression and the clinicopathologic characteristics of advanced GC. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected from patients with stage III or to IV (M(0)) GC who subsequently underwent curative surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. All the samples were analyzed for HER2 status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 142 samples analyzed, 7.1% scored IHC 2+ and 8.6% scored IHC 3+, whereas 9.3% were HER2-amplified. Of HER2-amplified cases, 76.9% (10/13) scored IHC 3+, showing the correlation between HER2 amplification and overexpression (P=0.01). HER2 IHC 3+ cases were more common in the intestinal-type tumors compared with diffuse-type tumors (16.7% vs. 5.1%, respectively; P=0.049), and a nonsignificant trend was observed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (14.3% vs. 9.2%, respectively; P=0.399). HER2 gene amplification was more frequent in stage IV (M(0)) than stage III disease (15.4% vs. 4.0%, respectively; P=0.037). Interestingly, HER2-amplified disease was more common than nonamplified disease in patients with nodal stage 3 tumors (76.9% vs. 38.6%, respectively; P=0.009); a similar pattern was observed using IHC. HER2 overexpression correlated with nodal stage, and a lymph node ratio greater than 0.5 was more common in HER2-amplified tumors than HER2-nonamplified tumors (69.2% vs. 43.3%, respectively; P=0.086). These findings suggest that further investigations of adjuvant therapy with HER2-targeted therapy for advanced GC are warranted.

  17. Emerging Role of miRNAs in the Drug Resistance of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Ismael; Letelier, Pablo; Riffo-Campos, Angela L.; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Unfortunately, most gastric cancer cases are diagnosed in an advanced, non-curable stage and with a limited response to chemotherapy. Drug resistance is one of the most important causes of therapy failure in gastric cancer patients. Although the mechanisms of drug resistance have been broadly studied, the regulation of these mechanisms has not been completely understood. Accumulating evidence has recently highlighted the role of microRNAs in the development and maintenance of drug resistance due to their regulatory features in specific genes involved in the chemoresistant phenotype of malignancies, including gastric cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the miRNAs’ characteristics, their regulation of the genes involved in chemoresistance and their potential as targeted therapies for personalized treatment in resistant gastric cancer. PMID:27011182

  18. Immunotherapy for gastric premalignant lesions and cancer.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Valerio; Maddalo, Gemma; Basso, Daniela; Farinati, Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous change for gastric cancer, shows a loss of appropriate glands, Helicobacter pylori infection and autoimmune gastritis being the two main etiologic factors. While H. pylori eradication is the mandatory treatment for the former, no etiologic treatment is available for the latter, in which a Th1-type response, modulated by Tregs and Th17 cells, is involved. H. pylori-related atrophic gastritis is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, while autoimmune atrophic gastritis is also linked to a substantial risk of gastric type I carcinoid, related to the chronic stimulus exerted by hypergastrinemia on enterochromaffin-like cells. Several studies have been published on gastric cancer treatment through an active specific immunotherapy, aimed at improving the immunoregulatory response and increasing the circulating tumor-specific T cells. No study on immunotherapy of carcinoids is available but, in our experience, the administration of an antigastrin 17 vaccine induced carcinoid regression in two out of three patients treated.

  19. Helicobacter Pylori associated global gastric cancer burden

    PubMed Central

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Hisada, Michie; El-Omar, Emad M.

    2008-01-01

    1. Abstract Helicobacter pylori infection is ubiquitous, infecting close to one-half of the world's population, but its prevalence is declining in developed countries. Chronic H. pylori infection is etiologically linked to gastric adenocarcinoma, especially non-cardia type (63% of all stomach cancer or ∼5.5% of the global cancer burden: ∼25% of cancers associated with infectious etiology), and to gastric mucosal associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, which accounts for up to 8% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Epidemiological, clinical, and animal studies have established a central role for H. pylori in gastric carcinogenesis and provided insights into the mechanisms and biologic relationships between bacterial infection, host genetics, nutrition, and environmental factors. These discoveries invite strategies to prevent infection to be the logical primary goals in a multi-pronged effort to curtail suffering and death from H. pylori infection-associated cancers. PMID:19273142

  20. [Palliative Care for Rectal Cancer Complicated with Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kei; Muto, Takaaki

    2015-11-01

    Medical advancements have led to an increase in the number of elderly people. However, standard treatments may sometimes be difficult to use in elderly people. Here, we report the case of an elderly patient with rectal and gastric cancer who refused radical surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who had type-2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperuricemia, mitral valve regurgitation, and mild dementia. Furthermore, he was blind in both eyes owing to glaucoma. He first visited our hospital in 2005. In 2010, he was diagnosed with anemia, but he refused a thorough examination; however, he did consent to take iron supplements. In July 2011, he consulted our hospital for symptoms of frequent diarrhea, and agreed to an examination. After colonoscopy, he was diagnosed with rectal cancer that was becoming obstructive. There were no metastases to other organs, but he was also diagnosed with gastric cancer. As he and his family refused radical surgery, a stoma was constructed. After the operation, he received palliative care but died in September 2013. PMID:26805335

  1. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  2. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  3. Gastric Cancer: Molecular and Clinical Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Roopma; Song, Shumei; Lee, Ju-Seog; Yao, Yixin; Wei, Qingyi; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) imposes a significant health burden around the globe despite its declining incidence. GC is often diagnosed in advanced stages and carries a poor prognosis. In depth understanding of molecular underpinnings of GC has lagged behind many other cancers of its magnitude, as a result our knowledge base for identifying germline susceptibility traits for risk and somatic drivers of progression (to identify novel therapeutic targets) is limited. A few germline (PLCE1) and somatic (ERBB2, ERBB3, PTEN, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, FGF, TP53, CDH1, and c-MET) alterations are emerging and some are being pursued in the clinic. Novel somatic gene targets, Arid1a, FAT4, and MLL/MLL3 are of interest. Clinically, variations in the therapeutic approaches for localized GC are evident by geographic regions. These are driven by preferences for the adjunctive strategies and the extent of surgery coupled with philosophical divides. However, there is a greater uniformity in approaches to metastatic cancer, an incurable condition. Having realized only modest successes, the momentum is building for carrying out more phase 3 comparative trials and some are using biomarker-based patient selection. Overall, rapid progress in biotechnology is improving our molecular understanding and can help with new drug discovery. The future prospects are excellent for defining biomarker-based subsets of patients and application of specific therapeutics. However, many challenges remain to be tackled. Here we review representative molecular and clinical dimensions of GC. PMID:24061039

  4. The Inositide Signaling Pathway As a Target for Treating Gastric Cancer and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Jun; Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer and colorectal cancer are the leading cause of cancer mortality and have a dismal prognosis. The introduction of biological agents to treat these cancers has resulted in improved outcomes, and combination chemotherapy with targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents is regarded as standard therapy. Additional newly clarified mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to targeted agents require the development of new biologic agents. Aberrant activation of the inositide signaling pathway by a loss of function PTEN mutation or gain of function mutation/amplification of PIK3CA is an oncogenic mechanism in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. Clinical trials with biologic agents that target the inositide signaling pathway are being performed to further improve treatment outcomes of patients with advanced gastric cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this review we summarize the inositide signaling pathway, the targeted agents that inhibit abnormal activation of this signaling pathway and the clinical trials currently being performed in patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer and metastatic CRC using these targeted agents. PMID:27242542

  5. Treatment modalities for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; del Rio, Maria Guerra

    2015-01-01

    Different treatment modalities have been proposed in the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). Endoscopic resection (ER) is an established treatment that allows curative treatment, in selected cases. In addition, ER allows for an accurate histological staging, which is crucial when deciding on the best treatment option for EGC. Recently, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have become alternatives to surgery in early gastric cancer, mainly in Asian countries. Patients with “standard” criteria can be successfully treated by EMR techniques. Those who meet “expanded” criteria may benefit from treatment by ESD, reducing the need for surgery. Standardized ESD training system is imperative to promulgate effective and safe ESD technique to practices with limited expertise. Although endoscopic resection is an option in patients with EGC, surgical treatment continues to be a widespread therapeutic option worldwide. In this review we tried to point out the treatment modalities for early gastric cancer. PMID:26380052

  6. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer--An overview.

    PubMed

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Orlowska, Janina; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Kadar, Zoltan; Turdean, Sabin; Bara, Tivadar

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer varies by up to ten fold throughout the world, and the geographic distribution of hereditary cases is not well explored. Familial clustering is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of all gastric cancers develop due to hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this review, the characteristics of HDGC are presented according to molecular particularities, geographic distribution, and other parameters. Based on our experience and the data from the literature, we discuss the possibility of applying a mutation signature (spectrum) study and adductomic approaches to a comparative carcinogenesis of HDGC. We also provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review of genetic counseling and criteria for screening and surveillance of eligible families.

  7. The Role of Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Ramakrishnan Ayloor; Glehen, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Peritoneal metastasis, either synchronous or metachronous, is commonly seen in gastric cancer. It is associated with a poor prognosis, with a median survival of less than one year. The outcomes are not significantly improved by the use of systemic chemotherapy. We review the relevant literature on the role of HIPEC in gastric cancer. Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been used in three situations in gastric cancer. Besides its role as a definitive treatment in patients with established peritoneal metastasis (PM), it has been used as a prophylaxis against peritoneal recurrence after curative surgery and also as a palliative treatment in advanced peritoneal metastasis with intractable ascites. While prophylactic HIPEC has been shown to reduce peritoneal recurrence and improve survival in many randomised trials, palliative HIPEC can reduce the need for frequent paracentesis. Although CRS with HIPEC has shown promise in increasing the survival of selected patients with established PM from gastric cancer, larger studies are needed before this can be accepted as a standard of care. PMID:27065710

  8. Current status of robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Obama, Kazutaka; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Although over 3000 da Vinci Surgical System (DVSS) devices have been installed worldwide, robotic surgery for gastric cancer has not yet become widely spread and is only available in several advanced institutions. This is because, at least in part, the advantages of robotic surgery for gastric cancer remain unclear. The safety and feasibility of robotic gastrectomy have been demonstrated in several retrospective studies. However, no sound evidence has been reported to support the superiority of a robotic approach for gastric cancer treatment. In addition, the long-term clinical outcomes following robotic gastrectomy have yet to be clarified. Nevertheless, a robotic approach can potentially overcome the disadvantages of conventional laparoscopic surgery if the advantageous functions of this technique are optimized, such as the use of wristed instruments, tremor filtering and high-resolution 3-D images. The potential advantages of robotic gastrectomy have been discussed in several retrospective studies, including the ability to achieve sufficient lymphadenectomy in the area of the splenic hilum, reductions in local complication rates and a shorter learning curve for the robotic approach compared to conventional laparoscopic gastrectomy. In this review, we present the current status and discuss issues regarding robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

  9. Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Güner, Ali; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    The interest in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has rapidly increased in recent decades and surgeons have adopted minimally invasive techniques due to its reduced invasiveness and numerous advantages for patients. With increased surgical experience and newly developed surgical instruments, MIS has become the preferred approach not only for benign disease but also for oncologic surgery. Recently, robotic systems have been developed to overcome difficulties of standard laparoscopic instruments during complex procedures. Its advantages including three-dimensional images, tremor filtering, motion scaling, articulated instruments, and stable retraction have created the opportunity to use robotic technology in many procedures including cancer surgery. Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While its overall incidence has decreased worldwide, the proportion of early gastric cancer has increased mainly in eastern countries following mass screening programs. The shift in the paradigm of gastric cancer treatment is toward less invasive approaches in order to improve the patient's quality of life while adhering to oncological principles. In this review, we aimed to summarize the operative strategy and current literature in laparoscopic and robotic surgery for gastric cancer.

  10. Gastric cancer: current and evolving treatment landscape.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weijing; Yan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Gastric (including gastroesophageal junction) cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. In China, an estimated 420,000 patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer in 2011, ranking this malignancy the second most prevalent cancer type and resulting in near 300,000 deaths. The treatment landscape of gastric cancer has evolved in recent years. Although systemic chemotherapy is still the mainstay treatment of metastatic disease, the introduction of agents targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelia growth factor receptor has brought this disease into the molecular and personalized medicine era. The preliminary yet encouraging clinical efficacy observed with immune checkpoint inhibitors, e.g., anti-programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death-ligand 1, will further shape the treatment landscape for gastric cancer. Molecular characterization of patients will play a critical role in developing new agents, as well as in implementing new treatment options for this disease. PMID:27581465

  11. Increased Expression of CSF-1 Associates With Poor Prognosis of Patients With Gastric Cancer Undergoing Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Heng; Shen, Zhenbin; Lin, Chao; Wang, Xuefei; Qin, Jing; Qin, Xinyu; Xu, Jiejie; Sun, Yihong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical significance of diametrically polarized tumor-associated macrophages in gastric cancer has been elucidated in our previous study, whereas the role of cytokines that orchestrate tumor-associated macrophages polarization in gastric cancer remains elusive. The study aims to evaluate the prognostic value of colony-stimulating factor-1 expression in patients with gastric cancer. We examined the colony-stimulating factor-1 expression in tumor tissues by immunohistochemical staining in retrospectively enrolled 365 patients with gastric cancer undergoing gastrectomy at Zhongshan Hospital during 2008. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic value of colony-stimulating factor-1 expression and its association with clinicopathological factors. A predictive nomogram by integrating colony-stimulating factor-1 expression with the TNM staging system was generated for overall survival evaluation of the patients. High colony-stimulating factor-1 expression predicted an unfavorable outcome in gastric cancer. The colony-stimulating factor-1 expression in tumor tissue could give a further discrimination for the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Cox multivariate analysis identified the colony-stimulating factor-1 expression as an independent prognostic factor. The generated nomogram performed well in predicting the 3- and 5-year overall survival of gastric cancer patients.T he colony-stimulating factor-1 is a potential independent adverse prognosticator for gastric cancer patients, which could be integrated with the tumor-associated macrophages staging system to improve the predictive accuracy for overall survival, especially in advanced tumors.

  12. Galectin-7 is epigenetically-regulated tumor suppressor in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jun; Hwang, Jung-Ah; Ro, Jae Y.; Lee, Yeon-Su; Chun, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death and remains a major clinical challenge due to poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Therefore, the basic mechanisms underlying gastric tumorigenesis deserve investigation. Although regulation of the galactoside-binding lectin galectin-7 in cancer has been studied, its role in tumor formation and progression remains controversial. In this study, we investigated galectin-7 expression and its role in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical staining using a tissue microarray of gastric cancer patients revealed significantly low expression levels of galectin-7 in malignant tissues compared with matched normal tissues, and decreased expression of galectin-7 in malignant tissues was associated with advanced TMN stage disease (p =0.034). Importantly, low expression of galectin-7 in normal tissues was associated with a poor survival rate (p =0.0561). Over-expression of galectin-7 in AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, whereas ablation of galectin-7 in KATO III gastric carcinoma cells reversed these properties. AGS cells that overexpressed galectin-7 could not form gastric tumors in xenografted mice. More than 70% hypermethylation was observed in 7 of 9 gastric cancer cell lines tested and 5-aza-cytidine treatment lowered galectin-7 expression by reducing methylation in 24 cancer cell lines from five different organ origins. We analyzed CpG islands in the galectin-7 genomic region and detected hypermethylation at +1566bp of exon 2, the predicted p53 binding region. DNA hypermethylation of this region was also detected in gastric cancer tissues from 20 patients. Taken together, our data indicate that galectin-7 has a tumor suppressive function, and that the gene is epigenetically modified by DNA methylation and significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer. Further study of galectin-7 regulation may lead to improved gastric cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID

  13. [Familial gastric cancer: diagnosis, treatment and periodic surveillance].

    PubMed

    Kluijt, Irma; Sijmons, Rolf H; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Vasen, Hans F A; Cats, Anemieke

    2011-01-01

    The only known genetic causes of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) are germline mutations in the CDH1 gene.- CDH1 mutation carriers have a lifetime risk of 70-80% of developing diffuse gastric cancer. As periodic gastric surveillance is of limited value in detecting early stages of HDGC, prophylactic gastrectomy is advised for this patient group. This group is small and little is known about other types of familial gastric cancer. The Dutch Working Group on Hereditary Gastric Cancer has formulated criteria for various aspects of medical care for families and individuals at high risk of developing gastric cancer, including criteria for diagnostics and periodic gastric surveillance. In order to optimize the care and increase the knowledge on hereditary gastric cancer it is important to centralize medical care for these patients.

  14. Mitomycin C as an adjuvant in resected gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Alcobendas, F; Milla, A; Estape, J; Curto, J; Pera, C

    1983-01-01

    As a result of their previous experience with mitomycin C at high discontinuous doses in advanced gastric cancer, the authors studied its role as an adjuvant for locally advanced cases after surgical complete resection. Results from 70 evaluable patients are presented. Patients were allocated randomly to receive mitomycin C, 20 mg/m2 I.V. direct once every 6 weeks, four courses, or a placebo. After a follow-up period of 250 weeks, seven patients of treatment arm and 23 controls have already relapsed (p less than 0.001). Toxicity was moderate and controllable by symptomatic measures. The authors consider this investigation a positive contribution in the field of adjuvant therapy of gastric cancer. PMID:6407408

  15. Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Pseudoachalasia, and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mizrak, Dilsa; Alkan, Ali; Erdogdu, Batuhan; Utkan, Gungor

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare, inherited skeletal disorder characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen. Malignancy is rarely reported in patients with OI and it was suggested that this disease can protect against cancer. Here, we report a 41-year-old woman with symptoms of achalasia where repeated treatment of pneumatic dilation and stent replacement was unsuccessful; therefore, surgery was performed. Pathology showed gastric adenocarcinoma unexpectedly. Chemotherapy was given after assessing dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme activity, which can be deficient in OI patients. This is the first report of gastric cancer mimicking achalasia in a patient with OI. PMID:25874139

  16. Prospective phase II trial of pazopanib plus CapeOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Se Hoon; Jung, Sin-Ho; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh

    2016-01-01

    We designed a single-arm, open label phase II study to determine the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of pazopanib with CapeOx (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in metastatic /recurrent advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Previously untreated AGC patients received capecitabine (850 mg/m2 bid, day 1–14) plus oxaliplatin (130 mg/m2, day 1) in combination with pazopanib (800 mg, day 1–21) every three weeks. Treatment was continued until progression of the disease or intolerable toxicity was observed. In all, 66 patients were treated with pazopanib plus CapeOx. The median age of the patients was 51.5 years (range, 23.0–77), and the median ECOG performance status was 1 (0–1). Among all 66 patients, one complete response and 37 partial responses were observed (overall response rate, 62.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 45.7–73.5% accounting for the 2-stage design of this trial). Stable disease was observed in 23 patients (34.8%), revealing a 92.4% disease control rate. The median progression free survival and overall survival were 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.6–7.4) and 10.5 months (95% CI, 8.1–12.9), respectively. Thirty-four patients (51.5%) experienced a treatment-related toxicity of grade 3 or more. The most common toxicities of grade 3 or more were neutropenia (15.1%), anemia (10.6%), thrombocytopenia (10.6%), anorexia (7.6%), nausea (3.0%), and vomiting (3.0%). There were no treatment-related deaths. The combination of pazopanib and CapeOx showed moderate activity and an acceptable toxicity profile as a first-line treatment in metastatic / recurrent AGC patients (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130805). PMID:27003363

  17. Doublet Versus Single Agent as Second-Line Treatment for Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 10 Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Ma, Bing; Huang, Xiao-Tian; Li, Yan-Song; Wang, Yu; Liu, Zhou-Lu

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the efficacy and safety of doublet versus single agent as second-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer (AGC).A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify relevant RCTs. All clinical studies were independently identified by 2 authors for inclusion. Demographic data, treatment regimens, objective response rate (ORR), and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were extracted and analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software (Version 2.0).Ten RCTs involving 1698 pretreated AGC patients were ultimately identified. The pooled results demonstrated that doublet combination therapy as second-line treatment for AGC significantly improved OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-0.97, P = 0.011), PFS (HR 0.79, 95% CI: 0.72-0.87, P < 0.001), and ORR (relative risk [RR] 1.57, 95% CI: 1.27-1.95, P < 0.001). Sub-group analysis according to treatment regimens also showed that targeted agent plus chemotherapy significantly improve OS, PFS, and ORR. However, no significant survival benefits had been observed in doublet cytotoxic chemotherapy when compared with single cytotoxic agent. Additionally, more incidences of grade 3 or 4 myelosuppression toxicities, diarrhea, and fatigue were observed in doublet combination groups, while equivalent frequencies of grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia and nausea were found between the 2 groups.In comparison with single cytotoxic agent alone, the addition of targeted agent to mono-chemotherapy as salvage treatment for pretreated AGC patients provide substantial survival benefits, while no significant survival benefits were observed in doublet cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26937908

  18. Identifying module biomarkers from gastric cancer by differential correlation network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoping; Chang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (stomach cancer) is a severe disease caused by dysregulation of many functionally correlated genes or pathways instead of the mutation of individual genes. Systematic identification of gastric cancer biomarkers can provide insights into the mechanisms underlying this deadly disease and help in the development of new drugs. In this paper, we present a novel network-based approach to predict module biomarkers of gastric cancer that can effectively distinguish the disease from normal samples. Specifically, by assuming that gastric cancer has mainly resulted from dysfunction of biomolecular networks rather than individual genes in an organism, the genes in the module biomarkers are potentially related to gastric cancer. Finally, we identified a module biomarker with 27 genes, and by comparing the module biomarker with known gastric cancer biomarkers, we found that our module biomarker exhibited a greater ability to diagnose the samples with gastric cancer. PMID:27703371

  19. Helicobacter pylori Eradication to Eliminate Gastric Cancer: The Japanese Strategy.

    PubMed

    Asaka, Masahiro; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Matsushima, Rumiko; Tsuda, Momoko

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy for chronic gastritis achieved world-first coverage by the Japanese national health insurance scheme in 2013, making a dramatic decrease of gastric cancer-related deaths more realistic. Combining H pylori eradication therapy with endoscopic surveillance can prevent the development of gastric cancer. Even if it develops, most patients are likely to be diagnosed at an early stage, possibly resulting in fewer gastric cancer deaths. Success with the elimination of gastric cancer in Japan could lead other countries with a high incidence to consider a similar strategy, suggesting the potential for elimination of gastric cancer around the world.

  20. Sentinel node biopsy using blue dye and technetium99 in advanced gastric cancer: anatomical drainage and clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Santos, F.A.V.; Drummond-Lage, A.P.; Rodrigues, M.A.; Cabral, M.A.; Pedrosa, M.S.; Braga, H.; Wainstein, A.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Lymph node metastases are an independent prognosis factor in gastric carcinoma (GC) patients. Radical lymphadenectomy can improve survival but it can also increase surgical morbidity. As a principle, sentinel node (SN) navigation surgery can avoid unnecessary lymphadenectomy without compromising prognosis. In this pilot study, 24 patients with untreated GC were initially screened for SN navigation surgery, of which 12 were eligible. Five patients had T2 tumors, 5 had T3 tumors and 2 had T1 tumors. In 33% of cases, tumor diameter was greater than 5.0 cm. Three hundred and eighty-seven lymph nodes were excised with a median of 32.3 per patient. The SN navigation surgery was feasible in all patients, with a median of 4.5 SNs per patient. The detection success rate was 100%. All the SNs were located in N1 and N2 nodal level. In 70.9% of cases, the SNs were located at lymphatic chains 6 and 7. The SN sensitivity for nodal staging was 91.6%, with 8.3% of false negative. In 4 patients who were initially staged as N0, the SNs were submitted to multisection analyses and immunohistochemistry, confirming the N0 stage, without micrometastases. In one case initially staged as negative for nodal metastases based on SN analyses, metastases in lymph nodes other than SN were found, resulting in a 20% skip metastases incidence. This surgery is a reproducible procedure with 100% detection rate of SN. Tumor size, GC location and obesity were factors that imposed some limitations regarding SN identification. Results from nodal multisection histology and immunohistochemistry analysis did not change initial nodal staging. PMID:27409337

  1. [Successful treatment of an elderly patient with advanced gastric cancer using low-doses of 5-fluorouracil, levofolinate calcium, and cis-platinum with chronomodulation].

    PubMed

    Honma, Hideyuki

    2006-11-01

    An 83-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain and severe vomiting. Gastrography and gastric endoscopy revealed that the pylorus was obstructed by a giant type 2 cancer in the lower gastric body. Furthermore, computed tomography revealed multiple metastases in the para-aortic lymph nodes. The man was unable to consume any food or liquid, and could not take medicine orally. Paclitaxel was not effective in treating the lymph node metastases or vomiting; therefore a chronomodulated schedule was used, which involved the administration of low doses of 5-fluorouracil, levofolinate calcium and cis-platinum (FLP) each night. After four cycles of low-dose FLP therapy, the patient was able to consume food orally. The patient has partially responded to this regime over five months. In the current study, low-dose FLP therapy with chronomodulation was considered an effective treatment, and there were no severe adverse side effects. This case suggested that low-dose FLP therapy with chronomodulation is promising for the treatment of gastric cancer in elderly patients who can not take medicine orally, and further trials are warranted.

  2. Surgical palliation of gastric outlet obstruction in advanced malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Potz, Brittany A; Miner, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a common problem associated with advanced malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Palliative treatment of patients’ symptoms who present with GOO is an important aspect of their care. Surgical palliation of malignancy is defined as a procedure performed with the intention of relieving symptoms caused by an advanced malignancy or improving quality of life. Palliative treatment for GOO includes operative (open and laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy) and non-operative (endoscopic stenting) options. The performance status and medical condition of the patient, the extent of the cancer, the patients prognosis, the availability of a curative procedure, the natural history of symptoms of the disease (primary and secondary), the durability of the procedure, and the quality of life and life expectancy of the patient should always be considered when choosing treatment for any patient with advanced malignancy. Gastrojejunostomy appears to be associated with better long term symptom relief while stenting appears to be associated with lower immediate procedure related morbidity.

  3. Use of positron emission tomography scan response to guide treatment change for locally advanced gastric cancer: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Won, Elizabeth; Shah, Manish A.; Schöder, Heiko; Strong, Vivian E.; Coit, Daniel G.; Brennan, Murray F.; Kelsen, David P.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Tang, Laura H.; Capanu, Marinela; Rizk, Nabil P.; Allen, Peter J.; Bains, Manjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early metabolic response on 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy is PET non-responders have poor outcomes whether continuing chemotherapy or proceeding directly to surgery. Use of PET may identify early treatment failure, sparing patients from inactive therapy and allowing for crossover to alternative therapies. We examined the effectiveness of PET directed switching to salvage chemotherapy in the PET non-responders. Methods Patients with locally advanced resectable FDG-avid gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma received bevacizumab 15 mg/kg, epirubicin 50 mg/m2, cisplatin 60 mg/m2 day 1, and capecitabine 625 mg/m2 bid (ECX) every 21 days. PET scan was obtained at baseline and after cycle 1. PET responders, (i.e., ≥35% reduction in FDG uptake at the primary tumor) continued ECX + bev. Non-responders switched to docetaxel 30 mg/m2, irinotecan 50 mg/mg2 day 1 and 8 plus bevacizumab every 21 days for 2 cycles. Patients then underwent surgery. The primary objective was to improve the 2-year disease free survival (DFS) from 30% (historical control) to 53% in the non-responders. Results Twenty evaluable patients enrolled before the study closed for poor accrual. Eleven were PET responders and the 9 non-responders switched to the salvage regimen. With a median follow-up of 38.2 months, the 2-year DFS was 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 30–85%] in responders compared with 56% in the non-responder group (95% CI, 20–80%, P=0.93). Conclusions The results suggest that changing chemotherapy regimens in PET non-responding patients may improve outcomes. Results from this pilot trial are hypothesis generating and suggest that PET directed neoadjuvant therapy merits evaluation in a larger trial. PMID:27563439

  4. Apatinib: A novel receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Ravelli, Andrea; Polom, Karol; Petrioli, Roberto; Marano, Luigi; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco; Generali, Daniele

    2016-03-28

    Metastatic gastric cancer is a lethal disease characterized by a very short overall survival, underlining a critical need of new therapeutic options. Unfortunately, although several molecular targets have been investigated, only very few recently approved agents, such as trastuzumab in the HER2-positive setting and ramucirumab, led to a clinical improvement in the outcome of metastatic gastric cancer patients. VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) is one of the most potent angiogenic factors and is a signalling molecule secreted by many solid tumours. Since high VEGF expression is one of the characteristic features of gastric carcinomas, targeting VEGF is therefore considered as a promising therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. In the scenario of possible new target therapies with particular regard to angiogenesis, apatinib is a novel receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor selectively targeting VEGFR-2. It is an orally-bioavailable agent currently being studied in several solid tumour types showing a promising activity in gastric cancer. Due to the recent positive results as a third line of treatment for metastatic gastric cancer patients, apatinib may be an interesting and novel type of targeted treatment for metastatic gastric cancer in several lines of therapy. In this review, we summarize the available data of apatinib, mainly focused on the clinical aspect, in advanced/metastatic gastric cancer. PMID:26797419

  5. Variation in Gene Expression Patterns in Human Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Leung, Suet Y.; Yuen, Siu T.; Chu, Kent-Man; Ji, Jiafu; Li, Rui; Chan, Annie S.Y.; Law, Simon; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Wong, John; So, Samuel; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the world's second most common cause of cancer death. We analyzed gene expression patterns in 90 primary gastric cancers, 14 metastatic gastric cancers, and 22 nonneoplastic gastric tissues, using cDNA microarrays representing ∼30,300 genes. Gastric cancers were distinguished from nonneoplastic gastric tissues by characteristic differences in their gene expression patterns. We found a diversity of gene expression patterns in gastric cancer, reflecting variation in intrinsic properties of tumor and normal cells and variation in the cellular composition of these complex tissues. We identified several genes whose expression levels were significantly correlated with patient survival. The variations in gene expression patterns among cancers in different patients suggest differences in pathogenetic pathways and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:12925757

  6. Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer: The cutting-edge

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lian-Wen; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer cells differs from that of normal epithelial cells. Upregulated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) in gastric cancer meeting the demands of cell proliferation is associated with genetic mutations, epigenetic modification and proteomic alteration. Understanding the mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis may contribute to our knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis. Metabolomic studies offer novel, convenient and practical tools in the search for new biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and chemosensitivity prediction of gastric cancer. Interfering with the process of glycolysis in cancer cells may provide a new and promising therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. In this article, we present a brief review of recent studies of glucose metabolism in gastric cancer, with primary focus on the clinical applications of new biomarkers and their potential therapeutic role in gastric cancer. PMID:26877609

  7. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A retrospective study in a single minimally invasive surgery center.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79.70%, 57

  8. Microarray analysis in gastric cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Giovanna; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Ojetti, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. Although several treatment options have been developed, the mortality rate is increasing. Lymph node involvement is considered the most reliable prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. Early diagnosis improves the survival rate of patients and increases the likelihood of successful treatment. The most reliable diagnostic method is endoscopic examination, however, it is expensive and not feasible in poorer countries. Therefore, many innovative techniques have been studied to develop a new non-invasive screening test and to identify specific serum biomarkers. DNA microarray analysis is one of the new technologies able to measure the expression levels of a large number of genes simultaneously. It is possible to define the gene expression profile of the tumor and to correlate it with the prognosis and metastasis formation. Several studies in the literature have been published on the role of microarray analysis in gastric cancer and the mechanisms of proliferation and metastasis formation. The aim of this review is to analyze the importance of microarray analysis and its clinical applications to better define the genetic characteristics of gastric cancer and its possible implications in a more decisive treatment. PMID:25232233

  9. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  10. Gastric Cancer Risk in Patients with Helicobacter pylori Infection and Following Its Eradication.

    PubMed

    Rugge, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    As Helicobacter pylori is a first-class carcinogen, eradication of the infection would be expected to be a beneficial measure for the (primary) prevention of gastric cancer. Given the natural history of gastric cancer, it is plausible that eradication before gastric atrophy sets in offers the best chance for cancer risk reduction. The beneficial effects of eradication may, nevertheless, still be achievable in more advanced disease. The reversibility of inflammatory lesions has been supported by undeniable evidence; the regression of mucosal atrophy/metaplasia has also been confirmed by several recent histologic studies.

  11. Prognostic value of CAPZA1 overexpression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YOUNG-JOON; JEONG, SANG-HO; HONG, SOON-CHAN; CHO, BOK-IM; HA, WOO-SONG; PARK, SOON-TAE; CHOI, SANG-KYUNG; JUNG, EUN-JUNG; JU, YOUNG-TAE; JEONG, CHI-YOUNG; KIM, JAE WON; LEE, CHANG WON; YOO, JIYUN; KO, GYUNG HYUCK

    2013-01-01

    F-actin capping protein α1 subunit (CAPZA1) was previously identified in a proteomic analysis of human gastric cancer clinical specimens and selected for further study. The association between CAPZA1 overexpression, detected by immunohistochemistry, and clinicopathological features including survival were evaluated. In vitro gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches were utilized to assess the function of CPAZA1 in malignancy. Univariate analysis revealed that poorly differentiated disease, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, advanced T stage, positive lymph nodes, high TNM stage, D2 lymph node dissection, adjuvant chemotherapy and CAPZA1 underexpression were significantly associated with cancer-related death (p<0.05); however, only high TNM stage remained significantly associated by multivariate analysis (p<0.01). CAPZA1 overexpression was associated with well differentiated histology, smaller tumor size, lower T stage, absence of lymph node metastasis, lower TNM stage, lower recurrence rate and longer survival time, compared to CAPZA1 underexpression. In vitro, forced expression of CAPZA1 caused a significant decrease in gastric cancer cell migration and invasion, whereas CAPZA1 depletion had the opposite effect. The present study suggests that CAPZA1 could be a marker of good prognosis in gastric cancer and shows that CAPZA1 is associated with decreased cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:23545944

  12. [Matrix metalloproteases as molecular markers in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the world. Prognosis in patients with gastric cancer is difficult to establish because it is commonly diagnosed when gastric wall invasion and metastasis have occurred. Currently, some members of the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases have been identified, whose expression in gastric tumor tissue is significantly elevated compared to healthy gastric tissue. Matrix metalloproteinases are 24 zinc-dependent endopeptidases that catalyze the proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. This degradation allows the cancer cells invade the surrounding stroma and trigger metastasis. Upregulation of certain matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis and elevated invasive capacity. This review compiles evidence about the genetic expression of matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer and their role in tumour invasion and metastasis, emphasizing their potential as molecular markers of prognosis.

  13. Mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic and radiographic screening.

    PubMed

    Hamashima, Chisato; Shabana, Michiko; Okada, Katsuo; Okamoto, Mikizo; Osaki, Yoneatsu

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening, we undertook a population-based cohort study in which both radiographic and endoscopic screenings for gastric cancer have been carried out. The subjects were selected from the participants of gastric cancer screening in two cities in Japan, Tottori and Yonago, from 2007 to 2008. The subjects were defined as participants aged 40-79 years who had no gastric cancer screening in the previous year. Follow-up of mortality was continued from the date of the first screening to the date of death or up to December 31, 2013. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of gastric cancer incidence, gastric cancer death, all cancer deaths except gastric cancer death, and all-causes death except gastric cancer death. The number of subjects selected for endoscopic screening was 9950 and that for radiographic screening was 4324. The subjects screened by endoscopy showed a 67% reduction of gastric cancer compared with the subjects screened by radiography (adjusted RR by sex, age group, and resident city = 0.327; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.118-0.908). The adjusted RR of endoscopic screening was 0.968 (95%CI, 0.675-1.387) for all cancer deaths except gastric cancer death, and 0.929 (95%CI, 0.740-1.168) for all-causes death except gastric cancer death. This study indicates that endoscopic screening can reduce gastric cancer mortality by 67% compared with radiographic screening. This is consistent with previous studies showing that endoscopic screening reduces gastric cancer mortality.

  14. Sensitive and Specific Detection of Early Gastric Cancer Using DNA Methylation Analysis of Gastric Washes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyun Soo; Castoro, Ryan J.; Chung, Woonbok; Estecio, Marcos R. H.; Kondo, Kimie; Guo, Yi; Ahmed, Saira S.; Toyota, Minoru; Itoh, Fumio; Suk, Ki Tae; Cho, Mee-Yon; Shen, Lanlan; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Aberrant DNA methylation is an early and frequent process in gastric carcinogenesis and could be useful for detection of gastric neoplasia. We hypothesized that methylation analysis of DNA recovered from gastric washes could be used to detect gastric cancer. Methods We studied 51 candidate genes in 7 gastric cancer cell lines and 24 samples (training set) and identified 6 for further studies. We examined the methylation status of these genes in a test set consisting of 131 gastric neoplasias at various stages. Finally, we validated the 6 candidate genes in a different population of 40 primary gastric cancer samples and 113 non-neoplastic gastric mucosa samples. Results 6 genes (MINT25, RORA, GDNF, ADAM23, PRDM5, MLF1) showed frequent differential methylation between gastric cancer and normal mucosa in the training, test and validation sets. GDNF and MINT25 were most sensitive molecular markers of early stage gastric cancer while PRDM5 and MLF1 were markers of a field defect. There was a close correlation (r=0.5 to 0.9, p=0.03 to 0.001) between methylation levels in tumor biopsy and gastric washes. MINT25 methylation had the best sensitivity (90%), specificity (96%), and area under the ROC curve (0.961) in terms of tumor detection in gastric washes. Conclusions These findings suggest MINT25 is a sensitive and specific marker for screening in gastric cancer. Additionally we have developed a new methodology for gastric cancer detection by DNA methylation in gastric washes. PMID:19375421

  15. Paclitaxel plus valproic acid versus paclitaxel alone as second- or third-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer: a randomized Phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Fushida, Sachio; Kinoshita, Jun; Kaji, Masahide; Oyama, Katsunobu; Hirono, Yasuo; Tsukada, Tomoya; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Weekly paclitaxel (wPTX) is the preferred second-line chemotherapy for gastric cancer in Japan. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to decrease proliferation through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. One histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), also inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel (PTX), shown in a murine gastric cancer model. This Phase II trial was designed to evaluate the benefits of adding VPA to wPTX in patients with gastric cancer refractory to first-line treatment with fluoropyrimidine. Patients and methods The patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive PTX 80 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, every 4 weeks, or a dose of PTX plus VPA taken everyday at 7.5 mg/kg twice daily. Random assignment was carried out at the data center with a minimization method adjusted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0–1 vs 2), prior chemotherapy (first-line vs second-line), and measurable lesions (presence vs absence). The primary end point was the overall survival (OS) rate, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival rate and safety analysis. Results Sixty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive wPTX (n=33) or wPTX plus VPA (n=33). The median OS was 9.8 months in the wPTX group and 8.7 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.19; 95% CI 0.702–2.026; P=0.51). The median progression-free survival was 4.5 months in the wPTX group and 3.0 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.29; 95% CI 0.753–2.211; P=0.35). Grade 3–4 adverse events were neutropenia (3.1%), pneumonia (1.6%), liver injury (1.6%), brain infarction (1.6%), and rupture of aorta (1.6%). Conclusion No statistically significant difference was observed between wPTX and wPTX plus VPA for OS. PMID:27524882

  16. HER2 testing in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Albarello, Luca; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Molecular therapies targeting HER2 are part of the established drug armamentarium in breast carcinoma. Now the ToGA trial, an international multicenter phase III clinical study, involving 24 countries globally, has shown that the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody Trastuzumab is effective in prolonging survival in HER2-positive carcinoma of the stomach and the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Similarly to breast carcinoma, >20% of gastric cancers show HER2 overexpression and/or amplification, and this percentage increases to 33% in GEJ tumors. Thus, as in breast carcinoma, pathologists are now asked to evaluate HER2 status in gastric carcinoma samples. As validated in the ToGA trial, the HER2 testing criteria that must be used in evaluating both gastric carcinoma biopsies and surgical specimens significantly differ from those routinely applied in breast carcinoma. The main variations with regard to the pattern of reactivity in HER2-expressing cells are as follows: the completeness of membrane staining is not a "conditio sine qua non" and the number of stained cells necessary to consider a case as positive is different. We must also take note of the much more frequent heterogeneity of HER2 positivity in gastric cancer compared with breast carcinoma and the less stringent correlation between HER2 amplification and protein overexpression that is observed in gastric carcinoma, where more than 20% of cases may carry HER2 amplification, although of low level, without HER2 expression. In these patients, in the ToGA trial, there was no apparent benefit from adding Trastuzumab to chemotherapy: for this reason the European Medicines Agency, while approving usage of Trastuzumab for metastatic adenocarcinoma treatment, indicated HER2 testing by immunohistochemistry as first evaluation assay, followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 2+ equivocal cases. HER2 testing in gastric carcinoma is a new field, opening several opportunities: for patients with gastric cancer

  17. Risk Factors and Epidemiology of Gastric Cancer in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Saeed; Ahmad, Mukhtiar; Asif, Hafiz Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad; Ur Rehman, Saif; Sultana, Sabira

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the 2nd most common cause of death among all cancers and is the 4th most common cancer in the world. The number of deaths due to gastric cancer is about 800,000 annually. Gastric cancer is more common in men as compared to women and is 3rd most common cancer after colorectal and breast cancers in women. A progressive rise in the incidence rate has been observed in females over the last 5 years. The highest incidence of stomach cancer is in China, South America and Eastern Europe. The incidence of gastric cancer has 20 fold variation worldwide. Global variation is linked by two factors which play important role in developing gastric cancer. One is infection with Helicobacter pylori and the 2nd is diet. South Asia is a region with low risk, despite a high prevalence of H.pylori. Gastric carcinoma is common in southern region of India. Gastric cancer is more readily treated if diagnosed early. This study aims to provide awareness about gastric cancer as well as an updated knowledge about risk factors and epidemiology of gastric cancer in Pakistan.

  18. Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byung Chun

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most frequent malignant diseases in the elderly. Systemic chemotherapy showed an improvement of quality of life and survival benefit compared to supportive care alone in patients with advanced GC. Because comorbidities or age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may lead to higher toxicity, however, many oncologists hesitate to recommend elderly patients to receive chemotherapy. Available data suggest that elderly patients with GC are able to tolerate and benefit from systemic chemotherapy to the same extent as younger patients. The age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective chemotherapy. However, proper patient selection is extremely important to deliver effective treatment safely. A comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a useful method to assess life expectancy and risk of morbidity in older patients and to guide providing optimal treatment. Treatment should be personalized based on the nature of the disease, the life expectancy, the risk of complication, and the patient's preference. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic GC who are classified as non-frail patients by CGA. For frail or vulnerable patients, however, monotherapy or only symptomatic treatment may be desirable. Targeted agents seem to be promising treatment options for elderly patients with GC considering their better efficacy and less toxicity. PMID:26722364

  19. Personalizing therapies for gastric cancer: Molecular mechanisms and novel targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Luis, Michael; Tavares, Ana; Carvalho, Liliana S; Lara-Santos, Lúcio; Araújo, António; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Globally, gastric cancer is the 4th most frequently diagnosed cancer and the 2nd leading cause of death from cancer, with an estimated 990000 new cases and 738000 deaths registered in 2008. In the advanced setting, standard chemotherapies protocols acquired an important role since last decades in prolong survival. Moreover, recent advances in molecular therapies provided a new interesting weapon to treat advanced gastric cancer through anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) therapies. Trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, was the first target drug in the metastatic setting that showed benefit in overall survival when in association with platinum-5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy. Further, HER2 overexpression analysis acquired a main role in predict response for trastuzumab in this field. Thus, we conducted a review that will discuss the main points concerning trastuzumab and HER2 in gastric cancer, providing a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms and novel trials involved. PMID:24151357

  20. Genomics Study of Gastric Cancer and Its Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease encompassing diverse morphological (intestinal versus diffuse) and molecular subtypes (MSI, EBV, TP53 mutation). Recent advances in genomic technology have led to an improved understanding of the driver gene mutational profile, gene expression, and epigenetic alterations that underlie each of the subgroups, with therapeutic implications in some of these alterations. There have been attempts to classify gastric cancers based on these genomic features, with an aim to improve prognostication and predict responsiveness to specific drug therapy. The eventual aims of these genomic studies are to develop deep biological insights into the carcinogenic pathway in each of these subtypes. Future large-scale drug screening strategies may then be able to link these genomic features to drug responsiveness, eventually leading to genome-guided personalized medicine with improved cure rates. PMID:27573784

  1. miR-485-5p acts as a negative regulator in gastric cancer progression by targeting flotillin-1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min; Ren, Mei-Ping; Zhao, Lei; Li, Chang-Ping; Deng, Ming-Ming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in cancer progression including gastric cancer. miR-485-5p is reported as a potential suppressor in breast cancer, but its expression, cellular function and clinic features in gastric cancer is not known. In our study, we found that miR-485-5p expression was down-regulated in gastric cancer cell lines. miR-485-5p could inhibit gastric cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. We also found that miR-485-5p suppressed gastric cancer cell metastasis and sphere formation. It was confirmed flotillin-1 (Flot1) as a direct target of miR-485-5p, and up-regulation of miR-485-5p could decrease expression of Flot1 in gastric cancer cells. Further investigation showed that ectopic expression of Flot1 partially reversed the inhibition effect of enforced miR-485-5p expression on the malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer cells. The low expression of miR-485-5p in gastric cancer tissues was related to advanced clinical features and poorer prognosis. Our study suggested that miR-485-5p could be a potential prognostic marker and functions as a tumor suppressor in human gastric cancer by post-transcriptionally targeting Flot1. PMID:26807169

  2. Adipokines and ghrelin in gastric cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Kerem, Mustafa; Ferahkose, Zafer; Yilmaz, Utku Tonguc; Pasaoglu, Hatice; Ofluoglu, Ebru; Bedirli, Abdulkadir; Salman, Bulent; Sahin, Tevfik Tolga; Akin, Murat

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles of the adipocytokines, ghrelin and leptin in gastric cancer cachexia. METHODS: Resistin, ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I), were measured in 30 healthy subjects, and 60 gastric cancer patients of which 30 suffered from cancer-induced cachexia and 30 served as a control group. The relationships between hormones, body mass index (BMI) loss ratio, age, gender, and Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) were investigated. RESULTS: Cachexia patients had higher tumor stage and GPS when compared with non-cachexia patients (P < 0.05). Ghrelin, resistin, leptin, adiponectin and IGF-I, showed a significant correlation with BMI loss ratio and GPS (P < 0.05). A strong correlation was seen between GPS and BMI loss (R = -0.570, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis indicated that BMI loss was significantly independent as a predictor of ghrelin, resistin, leptin and IGF-I (P < 0.05). Existence of an important significant relationship between resistin and insulin resistance was also noted. CONCLUSION: These results showed that serum ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, and IGF-I play important roles in cachexia-related gastric cancers. No relationship was found between resistin and cancer cachexia. Also, because of the correlation between these parameters and GPS, these parameters might be used as a predictor factor. PMID:18595130

  3. Comparative analysis of the efficacy and safety of modified FOLFOX-6 and DCF regimens as first-line treatment in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    HACIBEKIROGLU, ILHAN; KODAZ, HILMI; ERDOGAN, BULENT; TURKMEN, ESMA; ESENKAYA, ASIM; ONAL, YILMAZ; UZUNOGLU, SERNAZ; CICIN, IRFAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the efficacy and toxicity of the oxaliplatin + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + leucovorin (LV) regimen [modified (m)FOLFOX-6] with that of the docetaxel + cisplatin + 5-FU regimen (DCF) in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). A total of 72 patients received DCF (75 mg/m2 docetaxel and 75 mg/m2 cisplatin on day 1 and 750 mg/m2 5-FU on days 1–5) every 21 days, whereas 54 patients received mFOLFOX-6 (85 mg/m2 oxaliplatin and 400 mg/m2 LV as a 2-h infusion, followed by a 5-FU bolus of 400 mg/m2 and 2,400 mg/m2 5-FU as a 46-h continuous infusion) every 14 days. In the DCF arm, 55 (76.4%) of the patients received prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), 48–72 h following completion of chemotherapy. The median follow-up of the study was 12.1 months. The overall response rate (ORR) was 37.0% for mFOLFOX-6 and 40.3% for DCF (P=0.72). The median time to progression was 6.5 and 6.2 months in the mFOLFOX-6 and DCF arms, respectively (P=0.70). The median overall survival was 11.4 and 13.5 months in the mFOLFOX-6 and DCF arms, respectively (P=0.72). The rates of hematological toxicity did not differ between the two arms. However, in the subgroup analysis, grade 3–4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were significantly more common among patients who had not received G-CSF prophylaxis in the DCF arm. The incidence of grade 3–4 nausea/vomiting and diarrhea were significantly higher in the DCF arm. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the efficacy of the mFOLFOX-6 regimen was comparable to that of the DCF regimen in AGC patients. In addition, the benefit of G-CSF prophylaxis in conjunction with the DCF regimen was demonstrated. PMID:26623070

  4. Quality of Life in the Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Yung-Jue; Gotovkin, Evgeny A.; Hamamoto, Yasuo; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Moiseyenko, Vladimir M.; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Van Cutsem, Eric; Al-Sakaff, Nedal; Urspruch, Alexa; Hill, Julie; Weber, Harald A.; Chung, Hyun-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Background. The Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer phase III trial demonstrated that combining trastuzumab with chemotherapy significantly improved overall survival compared with chemotherapy alone in HER2-positive advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. We report health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (Q-TWiST) results from this trial. Patients and Methods. Patients were randomized to receive six cycles of chemotherapy given every 3 weeks (capecitabine or fluorouracil, plus cisplatin) either alone or combined with administration of trastuzumab every 3 weeks until disease progression. At each clinical visit, HRQoL was assessed using two European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires, QLQ-C30 and QLQ-STO22. Q-TWiST methodology was applied retrospectively using the clinical data and utility coefficients. Results. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy prolonged time to 10% definitive deterioration in all QLQ-C30 and QLQ-STO22 scores, including QLQ-C30 global health status versus chemotherapy alone, from 6.4 months to 10.2 months. In addition, trastuzumab plus chemotherapy extended Q-TWiST by 2.42 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Conclusion. Compared with chemotherapy alone, trastuzumab plus chemotherapy prolongs time to deterioration of HRQoL and increases quality-adjusted survival in patients with HER2-positive gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. PMID:24951609

  5. Early Gastric Cancer Just above a Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Murabayashi, Toji; Kawaguchi, Shinya; Okuda, Naoko; Oyamada, Jun; Yabana, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of early gastric cancer just above a heterotopic pancreas for which the differential diagnosis was carcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas. Routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in an 83-year-old man with sigmoid colon cancer revealed a gastric cancer in the lesser curvature of the antrum. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for evaluating the depth of tumor invasion revealed a hypoechoic mass in the submucosal layer. The depth of tumor invasion was diagnosed as muscularis propria. Distal gastrectomy and sigmoidectomy were performed. Histologically, the resected specimen of the stomach unexpectedly revealed a heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. They were not linked, and the heterotopic pancreas had no dysplasia. The gastric cancer had slightly invaded the submucosa. The hypoechoic mass on EUS was not the invasive tumor but the heterotopic pancreas. The preoperative staging of the gastric cancer on EUS was confounded by the presence of the heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. PMID:27482189

  6. [Mechanisms responsible for the progression of scirrhous gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Masakazu; Ohira, Masaichi; Muguruma, Kazuya; Shinto, Osamu; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2012-10-01

    Scirrhous gastric carcinoma is characterized by rapid cancer cell infiltration and proliferation accompanied by extensive stromal fibrosis. The proliferative and invasive ability of scirrhous gastric cancer cells are closely associated with the growth factors, FGF7 and TGFbeta produced by organ-specific fibroblasts. Peritoneal fibroblasts morphologically change mesothelial cells, and stimulate the migratory capability of cancer cells. A FGFR2 phosphorylation inhibitor prolongs the survival of mice with peritoneal metastasis of scirrhous gastric cancer. A TGFbetaR inhibitor decreases the growth of fibroblast, and invasion-stimulating activity of fibroblasts on cancer cells. A FGFR2 phosphorylation inhibitor or TGFbetaR inhibitor appears therapeutically promising in scirrhous gastric carcinoma.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection in relation to gastric cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Venkateshwari, A; Krishnaveni, D; Venugopal, S; Shashikumar, P; Vidyasagar, A; Jyothy, A

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer death worldwide, especially in developing countries. The incidence of gastric cancer varies from country to country, probably as a result of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. H. pylori infection is considered as a major risk factor in the development of gastric cancer. However, the scenario varies in Asian countries, exhibiting a higher rate of H. pylori infection and low incidence of gastric cancer, which could be attributed to strain-specific virulence factors and host genetic makeup. In this review, we discuss the various virulence factors expressed by this bacterium and their interaction with the host factors, to influence pathogenesis. PMID:21248438

  8. Prognostic significance of aberrant gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Zhang, Guanjun; Yao, Demao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Na; Ji, Meiju; He, Nongyue; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Promoter methylation acts as an important alternative to genetic alterations for gene inactivation in gastric carcinogenesis. Although a number of gastric cancer-associated genes have been found to be methylated in gastric cancer, valuable methylation markers for early diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of this cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, we used methylation-specific PCR (MSP) to analyze promoter methylation of 9 gastric cancer-associated genes, including MLF1, MGMT, p16, RASSF2, hMLH1, HAND1, HRASLS, TM, and FLNc, and their association with clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcome in a large cohort of gastric cancers. Our data showed that all of these genes were aberrantly methylated in gastric cancer, ranging from 8% to 51%. Moreover, gene methylation was strongly associated with certain clinicopathological characteristics, such as tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and cancer-related death. Of interest, methylation of MGMT, p16, RASSF2, hMLH1, HAND1, and FLNc was closely associated with poor survival in gastric cancer, particularly MGMT, p16, RASSF2 and FLNc. Thus, our findings suggested these epigenetic events may contribute to the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. Importantly, methylation of some genes were closely relevant to poor prognosis in gastric cancer, providing the strong evidences that these hypermethylated genes may be served as valuable biomarkers for prognostic evaluation in this cancer.

  9. KDM5B is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is required for gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenran; Tang, Fang; Qi, Guangying; Yuan, Shengguang; Zhang, Guangyu; Tang, Bo; He, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. KDM5B (also known as JARID1B) is a newly identified histone demethylase that regulates chromatin structure or gene expression by removing methyl residues from trimethylated lysine 4 on histone H3. Recent observations have shown oncogenic activity of KDM5B. However, the role of KDM5B in gastric cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of KDM5B in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis, western blotting, and qRT-PCR were used to measure the levels of KDM5B in gastric cancer cell lines, 45 pairs of gastric cancer tissues and the adjacent nonneoplastic tissues. KDM5B and shKDM5B were transfected into gastric cancer cells to investigate its role on regulating cell proliferation which was measured by MTT and colony formation assay. Cell’s migration and invasion were measured by Transwell and Matrigel analysis in vitro. PCNA expression was measured by immunofluorescence staining and immunohistochemical analysis. The in vivo tumorigenesis and metastasis assays were performed in SCID mice. In clinical gastric cancer samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly up-regulated in cancer lesions compared with paired normal gastric tissues. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in gastric cancer cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth and metastasis in vitro. An in vivo assay showed that KDM5B not only dramatically promoted gastric cancer cell xenograft formation and growth but also promoted gastric cancer cell metastasis in a liver metastasis model. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted gastric cancer metastasis via regulation of the Akt pathway. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in gastric cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer management. PMID:25628922

  10. In vivo medical imaging technologies: new possibility in diagnosis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cesaretti, Manuela; Zarzavadjian LE Bian, Alban

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers with an important related-mortality worldwide. It is preceded by a multistage pathological state arising from environmental and dietary factors. These factors influence intracellular molecular changes associated with the gastric carcinogenesis. Gastroenterology imaging, such as endoscopy, is essential for an early diagnosis as patients are typically asymptomatic at the onset of gastric cancer. Recent technological advances have allowed the development of novel imaging devices such as narrow-band imaging or high-definition endoscopy. Their accuracy in determining early gastric lesions makes biopsy of tissue unnecessary. They may largely simplify early diagnosis and improved prognosis. We performed a qualitative review about endoscopic application of advanced imaging technologies.

  11. Salt processed food and gastric cancer in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Hao; Li, Yuan-Hang; Leung, Kayee; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between salt processed food and gastric cancer, a hospital based case-control study was conducted in a high risk area of China. One hundred and seven newly diagnosed cases with histological confirmation of gastric cancer and 209 controls were recruited. Information on dietary intake was collected with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was applied to estimate the odds ratios with adjustment for other potential confounders. Comparing the high intake group with never consumption of salt processed foods, salted meat, pickled vegetables and preserved vegetables were significantly associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Meanwhile, salt taste preference in diet showed a dose-response relationship with gastric cancer. Our results suggest that consumption of salted meat, pickled and preserved vegetables, are positively associated with gastric cancer. Reduction of salt and salt processed food in diets might be one practical measure to preventing gastric cancer.

  12. [Research progression of translational medicine in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Maoran; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Chunchao

    2014-02-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors which is a great threat to human health. In recent years, the reform of surgical mordalities and the optimization of radiation and chemotherapy is still far from reducing morbidity and mortality of gastric cancer. As a new research pattern, translational medicine has emerged in various clinical subjects, which leads to remarkable effects. In this paper, the definition and development of translational medicine, molecular markers and drug treatment of gastric cancer will be discussed and the feasibility of translational medicine in the treatment of gastric cancer will be explained. In our opinion, the intervention of translational medicine could change the current situation that scientific researches is severely disconnected with clinical practice and increase the detection rate of gastric cancer and the effective rate of adjuvant therapy after surgery to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

  13. Primary advanced esophago-gastric melanoma: A rare case

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Zong, Liang; Nakazato, Hidetsugu; Wang, Wen-Yue; Li, Chao-Feng; Shi, Yan-Fen; Zhang, Guo-Chao; Tang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Primary esophageal or gastric melanoma is a very rare disease with early metastasis. Due to its atypical symptom and less efficiency of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the prognosis of esophageal or gastric melanoma is still very poor. Surgical resection remains the preferential treatment for esophageal or gastric melanoma. Here we present an extremely rare case of primary advanced esophago-gastric melanoma. Debulking surgery was performed without chemotherapy or radiotherapy. However, abdominal recurrence and hepatic metastases were found within one month by a postoperative follow-up computed tomography. Three and a half months after surgical resection, the patient died of extensive abdominal metastasis. PMID:27004009

  14. Metachronous gastric cancer after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken; Graham, David Y

    2014-09-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer in Japan initially resulted in establishment of a country-wide gastric cancer screening program to detect early and treatable cancers. In 2013 countrywide Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication was approved coupled with endoscopy to assess for the presence of chronic gastritis. Current data support the notion that cure of the infection in those with non-atrophic gastritis will prevent development of gastric cancer. However, while progression to more severe damage is halted in those who have already developed, atrophic gastritis/gastric atrophy remain at risk for subsequent development of gastric cancer. That risk is directly related to the extent and severity of atrophic gastritis. Methods to stratify cancer risk include those based on endoscopic assessment of the atrophic border, histologic grading, and non-invasive methods based on serologic testing of pepsinogen levels. Continued surveillance is required because those with atrophic gastritis/gastric atrophy retain considerable gastric cancer risk even after H. pylori eradication. Those who have already experienced a resectable early gastric cancer are among those at highest risk as metachronous lesions are frequent even after H. pylori eradication. We review the role of H. pylori and effect of H. pylori eradication indicating the incidence and the predictive factors on development of metachronous cancer after endoscopic therapy of early gastric cancer. Studies to refine risk markers to stratify for risk, surveillance methods, intervals, and duration after successful H. pylori eradication, and whether adjuvant therapy would change risk are needed.

  15. Metachronous gastric cancer after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer in Japan initially resulted in establishment of a country-wide gastric cancer screening program to detect early and treatable cancers. In 2013 countrywide Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication was approved coupled with endoscopy to assess for the presence of chronic gastritis. Current data support the notion that cure of the infection in those with non-atrophic gastritis will prevent development of gastric cancer. However, while progression to more severe damage is halted in those who have already developed, atrophic gastritis/gastric atrophy remain at risk for subsequent development of gastric cancer. That risk is directly related to the extent and severity of atrophic gastritis. Methods to stratify cancer risk include those based on endoscopic assessment of the atrophic border, histologic grading, and non-invasive methods based on serologic testing of pepsinogen levels. Continued surveillance is required because those with atrophic gastritis/gastric atrophy retain considerable gastric cancer risk even after H. pylori eradication. Those who have already experienced a resectable early gastric cancer are among those at highest risk as metachronous lesions are frequent even after H. pylori eradication. We review the role of H. pylori and effect of H. pylori eradication indicating the incidence and the predictive factors on development of metachronous cancer after endoscopic therapy of early gastric cancer. Studies to refine risk markers to stratify for risk, surveillance methods, intervals, and duration after successful H. pylori eradication, and whether adjuvant therapy would change risk are needed. PMID:25206262

  16. Gastritis, nitrosamines, and gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stemmermann, G.N.; Mower, H.

    1981-01-01

    Gastritis is associated with peptic ulcer, gastroenterostomy, pernicious anemia, and exposure to nitrosamines. Once established, the process may be self-perpetuating, resulting in atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and neoplasia. This can be explained by the process of endogenous nitrosation of amines in the inflamed gastric mucosa. Evidence is presented to support this hypothesis. Several drugs given parenterally have been identified as mutagenic nitroso compounds in homogenates of human and canine antral mucosa. Nitrite for this process is apparently derived from the inflamed mucosa. Different amines appear to be nitrosated at different places in the antrum, suggesting the presence of site-specific enzymes that control these reactions.

  17. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-19

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  18. Downregulation of tumor suppressor QKI in gastric cancer and its implication in cancer prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Yongqian; Wang, Li; Lu, Huanyu; Yang, Guodong; Zhang, Zhang; Fu, Haiyan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wei, Mengying; Sun, Jianyong; Zhao, Qingchuan; Dong, Guanglong; Lu, Zifan

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QKI expression is decreased in gastric cancer samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Promoter hyper methylation contributes to the downregulation of QKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QKI inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased QKI expression predicts poor survival. -- Abstract: Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. RNA-binding protein Quaking (QKI) is a newly identified tumor suppressor in multiple cancers, while its role in GC is largely unknown. Our study here aimed to clarify the relationship between QKI expression with the clinicopathologic characteristics and the prognosis of GC. In the 222 GC patients' specimens, QKI expression was found to be significantly decreased in most of the GC tissues, which was largely due to promoter hypermethylation. QKI overexpression reduced the proliferation ability of GC cell line in vitro study. In addition, the reduced QKI expression correlated well with poor differentiation status, depth of invasion, gastric lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced TNM stage, and poor survival. Multivariate analysis showed QKI expression was an independent prognostic factor for patient survival.

  19. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: A public health priority

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  20. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: a public health priority.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-04-28

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  1. Treatment options in patients with metastatic gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bilici, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of gastric cancer, it remains the world’s second highest cause of cancer death. As gastric cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, systemic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for these patients. However, no standard palliative chemotherapy regimen has been accepted for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. Palliative chemotherapy including fluoropyrimidine, platin compounds, docetaxel and epirubicin prolongs survival, and improves a high quality of life to a greater extent than best supportive care. The number of clinical investigations associated with targeted agents has recently increased. Agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have been widely tested. Trastuzumab was the first target drug developed, and pivotal phase III trials showed improved survival when trastuzumab was integrated into cisplatin/fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic gastric cancer. Trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy was thus approved to be a new standard of care for patients with HER2-positive advanced esophagogastric adenocarcinoma. Thus, the evaluation of HER2 status in all patients with metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma should be considered. Other agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and other biological pathways have also been investigated in clinical trials, but showed little impact on the survival of patients. In this review, systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer in the first- and second-line setting are summarized in the light of recent advances. PMID:24744580

  2. Specific expression and methylation of SLIT1, SLIT2, SLIT3, and miR-218 in gastric cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mirang; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Yong Sung

    2016-06-01

    SLIT has been suggested as a key regulator of cancer development and a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Herein, we analyzed expression and methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 in 11 gastric cancer cell lines, 96 paired gastric tumors and adjacent normal gastric tissues, and 250 gastric cancers provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas. Methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 was found both in early gastric cancers, and in advanced gastric cancers. Even normal gastric tissue showed increased methylation of SLIT1 and SLIT3 that correlated with patient age. Furthermore, epigenetic inactivation of SLIT occurred in a gastric cancer subtype-dependent manner. SLIT2 and SLIT3 expression was reduced in Epstein-Barr virus-positive and microsatellite instability subtypes, but increased in the genomically stable subtype. Expression of miR‑218 correlated negatively with methylation of SLIT2 or SLIT3. These findings suggest that a molecular subtype-specific therapeutic strategy is needed for targeting SLITs and miR-218 in treatment of gastric cancer.

  3. Patterns of Response After Preoperative Treatment in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose L.; Ciervide, Raquel; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Miguel, Inigo; Arbea, Leire; Aristu, J. Javier; Chopitea, Ana; Martinez-Regueira, Fernando; Valenti, Victor; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Sola, Jesus J.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the rate of pathologic response in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer treated with preoperative chemotherapy with and without chemoradiation at our institution. Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2007 patients were retrospectively identified who received preoperative treatment for gastric cancer (cT3-4/ N+) with induction chemotherapy (Ch) or with Ch followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy in 5 weeks) (ChRT). Surgery was planned 4-6 weeks after the completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Pathologic assessment was used to investigate the patterns of pathologic response after neoadjuvant treatment. Results: Sixty-one patients were analyzed. Of 61 patients, 58 (95%) underwent surgery. The R0 resection rate was 87%. Pathologic complete response was achieved in 12% of the patients. A major pathologic response (<10% of residual tumor) was observed in 53% of patients, and T downstaging was observed in 75%. Median follow-up was 38.7 months. Median disease-free survival (DFS) was 36.5 months. The only patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factor associated with pathologic response was the use of preoperative ChRT. Patients achieving major pathologic response had a 3-year actuarial DFS rate of 63%. Conclusions: The patterns of pathologic response after preoperative ChRT suggest encouraging intervals of DFS. Such a strategy may be of interest to be explored in gastric cancer.

  4. Multimodality management of resectable gastric cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Shum, Helen; Rajdev, Lakshmi

    2014-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach carries a poor prognosis and is the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. It is recommended that surgical resection with a D1 or a modified D2 gastrectomy (with at least 15 lymph nodes removed for examination) be performed in the United States, though D2 lymphadenectomies should be performed at experienced centers. A D2 lymphadenectomy is the recommended procedure in Asia. Although surgical resection is considered the definitive treatment, rates of recurrences are high, necessitating the need for neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy. This review article aims to outline and summarize some of the pivotal trials that have defined optimal treatment options for non-metastatic non-cardia gastric cancer. Some of the most notable trials include the INT-0116 trial, which established a benefit in concurrent chemoradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. This was again confirmed in the ARTIST trial, especially in patients with nodal involvement. Later, the Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy trial provided evidence for the use of perioperative chemotherapy. Targeted agents such as ramucirumab and trastuzumab are also being investigated for use in locally advanced gastric cancers after demonstrating a benefit in the metastatic setting. Given the poor response rate of this difficult disease to various treatment modalities, numerous studies are currently ongoing in an attempt to define a more effective therapy, some of which are briefly introduced in this review as well.

  5. Undiagnosed Borrmann type II gastric cancer due to necrosis and regenerative epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Joon; Chang, Jae Hyuck; Kim, Byung Kee; Ko, Hoon Young; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Soo Jeong; Song, Mi Ae; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Chang Whan; Han, Sok Won

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic biopsy is essential to the proper diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. Unfortunately, the results of endoscopic biopsy are not always the same as what is expected based on gross endoscopic findings. The results of endoscopic biopsy can be negative for malignancy in Borrmann type IV advanced gastric cancer (AGCa) or gastric lymphoma. However, in the case of type II AGCa, repeated biopsies negative for malignancy have not been reported. A 49-year-old male patient underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy three times due to large gastric ulcer suspected to be Borrmann type II cancer. However, three repeat endoscopic biopsies with multiple specimens showed necrosis and superficial regenerative epithelium without malignant findings. The patient underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection. The surgical specimen revealed that the mucosal layer was completely replaced with regenerative epithelium without cancer cells. PMID:25071361

  6. EF24 induces ROS-mediated apoptosis via targeting thioredoxin reductase 1 in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Xi; Ying, Shilong; Feng, Zhiguo; Chen, Tongke; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Zhe; Qiu, Chenyu; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world, and finding novel agents for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer is of urgent need. Diphenyl difluoroketone (EF24), a molecule having structural similarity to curcumin, exhibits potent anti-tumor activities by arresting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. Although EF24 demonstrates potent anticancer efficacy in numerous types of human cancer cells, the cellular targets of EF24 have not been fully defined. We report here that EF24 may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, EF24 induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to EF24 treatment. In vivo, EF24 treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden, and displays synergistic lethality with 5-FU against gastric cancer cells. Targeting TrxR1 with EF24 thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of EF24, and reveals that TrxR1 is a good target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26919110

  7. EF24 induces ROS-mediated apoptosis via targeting thioredoxin reductase 1 in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Xi; Ying, Shilong; Feng, Zhiguo; Chen, Tongke; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Zhe; Qiu, Chenyu; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world, and finding novel agents for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer is of urgent need. Diphenyl difluoroketone (EF24), a molecule having structural similarity to curcumin, exhibits potent anti-tumor activities by arresting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. Although EF24 demonstrates potent anticancer effïcacy in numerous types of human cancer cells, the cellular targets of EF24 have not been fully defined. We report here that EF24 may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, EF24 induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to EF24 treatment. In vivo, EF24 treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden, and displays synergistic lethality with 5-FU against gastric cancer cells. Targeting TrxR1 with EF24 thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of EF24, and reveals that TrxR1 is a good target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26919110

  8. Diagnosis and Management of High Risk Group for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval. PMID:25547086

  9. Diagnosis and management of high risk group for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval.

  10. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Taisei; Iida, Yasuaki; Yokoyama, Yuichirou; Tsuge, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Keiji; Wada, Akihito; Mikami, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered. PMID:27703825

  11. Decreased Core-Fucosylation Contributes to Malignancy in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; You, Qing; Yi, Chang-Hong; Ji, Jun; Gu, Xing; Zhou, Ping-Ting; Cheng, Cheng; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    The object of the study is to identify N-glycan profiling changes associated with gastric cancer and explore the impact of core-fucosylation on biological behaviors of human gastric cancer cells. A total of 244 subjects including gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and healthy control were recruited. N-glycan profiling from serum and total proteins in gastric tissues was analyzed by DNA sequencer-assisted fluorophore-assisted capillary electrophoresis. The abundance of total core-fucosylated residues and the expression of enzymes involved in core-fucosylation were analyzed with lectin blot, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot, Immunohistochemical staining and lectin-histochemical staining. The recombinant plasmids of GDP-fucose transporter and α-1,6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) were constructed and transfected into gastric cancer cell lines BGC-823 and SGC-7901. CCK-8 and wound healing assay were used to assess the functional impact of core-fucosylation modulation on cell proliferation and migration. Characteristic serum N-glycan profiles were found in gastric cancer. Compared with the healthy control, a trianntenary structure abundance, peak 9 (NA3Fb), was increased significantly in gastric cancer, while the total abundance of core-fucosylated residues (sumfuc) was decreased. Core-fucosylated structures, peak6(NA2F) and peak7(NA2FB) were deceased in gastric tumor tissues when compared with that in adjacent non-tumor tissues. Consistently, lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA)-binding proteins were decreased significantly in sera of gastric cancer, and protein level of Fut8 was decreased significantly in gastric tumor tissues compared with that in adjacent non-tumor tissues. Upregulation of GDP-Tr and Fut8 could inhibit proliferation, but had no significant influence on migration of BGC-823 and SGC-7901 cells. Core-fucosylation is down regulated in gastric cancer. Upregulation of core-fucosylation could inhibit proliferation of the human

  12. Molecular targeted agents for gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takashi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2012-04-01

    Despite recent improvements in surgical techniques and chemotherapy, advanced cancers of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) continue to have poor clinical outcomes. However, molecules intimately related to cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis have been studied as candidates for molecular targeted agents. Target molecules, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and P13k/Akt/mTor pathway, as well as the insulin-like growth factor receptor, c-Met pathways, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and other pathways are considered to be promising candidates for molecular targeted therapy for gastric and GEJ cancer. In this review we focus on the recent developments in targeting relevant pathways in these types of cancer.

  13. Prognostic value of microRNA-126 and CRK expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shun; Shi, Huichang; Han, Jun; Zhang, Tiecheng; Zhu, Weiguo; Zhang, Dahong

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNA (miR)-126, acting as a tumor suppressor, has been reported to inhibit the invasion of gastric cancer cells in part by targeting v-crk sarcoma virus CT10 oncogene homologue (CRK). The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of miR-126/CRK axis in gastric cancer. Methods miR-126 and CRK mRNA expression levels were detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 220 self-pairs of gastric cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues. Results Expression levels of miR-126 and CRK mRNA in gastric cancer tissues were, respectively, lower and higher than those in adjacent noncancerous tissues (both P<0.001). Low miR-126 expression and high CRK expression, alone or in combination, were all significantly associated with positive lymph node and distant metastases and advanced TNM stage of human gastric cancer (all P<0.05). We also found that the overall survival rates of the patients with low miR-126 expression and high CRK expression were, respectively, shorter than those with high miR-126 expression and low CRK expression. Interestingly, miR-126-low/CRK-high expression was associated with a significantly worse overall survival of all miR-126/CRK groups (P<0.001). Moreover, multivariate analysis identified miR-126 and/or CRK expression as independent prognostic factors for patients with gastric cancer. Notably, the prognostic relevance of miR-126 and/or CRK expression was more obvious in the subgroup of patients with TNM stage IV. Conclusion Dysregulation of miR-126/CRK axis may promote the malignant progression of human gastric cancer. miR-126 and CRK combined expression may serve as an independent predictor of overall survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:27785060

  14. Cancer type-specific epigenetic changes: gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major cause of mortality despite declining rate in the world. Epigenetic alterations contribute significantly to the development and progression of gastric tumors. Epigenetic refers to the number of modifications of the chromatin structure that affect gene expression without altering the primary sequence of DNA, and these changes lead to transcriptional activation or silencing of the gene. Over the years, the study of epigenetic processes has increased, and novel therapeutic approaches have emerged. This chapter summarizes the main epigenomic mechanisms described recently involved in gastric carcinogenesis, focusing on the roles that aberrant DNA methylation, histone modifications (histone acetylation and methylation), and miRNAs (oncogenic and tumor suppressor function of miRNA) play in the onset and progression of gastric tumors. Clinical implications of these epigenetic alterations in GC are also discussed.

  15. Cancer type-specific epigenetic changes: gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major cause of mortality despite declining rate in the world. Epigenetic alterations contribute significantly to the development and progression of gastric tumors. Epigenetic refers to the number of modifications of the chromatin structure that affect gene expression without altering the primary sequence of DNA, and these changes lead to transcriptional activation or silencing of the gene. Over the years, the study of epigenetic processes has increased, and novel therapeutic approaches have emerged. This chapter summarizes the main epigenomic mechanisms described recently involved in gastric carcinogenesis, focusing on the roles that aberrant DNA methylation, histone modifications (histone acetylation and methylation), and miRNAs (oncogenic and tumor suppressor function of miRNA) play in the onset and progression of gastric tumors. Clinical implications of these epigenetic alterations in GC are also discussed. PMID:25421656

  16. Current status of function-preserving surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takuro; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic techniques have allowed the diagnosis of gastric cancer (GC) at an early stage. Due to the low incidence of lymph node metastasis and favorable prognosis in early GC, function-preserving surgery which improves postoperative quality of life may be possible. Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is one such function-preserving procedure, which is expected to offer advantages with regards to dumping syndrome, bile reflux gastritis, and the frequency of flatus, although PPG may induce delayed gastric emptying. Proximal gastrectomy (PG) is another function-preserving procedure, which is thought to be advantageous in terms of decreased duodenogastric reflux and good food reservoir function in the remnant stomach, although the incidence of heartburn or gastric fullness associated with this procedure is high. However, these disadvantages may be overcome by the reconstruction method used. The other important problem after PG is remnant GC, which was reported to occur in approximately 5% of patients. Therefore, the reconstruction technique used with PG should facilitate postoperative endoscopic examinations for early detection and treatment of remnant gastric carcinoma. Oncologic safety seems to be assured in both procedures, if the preoperative diagnosis is accurate. Patient selection should be carefully considered. Although many retrospective studies have demonstrated the utility of function-preserving surgery, no consensus on whether to adopt function-preserving surgery as the standard of care has been reached. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are necessary to evaluate survival and postoperative quality of life associated with function-preserving surgery. PMID:25516640

  17. Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung-Young; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-06-01

    Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is a function-preserving surgery for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC), aiming to decrease the complication rate and improve postoperative quality of life. According to the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, PPG can be performed for cT1N0M0 gastric cancer located in the middle-third of the stomach, at least 4.0 cm away from the pylorus. Although the length of the antral cuff gradually increased, from 1.5 cm during the initial use of the procedure to 3.0 cm currently, its optimal length still remains unclear. Standard procedures for the preservation of pyloric function, infra-pyloric vessels, and hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, make PPG technically more difficult and raise concerns about incomplete lymph node dissection. The short- and long-term oncological and survival outcomes of PPG were comparable to those for distal gastrectomy, but with several advantages such as a lower incidence of dumping syndrome, bile reflux, and gallstone formation, and improved nutritional status. Gastric stasis, a typical complication of PPG, can be effectively treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion. Robot-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is feasible for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach in terms of the short-term clinical outcome. However, any benefits over laparoscopy-assisted PPG (LAPPG) from the patient's perspective have not yet been proven. An ongoing Korean multicenter randomized controlled trial (KLASS-04), which compares LAPPG and laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach, may provide more clear evidence about the advantages and oncologic safety of PPG. PMID:27433390

  18. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis associated with multiple gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Otowa, Yasunori; Mitsutsuji, Masaaki; Urade, Takeshi; Chono, Teruhiro; Morimoto, Haruki; Yokoyama, Kunio; Hirata, Kenro; Kawamura, Shiro; Shimada, Etsuji; Fujita, Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is an inflammation of the digestive tract that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration. There are no specific symptoms, and are related to the layer in which eosinophilic infiltration is observed. A 69-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of general malaise, diarrhea, and dysgeusia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed reddish elevated lesions that were edematous all over the gastric mucosa. In addition, three tumors were also observed. The biopsies of the reddish elevated mucosa revealed eosinophilic infiltration and tubular adenocarcinoma from the tumors. Colonoscopy showed abnormal reddish elevated mucosa. The biopsies from the reddish elevated mucosa showed eosinophilic infiltration. From the abdominal contrast computed tomography scan, tumor stain was seen in the anterior wall of the gastric body. No ascites, intestinal wall thickening, or lymph node swelling were found. A slight elevation in the serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), 480 IU/ml, was found from the laboratory test results; other laboratory results were within normal limits including the number of peripheral eosinophils. No specific allergen was found from the multiple antigen simultaneous test and from the skin patch test. The parasitic immunodiagnosis was negative. He was diagnosed with EG associated with gastric cancer and underwent total gastrectomy, regional lymph node dissection with reconstruction by a Roux-en-Y method. He was prescribed prednisolone after the operation and showed a good clinical response. There are many case reports on EG, but none of them were associated with cancer. We encountered a case of EG associated with multiple gastric cancer; the patient underwent total gastrectomy.

  19. Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Young; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is a function-preserving surgery for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC), aiming to decrease the complication rate and improve postoperative quality of life. According to the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, PPG can be performed for cT1N0M0 gastric cancer located in the middle-third of the stomach, at least 4.0 cm away from the pylorus. Although the length of the antral cuff gradually increased, from 1.5 cm during the initial use of the procedure to 3.0 cm currently, its optimal length still remains unclear. Standard procedures for the preservation of pyloric function, infra-pyloric vessels, and hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, make PPG technically more difficult and raise concerns about incomplete lymph node dissection. The short- and long-term oncological and survival outcomes of PPG were comparable to those for distal gastrectomy, but with several advantages such as a lower incidence of dumping syndrome, bile reflux, and gallstone formation, and improved nutritional status. Gastric stasis, a typical complication of PPG, can be effectively treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion. Robot-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is feasible for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach in terms of the short-term clinical outcome. However, any benefits over laparoscopy-assisted PPG (LAPPG) from the patient's perspective have not yet been proven. An ongoing Korean multicenter randomized controlled trial (KLASS-04), which compares LAPPG and laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach, may provide more clear evidence about the advantages and oncologic safety of PPG. PMID:27433390

  20. Current issues and future perspectives of gastric cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. About half of the incidence of gastric cancer is observed in East Asian countries, which show a higher mortality than other countries. The effectiveness of 3 new gastric cancer screening techniques, namely, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, serological testing, and “screen and treat” method were extensively reviewed. Moreover, the phases of development for cancer screening were analyzed on the basis of the biomarker development road map. Several observational studies have reported the effectiveness of endoscopic screening in reducing mortality from gastric cancer. On the other hand, serologic testing has mainly been used for targeting the high-risk group for gastric cancer. To date, the effectiveness of new techniques for gastric cancer screening has remained limited. However, endoscopic screening is presently in the last trial phase of development before their introduction to population-based screening. To effectively introduce new techniques for gastric cancer screening in a community, incidence and mortality reduction from gastric cancer must be initially and thoroughly evaluated by conducting reliable studies. In addition to effectiveness evaluation, the balance of benefits and harms must be carefully assessed before introducing these new techniques for population-based screening. PMID:25320514

  1. Current issues and future perspectives of gastric cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2014-10-14

    Gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. About half of the incidence of gastric cancer is observed in East Asian countries, which show a higher mortality than other countries. The effectiveness of 3 new gastric cancer screening techniques, namely, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, serological testing, and "screen and treat" method were extensively reviewed. Moreover, the phases of development for cancer screening were analyzed on the basis of the biomarker development road map. Several observational studies have reported the effectiveness of endoscopic screening in reducing mortality from gastric cancer. On the other hand, serologic testing has mainly been used for targeting the high-risk group for gastric cancer. To date, the effectiveness of new techniques for gastric cancer screening has remained limited. However, endoscopic screening is presently in the last trial phase of development before their introduction to population-based screening. To effectively introduce new techniques for gastric cancer screening in a community, incidence and mortality reduction from gastric cancer must be initially and thoroughly evaluated by conducting reliable studies. In addition to effectiveness evaluation, the balance of benefits and harms must be carefully assessed before introducing these new techniques for population-based screening. PMID:25320514

  2. CXC chemokines and chemokine receptors in gastric cancer: From basic findings towards therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Jin; Song, Ik-Chan; Yun, Hwan-Jung; Jo, Deog-Yeon; Kim, Samyong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer, and the second-highest cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite extensive research to identify novel diagnostic and therapeutic agents, patients with advanced gastric cancer suffer from a poor quality of life and poor prognosis, and treatment is dependent mainly on conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. To improve the quality of life and survival of gastric cancer patients, a better understanding of the underlying molecular pathologies, and their application towards the development of novel targeted therapies, is urgently needed. Chemokines are a group of small proteins associated with cytoskeletal rearrangements, the directional migration of several cell types during development and physiology, and the host immune response via interactions with G-protein coupled receptors. There is also growing evidence to suggest that chemokines not only play a role in the immune system, but are also involved in the development and progression of tumors. In gastric cancer, CXC chemokines and chemokine receptors regulate the trafficking of cells in and out of the tumor microenvironment. CXC chemokines and their receptors can also directly influence tumorigenesis by modulating tumor transformation, survival, growth, invasion and metastasis, as well as indirectly by regulating angiogenesis, and tumor-leukocyte interactions. In this review, we will focus on the roles of CXC chemokines and their receptors in the development, progression, and metastasis of gastric tumors, and discuss their therapeutic potential for gastric cancer. PMID:24587647

  3. Helicobacter pylori Antibody Titer and Gastric Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kishikawa, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kayoko; Takarabe, Sakiko; Kaida, Shogo; Nishida, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    The “ABC method” is a serum gastric cancer screening method, and the subjects were divided based on H. pylori serology and atrophic gastritis as detected by serum pepsinogen (PG): Group A [H. pylori (−) PG (−)], Group B [H. pylori (+) PG (−)], Group C [H. pylori (+) PG (+)], and Group D [H. pylori (−) PG (+)]. The risk of gastric cancer is highest in Group D, followed by Groups C, B, and A. Groups B, C, and D are advised to undergo endoscopy, and the recommended surveillance is every three years, every two years, and annually, respectively. In this report, the reported results with respect to further risk stratification by anti-H. pylori antibody titer in each subgroup are reviewed: (1) high-negative antibody titer subjects in Group A, representing posteradicated individuals with high risk for intestinal-type cancer; (2) high-positive antibody titer subjects in Group B, representing active inflammation with high risk for diffuse-type cancer; and (3) low-positive antibody titer subjects in Group C, representing advanced atrophy with increased risk for intestinal-type cancer. In these subjects, careful follow-up with intervals of surveillance of every three years in (1), every two years in (2), and annually in (3) should be considered. PMID:26494936

  4. Strategies for eliminating death from gastric cancer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    ASAKA, Masahiro; MABE, Katsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, efforts have been directed toward improving the detection of early gastric cancer by double contrast radiography and endoscopy, since early cancer has a good prognosis, resulting in Japan having the world’s best diagnostic system for early gastric cancer. The 5-year survival rate of gastric cancer patients in Japan is much higher than in Western countries by the development of endoscopic treatment for early gastric cancer. In February 2013, Japanese national health insurance cover for H. pylori eradication therapy was expanded to patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis, a type of chronic gastritis. H. pylori-associated gastritis causes gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric polyps, therefore, providing treatment for this gastritis is likely to substantially decrease the prevalence of both gastric and duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer. Patients with gastritis are tested for H. pylori infection and those who are positive receive eradication therapy followed by periodic endoscopic surveillance. If such an approach is pursued further in Japan, gastric cancer deaths will show a dramatic decline after 10–20 years. PMID:25169671

  5. Differential expression of CCN family members CYR611, CTGF and NOV in gastric cancer and their association with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Gao, Xiangyu; Ji, Ke; Sanders, Andrew J.; Zhang, Zhongtao; Jiang, Wen G.; Ji, Jiafu; Ye, Lin

    2016-01-01

    CCN is an acronym for cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV). Aberrations of certain CCN members including CYR61, CTGF, Wnt1-inducible signalling pathway protein (WISP)-1 and -3 have been reported in gastric cancer. The present study aimed to examine the clinical relevance of NOV along with CYR61 and CTGF in gastric cancer by analysing their transcript levels. CYR61, CTGF and NOV transcript expression in 324 gastric cancer samples with paired adjacent normal gastric tissues were determined using real-time quantitative PCR and the results were statistically analysed against patient clinicopathological data using SPSS software. NOV mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly elevated when compared with levels in their paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Local advanced tumours with invasive expansion (T3 and T4) expressed higher levels of NOV (p=0.013) compared with the less invasive tumours (T1 and T2). CYR61 transcript levels were also significantly increased in gastric cancers compared with levels in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with CYR61-low transcript levels had longer overall survival (OS) (p=0.018) and disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.015). NOV overexpression promoted the in vitro proliferation of AGS cells while the knockdown resulted in a reduced proliferation of HGC27 cells. A similar effect was observed for the invasion of these two gastric cancer cell lines. NOV expression was increased in gastric cancer which was associated with local invasion and distant metastases. Taken together, the expression of NOV and CYR61 was increased in gastric cancer. The elevated expression of CYR61 was associated with poorer survival. NOV promoted proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Further investigations may highlight their predictive and therapeutic potential in gastric cancer. PMID:27633176

  6. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J; Ernst, Matthias; Putoczki, Tracy L

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late-stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new-targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre-clinical development of new therapeutics. PMID:26809278

  7. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J; Ernst, Matthias; Putoczki, Tracy L

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late-stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new-targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre-clinical development of new therapeutics.

  8. Towards curative therapy in gastric cancer: Faraway, so close!

    PubMed Central

    Cravo, Marília; Fidalgo, Catarina; Garrido, Rita; Rodrigues, Tânia; Luz, Gonçalo; Palmela, Carolina; Santos, Marta; Lopes, Fábio; Maio, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Although recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances have substantially improved the survival of patients with gastric cancer (GC), the overall prognosis is still poor. Surgery is the only curative treatment and should be performed in experienced centers. Due to high relapse following surgery, complementary and systemic treatment aimed at eradicating micrometastasis should be performed in most cases. Cytotoxic treatments are effective in downstaging locally advanced cancer, but different sensitivities and toxicities probably exist in different GC subtypes. Current treatment protocols are based primarily on clinical data and histological features, but molecular biomarkers that would allow for the prediction of treatment responses are urgently needed. Understanding how host factors are responsible for inter-individual variability of drug response or toxicity will also contribute to the development of more effective and less toxic treatments. PMID:26556990

  9. Loss of GFAT1 promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and predicts unfavorable prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Zhao, Junjie; Wu, Weicheng; Min, Lingqiang; Song, Shushu; Wu, Hao; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hongshan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-06-21

    Gastric cancer remains the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer represent the major reason for its poor prognosis. Glutamine: fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase 1 (GFAT1) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP). Nevertheless, the role of GFAT1 in gastric cancer is little investigated. In this study, we found that the expression of GFAT1 was decreased in gastric cancer. Low expression of GFAT1 was positively associated with vessel invasion, late T stage, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced TNM stage and poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that down-regulation of GFAT1 promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasive activities in gastric cancer cells through inducing the expression of TGF-β1. The GFAT1 expression also significantly correlated with EMT-related factors in gastric cancer patients. Together, these findings indicate that GFAT1 functions as a novel suppressor of EMT and tumor metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:27509259

  10. Concurrent Liposomal Cisplatin (Lipoplatin), 5-Fluorouracil and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Liposomal drugs have a better tolerance profile and are highly accumulated in the tumor environment, properties that promise an optimal radiosensitization. We investigated the feasibility of the combination of 5-fluorouracil/lecovorin-based radio-chemotherapy with the administration of high weekly dose of a liposomal platinum formulation (Lipoplatin{sup TM}). Methods and Materials: Lipoplatin was given at a dose of 120mg/m{sup 2}/week, 5-fluorouracil at 400mg/m{sup 2}/week (Day 1), whereas radiotherapy was given through 3.5-Gy fractions on Days 2, 3, and 4. Two groups of 6 patients received four and five consecutive cycles, respectively. Results: Minimal nephrotoxicity (18.2% Grade 1) and neutropenia (9% Grade 3) was noted. Fatigue Grade 2 appeared in 25% of cases. Abdominal discomfort was reported by 18% of patients. No liver, kidney, gastric, or intestinal severe acute or late sequellae were documented, although the median follow-up of 9 months is certainly too low to allow safe conclusions. A net improvement in the performance status (from a median of 1 to 0) was recorded 2 months after the end of therapy. The response rates assessed with computed tomography, endoscopy, and biopsies confirmed 33% (2 of 6) tumor disappearance in patients treated with four cycles, which reached 80% (4 of 5) in patients receiving five cycles. Conclusions: Lipoplatin radio-chemotherapy is feasible, with minor hematological and nonhematological toxicity. The high complete response rates obtained support the testing of Lipoplatin in the adjuvant postoperative or preoperative radio-chemotherapy setting for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  11. TSLP Expression and High Serum TSLP Level Indicate a Poor Prognosis in Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Joji; Saito, Hiroaki; Miyatani, Kozo; Ikeguchi, Masahide; Umekita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays an important role in promoting tumor survival, by manipulating the immune response and angiogenesis. However, the clinical significance of TSLP in gastric cancer is unclear. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate TSLP expression in non-cancerous gastric mucosa and gastric cancer tissue from patients with gastric cancer. Serum TSLP levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Tumors with TSLP expression were significantly larger than those without TSLP expression. TSLP expression was observed more frequently in advanced (T2/T3/T4) than in early (T1) gastric cancer and in stage 3/4 than in stage 1/2. Lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, positive peritoneal lavage cytology, lymphatic invasion, and vascular invasion occurred significantly more often in TSLP-expressing than in non-expressing tumors. The prognosis of patients with TSLP-positive tumors was significantly worse than that of patients with TSLP-negative tumors. Patients with high serum TSLP concentrations also had a significantly worse prognosis than those with low concentrations. Multivariate analysis identified serum TSLP level as an independent prognostic indicator. Conclusion TSLP is closely related to the progression of gastric cancer and may predict survival in these patients. PMID:26538800

  12. GM130 regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of gastric cancer cells via snail

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianquan; Yang, Chun; Guo, Shujun; Wu, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of digestive tract tumor. Despite of recent advances in surgical techniques and development of adjuvant therapy, the underlying mechanisms of gastric cancer remain poorly understood and relevant insight into novel treatment strategies using gene target remains incomplete. Recently, several studies report that epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process for the invasion and metastasis of epithelial tumors; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are unknown. As a cis-Golgi matrix protein, GM130 plays an important role in cell cycle progression and transport of protein in the secretory pathway. In this study, we found that GM130 expression has a positive correlation with the pathological differentiation and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage of gastric cancer. High GM130 expression levels also predict shorter overall survival of gastric cancer patients. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GM130 expression increased epithelial marker (E-cadherin) and decreased mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin and vimentin) expression in gastric cancer cells, suppressing cell invasion, and tumor formation. Furthermore, we found that GM130 upregulated expression of the key EMT regulator Snail (SNAI1), which mediated EMT activation and cell invasion by GM130. Taken together, our study indicates GM130 may be a promising therapeutic biomarker for gastric cancer. PMID:26617790

  13. GM130 regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of gastric cancer cells via snail.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianquan; Yang, Chun; Guo, Shujun; Wu, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of digestive tract tumor. Despite of recent advances in surgical techniques and development of adjuvant therapy, the underlying mechanisms of gastric cancer remain poorly understood and relevant insight into novel treatment strategies using gene target remains incomplete. Recently, several studies report that epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process for the invasion and metastasis of epithelial tumors; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are unknown. As a cis-Golgi matrix protein, GM130 plays an important role in cell cycle progression and transport of protein in the secretory pathway. In this study, we found that GM130 expression has a positive correlation with the pathological differentiation and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage of gastric cancer. High GM130 expression levels also predict shorter overall survival of gastric cancer patients. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GM130 expression increased epithelial marker (E-cadherin) and decreased mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin and vimentin) expression in gastric cancer cells, suppressing cell invasion, and tumor formation. Furthermore, we found that GM130 upregulated expression of the key EMT regulator Snail (SNAI1), which mediated EMT activation and cell invasion by GM130. Taken together, our study indicates GM130 may be a promising therapeutic biomarker for gastric cancer. PMID:26617790

  14. Noncoding RNAs in gastric cancer: Research progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Du, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have attracted much attention in cancer research field. They are involved in cellular development, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The dysregulation of ncRNAs has been reported in tumor initiation, progression, invasion and metastasis in various cancers, including gastric cancer (GC). In the past few years, an accumulating body of evidence has deepened our understanding of ncRNAs, and several emerging ncRNAs have been identified, such as PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and circular RNAs (circRNAs). The competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) networks include mRNAs, microRNAs, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) and circRNAs, which play critical roles in the tumorigenesis of GC. This review summarizes the recent hotspots of ncRNAs involved in GC pathobiology and their potential applications in GC. Finally, we briefly discuss the advances in the ceRNA network in GC. PMID:27547004

  15. [Relation of HER2 status and prognosis in gastric cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Nozomu

    2011-07-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) became one of the most important biomarkers for gastric cancer patients with the results of ToGA trial which proved the benefits of trastuzumab treatment in HER2-positive advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients. Many investigations have been conducted on HER2 as a prognostic factor. Although there have been no universal conclusions, the positive result of HER2 status appears to be poor prognostic factor according to current evidences. All the studies have encountered problems such as small sample size, diversity of patient characteristics,methods of HER2 tests and diagnosis of HER2 status. Furthermore, few studies were conducted in advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients. Biomarker analysis including HER2 status on the patients enrolled in ACTS-GC trial which evaluated S-1 in resectable gastric cancer patients is underway, and we are planning biomarker analysis of HER2 status as a prognostic factor on advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients. These results would clarify the role of HER2 as a prognostic factor.

  16. Lysyl oxidase isoforms in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Añazco, Carolina; Delgado-López, Fernando; Araya, Paulina; González, Ileana; Morales, Erik; Pérez-Castro, Ramón; Romero, Jacqueline; Rojas, Armando

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fifth most frequent cancer in the world and shows the highest incidence in Latin America and Asia. An increasing amount of evidence demonstrates that lysyl oxidase isoforms, a group of extracellular matrix crosslinking enzymes, should be considered as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in GC. In this review, we focus on the expression levels of lysyl oxidase isoforms, its functions and the clinical implications in GC. Finding novel proteins related to the processing of these extracellular matrix enzymes might be helpful in the design of new therapies, which, in combination with classic pharmacology, could be used to delay the progress of this aggressive cancer and offer a wider temporal window for clinical intervention. PMID:27564724

  17. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  18. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gokula Krishnan; Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  19. Contactin 1: A potential therapeutic target and biomarker in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Hu; Yu, Ji-Wei; Jiang, Bo-Jian

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, gastric cancer remains one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide, and early diagnosis remains a challenge. The lack of effective methods to detect these tumors early is a major factor contributing to the high mortality in patients with gastric cancer, who are typically diagnosed at an advanced stage. Additionally, the early detection of metastases and the curative treatment of gastric cancer are difficult to achieve, and the detailed mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Thus, the identification of valuable predictive biomarkers and therapeutic targets to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer is becoming increasingly important. Contactin 1 (CNTN1), a cell adhesion molecule, is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neuronal membrane protein that plays an important role in cancer progression. The expression of CNTN1 is upregulated in primary lesions, and its expression level correlates with tumor metastasis in cancer patients. The current evidence reveals that the functions of CNTN1 in the development and progression of cancer likely promote the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells via the VEGFC/FLT4 axis, the RHOA-dependent pathway, the Notch signaling pathway and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition progression. Therefore, CNTN1 may be a novel biomarker and a possible therapeutic target in cancer treatment in the near future.

  20. Surgical palliation of gastric outlet obstruction in advanced malignancy.

    PubMed

    Potz, Brittany A; Miner, Thomas J

    2016-08-27

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a common problem associated with advanced malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Palliative treatment of patients' symptoms who present with GOO is an important aspect of their care. Surgical palliation of malignancy is defined as a procedure performed with the intention of relieving symptoms caused by an advanced malignancy or improving quality of life. Palliative treatment for GOO includes operative (open and laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy) and non-operative (endoscopic stenting) options. The performance status and medical condition of the patient, the extent of the cancer, the patients prognosis, the availability of a curative procedure, the natural history of symptoms of the disease (primary and secondary), the durability of the procedure, and the quality of life and life expectancy of the patient should always be considered when choosing treatment for any patient with advanced malignancy. Gastrojejunostomy appears to be associated with better long term symptom relief while stenting appears to be associated with lower immediate procedure related morbidity. PMID:27648158

  1. Surgical palliation of gastric outlet obstruction in advanced malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Potz, Brittany A; Miner, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a common problem associated with advanced malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Palliative treatment of patients’ symptoms who present with GOO is an important aspect of their care. Surgical palliation of malignancy is defined as a procedure performed with the intention of relieving symptoms caused by an advanced malignancy or improving quality of life. Palliative treatment for GOO includes operative (open and laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy) and non-operative (endoscopic stenting) options. The performance status and medical condition of the patient, the extent of the cancer, the patients prognosis, the availability of a curative procedure, the natural history of symptoms of the disease (primary and secondary), the durability of the procedure, and the quality of life and life expectancy of the patient should always be considered when choosing treatment for any patient with advanced malignancy. Gastrojejunostomy appears to be associated with better long term symptom relief while stenting appears to be associated with lower immediate procedure related morbidity. PMID:27648158

  2. The endoscopic diagnosis of early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kenshi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate the basic principles for the endoscopic diagnosis of early gastric cancer. The diagnostic process can be divided into two steps, detection and characterization. Detection requires good endoscopic technique, and thorough knowledge. With regard to technique, we should administer the optimum preparation to patients, including an antiperistaltic agent. Furthermore, in order to map the entire stomach we need to follow a standardized protocol, and we propose a systematic screening protocol for the stomach. With regard to knowledge, we should be able to identify high-risk background mucosa, and we should be aware of the indicators of a suspicious lesion. Chromoendoscopy and magnifying endoscopy are promising image-enhanced endoscopic techniques for characterization. The proposed criteria for a cancerous lesion are as follows: conventional endoscopic findings of 1) a well-demarcated lesion and 2) irregularity in color/surface pattern; vessel plus surface classification using magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging findings of 1) irregular microvascular pattern with a demarcation line or 2) irregular microsurface pattern with a demarcation line. Conventional endoscopy and subsequent image-enhanced endoscopy can both contribute to the detection of early gastric cancer. PMID:24714327

  3. Gastric Cancer in the Excluded Stomach 10 Years after Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Augusto; Gottardi, Lorena F.; Boechat, Eduardo D.

    2015-01-01

    According to the Brazilian health authorities, around 2,000 new cases of gastric cancer emerge in Brazil per year (Instituto Nacional de Câncer José Alencar Gomes da Silva, 2014). Indeed, gastric cancer constitutes the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and 95% of such malignancies are adenocarcinomas (De Roover et al., 2006, and Clark et al., 2006). Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a procedure frequently employed in bariatric surgery but restricted access to the excluded stomach means that discovery of gastric lesions is difficult, and diagnosis and treatment may be delayed. We report herein a case of gastric adenocarcinoma in the excluded stomach of a patient submitted to RYGB with the purpose of illustrating the difficulty of diagnosing and treating this rare condition. PMID:26229705

  4. The European Medicines Agency review of Tegafur/Gimeracil/Oteracil (Teysuno™) for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer when given in combination with cisplatin: summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for medicinal products for human use (CHMP).

    PubMed

    Matt, Petra; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Calvo Rojas, Gonzalo; Ter Hofstede, Hadewych; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Camarero, Jorge; Abadie, Eric; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The product Teysuno™ (S-1) contains tegafur, a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and two modulators of 5-FU metabolism, gimeracil and oteracil. The main clinical study in this application was a randomized controlled study comparing S-1 plus cisplatin with 5-FU plus cisplatin. In this study, median overall survival times of 8.6 months and 7.9 months for S-1 plus cisplatin and 5-FU plus cisplatin, respectively, were observed (hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-1.05). The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency concluded that S-1 in combination with cisplatin (75 mg/m²) was noninferior to 5-FU plus cisplatin (100 mg/m²) in patients with advanced gastric cancer and adopted a positive opinion recommending the marketing authorization for this product for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer when given in combination with cisplatin. The recommended dose of S-1 is 25 mg/m² (expressed as tegafur content) twice a day, for 21 consecutive days followed by 7 days rest (one treatment cycle), in combination with 75 mg/m² cisplatin i.v. administered on day 1. This treatment cycle is repeated every 4 weeks. The most common side effects reported in the pivotal study were anemia, neutropenia, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight decrease, anorexia, and fatigue. The objective of this paper is to summarize the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The full scientific assessment report and the summary of product characteristics are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu). PMID:21963999

  5. The European Medicines Agency review of Tegafur/Gimeracil/Oteracil (Teysuno™) for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer when given in combination with cisplatin: summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for medicinal products for human use (CHMP).

    PubMed

    Matt, Petra; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Calvo Rojas, Gonzalo; Ter Hofstede, Hadewych; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Camarero, Jorge; Abadie, Eric; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The product Teysuno™ (S-1) contains tegafur, a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and two modulators of 5-FU metabolism, gimeracil and oteracil. The main clinical study in this application was a randomized controlled study comparing S-1 plus cisplatin with 5-FU plus cisplatin. In this study, median overall survival times of 8.6 months and 7.9 months for S-1 plus cisplatin and 5-FU plus cisplatin, respectively, were observed (hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-1.05). The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency concluded that S-1 in combination with cisplatin (75 mg/m²) was noninferior to 5-FU plus cisplatin (100 mg/m²) in patients with advanced gastric cancer and adopted a positive opinion recommending the marketing authorization for this product for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer when given in combination with cisplatin. The recommended dose of S-1 is 25 mg/m² (expressed as tegafur content) twice a day, for 21 consecutive days followed by 7 days rest (one treatment cycle), in combination with 75 mg/m² cisplatin i.v. administered on day 1. This treatment cycle is repeated every 4 weeks. The most common side effects reported in the pivotal study were anemia, neutropenia, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight decrease, anorexia, and fatigue. The objective of this paper is to summarize the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The full scientific assessment report and the summary of product characteristics are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu).

  6. Biomarkers of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Cara L; Torres, Javier; Solnick, Jay V

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and is predicted to become even more common in developing countries as the population ages. Since gastric cancer develops slowly over years to decades, and typically progresses though a series of well-defined histologic stages, cancer biomarkers have potential to identify asymptomatic individuals in whom surgery might be curative, or even those for whom antibiotics to eradicate H. pylori could prevent neoplastic transformation. Here we describe some of the challenges of biomarker discovery, summarize current approaches to biomarkers of gastric cancer, and explore some recent novel strategies. PMID:23851317

  7. Characteristics of gastric cancer in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rubayat; Asombang, Akwi W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world with more than 70% of cases occur in the developing world. More than 50% of cases occur in Eastern Asia. GC is the second leading cause of cancer death in both sexes worldwide. In Asia, GC is the third most common cancer after breast and lung and is the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Although the incidence and mortality rates are slowly declining in many countries of Asia, GC still remains a significant public health problem. The incidence and mortality varies according to the geographic area in Asia. These variations are closely related to the prevalence of GC risk factors; especially Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its molecular virulent characteristics. The gradual and consistent improvements in socioeconomic conditions in Asia have lowered the H. pylori seroprevalence rates leading to a reduction in the GC incidence. However, GC remains a significant public health and an economic burden in Asia. There has been no recent systemic review of GC incidence, mortality, and H. pylori molecular epidemiology in Asia. The aim of this report is to review the GC incidence, mortality, and linkage to H. pylori in Asia. PMID:24782601

  8. Expression of the Matrix Metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and Tissue Inhibitor 3 as Potential Molecular Markers in Advanced Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background. During progression of gastric cancer (GC), degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs): changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. Objective. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG) and GC. Methods. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (CT) values, as very high (CT ≤ 25), high (CT = 26–30), moderate (CT = 31–35), low (CT = 36–39), or not detected (CT = 40). Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. Results. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. Conclusions. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC. PMID:24669030

  9. The Traditional Chinese Medicine Baicalein Potently Inhibits Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jiasheng; Liu, Tianrun; Jiang, Lin; Wu, Xiangsong; Cao, Yang; Li, Maolan; Dong, Qian; Liu, Yingbin; Xu, Haineng

    2016-01-01

    Baicalein, a traditional Chinese medicine, is a member of the flavone subclass of flavonoids. It has been reported to have anticancer activities in several human cancer cell lines in vitro. However, the therapeutic effects of baicalein on human gastric cancer and the mechanisms of action of baicalein have not been extensively studied. In the present study, we utilized a cell viability assay and an in vivo tumor growth assay to test the inhibitory effects of baicalein on gastric cancer. Analyses of the cell cycle, apoptosis and alterations in protein levels were performed to elucidate how baicalein functions in gastric cancer. We found that baicalein could potently inhibit gastric cancer cell growth and colony formation. Baicalein robustly induced arrest at the S phase in the gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901. It induced SGC-7901 cell apoptosis and disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of protein expression levels in SGC-7901 cells showed downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax in response to baicalein treatment. These results indicate that baicalein induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. In an in vivo subcutaneous xenograft model, baicalein exhibited excellent tumor inhibitory effects. These results indicate that baicalein may be a potential drug for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26918059

  10. The Traditional Chinese Medicine Baicalein Potently Inhibits Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jiasheng; Liu, Tianrun; Jiang, Lin; Wu, Xiangsong; Cao, Yang; Li, Maolan; Dong, Qian; Liu, Yingbin; Xu, Haineng

    2016-01-01

    Baicalein, a traditional Chinese medicine, is a member of the flavone subclass of flavonoids. It has been reported to have anticancer activities in several human cancer cell lines in vitro. However, the therapeutic effects of baicalein on human gastric cancer and the mechanisms of action of baicalein have not been extensively studied. In the present study, we utilized a cell viability assay and an in vivo tumor growth assay to test the inhibitory effects of baicalein on gastric cancer. Analyses of the cell cycle, apoptosis and alterations in protein levels were performed to elucidate how baicalein functions in gastric cancer. We found that baicalein could potently inhibit gastric cancer cell growth and colony formation. Baicalein robustly induced arrest at the S phase in the gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901. It induced SGC-7901 cell apoptosis and disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of protein expression levels in SGC-7901 cells showed downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax in response to baicalein treatment. These results indicate that baicalein induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. In an in vivo subcutaneous xenograft model, baicalein exhibited excellent tumor inhibitory effects. These results indicate that baicalein may be a potential drug for gastric cancer therapy.

  11. Detection of microsatellite instability in gastric cancer and dysplasia tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Liu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Shao-Hua; Sun, Peng; Gong, Fang-Ming; Jia, Bao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between gastric cancer and microsatellite instability (MSI) in the present study. Method: Phenol-chloroform method was employed for DNA extraction from the cancer tissues of 65gastric cancer patients and the dysplasia tissues and normal control tissues of 32 non-gastric cancer patients. The microsatellite loci Bat25, Bat26, D2S123, D5S346 and D17S250 were detected by using PCR-SSCP silver staining technique, and the MSI of the gastric cancer tissues and the precancerous tissues was analyzed. Results: Of 65 gastric cancer cases, MSI was detected in 43 cases, with the detection rate of 66.2%. There were 13 cases showing MSI-H and 30 cases showing MSI-L, accounting for 30.2% and 69.8%, respectively. Among 32 cases of dysplasia tissues, MSI was detected in 10 cases, with the detection rate of 31.3%. Two cases of dysplasia tissues showed MSI-H and 8 cases showed MSI-L, accounting for 20.0% and 80.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Gastric cancer patients had a high detection rate of MSI. It is speculated that MSI is another molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and may serve as a sensitive diagnostic indicator of gastric cancer. PMID:26885089

  12. Gastric hyperplastic polyps coexisting with early gastric cancers, adenoma and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, K; Lewandowska, M; Białek, A; Ławniczak, M; Urasińska, E

    2016-03-01

    Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) constitute up to 93% of all benign epithelial polyps of the stomach. The average probability of malignant transformation in GHP is 0.6-22% in large series. The aim of the study was to present the coexistence of GHP with early gastric cancer (EGC), gastric adenoma (GA), neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NH) and well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (NET G1). Three cases were studied to reveal clinical data and morphological changes and to assess the relationship between GHP and accompanying gastric neoplastic lesions. PMID:27179272

  13. REG4 promotes peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer through GPR37

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Mingde; Zhang, Baogui; Duan, Yantao; Fan, Zhiyuan; Li, Jianfang; Su, Liping; Yan, Min; Zhu, Zhenggang; Liu, Bingya; Yang, Qiumeng

    2016-01-01

    Being the major reason of recurrence and death after surgery, peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer dooms the prognosis of advanced gastric cancer patients. Regenerating islet-derived family, member 4 (REG4) is believed to promote peritoneal metastasis, however, its mechanism is still a moot point at present. In the present study, we show that high expression of REG4 correlates with advanced stage and poor survival prognosis for gastric cancer patients. REG4 overexpression significantly enhances peritoneal metastasis by increasing adhesion ability. Moreover, SP1 is proved to be a transcription factor of REG4 and induce REG4 expression upon TGF-alpha stimulation. Also, G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) is identified to be in the same complex of REG4, which mediates REG4′s signal transduction and promotes peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer cell. Interestingly, we also discover a positive feedback loop triggered by REG4, amplifying itself through EGFR transactivation, consisting of GPR37, ADAM17, TGF-alpha, EGFR, SP1 and REG4. In conclusion, REG4 promotes peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer through GPR37 and triggers a positive feedback loop. PMID:27036049

  14. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  15. The Mechanism in Gastric Cancer Chemoprevention by Allicin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Runlan; Fang, Dengyang; Hang, Hongdong; Tang, Zeyao

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains high prevalence and fatality rates in China even though its morbidity has been decreased drastically. Allicin, which is from an assistance food-garlic (Allium Sativum L), was found to be effective in gastric cancer treatment. It is a defensive substance with a board biological properties: inhibition of bacteria, fungus, virus, controlled hypertension, diabetes, and chemoprevention of several cancers, etc. Experiments have shown that allicin can be chemopreventive to gastric cancer by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells, arresting cell cycle at G2/M phase, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, which includes the caspase-dependent/-independent pathways and death receptor pathway. Those mechanisms probably involve in modulating enzymatic activity, restraining DNA formation, scavenging free radicals, and affecting cell proliferation and even tumor growth. Therefore, this review is focus on the mechanism of allicin in gastric cancer. PMID:26555611

  16. Endoscopic surveillance of gastric cancers after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer remains high in East Asian countries. Current data suggest that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication might be more effective for preventing gastric cancer in young people before they develop atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. However, the long-term effect of H. pylori eradication on metachronous cancer prevention after endoscopic resection (ER) of early gastric cancer remains controversial, with some discordance between results published for Japanese and Korean studies. The detection ability of synchronous lesions before ER and eradication of H. pylori directly influences these results. After eradication, some gastric cancers are more difficult to diagnose by endoscopy because of morphologic changes that lead to a flat or depressed appearance. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) is expected to be useful for identifying metachronous cancers. However, some gastric cancers after eradication show a "gastritis-like" appearance under NBI-ME. The gastritis-like appearance correlates with the histological surface differentiation of the cancer tubules and superficial non-neoplastic epithelium atop or interspersed with the cancer. Till date, it remains unclear whether H. pylori eradication could prevent progression of gastric cancer. Until we can establish more useful endoscopic examination methodologies, regular endoscopic surveillance of high-risk groups is expected to be the most beneficial approach for detection.

  17. Endoscopic surveillance of gastric cancers after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer remains high in East Asian countries. Current data suggest that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication might be more effective for preventing gastric cancer in young people before they develop atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. However, the long-term effect of H. pylori eradication on metachronous cancer prevention after endoscopic resection (ER) of early gastric cancer remains controversial, with some discordance between results published for Japanese and Korean studies. The detection ability of synchronous lesions before ER and eradication of H. pylori directly influences these results. After eradication, some gastric cancers are more difficult to diagnose by endoscopy because of morphologic changes that lead to a flat or depressed appearance. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) is expected to be useful for identifying metachronous cancers. However, some gastric cancers after eradication show a “gastritis-like” appearance under NBI-ME. The gastritis-like appearance correlates with the histological surface differentiation of the cancer tubules and superficial non-neoplastic epithelium atop or interspersed with the cancer. Till date, it remains unclear whether H. pylori eradication could prevent progression of gastric cancer. Until we can establish more useful endoscopic examination methodologies, regular endoscopic surveillance of high-risk groups is expected to be the most beneficial approach for detection. PMID:26457015

  18. Prediction Model for Gastric Cancer Incidence in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sohee; Shin, Aesun; Yang, Hye-Ryung; Park, Junghyun; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Young-Woo; Kim, Jeongseon; Nam, Byung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background Predicting high risk groups for gastric cancer and motivating these groups to receive regular checkups is required for the early detection of gastric cancer. The aim of this study is was to develop a prediction model for gastric cancer incidence based on a large population-based cohort in Korea. Method Based on the National Health Insurance Corporation data, we analyzed 10 major risk factors for gastric cancer. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to develop gender specific prediction models for gastric cancer development, and the performance of the developed model in terms of discrimination and calibration was also validated using an independent cohort. Discrimination ability was evaluated using Harrell’s C-statistics, and the calibration was evaluated using a calibration plot and slope. Results During a median of 11.4 years of follow-up, 19,465 (1.4%) and 5,579 (0.7%) newly developed gastric cancer cases were observed among 1,372,424 men and 804,077 women, respectively. The prediction models included age, BMI, family history, meal regularity, salt preference, alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity for men, and age, BMI, family history, salt preference, alcohol consumption, and smoking for women. This prediction model showed good accuracy and predictability in both the developing and validation cohorts (C-statistics: 0.764 for men, 0.706 for women). Conclusions In this study, a prediction model for gastric cancer incidence was developed that displayed a good performance. PMID:26186332

  19. Pattern-recognition receptors and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with an increased risk of several human malignancies, a classic example being gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Development of GC is known to result from infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, which initially induces acute inflammation and, in a subset of patients, progresses over time to chronic inflammation, gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and finally intestinal-type GC. Germ-line encoded receptors known as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical for generating mature pro-inflammatory cytokines that are crucial for both Th1 and Th2 responses. Given that H. pylori is initially targeted by PRRs, it is conceivable that dysfunction within genes of this arm of the immune system could modulate the host response against H. pylori infection, and subsequently influence the emergence of GC. Current evidence suggests that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) (NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3), a C-type lectin receptor (DC-SIGN), and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA-5), are involved in both the recognition of H. pylori and gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, polymorphisms in genes involved in the TLR (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, and CD14) and NLR (NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, NLRP12, NLRX1, CASP1, ASC, and CARD8) signaling pathways have been shown to modulate the risk of H. pylori infection, gastric precancerous lesions, and/or GC. Further, the modulation of PRRs has been suggested to suppress H. pylori-induced inflammation and enhance GC cell apoptosis, highlighting their potential relevance in GC therapeutics. In this review, we present current advances in our understanding of the role of the TLR and NLR signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of GC, address the involvement of other recently identified PRRs in GC, and discuss the potential implications of PRRs in GC immunotherapy.

  20. Pattern-Recognition Receptors and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Mitchell, Hazel M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with an increased risk of several human malignancies, a classic example being gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Development of GC is known to result from infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, which initially induces acute inflammation and, in a subset of patients, progresses over time to chronic inflammation, gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and finally intestinal-type GC. Germ-line encoded receptors known as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical for generating mature pro-inflammatory cytokines that are crucial for both Th1 and Th2 responses. Given that H. pylori is initially targeted by PRRs, it is conceivable that dysfunction within genes of this arm of the immune system could modulate the host response against H. pylori infection, and subsequently influence the emergence of GC. Current evidence suggests that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) (NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3), a C-type lectin receptor (DC-SIGN), and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA-5), are involved in both the recognition of H. pylori and gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, polymorphisms in genes involved in the TLR (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, and CD14) and NLR (NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, NLRP12, NLRX1, CASP1, ASC, and CARD8) signaling pathways have been shown to modulate the risk of H. pylori infection, gastric precancerous lesions, and/or GC. Further, the modulation of PRRs has been suggested to suppress H. pylori-induced inflammation and enhance GC cell apoptosis, highlighting their potential relevance in GC therapeutics. In this review, we present current advances in our understanding of the role of the TLR and NLR signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of GC, address the involvement of other recently identified PRRs in GC, and discuss the potential implications of PRRs in GC immunotherapy

  1. Implementation of gastric cancer screening - the global experience.

    PubMed

    Leja, Mārcis; You, Weicheng; Camargo, M Constanza; Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is still an important global healthcare problem, and in absolute figures it is going to remain at the present level in foreseeable future. In general, survival of patients with GC is poor mainly due to advanced-stage diagnosis. Early-stage GC can be cured by endoscopic resection or less invasive surgical treatment. Unfortunately, there is no appropriate screening strategy available for global application. This article provides a description of established national and regional GC screening programs and the screening modalities used. This review also summarizes current approaches to develop cancer-screening biomarkers. Although candidates with initial promising results have been suggested, moving discovery into clinical practice is still a major challenge. Well-designed biomarker studies, with systematic validation steps, are needed to decrease the burden of this fatal disease. PMID:25439074

  2. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  3. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  4. GCGene: a gene resource for gastric cancer with literature evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Chen, Luming; Liu, Yining; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fifth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Its lethality primarily stems from a lack of detection strategies for early stages of GC and a lack of noninvasive detection strategies for advanced stages. The development of early diagnostic biomarkers largely depends on understanding the biological pathways and regulatory mechanisms associated with putative GC genes. Unfortunately, the GC-implicated genes that have been identified thus far are scattered among thousands of published studies, and no systematic summary is available, which hinders the development of a large-scale genetic screen. To provide a publically accessible resource tool to meet this need, we constructed a literature-based database GCGene (Gastric Cancer Gene database) with comprehensive annotations supported by a user-friendly website. In the current release, we have collected 1,815 unique human genes including 1,678 protein-coding and 137 non-coding genes curated from extensive examination of 3,142 PubMed abstracts. The resulting database has a convenient web-based interface to facilitate both textual and sequence-based searches. All curated genes in GCGene are downloadable for advanced bioinformatics data mining. Gene prioritization was performed to rank the relative relevance of these genes in GC development. The 100 top-ranked genes are highly mutated according to the cohort of published studies we reviewed. By conducting a network analysis of these top-ranked GC-associated genes in the human interactome, we were able to identify strong links between 8 highly connected genes with low expression and patient survival time. GCGene is freely available to academic users at http://gcgene.bioinfo-minzhao.org/. PMID:27127885

  5. Gastric cancer: diagnosis, risk factors, treatment and life issues.

    PubMed

    Hicks, S

    Gastric cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the UK. It is responsible for over 9000 deaths annually in the UK. Distal gastric cancer has a decreasing incidence, but proximal gastric cancer continues to increase. Gastroscopy remains the gold standards for accurate diagnosis. Early diagnosis is essential, but symptoms and signs are often mistaken for other less serious diseases. Major surgery is the only proven treatment, but 5-year survival rates postoperatively are only 34%, and many people will continue to suffer side-effects of the surgery. Open access gastroscopy and health promotion may be the best chance of detecting this disease early enough so that it is treated successfully.

  6. Abnormal Growth Factor/Cytokine Network in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer cells express a broad spectrum of the growth factor/cytokine receptor systems that organize the complex interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells in tumor microenvironment, which confers cell growth, apoptosis, morphogenesis, angiogenesis, progression and metastasis. However, these abnormal growth factor/cytokine networks differ in the two histological types of gastric cancer. Importantly, activation of nuclear factor-kB pathway by Helicobacter pylori infection may act as a key player for induction of growth factor/cytokine networks in gastritis and pathogenesis of gastric cancer. Better understanding of these events will no doubt provide new approaches for biomarkers of diagnosis and effective therapeutic targeting of gastric cancer. PMID:19308687

  7. Gastric Metastasis of Breast Cancer: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Fernandes, Gustavo; Batista Bugiato Faria, Luiza D.; de Assis Pereira, Isadora; Neves, Natália C. Moreira; Vieira, Yasmine Oliveira; Leal, Alessandro I. Cavalcanti

    2016-01-01

    Gastric metastasis is rare but it can be the initial symptom of cancer. The second leading cause of this type of metastasis is breast cancer. A lack of clinical signs and nonspecific side effects of the treatment of primary tumors can lead to the misdiagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with biopsy and immunohistochemistry should be used for diagnosis. Treatment is palliative; it includes chemo, endocrine, and radiation therapies. Four patients with breast cancer and gastric metastasis were identified. All the patients tested positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors, and received chemotherapy and hormone therapy. One patient underwent surgery and two received radiation therapy. Patients with breast cancer and gastrointestinal symptoms should be investigated for gastric metastasis, given its morbidity and negative impact on quality of life. PMID:27746881

  8. A Possible Link between Gastric Mucosal Atrophy and Gastric Cancer after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of H. pylori eradication in gastric cancer prevention can be attributed to the improvement of atrophic gastritis, which is a known risk of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer has also been diagnosed after long-term H. pylori eradication. This study aimed to clarify the association between gastric atrophy and gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication, including its clinicopathological features. Methods A total of 55 consecutive patients with 64 early gastric cancers (EGCs) diagnosed after H. pylori eradication were enrolled. The degree of endoscopic atrophy and the histological degrees of mononuclear cell infiltration, atrophy, and metaplasia in the corpus and adjacent mucosa of the EGCs were determined and scored. Results The majority of EGCs (63/64) were located within the endoscopically assessed atrophic mucosa or along the atrophic border. The adjacent mucosa of the EGCs presented significantly higher degrees of all histological parameters than in the corpus (mononuclear cell infiltration, 0.86+/-0.09 vs. 0.51+/-0.11, P = 0.016; atrophy, 1.77+/-0.13 vs. 0.65+/-0.14, P<0.0001; metaplasia, 1.68+/-0.13 vs. 0.48+/-0.1, P<0.0001). The degree of endoscopic atrophy improved in the patients with longer post-H. pylori eradication periods; however, this trend was not observed for the histological parameters, and high degrees of atrophy and metaplasia were observed in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs compared with the corpus during all periods (all P<0.05). The histological degrees of atrophy and metaplasia in the adjacent mucosa were particularly higher in the patients who underwent eradication due to gastric ulcers. Conclusions Severe gastric atrophy remained in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs after H. pylori eradication, which may be linked to gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27706195

  9. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of a complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data have indicated that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect the risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness show the sophisticated relationship between H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori's activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Risk of Gastric Cancer in Korea: A Quantitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In the context of the global decrease in mortality due to gastric cancer, previous studies have reported that the effect of chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection on the incidence of gastric cancer varies among regions. This systematic review was conducted to investigate H. pylori as a risk factor for gastric cancer in Korea, where the incidence of gastric cancer is among the highest in the world. Methods: A search strategy was established to identify articles published in Korean as well as in English. Ultimately, we included observational studies conducted among Korean patients that designed with an age-matched and sex-matched control group that reported the odds ratio associated with H. pylori. Gastric cancer cases were subdivided into overall (OGC), cardia (CGC), non-cardia (NGC), early (EGC), advanced, intestinal (IGC), and diffuse forms of gastric cancer. Summary odds ratios (SORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated in the meta-analysis using a random-effect model. Results: Eleven case-control studies were ultimately selected. H. pylori was associated with an SOR of 1.81 (95% CI, 1.29 to 2.54) for OGC. Additionally, statistically significant risks were observed for CGC, NGC, EGC, and IGC. Conclusions: Chronic H. pylori infection was found to raise the risk of gastric cancer among Koreans, with the highest risk observed for CGC and EGC (SOR=2.88 for both). Follow-up clinical epidemiologic studies are needed to assess the effects of current treatments aimed at eradicating H. pylori infections. PMID:27499162

  11. Expression of FoxM1 and the EMT-associated protein E-cadherin in gastric cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Ke-Jian; Wu, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Qiu, Zheng-Jun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) and E-cadherin in tissues of gastric cancer in order to reveal any correlation between FoxM1, E-cadherin and clinicopathological parameters. The association between FoxM1 and E-cadherin in the development and progression of gastric cancer was also investigated. The expression of FoxM1 and E-cadherin in gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissue on tissue microarray was detected using immunohistochemistry. The clinicopathological significance of FoxM1 and E-cadherin in gastric cancer was explored, and the association between FoxM1 and E-cadherin was further examined using statistical techniques. In gastric cancer tissues, the expression of FoxM1 and E-cadherin was strongly positive, but it was weak in normal gastric mucosa. Overexpression of FoxM1 was evident in gastric cancer, and was associated with poor tumor differentiation (P<0.05), advanced tumor state (P<0.05) and lymph node (or distant) metastasis (P<0.05), whereas E-cadherin had the opposite effects. Furthermore, the correlation between FoxM1 and E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer tissue was negative. In conclusion, the high FoxM1 expression and low E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer tissue suggests that these proteins play a critical role in the development and progression of gastric cancer.

  12. Eradication of gastric cancer and more efficient gastric cancer surveillance in Japan: two peas in a pod.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y; Asaka, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We provide a historical review and update on current thinking regarding the possibility of elimination of gastric cancer from Japan. Because Helicobacter pylori infection is the cause gastric cancer, its elimination forms the cornerstone of eradication of gastric cancer. However, simply eradicating H. pylori from the entire population will not immediately solve the problem because many patients with H. pylori infections have already developed the precursor lesion, atrophic gastritis. Cure of H. pylori in these high risk patients will only reduce the risk of subsequent cancer. In contrast, treatment of low risk patients will prevent cancer. Thus, to eliminate gastric cancer it is necessary to identify and treat all infected individuals. In addition, those at increased risk for gastric cancer (i.e., atrophic gastritis irrespective of age) should be considered for endoscopic surveillance to identify those cancers that develop at an early stage. We propose that severity and extent of atrophy be used to separate those expected to benefit from endoscopy and annual surveillance from those with little or no potential benefit. We suggest an algorithm for eradicating gastric cancer that incorporates H. pylori and atrophic gastritis testing, H. pylori therapy, and surveillance to institute a program of surveillance restricted to those who could benefit most (i.e., those with moderate or severe atrophy). This will also allow a much closer matching of surveillance capacity and surveillance need making surveillance more clinically- and cost-effective.

  13. Advances in cancer control

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.N. ); Engstrom, P.F. ); Mortenson, L.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the sixth annual meeting on Advances in Cancer Control. Included are the following articles: Barriers and facilitators to compliance with routine mammographic screening, Preliminary report of an intervention to improve mammography skills of radiologists.

  14. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Composition of Gastric Microbiota in the Development of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lei; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancer types worldwide. In China, gastric cancer has become one of the major threats for public health, ranking second on incidence and third on cause of cancer death. Despite the common risk factors that promote the development of gastric cancer, the huge quantity of microorganism colonies within the gastrointestinal tract, particularly Helicobacter pylori infection, demonstrates a correlation with chronic inflammation and gastric carcinogenesis, as epidemiological studies have determined that H. pylori infection confers approximately 75% of the attributable risk for gastric cancer. Summary The current article draws an overview on the correlation between the microbiota, inflammation and gastric tumorigenesis. H. pylori infection has been identified as the main risk factor as it triggers epithelial barrier disruption, survival signaling as well as genetic/epigenetic modulation. Apart from H. pylori, the existence of a diverse and complex composition of microbiota in the stomach has been identified, which supports a role of microbiota in the development of gastric cancer. Moreover, metagenomics studies focused on the composition and function of the microbiota have associated microbiota with gastric metabolic diseases and even tumorigenesis. Apart from the gastric microbiota, inflammation is another identified contributor to cancer development as well. Key Message Though H. pylori infection and the non-H. pylori microbiota play a role in gastric cancer, the properties of gastric microbiota and mechanisms by which they participate in the genesis of gastric cancer are still not clearly depicted. Moreover, it remains to be understood how the presence of microbiota along with H. pylori infection affects the progress from gastric disease to cancer. Practical Implications This article summarized a clue of the current studies on microbiota, H. pylori infection and the progression from gastric disease to cancer. PMID

  15. Clinicopathological features and surgical safety of gastric cancer in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Lee, Dong Ho; Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Young Soo; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung

    2014-12-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, especially among the elderly. However little is known about gastric cancer in elderly patients. This study was designed to evaluate the specific features of gastric cancer in elderly patients. Medical records of 1,107 patients who had radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer between June 2005 and December 2009 were reviewed. They were divided into young (<65 yr, n=676), young-old (65-74 yr, n=332), and old-old age group (≥75 yr, n=99). Increased CA 19-9 (5.6%, 13.4%, 14.6%, P=0.001), advanced diseases (42.5%, 47.0%, and 57.6, P=0.014), and node metastasis (37.6%, 38.9%, 51.5%, P=0.029) were more common in the young-old and old-old age groups. There were no significant differences in Helicobacter pylori status (63.6%, 56.7%, 61.2%, P=0.324) between the three groups. Surgery-related complication rates were similar in the three groups (5.3%, 5.1%, 8.1%, P=0.497). Microsatellite instability (P<0.001) and p53 overexpression (P<0.001) were more common among the elderly. The elderly group had more synchronous tumors (7.5%, 10.2%, 17.2%; P=0.006). Surgery can be applied to elderly gastric cancer without significant risk of complications. However, considering the more advanced disease and synchronous tumors among the elderly, care should be taken while deciding the extent of surgery for elderly gastric cancer.

  16. Hyperfibrinogenemia is associated with lymphatic as well as hematogenous metastasis and worse clinical outcome in T2 gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroharu; Kitayama, Joji; Kanno, Nobuko; Yatomi, Yutaka; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2006-01-01

    Background Abnormal hemostasis in cancer patients has previously been described, however the correlation between the plasma fibrinogen level and cancer metastasis and prognosis has not been reported in a large-scale clinical study. Methods Preoperative plasma fibrinogen levels were retrospectively examined in 405 patients who underwent surgery for advanced gastric cancer. The association of fibrinogen levels with clinical/pathological findings and clinical outcome was evaluated. Results There was a positive correlation between plasma fibrinogen levels and the depth of invasion (p < 0.05). Hyperfibrinogenemia (>310 mg/dl) was independently associated with lymph node (Odds Ratio; 2.342, P = 0.0032) and liver (Odds Ratio; 2.933, P = 0.0147) metastasis, not with peritoneal metastasis in this series. Patients with hyperfibrinogenemia showed worse clinical outcome in T2 gastric cancer, however, there was no correlation of plasma fibrinogen level with prognosis in T3/T4 gastric cancer. Conclusion Our results might support the idea that hyperfibrinogenemia can augment lymphatic and hematogeneous metastasis of advanced gastric cancer, which is major determinant of the prognosis in T2 gastric cancer. Therefore, in the situation without peritoneal involvement, hyperfibrinogenemia is a useful biomarker to predict the possible metastasis and worse clinical outcome in T2 gastric cancer. PMID:16740157

  17. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Ramakrishnan Ayloor; Glehen, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer associated peritoneal carcinomatosis (GCPC) has a poor prognosis with a median survival of less than one year. Systemic chemotherapy including targeted agents has not been found to significantly increase the survival in GCPC. Since recurrent gastric cancer remains confined to the abdominal cavity in many patients, regional therapies like aggressive cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) have been investigated for GCPC. HIPEC has been used for three indications in GC- as an adjuvant therapy after a curative surgery, HIPEC has been shown to improve survival and reduce peritoneal recurrences in many randomised trials in Asian countries; as a definitive treatment in established PC, HIPEC along with CRS is the only therapeutic modality that has resulted in long-term survival in select groups of patients; as a palliative treatment in advanced PC with intractable ascites, HIPEC has been shown to control ascites and reduce the need for frequent paracentesis. While the results of randomised trials of adjuvant HIPEC from western centres are awaited, the role of HIPEC in the treatment of GCPC is still evolving and needs larger studies before it is accepted as a standard of care. PMID:26811651

  18. [Current status of robotic surgery for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Suda, Koichi; Ishida, Yoshinori; Uyama, Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    Robotic surgery was launched in Japan in 2000.In particular, the development of the da Vinci S Surgical System was a major breakthrough. It was introduced in Japan for the first time through our hospital in January 2009. Since then, the number of surgical robots used has been dramatically increasing, with up to approximately 160 robots all over the country. To date, we have performed more than 500 robotic surgeries, including 180 gastrectomies, at our hospital. Our data suggest that compared with the conventional laparoscopic approach, the use of the da Vinci Surgical System in minimally invasive gastrectomy for gastric cancer might improve short-term outcomes, particularly in terms of preventing postoperative local complications. Thus, we believe that use of surgical robots become increasingly beneficial for more extensive resections and operations that require more advanced skills, even though a couple of issues remain to be solved, such as long operative time, high cost, and limited experience and evidence. In this article, the current status and future perspectives regarding robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer are presented based on our experience and a review of the literature. PMID:25434438

  19. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D’Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando CM; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  20. Establishment and identification of a rabbit model of peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis is a common clinical problem, but there are no suitable large animal models to study this problem. This study was to establish a stable rabbit peritoneal carcinomatosis model of gastric cancer using VX2 tumor, and analyze the clinico-pathological features. Methods VX2 tumor was implanted into 36 New Zealand rabbits by 3 methods: laparotomic orthotopic injection of cancer cells into the submucosal layer of the stomach (Group A), laparotomic implantation of tumor tissue into the greater omentum immediately beneath the gastric antrum (Group B), and percutaneous injection of tumor cells directly into the peritoneal cavity (Group C), 12 rabbits in each group. The animals were closely observed and detailed clinico-pathological studies were conducted. Results The success rates of peritoneal carcinomatosis formation were 100% (12/12), 91.7% (11/12) and 58.3% (7/12), respectively, for Groups A, B and C (P = 0.019, A versus C; P = 0.077, B versus C; P = 0.500, A versus B, Fisher's exact test). Two weeks after submucosal cancer cells injection in Group A, ulcerative gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis showed typical VX2 tumor pathology, with widespread intraperitoneal metastatic nodules, bloody ascites and perspicuous pulmonary metastases. The clinico-pathological progression pattern was very similar to patients of advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Groups B and C showed similar pattern of cancer progression, but less aggressive. Conclusions First large animal model of peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastric cancer has been established by laparotomic orthotopic injection of VX2 cancer cells into the submucosal layer of the stomach, providing a more suitable model for surgical interventional studies. The clinico-pathological features of this model resemble human peritoneal carcinomatosis. PMID:20359350

  1. Cytogenetic studies in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Abarbanel, J; Shabtai, F; Kyzer, S; Chaimof, C

    1991-01-01

    Banded cytogenetic studies of gastric carcinoma are still relatively scarce, comprised of only a small number of patients. This study was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes and malignant cells of 16 patients with gastric carcinoma. The lymphocytes were analyzed by standard techniques. All patients had a normal constitutional karyotype; 90% of the patients presented an increased breakage rate and nonrandom chromosomal instability mainly in the heterochromatic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16. Decreased response to phytohemagglutinin was observed in 6 (38%) patients. The tissue specimens were analyzed using direct techniques. Normal ploidy was observed in only one patient, 3 tumors were near-diploid, 4 hyperdiploid, 4 near-triploid, and 4 near-tetraploid. Those with the near-triploid or near-tetraploid constitution were in a more advanced pathological stage, most of them with a more complex cytogenetic profile. Particular involvement was found for chromosomes 1 to 4, 7 to 9, 17, and 20, but the more specific nonrandom changes seemed to involve chromosomes 7, 8, 9, and 17. PMID:1767545

  2. MicroRNAs as potential biomarkers for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han-Shao; Xiao, Hua-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. More than 80% of diagnoses occur at the middle to late stage of the disease, highlighting an urgent need for novel biomarkers detectable at earlier stages. Recently, aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) have received a great deal of attention as potential sensitive and accurate biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. This review summarizes the current knowledge about potential miRNA biomarkers for gastric cancer that have been reported in the publicly available literature between 2008 and 2013. Available evidence indicates that aberrantly expressed miRNAs in gastric cancer correlate with tumorigenesis, tumor proliferation, distant metastasis and invasion. Furthermore, tissue and cancer types can be classified using miRNA expression profiles and next-generation sequencing. As miRNAs in plasma/serum are well protected from RNases, they remain stable under harsh conditions. Thus, potential functions of these circulating miRNAs can be deduced and may implicate their diagnostic value in cancer detection. Circulating miRNAs, as well as tissue miRNAs, may allow for the detection of gastric cancer at an early stage, prediction of prognosis, and monitoring of recurrence and/or lymph node metastasis. Taken together, the data suggest that the participation of miRNAs in biomarker development will enhance the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic and prognostic tests for gastric cancer. PMID:25232237

  3. Phlegmonous Gastritis with Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Kim, Young-Woo; Moon, Hae; Choi, Jee Eun; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong Yeul; Choi, Il Ju

    2016-01-01

    Phlegmonous gastritis is a rare and rapidly progressive bacterial infection of the stomach wall, with a high mortality rate. Antibiotics with or without surgical treatment are required for treatment. We present a case in which phlegmonous gastritis occurred during the diagnostic evaluation of early gastric cancer. The patient showed improvement after antibiotic treatment, but attempted endoscopic submucosal dissection failed because of submucosal pus. We immediately applied argon plasma coagulation since surgical resection was also considered a high-risk procedure because of the submucosal pus and multiple comorbidities. However, there was local recurrence two years later, and the patient underwent subtotal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Considering the risk of incomplete treatment immediately after recovery from phlegmonous gastritis and that recurrent disease can be more difficult to manage, delaying treatment and evaluation until after complete recovery of PG might be a better option in this particular clinical situation. PMID:27752398

  4. Lentiviral-mediated RNA interference targeting stathmin1 gene in human gastric cancer cells inhibits proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is highly aggressive disease. Despite advances in diagnosis and therapy, the prognosis is still poor. Various genetic and molecular alterations are found in gastric cancer that underlies the malignant transformation of gastric mucosa during the multistep process of gastric cancer pathogenesis. The detailed mechanism of the gastric cancer development remains uncertain. In present study we investigated the potential role of stathmin1 gene in gastric cancer tumorigenesis and examined the usefulness of RNA interference (RNAi) targeting stathmin1 as a form of gastric cancer treatment. Methods A lentiviral vector encoding a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeted against stathmin1 was constructed and transfected into the packaging cells HEK 293 T and the viral supernatant was collected to transfect MKN-45 cells. The transwell chemotaxis assay and the CCK-8 assay were used to measure migration and proliferation of tumor cells, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting were used to detect the expression levels of stathmin1. Results Lentivirus mediated RNAi effectively reduced stathmin1 expression in gastric cells. Significant decreases in stathmin1 mRNA and protein expression were detected in gastric cells carrying lentiviral stathmin-shRNA vector and also significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration in gastric cancer cells and tumorigenicity in Xenograft Animal Models. Conclusions Our findings suggest that stathmin1 overexpression is common in gastric cancer and may play a role in its pathogenesis. Lentivirus mediated RNAi effectively reduced stathmin1 expression in gastric cells. In summary, shRNA targeting of stathmin1 can effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell growth in vivo and may be a potential therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. PMID:24040910

  5. Perforation of gastric cancer - what should the surgeon do?

    PubMed Central

    Ignjatovic, Nebojsa; Stojanov, Dragan; Djordjevic, Miodrag; Ignjatovic, Jelena; Stojanov, Daniela Benedeto; Milojkovic, Bobana

    2016-01-01

    Perforation represents a rare and severe complication of gastric cancer (GC) with a large hospital mortality (8-82%). The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical-pathological features in patients with perforated gastric cancer (PGC) and to advise the surgical treatment options. A total of 11 patients with PGC were retrospectively reviewed among 376 consecutive cases of GC operated. The clinical-pathological features including tumor stage, survival, and the type of treatment were observed. The perforation was more frequent in stage III (8 patients) and in stage IV (3 patients), but none of the cases in stage I and II GC were observed. All the patients had serosal invasion and lymph node metastasis. Limited lymphadenectomy (D0, D1) was performed in 5 patients, and extended lymphadenectomy (D2, D3) in 3 patients. Emergency gastrectomy was performed in 8 (72.8%) patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 5 (45.5%), and total gastrectomy in 3 (27.2%) cases. Three (27.2%) patients were treated by simple closure with omental patch. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 46%. The survival rate was higher among the patients who underwent curative resection (75.77±68.88 days) than in those who underwent simple closure with omental patch (18.00±24.43 days). The difference between the treatments in these groups was significant (p < 0.05). PGC required surgical emergency. Curative resection improved long-term survival in the patients with potentially curable gastric malignancy. Unsuccessful outcomes after PGC could be attributed to the poor condition of the patients and the advanced disease stage.

  6. HER2 diagnostics in gastric cancer-guideline validation and development of standardized immunohistochemical testing.

    PubMed

    Rüschoff, Josef; Dietel, Manfred; Baretton, Gustavo; Arbogast, Susanne; Walch, Axel; Monges, Geneviéve; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Nagelmeier, Iris; Schlake, Werner; Höfler, H; Kreipe, H H

    2010-09-01

    Trastuzumab-based therapy has been shown to confer overall survival benefit in HER2-positive patients with advanced gastric cancer in a large multicentric trial (ToGA study). Subgroup analysis identified adenocarcinomas of the stomach and gastroesophageal (GE) junction with overexpression of HER2 according to immunohistochemistry (IHC) as potential responders. Due to recent approval of trastuzumab for HER2 positive metastatic gastric and GE-junction cancer in Europe (EMEA) HER2 diagnostics is now mandatory with IHC being the primary test followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in IHC2+ cases. However, in order to not miss patients potentially responding to targeted therapy determination of a HER2-positive status for gastric cancer required modification of scoring as had been proposed in a pre-ToGA study. To validate this new HER2 status testing procedure in terms of inter-laboratory and inter-observer consensus for IHC scoring a series of 547 gastric cancer tissue samples on a tissue microarray (TMA) was used. In the first step, 30 representative cores were used to identify specific IHC HER2 scoring issues among eight French and German laboratories, while in the second step the full set of 547 cores was used to determine IHC HER2 intensity and area score concordance between six German pathologists. Specific issues relating to discordance were identified and recommendations formulated which proved to be effective to reliably determine HER2 status in a prospective test series of 447 diagnostic gastric cancer specimens.

  7. Ramucirumab for metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer: results and implications of the REGARD trial.

    PubMed

    Liguigli, Wanda; Tomasello, Gianluca; Toppo, Laura; Ratti, Margherita; Passalacqua, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a highly aggressive disease. In metastatic setting, median overall survival, even with modern chemotherapy regimens, generally does not exceed 1 year and toxicity is a major concern. Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in cancer development and progression, and VEGF is one of the most important mediators of this process. Ramucirumab, an anti-VEGFR-2 antibody, has been recently evaluated in the large Phase III REGARD trial, demonstrating a significant survival benefit in second-line treatment of patients with advanced gastric or gastro-eosophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Unlike traditional chemotherapy, treatment with ramucirumab was associated with very few toxic effects. This article will review the main findings of the REGARD trial and discuss their potential impact on future treatment of metastatic gastric cancer.

  8. [Clinical aspect of new international gastric cancer staging system].

    PubMed

    Liang, Han

    2013-02-01

    The 7th UICC/AJCC Gastric Cancer TNM Staging System includes major revisions of pT and pN classification. The Japanese Classification and UICC/AJCC TNM System have reached consistency in staging of gastric cancer. There are some new topics of lymphadenectomy in the new guidelines. The new TNM system accepts the database from Japan and Korea and it will be more accurate to predict the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. The rationality of splenectomy, total bursectomy, dissection of No.13 and No.14 lymph nodes is still not very clear and needs more evidences. D2 lymphadenectomy is the recommended surgical approach both in Eastern and Western countries. The benefit of paraaortic lymphadenectmoy for selected patients needs further evidences as well. The international gastric cancer staging project will collect the data from 23 countries and the new staging system will be applicable worldwide. PMID:23446465

  9. [Prevention of gastric cancer by Helicobacter pylori eradication].

    PubMed

    Asaka, Masahiro

    2009-08-01

    Though the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric cancer has been proved in epidemiological studies and animal experiments, the prophylactic effect of H. pylori eradication is controversial in human studies. A large-scale clinical study performed by the JAPANGAST Study Group has confirmed that the eradication of H. pylori undoubtedly decreases the incidence of metachronous gastric cancer after endoscopic mucosal resection as published in The Lancet (372: 392-397, 2008). This study shows gastric cancer is a kind of infectious disease, not a lifestyle-related disease, and can thus be averted by preventing or curing the infection, suggesting the eradication of H. pylori might be indicated to prevent development of gastric cancers. PMID:19692758

  10. MYC Deregulation in Gastric Cancer and Its Clinicopathological Implications

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Carolina Rosal Teixeira; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Costa Sozinho, Eliana Kelly; Borges, Bárbara do Nascimento; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; dos Santos, Ândrea Kely Campos Ribeiro; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista; Ribeiro, Helem Ferreira; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigated the relationship between MYC alterations and clinicopathological features in gastric cancers. We evaluated the effect of MYC mRNA expression and its protein immunoreactivity, as well as copy number variation, promoter DNA methylation, and point mutations, in 125 gastric adenocarcinoma and 67 paried non-neoplastic tissues. We observed that 77% of the tumors presented MYC immunoreactivity which was significantly associated with increased mRNA expression (p<0.05). These observations were associated with deeper tumor extension and the presence of metastasis (p<0.05). MYC protein expression was also more frequently observed in intestinal-type than in diffuse-type tumors (p<0.001). Additionally, MYC mRNA and protein expression were significantly associated with its copy number (p<0.05). The gain of MYC copies was associated with late-onset, intestinal-type, advanced tumor stage, and the presence of distant metastasis (p<0.05). A hypomethylated MYC promoter was detected in 86.4% of tumor samples. MYC hypomethylation was associated with diffuse-type, advanced tumor stage, deeper tumor extension, and the presence of lymph node metastasis (p<0.05). Moreover, eighteen tumor samples presented at least one known mutation. The presence of MYC mutations was associated with diffuse-type tumor (p<0.001). Our results showed that MYC deregulation was mainly associated with poor prognostic features and also reinforced the presence of different pathways involved in intestinal-type and diffuse-type gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, our findings suggest that MYC may be a useful marker for clinical stratification and prognosis. PMID:23717612

  11. Korean Gastric Cancer Association Nationwide Survey on Gastric Cancer in 2014

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Korean Gastric Cancer Association (KGCA) has conducted nationwide surveys every 5 years, targeting patients who received surgical treatment for gastric cancer. We report the results of the 2014 nationwide survey and compare them to those of the 1995, 1999, 2004, and 2009 surveys. Materials and Methods From March 2015 to January 2016, a standardized case report form was sent to every member of the KGCA via e-mail. The survey consisted of 29 questions, regarding patient demographics as well as tumor-, and surgery-related factors. The completed data forms were analyzed by the KGCA information committee. Results Data on 15,613 patients were collected from 69 institutions. The mean age was 60.9±12.1 years, and the proportion of patients more than 70 years of age increased from 9.1% in 1995 to 25.3% in 2014. Proximal cancer incidence steadily increased from 11.2% in 1995 to 16.0% in 2014. Early gastric cancer incidence consistently increased and accounted for 61.0% of all cases in 2014. The surgical approach was diversified in 2014, and 7,818 cases (50.1%) were treated with a minimally invasive approach. The most common anastomosis was Billroth I (50.2%) after distal gastrectomy, and the proportion of Roux-en-Y anastomoses performed increased to 8.6%. Conclusions The results of this survey are expected to be important data for future studies and to be useful for generating a national cancer control program. PMID:27752390

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor as a potential prognostic factor in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Long-Jun; Xie, Dan; Hu, Pin-Jin; Liao, Yi-Ji; Deng, Hai-Xia; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Zhu, Sen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) expression and its clinical relevance in gastric cancer, and effects of MIF knockdown on proliferation of gastric cancer cells. METHODS: Tissue microarray containing 117 samples of gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancer normal tissues was studied for MIF expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) semiquantitatively, and the association of MIF expression with clinical parameters was analyzed. MIF expression in gastric cancer cell lines was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Two pairs of siRNA targeting the MIF gene (MIF si-1 and MIF si-2) and one pair of scrambled siRNA as a negative control (NC) were designed and chemically synthesized. All siRNAs were transiently transfected in AGS cells with OligofectamineTM to knock down the MIF expression, with the NC group and mock group (OligofectamineTM alone) as controls. At 24, 48, and 72 h after transfection, MIF mRNA was analyzed by RT-PCR, and MIF and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins were detected by Western blot. The proliferative rate of AGS cells was assessed by methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and colony forming assay. RESULTS: The tissue microarray was informative for IHC staining, in which the MIF expression in gastric cancer tissues was higher than that in adjacent non-cancer normal tissues (P < 0.001), and high level of MIF was related to poor tumor differentiation, advanced T stage, advanced tumor stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor patient survival (P < 0.05 for all). After siRNA transfection, MIF mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, and MIF protein and PCNA were assessed by Western blot analysis. We found that compared to the NC group and mock group, MIF expression was knocked down successfully in gastric cancer cells, and PCNA expression was downregulated with MIF knockdown as well. The cell counts and the doubling times were assayed by MTT 4 d after transfection, and

  13. The Prognostic Role of the Platelet-Lymphocytes Ratio in Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhengshui; Xu, Wei; Cheng, Hua; Shen, Wei; Ying, Jiaqi; Cheng, Fei; Xu, Wenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammatory parameters, such as the elevator PLR (platelet-lymphocyte ratio), the NLR (neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio) and the platelet count (PLT), have been found to be associated with the prognosis in gastric cancer; however, these results, especially those relating to the PLR, remain inconsistent. So we aimed to evaluate the prognostic role of the PLR in gastric cancer by conducting and presenting the findings of this meta-analysis. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library to evaluate the prognostic value of the PLR in gastric cancer. The quality of the included studies was evaluated using the Newcastle Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS). The hazard ratio (HR) /Odds Ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence were pooled using a random effects model. A funnel plot based on overall survival was used to evaluate the publication bias. Results It total, 8 studies comprising 4513 patients with gastric cancer met the pre-setting inclusion criteria. In comparison to the normal PLR, an elevated PLR was correlated with a higher risk of lymph node metastasis with an OR of 1.50 (95% Cl:1.24–1.82; I2 = 17%) and serosal invasion (T3 +T4) risk with an OR of 2.01 (95% Cl: 1.49–2.73; I2 = 55%), and an elevated PLR also increased the advanced stage (III +IV) risk with an OR of 1.99 (95% Cl: 1.60–2.46; I2 = 28%). An elevated PLR was not a reliable predictor for OS with an HR of 0.99 (95% CI: 0.9–1.1; I2 = 12%). Conclusions An elevated PLR was correlated with a higher risk of lymph node metastasis, serosal invasion and advanced stage (III +IV) risk in gastric cancer; however, the PLR may not act as a negative predictor for the overall survival of gastric cancer. PMID:27684077

  14. Recent insights in the therapeutic management of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    de Mestier, Louis; Lardière-Deguelte, Sophie; Volet, Julien; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bouché, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains frequent and one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. In this article, we aimed to comprehensively review recent insights in the therapeutic management of gastric cancer, with focus on the surgical and perioperative management of resectable forms, and the latest advances regarding advanced diseases. Surgical improvements comprise the use of laparoscopic surgery including staging laparoscopy, a better definition of nodal dissection, and the development of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The best individualized perioperative management should be assessed before curative-intent surgery for all patients and can consists in perioperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy or adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The optimal timing and sequence of chemotherapy and radiation therapy with respect to surgery should be further explored. Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, they can benefit from doublet or triplet chemotherapy combination, including trastuzumab in HER2-positive patients. Upon progression, second-line therapy can be considered in patients with good performance status. Although anti-HER2 (trastuzumab) and anti-VEGFR (ramucirumab) may yield survival benefit, anti-EGFR and anti-HGFR therapies have failed to improve outcomes. Nevertheless, combination regimens containing cytotoxic drugs and targeted therapies should be further evaluated; keeping in mind that gastric cancer biology is different between Asia and the Western countries.

  15. Recent insights in the therapeutic management of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    de Mestier, Louis; Lardière-Deguelte, Sophie; Volet, Julien; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bouché, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains frequent and one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. In this article, we aimed to comprehensively review recent insights in the therapeutic management of gastric cancer, with focus on the surgical and perioperative management of resectable forms, and the latest advances regarding advanced diseases. Surgical improvements comprise the use of laparoscopic surgery including staging laparoscopy, a better definition of nodal dissection, and the development of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The best individualized perioperative management should be assessed before curative-intent surgery for all patients and can consists in perioperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy or adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The optimal timing and sequence of chemotherapy and radiation therapy with respect to surgery should be further explored. Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, they can benefit from doublet or triplet chemotherapy combination, including trastuzumab in HER2-positive patients. Upon progression, second-line therapy can be considered in patients with good performance status. Although anti-HER2 (trastuzumab) and anti-VEGFR (ramucirumab) may yield survival benefit, anti-EGFR and anti-HGFR therapies have failed to improve outcomes. Nevertheless, combination regimens containing cytotoxic drugs and targeted therapies should be further evaluated; keeping in mind that gastric cancer biology is different between Asia and the Western countries. PMID:27156069

  16. Emerging role of S-1 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Krasniqi, Eriseld; Pellicori, Stefania; Formica, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most important malignancies worldwide in terms of incidence and mortality. The treatment is based on the combination of local surgery and radiation therapy as well as systemic chemotherapy and targeted molecules. Fluoropyrimidines and particularly 5-fluorouracil (FU) represent still the backbone for gastric cancer chemotherapy and new molecular versions of this molecule have been brought to clinical practice in order to improve benefits and reduce adverse effects. S-1 is an oral prodrug of 5-FU, which has demonstrated high effectiveness for gastric cancer treatment and a favorable safety profile. Currently, there are geographic differences in the treatment of gastric cancer and in the use of S-1, which is a mainstay of gastric cancer management in Eastern countries, but is not part of the standard care in the rest of the world. In this review, we gathered data from phase I, II, and III trials of S-1 in gastric cancer, in order to define its real benefit-risk ratio and assess whether geographic differences in S-1 use are justified by unchangeable factors.

  17. Prevention Strategies for Gastric Cancer: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Young; von Karsa, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Despite the substantial burden of gastric cancer worldwide, population strategies for primary prevention have not been introduced in any country. Recognizing the causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection, there is increasing interest in population-based programs to eradicate the infection to prevent gastric cancer. Nonetheless, the paucity of available evidence on feasibility and effectiveness has prevented implementation of this approach. There are very few secondary prevention programs based on screening with endoscopy or radiography, notably in the Republic of Korea and Japan, two of the countries with the highest incidence rates of gastric cancer. In Korea, where the organized screening program is in place, survival rate of gastric cancer is as high as 67%. More research is needed to quantify the specific contribution of the screening program to observed declines in mortality rates. Gastric cancer screening is unlikely to be feasible in many Low-Middle Income Countries where the gastric cancer burden is high. Prevention strategies are still under development and the optimal approach may differ depending on local conditions and societal values. The present review gives an overview of the etiology and burden of the disease, and possible prevention strategies for countries and regions confronted with a significant burden of disease. PMID:25505712

  18. Photodynamic therapy using nanoparticle loaded with indocyanine green for experimental peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Hironori; Morimoto, Yuji; Takahata, Risa; Nomura, Shinsuke; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Horiguchi, Hiroyuki; Hiraki, Shuichi; Ono, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Saito, Daizo; Hara, Isao; Ozeki, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Junji; Hase, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    Although there have been multiple advances in the development of novel anticancer agents and operative procedures, prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor, especially in patients with peritoneal metastasis. In this study, we established nanoparticles loaded with indocyanine green (ICG) derivatives: ICG loaded lactosomes (ICGm) and investigated the diagnostic and therapeutic value of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using ICGm for experimental peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer. Experimental peritoneal disseminated xenografts of human gastric cancer were established in nude mice. Three weeks after intraperitoneal injection of the cancer cells, either ICGm (ICGm-treated mice) or ICG solution (ICG-treated mice) was injected through the tail vein. Forty-eight hours after injection of the photosensitizer, in vivo and ex vivo imaging was carried out. For PDT, 48 h after injection of the photosensitizer, other mice were irradiated through the abdominal wall, and the body weight and survival rate were monitored. In vivo imaging revealed that peritoneal tumors were visualized through the abdominal wall in ICGm-treated mice, whereas only non-specific fluorescence was observed in ICG-treated mice. The PDT reduced the total weight of the disseminated nodules and significantly improved weight loss and survival rate in ICGm-treated mice. In conclusion, ICGm can be used as a novel diagnostic and therapeutic nanodevice in peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer.

  19. Perforated early gastric cancer: uncommon and easily missed a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Lim, Raymond Hon Giat; Tay, Clifton Ming; Wong, Benjamin; Chong, Choon Seng; Kono, Koji; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Shabbir, Asim

    2013-03-01

    Gastric carcinoma rarely presents as a perforation, but when it does, is perceived as advanced disease. The majority of such perforations are Stage III/IV disease. A T1 gastric carcinoma has never been reported to perforate spontaneously in English literature. We present a 56 year-old Chinese male who presented with a perforated gastric ulcer. Intra-operatively, there was no suspicion of malignancy. At operation, an open omental patch repair was performed. Post-operative endoscopy revealed a macroscopic Type 0~III tumour and from the ulcer edge biopsy was reported as adenocarcinoma. Subsequently, the patient underwent open subtotal gastrectomy and formal D2 lymphadenectomy. The final histopathology report confirms T1b N0 disease. The occurrence of a perforated early gastric cancer re-emphasises the need for vigilance, including intra-operative frozen section and/or biopsy, as well as routine post-operative endoscopy for all patients.

  20. Benefits and harms of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2016-07-28

    Gastric cancer has remained a serious burden worldwide, particularly in East Asian countries. However, nationwide prevention and screening programs for gastric cancer have not yet been established in most countries except in South Korea and Japan. Although evidence regarding the effectiveness of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has been increasingly accumulated, such evidence remains weak because it is based on results from studies other than randomized controlled trials. Specifically, evidence was mostly based on the results of cohort and case-control studies mainly conducted in South Korea and Japan. However, the consistent positive results from these studies suggest promising evidence of mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening. The major harms of endoscopic screening include infection, adverse effects, false-positive results, and overdiagnosis. Despite the possible harms of endoscopic screening, information regarding these harms remains insufficient. To provide appropriate cancer screening, a balance of benefits and harms should always be considered when cancer screening is introduced as a public policy. Quality assurance is very important for the implementation of cancer screening to provide high-quality and safe screening and minimize harms. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has shown promising results, and thus deserves further evaluation to reliably establish its effectiveness and optimal use. PMID:27605874

  1. Benefits and harms of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer has remained a serious burden worldwide, particularly in East Asian countries. However, nationwide prevention and screening programs for gastric cancer have not yet been established in most countries except in South Korea and Japan. Although evidence regarding the effectiveness of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has been increasingly accumulated, such evidence remains weak because it is based on results from studies other than randomized controlled trials. Specifically, evidence was mostly based on the results of cohort and case-control studies mainly conducted in South Korea and Japan. However, the consistent positive results from these studies suggest promising evidence of mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening. The major harms of endoscopic screening include infection, adverse effects, false-positive results, and overdiagnosis. Despite the possible harms of endoscopic screening, information regarding these harms remains insufficient. To provide appropriate cancer screening, a balance of benefits and harms should always be considered when cancer screening is introduced as a public policy. Quality assurance is very important for the implementation of cancer screening to provide high-quality and safe screening and minimize harms. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has shown promising results, and thus deserves further evaluation to reliably establish its effectiveness and optimal use.

  2. Benefits and harms of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer has remained a serious burden worldwide, particularly in East Asian countries. However, nationwide prevention and screening programs for gastric cancer have not yet been established in most countries except in South Korea and Japan. Although evidence regarding the effectiveness of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has been increasingly accumulated, such evidence remains weak because it is based on results from studies other than randomized controlled trials. Specifically, evidence was mostly based on the results of cohort and case-control studies mainly conducted in South Korea and Japan. However, the consistent positive results from these studies suggest promising evidence of mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening. The major harms of endoscopic screening include infection, adverse effects, false-positive results, and overdiagnosis. Despite the possible harms of endoscopic screening, information regarding these harms remains insufficient. To provide appropriate cancer screening, a balance of benefits and harms should always be considered when cancer screening is introduced as a public policy. Quality assurance is very important for the implementation of cancer screening to provide high-quality and safe screening and minimize harms. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has shown promising results, and thus deserves further evaluation to reliably establish its effectiveness and optimal use. PMID:27605874

  3. Expression of early growth response gene-1 in precancerous lesions of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Su-Mi; Chung, Jin Ook; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Jung, Young-Do; Lee, Yong Han

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between the expression of early growth response gene-1 (EGR-1) and the progression of gastric cancers at advanced stages. However, the effects of EGR-1 expression on human gastric cancer progression, particularly on precancerous lesions, have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluate EGR-1 expression levels in target mucosa from patients with early gastric cancer and precancerous lesions, and assess whether EGR-1 expression affects the oncogenic phenotypes of human gastric cancer cells. EGR-1 protein levels were measured in tissues from subjects with normal mucosa (n=6), low-grade dysplasia (n=6), high-grade dysplasia (n=4) and adenocarcinoma (n=3) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry analyses. We also investigated the role of EGR-1 in tumor cell behavior by transiently expressing a dominant active EGR-1 variant in cultured cells. A positive correlation was observed between EGR-1 expression and gastric carcinogenesis (P=0.016). Furthermore, there was an increase in nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of EGR-1 in accordance with the histological grade (P for trends=0.003 and 0.003, respectively), and a positive association between the sum of the nuclear and cytoplasmic EGR-1 expression values and the histological grade (P=0.003). In addition, transient overexpression of EGR-1 enhanced cell proliferation, stimulated cell migration, and promoted the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and AKT in gastric cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate that EGR-1 may contribute to the early stages of gastric carcinogenesis via the alteration of tumor cell behaviors. PMID:27698846

  4. Expression of early growth response gene-1 in precancerous lesions of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Su-Mi; Chung, Jin Ook; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Jung, Young-Do; Lee, Yong Han

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between the expression of early growth response gene-1 (EGR-1) and the progression of gastric cancers at advanced stages. However, the effects of EGR-1 expression on human gastric cancer progression, particularly on precancerous lesions, have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluate EGR-1 expression levels in target mucosa from patients with early gastric cancer and precancerous lesions, and assess whether EGR-1 expression affects the oncogenic phenotypes of human gastric cancer cells. EGR-1 protein levels were measured in tissues from subjects with normal mucosa (n=6), low-grade dysplasia (n=6), high-grade dysplasia (n=4) and adenocarcinoma (n=3) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry analyses. We also investigated the role of EGR-1 in tumor cell behavior by transiently expressing a dominant active EGR-1 variant in cultured cells. A positive correlation was observed between EGR-1 expression and gastric carcinogenesis (P=0.016). Furthermore, there was an increase in nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of EGR-1 in accordance with the histological grade (P for trends=0.003 and 0.003, respectively), and a positive association between the sum of the nuclear and cytoplasmic EGR-1 expression values and the histological grade (P=0.003). In addition, transient overexpression of EGR-1 enhanced cell proliferation, stimulated cell migration, and promoted the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and AKT in gastric cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate that EGR-1 may contribute to the early stages of gastric carcinogenesis via the alteration of tumor cell behaviors.

  5. Elevated Expression of Calpain-4 Predicts Poor Prognosis in Patients with Gastric Cancer after Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peike; Min, Lingqiang; Song, Shushu; Zhao, Junjie; Li, Lili; Yang, Caiting; Shao, Miaomiao; Zhang, Mingming; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Can; Wang, Xuefei; Wang, Hongshan; Qin, Jing; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Calpain-4 belongs to the calpain family of calcium-dependent cysteine proteases, and functions as a small regulatory subunit of the calpains. Recent evidence indicates that calpain-4 plays critical roles in tumor migration and invasion. However, the roles of calpain-4 in gastric tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. Herein, we examined calpain-4 expression by immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays containing tumor samples of 174 gastric cancer patients between 2004 and 2008 at a single center. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare survival curves, and expression levels were correlated to clinicopathological factors and overall survival. Our data demonstrated that calpain-4 was generally increased in gastric cancer cell lines and primary tumor tissues. High expression of calpain-4 was positively associated with vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis, and advanced TNM (Tumor Node Metastasis) stage. Multivariate analysis identified calpain-4 as an independent prognostic factor for poor prognosis. A predictive nomogram integrating calpain-4 expression with other independent prognosticators was constructed, which generated a better prognostic value for overall survival of gastric cancer patients than a TNM staging system. In conclusion, calpain-4 could be regarded as a potential prognosis indicator for clinical outcomes in gastric cancer. PMID:27689993

  6. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastric cancer: current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew D.; Datta, Jashodeep; Loaiza-Bonilla, Arturo; Karakousis, Giorgos C.

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment for gastric cancer (GC), poor long-term outcomes with resection alone compel a multimodality approach to this disease. Multimodality strategies vary widely; while adjuvant approaches are typically favored in Asia and the United States (USA), a growing body of evidence supports neoadjuvant and/or perioperative strategies in locally advanced tumors. Neoadjuvant approaches are particularly attractive given the morbidity associated with surgical management of GC and the substantial risk of omission of adjuvant therapy. The specific advantages of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) compared to chemotherapy have not been well defined, particularly in the preoperative setting and trials aimed at determining the optimal elements and sequencing of therapy are underway. Future studies will also define the role of targeted and biologic therapies. PMID:26487948

  7. Ramucirumab and its use in gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bronte, G; Galvano, A; Cicero, G; Passiglia, F; Rolfo, C; Bazan, V; Russo, A

    2014-09-01

    The inhibition of the mechanisms of tumor neo-angiogenesis represents a milestone that in the last 10 years has seen the advent of numerous molecules to target action against the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). More recently, new molecules have been developed that inhibit tumor spread by the blockade of specific VEGF receptors (VEGFRs), thereby preventing the binding of a ligand to its receptor and the cascade of proliferative events downstream. Ramucirumab is a fully humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that performs its action by blocking the isoform 2 of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR-2). Numerous preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated its activity in several solid tumors, demonstrating a remarkable efficacy in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival in addition to a favorable toxicity profile. This review analyzes in detail the role of ramucirumab in the treatment of advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers.

  8. Prevalence of Precancerous Conditions and Gastric Cancer Based upon the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea for 7 Years, Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji Hyuk; Lim, Yun Jeong; Kang, Jung Hyun; Yang, Jae Nam; Shin, Seung Min; Choi, Jae Hyeuk; Lee, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Gastric cancer is the second most prevalent cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Korea. The National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) has implemented esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) biennially for all Koreans starting in their 40s. This study was conducted to estimate the clinical relevance of NCSP through identifying the prevalence of gastric disease, including cancer. Materials and Methods. Data from 40,821 subjects who received the screening EGD in the single center for 7 years were retrospectively investigated. Results. The overall prevalence of nonatrophic/atrophic/metaplastic gastritis, peptic ulcer, adenoma, early gastric cancer (EGC), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) was 44.28%, 27.97%, 14.95%, 0.59%, 0.43%, 0.21%, and 0.09%, respectively. The prevalence of metaplastic gastritis, peptic ulcer, adenoma, EGC, and AGC was significantly higher in men than in women. The prevalence of preneoplastic/neoplastic disease significantly increased with age. Judged from the ratio of EGC to AGC, the proportion of EGC made up to 70% of all cancers. Conclusions. Screening endoscopy starting for people in their 40s should be strongly recommended for the elderly. Through the NCSP, the early detection of gastric cancer might contribute to the decreased mortality rate due to gastric cancer in Korea. PMID:25642244

  9. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  10. CXCL10/CXCR3 axis promotes the invasion of gastric cancer via PI3K/AKT pathway-dependent MMPs production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongfeng; Wu, Jin; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Xufeng; Liu, Dan

    2016-08-01

    CXCR3, a G-protein coupled chemokine receptor, has been found to be overexpressed in many tumors and act as an independent prognostic marker. However, it is still unclear whether CXCR3 is involved in gastric cancer progression. In this study, we found that CXCR3 was markedly expressed in gastric cancer cells and tissues. High CXCR3 expression correlated with advanced tumor stage, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis and poor survival of gastric cancer patients. Activation of CXCR3 by one of its ligands CXCL10 promoted the invasion and migration of gastric cancer BGC-823 and MGC-803 cells, and increased the secretion and activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9. However, the effects of CXCL10 on gastric cancer cells were attenuated by CXCR3 siRNA transfection. Furthermore, overexpression of CXCR3 enhanced CXCL10-mediated cell invasion and migration of gastric cancer MKN28 cells. In addition, CXCR3 time-dependently induced activation of AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway was required for CXCR3-mediated gastric cancer cell invasion, migration and MMP-2/9 production. Together, our findings suggest that CXCL10/CXCR3 axis promotes gastric cancer cell invasion and migration by upregulating MMP-2 and MMP-9 production via PI3K/AKT pathway. Thus, CXCR3 could be a potential target for the gastric cancer treatment.

  11. The Outcomes of Esophageal and Gastric Cancer Treatments in a Retrospective Study, Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Arash; Aliabadi, Leyla Sharifi; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Maheri, Roghieh; Eini, Ezzat; Mashhadireza, Maryam; Mousavi, Seied Asadollah; Bahar, Babak; Jahani, Mohammad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal and gastric cancers are among the most common cancers in Iran. Usually survival of these cases is poor despite of treatment. Here we studied outcome of these cases in our center to have an estimation of general prognosis of patients. Methods In this retrospective study, we reviewed the data of patient's files before treatment, including cancer stage at diagnosis, types of treatments and outcomes. We studied 368 patients treated between 1995 and 2011. Results The study included 368 patients (248 [67.4%] males and 120 [32.6%] females) with a median age of 58 (range: 23 - 94). Sixty nine patients (18.8%) had esophageal cancer with a median age of 58.5 years (range: 33 – 84), and 47.8% (33/69) of whom were male. Sixty five (17.7%) were reported to have gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) with a median age of 62.0 (range: 32 – 94), among them 72.3% (47/65) of whom were male and finally Two hundred thirty four (63.6%) had gastric cancer with a median age of 57.0 (range: 23 – 82), which 71.8% (168/234) of whom were male. The Median follow-up was 10 months. The majority of patients were diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease. Stage III or IV was observed in 65.0% (39/60) of patients with esophageal cancer, 75.0% (33/44) with GEJ cancer and 65.4% (121/185) with gastric cancer. In this study, 58% of patients with esophageal cancer, 50.8% with GEJ and gastric cancers had unresectable disease or metastases at presentation. One-year EFS was 51.8% (95% CI: 39.8 – 67.3%), 32.8% (95% CI: 22.1 – 48.7%), and 56.7% (95% CI: 50.1 – 64.3%) in patients with esophageal, GEJ and gastric cancers, respectively (p = 0.002). The 1-year OS was 54.5% (95% CI: 42.6 – 69.8%), 39.5% (95 CI: 28.1 – 55.5%), and 68.2% (95% CI: 61.8 – 75.3%), respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion Cancers of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract contribute to the high mortality and morbidity rates because they are more likely to be diagnosed at late or advanced stages of disease

  12. Active Targeted Nanoparticles for Oral Administration of Gastric Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Zih-Rou; Lai, Chih-Ho; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Feng, Chun-Lung

    2015-09-14

    Gastric carcinogenesis is a commonly diagnosed type of cancer and has a dismal prognosis because of the rate at which it aggressively spreads and because of the lack of effective therapies to stop its progression. This study evaluated a type of oral drug delivery system of a potential target-activated nanosizer comprising a fucose-conjugated chitosan and polyethylene glycol-conjugated chitosan complex with gelatin containing encapsulated green tea polyphenol extract epigallocatechin-3-gallate, allowing oral administration of the drug through a site-specific release in gastric cancer cells. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles effectively reduced drug release within gastric acids and that a controlled epigallocatechin-3-gallate release inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, induced cell apoptosis, and reduced vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression. Furthermore, in vivo assay results indicated that the prepared epigallocatechin-3-gallate-loaded fucose-chitosan/polyethylene glycol-chitosan/gelatin nanoparticles significantly affected gastric tumor activity and reduced gastric and liver tissue inflammatory reaction in an orthotopic gastric tumor mouse model.

  13. Stromal-Based Signatures for the Classification of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Liu, Jiangang; Falcon, Beverly L; Iyer, Seema; Stewart, Julie; Celikkaya, Hilal; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Sevinsky, Christopher; Lowes, Christina; Douglass, Larry; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bodenmiller, Diane; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Fischl, Anthony; Gerald, Damien; Xue, Qi; Lee, Jee-Yun; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Sui, Yunxia; Desai, Keyur; Doman, Thompson; Aggarwal, Amit; Carter, Julia H; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Ginty, Fiona; Nasir, Aejaz; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric cancer typically involves chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and VEGFR2 (KDR). However, reliable methods to identify patients who would benefit most from a combination of treatment modalities targeting the tumor stroma, including new immunotherapy approaches, are still lacking. Therefore, we integrated a mouse model of stromal activation and gastric cancer genomic information to identify gene expression signatures that may inform treatment strategies. We generated a mouse model in which VEGF-A is expressed via adenovirus, enabling a stromal response marked by immune infiltration and angiogenesis at the injection site, and identified distinct stromal gene expression signatures. With these data, we designed multiplexed IHC assays that were applied to human primary gastric tumors and classified each tumor to a dominant stromal phenotype representative of the vascular and immune diversity found in gastric cancer. We also refined the stromal gene signatures and explored their relation to the dominant patient phenotypes identified by recent large-scale studies of gastric cancer genomics (The Cancer Genome Atlas and Asian Cancer Research Group), revealing four distinct stromal phenotypes. Collectively, these findings suggest that a genomics-based systems approach focused on the tumor stroma can be used to discover putative predictive biomarkers of treatment response, especially to antiangiogenesis agents and immunotherapy, thus offering an opportunity to improve patient stratification. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2573-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197264

  14. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY FOR GASTRIC CANCER: TIME TO CHANGE THE PARADIGM

    PubMed Central

    BARCHI, Leandro Cardoso; JACOB, Carlos Eduardos; BRESCIANI, Cláudio José Caldas; YAGI, Osmar Kenji; MUCERINO, Donato Roberto; LOPASSO, Fábio Pinatel; MESTER, Marcelo; RIBEIRO-JÚNIOR, Ulysses; DIAS, André Roncon; RAMOS, Marcus Fernando Kodama Pertille; CECCONELLO, Ivan; ZILBERSTEIN, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Minimally invasive surgery widely used to treat benign disorders of the digestive system, has become the focus of intense study in recent years in the field of surgical oncology. Since then, the experience with this kind of approach has grown, aiming to provide the same oncological outcomes and survival to conventional surgery. Regarding gastric cancer, surgery is still considered the only curative treatment, considering the extent of resection and lymphadenectomy performed. Conventional surgery remains the main modality performed worldwide. Notwithstanding, the role of the minimally invasive access is yet to be clarified. Objective: To evaluate and summarize the current status of minimally invasive resection of gastric cancer. Methods: A literature review was performed using Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library and SciELO with the following headings: gastric cancer, minimally invasive surgery, robotic gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastrectomy, stomach cancer. The language used for the research was English. Results: 28 articles were considered, including randomized controlled trials, meta-analyzes, prospective and retrospective cohort studies. Conclusion: Minimally invasive gastrectomy may be considered as a technical option in the treatment of early gastric cancer. As for advanced cancer, recent studies have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the laparoscopic approach. Robotic gastrectomy will probably improve outcomes obtained with laparoscopy. However, high cost is still a barrier to its use on a large scale. PMID:27438040

  15. Gastric Stump Cancer: More Than Just Another Proximal Gastric Cancer and Demanding a More Suitable TNM Staging System

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Pinho, André; Pinto-de-Sousa, J.; Barbosa, José; Costa-Maia, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Considerable controversy persists about the biological behavior of gastric stump cancer (GSC). The aim of this study is to clarify if this cancer is just another proximal gastric cancer or if it emerges as a distinctive clinicopathologic entity. Methods. This review of a prospectively collected gastric cancer database identified 73 patients with GSC in a single institution between January 1980 and June 2012 and compared them with 328 patients with proximal gastric cancer (PGC) and 291 patients with esophagogastric junction cancer (EGJC). Results. Patients with GSC were predominantly males. Eighty-three percent of GSC penetrated the subserosal or the serosal layers. The median number of lymph nodes retrieved in GSC patients was significantly lower than in PGC patients or in EGJC patients. Cumulative survival curves were not different between GSC, PGC, or EGJC patients. Unlike that observed in PGC and in EGJC, no significant differences in cumulative survival according to the TNM staging system were observed in GSC cases. Conclusions. The outcome of patients with GSC displayed significant differences when compared to those with other proximal gastric cancers concerning the lack of survival association with the TNM staging system. Therefore a more suitable staging system should be designed for these unique cancers. PMID:24151622

  16. Nutrition in Patients with Gastric Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Rosania, Rosa; Chiapponi, Costanza; Malfertheiner, Peter; Venerito, Marino

    2016-01-01

    Background Nutritional management of patients with gastric cancer (GC) represents a challenge. Summary This review provides an overview of the present evidence on nutritional support in patients with GC undergoing surgery as well as in those with advanced disease Key Message For patients undergoing surgery, the preoperative nutritional condition directly affects postoperative prognosis, overall survival and disease-specific survival. Perioperative nutritional support enriched with immune-stimulating nutrients reduces overall complications and hospital stay but not mortality after major elective gastrointestinal surgery. Early enteral nutrition after surgery improves early and long-term postoperative nutritional status and reduces the length of hospitalization as well. Vitamin B12 and iron deficiency are common metabolic sequelae after gastrectomy and warrant appropriate replacement. In malnourished patients with advanced GC, short-term home complementary parenteral nutrition improves the quality of life, nutritional status and functional status. Total home parenteral nutrition represents the only modality of caloric intake for patients with advanced GC who are unable to take oral or enteral nutrition Practical Implications Early evaluations of nutritional status and nutritional support represent key aspects in the management of GC patients with both operable and advanced disease. PMID:27403412

  17. THE CYTOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF GASTRIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Charles D.; Johnson, William D.; Wilbur, Richard S.; Lack, Arthur J.

    1961-01-01

    Established centers find that cytological study of gastric washings with saline or chymotrypsin, adequately performed, is a valuable diagnostic tool in the detection of early and curable gastric carcinoma. Our experience with a small series of 150 patients, studied by saline gastric washing, has emphasized the difficulties of collection and the particular importance of obtaining, by repeated washings if necessary, an adequate specimen of gastric epithelial cells for diagnosis, before an opinion is given. It seems likely that the cytological method will be of future value in study of the natural history of gastric malignant disease and in detection of its surface lesions in their earliest form in asymptomatic, known-susceptible persons. Further, it should become a complementary part of the “stomach profile” in gastric diagnostic problems, where roentgenologic and gastroscopic studies may be expected to reveal the older, necrotic, or infiltrative lesions; cytological study, the earlier and more superficial stages of disease. PMID:13862364

  18. VEGF promotes gastric cancer development by upregulating CRMP4

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianjun; Zhai, Ertao; He, Yulong; Wu, Hui; Chen, Chuangqi; Ma, Jinping; Wang, Zhao; Cai, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the precise role of CRMP4 in gastric tumor growth and patient survival. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CRMP4, VEGF and VEGFR2 were validated by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. We investigated the effects on tumor growth of overexpression and knockdown of CRMP4 both in vitro and in vivo by constructing stable gastric cell lines using lentiviral-mediated transduction and shRNA interference-mediated knockdown of CRMP4 expression. We further validated the role of the ERK/AKT signaling pathways in VEGF and CRMP4 expression using ERK and PI3K inhibitors. Increased expression of VEGF and CRMP4 were observed in gastric cancer tissues compared with tumor-adjacent tissue. We found that higher CRPM4 expression was associated with lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, tumor differentiation and poorer prognosis in gastric cancer patients. In HGC27 and SGC7901 gastric cancer cells, VEGF upregulated CRMP4 in time and dose-dependent manners. Overexpression of CRMP4 increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of CRMP4 expression had opposite effects. VEGF activated CRMP4 expression in gastric cancer cells, and this effect was significantly inhibited by MAPK and PI3K inhibitors (PD98059 and LY294002). In mice, CRMP4 overexpression also resulted in increased tumor growth. These results suggest that increased CRMP4 expression mediated by the activation of VEGF signaling facilitates gastric tumor growth and metastasis, which may have clinical implications associated with a reduced survival rate in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26934554

  19. Helicobacter pylori Update: Gastric Cancer, Reliable Therapy, and Possible Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to development of diverse gastric and extra-gastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, so there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk—these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma, although there are no convincing data to support the benefits of H pylori infections. PMID:25655557

  20. How Much Progress Has Been Made in Minimally Invasive Surgery for Gastric Cancer in Korea?: A Viewpoint From Korean Prospective Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Han; Kim, Sung-Heun; Kim, Min-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is the most common cancer in Korea. Because the incidence of gastric cancer is still high even with early detection and because of developments in surgical instruments and technological advances, minimally invasive surgery has rapidly become an accepted treatment for gastric cancer in Korea. Many Korean gastric surgeons have contributed to the rapid adaptation of minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer: not only the Korean Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Surgery Study (KLASS) group, but also other expert surgeons after the 2000s. Thanks to their vigorous efforts involving active learning, education, workshops, academic communications, and international communications with active laparoscopic gastric surgeons in Korea, numerous results and well-designed large-scale clinical studies have been published or are actively ongoing, thus increasing its wide acceptance as an option for gastric cancer. Now, Korea has become one of the leading countries using minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of gastric cancer. This review article will summarize the current status and issues, as well as the clinical trials that have finished or are ongoing, regarding minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer in Korea. PMID:25526443

  1. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  2. Environmental and lifestyle risk factors of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Derakhshan, Mohammad H

    2013-06-01

    Effective prevention and early diagnostic strategies are the most important public health interventions in gastric cancer, which remains a common malignancy worldwide. Preventive strategies require identification and understanding of environmental risk factors that lead to carcinogenesis. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the primary carcinogen as this ancient bacterium has a complex ability to interact with its human host. Smoking and salt are strong independent risk factors for gastric cancer whereas alcohol is only a risk when it is heavily consumed. Red meat and high fat increase the risk of gastric cancer however fresh fruits, vegetables (allium family) and certain micronutrients (selenium, vitamin C) reduce the risk, with evidence lacking for fish, coffee and tea. Foods that inhibit H. pylori viability, colonization and infection may reduce cancer risk. Obesity is increasingly recognized as a contributory factor in gastric cardia carcinogenesis. Therefore, modest daily physical activities can be protective against cancer. Foundry workers are at risk for developing gastric cancer with dust iron being an important cause. Other risk factors include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), possibly JC virus and radiation but the effects of these are likely to remain small. PMID:23725070

  3. High expression of RELM-α correlates with poor prognosis and promotes angiogenesis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhao, Deshou; Wang, Weiyi; Zhang, Yongping; Yuan, Yaozong; Wang, Lifu; Wu, Yunlin

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that resistin-like molecule-α (RELM-α) is involved in angiogenesis, while the clinical significance and the exact role of RELM-α in gastric cancer remain obscure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of RELM-α in gastric cancer, and to investigate its effective mechanisms in order to identify a potential therapeutic target. The expression levels of RELM-α in 92 gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues were investigated and the relationship between RELM-α expression and the clinicopathological characteristics was explored. To investigate the potential role of RELM-α in gastric cancer cell biological behavior, the cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays were conducted using two gastric cancer cell lines (SGC7901 and MKN45). We also assessed whether RELM-α gene silencing modulates angiogenesis using small interference RNA in cancer cell lines, and investigated its effect on nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and MMP-9 expression. Contrasting sharply with the strong RELM-α-positive tumors, adjacent normal tissues and cell lines exhibited negative or weakly positive expression (P<0.01). High expression level of RELM-α was associated with advanced stage and tumor size (P<0.01). The silencing of RELM-α expression by Ad5/F35-siRNA treatment significantly inhibited cell migratory and invasive ability in SGC7901 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells compared with the control and Ad5/F35 vector-transfected cell lines (P<0.01). However, the silencing of RELM-α expression also significantly blocked NF-κB activation and attenuated VEGF and MMP-9 expression. The data demonstrated that RELM-α is a promising novel biomarker of angiogenesis in patients with gastric cancer. The study identified that the silencing of RELM-α expression may regulate the proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells by targeting VEGF/MMP-9, and the mechanism

  4. High expression of RELM-α correlates with poor prognosis and promotes angiogenesis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhao, Deshou; Wang, Weiyi; Zhang, Yongping; Yuan, Yaozong; Wang, Lifu; Wu, Yunlin

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that resistin-like molecule-α (RELM-α) is involved in angiogenesis, while the clinical significance and the exact role of RELM-α in gastric cancer remain obscure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of RELM-α in gastric cancer, and to investigate its effective mechanisms in order to identify a potential therapeutic target. The expression levels of RELM-α in 92 gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues were investigated and the relationship between RELM-α expression and the clinicopathological characteristics was explored. To investigate the potential role of RELM-α in gastric cancer cell biological behavior, the cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays were conducted using two gastric cancer cell lines (SGC7901 and MKN45). We also assessed whether RELM-α gene silencing modulates angiogenesis using small interference RNA in cancer cell lines, and investigated its effect on nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and MMP-9 expression. Contrasting sharply with the strong RELM-α-positive tumors, adjacent normal tissues and cell lines exhibited negative or weakly positive expression (P<0.01). High expression level of RELM-α was associated with advanced stage and tumor size (P<0.01). The silencing of RELM-α expression by Ad5/F35-siRNA treatment significantly inhibited cell migratory and invasive ability in SGC7901 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells compared with the control and Ad5/F35 vector-transfected cell lines (P<0.01). However, the silencing of RELM-α expression also significantly blocked NF-κB activation and attenuated VEGF and MMP-9 expression. The data demonstrated that RELM-α is a promising novel biomarker of angiogenesis in patients with gastric cancer. The study identified that the silencing of RELM-α expression may regulate the proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells by targeting VEGF/MMP-9, and the mechanism

  5. Role of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in gastric cancer: Biological and pharmacological aspects

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Jan Trøst

    2014-01-01

    Amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene and overexpression of the HER2 protein is found in 15%-20% of patients with gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer. The degree of HER2 overexpression and amplification varies with the location of the carcinoma, with higher expression in the gastroesophageal and proximal parts compared to the distal parts of the stomach. Further, HER2 overexpression and amplification also seems to be related to the Lauren histological classification, with higher levels found in the intestinal phenotype compared to the diffuse and mixed types. The prognostic properties of HER2 overexpression and amplification are still under debate, but a large number of studies seem to indicate that HER2 is a negative prognostic factor. The usefulness of HER2 targeted therapy in gastric cancer was demonstrated in the ToGA trial, where HER2-positive patients with advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma were randomized to receive 5-FU/capecitabine and cisplatin, either alone or in combination with trastuzumab. A statically significant gain in overall survival was seen in patients who received the combined treatment of trastuzumab and chemotherapy. Patients with a strong overexpression of the HER2 protein (IHC3+) specifically benefited from the treatment, with a median overall survival of 17.9 mo. As a consequence of the positive results of the ToGA trial, patients with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma are now routinely tested for HER2. The ToGA trial must be characterized as a landmark in the treatment of gastric cancer and it has paved the way for a number of new HER2 targeted compounds such as pertuzumab, ado-trastuzumab emtansine, lapatinib, afatinib, and dacomitinib, which are currently undergoing phase II and III clinical testing. Overall, this review will discuss the current status of HER2 in gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer and the future direction in

  6. Update on a tumor-associated NADH oxidase in gastric cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Lee, Yi-Hui; Yuan, Tein-Ming; Chen, Shi-Wen; Chueh, Pin-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common human malignancies, and its prevalence has been shown to be well-correlated with cancer-related deaths worldwide. Regrettably, the poor prognosis of this disease is mainly due to its late diagnosis at advanced stages after the cancer has already metastasized. Recent research has emphasized the identification of cancer biomarkers in the hope of diagnosing cancer early and designing targeted therapies to reverse cancer progression. One member of a family of growth-related nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH or hydroquinone) oxidases is tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX; ENOX2). Unlike its counterpart CNOX (ENOX1), identified in normal rat liver plasma membranes and shown to be stimulated by growth factors and hormones, tNOX activity purified from rat hepatoma cells is constitutively active. Its activity is detectable in the sera of cancer patients but not in those of healthy volunteers, suggesting its clinical relevance. Interestingly, tNOX expression was shown to be present in an array of cancer cell lines. More importantly, inhibition of tNOX was well correlated with reduced cancer cell growth and induction of apoptosis. RNA interference targeting tNOX expression in cancer cells effectively restored non-cancerous phenotypes, further supporting the vital role of tNOX in cancer cells. Here, we review the regulatory role of tNOX in gastric cancer cell growth. PMID:26973386

  7. Targeted therapies in gastric cancer and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Ozan; Sendur, M Ali Nahit; Ozdemir, Nuriye; Aksoy, Sercan

    2016-01-01

    Advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is associated with a high mortality rate and, despite multiple new chemotherapy options, the survival rates of patients with AGC remains poor. After the discovery of targeted therapies, research has focused on the new treatment options for AGC. In the last two decades, many targeted molecules were developed against AGC. Currently, two targeted therapy molecules have been approved for patients with AGC. In 2010, trastuzumab was the first molecule shown to improve survival in patients with HER2-positive AGC as part of a first-line combination regimen. In 2014, ramucirumab was the second targeted molecule to improve survival rates and was suggested as treatment for patients with AGC who had progressed after first-line platinum plus fluoropyrimidine with or without anthracycline chemotherapy. Ramucirumab was the first targeted therapy acting as a single agent in patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancers. Although these two molecules were introduced into clinical use, many other promising molecules have been tested in phase I-II trials. It is obvious that in the near future many different targeted therapies will be in use for treatment of AGC. In this review, the current status of targeted therapies in the treatment of AGC and gastroesophageal junction tumors, including HER (2-3) inhibitors, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antiangiogenic agents, c-MET inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, agents against other molecular pathways fibroblast growth factor, Claudins, insulin-like growth factor, heat shock proteins, and immunotherapy, will be discussed. PMID:26811601

  8. Endoscopic submucosal dissection combined with endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for early gastric cancer on gastric fundal varices.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yasuhiko; Asano, Naoki; Yokosawa, Satoshi; Imatani, Akira; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-08-01

    Currently, there is little report of treatment strategy for early gastric cancer (EGC) on gastric fundal varices (GFVs), because controlling GFVs was more challenging than controlling gastric cardiac varices associated with esophageal varices. We first report effective endoscopic treatment of EGC on GFVs of a 77-year-old man with Child-B cirrhosis. Endoscopic ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography studies revealed intramucosal EGC on variceal components, supplied from posterior gastric vein and drained to subphrenic vein without gastrorenal shunt. With informed consent, we performed endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) after eradication of GFVs by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS). Histologic assessment revealed curability of ESD and inflammation and fibrosis around EIS site. Thereafter, no recurrence and complication had occurred. To avoid life-threatening bleeding from GFVs, we achieved complete resection by ESD under direct visualization of submucosa after eradication of GFVs by EIS based on the examination of hemodynamics and local relationship between EGC and GFVs.

  9. Gastric Cancer: Descriptive Epidemiology, Risk Factors, Screening, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Parisa; Islami, Farhad; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Freedman, Neal D.; Kamangar, Farin

    2014-01-01

    Less than a century ago, gastric cancer (GC) was the most common cancer in the United States and perhaps throughout the world. Despite its worldwide decline in incidence over the past century, GC remains a major killer across the globe. This article reviews the epidemiology, screening, and prevention of gastric cancer. We first discuss the descriptive epidemiology of GC, including its incidence, survival, and mortality, including trends over time. Next, we characterize the risk factors for gastric cancer, both environmental and genetic. Serological markers and histological precursor lesions of GC and early detection of GC of using these markers is reviewed. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies and provide suggestions for further research. PMID:24618998

  10. Phase I and II clinical trials for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Khushalani, Nikhil I

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a global public health problem with considerable heterogeneity in pathogenesis and clinical presentation across geographic regions. Improved understanding of the molecular biology of this disease has opened avenues for targeted intervention. An individualized treatment approach is required for optimal management of this cancer. Overcoming resistance to therapy requires combining targeted agents with the traditional options of chemotherapy/radiation therapy, and also targeting more than 1 pathway of carcinogenesis at a time. Encouraging molecular hypothesis and biomarker-driven trials will lead to improved patient outcomes and may eventually enable the therapeutic nihilism associated with gastric cancer to be overcome. PMID:22098835

  11. Clinical significance of MET in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Mikito; Otsuki, Sho; Fujimori, Yoshitaka; Sato, Yuya; Nakagawa, Masatoshi; Kojima, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy has become the global standard treatment for patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric cancer (GC), although outcomes remain unfavorable. Many molecular-targeted therapies inhibiting signaling pathways of various tyrosine kinase receptors have been developed, and monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 have become standard therapy for GC. Hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor, c-MET (MET), play key roles in tumor growth through activated signaling pathways from receptor in GC cells. Genomic amplification of MET leads to the aberrant activation found in GC tumors and is related to survival in patients with GC. This review discusses the clinical significance of MET in GC and examines MET as a potential therapeutic target in patients with GC. Preclinical studies in animal models have shown that MET antibodies or small-molecule MET inhibitors suppress tumor-cell proliferation and tumor progression in MET-amplified GC cells. These drugs are now being evaluated in clinical trials as treatments for metastatic or unresectable GC. PMID:26600931

  12. Preclinical evidence of multiple mechanisms underlying trastuzumab resistance in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arienti, Chiara; Zanoni, Michele; Pignatta, Sara; Del Rio, Alberto; Carloni, Silvia; Tebaldi, Michela; Tedaldi, Gianluca; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer patients frequently develop resistance to trastuzumab through mechanisms still poorly understood. In breast cancer, other members of the HER-family are known to be involved in trastuzumab-resistance, as is overexpression of the scaffold protein IQGAP1. In the present work, we investigated acquired resistance to trastuzumab in gastric cancer experimental models. Trastuzumab-resistant (HR) subclones derived from 3 HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cells were generated and characterized for alterations in HER2-signaling mechanisms by next-generation sequencing, immunohistochemical, western blot and qRT-PCR techniques, and molecular modeling analysis. All subclones showed a reduced growth rate with respect to parental cell lines but each had a different resistance mechanism. In NCI N87 HR cells, characterized by a marked increase in HER2-signaling pathways with respect to the parental cell line, trastuzumab sensitivity was restored when IQGAP1 expression was silenced. AKG HR subclone showed higher HER3 protein expression than the parental line. High nuclear HER4 levels were observed in KKP HR cells. In conclusion, our study revealed that high IQGAP1 expression leads to resistance to trastuzumab in gastric cancer. Furthermore, 2 new mutations of the HER2 gene that may be involved in acquired resistance were identified in AKG HR and KKP HR subclones. PMID:26919099

  13. Matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in gastric cancer as molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, Jos Maria

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex disease that involves a range of biological individuals and tumors with histopathological features. The pathogenesis of this disease is multi-factorial and includes the interaction of genetic predisposition with environmental factors. Gastric cancer is normally diagnosed in advanced stages where there are few alternatives to offer and the prognosis is difficult to establish. Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Identification of key genes and signaling pathways involved in metastasis and recurrence could predict these events and thereby identify therapeutic targets. In this context, the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) represent a potential prognostic tool, because both genetic families regulate growth, angiogenesis, invasion, immune response, epithelial mesenchymal transition and cellular survival. Proteolytic parameters based on MMP/TIMP expression could be useful in the identification of patients with a high probability of developing distant metastases or peritoneal dissemination for each degree of histological malignancy. It is also probable that these parameters can allow improvement in the extent of surgery and dictate the most suitable therapy. We reviewed papers focused on human gastric epithelial cancer as a model and focus on the potential use of MMPs and TIMPs as molecular markers; also we include literature regarding gastric cancer risk factors, classification systems and MMP/TIMP regulation.

  14. DNA Methylation as Surrogate Marker For Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Hong, Seung-Jin; Rhyu, Mun-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer remains, stubbornly, highly prevalent in East Asia. Still, stomach cancer has few biomarkers by which it can be predicted. Helicobacter pylori infection, a known carcinogen of stomach cancer, usually goes undetected prior to cancer diagnosis, due to the poor mucosal environments that its related gastric atrophy causes. We propose, herein, an endoscopic-biopsy-based cancer-predicting DNA methylation marker. We semi-quantitatively examined the methylation-variable sites near the CpG-island margins by radioisotope-labeling methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in association with H. pylori, which increases age-related over-methylation in CpG islands of gastric mucosa. These age-related methylation patterns of the transitional-CpG sites are proposed as useful surrogate markers for stomach cancer. It would be helpful for setting the optimal screening interval for high-risk subjects as well as for estimating the prognosis and the predictability for recurrence of early gastric cancer in patients having undergone endoscopic submucosal dissection. New screening-interval guidelines for gastric cancer should be suggested considering individual risk based on age, severity of atrophy, H. pylori status, and DNA methylation pattern. PMID:26473155

  15. May Circulating microRNAs be Gastric Cancer Diagnostic Biomarkers?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoling; Tan, Xiaohui; Fu, Sidney W.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. More than 80% of the diagnosis was made at the advanced stages of the disease, highlighting the urgent demand for novel biomarkers that can be used for early detection. Recently, a number of studies suggest that circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) could be potential biomarkers for GC diagnosis. Cancer-related circulating miRNAs, as well as tissue miRNAs, provide a hopeful prospect of detecting GC at early stages, and the prospective participation of miRNAs in biomarker development will enhance the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests for GC. As miRNAs in blood are stable, their potential value as diagnostic biomarkers in GC has been explored over the past few years. However, due to the inconsistent or sometimes conflicting reports, large-scale prospective studies are needed to validate their potential applicability in GC diagnosis. This review summarizes the current development about potential miRNA biomarkers for GC diagnosis and the obstacles hindering their clinical usage. PMID:26535061

  16. Screening for and surveillance of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Compare, Debora; Rocco, Alba; Nardone, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Although the prevalence of gastric cancer (GC) progressively decreased during the last decades, due to improved dietary habit, introduction of food refrigeration and recovered socio-economic level, it still accounts for 10% of the total cancer-related deaths. The best strategy to reduce the mortality for GC is to schedule appropriate screening and surveillance programs, that rises many relevant concerns taking into account its worldwide variability, natural history, diagnostic tools, therapeutic strategies, and cost-effectiveness. Intestinal-type, the most frequent GC histotype, develops through a multistep process triggered by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and progressing from gastritis to atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and dysplasia. However, the majority of patients infected with H. pylori and carrying premalignant lesions do not develop GC. Therefore, it remains unclear who should be screened, when the screening should be started and how the screening should be performed. It seems reasonable that screening programs should target the general population in eastern countries, at high prevalence of GC and the high-risk subjects in western countries, at low prevalence of GC. As far as concern surveillance, currently, we are lacking of standardized international recommendations and many features have to be defined regarding the optimal diagnostic approach, the patients at higher risk, the best timing and the cost-effectiveness. Anyway, patients with corpus atrophic gastritis, extensive incomplete IM and dysplasia should enter a surveillance program. At present, screening and surveillance programs need further studies to draw worldwide reliable recommendations and evaluate the impact on mortality for GC. PMID:25320506

  17. Laparoscopic Gastrectomy and Transvaginal Specimen Extraction in a Morbidly Obese Patient with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, Fatih; Karagul, Servet

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer has some significant postoperative benefits over open surgery with similar oncologic outcomes. This procedure is more popular in the Far East countries where obesity is not a serious public health problem. In the Western countries, laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer is not a common procedure, yet obesity is more common. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer in a morbidly obese patient. Additionally, we used natural orifice specimen extraction as an option to decrease wound-related complications, which are more prevalent in morbidly obese patients. In this case, we performed a fully laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy with the specimen extracted through the vagina. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report of a natural orifice surgery in a morbidly obese patient with gastric cancer. PMID:27104027

  18. Pathogenesis and risk factors for gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Reina; Iijima, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was thought to be the main cause of gastric cancer, and its eradication showed improvement in gastric inflammation and decreased the risk of gastric cancer. Recently, a number of studies reported the occurrence of gastric cancer after successful eradication. Patients infected with H. pylori, even after eradication, have a higher risk for the occurrence of gastric cancer when compared with uninfected patients. Metachronous gastric cancer occurs frequently following the endoscopic removal of early gastric cancer. These data indicate that metachronous cancer leads to the occurrence of gastric cancer even after successful eradication of H. pylori. The pathogenesis of this metachronous cancer remains unclear. Further research is needed to identify biomarkers to predict the development of metachronous gastric cancer and methods for gastric cancer screening. In this article, we review the role of the H. pylori in carcinogenesis and the histological and endoscopic characteristics and risk factors for metachronous gastric cancer after eradication. Additionally, we discuss recent risk predictions and possible approaches for reducing the risk of metachronous gastric cancer after eradication. PMID:27672424

  19. Pathogenesis and risk factors for gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Reina; Iijima, Katsunori

    2016-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was thought to be the main cause of gastric cancer, and its eradication showed improvement in gastric inflammation and decreased the risk of gastric cancer. Recently, a number of studies reported the occurrence of gastric cancer after successful eradication. Patients infected with H. pylori, even after eradication, have a higher risk for the occurrence of gastric cancer when compared with uninfected patients. Metachronous gastric cancer occurs frequently following the endoscopic removal of early gastric cancer. These data indicate that metachronous cancer leads to the occurrence of gastric cancer even after successful eradication of H. pylori. The pathogenesis of this metachronous cancer remains unclear. Further research is needed to identify biomarkers to predict the development of metachronous gastric cancer and methods for gastric cancer screening. In this article, we review the role of the H. pylori in carcinogenesis and the histological and endoscopic characteristics and risk factors for metachronous gastric cancer after eradication. Additionally, we discuss recent risk predictions and possible approaches for reducing the risk of metachronous gastric cancer after eradication. PMID:27672424

  20. Pathogenesis and risk factors for gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Reina; Iijima, Katsunori

    2016-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was thought to be the main cause of gastric cancer, and its eradication showed improvement in gastric inflammation and decreased the risk of gastric cancer. Recently, a number of studies reported the occurrence of gastric cancer after successful eradication. Patients infected with H. pylori, even after eradication, have a higher risk for the occurrence of gastric cancer when compared with uninfected patients. Metachronous gastric cancer occurs frequently following the endoscopic removal of early gastric cancer. These data indicate that metachronous cancer leads to the occurrence of gastric cancer even after successful eradication of H. pylori. The pathogenesis of this metachronous cancer remains unclear. Further research is needed to identify biomarkers to predict the development of metachronous gastric cancer and methods for gastric cancer screening. In this article, we review the role of the H. pylori in carcinogenesis and the histological and endoscopic characteristics and risk factors for metachronous gastric cancer after eradication. Additionally, we discuss recent risk predictions and possible approaches for reducing the risk of metachronous gastric cancer after eradication.

  1. Pathogenesis and risk factors for gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Reina; Iijima, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was thought to be the main cause of gastric cancer, and its eradication showed improvement in gastric inflammation and decreased the risk of gastric cancer. Recently, a number of studies reported the occurrence of gastric cancer after successful eradication. Patients infected with H. pylori, even after eradication, have a higher risk for the occurrence of gastric cancer when compared with uninfected patients. Metachronous gastric cancer occurs frequently following the endoscopic removal of early gastric cancer. These data indicate that metachronous cancer leads to the occurrence of gastric cancer even after successful eradication of H. pylori. The pathogenesis of this metachronous cancer remains unclear. Further research is needed to identify biomarkers to predict the development of metachronous gastric cancer and methods for gastric cancer screening. In this article, we review the role of the H. pylori in carcinogenesis and the histological and endoscopic characteristics and risk factors for metachronous gastric cancer after eradication. Additionally, we discuss recent risk predictions and possible approaches for reducing the risk of metachronous gastric cancer after eradication.

  2. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions are altered after subtotal gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching-Hung; Lin, Jaw-Town; Ho, Hsiu J.; Lai, Zi-Lun; Wang, Chang-Bi; Tang, Sen-Lin; Wu, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subtotal gastrectomy (i.e., partial removal of the stomach), a surgical treatment for early-stage distal gastric cancer, is usually accompanied by highly selective vagotomy and Billroth II reconstruction, leading to dramatic changes in the gastric environment. Based on accumulating evidence of a strong link between human gut microbiota and host health, a 2-year follow-up study was conducted to characterize the effects of subtotal gastrectomy. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequencing were analyzed before and after surgery. The results demonstrated that gastric microbiota is significantly more diverse after surgery. Ralstonia and Helicobacter were the top two genera of discriminant abundance in the cancerous stomach before surgery, while Streptococcus and Prevotella were the two most abundant genera after tumor excision. Furthermore, N-nitrosation genes were prevalent before surgery, whereas bile salt hydrolase, NO and N2O reductase were prevalent afterward. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document changes in gastric microbiota before and after surgical treatment of stomach cancer. PMID:26860194

  3. FDA Approval Summary: Ramucirumab for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Casak, Sandra J; Fashoyin-Aje, Ibilola; Lemery, Steven J; Zhang, Lillian; Jin, Runyan; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Huanyu; He, Kun; Dougherty, Michele; Novak, Rachel; Kennett, Sarah; Khasar, Sachia; Helms, Whitney; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The FDA approved ramucirumab (CYRAMZA; Eli Lilly and Company) for previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma initially as monotherapy (April 21, 2014) and subsequently as combination therapy with paclitaxel (November 5, 2014). In the monotherapy trial, 355 patients in the indicated population were randomly allocated (2:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. In the combination trial, 665 patients were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks, in combination with paclitaxel, 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of 28-day cycles. Overall survival (OS) was increased in patients who received ramucirumab in both the monotherapy [HR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60-0.998; log rank P = 0.047] and combination trials (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.96; P = 0.017). The most common adverse reactions were hypertension and diarrhea in the monotherapy trial and fatigue, neutropenia, diarrhea, and epistaxis in the combination trial. Because of concerns about the robustness of the monotherapy trial results, FDA approved the original application after receiving the results of the combination trial confirming the OS effect. Based on exploratory exposure-response analyses, there is residual uncertainty regarding the optimal dose of ramucirumab.

  4. Robotic surgery for gastric cancer: a technical review.

    PubMed

    Hyung, Woo Jin; Woo, Yanghee; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Minimally invasive gastric cancer surgery is gaining acceptance, especially in the treatment of patients with early gastric cancer. While offering patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic surgery is limited by several disadvantages such as altered operating view and lack of versatility in surgical instrumentation. Robotic surgery offers the surgeon the benefit of superior 3D visualization, the freedom of the EndoWrist function, and the tremble-filtered control of the four robotic arms. Due to the technical advantages of the robotic surgical system, robotic surgery may facilitate the expansion of minimally invasive surgery over laparoscopy. The application of robotic surgery for gastric cancer is increasing in experienced centers. Most reports of the robotic operating methods are only slightly modified from the laparoscopic technique. Robotic gastric cancer surgery including radical subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection is technically feasible and safe and results in similar short-term postoperative outcomes when compared to laparoscopic surgery. The role of robotic surgery in gastric cancer is promising but awaits further comparative studies of long-term results and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27628113

  5. Diffuse Type Gastric and Lobular Breast Carcinoma in a Familial Gastric Cancer Patient with an E-Cadherin Germline Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Gisela; Vogelsang, Holger; Becker, Ingrid; Hutter, Jörg; Ott, Katja; Candidus, Sonja; Grundei, Tobias; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Mueller, James; Siewert, Jörg R.; Höfler, Heinz

    1999-01-01

    E-Cadherin alterations have been reported frequently in sporadic diffuse type gastric and lobular breast carcinomas. Germline mutations of this gene have been identified recently in several gastric cancer families. We analyzed seven patients with a family history of the disease who had diffuse type gastric cancer diagnosed before the age of 45 for germline mutations in CDH1, the gene encoding the E-cadherin protein. We identified a frameshift mutation in exon 3 in one patient with a strong family history of gastric cancer. The same germline mutation was found in the patient’s mother, who had metachronous development of lobular breast and diffuse type gastric carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry for E-cadherin protein expression revealed an abnormal staining pattern in both of these tumors, suggesting complete inactivation of the cell adhesion molecule. Thus, our finding suggests that besides diffuse type gastric cancer, lobular breast carcinomas may be associated with germline CDH1 mutations. PMID:10433926

  6. [Recent results of research on cancer of the colon, gastric cancer, sarcoma and bronchial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Hacker, U T; Wolf, J; Wendtner, C-M

    2011-02-01

    In patients up to 70 years of age with colon carcinoma stage III adjuvant chemotherapy with infusions of fluorouracil (5-FU) or oral capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin should be the standard method. A new standard for the palliative treatment of Her2/newly positive advanced gastric cancer and cancer at the gastro-esophageal junction is the administration of trastuzumab combined with chemotherapy. Patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma can be helped, in addition to surgical resection and subsequent radiotherapy, by neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with regional deep hyperthermia. For patients with lung cancer additional individualized treatment is about to become routine. In addition to the EGFR mutation status, all non-smokers should in future be tested for aberration in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene.

  7. Factors Associated with Fatigue in Korean Gastric Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wan; Lee, Jung-Kwon; Kim, Cho-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer in Korea. Fatigue is a common symptom among cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with fatigue in gastric cancer survivors. Methods Data were analyzed from 199 gastric cancer survivors who visited a cancer survivor outpatient clinic from July 2013 to June 2014. Patients were surveyed using a questionnaire containing a fatigue severity scale (FSS) and questions regarding associated symptoms. Participants were divided into fatigue (FSS) and non-fatigue groups based on FSS scores (≥4 and <4, respectively). Age, sex, weight, body mass index, cancer stage, pathology, surgery type, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, comorbid disease, family history of cancer, smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise, and laboratory results were investigated. Results The fatigue and non-fatigue groups contained 42 and 157 survivors, respectively. Their mean age was 58 years, and the mean post-operative period was 6.58 years. Arthralgia (odds ratio [OR], 12.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.21-52.34), dyspnea (OR, 10.54; 95% CI, 2.94-37.80), dyspepsia (OR, 8.26; 95% CI, 2.63-25.96), changed bowel habits (OR, 4.56; 95% CI, 1.09-19.11), anemia (OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.26-8.05), and regular exercise (OR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.12-0.77) were significantly associated with fatigue in gastric cancer survivors, while weight, treatment, and depressive mood were not. Conclusion Arthralgia, dyspnea, dyspepsia, bowel habit change, anemia, and regular exercise are associated with fatigue in gastric cancer survivors. PMID:26634101

  8. Prognosis of Pregnancy-Associated Gastric Cancer: An Age-, Sex-, and Stage-Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min Jeong; Park, Young Soo; Song, Ho June; Park, Se Jeong; Ahn, Ji Yong; Choi, Kee Don; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byung Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Pregnancy-associated gastric cancer is a rare condition. This case-control study was performed to identify the clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of pregnancy-associated gastric cancer. Methods All consecutive patients who presented to our tertiary referral hospital with pregnancy-associated gastric cancer from 1991 to 2012 were identified. Two age-, sex-, and stage-matched controls for each case were also identified from the records. Clinicopathological, gynecological, and oncological outcomes were recorded. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor, and E-cadherin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed for fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. Results The median overall survival rates of the pregnancy-associated gastric cancer and control groups were 7.0 months and 15.0 months, respectively (p=0.189). Poor prognostic factors included advanced stage and tumor location in the corpus or the entire stomach but not pregnancy status or loss of E-cadherin. Pregnancy-associated gastric cancer was associated with a longer time from diagnosis to treatment (21 days vs 7 days, p=0.021). The two groups did not differ in the expression of the receptors or E-cadherin. Conclusions The dismal prognosis of pregnancy-associated gastric cancer may related to the tumor stage and location rather than to pregnancy itself. PMID:27114414

  9. Syndromic Gastric Polyps: At the Crossroads of Genetic and Environmental Cancer Predisposition.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur in 1-4 % of patients undergoing gastroscopy. Although most are sporadic, some gastric polyps are part of an underlying hereditary syndrome. Gastric polyps can be seen in each of the well-known gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes, but also in Lynch syndrome and in several rare not primarily gastrointestinal syndromes. In addition, Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach (GAPPS) is a recently described heritable syndrome characterized by isolated gastric polyposis and risk of gastric cancer.Some of these syndromes are associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer, whereas others are not. However, the neoplastic potential and the precursor status of these gastric polyps are not always clear, even in syndromes with a well-established risk of gastric cancer. For instance, the neoplastic potential of Peutz-Jeghers polyps is debatable, despite the well-established risk of gastric cancer in this syndrome. Also fundic gland polyps and gastric foveolar-type adenomas in FAP carry a low risk of malignant transformation. In contrast, gastric juvenile polyps are precursor lesions of gastric cancer in juvenile polyposis syndrome through neoplastic progression of juvenile polyps in these patients.Although these hereditary syndromes with gastric polyps are rare, recognition is important for individual patient management. Furthermore, the initiation and progression of these lesions can be influenced by environmental factors such as Helicobacter Pylori infection. This makes these rare lesions an appropriate model for understanding the clonal evolution of early gastric cancer in the wider population. PMID:27573780

  10. [A Case of Unresectable Local Recurrence of Gastric Cancer Successfully Resected after Pre-Operative Chemotherapy with Trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamazaki, Makoto; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old man was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer and underwent total gastrectomy (tubular adenocarcinoma, tub2, pT3N0M0, stageⅡA). Eight months after the surgery, recurrence on the anastomosis was observed. Tumor invasion of the aortic artery was suspected, and the patient was considered inoperable. He was treated with S-1/CDDP plus trastuzumab therapy as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen. After 4 courses of the chemotherapy, significant tumor reduction was observed, and the patient underwent anastomosis resection. Chemotherapy with trastuzumab appears to be an effective NAC treatment for HER2-positive, advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26805275

  11. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Lee, Chung Wa; Cho, Chi Hin; Chan, Francis Ka Leung; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2011-06-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D{sub 3} and p21{sup Waf1}, which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G{sub 1}-S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  12. The Role of Sonic Hedgehog Reemergence During Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jason; Donnelly, Jessica M.; Houghton, JeanMarie

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been extensively studied for its role in developmental biology and cancer biology. The association between Shh and cancer development in general is well established but the functional role of Shh in the development and progression of gastric cancer specifically is largely unknown. Bone marrow-derived stem cells, specifically mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) infiltrate and engraft into the gastric mucosa in response to the chronic inflammatory environment of Helicobacter infection. In this review, MSC infiltration and changes in the cytokine and cellular profiles of later-stage chronic environments will be tied into their interactions with the Shh pathway. We will discuss how these changes shape tumorigenesis and tumor progression in the gastric mucosa. The current review focuses on the Shh signaling pathway and its role in the development of gastric cancer, specifically in response to Helicobacter pylori infection. We follow with an in-depth discussion of the regulation of the Hedgehog pathway during acute and chronic gastric inflammation with a focus on signaling within the MSC compartment. PMID:20437100

  13. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  14. [Therapy of both surgical and non-surgical related complication of gastric cancer for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zheng, Jiabin

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common digestive malignant tumors. More and more elderly gastric cancer patients are diagnosed and need to undergo surgical treatment as the population ages. Since the elderly patients decrease in organ function and increase in internal diseases, the tolerance to anesthesia and surgery is poor. As a result, the incidence of surgical and postoperative complications is obviously higher. Complications can be divided into surgical complications and non-surgical related complications. Surgical complications consist mainly of hemorrhage, anastomotic leakage, anastomotic dehiscence and intestinal obstruction, while non-surgical related complications include deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary infection, anesthesia-related complication, abdominal infection, urinary infection, incision infection, poor wound healing, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, dumping syndrome and so on. Hence, we should consider more about the elderly patients' physical condition instead of the extent of radical operation. To reduce complications, we should evaluate the organ function and take an active role in underlying diseases before operation. Meanwhile, high quality nursing, powerful analgesia, anti-inflammation, keeping water electrolyte balance and nutrition support are also required postoperatively. Moreover, laparoscopic surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) can reduce the postoperative complications in elderly patients with gastric cancer as well. Further prospective randomized controlled trials about elderly gastric cancer should be carried out in the future, which can provide advanced evidences for treatment. PMID:27215514

  15. The metastasis suppressor SOX11 is an independent prognostic factor for improved survival in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    QU, YING; ZHOU, CHENFEI; ZHANG, JIANIAN; CAI, QU; LI, JIANFANG; DU, TAO; ZHU, ZHENGGANG; CUI, XIAOJIANG; LIU, BINGYA

    2014-01-01

    SOX11 is involved in gastrulation and in malignant diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SOX11 in gastric cancer and its expression pattern and clinical significance. SOX11 overexpression cell model was used to examine in vitro and in vivo the role of SOX11 in cell growth and metastasis. Cell cycle analysis and Annexin V/PI double staining were used to investigate the effect of SOX11 on cell cycle progression and apoptosis. The expression of SOX11 in human gastric cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of SOX11 expression with clinicopathological characteristics and survival of patients was analyzed by Pearson’s χ2 and Kaplan-Meier analyses, respectively. Cox’s proportional hazard model was employed in multivariate analysis. SOX11 overexpression did not inhibit cell growth but strongly suppressed cell migration/invasion in vitro and in vivo. We found a significant correlation between high SOX11 protein levels and Lauren’s classification (intestinal type), differentiation status (high and medium), and early TNM stage. SOX11 is an independent prognostic factor for improved survival in gastric cancer patients. SOX11 was a potential tumor-suppressor and an independent positive prognostic factor in gastric cancer patients with less advanced clinicopathological features. PMID:24604109

  16. Ropidoxuridine in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Bile Duct Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  17. Microvessel density is a prognostic marker of human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Chuan; Qin, Rong; Chen, Xiao-Xin; Sheng, Xia; Wu, Ji-Feng; Wang, Dao-Bin; Chen, Gui-Hua

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether microvessel density (MVD) is related with prognosis in gastric cancer patients, and the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vessel endothelial growth factor (VEGF) so as to determine the possible role of COX-2 and VEGF in gastric cancer angiogenesis. METHODS: Forty-seven formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of gastric cancer were evaluated for COX-2, VEGF by immunohistochemical staining. To assess tumor angiogenesis, MVD was determined by immunohistochemical staining of endothelial protein factor VIII-related antigen. The relationship among COX-2 and VEGF expression, MVD, and clinicopathologic parameters was analyzed. RESULTS: Among the 67 samples, high MVD was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and poor survival. Multivariate survival analysis showed that MVD value and lymph node metastasis were independent prognostic factors. The expression rate of COX-2 and VEGF was significantly higher than that of the adjacent tissues. COX-2 and VEGF expression in gastric cancer was significantly correlated with tumor differentiation and depth of invasion, but not with survival. The mean MVD value of COX-2 or VEGF positive tumors was higher than that of COX-2 or VEGF negative tumors. A significant correlation was found between the expressions of COX-2 and VEGF. CONCLUSION: MVD may be one of the important prognostic factors for gastric cancer patients. COX-2 and VEGF may play an important role in tumor progression by stimulating angiogenesis. VEGF might play a main role in the COX-2 angiogenic pathway. The inhibition of angiogenesis or COX-2, VEGF activity may have an important therapeutic benefit in the control of gastric cancer. PMID:17171787

  18. Gastric tube perforation after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Hideyuki; Nakachi, Takeshi; Tabuchi, Takanobu; Nagata, Hiroyuki; Takemura, Akira; Shimazaki, Jiro; Konishi, Satoru; Tabuchi, Takafumi

    2011-05-01

    We searched for cases of perforation of the gastric tube after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer by reviewing the literature. Only 13 cases were found in the English literature, and serious complications were seen in all cases, especially in cases of posterior mediastinal reconstruction. However, in the Japanese literature serious complications were also frequently seen in retrosternal reconstruction. Gastric tubes are at a higher risk of developing an ulcer than the normal stomach, including an ulcer due to Helicobacter pylori infection, insufficient blood supply, gastric stasis, and bile juice regurgitation. H. pylori eradication and acid-suppressive medications are important preventive therapies for ordinary gastric ulcers, but for gastric tube ulcers the effects of such treatments are still controversial. We tried to determine the most appropriate treatment to avoid serious complications in the gastric tubes, but we could not confirm an optimal route because each had advantages and disadvantages. However, at least in cases with severe atrophic gastritis due to H. pylori infection or a history of frequent peptic ulcer treatment, the antesternal route is clearly the best. Many cases of gastric tube ulcers involve no pain, and vagotomy may be one of the reasons for this absence of pain. Therefore, periodic endoscopic examination may be necessary to rule out the presence of an ulcer.

  19. TBL1XR1 Is Highly Expressed in Gastric Cancer and Predicts Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Liu, Ni; Zhang, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the expression of transducin- (β-) like 1 X-linked receptor 1 (TBL1XR1) in human gastric cancer (GC) and its correlation with prognostic and biologic significance. Methods. TBL1XR1 mRNA expression was analyzed in gastric cancer using a microarray dataset (GSE2701) from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of TBL1XR1 was performed on GC tissue microarray (TMA) to assess its prognostic and biological significance in 334 patients of GC. Results. Analysis of GSE2701 showed that the mRNA levels of TBL1XR1 were significantly elevated in primary gastric tumor and lymph node tissues than normal gastric tissues (P < 0.05). The same results of TBL1XR1 protein level were observed by IHC staining in 334 GC tissues. 204 of 334 (60.1%) primary gastric cancer tissues showed high expression of TBL1XR1 protein. TBL1XR1 overexpression was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.000) and advanced TNM stage (P = 0.001). Moreover, high levels of TBL1XR1 predicted worse overall survival (P = 0.015). Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that high expression of TBL1XR1 was an independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival (HR, 0.525; 95% confidence interval, 0.367–0.752; P = 0.005). Conclusion. This present study demonstrates that TBL1XR1 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and may be a potential predictor and therapeutic target for GC patients.

  20. TBL1XR1 Is Highly Expressed in Gastric Cancer and Predicts Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Liu, Ni; Zhang, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the expression of transducin- (β-) like 1 X-linked receptor 1 (TBL1XR1) in human gastric cancer (GC) and its correlation with prognostic and biologic significance. Methods. TBL1XR1 mRNA expression was analyzed in gastric cancer using a microarray dataset (GSE2701) from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of TBL1XR1 was performed on GC tissue microarray (TMA) to assess its prognostic and biological significance in 334 patients of GC. Results. Analysis of GSE2701 showed that the mRNA levels of TBL1XR1 were significantly elevated in primary gastric tumor and lymph node tissues than normal gastric tissues (P < 0.05). The same results of TBL1XR1 protein level were observed by IHC staining in 334 GC tissues. 204 of 334 (60.1%) primary gastric cancer tissues showed high expression of TBL1XR1 protein. TBL1XR1 overexpression was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.000) and advanced TNM stage (P = 0.001). Moreover, high levels of TBL1XR1 predicted worse overall survival (P = 0.015). Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that high expression of TBL1XR1 was an independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival (HR, 0.525; 95% confidence interval, 0.367–0.752; P = 0.005). Conclusion. This present study demonstrates that TBL1XR1 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and may be a potential predictor and therapeutic target for GC patients. PMID:27672238

  1. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: current status of the Austrain-Czech-German gastric cancer prevention trial (PRISMA-Study)

    PubMed Central

    Miehlke, S.; Kirsch, C.; Dragosics, B.; Gschwantler, M.; Oberhuber, G.; Antos, D.; Dite, P.; Luter, J.; Labenz, J.; Leodolter, A.; Malfertheiner, P.; Neubauer, A.; Ehninger, G.; Stolte, M.; rffer, E. Bayerdö

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori eradication alone can reduce the incidence of gastric cancer in a subgroup of individuals with an increased risk for this fatal disease. METHODS: It is a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled multinational multicenter trial. Men between 55 and 65 years of age with a gastric cancer phenotype of Helicobacter pylori gastritis are randomized to receive a 7 day course of omeprazole 2 × 20 mg, clarithromycin 2 × 500 mg, and amoxicillin 2 × 1 g for 7 days, or omeprazole 2 × 20 mg plus placebo. Follow-up endoscopy is scheduled 3 months after therapy, and thereafter in one-year intervals. Predefined study endpoints are gastric cancer, precancerous lesions (dysplasia, adenoma), other cancers, and death. RESULTS: Since March 1998, 1524 target patients have been screened, 279 patients (18.3%) had a corpus dominant type of H. pylori gastritis, and 167 of those were randomized (58.8%). In the active treatment group (n = 86), H. pylori infection infection was cured in 88.9% of patients. Currently, the cumulative follow-up time is 3046 months (253. 38 patient years, median follow up 16 months). So far, none of the patients developed gastric cancer or any precancerous lesion. Three (1.8%) patients reached study endpoints other than gastric cancer. CONCLUSION: Among men between 55 and 65 years of age, the gastric cancer phenotype of H. pylori gastritis appears to be more common than expected. Further follow up and continuing recruitment are necessary to fulfil the main aim of the study. PMID:11819768

  2. An Anticancer Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Yang, Jianqiang; Sun, Dongsheng; Li, Chunfeng; Xue, Yingwei; Jiang, Qiuying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Changqing; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be synthesized in mammalian cells by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and/or cystathionine β-synthase (CBS). Both CSE and CBS are expressed in rat gastric tissues but their role in human gastric neoplasia has been unclear. The aims of the present study were to detect CSE and CBS proteins in human gastric cancer and determine the effect of exogenous NaHS on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. We found that both CSE and CBS proteins were expressed in human gastric cancer cells and upregulated in human gastric carcinoma mucosa compared with those in noncancerous gastric samples. NaHS induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells by regulating apoptosis related proteins. Also, NaHS inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. An antigastric cancer role of H2S is thus indicated. PMID:26078811

  3. [Particular features of lymph dissection in operations for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Iaitskiĭ, A N; Danilov, I N

    2008-01-01

    In order to optimize the technique of lymph dissection, a method of intraoperative mapping of lymph outflow tracts was used with a lymphotropic dye Blue patente V. It allowed better orientation during lymphodissection in operations for gastric cancer. The detection and investigation of the "signal" lymph node as the most probable object of lymphogenic metastazing can improve the accuracy of postoperative staging of gastric cancer. Visualization of the lymph nodes in the preparation made it possible to increase the number of lymph nodes sent for histological investigation. PMID:18522180

  4. Long-Term Coffee Consumption and Risk of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shao-Bo; Weng, Hong; Zhou, Meng; Duan, Xiao-Li; Shen, Xian-Feng; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk remains controversial. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate and quantify the potential dose–response association between long-term coffee consumption and risk of gastric cancer. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase from January 1996 through February 10, 2015 and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved publications. Prospective cohort studies in which authors reported effect sizes and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of gastric cancer for 3 or more categories of coffee consumption were eligible. Results from eligible studies were aggregated using a random effect model. All analyses were carried out using the STATA 12.0 software. Nine studies involving 15 independent prospective cohorts were finally included. A total of 2019 incident cases of gastric cancer were ascertained among 1,289,314 participants with mean follow-up periods ranging from 8 to 18 years. No nonlinear relationship of coffee consumption with gastric cancer risk was indentified (P for nonlinearity = 0.53; P for heterogeneity = 0.004). The linear regression model showed that the combined relative risk (RR) of every 3 cups/day increment of total coffee consumption was 1.07 (95% CI = 0.95–1.21). Compared with the lowest category of coffee consumption, the RR of gastric cancer was 1.18 (95% CI = 0.90–1.55) for the highest (median 6.5 cups/day) category, 1.06 (95% CI = 0.85–1.32) for the second highest category (median 3.5 cups/day), and 0.97 (95% CI = 0.79–1.20) for the third highest category (median 1.5 cups/day). Subgroup analysis showed an elevated risk in the US population (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06–1.75) and no adjustment for smoking (RR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.08–2.59) for 6.5 cups/day. Current evidence indicated there was no nonlinear association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk. However, high

  5. [Particular features of lymph dissection in operations for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Iaitskiĭ, A N; Danilov, I N

    2008-01-01

    In order to optimize the technique of lymph dissection, a method of intraoperative mapping of lymph outflow tracts was used with a lymphotropic dye Blue patente V. It allowed better orientation during lymphodissection in operations for gastric cancer. The detection and investigation of the "signal" lymph node as the most probable object of lymphogenic metastazing can improve the accuracy of postoperative staging of gastric cancer. Visualization of the lymph nodes in the preparation made it possible to increase the number of lymph nodes sent for histological investigation.

  6. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wook Jin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of complications (e.g., wound/infectious complications) compared to well-nourished patients. Malnutrition is commonly found in advanced gastric cancer patients due to poor absorption of essential nutrients after surgery. Therefore, nutritional support protocols, such as early oral and enternal feeding, have been proposed in many studies, to improve unfavorable clinical outcomes and to reduce complications due to delayed application of oral nutritional support or parental feeding. Also, the supplied with enternal immune-enriched diet had more benefits in improving clinical outcomes and fewer complications compared to a group supplied with control formula. Using nutritional screening tools, such as nutritional risk index (NRI) and nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002), malnourished patients showed higher incidence of complications and lower survival rates than non-malnourished patients. However, a long-term nutritional intervention, such as nutritional counseling, was not effective in the patients. Therefore, early assessment of nutritional status in patients using a proper nutritional screening tool is suggested to prevent malnutrition and adverse health outcomes. Further studies with numerous ethnic groups may provide stronger scientific evidences in association between nutritional care and recovery from surgery in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27152296

  7. Genetic Analysis-Guided Dosing of FOLFIRABAX in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary; Adult Cholangiocarcinoma; Gallbladder Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Gastrointestinal Neoplasm; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ampulla of Vater Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Ampulla of Vater Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. An Unusual Case of Gastric Cancer Presenting with Breast Metastasis with Pleomorphic Microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Solomon Yig Joon; Lo, Sherwin Shing Wai; Chu, Chi Yeung; Ma, Ming Wai

    2012-01-01

    Breast metastasis from gastric carcinoma is rare. We present a case of right breast mass with microcalcification in which the diagnosis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma from the stomach was made after a biopsy. Pleomorphic microcalcification was noted in the ill-defined breast mass, which is a rare feature in breast metastasis. Since breast metastasis usually signifies advanced metastatic disease, differentiating primary breast cancer from metastasis is important for appropriate treatment. PMID:23091550

  9. Gastric cancer and coal mine dust exposure. A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.G.

    1983-10-01

    Based on evidence that coal miners have elevated gastric cancer mortality rates, a case-control study was developed to assess the gastric cancer risk of coal mine dust exposure. Forty-six cases of US white male gastric cancer deaths from NIOSH coal miner cohorts were individually matched by age to controls. From these data we show that a statistically elevated gastric cancer risk exists for miners who have prolonged exposure to coal mine dust and prolonged exposure to cigarette smoke. Coal workers' pneumoconiosis, a disease defined in terms of coal dust deposition in the lungs, was not found to be a gastric cancer risk.

  10. Paradoxical role of SOX2 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Santos, Juliana C; Garcia, Idoia; Brianti, Mitsue; García-Puga, Mikel; Pedrazzoli, José Jr; Matheu, Ander; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2016-01-01

    Sox2 is a critical regulator of embryogenesis and necessary for cellular reprogramming. It also plays an important role in tissue homeostasis and regeneration, maintaining the population of undifferentiated adult stem cells. Like various developmental and stem cell genes, SOX2 is aberrantly expressed and amplified in several human cancers. Moreover, functional studies have shown that it regulates many biological processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis, self-renewal and invasion. While it is oncogenic in most cancers, SOX2 activity is controversial in gastric cancer, where it might behave as a tumor suppressor in some situations. In this review, we discuss its role in cancer biology, with particular attention to what is known about the involvement of SOX2 in gastric cancer biology. PMID:27186426

  11. Function-preserving gastrectomy for gastric cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Eiji; Okajima, Kunio

    2016-07-14

    Surgery used to be the only therapy for gastric cancer, and since its ability to cure gastric cancer was the focus of attention, less attention was paid to function-preserving surgery in gastric cancer, though it was studied for gastroduodenal ulcer. Maki et al developed pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for gastric ulcer in 1967. At the same time, the definition of early gastric cancer (EGC) was being considered, histopathological investigations of EGC were carried out, and the validity of modified surgery was sustained. After the development of H2-blockers, the number of operations for gastroduodenal ulcers decreased, and the number of EGC patients increased simultaneously. As a result, the indications for pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for EGC in the middle third of the stomach extended, and various alterations were added. Since then, many kinds of function-preserving gastrectomies have been performed and studied in other fields of gastric cancer, and proximal gastrectomy, jejunal pouch interposition, segmental gastrectomy, and local resection have been performed. On the other hand, from the overall perspective, it can be said that endoscopic resection, which was launched at almost the same time, is the ultimate function-preserving surgery under the current circumstances. The current function-preserving gastrectomies that are often performed and studied are pylorus-preserving gastrectomy and proximal gastrectomy. The reasons for this are that these procedures that can be performed with systemic lymph node dissection, and they include three important elements: (1) reduction of the extent of gastrectomy; (2) preservation of the pylorus; and (3) preservation of the vagal nerve. In addition, these operations are more likely to be performed with a laparoscopic approach as minimally invasive surgery. Of the above-mentioned three elements, reduction of the extent of gastrectomy is the most important in our view. Therefore, we should try to reduce the extent of gastrectomy

  12. Function-preserving gastrectomy for gastric cancer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Eiji; Okajima, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    Surgery used to be the only therapy for gastric cancer, and since its ability to cure gastric cancer was the focus of attention, less attention was paid to function-preserving surgery in gastric cancer, though it was studied for gastroduodenal ulcer. Maki et al developed pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for gastric ulcer in 1967. At the same time, the definition of early gastric cancer (EGC) was being considered, histopathological investigations of EGC were carried out, and the validity of modified surgery was sustained. After the development of H2-blockers, the number of operations for gastroduodenal ulcers decreased, and the number of EGC patients increased simultaneously. As a result, the indications for pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for EGC in the middle third of the stomach extended, and various alterations were added. Since then, many kinds of function-preserving gastrectomies have been performed and studied in other fields of gastric cancer, and proximal gastrectomy, jejunal pouch interposition, segmental gastrectomy, and local resection have been performed. On the other hand, from the overall perspective, it can be said that endoscopic resection, which was launched at almost the same time, is the ultimate function-preserving surgery under the current circumstances. The current function-preserving gastrectomies that are often performed and studied are pylorus-preserving gastrectomy and proximal gastrectomy. The reasons for this are that these procedures that can be performed with systemic lymph node dissection, and they include three important elements: (1) reduction of the extent of gastrectomy; (2) preservation of the pylorus; and (3) preservation of the vagal nerve. In addition, these operations are more likely to be performed with a laparoscopic approach as minimally invasive surgery. Of the above-mentioned three elements, reduction of the extent of gastrectomy is the most important in our view. Therefore, we should try to reduce the extent of gastrectomy

  13. Adjuvant Treatment for Gastric Cancer: Chemotherapy Versus Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Noman; Hoffe, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Surgery is the only curative modality, but mortality remains high because a significant number of patients have recurrence after complete surgical resection. Chemotherapy, radiation, and chemoradiotherapy have all been studied in an attempt to reduce the risk for relapse and improve survival. There is no globally accepted standard of care for resectable gastric cancer, and treatment strategies vary across the world. Postoperative chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin is most commonly practiced in the United States; however, recent clinical trials from Asia have shown benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy alone and have questioned the role of radiation. In this review, we examine the current literature on adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and discuss the roles of radiation and chemotherapy, particularly in light of these new data and their applicability to the Western population. We highlight some of the ongoing and planned clinical trials in resectable gastric cancer and identify future directions as well as areas where further research is needed. PMID:23966224

  14. Gastric cancer and the epoch of immunotherapy approaches.

    PubMed

    Niccolai, Elena; Taddei, Antonio; Prisco, Domenico; Amedei, Amedeo

    2015-05-21

    The incidence of gastric cancer (GC) fell dramatically over the last 50 years, but according to IARC-Globocan 2008, it is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths with a case fatality GC ratio higher than other common malignancies. Surgical resection is the primary curative treatment for GC though the overall 5-year survival rate remains poor (approximately 20%-25%). To improve the outcome of resectable gastric cancer, different treatment strategies have been evaluated such as adjuvant or perioperative chemotherapy. In resected gastric cancer, the addition of radiotherapy to chemotherapy does not appear to provide any additional benefit. Moreover, in metastatic patients, chemotherapy is the mainstay of palliative therapy with a median overall survival of 8-10 mo and objective response rates of merely 20%-40%. Therefore, the potential for making key beneficial progress is to investigate the GC molecular biology to realize innovative therapeutic strategies, such as specific immunotherapy. In this review, we provide a panoramic view of the different immune-based strategies used for gastric cancer treatment and the results obtained in the most significant clinical trials. In detail, firstly we describe the therapeutic approaches that utilize the monoclonal antibodies while in the second part we analyze the cell-based immunotherapies.

  15. Serum biomarker panels for diagnosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Weihua; Ye, Fei; He, Liang; Cui, Lifeng; Cui, Miao; Hu, Yuan; Li, Wei; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, David Y; Suo, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently, serum biomarkers that are sufficiently sensitive and specific for early detection and risk classification of gastric adenocarcinomas are not known. In this study, ten serum markers were assessed using the Luminex system and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of gastric cancer and analysis of the relation between prognosis and metastases. Patients and methods A training set consisting of 228 gastric adenocarcinoma and 190 control samples was examined. A Luminex multiplex panel with nine biomarkers, consisting of three proteins discovered through our previous studies and six proteins previously reported to be cancer-associated, was constructed. One additional biomarker was detected using a commercial kit containing EDTA. Logistic regression, random forest (RF), and support vector machine (SVM) were used to identify the panel of discriminatory biomarkers in the training set. After selecting five proteins as candidate biomarkers, multivariate classification analyses were used to identify algorithms for diagnostic biomarker combinations. These algorithms were independently validated using a set of 57 gastric adenocarcinoma and 48 control samples. Results Serum pepsinogen I, serum pepsinogen II, A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 8 (ADAM8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and serum IgG to Helicobacter pylori were selected as classifiers in the three algorithms. These algorithms differentiated between the majority of gastric adenocarcinoma and control serum samples in the training/test set with high accuracy (RF 79.0%, SVM 83.8%, logistic regression 76.2%). These algorithms also differentiated the samples in the validation set (accuracy: RF 82.5%, SVM 86.1%, logistic regression 78.7%). Conclusion A panel of combinatorial biomarkers comprising VEGF, ADAM8, IgG to H. pylori, serum pepsinogen I, and pepsinogen II were developed. The use of biomarkers is a less invasive method for the diagnosis of

  16. Expression of TFF1, TFF2 and TFF3 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirikoshi, Hiroyuki; Katoh, Masaru

    2002-09-01

    Expression of some members of the trefoil factor (TFF) and the WNT gene families is regulated together by estrogen. We have cloned and characterized human WNT signaling molecules using bioinformatics, cDNA-library screening and cDNA-PCR to investigate expression profile of WNT signaling molecules in human gastric cancer. Here, we investigated expression profile of TFF1/pS2, TFF2/SP and TFF3/ITF in human gastric cancer. Among 7 gastric cancer cell lines, TFF1 was expressed in OKAJIMA, TMK1, MKN45, and KATO-III, TFF2 in KATO-III, and TFF3 in MKN45 and KATO-III. TFFs were preferentially expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancer cell lines. Expression of TFFs in primary gastric cancer was next investigated. TFF1 was down-regulated in 7 cases out of 12 cases (58.3%) of primary gastric cancer. TFF2 was down-regulated in 10 out of 12 cases (83.3%) of primary gastric cancer. TFF3 was down-regulated in 2 out of 12 cases (16.7%) of primary gastric cancer, and was up-regulated in 5 out of 12 cases (41.7%). TFF1 and TFF2 were frequently down-regulated in primary gastric cancer, while TFF3 was up-regulated in some cases of primary gastric cancer. This is the first report on comprehensive expression analyses on TFFs in gastric cancer.

  17. Irinotecan Hydrochloride With or Without Alvocidib in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  18. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection of an Inverted Early Gastric Cancer-Forming False Gastric Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-il; Lee, Sang-kil

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a standard treatment for early gastric cancer (EGC) that does not have any risk of lymph node or distant metastases. Here, we report a case of EGC resembling a diverticulum. Diverticular formation makes it difficult for endoscopists to determine the depth of invasion and to subsequently perform ESD. Because the false diverticulum does not have a muscular layer, this lesion can be treated with ESD. Our case was successfully treated with ESD. After ESD, the EGC was confined to the submucosal layer without vertical and lateral margin involvement. This is the first case in which ESD was successfully performed for a case of EGC that coexisted with a false gastric diverticulum. An additional, larger study is needed to determine the efficacy of ESD in various types of EGC, such as a false gastric diverticulum. PMID:26855930

  19. Biomarkers for antitumor activity of bevacizumab in gastric cancer models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody to human vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) and has been used for many types of cancers such as colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, and glioblastoma. Bevacizumab might be effective against gastric cancer, because VEGF has been reported to be involved in the development of gastric cancer as well as other cancers. On the other hand, there are no established biomarkers to predict the bevacizumab efficacy in spite of clinical needs. Therefore, we tried to identify the predictive markers for efficacy of bevacizumab in gastric cancer patients by using bevacizumab-sensitive and insensitive tumor models. Methods Nine human gastric and two colorectal cancer mouse xenografts were examined for their sensitivity to bevacizumab. We examined expression levels of angiogenic factors by ELISA, bioactivity of VEGF by phosphorylation of VEGFR2 in HUVEC after addition of tumor homogenate, tumor microvessel density by CD31-immunostaining, and polymorphisms of the VEGF gene by HybriProbe™ assay. Results Of the 9 human gastric cancer xenograft models used, GXF97, MKN-45, MKN-28, 4-1ST, SC-08-JCK, and SC-09-JCK were bevacizumab-sensitive, whereas SCH, SC-10-JCK, and NCI-N87 were insensitive. The sensitivity of the gastric cancer model to bevacizumab was not related to histological type or HER2 status. All tumors with high levels of VEGF were bevacizumab-sensitive except for one, SC-10-JCK, which had high levels of VEGF. The reason for the refractoriness was non-bioactivity on the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and micro-vessel formation of VEGF, but was not explained by the VEGF allele or VEGF165b. We also examined the expression levels of other angiogenic factors in the 11 gastrointestinal tumor tissues. In the refractory models including SC-10-JCK, tumor levels of another angiogenic factor, bFGF, were relatively high. The VEGF/bFGF ratio correlated more closely with sensitivity to bevacizumab

  20. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for gastric cancer and other less common disease histologies: is it time?

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Paul L.; Kwong, Mei Li M.; Sabesan, Arvind; Sorber, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide, and once spread to the peritoneum, has a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Recent years have demonstrated advances in the use of cytoreductive surgery