Science.gov

Sample records for advanced glass melting

  1. Technical Advances in the Continuous Melting of Phosphate Laser Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T; Thorsness, C; Campbell, J; Takeuchi, K; Suzuki, K; Yamamoto, K; Cimino, J; Thorne, A; Hayden, J

    2001-09-05

    Continuous melting of phosphate laser glass is now being used for the first time to prepare meter-scale amplifier optics for megajoule lasers. The scale-up to continuous melting from the previous one-at-a-time ''discontinuous'' batch process has allowed for the production of glass at rates more than 20 times faster, 5 times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality. Almost 8000 slabs of laser glass will be used in high-energy, high-peak-power laser systems that are being designed and built for fusion energy research. The success of this new continuous melting process, which is a result of a six year joint R&D program between government and industry, stems from numerous technical advances which include (1) dehydroxylating the glass to concentrations less than {approx}100 ppm OH; (2) minimizing damage-causing Pt-inclusions; (3) preventing glass fracture; (4) minimizing impurities such as Cu and Fe to <20 ppm; (5) improving forming methods to get high optical homogeneity glass; and (6) developing large aperture quality assurance tools to verify properties of the glass.

  2. Advanced coal-fired glass melting development program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The objective of Phase 1 of the current contract was to verify the technical feasibility and economic benefits of Vortec's advanced combustion/melting technology using coal as the fuel of choice. The objective of the Phase 2 effort was to improve the performance of the primary components and demonstrate the effective operation of a subscale process heater system integrated with a glass separator/reservoir. (VC)

  3. Manufacturing laser glass by continuous melting

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Suratwala, T; krenitsky, S; Takeuchi, K

    2000-07-01

    A novel, continuous melting process is being used to manufacture meter-sized plates of laser glass at a rate 20-times faster, 5-times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality than with previous one-at-a-time, ''discontinuous'' technology processes. This new technology for manufacturing laser glass, which is arguably the most difficult continuously-melted optical material ever produced, comes as a result of a $60 million, six-year joint R&D program between government and industry. The glasses manufactured by the new continuous melting process are Nd-doped phosphate-based glasses and are marketed under the product names LG-770 (Schott Glass Technologies) and LHG-8 (Hoya Corporation USA). With this advance in glass manufacturing technology, it is now possible to construct high-energy, high-peak-power lasers for use in fusion energy development, national defense, and basic physics research that would have been impractical to build using the old melting technology. The development of continuously melted laser glass required technological advances that have lead to improvements in the manufacture of other optical glass products as well. For example, advances in forming, annealing, and conditioning steps of the laser glass continuous melting process are now being used in manufacture of other large-size optical glasses.

  4. Method and apparatus for melting glass batch

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.; Walkup, Paul C.; Mudge, Lyle K.

    1988-01-01

    A glass melting system involving preheating, precalcining, and prefluxing of batch materials prior to injection into a glass furnace. The precursors are heated by convection rather than by radiation in present furnaces. Upon injection into the furnace, batch materials are intimately coated with molten flux so as to undergo or at least begin the process of dissolution reaction prior to entering the melt pool.

  5. Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting Research Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, John J.; McConnell, John F.; Henry, Vincent I.; MacDonald, Blake A.; Gallagher, Robert J.; Field, William B.; Walsh, Peter M.; Simmons, Michael C.; Adams, Michael E.; Leadbetter, James M.; Tomasewski, Jack W.; Operacz, Walter J.; Houf, William G.; Davis, James W.; Marvin, Bart G.; Gunner, Bruce E.; Farrell, Rick G.; Bivins, David P.; Curtis, Warren; Harris, James E.

    2004-08-01

    solution of proprietary glass production problems. As a consequence of the substantial increase in scale and scope of the initial furnace concept in response to industry recommendations, constraints on funding of industrial programs by DOE, and reorientation of the Department's priorities, the OIT Glass Program is unable to provide the support for construction of such a facility. However, it is the present investigators' hope that a group of industry partners will emerge to carry the project forward, taking advantage of the detailed furnace design presented in this report. The engineering, including complete construction drawings, bill of materials, and equipment specifications, is complete. The project is ready to begin construction as soon as the quotations are updated. The design of the research melter closely follows the most advanced industrial practice, firing by natural gas with oxygen. The melting area is 13 ft x 6 ft, with a glass depth of 3 ft and an average height in the combustion space of 3 ft. The maximum pull rate is 25 tons/day, ranging from 100% batch to 100% cullet, continuously fed, with variable batch composition, particle size distribution, and raft configuration. The tank is equipped with bubblers to control glass circulation. The furnace can be fired in three modes: (1) using a single large burner mounted on the front wall, (2) by six burners in a staggered/opposed arrangement, three in each breast wall, and (3) by down-fired burners mounted in the crown in any combination with the front wall or breast-wall-mounted burners. Horizontal slots are provided between the tank blocks and tuck stones and between the breast wall and skewback blocks, running the entire length of the furnace on both sides, to permit access to the combustion space and the surface of the glass for optical measurements and sampling probes. Vertical slots in the breast walls provide additional access for measurements and sampling. The furnace and tank are to be fully instrumented

  6. Production of Synthetic Nuclear Melt Glass.

    PubMed

    Molgaard, Joshua J; Auxier, John D; Giminaro, Andrew V; Oldham, Colton J; Gill, Jonathan; Hall, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Realistic surrogate nuclear debris is needed within the nuclear forensics community to test and validate post-detonation analysis techniques. Here we outline a novel process for producing bulk surface debris using a high temperature furnace. The material developed in this study is physically and chemically similar to trinitite (the melt glass produced by the first nuclear test). This synthetic nuclear melt glass is assumed to be similar to the vitrified material produced near the epicenter (ground zero) of any surface nuclear detonation in a desert environment. The process outlined here can be applied to produce other types of nuclear melt glass including that likely to be formed in an urban environment. This can be accomplished by simply modifying the precursor matrix to which this production process is applied. The melt glass produced in this study has been analyzed and compared to trinitite, revealing a comparable crystalline morphology, physical structure, void fraction, and chemical composition. PMID:26779720

  7. Analysis of the continuous melting of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A R

    1984-01-01

    Some historical aspects of continuous glass melting are recalled. Then, an overall heat balance of the process is used to illustrate that future improvements will be achieved by different means than those which have been successful in the past. The heat balance also permits comparison of ohmic melting with combustion melting when the primary energy source in both cases is coal. A simplified analysis of batch melting begins by defining a melted batch according to its effective viscosity and proceeds to calculate the temperature distribution in a cold tap batch blanket. Then, the fraction liquid as a function of temperature is determined. 15 references, 7 figures.

  8. Terrestrial impact melt rocks and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    2001-12-01

    The effects of meteorite and comet impact on Earth are rock brecciation, the formation of shock metamorphic features, rock melting, and the formation of impact structures, i.e. simple craters, complex craters, and multi-ring basins. Large events, such as the 65-Ma Chicxulub impact, are believed to have had catastrophic environmental effects that profoundly influenced the development of life on Earth. In this review, an attempt is made to summarize some of the voluminous literature on impact melting, one important aspect of planetary impact, provide some comments on this process, and to make suggestions for future research. The products of impact melting are glasses, impact melt rocks, and pseudotachylites. Our treatise deals mainly with the geological setting, petrography, and major-element chemistry of melt rocks and glasses. Impact glasses, in several petrographic aspects, are similar to volcanic glasses, but they are associated with shock metamorphosed mineral and rock fragments and, in places, with siderophile element anomalies suggestive of meteoritic contamination. They are found in allogenic breccia deposits within (fall-back 'suevite') and outside (fall-out 'suevite') impact craters and, as spherules, in distal ejecta. Large events, such as the K/T boundary Chicxulub impact, are responsible for the formation of worldwide ejecta horizons which are associated with siderophile element anomalies and shock metamorphosed mineral and rock debris. Impact glasses have a bulk chemical composition that is homogeneous but exemptions to this rule are common. On a microscopic scale, however, impact glasses are commonly strikingly heterogeneous. Tektites are glasses ejected from craters over large distances. They are characterized by very low water and volatile contents and element abundances and ratios that are evidence that tektites formed by melting of upper crustal, sedimentary rocks. Four tektite strewn-fields are known, three of which can be tied to specific impact

  9. Terrestrial impact melt rocks and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    2001-12-01

    The effects of meteorite and comet impact on Earth are rock brecciation, the formation of shock metamorphic features, rock melting, and the formation of impact structures, i.e. simple craters, complex craters, and multi-ring basins. Large events, such as the 65-Ma Chicxulub impact, are believed to have had catastrophic environmental effects that profoundly influenced the development of life on Earth. In this review, an attempt is made to summarize some of the voluminous literature on impact melting, one important aspect of planetary impact, provide some comments on this process, and to make suggestions for future research. The products of impact melting are glasses, impact melt rocks, and pseudotachylites. Our treatise deals mainly with the geological setting, petrography, and major-element chemistry of melt rocks and glasses. Impact glasses, in several petrographic aspects, are similar to volcanic glasses, but they are associated with shock metamorphosed mineral and rock fragments and, in places, with siderophile element anomalies suggestive of meteoritic contamination. They are found in allogenic breccia deposits within (fall-back 'suevite') and outside (fall-out 'suevite') impact craters and, as spherules, in distal ejecta. Large events, such as the K/T boundary Chicxulub impact, are responsible for the formation of worldwide ejecta horizons which are associated with siderophile element anomalies and shock metamorphosed mineral and rock debris. Impact glasses have a bulk chemical composition that is homogeneous but exemptions to this rule are common. On a microscopic scale, however, impact glasses are commonly strikingly heterogeneous. Tektites are glasses ejected from craters over large distances. They are characterized by very low water and volatile contents and element abundances and ratios that are evidence that tektites formed by melting of upper crustal, sedimentary rocks. Four tektite strewn-fields are known, three of which can be tied to specific impact

  10. Thermally efficient melting for glass making

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael S. K.; Painter, Corning F.; Pastore, Steven P.; Roth, Gary; Winchester, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is an integrated process for the production of glass utilizing combustion heat to melt glassmaking materials in a glassmaking furnace. The fuel combusted to produce heat sufficient to melt the glassmaking materials is combusted with oxygen-enriched oxidant to reduce heat losses from the offgas of the glassmaking furnace. The process further reduces heat losses by quenching hot offgas from the glassmaking furnace with a process stream to retain the heat recovered from quench in the glassmaking process with subsequent additional heat recovery by heat exchange of the fuel to the glassmaking furnace, as well as the glassmaking materials, such as batch and cullet. The process includes recovery of a commercially pure carbon dioxide product by separatory means from the cooled, residual offgas from the glassmaking furnace.

  11. Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter

    SciTech Connect

    David Rue

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

  12. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    This flight definition project has the specific objective of investigating the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in high temperature inorganic oxide, glass forming melts in microgravity. It is related to one1 of our previous NASA projects that was concerned with glass formation for high temperature containerless melts in microgravity. The previous work culminated in two experiments which were conducted aboard the space shuttle in 1983 and 1985 and which consisted of melting (at 1500 C) and cooling levitated 6 to 8 mm diameter spherical samples in a Single Axis Acoustic Levitator (SAAL) furnace. Compared to other types of materials, there have been relatively few experiments, 6 to 8, conducted on inorganic glasses in space. These experiments have been concerned with mass transport (alkali diffusion), containerless melting, critical cooling rate for glass formation, chemical homogeneity, fiber pulling, and crystallization of glass forming melts. One of the most important and consistent findings in all of these experiments has been that the glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization (better glass former) and more chemically homogeneous than equivalent glasses made on earth (1g). The chemical composition of the melt appears relatively unimportant since the same general results have been reported for oxide, fluoride and chalcogenide melts. These results for space-processed glasses have important implications, since glasses with a higher resistance to crystallization or higher chemical homogeneity than those attainable on earth can significantly advance applications in areas such as fiber optics communications, high power laser glasses, and other photonic devices where glasses are the key functional materials. The classical theories for nucleation and crystal growth for a glass or melt do not contain any parameter that is directly dependent upon the g-value, so it is not readily apparent why glasses prepared in microgravity should be

  13. Determination of Reactive Surface Area of Melt Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier,W.L.; Roberts, S.; Smith, D.K.; Hulsey, S.; Newton,L.; Sawvel, A.; Bruton, C.; Papelis, C.; Um, W.; Russell, C. E.; Chapman,J.

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of natural and manmade silicate glasses, and nuclear melt glass was undertaken in order to derive an estimate of glass reactive surface area. Reactive surface area is needed to model release rates of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass in the subsurface. Because of the limited availability of nuclear melt glasses, natural volcanic glass samples were collected which had similar textures and compositions as those of melt glass. A flow-through reactor was used to measure the reactive surface area of the analog glasses in the presence of simplified NTS site ground waters. A measure of the physical surface area of these glasses was obtained using the BET gas-adsorption method. The studies on analog glasses were supplemented by measurement of the surface areas of pieces of actual melt glass using the BET method. The variability of the results reflect the sample preparation and measurement techniques used, as well as textural heterogeneity inherent to these samples. Based on measurements of analog and actual samples, it is recommended that the hydraulic source term calculations employ a range of 0.001 to 0.01 m{sup 2}/g for the reactive surface area of nuclear melt glass.

  14. Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas D; Yue, Yuanzheng; Li, Peng; Qiao, Ang; Tao, Haizheng; Greaves, Neville G; Richards, Tom; Lampronti, Giulio I; Redfern, Simon A T; Blanc, Frédéric; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Cheetham, Anthony K; Keen, David A

    2016-03-16

    Crystalline solids dominate the field of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), with access to the liquid and glass states of matter usually prohibited by relatively low temperatures of thermal decomposition. In this work, we give due consideration to framework chemistry and topology to expand the phenomenon of the melting of 3D MOFs, linking crystal chemistry to framework melting temperature and kinetic fragility of the glass-forming liquids. Here we show that melting temperatures can be lowered by altering the chemistry of the crystalline MOF state, which provides a route to facilitate the melting of other MOFs. The glasses formed upon vitrification are chemically and structurally distinct from the three other existing categories of melt-quenched glasses (inorganic nonmetallic, organic, and metallic), and retain the basic metal-ligand connectivity of crystalline MOFs, which connects their mechanical properties to their starting chemical composition. The transfer of functionality from crystal to glass points toward new routes to tunable, functional hybrid glasses.

  15. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2001-01-01

    This flight definition project has the specific objective of investigating the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in high temperature inorganic oxide, glass forming melts in microgravity. It is related to one of our previous NASA projects that was concerned with glass formation for high temperature containerless melts in microgravity. The previous work culminated in two experiments which were conducted aboard the space shuttle in 1983 and 1985 and which consisted of melting (at 1500 C) and cooling levitated 6 to 8 mm diameter spherical samples in a Single Axis Acoustic Levitator (SAAL) furnace. Compared to other types of materials, there have been relatively few experiments, 6 to 8, conducted on inorganic glasses in space. These experiments have been concerned with mass transport (alkali diffusion), containerless melting, critical cooling rate for glass formation, chemical homogeneity, fiber pulling, and crystallization of glass forming melts. One of the most important and consistent findings in all of these experiments has been that the glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization (better glass former) and more chemically homogeneous than equivalent glasses made on Earth (1 g). The chemical composition of the melt appears relatively unimportant since the same general results have been reported for oxide, fluoride and chalcogenide melts. These results for space-processed glasses have important implications, since glasses with a higher resistance to crystallization or higher chemical homogeneity than those attainable on Earth can significantly advance applications in areas such as fiber optics communications, high power laser glasses, and other photonic devices where glasses are the key functional materials.

  16. Redox of Simulated Nuclear Waste Glass Forming Melts

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, Sara C.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2001-12-01

    Glasses are found in most reduction-oxidation (redox) items that are used everyday; from automobiles to planes. With stability of most glasses, they are being used to store hazardous waste materials. Many elements have different oxidation states and are found in multiple states in glasses. Redox of glasses has significant effect on processing of waste glass melts in melters as well as properties of the waste forms. Nuclear waste glasses generally have complex chemistry (including several redox ions) and form corrosive melts. Basic objective: study the redox of the glasses containing Fe and Ni with square wave voltammetry. A basic simulated frit glass was used for vitrification. The frit composition used was 57.90% SiO2, 17.70% Na2O, 14.70% B2O3, 5.70% Li2O, 2.00% MgO, 1.00% TiO2, 0.50% ZrO2, and 0.50% La2O3. Batch glasses were synthesized and then dopants of Fe2O3 , NiO, and a combination of Fe2O3-NiO were added in 1-wt % amounts. The glass was melted at 1150 C and held for 24 hours. It was poured to the top of a medium sized Pt/Rh crucible and placed in a furnace at 1150 C. The glass powder was allowed to melt for five minutes before the testing apparatus was placed in the melt. The testing apparatus was composed of a Pt/Rh working electrode, Pt/Rh counter electrode, and a Zr/Al reference electrode. The counter electrode is placed in the melt until it is touching the bottom of the crucible creating a closed circuit. Both the reference electrode and working electrode are located half way down the counter electrode. The test showed that melt resistivity was high indicating the amount of conductivity in the melt. Sample melt volume and area of the working electrode were high. Adjusting the crucible size and sizing other electrodes will improve the measurements. Future work: testing NiO glass and Fe2O3-NiO glass to see the interaction between the Fe and the Ni and synthesis of 2 wt %, 3 wt %, and 5-wt % Fe2O3 doped glasses to study effects of Fe concentration.

  17. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-09-23

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste uranium oxides The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  18. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  19. Bioactive ceramic glasses in situ synthesized by laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taca, Mihaela; Vasile, Eugeniu; Boroica, Lucica; Udrea, Mircea; Medianu, Rares; Munteanu, Maria Cristina

    2008-10-01

    The synthesis of bioactive glass from raw materials even during the laser deposition process, could provide formation of a biocompatible layer on the metallic prosthesis. During the laser irradiation melting and ultrarapid solidification of ceramic materials occur and glasses controlled by the process parameters (especially laser power and solidification rate) will be obtained. The aim of the present paper is to study the influence of the processing parameters on the laser synthesized glasses chemical composition, structure and bioactive behaviour.

  20. Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas D; Yue, Yuanzheng; Li, Peng; Qiao, Ang; Tao, Haizheng; Greaves, Neville G; Richards, Tom; Lampronti, Giulio I; Redfern, Simon A T; Blanc, Frédéric; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Cheetham, Anthony K; Keen, David A

    2016-03-16

    Crystalline solids dominate the field of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), with access to the liquid and glass states of matter usually prohibited by relatively low temperatures of thermal decomposition. In this work, we give due consideration to framework chemistry and topology to expand the phenomenon of the melting of 3D MOFs, linking crystal chemistry to framework melting temperature and kinetic fragility of the glass-forming liquids. Here we show that melting temperatures can be lowered by altering the chemistry of the crystalline MOF state, which provides a route to facilitate the melting of other MOFs. The glasses formed upon vitrification are chemically and structurally distinct from the three other existing categories of melt-quenched glasses (inorganic nonmetallic, organic, and metallic), and retain the basic metal-ligand connectivity of crystalline MOFs, which connects their mechanical properties to their starting chemical composition. The transfer of functionality from crystal to glass points toward new routes to tunable, functional hybrid glasses. PMID:26885940

  1. Melting and solidification of Bi nanoparticles in a germanate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro-Poniatowski, E.; Jiménez de Castro, M.; Fernández Navarro, J. M.; Morhange, J. F.; Ricolleau, C.

    2007-08-01

    A very large melting-solidification hysteresis of Bi nanoparticles embedded in a bulk alkali germanate glass is reported. Heating and cooling cycles are reproducible and show reversible transitions. High resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the glass contains nanocrystals of elementary Bi which are a few tenths of a nanometre in size. Upon heating above the Bi melting temperature the glass transmission increases up to 10% with respect to the initial value, which is most likely related to Bi melting. Upon cooling this high transmission state remains up to temperatures as low as 436 K. This behaviour is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy measurements. This nanostructured glass with a high refractive index can be used in nonlinear optical applications as well as an optical thermo-sensor.

  2. Recovery of recyclable metals from waste glass melts

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A.B.; Schreiber, H.D.

    1994-12-31

    The redox chemistries of copper and silver were determined in borosilicate glass melts representative of those to be used in nuclear waste immobilization and electronic circuit board vitrification. The recovery of these elements during waste processing depend on their solubilities, which are controlled by the Cu{sup 2+}-Cu{sup +}-Cu{sup 0} and Ag{sup +}-Ag{sup 0} redox equilibria in the melt. The copper and the silver redox equilibria operate independently without interaction in melts simultaneously containing both elements. The individual equilibria are independent of the total content of copper (to 10 wt%) and of silver (to 5 wt%) in glass. Immiscible metallic copper separates from the melt at oxygen fugacities more reducing than that required for silver metal precipitation. After settling, the metallic liquids tend to react at the melt/metal interface with the alumina container and {open_quotes}drill{close_quotes} through the container bottom under oxidizing conditions.

  3. Glasses and Melts under Compression and Surface Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Upon compression and confinement (near surfaces), glasses are expected to be subject to successive structural transitions with multiple densification and confinement mechanisms. Experimental verification of these phenomena remain a major target of glass-melt studies. Here, we provide an overview of the recent progress by solid-state NMR and inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) into structures of multi-component silicate and oxide glasses with varying pressure, composition (with fluid contents), and confinement [e.g., Lee et al. Rev. Min. Geochem. 2014, 78, 139; Lee and Ahn, Sci. Report, 2014, 4, 4200; Lee and Kim, J. Phys. Chem. C. 2015, 119 748]. O-17 NMR studies reveal the presence of metal-bridging oxygen in orthosilicate glasses (an analogue to peridotite melts) and allow direct quantification of the degree of Metal/Si disorder with composition and pressure. Despite the pronounced paramagnetic effect, detailed structural changes in iron-bearing silicate glasses can now be probed using solid-state NMR techniques. NMR results for the multi-component silicate glasses melts at high pressure highlight the moderate deviation from the degree of Al avoidance among framework cations (Si and Al) and preferential proximity between non-network cations and non-bridging oxygen. In contrast to an expected complexity in densification, experimental NMR and IXS results for glasses demonstrate that the pressure-induced changes in melt structures show a simple trend where the effect composition and pressure can be predicted with network flexibility. Solid-state NMR techniques revealed the unknown structural details of oxide glasses and melts near surfaces and interfaces: the coordination environments in the surface confined oxide glasses are distinct from those of bulk, highlighted by a decrease in the fractions of high-energy clusters (and thus the degree of disorder) near interface. The structure of glass surfaces is also affected by the types of interfaces (e.g. crystalline vs

  4. Dissolution retardation of solid silica during glass batch-melting

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose

    2011-07-15

    During glass-batch melting, solid silica (quartz) usually dissolves last. A retardation function was defined as a measure of the progressive inhibition of silica dissolution that occurs during batch melting. This function is based on the comparison of the measured rate of dissolution of silica particles with the hypothetical diffusion-controlled volume flux from regularly distributed particles with uniform concentration layers around them. The severe inhibition of silica dissolution has been attributed to the irregular spatial distribution of silica particles that is associated with the formation of nearly saturated melt at a portion of their surfaces. Irregular shapes and unequal sizes of particles also contribute to their extended lifetime.

  5. Glass Nanofibers from Fragile Melts Produced by Laser Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieste, O.; Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    Laser Spinning is a new technique enabling the production of large quantity of very long amorphous ceramic nanofibers. This technique has been successfully tested with different material compositions, probing its capability to produce fibers of inorganic oxides that cannot be produced by any other technique. Precise control of the process allows for the production of amorphous nanofibers of non-ready glass former materials and the unprecedented synthesis of glass nanofibers from very fragile melts. This outcome demonstrates the capability for the synthesis of glass nanofibers with applications in the field of fire retardant fabrics, catalysis or high refractory materials.

  6. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2004-11-02

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  7. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-10-07

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  8. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  9. Containerless processing of glass forming melts in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, D. E.; Ray, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    The near weightlessness of a material in the reduced gravity environment of space offers the opportunity of melting and cooling glass forming compositions without a container. This reduces the heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization which usually occurs at the walls of the container, thereby, extending the range of glass forming compositions. Based primarily on this idea, containerless glass forming experiments, which used a single axis acoustic levitator/furnace (SAAL), were conducted on SPAR rocket flights, 6 and 8, and on Space Shuttle mission, STS-7 and STS-61A. The experiments on the Space Shuttle were designed to include other studies related to melt homogenization and mixing, development of techniques for preparing uncontaminated preflight samples, and simple shaping experiments.

  10. Effect of glass-batch makeup on the melting process

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R; Schweiger, Michael J; Humrickhouse, Carissa J; Moody, J Adam; Tate, Rachel M; Rainsdon, Timothy T; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E; Arrigoni, Benjamin M; Marcial, Jose; Rodriguez, Carmen P; Tincher, Benjamin

    2010-03-29

    The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5-μm in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800°C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass-forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, ±75 μm in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800°C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160°C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B2O3, CaO, Li2O, MgO, and Na2O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

  11. Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

    2006-01-17

    This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore

  12. Experimental Investigation on Selective Laser Melting of Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateri, Miranda; Gebhardt, Andreas; Thuemmler, Stefan; Thurn, Laura

    Although laser-based Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes have been investigated extensively for use with different materials, fabrication of 3D glass objects using Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology is not well developed even though it has many applications. As such an experimental investigation on the process parameters of glass powder using SLM process was conducted and the results are summarized in this paper. Multiple 3D objects were fabricated and analyzed. Lastly Scanning Electron Microcopy (SEM) of the manufactured objects as well as effect of process parameters on dimensional accuracy, surface quality, and the density of the fabricated parts are presented in this paper.

  13. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-14

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  14. Composite material based on fluoroplast and low melting oxyfluoride glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatieva, L. N.; Savchenko, N. N.; Lalayan, V. M.; Zverev, G. A.; Goncharuk, V. K.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Shaulov, A. Yu.; Berlin, A. A.; Bouznik, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work summarizes the results of studies of the samples fabricated through extrusion blending of mixtures composed of the perfluorocarbon polymer (polyvinylidene fluoride, PVDF), which presently undergoes intensive studies, and the inorganic glass (BF-glass) of the composition 3B2O3-97(40SnF2-30SnO-30P2O5). It is revealed as a result of application of the suggested technique the composite material whose structure depends on the component ratio in the mixture (from individual areas formed by each component to homogeneously distributed composite particles) has been fabricated. The peculiarities of formation of composites were studied on the basis of the results of studying their morphology, molecular structure and phase composition. It was revealed the preservation of the polymer molecular structure and the absence of interaction with the glass in the fabricated samples. We found that in the process of sample fabrication there occur melting of the mixture, mixing of particles and changing of the phase compositions. The polymer partially and the glass almost completely crystallize in the process of composite fabrication. Glass crystals fill polymer cavities forming agglomerates. Along with the increase of the amount of inorganic component crystals, the polymer monolithic nature is disrupted and an inversion occurs at a certain component ratio: polymer particles are located between crystals of the inorganic component, mixing with them and covering them. The glass crystallization is facilitated through pre-crushing in extruder mill.

  15. MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE MATERIALS FOR GLASS MELTING SENSOR SHEATHS

    SciTech Connect

    J. PETROVIC; R. CASTRO; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    Sensors for measuring the properties of molten glass require protective sensor sheaths in order to shield them from the extremely corrosive molten glass environment. MoSi{sub 2} has been shown to possess excellent corrosion resistance in molten glass, making it a candidate material for advanced sensor sheath applications. MoSi{sub 2}-coated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes, MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laminate composite tubes, and MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} functionally graded composite tubes have been produced by plasma spray-forming techniques for such applications.

  16. Behaviour of ruthenium dioxide particles in borosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflieger, Rachel; Lefebvre, Leila; Malki, Mohammed; Allix, Mathieu; Grandjean, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Ruthenium-glass systems are formed during the vitrification of nuclear waste. They are also widely used in micro-electronics because of their unique electrical properties. However, the interaction of this element with the glass matrix remains poorly understood. This work focuses on a RuO 2 particles-nuclear alumino-borosilicate glass system in which the electrical conductivity is known to vary considerably with the RuO 2 content and to become electronic above about 0.5-0.7 vol.% RuO 2 [R. Pflieger, M. Malki, Y. Guari, J. Larionova, A. Grandjean, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., accepted for publication]. Some RuO 2 segregation was observed in SEM/TEM investigations but no continuous chain of RuO 2 particles could be seen. Electron relays between the particles are then necessary for a low-rate percolation, such as the nanoclusters suggested by Adachi et al. [K. Adachi, S. Iida, K. Hayashi, J. Mater. Res. 9 (7) (1994) 1866; K. Adachi, H. Kuno, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 83 (10) (2000) 2441], which could consist in dissolved ruthenium. Indeed, several observations made here clearly indicate the presence of dissolved ruthenium in the glass matrix, like the modification of the glass density in presence of RuO 2 particles or the diffusion-limited growth of RuO 2 particles in the melt.

  17. Microwires fabricated by glass-coated melt spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Li, H.; Hao, H. Y.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y.; Liaw, P. K.

    2013-07-15

    The glass-coated melt spinning method offers a route for the manufacture of metal filaments with a few micrometers in diameter in a single operation directly from the melt. Cobalt-based amorphous wires, Cu-15.0 atomic percent (at. %) Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa (atomic percent) ferromagnetic wires were successfully produced by this method. The cobalt-based amorphous wire is flexible, and Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires have the tensile elongation of 14%. However, because of chemical reaction with glass and oxidation, it is hard to make Cu–Al–Ni shape-memory wires and Ni–Nb–Sn amorphous wires. Conditions for preparing these materials were summarized, and the differences of the solidification processes among glass-coated amorphous cobalt-based wires, Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa wires were analyzed and discussed.

  18. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    1999-01-01

    The following list summarizes the most important results that have been consistently reported for glass forming melts in microgravity: (1) Glass formation is enhanced for melts prepared in space; (2) Glasses prepared in microgravity are more chemically homogeneous and contain fewer and smaller chemically heterogeneous regions than identical glasses prepared on earth; (3) Heterogeneities that are deliberately introduced such as Pt particles are more uniformly distributed in a glass melted in space than in a glass melted on earth; (4) Glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization and have a higher mechanical strength and threshold energy for radiation damage; and (5) Glasses crystallized in space have a different microstructure, finer grains more uniformly distributed, than equivalent samples crystallized on earth. The preceding results are not only scientifically interesting, but they have considerable practical implications. These results suggest that the microgravity environment is advantageous for developing new and improved glasses and glass-ceramics that are difficult to prepare on earth. However, there is no suitable explanation at this time for why a glass melted in microgravity will be more chemically homogeneous and more resistant to crystallization than a glass melted on earth. A fundamental investigation of melt homogenization, nucleation, and crystal growth processes in glass forming melts in microgravity is important to understanding these consistently observed, but yet unexplained results. This is the objective of the present research. A lithium disilicate (Li2O.2SiO2) glass will be used for this investigation, since it is a well studied system, and the relevant thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for nucleation and crystal growth at 1-g are available. The results from this research are expected to improve our present understanding of the fundamental mechanism of nucleation and crystal growth in melts and liquids, and to lead

  19. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-17

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  20. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  1. Effect of the glass melting condition on the processing of phosphate-based glass-ceramics with persistent luminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massera, J.; Gaussiran, M.; Głuchowski, P.; Lastusaari, M.; Petit, L.; Hölsä, J.; Hupa, L.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the impact of the temperature and the duration of the melting on the persistent luminescence properties of phosphate glasses within the P2O5-Na2O-CaO and P2O5-Na2O-SrO systems prepared using a standard melting process in normal atmosphere by adding Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+,Dy3+ microparticles in the glass batch before melting. Glasses with persistent luminescence properties can be successfully prepared if the melting conditions are carefully controlled.

  2. Correlation between average melting temperature and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhibin; Li, Jiangong

    2009-02-01

    The correlation between average melting temperature (⟨Tm⟩) and glass transition temperature (Tg) in metallic glasses (MGs) is analyzed. A linear relationship, Tg=0.385⟨Tm⟩, is observed. This correlation agrees with Egami's suggestion [Rep. Prog. Phys. 47, 1601 (1984)]. The prediction of Tg from ⟨Tm⟩ through the relationship Tg=0.385⟨Tm⟩ has been tested using experimental data obtained on a large number of MGs. This relationship can be used to predict and design MGs with a desired Tg.

  3. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Fox, Kevin M.

    2015-07-01

    glass formulations will reduce the cost of Hanford tank waste management by reducing the schedule for tank waste treatment and reducing the amount of HLW glass for storage, transportation, and disposal. Additional benefits will be realized if advanced glasses are developed that demonstrate more tolerance for key components in the waste (such as Al2O3, Cr2O3, SO3 and Na2O) above the currently defined WTP constraints. Tolerating these higher concentrations of key waste loading limiters may reduce the burden on (or even eliminate the need for) leaching to remove Cr and Al and washing to remove excess S and Na from the HLW fraction. Advanced glass formulations may also make direct vitrification of the HLW fraction without significant pretreatment more cost effective. Finally, the advanced glass formulation efforts seek not only to increase waste loading in glass, but also to increase glass production rate. When coupled with higher waste loading, ensuring that all of the advanced glass formulations are processable at or above the current contract processing rate leads to significant improvements in waste throughput (the amount of waste being processed per unit time),which could significantly reduce the overall WTP mission life. The integration of increased waste loading, reduced leaching/washing requirements, and improved melting rates provides a system-wide approach to improve the effectiveness of the WTP process.

  4. Water-soluble lead in cathode ray tube funnel glass melted in a reductive atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    In the reduction-melting process, lead can be recovered from cathode ray tube funnel glass (PbO=25wt%); however, resulting glass residues still contain approximately 1-2wt% of unrecovered lead. For environmental protection in the residue disposal or recycling, it is important to evaluate the quantities of water-soluble species among the unrecovered lead. This study examined water-soluble lead species generated in the reduction-melting process of the funnel glass and factors determining their generation. In the reduction-melting, metallic lead was generated by reducing lead oxides in the glass, and a part of the metallic lead remained in the glass residue. Such unrecovered metallic lead can dissolve in water depending on its pH level and was regarded as water-soluble lead. When 10g Na2CO3 was added to 20g funnel glass during reduction-melting, the resulting glass contained high concentrations of sodium. In a water leaching of the glass, the obtained leachate was alkalized by the sodium-rich glass (pH=12.7-13.0). The unrecovered metallic lead in the glass was extracted in the alkalized leachate. The quantity of the unrecovered metallic lead (water-soluble lead) in the glass decreased when the melting time, melting temperature, and carbon dosage were controlled during reduction-melting. PMID:27209518

  5. Water-soluble lead in cathode ray tube funnel glass melted in a reductive atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    In the reduction-melting process, lead can be recovered from cathode ray tube funnel glass (PbO=25wt%); however, resulting glass residues still contain approximately 1-2wt% of unrecovered lead. For environmental protection in the residue disposal or recycling, it is important to evaluate the quantities of water-soluble species among the unrecovered lead. This study examined water-soluble lead species generated in the reduction-melting process of the funnel glass and factors determining their generation. In the reduction-melting, metallic lead was generated by reducing lead oxides in the glass, and a part of the metallic lead remained in the glass residue. Such unrecovered metallic lead can dissolve in water depending on its pH level and was regarded as water-soluble lead. When 10g Na2CO3 was added to 20g funnel glass during reduction-melting, the resulting glass contained high concentrations of sodium. In a water leaching of the glass, the obtained leachate was alkalized by the sodium-rich glass (pH=12.7-13.0). The unrecovered metallic lead in the glass was extracted in the alkalized leachate. The quantity of the unrecovered metallic lead (water-soluble lead) in the glass decreased when the melting time, melting temperature, and carbon dosage were controlled during reduction-melting.

  6. Entropy and structure of silicate glasses and melts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richet, P.; Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    Low-temperature adiabatic Cp measurements have been made on NaAlSi2O6, MgSiO3, Ca3Al2Si3O12 and Ca1.5Mg1.5Al2Si3O12 glasses. Above about 50 K, these and previous data show that the heat capacity is an additive function of composition to within ??1% throughout the investigated glassforming part of the system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2. In view of the determining role of oxygen coordination polyhedra on the low-temperature entropy, this is interpreted as indicating that Si and Al are tetrahedrally coordinated in all these glasses, in agreement with structural data; whereas Ca and Mg remain octahedrally coordinated. In contrast, heat capacities and entropies are not additive functions of composition for alkali aluminosilicates, indicating increases in the coordination numbers of alkali elements from about six to nine when alumina is introduced. A thermochemical consequence of additivity of vibrational entropies of glasses is that entropies of mixing are essentially configurational for calcium and magnesium aluminosilicate melts. For alkali-bearing liquids, it is probable that vibrational entropies contribute significantly to entropies of mixing. At very low temperatures, the additive nature of the heat capacity with composition is less well followed, likely as a result of specific differences in medium-range order. ?? 1993.

  7. Lead extraction from cathode ray tube funnel glass melted under different oxidizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi

    2015-07-15

    Lead was extracted into hydrochloric acid from cathode ray tube funnel glass melted under reducing atmosphere, oxidizing atmosphere, or a sequential combination of both to mechanistically investigate effects of the melting atmosphere on lead extraction. Melting funnel glass in a reductive atmosphere led to the generation of metallic lead particles that were readily soluble in the acid, increasing the quantity of lead extracted into the acid. Meanwhile, the glass product obtained after melting funnel glass in an oxidative atmosphere exhibited higher corrosion resistance in the acid, and the quantity of lead extracted from the treated glass decreased. However, Na2CO3 addition to the glass during melting hindered the enhancement of corrosion resistance and the immobilization of lead in the acid. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of the treated glass samples showed that the positions of the peak or the profiles of the spectra attributed to Pb 4f, Si 2p, and O 1s signals were modified by oxidative melting, an indication that oxidative melting results in structural changes in the SiO2 framework of the glass.

  8. Nuclear Melt Glass Dissolution and Secondary Mineral Precipitation at 40 to 200C

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Viani, B; Pawloski, G; Rose, T

    2004-06-14

    Most long-lived radionuclides associated with an underground nuclear test are initially incorporated into melt glass and become part of the hydrologic source term (HST) only upon their release via glass dissolution (Pawloski et al., 2001). As the melt glass dissolves, secondary minerals precipitate. The types of secondary minerals that precipitate influence the water chemistry in and around the melt glass. The secondary minerals also provide a sorption sink to the released radionuclides. The changing water chemistry affects the rate of glass dissolution; it also affects the sorption behavior of the released radionuclides. This complex nature of glass dissolution and its important role in defining the HST requires a thorough understanding of glass dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation. The identity of secondary minerals formed at temperatures from 40 to 200 C are evaluated in this report to assist in that understanding.

  9. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  10. Glass science tutorial lecture {number_sign}6: The melting of silicate glasses, a review of selected topics

    SciTech Connect

    Swarts, E.L.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a two-day lecture given at Westinghouse Hanford Company in March, 1995 and includes the data used in the presentation. Topics included the special needs of a low-level waste vitrification process, glass melting, mechanisms of the formation of foam, glass refining (bubble removal), and homogenization (reduction of chemical heterogeneity to acceptable levels). 96 refs.

  11. High spatial resolution geochemistry and textural characteristics of 'microtektite' glass spherules in proximal Cretaceous-Paleogene sections: Insights into glass alteration patterns and precursor melt lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belza, Joke; Goderis, Steven; Smit, Jan; Vanhaecke, Frank; Baert, Kitty; Terryn, Herman; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    variably enriched in Sr, Ba, and Cs, indicating preferred adsorption from seawater during hydration. Despite the onset of ion-exchange reactions, which only seem to have affected the alkalis, the trace element composition of the green high-Si, Al glass is still largely representative of the original melt composition. Refining the geochemical signature of (altered) melt lithologies may advance our current understanding of glass stability in the natural environment and provide insight into the origin and emplacement of ejecta material during crater formation.

  12. Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-04-07

    A method is described for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term. 4 figs.

  13. Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    1992-01-01

    A method for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a "non-bridging oxygen" term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

  14. Influence of lithium-containing waste materials on the melting of packaging glass

    SciTech Connect

    Katkova, K.S.; Balandina, T.I.; Belyaeva, A.G.; Guloyan, Y.A.; Seregina, E.P.

    1986-07-01

    Lithium-containing waste materials from mica enrichment factories are studied. The possibilities of using the wastes for melting of green and semi-white sodium calcium silicate glasses are studied as well. Using physical methods, the authors study the influence of lithium-containing mica waste materials on the process of batch melting, silicate and glass formation, and clarification of molten glass. Tables show melting characteristics with various additions of lithium-containing mica waste, and the influence of added Li/sub 2/O on glass clarification. It is shown that the addition of lithium-containing mica waste materials to sodium calcium silicate glass has a positive effect on silicate and glass formation and on clarification.

  15. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Glass Manufacturing Plants § 60.293 Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass...

  16. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Glass Manufacturing Plants § 60.293 Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass...

  17. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Glass Manufacturing Plants § 60.293 Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass...

  18. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Glass Manufacturing Plants § 60.293 Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass...

  19. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Glass Manufacturing Plants § 60.293 Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass...

  20. On the Possibility of Selective Laser Melting of Quartz Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmyrov, R. S.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Okunkova, A. A.; Gusarov, A. V.

    Quartz glass is considered as model ceramic material for selective laser melting (SLM). Single beads of fused powder bonded with a continuous substrate of the same material are obtained. Neither the beads nor the substrates near them are cracked. Low closed porosity in the beads and detachment of the bead borders from the substrate are observed. The quality of the obtained beads is estimated to be sufficient for fabrication of three-dimensional parts by SLM. Comparison with calculations of heat transfer and evaporation reveals that the mass and the energy losses by evaporation are considerable and that the substrate surface should be locally heated up to 1600 K for strong bonding with the bead. Decreasing the thickness of the deposited powder layer is proposed to improve the adhesion between the bead and the substrate with the minimum loss in the productivity of the process. Finer powder is expected to decrease the residual closed porosity in the bead and to make the pores finer too.

  1. Advanced laser processing of glass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji; Obata, Kotaro; Cheng, Ya; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2003-09-01

    Three kinds of advanced technologies using lasers for glass microprocessing are reviewed. Simultaneous irradiation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser beam, which possesses extremely small laser fluence, with ultraviolet (UV) laser achieves enhanced high surface and edge quality ablation in fused silica and other hard materials with little debris deposition as well as high-speed and high-efficiency refractive index modification of fused silica (VUV-UV multiwavelength excitation processing). Metal plasma generated by the laser beam effectively assists high-quality ablation of transparent materials, resulting in surface microstructuring, high-speed holes drilling, crack-free marking, color marking, painting and metal interconnection for the various kinds of glass materials (laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA)). In the meanwhile, a nature of multiphoton absorption of femtosecond laser by transparent materials realizes fabrication of true three-dimensional microstructures embedded in photosensitive glass.

  2. Incorporation and distribution of rhenium in a borosilicate glass melt heat treated in a sealed ampoule

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2013-07-25

    We investigated a mass balance of rhenium (used as a surrogate for technetium-99) in a borosilicate glass that was mixed with excess Re source (KReO4) beyond its solubility and heat treated in a vacuum-sealed fused silica ampoule. Distribution of Re in the bulk of the glass, in a salt phase formed on the melt surface, and in condensate material deposited on the ampoule wall was evaluated to understand the Re migration into different phases during the reaction between the molten glass and KReO4. The information gained from this study will contribute to an effort to understand the mechanism of technetium retention in or escape from glass melt during early stages of glass batch melting, which is a goal of the present series of studies.

  3. Reaction of Inconel 690 and 693 in Iron Phosphate Melts: Alternative Glasses for Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E. Kim, Cheol-Woon

    2005-09-13

    The corrosion resistance of candidate materials used for the electrodes (Inconel 690 & 693) and the melt contact refractory (Monofrax K-3) in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) has been investigated at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) during the period from June 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (DE-FG02-04ER63831). The unusual properties and characteristics of iron phosphate glasses, as viewed from the standpoint of alternative glasses for vitrifying nuclear and hazardous wastes which contain components that make them poorly suited for vitrification in borosilicate glass, were recently discovered at UMR. The expanding national and international interest in iron phosphate glasses for waste vitrification stems from their rapid melting and chemical homogenization which results in higher furnace output, their high waste loading that varies from 32 wt% up to 75 wt% for the Hanford LAW and HLW, respectively, and the outstanding chemical durability of the iron phosphate wasteforms which meets all present DOE requirements (PCT and VHT). The higher waste loading in iron phosphate glasses, compared to the baseline borosilicate glass, can reduce the time and cost of vitrification considerably since a much smaller mass of glass will be produced, for example, about 43% less glass when the LAW at Hanford is vitrified in an iron phosphate glass according to PNNL estimates. In view of the promising performance of iron phosphate glasses, information is needed for how to best melt these glasses on the scale needed for practical use. Melting iron phosphate glasses in a JHM is considered the preferred method at this time because its design could be nearly identical to the JHM now used to melt borosilicate glasses at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Therefore, it is important to have information for the corrosion of candidate electrode

  4. Tomographic location of potential melt-bearing phenocrysts in lunar glass spherules

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, D.S.; Fogel, R.A.; Rivers, M.L.

    2005-02-04

    Apollo 17 orange glass spherules contain olivine phenocrysts with melt inclusions from depth. Tomography (<2micron/pxl) of >200 spherules located 1 phenocryst. We will try to find melt inclusions and obtain original magma volatiles and compositions. In 1971, Apollo 17 astronauts collected a 10 cm soil sample (74220) comprised almost entirely of orange glass spherules. Below this, a double drive-tube core sampled a 68 cm thick horizon comprised of orange glass and black beads (crystallized equivalents of orange glass). Primitive lunar glass spherules (e.g.-A17 orange glasses) are thought to represent ejecta from lunar mare fire fountains. The fire-fountains were apparently driven by a combination of C-O gas exsolution from orange glass melt and the oxidation of graphite. Upon eruption, magmas lost their volatiles (e.g., S, CO, CO{sub 2}) to space. Evidence for volatile escape remains as volatile-rich coatings on the exteriors of many spherules. Moreover, it showed that Type I and II Fe-Ni-rich metal particles found within orange glass olivine phenocrysts, or free-floating in the glass itself, are powerful evidence for the volatile driving force for lunar fire fountains. More direct evidence for the volatile mechanism has yet to be uncovered. Issues remaining include: the exact composition of magmatic volatiles; the hypothesized existence of graphite in the magma; the oxygen fugacity of the magma and of the lunar interior. In 1996 reported a single {approx}450 micron, equant olivine phenocryst, containing four glassy melt inclusions (or inclusion cores), the largest {approx}30micron in size, in a thin section of the 74001/2 drill core. The melt is assumed to sample the parent magma of the lunar basalts at depth, evidenced by the S content of the inclusion (600 ppm) which is 400 ppm greater than that of the orange glass host. Such melts potentially contain a full complement of the volatile components of the parent magma, which can be analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

  5. Bulk formation of metallic glasses and amorphous silicon from the melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures and compositions for producing metallic glasses in bulk at slow cooling rates were investigated. An attempt was made to form the amorphous phase of the tetrahedrally coordinated elements (Si or Ge) by undercooling the melt. The crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquids and glass formers were examined.

  6. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnbull, D.

    1979-01-01

    Crystal nucleation behavior in metallic alloys known to form glasses in melt quenching was characterized and from this characterization the possibility that massive amounts of certain alloys could be slow cooled to the glass state was assessed. Crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquid metals was examined experimentally, under containerless conditions, and theoretically.

  7. Bulk Formation of Metallic Glasses and Amorphous Silicon from the Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1985-01-01

    By using metallic glass compositions with a high relative glass transition temperature, such as Pd40Ni40P20, homogeneous nucleation also becomes negligible. Large (5g) masses of this alloys were obtained using a molten B2O3 flux. Presently, bulk glass formation in iron based glasses is being investigated. It is expected that if an undercooling of about 250K can be achieved in a Ge or Si melt, formation of the amorphous semiconductor phase (rather than the crystal) may be kinetically favored. The volumetric behavior of undercooled liquid Ga droplet dispersion is investigated by dilatometry. A theoretical model (both analytical and numerical) was developed for transient nucleation in glass forming melts. The model, originally designed for isothermal conditions, was extended to continuous quenching. It is being applied to glass formation in various metallic and oxide systems. A further refinement will be the inclusion of diffusion controlled interfacial rearrangements governing the growth of the crystal embryos.

  8. Structure and dynamics of bioactive phosphosilicate glasses and melts from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2007-12-01

    Ab initio (Car-Parrinello) molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the melt precursor of a modified phosphosilicate glass with bioactive properties, and to quench the melt to the vitreous state. The properties of the 3000K liquid were extensively compared with those of the final glass structure. The melt is characterized by a significant fraction of structural defects (small rings, undercoordinated and overcoordinated ions), often combined together. The creation or removal of these coordinative defects in the liquid (through Si-O bond formation or dissociation) reflects frequent exchanges within the silicate first coordination shell, which in turn dynamically modify the intertetrahedral connectivity of silicate groups. The observed dynamical variation in both the identity and the number of silicate groups linked to a tagged Si ( Qn speciation) are considered key processes in the viscous flow of silicate melts [I. Farnan and J. F. Stebbins, Science 265, 1206 (1994)]. On the other hand, phosphate groups do not show an equally marked exchange activity in the coordination shell, but can still form links with Si. Once formed, these Si-O-P bridges are rather stable, and in fact they are retained in the glass phase obtained after cooling; their formation within the present full ab initio melt-and-quench approach strongly supports their presence in melt-derived phosphosilicate glasses with bioactive applications. On the other hand, the simulations show that the fraction of structural defects rapidly decreases during the cooling, and the glass is essentially free of miscoordinated ions and small rings.

  9. Production and dissolution of nuclear explosive melt glasses at underground test sites in the Pacific Region

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W.L.; Smith, D.K.

    1998-11-06

    From 1975 to 1996 the French detonated 140 underground nuclear explosions beneath the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa in the South Pacific; from 1965 to 1971 the United States detonated three high yield nuclear tests beneath Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain. Approximately 800 metric tons of basalt is melted per kiloton of nuclear yield; almost lo7 metric tons of basalt were melted in these tests. Long-lived and toxic radionuclides are partitioned into the melt glass at the time of explosion and are released by dissolution with seawater under saturated conditions. A glass dissolution model predicts that nuclear melt glasses at these sites will dissolve in lo6 to lo7 yea

  10. An innovative energy-saving in-flight melting technology and its application to glass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yaochun; Watanabe, Takayuki; Yano, Tetsuji; Iseda, Toru; Sakamoto, Osamu; Iwamoto, Masanori; Inoue, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    The conventional method used for glass melting is air-fuel firing, which is inefficient, energy-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, an innovative in-flight melting technology was developed and applied to glass production for the purposes of energy conservation and environmental protection. Three types of heating sources, radio-frequency (RF) plasma, a 12-phase alternating current (ac) arc and an oxygen burner, were used to investigate the in-flight melting behavior of granulated powders. Results show that the melted particles are spherical with a smooth surface and compact structure. The diameter of the melted particles is about 50% of that of the original powders. The decomposition and vitrification degrees of the prepared powders decrease in the order of powders prepared by RF plasma, the 12-phase ac arc and the oxygen burner. The largest heat transfer is from RF plasma to particles, which results in the highest particle temperature (1810 °C) and the greatest vitrification degree of the raw material. The high decomposition and vitrification degrees, which are achieved in milliseconds, shorten the melting and fining times of the glass considerably. Our results indicate that the proposed in-flight melting technology is a promising method for use in the glass industry.

  11. Growth and melting of metallic nanoclusters in glass: A review of recent investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Kellermann, G.; Craievich, A. F.

    2008-12-15

    The mechanisms of nucleation and growth and the solid-to-liquid transition of metallic nanoclusters embedded in sodium borate glass were recently studied in situ via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). SAXS results indicate that, under isothermal annealing conditions, the formation and growth of Bi or Ag nanoclusters embedded in sodium borate glass occurs through two successive stages after a short incubation period. The first stage is characterized by the nucleation and growth of spherical metal clusters promoted by the diffusion of Bi or Ag atoms through the initially supersaturated glass phase. The second stage is named the coarsening stage and occurs when the (Bi-or Ag-) doping level of the vitreous matrix is close to the equilibrium value. The experimental results demonstrated that, at advanced stages of the growth process, the time dependence of the average radius and density number of the clusters is in agreement with the classical Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) theory. However, the radius distribution function is better described by a lognormal function than by the function derived from the theoretical LSW model. From the results of SAXS measurements at different temperatures, the activation energies for the diffusion of Ag and Bi through sodium borate glass were determined. In addition, via combination of the results of simultaneous WAXS and SAXS measurements at different temperatures, the crystallographic structure and the dependence of melting temperature T{sub m} on crystal radius R of Bi nanocrystals were established. The experimental results indicate that T{sub m} is a linear and decreasing function of nanocrystal reciprocal radius 1/R, in agreement with the Couchman and Jesser theoretical model. Finally, a weak contraction in the lattice parameters of Bi nanocrystals with respect to bulk crystals was established.

  12. Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

    2012-01-09

    The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

  13. Hot melt "corner point method" for attaching large plastic sections to glass slides.

    PubMed

    Krämer, K L; von Hagens, G

    1983-03-01

    We describe a fast method for firm attachment of large plastic sections to glass slides with EVA-copolymers, commonly known as hot melt sticks. Solid hot melt sticks dissolve slowly in xylene to form an adhesive gel within 6 hours. Small drops of hot melt gel are applied to the corners of the sections and surrounding slide surface at ambient or elevated temperatures. The gel sticks to both the plastic and the glass slides. The hot melt "corner point method" prevented detachment of sections in staining procedures. As an additional technique, we suggest the use of hot melt adhesive for attaching plastic specimen blocks to wooden blocks or metallic specimen holders. PMID:6353677

  14. DETERMINATION OF HLW GLASS MELT RATE USING X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.; Miller, D.; Immel, D.

    2011-10-06

    The purpose of the high-level waste (HLW) glass melt rate study is two-fold: (1) to gain a better understanding of the impact of feed chemistry on melt rate through bench-scale testing, and (2) to develop a predictive tool for melt rate in support of the on-going frit development efforts for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). In particular, the focus is on predicting relative melt rates, not the absolute melt rates, of various HLW glass formulations solely based on feed chemistry, i.e., the chemistry of both waste and glass-forming frit for DWPF. Critical to the successful melt rate modeling is the accurate determination of the melting rates of various HLW glass formulations. The baseline procedure being used at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is to; (1) heat a 4 inch-diameter stainless steel beaker containing a mixture of dried sludge and frit in a furnace for a preset period of time, (2) section the cooled beaker along its diameter, and (3) measure the average glass height across the sectioned face using a ruler. As illustrated in Figure 1-1, the glass height is measured for each of the 16 horizontal segments up to the red lines where relatively large-sized bubbles begin to appear. The linear melt rate (LMR) is determined as the average of all 16 glass height readings divided by the time during which the sample was kept in the furnace. This 'visual' method has proved useful in identifying melting accelerants such as alkalis and sulfate and further ranking the relative melt rates of candidate frits for a given sludge batch. However, one of the inherent technical difficulties of this method is to determine the glass height in the presence of numerous gas bubbles of varying sizes, which is prevalent especially for the higher-waste-loading glasses. That is, how the red lines are drawn in Figure 1-1 can be subjective and, therefore, may influence the resulting melt rates significantly. For example, if the red lines are drawn too low, a

  15. Crystal nucleation and glass formation in metallic alloy melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1984-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation, containerless solidification, and bulk formation of metallic glasses are discussed. Homogeneous nucleation is not a limiting factor for metallic glass formation at slow cooling rates if the reduced glass transition temperature is high enough. Such glasses can be made in bulk if heterogeneous nucleants are removed. Containerless processing eleminates potential sources of nucleants, but as drop tube experiments on the Pd-Si alloys show, the free surface may still be a very effective heterogeneous nucleant. Combination of etching and heating in vacuum or fluxing can be effective for cleaning fairly large ingots of nucleants. Reduced gravity processing has a potentially useful role in the fluxing technique, for example to keep large metallic ingots surrounded by a low density, low fluidity flux if this proved difficult under ground conditions. For systems where heterogeneous nucleants in the bulk of the ingot need gravity to segregate to the flux-metal interface, reduced gravity processing may not be appropriate for bulk glass formation.

  16. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takashi Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • We recovered Pb from cathode ray tube funnel glass using reduction melting process. • We modified the melting process to achieve Pb recovery with low energy consumption. • Pb in the funnel glass is efficiently recovered at 1000 °C by adding Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • Pb remaining in the glass after reduction melting is extracted with 1 M HCl. • 98% of Pb in the funnel glass was recovered by reduction melting and HCl leaching. - Abstract: Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900–1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1 g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1 M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

  17. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  18. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    DOE PAGES

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  19. NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES CONTINUOUS MELTING AND BULK VITRIFICAITON

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2008-03-24

    This contribution addresses various aspects of nuclear waste vitrification. Nuclear wastes have a variety of components and composition ranges. For each waste composition, the glass must be formulated to possess acceptable processing and product behavior defined in terms of physical and chemical properties that guarantee the glass can be easily made and resist environmental degradation. Glass formulation is facilitated by developing property-composition models, and the strategy of model development and application is reviewed. However, the large variability of waste compositions presents numerous additional challenges: insoluble solids and molten salts may segregate; foam may hinder heat transfer and slow down the process; molten salts may accumulate in container refractory walls; the glass on cooling may precipitate crystalline phases. These problems need targeted exploratory research. Examples of specific problems and their possible solutions are discussed.

  20. Glass Melt Emissivity, Viscosity, and Foaming Monitoring with Millimeter-Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, S.K.; Daniel, William E.; Hadidi, Kamal; Bromberg, Leslie; Miller, Don; Rogers, L.A.

    2003-09-10

    Nuclear waste glass processing efficiencies, improved melter control to anomalies such as foaming, and environmental compliance would be facilitated by the availability of on-line monitoring technologies. It has been shown that the millimeter-wave (MMW) range of the electromagnetic spectrum (0.3-10 mm) is ideally suited to hot melter environments by having wavelengths long enough to penetrate optically obscure views yet short enough to provide spatial resolution with reliable refractory quasi-optical components. A thermal return reflection (TRR) method has been developed that allows a millimeter-wave pyrometer to determine emissivity by returning a portion of the thermal emission as a probe. Melt glass viscosities in the range 20 -2000 Poise and specific gravities have been measured by rates of flow and displacements inside hollow MMW ceramic waveguides immersed into the melts. Glass foaming has been observed by detecting the melt surface swelling followed by the increase in surface emissivity after gases break the surface.

  1. Microwave melt and offgas analysis results from a Ferro Corporation{reg_sign} glass frit

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.A.; Hoffman, C.R.; Knutson, P.T.

    1995-03-01

    In support of the Residue Treatment Technology (RTT) Microwave Solidification project, Waste Projects and Surface Water personnel conducted a series of experiments to determine the feasibility of encapsulating a surrogate sludge waste using the microwave melter. The surrogate waste was prepared by RTT and melted with five varying compositions of low melting glass frit supplied by the Ferro Corporation. Samples were melted using a 50% waste/50% glass frit and a 47.5% waste/47.5% glass frit/5% carbon powder. This was done to evaluate the effectiveness of carbon at reducing a sulfate-based surface scale which has been observed in previous experiments and in full-scale testing. These vitrified samples were subsequently submitted to Environmental Technology for toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. Two of the five frits tested in this experiment merit further evaluation as raw materials for the microwave melter. Ferro frit 3110 with and without carbon powder produced a crystalline product which passed TCLP testing. The quality of the melt product could be improved by increasing the melting temperature from 900{degrees}C to approximately 1150-1200{degrees}C. Ferro frit 3249 produced the optimal quality of glass based on visual observations, but failed TCLP testing for silver when melted without carbon powder. This frit requires a slightly higher melting temperature ({ge} 1200{degrees}C) compared to frit 3110 and produces a superior product. In conjunction with this work, Surface Water personnel conducted offgas analyses using a Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (TDMS) on selected formulations. The offgas analyses identified and quantified water vapor (H{sub 2}O), oxygen (O{sub 2}) and carbon oxides (CO and CO{sub 2}), sulfur (S) and sulfur oxides (SO and SO{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) that volatilized during glass formation.

  2. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4 cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  3. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    DOE PAGES

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R.; Holliday, K. S.

    2016-05-18

    We report that nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. Wemore » find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. Lastly, the resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.« less

  4. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R.; Holliday, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. We find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. The resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.

  5. A new method for separating first row transition metals and actinides from synthetic melt glass

    DOE PAGES

    Roman, Audrey Rae; Bond, Evelyn M.

    2016-01-14

    A new method was developed for separating Co, Fe, and Sc from complex debris matrices using the extraction chromatography resin DGA. The activation products Co-58, Mn-54, and Sc-46 were used to characterize the separation of the synthetic melt glass solutions. In the separation scheme that was developed, Au, Co, Cu, Fe, Sc, and Ti were separated from the rest of the sample constituents. In this paper, the synthetic melt glass separation method, efficiency, recoveries, and the length of procedure will be discussed. In conclusion, batch contact adsorption studies for Na and Sc for DGA resin are discussed as well.

  6. SUMMARY OF 2010 DOE EM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM STUDIES OF WASTE GLASS MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2011-01-19

    A collaborative study has been established under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management International Program between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) in St. Petersburg, Russia, to investigate potential improvements in melt rate via chemical additions to the glass frit. Researchers at KRI suggested a methodology for selecting frit additives based on empirical coefficients for optimization of glass melting available in the Russian literature. Using these coefficients, KRI identified B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO, and MnO as frit additives that were likely to improve melt rate without having adverse effects on crystallization of the glass or its chemical durability. The results of the melt rate testing in the SMK melter showed that the slurry feed rate (used as a gauge of melt rate) could be significantly increased when MnO or CuO were added to Frit 550 with the SMR-2 sludge. The feed rates increased by about 27% when MnO was added to the frit and by about 26% when CuO was added to the frit, as compared to earlier results for Frit 550 alone. The impact of adding additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the frit was minor when added with CuO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed a more significant, 39% improvement in melt rate when added with MnO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} also reduced the viscosity of the glasses during pouring. Samples of the glasses from the melt rate testing characterized at SRNL showed that there were no significant impacts on crystallization of the glasses. All of the glasses had very good chemical durability. Chemical composition measurements showed that the frit additives were present in concentrations below the targeted values in some of the glasses. Therefore, it is possible that higher concentrations of these additives may further improve melt rate, although the impacts of higher concentrations of these components on crystallization and durability would need to

  7. Interaction study between nuclear waste-glass melt and ceramic melter bellow liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Pranesh

    2011-04-01

    Identification of proper materials for plant scale vitrification furnaces, engaged in immobilization of high level nuclear waste has always been a great challenge. Fast degradation of pour spout materials very often cause problem towards smooth pouring of waste-glass melt in canister and damages bellow kept in between. The present experimental study describes the various reaction products that form due to interaction between waste-glass melt and potential bellow liner materials such as copper, stainless steel and nickel based Superalloys (Alloy 690, 625). The results indicate that copper based material has lesser tendency to form adherent glassy layer.

  8. Thermally efficient melting and fuel reforming for glass making

    DOEpatents

    Chen, M.S.; Painter, C.F.; Pastore, S.P.; Roth, G.S.; Winchester, D.C.

    1991-10-15

    An integrated process is described for utilizing waste heat from a glass making furnace. The hot off-gas from the furnace is initially partially cooled, then fed to a reformer. In the reformer, the partially cooled off-gas is further cooled against a hydrocarbon which is thus reformed into a synthesis gas, which is then fed into the glass making furnace as a fuel. The further cooled off-gas is then recycled back to absorb the heat from the hot off-gas to perform the initial cooling. 2 figures.

  9. Thermally efficient melting and fuel reforming for glass making

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael S.; Painter, Corning F.; Pastore, Steven P.; Roth, Gary S.; Winchester, David C.

    1991-01-01

    An integrated process for utilizing waste heat from a glass making furnace. The hot off-gas from the furnace is initially partially cooled, then fed to a reformer. In the reformer, the partially cooled off-gas is further cooled against a hydrocarbon which is thus reformed into a synthesis gas, which is then fed into the glass making furnace as a fuel. The further cooled off-gas is then recycled back to absorb the heat from the hot off-gas to perform the initial cooling.

  10. Thermal diffusivity of pyroxene, feldspar, and silica melts, glasses, and single-crystals at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertermann, M.; Branlund, J.; Whittington, A.; Hofmeister, A.

    2007-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity (D) due to phonon transport (the lattice component) was measured using laser-flash analysis from oriented single-crystals and of glasses above the glass transition, which proxy as melts. Compositions include SiO2, CaMgSi2O6, LiAlSi2O6, NaAlSi3O8, and CaAl2Si2O8. KAlSi3O8 was studied previously. Viscosity measurements of the supercooled liquids, in the range 106.8 to 1012.3 Pas, confirm near-Arrhenian behavior. For all compositions and for crystal and glass, D decreases with T, approaching a constant generally near 1000 K: Dsat, which is larger in the crystal than in the glass. A rapid decrease in D as T is increased further (ca 1400 K for orthoclase) is consistent with crossing the glass transition, verified from our viscosity data on these systems. The amount of the decrease depends on the chemical composition and similar to the relative decrease observed in heat capacity. Orthoclase values for Dsat are 0.65± 0.3 mm2/s for bulk crystal and 0.53+/-0.03 mm2/s for the glass. Constant D = 0.475+/-.01 mm2/s represents melt. Thermal conductivity (klat) of orthoclase glass, calculated using previous results for heat capacity (CP) and our density data, increases with T due to CP strongly increasing with T, reaching a plateau near 1.45 W/m-K for melt, but is always below klat of the crystal. Similar results were obtained from the other systems studied. Melting of silica, pyroxene, and feldspars impedes heat transport, providing positive thermal feedback that may promote further melting in the continental crust. The consistency of the behavior for these different compositions and structures suggests that our results are universal, holding for oceanic lithosphere as well. Melts, due to being disordered, are poor transporters of heat via vibrations. However, d(ln klat)/dP depends inversely on bulk modulus, suggesting that at some high pressure, the thermal conductivity of the melt and corresponding crystal become equal so that retention of heat by melts

  11. Melt rate predictions for slurry-fed glass melters

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, C.J.

    1996-03-01

    Numerous bench-scale and pilot-scale tests have been conducted to support high-level waste vitrification projects within DOE. These projects include the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and the West Valley Demonstration Project (MNDP). Testing for these projects has investigated aspects of the vitrification process such as the pumpability of the slurry feed, melter processing rates, melter scale-up, and off-gas decontamination factors for feed constituents. The high costs for testing have generated interest in using modeling to predict major processing impacts on the vitrification systems from any given feed material. Important components required for such modeling include feed composition, feed rheology, melter glass temperature, melter geometry, and melter power configurations. I Some work has already been performed in modeling glass melters, but little attention has been given to feed composition (Routt 1982).

  12. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-01

    Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900-1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na(2)CO(3) at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na(2)CO(3) dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

  13. Sealing ceramic material in low melting point glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritoki, M.; Fujikawa, T.; Miyanaga, J.

    1984-01-01

    A structured device placed in an aerated crucible to pack ceramics molding substance that is to be processed was designed. The structure is wrapped by sealing material made of pyrex glass and graphite foil or sheet with a weight attached on top of it. The crucible is made of carbon; the ceramics material to be treated through heat intervenient press process is molding substance consisting mainly of silicon nitride.

  14. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  15. The melting of stable glasses is governed by nucleation-and-growth dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jack, Robert L; Berthier, Ludovic

    2016-06-28

    We discuss the microscopic mechanisms by which low-temperature amorphous states, such as ultrastable glasses, transform into equilibrium fluids, after a sudden temperature increase. Experiments suggest that this process is similar to the melting of crystals, thus differing from the behaviour found in ordinary glasses. We rationalize these observations using the physical idea that the transformation process takes place close to a "hidden" equilibrium first-order phase transition, which is observed in systems of coupled replicas. We illustrate our views using simulation results for a simple two-dimensional plaquette spin model, which is known to exhibit a range of glassy behaviour. Our results suggest that nucleation-and-growth dynamics, as found near ordinary first-order transitions, is also the correct theoretical framework to analyse the melting of ultrastable glasses. Our approach provides a unified understanding of multiple experimental observations, such as propagating melting fronts, large kinetic stability ratios, and "giant" dynamic length scales. We also provide a comprehensive discussion of available theoretical pictures proposed in the context of ultrastable glass melting. PMID:27369526

  16. The use of ``self heating`` ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-12-31

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  17. The use of self heating'' ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  18. Some features of the melting of borosilicate glasses in continuous furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sivko, A.P.

    1988-07-01

    The quality of G40-1 glass obtained in continuous gas furnaces was studied. The solubility of the gases in the G40-1 glass was determined for acceptable articles obtained in the two furnaces. The effect of repeat heating of the G40-1 glass in the forming zone was studied to find reasons for the formation of seeds and bubbles. It was shown that they form when scale from hot angle-bar supporting the plate-blocks of the crown fell into the glass of the working end of the furnace if the lining of the curtain wall has not been adequately sealed. When borosilicate glass with a large concentration of the boron oxide phase was melted in continuous furnaces it was not permissible to have a positive pressure of the gas medium in the sub-crown space.

  19. Advanced Modeling of Cold Crucible Induction Melting for Process Control and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Roach; D. B. Lopukh; A. P. Martynov; B. S. Polevodov; S. I. Chepluk

    2008-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University “LETI” (ETU) have collaborated on development and validation of an advanced numerical model of the cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) process. This work was conducted in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management Technology and Engineering (EM-20) International Program. The model predicts quasi-steady state temperature distributions, convection cell configurations, and flow field velocities for a fully established melt of low conductivity non-magnetic materials at high frequency operations. The INL/ETU ANSYS© finite element model is unique in that it has been developed specifically for processing borosilicate glass (BSG) and other glass melts. Specifically, it accounts for the temperature dependency of key material properties, some of which change by orders of magnitude within the temperature ranges experienced (temperature differences of 500oC are common) in CCIM processing of glass, including density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, and electrical resistivity. These values, and their responses to temperature changes, are keys to understanding the melt characteristics. Because the model has been validated, it provides the capability to conduct parametric studies to understand operational sensitivities and geometry effects. Additionally, the model can be used to indirectly determine difficult to measure material properties at higher temperatures such as resistivity, thermal conductivity and emissivity. The model can also be used to optimize system design and to predict operational behavior for specific materials and system configurations, allowing automated feedback control. This becomes particularly important when designing melter systems for full-scale industrial applications.

  20. Melting, Solidification, Remelting, and Separation of Glass and Metal

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C.Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1998-11-02

    Several kinds of radioactive waste exist in mixed forms at DOE sites throughout the United States. These Wastes consist of radionuclides and some usefil bme materials. One purpose of waste treatment technologies is to vitrify the radionuclides into durable, stable glass-like materials to reduce the size of the waste form requiring final disposal. The other purpose is to recycle and reuse most of the usefi.d base materials. Thus, improved techniques for the separation of molten metal and glass are essential. Several high temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. These processes include the plasma hearth process, which is being developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and the arc melter vitrification process, which is being developed at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to suppoti these process. A separation method is also needed for the radioactively contaminated scrap metal recycling processe; in order to obtain highly refined recycled metals.

  1. Compositional Models of Glass/Melt Properties and their Use for Glass Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-18

    Nuclear waste glasses must simultaneously meet a number of criteria related to their processability, product quality, and cost factors. The properties that must be controlled in glass formulation and waste vitrification plant operation tend to vary smoothly with composition allowing for glass property-composition models to be developed and used. Models have been fit to the key glass properties. The properties are transformed so that simple functions of composition (e.g., linear, polynomial, or component ratios) can be used as model forms. The model forms are fit to experimental data designed statistically to efficiently cover the composition space of interest. Examples of these models are found in literature. The glass property-composition models, their uncertainty definitions, property constraints, and optimality criteria are combined to formulate optimal glass compositions, control composition in vitrification plants, and to qualify waste glasses for disposal. An overview of current glass property-composition modeling techniques is summarized in this paper along with an example of how those models are applied to glass formulation and product qualification at the planned Hanford high-level waste vitrification plant.

  2. Compositional Models of Glass/Melt Properties and their Use for Glass Formulation

    DOE PAGES

    Vienna, John D.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-18

    Nuclear waste glasses must simultaneously meet a number of criteria related to their processability, product quality, and cost factors. The properties that must be controlled in glass formulation and waste vitrification plant operation tend to vary smoothly with composition allowing for glass property-composition models to be developed and used. Models have been fit to the key glass properties. The properties are transformed so that simple functions of composition (e.g., linear, polynomial, or component ratios) can be used as model forms. The model forms are fit to experimental data designed statistically to efficiently cover the composition space of interest. Examples ofmore » these models are found in literature. The glass property-composition models, their uncertainty definitions, property constraints, and optimality criteria are combined to formulate optimal glass compositions, control composition in vitrification plants, and to qualify waste glasses for disposal. An overview of current glass property-composition modeling techniques is summarized in this paper along with an example of how those models are applied to glass formulation and product qualification at the planned Hanford high-level waste vitrification plant.« less

  3. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  4. Tomographic Location of Potential Melt-Bearing Phenocrysts in Lunar Glass Spherules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebel, D. S.; Fogel, R. A.; Rivers, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    In 1971, Apollo 17 astronauts collected a 10 cm soil sample (74220) comprised almost entirely of orange glass spherules. Below this, a double drive-tube core sampled a 68 cm thick horizon comprised of orange glass and black beads (crystallized equivalents of orange glass). Primitive lunar glass spherules (e.g.-A17 orange glasses) are thought to represent ejecta from lunar mare fire fountains [1, 2]. The fire-fountains were apparently driven by a combination of C-O gas ex-solution from orange glass melt and the oxidation of graphite [3, 4]. Upon eruption, magmas lost their volatiles (e.g., S, CO, CO2) to space. Evidence for volatile escape remains as volatile-rich coatings on the exteriors of many spherules [e.g., 5,6]. Moreover, [7] showed that Type I and II Fe-Ni-rich metal particles found within orange glass olivine phenocrysts, or free-floating in the glass itself, are powerful evidence for the volatile driving force for lunar fire fountains.

  5. Silicate melt inclusions and glasses in lunar soil fragments from the Luna 16 core sample

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    More than 2000 fragments were studied microscopically, and electron microprobe analyses were made of 39 selected areas, from a few square mm of polished surface, through 75- to 425-??m fragments of lunar soil from two samples of the Luna 16 core. The silicate melt inclusions and glasses differ in important details from those observed earlier in the Apollo samples. Melt inclusions in olivine contain epitaxially oriented daughter crystals, but also show a similar epitaxy around the outside of the crystals not observed in previous lunar samples. Melt inclusions in ilmenite suggest trapping at successive stages in a differentiation sequence. There is abundant evidence for late-stage silicate liquid immiscibility, with melt compositions similar but not identical to those from Apollo 11 and 12. A comparison of the alkali ratio of any given bulk rock analysis with that of its late-stage, high-silica melt shows gross differences for different rocks. This is pertinent to understanding late-stage differentiation processes. Glass fragments and spherules exhibit a wide range of crystallization textures, reflecting their wide range of compositions and cooling histories. No significant differences were found between the two portions of core examined (Zones A and D). ?? 1972.

  6. Ni(2+) doped glass ceramic fiber fabricated by melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zaijin; Zheng, Shupei; Peng, Wencai; Zhang, Hang; Ma, Zhijun; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Chen, Danping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2015-11-01

    Glass ceramic fibers containing Ni(2+) doped LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were fabricated by a melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment. Fiber precursors were prepared by drawing at high temperature where fiber core glass was melted while fiber clad glass was softened. After heat treatment, LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were precipitated in the fiber core. Excited by 980 nm laser, efficient broadband near-infrared emission was observed in the glass ceramic fiber compared to that of precursor fiber. The melt-in-tube method can realize controllable crystallization and is suitable for fabrication of novel glass ceramic fibers. The Ni(2+)-doped glass ceramic fiber is promising for broadband optical amplification. PMID:26561096

  7. Ni(2+) doped glass ceramic fiber fabricated by melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zaijin; Zheng, Shupei; Peng, Wencai; Zhang, Hang; Ma, Zhijun; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Chen, Danping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2015-11-01

    Glass ceramic fibers containing Ni(2+) doped LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were fabricated by a melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment. Fiber precursors were prepared by drawing at high temperature where fiber core glass was melted while fiber clad glass was softened. After heat treatment, LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were precipitated in the fiber core. Excited by 980 nm laser, efficient broadband near-infrared emission was observed in the glass ceramic fiber compared to that of precursor fiber. The melt-in-tube method can realize controllable crystallization and is suitable for fabrication of novel glass ceramic fibers. The Ni(2+)-doped glass ceramic fiber is promising for broadband optical amplification.

  8. Alkali aluminosilicate melts and glasses: structuring at the middle range order of amorphous matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, C.; neuville, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviours. It is well known that several parameters impact strongly these properties, such as for instance the temperature, pressure, chemical composition and volatiles concentration, finally influencing eruptive behaviour of volcanoes. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts, like for instance the Vesuvius (Italy) or Erebus (Antartica) magmas. In an oncoming paper in Chemical Geology (Le Losq and Neuville, 2012), we have communicated results of the study of mixing Na-K in tectosilicate melts containing a high concentration of silica (≥75mol%). In the present communication, we will enlarge this first point of view to tectosilicate melts presenting a lower silica concentration. We will first present our viscosity data, and then the Adam and Gibbs theory that allows theoretically modelling Na-K mixing in aluminosilicate melts by using the so-called "mixed alkali effect". On the basis of the rheological results, the Na-K mixing cannot be explained with the ideal "mixed alkali effect", which involves random exchange of Na-K cationic pairs. To go further and as rheological properties are directly linked with structural properties, we will present our first results obtained by Raman and NMR spectroscopy. These last ones provide important structural pieces of information on the polymerization state of glasses and melts, and also on the environment of tetrahedrally coordinated cations. Rheological and structural results all highlight that Na and K are not randomly distributed in aluminosilicate glasses and melts networks. Na melts present a network with some channels and a non-random distribution of Al and Si. K networks are different. They also present a non-random distribution of Al and Si, but in two sub

  9. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, David K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule. The purpose of this advanced LAW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-term, mid-term, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced LAW glasses, property-composition models and their uncertainties, and an advanced glass algorithm to support WTP facility operations, including both Direct Feed LAW and full pretreatment flowsheets. Data are needed to develop, validate, and implement 1) new glass property-composition models and 2) a new glass formulation algorithm. Hence, this plan integrates specific studies associated with increasing the Na2O and SO3/halide concentrations in glass, because these components will ultimately dictate waste loadings for LAW vitrification. Of equal importance is the development of an efficient and economic strategy for 99Tc management. Specific and detailed studies are being implemented to understand the fate of Tc throughout

  10. High-quality chalcogenide glass waveguide fabrication by hot melt smoothing and micro-trench filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yanfen; Qi, Renduo; Yuan, Chenzhi; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2016-05-01

    We propose a fabrication method for chalcogenide glass (ChG) waveguides based on hot melt smoothing and micro-trench filling. ChGs has low melting points and good flowability. Experiments show that this method can realize high quality As2S7 glass waveguides with reverse ridge structures. The attenuations of the fundamental quasi-TE mode and quasi-TM mode are 0.1 and 0.9 dB/cm, respectively. This method avoids fabrication processes, such as photolithography, lift-off, and dry or wet etching that are directly applied to the ChG films. It provides a simple way to fabricate high quality ChG waveguides, which have great potential for applications in integrated nonlinear optical devices.

  11. Melt-cast organic glasses as high-efficiency fast neutron scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Joseph S.; Feng, Patrick L.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we report a new class of organic-based scintillators that combines several of the desirable attributes of existing crystalline, liquid, and plastic organic scintillators. The prepared materials may be isolated in single crystalline form or melt-cast to produce highly transparent glasses that have been shown to provide high light yields of up to 16,000 photons/MeVee, as evaluated against EJ-200 plastic scintillators and solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals. The prepared organic glasses exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and are compatible with wavelength shifters to reduce optical self-absorption effects that are intrinsic to pure materials such as crystalline organics. The combination of high scintillation efficiency, PSD capabilities, and facile scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes this new class of amorphous materials from existing alternatives.

  12. Melt-cast organic glasses as high-efficiency fast neutron scintillators

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Joseph S.; Feng, Patrick L.

    2016-06-24

    In this work we report a new class of organic-based scintillators that combines several of the desirable attributes of existing crystalline, liquid, and plastic organic scintillators. The prepared materials may be isolated in single crystalline form or melt-cast to produce highly transparent glasses that have been shown to provide high light yields of up to 16,000 photons/MeVee, as evaluated against EJ-200 plastic scintillators and solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals. The prepared organic glasses exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and are compatible with wavelength shifters to reduce optical self-absorption effects that are intrinsic to pure materials such as crystalline organics. In conclusion, themore » combination of high scintillation efficiency, PSD capabilities, and facile scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes this new class of amorphous materials from existing alternatives.« less

  13. Lindemann's rule applied to the melting of crystals and ultra-stable glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2016-05-01

    The ratio of the mean square amplitude root of thermal vibrations and the interatomic distance is a universal constant δls at the melting temperature Tm. The classical Gibbs free energy change completed by a volume energy saving ɛls (or Δɛlg) × ΔHm that governs the liquid to solid and liquid to ultra-stable glass transformations leads to a universal constant equal to δls (or δlg), ΔHm being the crystal melting enthalpy. The minimum values 0.217 of ɛls and 0.103 of δls are used to predict ultra-stable glass formation in pure metallic liquid elements at a universal reduced temperature θg = (Tg - Tm)/Tm = -0.6223.

  14. Stable Freestanding Thin Films of Copolymer Melts Far from the Glass Transition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thin polymer films have attracted attention because of both their broad range of applications and of the fundamental questions they raise regarding the dynamic response of confined polymers. These films are unstable if the temperature is above their glass transition temperature Tg. Here, we describe freestanding thin films of centimetric dimensions made of a comb copolymer melt far from its glass transition that are stable for more than a day. These long lifetimes allowed us to characterize the drainage dynamics and the thickness profile of the films. Stratified regions appear as the film drains. We have evidence that the stability, thinning dynamics, and thickness profile of the films result from structural forces in the melt. Understanding the key mechanisms behind our observations may lead to new developments in polymeric thin films, foams, and emulsions without the use of stabilizing agents. PMID:26527410

  15. Vanadium K Xanes Studies of EET79001 Impact-Melt Glasses Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Some impact-melt glasses in shergottites are rich in Martian atmospheric noble gases and sulfur suggesting a possible association with regolith-derived secondary mineral assemblages in the shocked samples. Previously, we studied two glasses, # 506 (Lith C in Lith A) and # 507 (Lith C in Lith B) from EET79001 [1,2] and suggested that sulfur initially existed as sulfate in the glass precursor materials and, on shock-melting of the precursors, the sulfate was reduced to sulfides in the shock glasses. To examine the validity of this hypothesis, we used V K microXANES techniques to measure the valence states of vanadium in the Lith C glasses from Lith A and Lith B in EET79001 [3] to complement and com-pare with previous analogous measurements on,78 glass (Lith C in Lith A) [4,5]. We reported the preliminary results in [3]. Vanadium is ideal for addressing the redox issue because it has multiple valence states and is a well-studied element. Vanadium in basalts exists mostly as V(sup 3+), V(sup 4+) and V(sup 5+) in terrestrial samples, mainly as V(sup 3+) with minor V(sup 2+) and minor V(sup 4+) in lunar samples and as roughly equal mixtures of V(sup 3+) and V(sup 4+) in Martian meteorites. In this report, we discuss the application of the V K XANES results to decipher the nature of shock reduction occurring in the silicate glasses during the impact process.

  16. Velocity of a freely rising gas bubble in a soda-lime silicate glass melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornyak, E. J.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison is conducted between measured velocities for the buoyant rise of single bubbles of varying size and composition, in a soda-lime silicate glass melt, with the steady state velocities predicted by the Stokes and Hadamard-Rybczynski formulas. In all cases, the data are noted to fit the Hadamard-Rybczynski expression for steady state rise speed considerably better than the Stokes formula.

  17. Kinetic model for quartz and spinel dissolution during melting of high-level-waste glass batch

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-07-24

    The dissolution of quartz particles and the growth and dissolution of crystalline phases during the conversion of batch to glass potentially affects both the glass melting process and product quality. Crystals of spinel exiting the cold cap to molten glass below can be troublesome during the vitrification of iron-containing high-level wastes. To estimate the distribution of quartz and spinel fractions within the cold cap, we used kinetic models that relate fractions of these phases to temperature and heating rate. Fitting the model equations to data showed that the heating rate, apart from affecting quartz and spinel behavior directly, also affects them indirectly via concurrent processes, such as the formation and motion of bubbles. Because of these indirect effects, it was necessary to allow one kinetic parameter (the pre-exponential factor) to vary with the heating rate. The resulting kinetic equations are sufficiently simple for the detailed modeling of batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in glass melters. The estimated fractions and sizes of quartz and spinel particles as they leave the cold cap, determined in this study, will provide the source terms needed for modeling the behavior of these solid particles within the flow of molten glass in the melter.

  18. Structural aspects of glass-formation in Ni-Nb melts

    SciTech Connect

    Holland-Moritz, D.; Yang, F.; Gegner, J.; Meyer, A.; Hansen, T.; Ruiz-Martín, M. D.

    2014-05-28

    We report on investigations of the static structure factors of glass-forming Ni{sub 59.5}Nb{sub 40.5} alloy melts by combination of the containerless processing technique of electrostatic levitation with neutron diffraction. By application of the isotopic substitution method, the full set of partial structure factors was determined. The short-range order in liquid Ni{sub 59.5}Nb{sub 40.5} is characterized by a large nearest neighbor coordination number of Z{sub NN} = 14.3 and a chemical short-range order with an affinity for the formation of heterogeneous Nb-Ni nearest neighbors. The structure factors observed here in the liquid state closely resemble those reported for amorphous Nb-Ni solids. The comparison with earlier results on the short-range structure in Zr-based glass-forming melts suggests that a large local density of packing, chemical order, and structural frustration are, amongst others, common structural properties of these metallic glass-forming systems, which favor glass-formation.

  19. Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2005-11-01

    The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

  20. Flux Decoupling and Chemical Diffusion in Redox Dynamics in Aluminosilicate Melts and Glasses (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. F.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of redox dynamics in silicate melts and glasses suggest that, for many compositions and for many external environments, the reaction proceeds and is rate-limited by the diffusive flux of divalent-cation network modifiers. Application of ion-backscattering spectrometry either (i) on oxidized or reduced melts (subsequently quenched before analysis) or (ii) on similarly reacted glasses, both of basalt-composition polymerization, demonstrates that the network modifiers move relative to the (first-order-rigid) aluminosilicate network. Thus, the textures associated with such reactions are often surprising, and frequently include metastable or unstable phases and/or spatial compositional differences. This response is only possible if the motion of cations can be decoupled from that of anions. In many cases, decoupling is accomplished by the presence in the melt/glass of transition-metal cations, whose heterovalency creates distortions in the electronic band structure resulting in electronic defects: electron “holes” in the valence band or electrons in the conduction band. (The prevalence of holes or electrons being a function of bulk chemistry and oxygen activity.) These electronic species make the melt/glass a “defect semiconductor.” Because (a) the critical issue in reaction dynamics is the transport coefficient (the product of species mobility and species concentration) and (b) the electronic species are many orders of magnitude more mobile than are the ions, very low concentrations of transition-metal ions are required for flux decoupling. For example, 0.04 at% Fe keeps a magnesium aluminosilicate melt/glass a defect semiconductor down to 800°C [Cook & Cooper, 2000]. Depending on composition, high-temperature melts can see ion species having a high-enough transport coefficient to allow decoupling, e.g., alkali cations in a basaltic melt [e.g., Pommier et al., 2010]. In this presentation, these ideas will be illustrated by examining redox dynamics

  1. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  2. Computer Modeling of Thermal Convection in Melts to Explain Glass Formation in Low Gravity and on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2006-01-01

    Experiments conducted up to this time on glass forming melts in the low gravity environment of space show that glasses prepared in low-g are more chemically homogeneous and more resistant to crystallization than the comparable glasses prepared at 1-g on Earth. This result is somewhat surprising and opposite to the accepted concept on glass formation for a melt. A hypothesis based on "shear thinning" of a melt, a decrease in viscosity with increasing shear stress, is proposed as an explanation for the observed low-gravity results. This paper describes detailed simulation procedures to test the role of thermal convection in introducing shear stress in glass forming melts, using a lithium disilcate melt as a model. The simulation system in its idealized version consists of a cylinder that is heated at one end and cooled at the other with gravity acting in a transverse direction to the thermal gradient. The side wall of the cylinder is assumed to be insulating. The governing equations of motion and energy are solved using variable properties for viscosity (Arrehenius and non-Arrehenius behaviors) and density (constant and temperature dependent). Other parametric variables in the calculations include gravity level and gravity vector orientation. The shear stress in the system are then computed as a function of gravity from the calculated values of maximum melt velocity, and its effect on melt viscosity (shear thinning) is predicted. Also included and discussed are the modeling efforts related to other potential convective processes in glass forming melts and their possible effects on melt viscosity.

  3. Higher Fe{sup 2+}/total Fe ratio in iron doped phosphate glass melted by microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Ashis K.; Sinha, Prasanta K.; Das, Dipankar; Guha, Chandan; Sen, Ranjan

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Iron doped phosphate glasses prepared using microwave heating and conventional heating under air and reducing atmosphere. • Presence of iron predominantly in the ferrous oxidation state in all the glasses. • Significant concentrations of iron in the ferrous oxidation state on both octahedral and tetrahedral sites in all the glasses. • Ratio of Fe{sup 2+} with total iron is found higher in microwave prepared glasses in comparison to conventional prepared glasses. - Abstract: Iron doped phosphate glasses containing P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–MgO–ZnO–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were melted using conventional resistance heating and microwave heating in air and under reducing atmosphere. All the glasses were characterised by UV–Vis–NIR spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and wet colorimetry analysis. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed presence of iron predominantly in the ferrous oxidation state on two different sites in all the glasses. The intensity of the ferrous absorption peaks in UV–Vis–NIR spectrum was found to be more in glasses prepared using microwave radiation compared to the glasses prepared in a resistance heating furnace. Thermogravimetric analysis showed increasing weight gain on heating under oxygen atmosphere for glass corroborating higher ratio of FeO/(FeO + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in glass melted by direct microwave heating. Wet chemical analysis also substantiated the finding of higher ratio Fe{sup +2}/ΣFe in microwave melted glasses. It was found that iron redox ratio was highest in the glasses prepared in a microwave furnace under reducing atmosphere.

  4. Effect of Alumina Source on the Rate of Melting Demonstrated with Nuclear Waste Glass Batch

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2012-03-30

    The melting behaviors of three glass batches formulated to vitrify high-level waste were compared. These batches, otherwise identical, differed in the alumina source: one was prepared with corundum (Al2O3), another with gibbsite [Al(OH)3], and the other with boehmite [AlO(OH)]. Batch samples, in the form of loose batches or pressed pellets, were heated at 5°C/min up to 1200°C. The expansion of pellets was monitored photographically. Quenched samples of batches, heated in crucibles, were thin-sectioned, investigated with optical microscopy, and analyzed with X-ray diffraction to quantify crystalline phases. Finally, batch-to-glass conversion was investigated with thermal analysis. Corundum was still present in one batch up to 900°C whereas gibbsite and boehmite dissolved below 500°C. In the batch with corundum, quartz, the source of silica, dissolved marginally earlier than in the batches with gibbsite and boehmite. Unlike the batch with corundum that exhibited considerable foaming, the batches with gibbsite and boehmite did not produce primary foam and made a more homogeneous glass. The occurrence of primary foam in the batch with corundum is a likely cause of a low rate of melting within the cold cap of a large-scale electric melter.

  5. A comparison of melt densities for several Apollo volcanic glass compositions up to 11 GPa: Implications for the role of Ti in melt compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Kaaden, K. E.; Agee, C. B.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    This study focuses on the density and compressibility of three lunar glass compositions encountered during the Apollo missions to the Moon. These glasses are hypothesized to have rapidly quenched as glass beads during lunar fire fountain eruptions. The lunar glass beads have distinctive colors that correspond to TiO2 content. The glasses of interest for this study are the Apollo 15 green glass Type C (A15C) which has a low TiO2 content of only 0.26 wt%, the Apollo 17 orange glass (74220-type), which has a moderately high TiO2 content of 9.12 wt%, and the Apollo 14 black glass which has the highest TiO2 content with 16.40 wt%. These glasses represent primary, unfractionated melts making them a prime candidate for experimental studies into lunar basalt density and eruptability during partial melting of the lunar mantle. Sink/float experiments were performed on both A15C and the A17 74220-type, and previously published data from the A14 black glass were used. Experiments were performed in both a piston cylinder apparatus for pressures up to 2.5 GPa and a Walker-style multi-anvil device for pressures greater than 2.5 GPa. Thus far we have estimated the density and compressibility of the orange glass successfully up to 8 GPa with future experiments planned for 10 GPa. Although these pressures exceed that of the lunar interior (~4.7 GPa), higher experimental pressures are important for determination of melt bulk modulus and identification of such factors as compositional effects on melt compressibility. Experiments have also been run on A15C for pressures relevant to the lunar interior. Our sink/float observations at 8 GPa confirm that the orange glass density curve can be approximated by a straight line at liquidus temperatures, while the black glass shows a strong decrease in slope with pressure, especially above 3 GPa. The different slopes between these two glasses creates a density crossover at approximately 6 GPa. SiO2, TiO2, and FeO are the largest compositional

  6. IMPACT OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION MELT RATE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Koopman, D.

    2011-04-26

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) streams - particularly the addition of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) - on the melt rate of simulated feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additional MST was added to account for contributions from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) was used to evaluate four melter feed compositions: two with simulated SCIX and SWPF material and two without. The Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) was then used to compare two different feeds: one with and one without bounding concentrations of simulated SCIX and SWPF material. Analyses of the melter feed materials confirmed that they met their targeted compositions. Four feeds were tested in triplicate in the MRF. The linear melt rates were determined by using X-ray computed tomography to measure the height of the glass formed along the bottom of the beakers. The addition of the SCIX and SWPF material reduced the average measured melt rate by about 10% in MRF testing, although there was significant scatter in the data. Two feeds were tested in the SMRF. It was noted that the ground CST alone (ground CST with liquid in a bucket) was extremely difficult to resuspend during preparation of the feed with material from SCIX and SWPF. This feed was also more difficult to pump than the material without MST and CST due to settling occurring in the melter feed line, although the yield stress of both feeds was high relative to the DWPF design basis. Steady state feeding conditions were maintained for about five hours for each feed. There was a reduction in the feed and pour rates of approximately 15% when CST and MST were added to the feed, although there was significant scatter in the data. Analysis of samples collected from the SMRF pour stream showed that the composition of the glass changed as expected when MST and

  7. Mid-infrared bi-directional reflectance spectroscopy of impact melt glasses and tektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlok, Andreas; Stojic, Aleksandra; Weber, Iris; Hiesinger, Harald; Zanetti, Michael; Helbert, Joern

    2016-11-01

    We have analyzed 14 impact melt glass samples, covering the compositional range from highly felsic to mafic/basaltic, as part of our effort to provide mid-infrared spectra (7-14 μm) for MERTIS (Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer), an instrument onboard of the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Since Mercury was exposed to many impacts in its history, and impact glasses are also common on other bodies, powders of tektites (Irghizite, Libyan Desert Glass, Moldavite, Muong Nong, Thailandite) and impact glasses (from the Dellen, El'gygytgyn, Lonar, Mien, Mistastin, and Popigai impact structures) were analyzed in four size fractions of (0-25, 25-63, 93-125 and 125-250 μm) from 2.5 to 19 μm in bi-directional reflectance. The characteristic Christiansen Feature (CF) is identified between 7.3 μm (Libyan Desert Glass) and 8.2 μm (Dellen). Most samples show mid-infrared spectra typical of highly amorphous material, dominated by a strong Reststrahlen Band (RB) between 8.9 μm (Libyan Desert Glass) and 10.3 μm (Dellen). Even substantial amounts of mineral fragments hardly affect this general band shape. Comparisons of the SiO2 content representing the felsic/mafic composition of the samples with the CF shows felsic/intermediate glass and tektites forming a big group, and comparatively mafic samples a second one. An additional sign of a highly amorphous state is the lack of features at wavelengths longer than ∼15 μm. The tektites and two impact glasses, Irghizite and El'gygytgyn respectively, have much weaker water features than most of the other impact glasses. For the application in remote sensing, spectral features have to be correlated with compositional characteristics of the materials. The dominating RB in the 7-14 μm range correlates well with the SiO2 content, the Christiansen Feature shows similar dependencies. To distinguish between glass and crystalline phases of the same chemical composition, a comparison between CF the SCFM index (SiO2/(SiO2

  8. A molecular dynamics simulation of the melting points and glass transition temperatures of myo- and neo-inositol.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stephen W; Chisholm, James A; Jones, William; Motherwell, Sam

    2004-11-15

    The heat of sublimation, density, melting point, and glass transition temperature are calculated for myo- and neo-inositol, using the condensed-phase optimized molecular potentials for atomistic simulation studies (COMPASS) force field and molecular dynamics techniques. Our results show that the calculated heats of sublimation and density are very close to the experimental values for both compounds. Furthermore, our simulated melting temperatures for myo- and neo-inositol also compare very well to the experimentally obtained data. The glass transition temperatures for myo- and neo-inositol have been calculated to be ca. 494 K and ca. 518 K, respectively, and the shape of the volume versus temperature plots produced are typical for a glass transition. As a result, it is our view that the COMPASS force field suitably describes these two compounds in molecular simulations and that molecular dynamics techniques, combined with this force field, can be used to simulate the melt and glass transitions for such molecules.

  9. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    SciTech Connect

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L.

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show “fast” growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing “slow” growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g} / T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g} / T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max} / T{sub g} = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  10. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts.

    PubMed

    Orava, J; Greer, A L

    2014-06-01

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U(max) at a temperature T(max) that lies between the glass-transition temperature T(g) and the melting temperature T(m). A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high U(max), a low T(max)/T(m), and a very broad peak in U vs. T/T(m). In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low U(max), a high T(max)/T(m), and a sharp peak in U vs. T/T(m). Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U(max) seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T(g)/T(m)) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T(g)/T(m) and fragility, can show a good correlation with U(max). For all the systems, growth at U(max) is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T(max)/T(g) = 1.48 ± 0.15. PMID:24908023

  11. Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Karl F.

    2015-08-07

    While a wide range of non-trivial predictions of the generalized entropy theory (GET) of glass-formation in polymer melts agree with a large number of observed universal and non-universal properties of these glass-formers and even for the dependence of these properties on monomer molecular structure, the huge mathematical complexity of the theory precludes its extension to describe, for instance, the perplexing, complex behavior observed for technologically important polymer films with thickness below ∼100 nm and for which a fundamental molecular theory is lacking for the structural relaxation. The present communication describes a hugely simplified version of the theory, called the simplified generalized entropy theory (SGET) that provides one component necessary for devising a theory for the structural relaxation of thin polymer films and thereby supplements the first required ingredient, the recently developed Flory-Huggins level theory for the thermodynamic properties of thin polymer films, before the concluding third step of combining all the components into the SGET for thin polymer films. Comparisons between the predictions of the SGET and the full GET for the four characteristic temperatures of glass-formation provide good agreement for a highly non-trivial model system of polymer melts with chains of the structure of poly(n-α olefins) systems where the GET has produced good agreement with experiment. The comparisons consider values of the relative backbone and side group stiffnesses such that the glass transition temperature decreases as the amount of excess free volume diminishes, contrary to general expectations but in accord with observations for poly(n-alkyl methacrylates). Moreover, the SGET is sufficiently concise to enable its discussion in a standard course on statistical mechanics or polymer physics.

  12. Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl F.

    2015-08-01

    While a wide range of non-trivial predictions of the generalized entropy theory (GET) of glass-formation in polymer melts agree with a large number of observed universal and non-universal properties of these glass-formers and even for the dependence of these properties on monomer molecular structure, the huge mathematical complexity of the theory precludes its extension to describe, for instance, the perplexing, complex behavior observed for technologically important polymer films with thickness below ˜100 nm and for which a fundamental molecular theory is lacking for the structural relaxation. The present communication describes a hugely simplified version of the theory, called the simplified generalized entropy theory (SGET) that provides one component necessary for devising a theory for the structural relaxation of thin polymer films and thereby supplements the first required ingredient, the recently developed Flory-Huggins level theory for the thermodynamic properties of thin polymer films, before the concluding third step of combining all the components into the SGET for thin polymer films. Comparisons between the predictions of the SGET and the full GET for the four characteristic temperatures of glass-formation provide good agreement for a highly non-trivial model system of polymer melts with chains of the structure of poly(n-α olefins) systems where the GET has produced good agreement with experiment. The comparisons consider values of the relative backbone and side group stiffnesses such that the glass transition temperature decreases as the amount of excess free volume diminishes, contrary to general expectations but in accord with observations for poly(n-alkyl methacrylates). Moreover, the SGET is sufficiently concise to enable its discussion in a standard course on statistical mechanics or polymer physics.

  13. Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Freed, Karl F

    2015-08-01

    While a wide range of non-trivial predictions of the generalized entropy theory (GET) of glass-formation in polymer melts agree with a large number of observed universal and non-universal properties of these glass-formers and even for the dependence of these properties on monomer molecular structure, the huge mathematical complexity of the theory precludes its extension to describe, for instance, the perplexing, complex behavior observed for technologically important polymer films with thickness below ∼100 nm and for which a fundamental molecular theory is lacking for the structural relaxation. The present communication describes a hugely simplified version of the theory, called the simplified generalized entropy theory (SGET) that provides one component necessary for devising a theory for the structural relaxation of thin polymer films and thereby supplements the first required ingredient, the recently developed Flory-Huggins level theory for the thermodynamic properties of thin polymer films, before the concluding third step of combining all the components into the SGET for thin polymer films. Comparisons between the predictions of the SGET and the full GET for the four characteristic temperatures of glass-formation provide good agreement for a highly non-trivial model system of polymer melts with chains of the structure of poly(n-α olefins) systems where the GET has produced good agreement with experiment. The comparisons consider values of the relative backbone and side group stiffnesses such that the glass transition temperature decreases as the amount of excess free volume diminishes, contrary to general expectations but in accord with observations for poly(n-alkyl methacrylates). Moreover, the SGET is sufficiently concise to enable its discussion in a standard course on statistical mechanics or polymer physics.

  14. Effect of water on the heat capacity of polymerized aluminosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhifd, M. Ali; Whittington, Alan; Roux, Jacques; Richet, Pascal

    2006-02-01

    The effect of water on heat capacity has been determined for four series of hydrated synthetic aluminosilicate glasses and supercooled liquids close to albite, phonolite, trachyte, and leucogranite compositions. Heat capacities were measured at atmospheric pressure by differential scanning calorimetry for water contents between 0 and 4.9 wt % from 300 K to about 100 K above the glass transition temperature ( Tg). The partial molar heat capacity of water in polymerized aluminosilicate glasses, which can be considered as independent of composition, is =-122.319+341.631×10-3T+63.4426×105/T2 (J/mol K). In liquids containing at least 1 wt % H 2O, the partial molar heat capacity of water is about 85 J/mol K. From speciation data, the effects of water as hydroxyl groups and as molecular water have tentatively been estimated, with partial molar heat capacities of 153 ± 18 and 41 ± 14 J/mol K, respectively. In all cases, water strongly increases the configurational heat capacity at Tg and exerts a marked depressing effect on Tg, in close agreement with the results of viscosity experiments on the same series of glasses. Consistent with the Adam and Gibbs theory of relaxation processes, the departure of the viscosity of hydrous melts from Arrhenian variations correlates with the magnitude of configurational heat capacities.

  15. Ni/S/Cl systematics and the origin of impact-melt glasses in Martian meteorite Elephant Moraine 79001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Donovan, John J.; Vicenzi, Edward P.

    2016-04-01

    Martian meteorite Elephant Moraine A79001 (EET 79001) has received considerable attention for the unusual composition of its shock melt glass, particularly its enrichment in sulfur relative to the host shergottite. It has been hypothesized that Martian regolith was incorporated into the melt or, conversely, that the S-enrichment stems from preferential melting of sulfide minerals in the host rock during shock. We present results from an electron microprobe study of EET 79001 including robust measurements of major and trace elements in the shock melt glass (S, Cl, Ni, Co, V, and Sc) and minerals in the host rock (Ni, Co, and V). We find that both S and major element abundances can be reconciled with previous hypotheses of regolith incorporation and/or excess sulfide melt. However, trace element characteristics of the shock melt glass, particularly Ni and Cl abundances relative to S, cannot be explained either by the incorporation of regolith or sulfide minerals. We therefore propose an alternative hypothesis whereby, prior to shock melting, portions of EET 79001 experienced acid-sulfate leaching of the mesostasis, possibly groundmass feldspar, and olivine, producing Al-sulfates that were later incorporated into the shock melt, which then quenched to glass. Such activity in the Martian near-surface is supported by observations from the Mars Exploration Rovers and laboratory experiments. Our preimpact alteration model, accompanied by the preferential survival of olivine and excess melting of feldspar during impact, explains the measured trace element abundances better than either the regolith incorporation or excess sulfide melting hypothesis does.

  16. Effect of Sulfate on Rhenium Partitioning during Melting of Low-Activity Waste Glass Feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tongan; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    The volatile loss of technetium-99 (99Tc) is a major concern of the low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification at Hanford. We investigated the incorporation and volatile loss of Re (a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc) during batch-to-glass conversion up to 1100°C. The AN-102 feed, which is one of the representative Hanford LAW feeds, containing 0.59 wt% of SO3 (in glass if 100% retained) was used. The modified sulfate-free AN-102_0S feed was also tested to investigate the effect of sulfate on Re partitioning and retention during melting. After heating of the dried melter feed (mixture of LAW simulant and glass forming/modifying additives) to different temperatures, the heat-treated samples were quenched. For each heat-treated sample, the salts (soluble components in room temperature leaching), early glass forming melt (soluble components in 80°C leaching), and insoluble solids were separated by a two-step leaching and the chemical compositions of each phase were quantitatively analyzed. The final retention ratio of AN-102 and AN-102_0S in glass (insoluble solids) are 32% and 63% respectively. The presence of sulfate in the salt phase between 600 and 800°C leads to a significantly higher Re loss via volatilization from the salt layer. At ≥800°C, for both samples, there is no more incorporation of Re into the insoluble phase because: for AN-102_0S there is no salt left i.e., the split into the insoluble and gas phases is complete by 800°C and for AN-102 all the Re contained in the remaining salt phase is lost through volatilization. The present results on the effect of sulfate, although not directly applicable to LAW vitrification in the melter, will be used to understand the mechanism of Re incorporation into glass to eventually develop the methods that can increase the 99Tc retention during LAW vitrification at Hanford.

  17. Glass transition, freezing and melting of liquids confined in the mesoporous silicate MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morineau, Denis; Dosseh, Gilberte; Alba-Simionesco, Christiane; Llewellyn, Philip

    1999-11-01

    MCM-41 is a recently discovered mesoporous silicate that consists of a hexagonal arrangement of cylindrical pores. Because the pores are very well defined in size and shape, MCM-41 can be considered as a model material in comparison with previous types of porous glass and has therefore been used in the present study. In particular, we have focused on the properties of confined liquids and related phase transitions using an MCM-41 with a pore diameter of 4nm. We discuss here the first stage of a study where the thermodynamics of a series of molecular liquids (water, cyclohexane, benzene, toluene, o-terphenyl and m toluidine) are analysed by differential scanning calorimetry. Only a moderate decrease in the melting point of organic liquids has been observed. Moreover, analysing the freezing process, we have established thermal treatments that provide temperature ranges where confined liquids can be studied below the melting temperatures of both the bulk and the confined phases. Surprisingly, no significant change in the glass transition temperature has been observed compared with the bulk.

  18. Structure and dynamical intra-molecular heterogeneity of star polymer melts above glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Glynos, Emmanouil; Green, Peter F

    2015-01-28

    Structural and dynamical properties of star melts have been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of a bead-spring model. Star polymers are known to be heterogeneous, but a systematic simulation study of their properties in melt conditions near the glass transition temperature was lacking. To probe their properties, we have expanded from linear to star polymers the applicability of Dobkowski's chain-length dependence correlation function [Z. Dobkowski, Eur. Polym. J. 18, 563 (1982)]. The density and the isokinetic temperature, based on the canonical definition of the laboratory glass-transition, can be described well by the correlation function and a subtle behavior manifests as the architecture becomes more complex. For linear polymer chains and low functionality star polymers, we find that an increase of the arm length would result in an increase of the density and the isokinetic temperature, but high functionality star polymers have the opposite behavior. The effect between low and high functionalities is more pronounced for short arm lengths. Complementary results such as the specific volume and number of neighbors in contact provide further insights on the subtle relation between structure and dynamics. The findings would be valuable to polymer, colloidal, and nanocomposites fields for the design of materials in absence of solution with the desired properties. PMID:25638003

  19. Melting and freezing of spherical bismuth nanoparticles confined in a homogeneous sodium borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, G.; Craievich, A. F.

    2008-08-01

    The melting temperature and the crystallization temperature of Bi nanoclusters confined in a sodium borate glass were experimentally determined as functions of the cluster radius. The results indicate that, on cooling, liquid Bi nanodroplets exhibit a strong undercooling effect for a wide range of radii. The difference between the melting temperature and the freezing temperature decreases for decreasing radius and vanishes for Bi nanoparticles with a critical radius R=1.9nm . The magnitude of the variation in density across the melting and freezing transitions for Bi nanoparticles with R=2nm is 40% smaller than for bulk Bi. These experimental results support a basic core-shell model for the structure of Bi nanocrystals consisting of a central crystalline volume surrounded by a structurally disordered shell. The volume fraction of the crystalline core decreases for decreasing nanoparticle radius and vanishes for R=1.9nm . Thus, on cooling, the liquid nanodroplets with R<1.9nm preserve, across the liquid-to-solid transformation, their homogeneous and disordered structure without crystalline core.

  20. In-situ observation of bubble formation at silicon melt-silica glass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Toshiro; Maeda, Susumu; Higasa, Mitsuo; Kashima, Kazuhiko

    2011-03-01

    The generation mechanism of pinhole defects in the Czochralski (CZ)-grown silicon (Si) single crystals was clarified by in-situ observations of bubble formation at the interface between Si melt and a silica glass crucible in a small experimental apparatus. The nucleation and growth of bubbles were facilitated by creating small cavities on the inner wall of the crucible. Si melting was conducted in an argon (Ar) atmosphere, and the pressure was maintained at either 100 Torr or close to a vacuum (no Ar-gas flow). It was found that in the presence of Ar, bubbles formed in the cavities immediately after the cavities came in contact with the melt. However, no bubbles formed in a vacuum in the experimental apparatus. These results indicate that the bubbles formed in the cavities are largely filled with Ar, and the initial bubble volumes are nearly comparable with those of the cavities. In an initial stage of expansion of a bubble, estimated volumes changed nearly in accordance with the Boyle-Charles law. Further, participation of SiO gas in bubble growth may explain the deviation of the bubble volume from the theoretical value anticipated if only Ar gas was involved in the bubble growth.

  1. Putative Bioalteration Textures Hosted Within Impact Melt Glasses From the Ries Crater, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapers, H. M.; Osinski, G. R.; Banerjee, N. R.

    2009-05-01

    [5]. The bulk compositions of impact melts are diverse, reflecting heterogeneities in the target lithologies. Furthermore, impact melts often display heterogeneity on multiple scales. Given the probable ubiquity of impact glasses in hydrothermal settings throughout the Solar System, it is important to understand the biological components and potential of such systems. Impact derived endolithic habitats are being considered as possible locations for life on early Earth [6] and on the surface of other planets such as Mars [7]. Understanding the geomicrobiology of impact craters on Earth is critical in furthering the search for life on Mars. Studies constraining the biogeochemistry of impact craters may not only yield insight into early life and the origin of life on Earth, but furthermore, may comprise a potential habitat for life and past life on other terrestrial planets such as Mars. References: [1] M.V. Naumov (2005) Geofluids, 5, 165-184. [2] C.S. Cockell, P. Lee (2002) Biological Reviews, 77, 279-310. [3] Banerjee et. al. (2007) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 71, A58. [4] Staudigel et al. 2008. ES Rev. 89(3-4) 156-178. [5] Osinski G. R. (2003) MAPS 38(11), 1641-1667. [6] F. Westall, R.L. Folk (2003) Precambrian Res. 126. [7] Cockell C. S., et al. (2005) MAPS 40(12), 1901-1914

  2. Apollo 14 very low titanium glasses - Melting experiments in iron-platinum alloy capsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H.-K.; Lindsley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes two techniques that have been developed to produce Fe-Pt alloy capsules for hgh-pressure experiments, and reports liquidus-phase relations of the Apollo 14 very low titanium glasses determined using Fe-rich capsules (a/Fe/ approximately 0.6). The liquid is multiply saturated with olivine and clinopyroxene at equal to or greater than 22 kbar. The multiple saturation is at least 3 kbar higher than that determined using pure Fe capsules and corresponds to a source region at least 60 km deeper if olivine and clinopyroxene were the residual phases. However, independent data on iron activity or oxygen fugacity of the glasses are still needed in order to choose a container of optimum composition. Preliminary experiments in Fe-poor alloy capsules suggest that the valence state of iron and the crystallization sequence in the melt have changed, possibly as a result of oxidizing materials entrapped during the iron-plating processes. The FeO content of the charge decreases linearly with increasing run duration in experiments using pure Fe capsules. The observation that iron-rich globules grow with time suggests that the equilibrium Fe (bleb) + Fe2O3 (liq) = 3 FeO (liq) might be established in the liquid at high pressure. If this explanation is correct, an appreciable amount of 'FeO' in the liquid could actually be Fe2O3, and some natural lunar volcanic glasses may contain ferric iron as well.

  3. Apollo 14 very low titanium glasses - Melting experiments in iron-platinum alloy capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.-K.; Lindsley, D. H.

    1983-11-01

    This paper describes two techniques that have been developed to produce Fe-Pt alloy capsules for hgh-pressure experiments, and reports liquidus-phase relations of the Apollo 14 very low titanium glasses determined using Fe-rich capsules (a/Fe/ approximately 0.6). The liquid is multiply saturated with olivine and clinopyroxene at equal to or greater than 22 kbar. The multiple saturation is at least 3 kbar higher than that determined using pure Fe capsules and corresponds to a source region at least 60 km deeper if olivine and clinopyroxene were the residual phases. However, independent data on iron activity or oxygen fugacity of the glasses are still needed in order to choose a container of optimum composition. Preliminary experiments in Fe-poor alloy capsules suggest that the valence state of iron and the crystallization sequence in the melt have changed, possibly as a result of oxidizing materials entrapped during the iron-plating processes. The FeO content of the charge decreases linearly with increasing run duration in experiments using pure Fe capsules. The observation that iron-rich globules grow with time suggests that the equilibrium Fe (bleb) + Fe2O3 (liq) = 3 FeO (liq) might be established in the liquid at high pressure. If this explanation is correct, an appreciable amount of 'FeO' in the liquid could actually be Fe2O3, and some natural lunar volcanic glasses may contain ferric iron as well.

  4. Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

  5. Insights into Silicate and Oxide Melt Structure from Amorphous, Non-Glass-Forming Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Many silicate and oxide liquids of interest in the Earth sciences and in technology cannot readily be quenched to glasses, either because of low silica contents (and hence low viscosity at the melting point and accompanying liquid 'fragility') or because of liquid-liquid unmixing at high temperature. Although in-situ, high temperature structural tools have been in use for decades and are rapidly developing, many methods are still most informative for glass samples quenched to ambient pressure and temperature, e.g. high-resolution solid-state NMR. Amorphous oxides, including alumina and silicate compositions, have widespread technological applications. These are generally deposited by a variety of high-energy sputtering methods, as films of thicknesses of 10's to 100's of nm. Using Al-27, Si-29, and O-17 NMR, we have recently shown that for such films, very similar short-range structure is seen in materials made by very different kinetic pathways, such as sol-gel synthesis vs. ion-beam sputtering. This path-independent structure suggests that these materials pass through transient equilibrium states during their formation, probably that of deeply supercooled liquids just above glass transition temperatures. In the HfO2-SiO2 and ZrO2-SiO2 systems, for example, samples have well-resolved O-17 NMR spectra, allowing quantitation of O sites with only Hf(Zr) neighbors (so-called "free" oxide ions), with mixed Hf(Zr) and Si neighbors, and Si only. The observed oxygen speciation agrees well with a simple thermodynamic model of one of the most fundamental equilibria in silicate systems, namely the reaction of bridging (Si-O-Si) and "free" (e.g. OHf3 and OHf4) oxide ions to produce "non-bridging" oxygens (e.g. Si-OHf2). This new approach to sampling such structural equilibria in compositions far outside the range of normal glass-forming liquids may provide new insights into more geological compositions as well, as well as in more general models of silicate melt chemistry.

  6. MEA/A-1 experiment 81F01 conducted on STS-7 flight, June 1983. Containerless processing of glass forming melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, D. E.; Ray, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    The space processing of containerless, glassforming melts on board the space shuttle flight STS-7 is investigated. Objectives include; (1) obtain quantitative evidence for the supression of heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization, (2) study melt homogenization without gravity driven convection, (3) procedural development for bubble free, high purity homogeneous melts inmicro-g, (4) comparative analysis of melts on Earth and in micro g, and (5) assess the apparatus for processing multicomponent, glass forming melts in a low gravity environment.

  7. Time-resolved Visualization of Laser Beam Melting of Silica Glass Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirnov, I.; Khmyrov, R. S.; Protasov, C. E.; Gusarov, A. V.

    Silica glass is an inorganic dielectric material that can be used for laser beam melting without cracking. However, the extremely high viscosity makes consolidation of powder very slow. To study the dynamics of consolidation, a 10.6 μm laser beam was directed on the powder layer deposited on the solid substrate of the same material. The laser-interaction zone was lighted with green laser and filmed with a high-speed camera at 6000 fps. The process develops steadily. Neither fluctuation nor droplets are observed. An expanding consolidation zone is observed. Viscous merging of softened powder particles is supposed to be the principal mechanism of consolidation. Mathematical model based on this mechanism confirms formation of the consolidated zone in the center. Both the experiment and the model indicate that consolidation looks like propagation of a sharp front. Comparison of the experiments and the calculations estimates the consolidation front temperature of about 1800-1900 K.

  8. Hydrogen isotopes in lunar volcanic glasses and melt inclusions reveal a carbonaceous chondrite heritage.

    PubMed

    Saal, Alberto E; Hauri, Erik H; Van Orman, James A; Rutherford, Malcolm J

    2013-06-14

    Water is perhaps the most important molecule in the solar system, and determining its origin and distribution in planetary interiors has important implications for understanding the evolution of planetary bodies. Here we report in situ measurements of the isotopic composition of hydrogen dissolved in primitive volcanic glass and olivine-hosted melt inclusions recovered from the Moon by the Apollo 15 and 17 missions. After consideration of cosmic-ray spallation and degassing processes, our results demonstrate that lunar magmatic water has an isotopic composition that is indistinguishable from that of the bulk water in carbonaceous chondrites and similar to that of terrestrial water, implying a common origin for the water contained in the interiors of Earth and the Moon. PMID:23661641

  9. Melt-electrospun polycaprolactone strontium-substituted bioactive glass scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiongyu; Blackwood, Keith A; Doustgani, Amir; Poh, Patrina P; Steck, Roland; Stevens, Molly M; Woodruff, Maria A

    2014-09-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a resorbable polymer used extensively in bone tissue engineering owing to good structural properties and processability. Strontium-substituted bioactive glass (SrBG) has the ability to promote osteogenesis and may be incorporated into scaffolds intended for bone repair. Here, we describe for the first time, the development of a PCL-SrBG composite scaffold incorporating 10% (weight) of SrBG particles into PCL bulk, produced by the technique of melt electrospinning. We show that we are able to reproducibly manufacture composite scaffolds with an interconnected porous structure and, furthermore, these scaffolds were demonstrated to be noncytotoxic in vitro. Ions present in the SrBG component were shown to dissolve into cell culture media and promoted precipitation of a calcium phosphate layer on the scaffold surface which in turn led to noticeably enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity in MC3T3-E1 cells compared to PLC-only scaffolds. These results suggest that melt-electrospun PCL-SrBG composite scaffolds show potential to become effective bone graft substitutes.

  10. Altered spherules of impact melt and associated relic glass from the K/T boundary sediments in Haiti

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, D.A.; Boynton, W.V. )

    1991-06-01

    Partially to wholly altered glass spherules produced by impact-induced shock melting have been found in the K/T boundary sediments of Haiti which also contain grains of shocked quartz. The relic glass has an approximately dacitic composition, and although grossly similar in composition to most previously described tektite glasses, it is slightly enriched in Ca and slightly depleted in Si, suggesting the Haitian glass was produced either from a target with a greater fraction of carbonate and anhydrite lithologies and fewer silicate units than the targets from which most other tektites were produced, and/or from one with a significant mafic component. The composition of the glass can best be reconciled with a continental margin terrane, consistent with studies of shocked mineral phases reported elsewhere. The thickness of the deposit in which the impact spherules occur indicates the source of the ejecta was in the proto-Caribbean region.

  11. Silicate glasses and sulfide melts in the ICDP-USGS Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Horton, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electron-beam petrography of melt-rich suevite and melt-rock clasts from selected samples from the Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, reveal a variety of silicate glasses and coexisting sulfur-rich melts, now quenched to various sulfi de minerals (??iron). The glasses show a wide variety of textures, fl ow banding, compositions, devitrifi cation, and hydration states. Electron-microprobe analyses yield a compositional range of glasses from high SiO2 (>90 wt%) through a range of lower SiO2 (55-75 wt%) with no relationship to depth of sample. Some samples show spherical globules of different composition with sharp menisci, suggesting immiscibility at the time of quenching. Isotropic globules of higher interfacial tension glass (64 wt% SiO2) are in sharp contact with lower-surface-tension, high-silica glass (95 wt% SiO2). Immiscible glass-pair composition relationships show that the immiscibility is not stable and probably represents incomplete mixing. Devitrifi cation varies and some low-silica, high-iron glasses appear to have formed Fe-rich smectite; other glass compositions have formed rapid quench textures of corundum, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, magnetite, K-feldspar, plagioclase, chrome-spinel, and hercynite. Hydration (H2O by difference) varies from ~10 wt% to essentially anhydrous; high-SiO2 glasses tend to contain less H2O. Petrographic relationships show decomposition of pyrite and melting of pyrrhotite through the transformation series; pyrite? pyrrhotite? troilite??? iron. Spheres (~1 to ~50 ??m) of quenched immiscible sulfi de melt in silicate glass show a range of compositions and include phases such as pentlandite, chalcopyrite, Ni-As, monosulfi de solid solution, troilite, and rare Ni-Fe. Other sulfi de spheres contain small blebs of pure iron and exhibit a continuum with increasing iron content to spheres that consist of pure iron with small, remnant blebs of Fe-sulfi de. The Ni-rich sulfi de phases can be explained by

  12. Technology development program for an advanced microsheet glass concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Dynamic Space Power Systems are candidate electrical power generating systems for future NASA missions. One of the key components in a solar dynamic power system is the concentrator which collects the sun's energy and focuses it into a receiver. In 1985, the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated the Advanced Solar Dynamic Concentrator Program with funding from NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST). The objectives of the Advanced Concentrator Program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived (7 to 10 years) space solar dynamic concentrators. The Advanced Concentrator Program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. The Advanced Microsheet Glass Concentrator Program, a reflector concept, that is currently being investigated both in-house and under contract is discussed.

  13. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-08-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2], and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history.

  14. Eruption Depths, Magma Storage and Magma Degassing at Sumisu Caldera, Izu-Bonin Arc: Evidence from Glasses and Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Island arc volcanoes can become submarine during cataclysmal caldera collapse. The passage of a volcanic vent from atmospheric to under water environment involves complex modifications of the eruption style and subsequent transport of the pyroclasts. Here, we use FTIR measurements of the volatile contents of glass and melt inclusions in the juvenile pumice clasts in the Sumisu basin and its surroundings (Izu-Bonin arc) to investigate changes in eruption depths, magma storage and degassing over time. This study is based on legacy cores from ODP 126, where numerous unconsolidated (<65 ka), extremely thick (few m to >250 m), massive to normally graded pumice lapilli-tuffs were recovered over four cores (788C, 790A, 790B and 791A). Glass and clast geochemistry indicate the submarine Sumisu caldera as the source of several of these pumice lapilli-tuffs. Glass chips and melt inclusions from these samples were analyzed using FTIR for H2O and CO2 contents. Glass chips record variable H2O contents; most chips contain 0.6-1.6 wt% H2O, corresponding to eruption depths of 320-2100 mbsl. Variations in glass H2O and pressure estimates suggest that edifice collapse occurred prior-to or during eruption of the oldest of these samples, and that the edifice may have subsequently grown over time. Sanidine-hosted melt inclusions from two units record variably degassed but H2O-rich melts (1.1-5.6 wt% H2O). The lowest H2O contents overlap with glass chips, consistent with degassing and crystallization of melts until eruption, and the highest H2O contents suggest that large amounts of degassing accompanied likely explosive eruptions. Most inclusions, from both units, contain 2-4 wt% H2O, which further indicates that the magmas crystallized at pressures of ~50-100 MPa, or depths ~400-2800 m below the seafloor. Further glass and melt inclusion analyses, including major element compositions, will elucidate changes in magma storage, degassing and evolution over time.

  15. Ejection of glass melts and generation of nanofibers from the back surface of a glass plate by pulsed UV laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Sho; Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka

    2016-03-01

    Several applications of glass nanofibers have been proposed for the past years. We found a new method for production of nanofibers with a diameter of 100 nm order from thin glass plates by irradiation with nanoseconds pulsed UV laser (wavelength is 355 nm). Although the generation of nanofibers from the back surface of a glass plate is convenient for continuous laser irradiation and collection of fibers, the details of the mechanism have not been elucidated yet. In this paper, we focused on the dynamics of ejection of glass melts that results in the formation of nanofibers, and investigated the mechanism of nanofiber generation. Based on the observation by a high-speed camera, we found that voids inside of the glass plate propagated in the laser propagation direction shot by shot, then, the void pushed the molten glass near the back surface. We also confirmed that the molten glass was ejected from the back surface of plates at a speed of 10-100 m/s. We assumed that the driving force is "recoil pressure", and compared the estimated pressure value from this experiment with that shown in the references. The value estimated by the relationship between pressure and momentum was 1.3 MPa, which was close to that reported in the past.

  16. Electron beam melting of advanced materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahale, Tushar Ramkrishna

    Layered manufacturing has for long been used for the fabrication of non-functional parts using polymer-based processes. Developments in laser beam and electron beam welding technologies and their adoption to layered manufacturing has made it possible to fabricate high-density functional parts in metal irrespective of the level of complexity. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process by Arcam AB is one such layered manufacturing process that utilizes a focused electron beam to process metal powder, layer by layer, in a vacuum environment. Research conducted as part of this body of work looks into the development of both bulk materials in the form of metal alloys and ceramic metal-matrix composites as well as the development of tunable mechanical & thermal metamaterials. Simulation models to approximate electron beam melting were suggested using commercial finite element analysis packages. A framework was developed based on the finite difference method to simulate layered manufacturing using Arcam AB's electron beam melting process. The outputs from the simulation data could be used to better understand the local melting, grain evolution, composition and internal stresses within freeform-fabricated metal parts.

  17. Attack of high-strength, oxidation-resistant alloys during in-can melting of simulated waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    The restistance of candidate canister alloys to penetration under the most severe conditions expected during in-can melting was directly proportional to the chromium content of the alloy, and inversely proportional to the Na/sub 2/O content of the glass melt. Specimens were exposed for 24 hours, which is the time required for in-can melting full-size waste-glass forms based on tests carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) and at SRL. The penetration resistance to Frit 211 at 1150/sup 0/C for 24 hours of most alloys tested was satisfactory. The amount of penetration would not affect the integrity of the waste form. Inconel 625, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 601 were penetrated < 20 mils. This was considered excellent. Incoloy 801, Type 310 stainless steel, Type 304L stainless steel, Inconel 600, and Type 347 stainless steel were penetrated < 40 mils. This was considered good. Hastelloy C-4 was penetrated > 100 mils by a glass composed of 65 wt % Frit 21 and 35 wt % composite sludge (with uranium) at 1150/sup 0/C for only 7 hours. This amount of penetration of an in-can melting canister would not be satisfactory. 12 figures.

  18. Engineering novel infrared glass ceramics for advanced optical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, K.; Buff, A.; Smith, C.; Sisken, L.; Musgraves, J. David; Wachtel, P.; Mayer, T.; Swisher, A.; Pogrebnyakov, A.; Kang, M.; Pantano, C.; Werner, D.; Kirk, A.; Aiken, S.; Rivero-Baleine, C.

    2016-05-01

    Advanced photonic devices require novel optical materials that serve specified optical function but also possess attributes which can be tailored to accommodate specific optical design, manufacturing or component/device integration constraints. Multi-component chalcogenide glass (ChG) materials have been developed which exhibit broad spectral transparency with a range of physical properties that can be tuned to vary with composition, material microstructure and form. Specific tradeoffs that highlight the impact of material morphology and optical properties including transmission, loss and refractive index, are presented. This paper reports property evolution in a representative 20 GeSe2-60 As2Se3-20 PbSe glass material including a demonstration of a 1D GRIN profile through the use of controlled crystallization.

  19. Structure and disorder in iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses and melts: High-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding of the effect of iron content on the structure (Si coordination environment and the degree of polymerization) of iron-bearing silicate melts and glasses is essential for studying their macroscopic properties and diverse geological processes in Earth's interior. Although the recent advances in high-resolution solid-state NMR techniques provide detailed structural information of a diverse iron-free oxide glasses with varying composition (e.g., Lee, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 2011, 108, 6847; Lee and Sung, Chem. Geol., 2008, 256, 326; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Lee et al., Phys. Rev., 103, 095501, 2009), their application to iron-bearing silicate glasses has a limited usefulness in resolving atomic configurations due to the effect of paramagnetic cation (i.e., Fe) on the NMR spectra. Here, we report the first ^{29}Si and ^{17}O NMR spectra for sodium-iron silicate glasses with varying iron content (Na_{2}O-Fe_{2}O_{3}-SiO_{2} glasses, up to 34.60 wt% Fe_{2}O_{3}), revealing previously unknown details of iron-induced changes in structure and disorder. While signal intensity decreases and peak width increases exponentially with increasing iron content [=Fe_{2}O_{3}/(Na_{2}O+Fe_{2}O_{3})], ^{29}Si MAS NMR spectra for sodium-iron silicate glasses present the slight peak shift and an asymmetrical peak broadening toward higher Q^{n} species with increasing iron content. This result implies an increase in the degree of polymerization with increasing iron content. Additionally, ^{29}Si spin-relaxation time (T_{1}) for the glasses decreases with increasing of iron content by several orders of magnitude. ^{17}O 3QMAS NMR spectra for the glasses show well-resolved non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Na-O-Si) and bridging oxygen (BO, Si-O-Si) even at relatively high iron content, providing the first direct experimental estimation of the degree of polymerization. In sodium-iron silicate glasses, the fraction of NBO decreases with increasing iron

  20. Geochemistry of volcanic glasses from the Louisville Seamount Trail (IODP Expedition 330): Implications for eruption environments and mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Beier, Christoph; Brandl, Philipp A.; Buchs, David M.; Krumm, Stefan H.

    2014-05-01

    glasses recovered from four guyots during drilling along the Louisville Seamount Trail, southwest Pacific, have been analyzed for major, trace, and volatile elements (H2O, CO2, S, and Cl), and oxygen isotopes. Compared to other oceanic island settings, they are geochemically homogeneous, providing no evidence of the tholeiitic stage that characterizes Hawai'i. The degrees and depth of partial melting remained constant over 1-3 Ma represented by the drill holes, and along-chain over several million years. The only exception is Hadar Guyot with compositions that suggest small degree preferential melting of an enriched source, possibly because it erupted on the oldest and thickest lithosphere. Incompatible element enriched glass from late-stage volcaniclastics implies lower degrees of melting as the volcanoes moved off the melting anomaly. Volcaniclastic glasses from throughout the igneous basement are degassed suggesting generation during shallow submarine eruptions (<20 mbsl) or as subaerial flows entered the sea. Drill depths may no longer reflect relative age due to postquench downslope movement. Higher volatile contents in late-stage volcaniclastics indicate submarine eruptions at 118-258 mbsl and subsidence of the edifices below sea level by the time they erupted, or generation in flank eruptions. Glass from intrusion margins suggests emplacement ˜100 m below the surface. The required uplift to achieve these paleo-quench depths and the subsequent subsidence to reach their current depths exceeds that expected for normal oceanic lithosphere, consistent with the Louisville melting anomaly being <100°C hotter than normal asthenosphere at 50-70 Ma when the guyots were erupted.

  1. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  2. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  3. Ferrule and use thereof for cooling a melt spun hollow glass fiber as it emerges from a spinnerette

    DOEpatents

    Brown, William E.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement in the process of melt spinning thin walled, hollow fibers from relatively low melting glasses results if cooling of the emerging fiber is accomplished by use of a thin layer of gas to transfer heat from the fiber to a ferrule which fits closely to the spinnerette face and the individual fiber. The ferrule incorporates or is in contact with a heat sink and is slotted or segmented so that it may be brought into position around the moving fiber. Thinner walled, more uniform fibers may be spun when this method of cooling is employed.

  4. Discovery of Critical Oxygen Content for Glass Formation in Zr80Pt20 Melt Spun Ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Sordelet; E.A. Rozhkova; X. Yang; M.J. Kramer

    2004-09-30

    Zr{sub 80}Pt{sub 20} alloys may form meta-stable quasicrystals either during devitrification of an amorphous phase or directly upon cooling from a liquid depending on processing conditions. To date, little attention has been given to the role of oxygen on the glass formation or devitrification behavior of Zr-Pt and similar alloys. This study reveals that oxygen content during melt spinning indeed strongly influences the formation of the as-quenched structure. A critical amount of oxygen was found to be required to form amorphous ribbons at a fixed quench rate. At lower oxygen levels (i.e., <500 ppm mass), a fully crystallized is formed; the structure is composed mainly of meta-stable {beta}-Zr with a small fraction of a quasicrystalline phase. At higher oxygen levels, the as-quenched structure transitions to a fully amorphous structure ({approx}1000 ppm mass), and with further oxygen addition forms a mixture of amorphous and quasicrystalline ({approx}1500 ppm mass) or crystalline phases (>2500 ppm mass). Details regarding the structure of the meta-stable {beta}-Zr phase in the low-oxygen ribbons are provided along with a discussion of the structural similarity between this phase and the quasicrystal structure that formed in this alloy.

  5. Shock temperatures in silica glass - Implications for modes of shock-induced deformation, phase transformation, and melting with pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Douglas R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of shock-induced radiative thermal emissions are used to determine the gray body temperatures and emittances of silica glass under shock compression between 10 and 30 GPa. The results suggest that fused quartz deforms heterogeneously in this shock pressure range. It is shown that the 10-16 GPa range coincides with the permanent densification region, while the 16-30 GPa range coincides with the inferred mixed phase region along the silica glass Hugoniot. Low emittances in the mixed phase region are thought to represent the melting temperature of the high-pressure phase, stishovite. Also, consideration is given to the effects of pressure on melting relations for the system SiO2-Mg2SiO4.

  6. Tracking the Depleted Mantle Signature in Melt Inclusions and Residual Glass of Basaltic Martian Shergottites using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Usui, Tomohiro; Economos, Rita C.; Schmitt, Axel K.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-­phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-­normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-­system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for both Y98 bulk and MI analyses display a flattening of the LREE that suggests a crustal contribution to the Y98 parent melt. This observation has important implications for the origins of depleted and enriched shergottites.

  7. A review of literature pertaining to the leaching and sorption of radionuclides associated with nuclear explosive melt glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.K.

    1993-05-01

    For the purposes of groundwater characterization, environmental remediation and health risk assessment, the mechanism and rate by which radionuclides bound within nuclear device melt glass are manifest in Nevada Test Site groundwaters must be known. Exchange between radionuclides and groundwater is dominated by the kinetics of leaching and the resultant sorption of derivative nuclides by minerals along the flow-path. In this context, a survey of the report literature has been conducted to review work related to these subjects. This report provides a representative, although not exhaustive, summary of the literature; because of the specialized nature of nuclear melt glass, emphasis was given to the report literature available from Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies and pertinent contractors. Where data is corroborated in journal literature, those references are also included. Before the risk to ground waters is estimated with any accuracy, recommendations for continued future work integrate systematic characterization of melt glass with leaching studies of these heterogeneous matrices.

  8. Melting of Soil Rich in Quartz by Radiation from Aerial Bursts - A Possible Cause of Formation of Libyan Desert Glass and Layered Tektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetsov, V. V.; Wasson, J. T.

    2007-03-01

    Impact scenarios with breakup and atmospheric deceleration of meteoroids, in which Libyan Desert Glass and layered tektites could be produced, are considered. Amounts of quartz-rich soil melted by radiation from the bursts are estimated.

  9. Dynamic processes in a silicate liquid from above melting to below the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Marcio Luis Ferreira; Fokin, Vladimir Mihailovich; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra; Abyzov, Alexander S.

    2011-11-01

    We collect and critically analyze extensive literature data, including our own, on three important kinetic processes—viscous flow, crystal nucleation, and growth—in lithium disilicate (Li2O.2SiO2) over a wide temperature range, from above Tm to 0.98Tg where Tg ≈ 727 K is the calorimetric glass transition temperature and Tm = 1307 K, which is the melting point. We found that crystal growth mediated by screw dislocations is the most likely growth mechanism in this system. We then calculated the diffusion coefficients controlling crystal growth, D_{eff}^U, and completed the analyses by looking at the ionic diffusion coefficients of Li+1, O2-, and Si4+ estimated from experiments and molecular dynamic simulations. These values were then employed to estimate the effective volume diffusion coefficients, D_{eff}^V, resulting from their combination within a hypothetical Li2Si2O5 "molecule". The similarity of the temperature dependencies of 1/η, where η is shear viscosity, and D_{eff}^V corroborates the validity of the Stokes-Einstein/Eyring equation (SEE) at high temperatures around Tm. Using the equality of D_{eff}^V and D_{eff}^η, we estimated the jump distance λ ˜ 2.70 Å from the SEE equation and showed that the values of D_{eff}^U have the same temperature dependence but exceed D_{eff}^η by about eightfold. The difference between D_{eff}^η and D_{eff}^U indicates that the former determines the process of mass transport in the bulk whereas the latter relates to the mobility of the structural units on the crystal/liquid interface. We then employed the values of η(T) reduced by eightfold to calculate the growth rates U(T). The resultant U(T) curve is consistent with experimental data until the temperature decreases to a decoupling temperature T_d^U ≈ 1.1 - 1.2T_g, when D_{eff}^η begins decrease with decreasing temperature faster than D_{eff}^U. A similar decoupling occurs between D_{eff}^η and D_{eff}^τ (estimated from nucleation time-lags) but at a

  10. Polypropylene/glass fiber hierarchical composites incorporating inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles for advanced technological applications.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Naffakh, Mohammed

    2013-10-01

    Novel isotactic polypropylene (iPP)/glass fiber (GF) laminates reinforced with inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS2) nanoparticles as environmentally friendly fillers have been successfully fabricated by simple melt-blending and fiber impregnation in a hot-press without the addition of any compatibilizer. The influence of IF-WS2 concentration on the morphology, viscosity. and thermal and mechanical behavior of the hierarchical composites has been investigated. Results revealed an unprecedented 62 °C increase in the degradation temperature of iPP/GF upon addition of only 4.0 wt % IF-WS2. The coexistence of both micro- and nanoscale fillers resulted in synergistic effects on enhancing the stiffness, strength, crystallinity, thermal stability, glass transition (Tg) and heat distortion temperature (HDT) of the matrix. The approach used in this work is an efficient, versatile, scalable and economic strategy to improve the mechanical and thermal behavior of GF-reinforced thermoplastics with a view to extend their use in advanced technological applications. This new type of composite materials shows great potential to improve the efficiency and sustainability of many forms of transport. PMID:24015820

  11. Analysis of glass and glass melts during the vitrification of fly and bottom ashes by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy. Part II. Process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panne, U.; Clara, M.; Haisch, C.; Niessner, R.

    1998-12-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) is employed for in situ and on-line process analysis of major glass constituents during a vitrification process for fly and bottom ashes from waste incineration. The system is based on an Nd:YAG laser for plasma ignition, while the elemental emissions from the plasma are detected time-resolved by an intensified multichannel analyzer. The perpendicular, single axis, imaging optics allow a remote sensing of the composition of the hot glass melt. Taking into account the plasma characteristics for calibration, good agreement between the LIPS analysis and the established reference analysis is achieved for the concentration ratios of SiO 2, Al 2O 3, and CaO. In addition, LIPS is applied to the analysis of aerosols generated by homogeneous nucleation during the heating-up of the investigated fly ashes. A distinctive temperature dependence of the heavy metal concentration of the aerosols is observed.

  12. EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

    2010-07-28

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro

  13. Entropy dependence of viscosity and the glass-transition temperature of melts in the system diopside-anorthite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, H.

    1992-01-01

    Viscosities of diopside-anorthite melts were measured over the wide range of temperature (near the glass-transition temperature-1580°C/1bar) and pressure (5 20 kb/above the liquidus temperature). The measurements were carried out by the fibre-elongation method for low temperature and the counter-balanced sphere method for high temperature at 1 bar, and the sinking and floating spheres method for high temperature at high pressure. Some of the values obtained deviated slightly from those in the literature. The data on viscosity and the glasstransition temperature have been interpreted on the basis of the configurational entropy theory, by which temperature and compositional effects on viscosity were explained well. The configurational entropies at the glasstransition temperature of magmatic silicate melts are almost constant if we use an average molecular weight (amw) or “bead” as a unit; 8.0±1.2 J/K·amw, 1.1 ±0.2cal/K·bead. The latter value coincides well with the value from the literature for organic polymers. The negative deviation from linearity of the glass-transition temperature of intermediate melts may be interpreted as the effect of the mixing entropy. The calculated glasstransition temperature-composition curve using the mixing entropy agreed well with the experimental values.

  14. The role of Al3+ on rheology and structural changes in sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel R.; Florian, Pierre; Henderson, Grant S.; Massiot, Dominique

    2014-02-01

    Because of their importance in both the geosciences and the glass-making industry, alkali aluminosilicate melts have been the focal point of many past studies, but despite progress many problems remain unresolved, such as the complex behaviour of the thermodynamic properties of aluminium-rich alkali silicate melts. This paper presents a study of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses and melts, containing 75 mol% SiO2 and different Al/(Al + Na) ratios. Their structure has been investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, as well as, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si 1D MAS NMR spectroscopy. Results confirm the role change of Na+ cations from network modifier to charge compensator in the presence of Al3+ ions. In addition, polymerization increases with increase of the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. These structural changes explain the observed variations in the viscosity of these melts. The viscosity data in turn allow us to calculate the configurational entropy of melts at the glass transition temperature [the Sconf(Tg)]. The variations of the Sconf(Tg) are strongly nonlinear, with sharp increases and decreases depending on the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. More importantly, a strong increase of the Sconf(Tg) is observed when a few Al2O3 is added to sodium silicate melt. A strong decrease is observed after crossing the tectosilicate join, when Al/(Al + Na) > 0.5 and when Al3+ ions are present in fivefold coordination, Al[5], in the glass. Furthermore, in situ27Al NMR spectra of the peraluminous melt show a clear increase of the Al[5] concentration with increasing temperature. When considered in combination with melt fragility and heat capacity, our data demonstrate that Al[5] is clearly a transient unit at high temperature in highly polymerized tectosilicate and peraluminous melts. However, when present in glasses, Al[5] increases the stability of the aluminosilicate network, hence the Tg of glasses. This could be explained by the ability of Al[5] to carry threefold coordinated oxygen atoms in its first coordination

  15. Interplay of anisotropy and disorder in the doping-dependent melting and glass transitions of vortices in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O 8+delta.

    PubMed

    Beidenkopf, H; Verdene, T; Myasoedov, Y; Shtrikman, H; Zeldov, E; Rosenstein, B; Li, D; Tamegai, T

    2007-04-20

    We study the oxygen doping dependence of the equilibrium first-order melting and second-order glass transitions of vortices in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O 8+delta. Doping affects both anisotropy and disorder. Anisotropy scaling is shown to collapse the melting lines only where thermal fluctuations are dominant. Yet, in the region where disorder breaks that scaling, the glass lines are still collapsed. A quantitative fit to melting and replica symmetry-breaking lines of a 2D Ginzburg-Landau model further reveals that disorder amplitude weakens with doping, but to a lesser degree than thermal fluctuations, enhancing the relative role of disorder.

  16. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Skorski, Daniel C.; Matyas, Josef

    2013-07-31

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  17. The role of Al3+ on rheology and structural changes in sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel R.; Florian, Pierre; Henderson, Grant S.; Massiot, Dominique

    2014-02-01

    Because of their importance in both the geosciences and the glass-making industry, alkali aluminosilicate melts have been the focal point of many past studies, but despite progress many problems remain unresolved, such as the complex behaviour of the thermodynamic properties of aluminium-rich alkali silicate melts. This paper presents a study of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses and melts, containing 75 mol% SiO2 and different Al/(Al + Na) ratios. Their structure has been investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, as well as, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si 1D MAS NMR spectroscopy. Results confirm the role change of Na+ cations from network modifier to charge compensator in the presence of Al3+ ions. In addition, polymerization increases with increase of the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. These structural changes explain the observed variations in the viscosity of these melts. The viscosity data in turn allow us to calculate the configurational entropy of melts at the glass transition temperature [the Sconf(Tg)]. The variations of the Sconf(Tg) are strongly nonlinear, with sharp increases and decreases depending on the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. More importantly, a strong increase of the Sconf(Tg) is observed when a few Al2O3 is added to sodium silicate melt. A strong decrease is observed after crossing the tectosilicate join, when Al/(Al + Na) > 0.5 and when Al3+ ions are present in fivefold coordination, Al[5], in the glass. Furthermore, in situ27Al NMR spectra of the peraluminous melt show a clear increase of the Al[5] concentration with increasing temperature. When considered in combination with melt fragility and heat capacity, our data demonstrate that Al[5] is clearly a transient unit at high temperature in highly polymerized tectosilicate and peraluminous melts. However, when present in glasses, Al[5] increases the stability of the aluminosilicate network, hence the Tg of glasses. This could be explained by the ability of Al[5] to carry threefold coordinated oxygen atoms in its first coordination

  18. Effects of coordination environment on the Zr-F symmetric stretching frequency of fluorozirconate glasses, crystals, and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phifer, Carol C.; Gosztola, David J.; Kieffer, John; Austen Angell, C.

    1991-03-01

    A treatment based on Badger's rule is used to estimate symmetric stretching frequencies νs of the nonbridging fluorides of various ZrFn groups in the presence of divalent and monovalent countercations. New vibrational spectra of MgZrF6, Ba2ZrF8, and β-BaZr2F10 are presented and incorporated into the method. The factors affecting νs are outlined and discussed in detail. Compilations of estimated frequencies are used to deduce the probable local structure around Zr ions in binary barium fluorozirconate glasses and in fluorozirconate melts containing lithium and sodium ions. It is concluded that the results of Raman spectroscopy indicate the presence of seven- and eight-coordinate Zr in some barium fluorozirconate glasses.

  19. Effects of Mg and Zn on the surface of doped melt-derived glass for biomaterials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, E.; Oudadesse, H.; Lucas-Girot, A.; Le Gal, Y.; Jeanne, S.; Cathelineau, G.

    2008-11-01

    Bioactive glasses in the system SiO 2-CaO-Na 2O-P 2O 5 were synthesized pure and doped with magnesium or zinc by melt-derived method. The bioactivity was studied during in vitro assays: the ability of hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) layer to form on the glass surface was examined after contact with simulated body fluid (SBF). The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies were performed before and after immersion in vitro assays. The SBF solutions were also analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Introduction of magnesium and zinc as trace element induces several modifications on the observed phenomena at the glass surface and in SBF solution after immersion of the samples. The chemical durability of the glasses, the formation of the silica-rich layer and the crystallization of the HCA layer were affected, but not present the same modifications as the introduced doping element.

  20. Molten (Mg0.88Fe0.12)2SiO4 at lower mantle conditions - Melting products and structure of quenched glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Quentin

    1990-01-01

    Infrared spectra of quenched magnesium silicate glasses synthesized by fusing olivine at pressures in excess of 50 GPa and temperatures greater than 2500 K demonstrate that silicon is dominantly present in four-fold coordination with respect to oxygen within these quenched glasses. This low coordination is attributed, by analogy with the structural behavior of glasses compressed at 300 K, to the instability of higher coordinations in glasses of these compositions on decompression. Spectra of glasses formed in a hydrous environment document that water is extensively soluble in melts at these high pressures and temperatures. Also, these results are consistent with the melting of (Mg0.88Fe0.12)2SiO4 compositions to liquids near pyroxene in stoichiometry under these conditions, with iron-rich magnesiowuestite being the liquidus phase.

  1. Density and compressibility of the molten lunar picritic glasses: Implications for the roles of Ti and Fe in the structures of silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; Agee, Carl B.; McCubbin, Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    The density and compressibility of four synthetic molten lunar picritic glasses was investigated from 0 to 10 GPa and 1748 to 2473 K. The picritic glasses were collected from the lunar surface during the Apollo missions, and they are hypothesized to have rapidly quenched as glass beads during pyroclastic fire fountain eruptions. The specific melt compositions investigated in the present study are the Apollo 15 green glass Type C (A15C, TiO2 = 0.26 wt%), the Apollo 14 yellow glass (A14Y, TiO2 = 4.58 wt%), the Apollo 17 orange glass 74220-type (A17O TiO2 = 9.12 wt%), and the Apollo 14 black glass (A14B, TiO2 = 16.40 wt%). These glasses are reported to represent primary unfractionated melts, making them a prime candidate for experimental studies into lunar basalt density and compressibility during partial melting of the lunar mantle. Sink-float experiments were conducted on the synthetic molten lunar glass compositions using a piston-cylinder apparatus (P < 2 GPa) and a Walker-style multi-anvil device (P > 2.5 GPa) in order to bracket the density of the melts. New sink-float data are reported for A15C, A14Y, and A17O, which are combined with previously published density and compressibility data on A15C, A17O, and A14B. Although the Ti-rich liquids are highly compressible at lower pressures, they become nearly incompressible at much higher pressures when compared to the molten low-Ti glasses. Consequently, the melts with the most TiO2 (A14B) are the least dense at higher pressures, a reversal of what is seen at lower pressures. This change in density and compressibility is attributed to changes in coordination of Ti and Fe in the silicate melt structure. As Ti4+ abundances in the silicate melt increase, predominantly [IV]Ti4+ and [IV]Fe2+ change to [VI]Ti4+ and [VI]Fe2+ in the melt structure. All of the data from the present study were used to calculate a Birch-Murnaghan equation-of-state (BM-EOS) for each melt composition. The BM-EOS model for each composition was

  2. Effect of composition and temperature on the properties of High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses melting above 1200{degrees}C (Draft)

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    Increasing the melting temperature of HLW glass allows an increase of waste loading (thus reducing product volume) and the production of more durable glasses at a faster melting rate. However, HLW glasses that melt at high temperatures differ in composition from glasses formulated for low temperature ({approximately}1150{degree}C). Consequently, the composition of high-temperature glasses falls in a region previously not well tested or understood. This report represents a preliminary study of property/composition relationships of high-temperature Hanford HLW glasses using a one-component-at-a-time change approach. A test matrix has been designed to explore a composition region expected for high-temperature high-waste loading HLW glasses to be produced at Hanford. This matrix was designed by varying several key components (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, UO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and others) starting from a glass based on a Hanford HLW all-blend waste. Glasses were fabricated and tested for viscosity, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, liquidus temperature, and PCT release. The effect of individual components on glass properties was assessed using first- and second- order empirical models. The first-order component effects were compared with those from low-temperature HLW glasses.

  3. Advanced automated glass cockpit certification: Being wary of human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amalberti, Rene; Wilbaux, Florence

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents some facets of the French experience with human factors in the process of certification of advanced automated cockpits. Three types of difficulties are described: first, the difficulties concerning the hotly debated concept of human error and its non-linear relationship to risk of accident; a typology of errors to be taken into account in the certification process is put forward to respond to this issue. Next, the difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. The last difficulties to be considered are those related to the goals of certification itself on these new aircraft and the status of findings from human factor analyses (in particular, what should be done with disappointing results, how much can the changes induced by human factors investigation economically affect aircraft design, how many errors do we need to accumulate before we revise the system, what should be remedied when human factor problems are discovered at the certification stage: the machine? pilot training? the rules? or everything?). The growth of advanced-automated glass cockpits has forced the international aeronautical community to pay more attention to human factors during the design phase, the certification phase and pilot training. The recent creation of a human factor desk at the DGAC-SFACT (Official French services) is a direct consequence of this. The paper is divided into three parts. Part one debates human error and its relationship with system design and accident risk. Part two describes difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. Part three focuses on concrete outcomes of human factors for certification purposes.

  4. Oxygen isotope partitioning between rhyolitic glass/melt and CO{sub 2}: An experimental study at 550-950{degrees}C and 1 bar

    SciTech Connect

    Palin, J.M.; Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.M.

    1996-06-01

    Oxygen isotope partitioning between gaseous CO{sub 2} and a natural rhyolitic glass and melt (77.7 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 0.16 wt% H{sub 2}O{sub total}) has been measured at 550-950{degrees}C and approximately 1 bar. Equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation factors ({alpha}{sub CO2-rhyolite} = ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O){sub rhyolite}) determined in exchange experiments of 100-255 day duration. These values agree well with predictions based on experimentally determined oxygen isotope fractionation factors for CO{sub 2}-silica glass and CO{sub 2}-albitic glass/melt, if the rhyolitic glass is taken to be a simple mixture of normative silica and alkali feldspar components. The results indicate that oxygen isotope partitioning in felsic glasses and melts can be modeled by linear combinations of endmember silicate constituents. Rates of oxygen isotope exchange observed in the partitioning experiments are consistent with control by diffusion of molecular H{sub 2}O dissolved in the glass/melt and are three orders of magnitude faster than predicted for rate control solely by diffusion of dissolved molecular CO{sub 2} under the experimental conditions. Additional experiments using untreated and dehydrated (0.09 wt% H{sub 2}O{sub total}) rhyolitic glass quantatively support these interpretations. We conclude that diffusive oxygen isotope exchange in rhyolitic glass/melt, and probably other polymerized silicate materials, it controlled by the concentrations and diffusivities of dissolved oxygen-bearing volatile species rather than diffusion of network oxygen under all but the most volatile-poor conditions. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Chemical Composition of Impact Glass and Suevite-Type Partial Melts of the Rab and Krk Islands and Their Relation with the Proposed Krk Impact Structure in Northern Adriatic, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čalogović, M.; Marjanac, T.; Fazinić, S.; Strmić-Palinkaš, S.; Tomša, A. M.; Marjanac, L.

    2015-09-01

    Chemical composition of Krk impact structure ejecta represented by incomplete melts and glasses indicate affinity with Pleistocene loess as target lithology, and suggests Pleistocene age of the impact.

  6. Containerless preparation of advanced optical glasses: Experiment 77F095

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happe, R. A.; Kim, K. S.

    1982-01-01

    Containerless processing of optical glasses was studied in preparation for space shuttle MEA flight experiments. Ground based investigation, experiment/hardware coordination activities and development of flight experiment and sample characterization plans were investigated. In the ground based investigation over 100 candidate glass materials for space processing were screened and promising compositions were identified. The system of Nb2O5-TiO2-CaO was found to be very rich with containerless glass compositions and as extensive number of the oxides combinations were tried resulting in a glass formation ternary phase diagram. The frequent occurrence of glass formation by containerless processing among the compositions for which no glass formations were previously reported indicated the possibility and an advantage of containerless processing in a terrestrial environment.

  7. Gels and gel-derived glasses in the Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 system. [containerless melting in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    The containerless melting of high-purity multicomponent homogeneous gels and gel-monoliths offers a unique approach to making ultrapure multicomponent optical glasses in the reduced gravity environment of space. Procedures for preparing and characterizing gels and gel-derived glasses in the Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 system are described. Preparation is based on the polymerization reactions of alkoxysilane with trimethyl borate or boric acid and a suitable sodium compound. The chemistry of the gelling process is discussed in terms of process parameters and the gel compositions. The physicochemical nature of gels prepared by three different procedures were found to be significantly different. IR absorption spectra indicate finite differences in the molecular structures of the different gels. The melting of the gel powders and the transformation of porous gel-monoliths to transparent 'glass' without melting are described.

  8. The performance of Inconel 693 electrodes for processing an iron phosphate glass melt containing 26 wt.% of a simulated low activity waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Hsien; Newkirk, Joseph W.; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Brow, Richard K.; Schlesinger, Mark E.; Ray, Chandra S.; Day, Delbert E.

    2014-01-01

    Iron phosphate glass is a candidate fixation medium for storing radioactive waste. The Department of Energy supported a program to assess the viability of using Fe-phosphate glass for vitrifying low activity waste in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM). In this study, Inconel 693 electrodes were tested in a research-scale joule-heated melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. After a 10-day test at 1030 °C that yielded 124 kg of glass, the electrodes exhibited a dimensional loss rate of ∼1.6 mm/year, which is comparable to that of Inconel 690 electrodes used in a JHM for processing borosilicate melts. Microstructural changes occurred within the outermost 700 μm of the electrodes and are consistent with an earlier study of Inconel coupons in Fe-phosphate melts. The results indicate that Inconel 693 should have an acceptable corrosion resistance as the electrode for JHM processing of iron phosphate melts.

  9. Platinum group metal particles aggregation in nuclear glass melts under the effect of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanotin, Caroline; Puig, Jean; Neyret, Muriel; Marchal, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The viscosity of simulated high level radioactive waste glasses containing platinum group metal particles is studied over a wide range of shear stress, as a function of the particles content and the temperature, thanks to a stress imposed rheometer, coupled to a high-temperature furnace. The system shows a very shear thinning behavior. At high shear rate, the system behaves as a suspension of small clusters and individual particles and is entirely controlled by the viscosity of the glass matrix as classical suspensions. At low shear rate, above a certain fraction in platinum group metal particles, the apparition of macroscopic aggregates made up of chains of RuO2 particles separated by thin layers of glass matrix strongly influences the viscosity of the nuclear glass and leads, in particular, to the apparition of yield stress and thixotropic effects. The maximum size of these clusters as well as their effective volume fraction have been estimated by a balance between Van der Waals attractive forces and hydrodynamic forces due to shear flow. We showed experimentally and theoretically that this aggregation phenomenon is favored by an increase of the temperature, owing to the viscosity decrease of the glass matrix, leading to an unusual increase of the suspension viscosity.

  10. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  11. Reactions during melting of low-activity waste glasses and their effects on the retention of rhenium as a surrogate for technetium-99

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tongan; Kim, Dong-Sang; Tucker, Abigail E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-10-01

    Volatile loss of radioactive 99Tc to offgas is a concern with processing the low-activity waste (LAW) at Hanford site. We investigated the partitioning and incorporation of Re (a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc) into the glass melt during crucible melting of two simulated LAW feeds that resulted in a large difference in 99mTc/Re retention in glass from the small-scale melter tests. Each feed was prepared from a simulated liquid LAW and chemical and mineral additives (boric acid, silica sand, etc.). The as-mixed slurry feeds were dried at 105°C and heated to 600–1100°C at 5 K/min. The dried feeds and heat treated samples were leached with deionized water for 10 min at room temperature followed by 24-h leaching at 80°C. Chemical compositions of the resulting solutions and insoluble solids were analyzed. Volume expansion measurement and X-ray diffraction were performed on dried feeds and heat treated samples to characterize the progress of feed-to-glass conversion reactions. It was found that the incorporation of Re into glass melt virtually completed during the major feed-to-glass conversion reactions were going on at ≤ 700°C. The present results suggest that the different composition of the salt phase is responsible for the large difference in Re incorporation into glass melt during early stages of glass melting at ≤ 700°C. Additional studies with modified and simplified feeds are underway to understand the details on how the different salt composition affects the Re incorporation.

  12. Chemical Principles Revisited: The Chemistry of Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris; Kolb, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a detailed discussion on the chemistry of glass. Topics discussed include: natural glass, early history, modern glass composition, raw materials for glass melting, chemically modified glasses, modern glass forming, glass ceramics, and new developments in glass research. (BT)

  13. Melting Hanford LAW into Iron-Phosphate Glass in a CCIM

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Sharna Rossberg

    2011-09-01

    A vitrification test has been conducted using the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system at the Idaho National Laboratory. The test was conducted to demonstrate the vitrification of a Hanford low activity waste (LAW) that contains relatively large amounts of sulfate and sodium, compared to other radioactive Hanford waste streams. The high sulfate content limits the potential loading of this waste stream in conventional borosilicate glass, so this test demonstrated how this waste stream could be vitrified in an iron-phosphate glass that can tolerate higher levels of sulfate.

  14. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-08-10

    In this study, we present a model for the kinetics of multiple overlapping reactions. Mathematical representation of the kinetics of gas-evolving reactions is crucial for the modeling of the feed-to-glass conversion in a waste-glass melter. The model simulates multiple gas-evolving reactions that occur during heating of a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To obtain satisfactory kinetic parameters, we employed Kissinger's method combined with least-squares analysis. The power-law kinetics with variable reaction order sufficed for obtaining excellent agreement with measured thermogravimetric analysis data.

  15. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH - MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; PIERCE DA; POKORNY R; HRMA PR

    2012-02-07

    In this study, we present a model for the kinetics of multiple overlapping reactions. Mathematical representation of the kinetics of gas-evolving reactions is crucial for the modeling of the feed-to-glass conversion in a waste-glass melter. The model simulates multiple gas-evolving reactions that occur during heating of a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To obtain satisfactory kinetic parameters, we employed Kissinger's method combined with least-squares analysis. The power-law kinetics with variable reaction order sufficed for obtaining excellent agreement with measured thermogravimetric analysis data.

  16. Millimeter-Wave Measurements of High Level and Low Level Activity Glass Melts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Woskov

    2005-03-02

    EMSP supported research of millimeter-wave technology for nuclear waste glass melter monitoring has been very productive in establishing this field and showing great progress. This work has garnered significant recognition, winning an R&D 100 Award for viscosity monitoring, a Best Paper Award by the American Ceramic Society for nuclear waste glass monitoring, investment by the Glass Plus industry consortium to test this technology for glass fiber manufacture, investment by Savannah River Technology Center in purchasing key hardware components for additional tests, and Japanese initiated exchange visits between MIT and the vitrification facilities at Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in Tokai to review this technology. There are also potentially important spin offs to other areas including nuclear and fossil fuel power production, and National Institute of Health sponsored research as indicated below. Consequently, this work has the potential of becoming a major inter nationally recognized EMSP success story. A summary of the main accomplishments follows. The readers are referred to the cited reference publications for more details, many of which were EMSP supported by this work.

  17. Evidence of liquid–liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above liquidus temperature

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Sandor, Magdalena T.; Yu, Yao; Ke, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Hua-Ping; Li, Mao-Zhi; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Liquid–liquid transition, a phase transition of one liquid phase to another with the same composition, provides a key opportunity for investigating the relationship between liquid structures and dynamics. Here we report experimental evidences of a liquid–liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above its liquidus temperature by 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance including the temperature dependence of cage volume fluctuations and atomic diffusion. The observed dependence of the incubation time on the degree of undercooling is consistent with a first-order phase transition. Simulation results indicate that such transition is accompanied by the change of bond-orientational order without noticeable change in density. The temperature dependence of atomic diffusion revealed by simulations is also in agreement with experiments. These observations indicate the need of two-order parameters in describing phase transitions of liquids. PMID:26165855

  18. The nature of the glass transition in a silica-rich oxide melt.

    PubMed

    Farnan, I; Stebbins, J F

    1994-08-26

    The atomic-scale dynamics of the glass-to-liquid transition are, in general, poorly understood in inorganic materials. Here, two-dimensional magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra collected just above the glass transition of K(2)Si(4)O(9) at temperatures as high as 583 degrees C are presented. Rates of exchange for silicon among silicate species, which involves Si-O bond breaking, have been measured and are shown to be closely related in time scale to those defined by viscosity. Thus, even at viscosities as high as 10(10) pascal seconds, local bond breaking (in contrast to the cooperative motion of large clusters) is of major importance in the control of macroscopic flow and diffusion. PMID:17787585

  19. The Nature of the Glass Transition in a Silica-Rich Oxide Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnan, Ian; Stebbins, Jonathan F.

    1994-08-01

    The atomic-scale dynamics of the glass-to-liquid transition are, in general, poorly understood in inorganic materials. Here, two-dimensional magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra collected just above the glass transition of K_2Si_4O_9 at temperatures as high as 583^circC are presented. Rates of exchange for silicon among silicate species, which involves Si-O bond breaking, have been measured and are shown to be closely related in time scale to those defined by viscosity. Thus, even at viscosities as high as 1010 pascal seconds, local bond breaking (in contrast to the cooperative motion of large clusters) is of major importance in the control of macroscopic flow and diffusion.

  20. Structure of a composite material based on oxyfluoride glass and low-melting fluoroplast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'eva, L. N.; Savchenko, N. N.; Lalayan, V. M.; Zverev, G. A.; Usol'tseva, T. I.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Shaulov, A. Yu.; Berlin, A. A.; Buznik, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Aspects of the fabrication of composites obtained via the extrusion formation of mixtures composed of a perfluorocarbon polymer (F2MB) and a thermoplastic inorganic glass of the composition 3B2O3-97(40SnF2-30SnO-30P2O5) are investigated by analyzing the results from studies of their morphology, molecular structure, and phase composition.

  1. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  2. Effect of pressure on the carbon speciation in silicate glasses and melts: Insights from multi-nuclear solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Fei, Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    The pressure-induced structural changes in carbon-bearing silicate glasses and melts is essential to understand the changes in melt properties in the Earth interior and yield atomistic insights into the deep carbon cycle. Despite the extensive pioneering studies on carbon-bearing silicate glasses, spectroscopic and scattering studies at high pressure above ~4 GPa is limited due to the lack of suitable experimental probes. Here, we report the pressure-induced structural changes around C, Si and Al in albite and Na-trisilicate (Na2O:SiO2=1:3, NS3) glasses with varying pressure up to 8 GPa, using 27Al, 29Si and 13C solid-state high-resolution NMR. 27Al 3QMAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite glasses quenched from melts at high pressure up to 6 GPa show only [4]Al environments. The FWHM of [4]Al in albite glasses increases with increasing pressure, indicating that the overall densification of albite glasses at high pressure is accompanied by an increase in the topological disorder around Al. 29Si MAS NMR spectra for NS3 glasses at high pressure up to 8 GPa show the presence of highly coordinated Si, [5,6]Si, which contributes to an increases in the total configurational disorder in the NS3 glasses with pressure. 13C MAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite glasses show the presence of dominant fraction of CO2, and minor amounts of CO32-, and CO. At least three distinct carbonate species, such as [4]Si(CO3)[4]Si, [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al, and CO32- were observed. Among those species, the increase in the fraction of [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al species is most prevalent. 13C MAS NMR spectra for NS3 glasses show the presence of carbonate species. The peaks position of the carbonate species shifts to lower frequency upon compression, suggesting the pressure-induced structural distortion of CO32- in the glasses above 6 GPa. Spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time for molecular CO2 in carbon-bearing albite glasses increases with increasing pressure. T1 relaxation time for CO2 species at 6 GPa is 3

  3. Preparations of PbSe quantum dots in silicate glasses by a melt-annealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D. W.; Cheng, C.; Zhang, Y. N.; Xu, Z. S.

    2014-11-01

    Silicate glass containing PbSe quantum dots (QDs) has important prospective applications in near infra-red optoelectronic devices. In this study, single-stage and double-stage heat-treatment methods were used respectively to prepare PbSe QDs in silicate glasses. Investigation results show that the double-stage heat-treatment is a favorable method to synthesize PbSe QDs with strong photoluminescence (PL) intensity and narrow full weight at half maximum (FWHM) in PL peak. Therefore, the method to prepare PbSe QDs was emphasized on the double-stage heat-treatment. Transmission electron microscopy measurements show that the standard deviations of the average QD sizes from the samples heat-treated at the development temperature of 550 °C fluctuate slightly in the range of 0.6-0.8 nm, while this deviation increases up to 1.2 nm for the sample with the development temperature of 600 °C. In addition, the linear relationship between the QD size and holding time indicates that the crystallization behavior of PbSe QDs in silicate glasses is interface-controlled growth in early stage of crystallization. The growth rates of PbSe QDs are determined to be 0.24 nm/h at 550 °C and 0.72 nm/h at 600 °C. In short, the double-stage heat-treatment at 450 °C for 20 h followed by heat-treatment at 550 °C for 5 h is a preferred process for the crystallization of PbSe QDs in silicate glass. Through this treatment, PbSe QDs with a narrow size dispersion of 5.0 ± 0.6 nm can be obtained, the PL peak from this sample is highest in intensity and narrowest in FWHM among all samples, and the peak is centered on 1575 nm, very close to the most common wavelength of 1550 nm in fiber-optic communication systems.

  4. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations and GIPAW NMR Calculations of a Lithium Borate Glass Melt.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Tsuchida, Eiji; Takahashi, Takafumi; Iwadate, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-14

    The atomic structure of a molten 0.3Li2O-0.7B2O3 glass at 1250 K was investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) method was then employed for computing the chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling constant of (11)B, (17)O, and (7)Li from 764 AIMD derived structures. The chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling constant distributions were directly estimated from the dynamical structure of the molten glass. (11)B NMR parameters of well-known structural units such as the three-coordinated ring, nonring, and four-coordinated tetrahedron were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. In this study, more detailed classification of B units was presented based on the number of O species bonded to the B atoms. This highlights the limitations of (11)B NMR sensitivity for resolving (11)B local environment using the experimentally obtained spectra only. The (17)O NMR parameter distributions can theoretically resolve the bridging and nonbridging O atoms with different structural units such as nonring, single boroxol ring, and double boroxol ring. Slight but clear differences in the number of bridging O atoms surrounding Li that have not been reported experimentally were observed in the theoretically obtained (7)Li NMR parameters. PMID:27010637

  5. The influence of the conditions of ion exchange in CuSO4:Na2SO4 melt on the optical properties of surface layers of silicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demichev, I. A.; Sidorov, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of the temperature and duration of ion exchange in BK7 silicate glass in CuSO4:Na2SO4 melt on the optical properties of the glass surface layers has been investigated. It is shown that ion exchange occurs from the melt according to the Cu2+ ↔ 2Na+ scheme. Cu2+ ions penetrate the sample to a depth of about 1 µm. Reduction of Cu2+ ions near the glass surface gives rise to the Cu+ ↔ Na+ ion exchange in the glass. Measurements of refractive index profiles in the glass sample subjected to ion exchange have revealed the formation of two waveguides in the sample: near the surface and at a depth of more than 3 µm; the second waveguide is formed by Cu+ ions. It is shown that relatively low temperatures and short durations of ion exchange lead to the formation of copper molecular clusters Cu n in glass. An increase of ion exchange temperature and duration leads to decomposition of molecular clusters with formation of Cu2+ ions.

  6. The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V.

    2013-07-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases.

  7. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1982-01-01

    The undercooling behavior of large spheroids of Pd40Ni40P40 was investigated. By surface etching, supporting the specimens on a fused silica substrate, and successive heating and cooling, crystallization can be eliminated, presumable due to the removal of surface heterogeneities. By this method samples up to 3.2g with a 0.53 mm minor diameter, were made entirely glassy, except for some superficial crystals comprising less than 0.5% of the volume. These experiments show that a cooling rate of approximately 1 K/sec is adequate to avoid copious homogeneous nucleation in the alloy, and that by eliminating or reducing the effectiveness of heterogeneous nucleation sites, it is possible to form bulk samples of this metallic glass with virtually unlimited dimensions.

  8. Crustal accretion along the global mid-ocean ridge system based on basaltic glass and olivine-hosted melt inclusion compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, V. D.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The depth and distribution of crystallization at mid-ocean ridges controls the overall architecture of the oceanic crust, influences hydrothermal circulation, and determines geothermal gradients in the crust and uppermost mantle. Despite this, there is no overall consensus on how crystallization is distributed within the crust/upper mantle or how this varies with spreading rate. Here, we examine crustal accretion at mid-ocean ridges by combining crystallization pressures calculated from major element barometers on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses with vapor-saturation pressures from melt inclusions to produce a detailed map of crystallization depths and distributions along the global ridge system. We calculate pressures of crystallization from >11,500 MORB glasses from the global ridge system using two established major element barometers (1,2). Additionally, we use vapor-saturation pressures from >400 olivine-hosted melt inclusions from five ridges with variable spreading rates to constrain pressures and distributions of crystallization along the global ridge system. We show that (i) crystallization depths from MORB glasses increase and become less focused with decreasing spreading rate, (ii) maximum glass pressures are greater than the maximum melt inclusion pressure, which indicates that the melt inclusions do not record the deepest crystallization at mid-ocean ridges, and (iii) crystallization occurs in the lower crust/upper mantle at all ridges, indicating accretion is distributed throughout the crust at all spreading rates, including those with a steady-state magma lens. Finally, we suggest that the remarkably similar maximum vapor-saturation pressures (~ 3000 bars) in melt inclusion from all spreading rates reflects the CO2 content of the depleted upper mantle feeding the global mid-ocean ridge system. (1) Michael, P. & W. Cornell (1998), Journal of Geophysical Research, 103(B8), 18325-18356; (2) Herzberg, C. (2004), Journal of Petrology, 45(12), 2389.

  9. Human factors of advanced technology (glass cockpit) transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year study of airline crews at two U.S. airlines who were flying an advanced technology aircraft, the Boeing 757 is discussed. The opinions and experiences of these pilots as they view the advanced, automated features of this aircraft, and contrast them with previous models they have flown are discussed. Training for advanced automation; (2) cockpit errors and error reduction; (3) management of cockpit workload; and (4) general attitudes toward cockpit automation are emphasized. The limitations of the air traffic control (ATC) system on the ability to utilize the advanced features of the new aircraft are discussed. In general the pilots are enthusiastic about flying an advanced technology aircraft, but they express mixed feelings about the impact of automation on workload, crew errors, and ability to manage the flight.

  10. Evidence of denser MgSiO3 glass above 133 gigapascal (GPa) and implications for remnants of ultradense silicate melt from a deep magma ocean.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Motohiko; Bass, Jay D

    2011-10-18

    Ultralow velocity zones are the largest seismic anomalies in the mantle, with 10-30% seismic velocity reduction observed in thin layers less than 20-40 km thick, just above the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB). The presence of silicate melts, possibly a remnant of a deep magma ocean in the early Earth, have been proposed to explain ultralow velocity zones. It is, however, still an open question as to whether such silicate melts are gravitationally stable at the pressure conditions above the CMB. Fe enrichment is usually invoked to explain why melts would remain at the CMB, but this has not been substantiated experimentally. Here we report in situ high-pressure acoustic velocity measurements that suggest a new transformation to a denser structure of MgSiO(3) glass at pressures close to those of the CMB. The result suggests that MgSiO(3) melt is likely to become denser than crystalline MgSiO(3) above the CMB. The presence of negatively buoyant and gravitationally stable silicate melts at the bottom of the mantle, would provide a mechanism for observed ultralow seismic velocities above the CMB without enrichment of Fe in the melt. An ultradense melt phase and its geochemical inventory would be isolated from overlying convective flow over geologic time. PMID:21969547

  11. Evidence of denser MgSiO3 glass above 133 gigapascal (GPa) and implications for remnants of ultradense silicate melt from a deep magma ocean.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Motohiko; Bass, Jay D

    2011-10-18

    Ultralow velocity zones are the largest seismic anomalies in the mantle, with 10-30% seismic velocity reduction observed in thin layers less than 20-40 km thick, just above the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB). The presence of silicate melts, possibly a remnant of a deep magma ocean in the early Earth, have been proposed to explain ultralow velocity zones. It is, however, still an open question as to whether such silicate melts are gravitationally stable at the pressure conditions above the CMB. Fe enrichment is usually invoked to explain why melts would remain at the CMB, but this has not been substantiated experimentally. Here we report in situ high-pressure acoustic velocity measurements that suggest a new transformation to a denser structure of MgSiO(3) glass at pressures close to those of the CMB. The result suggests that MgSiO(3) melt is likely to become denser than crystalline MgSiO(3) above the CMB. The presence of negatively buoyant and gravitationally stable silicate melts at the bottom of the mantle, would provide a mechanism for observed ultralow seismic velocities above the CMB without enrichment of Fe in the melt. An ultradense melt phase and its geochemical inventory would be isolated from overlying convective flow over geologic time.

  12. In-Situ, Real-Time Measurement of Melt Constituents in the Aluminum, Glass, and Steel Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Robert De Saro

    2006-05-18

    Energy Research Company (ERCo), with support from DOE’s Industrial Technologies Program, Sensors and Automation has developed a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) probe to measure, in real time and in-situ, the composition of an aluminum melt in a furnace at an industrial plant. The compositional data is provided to the operator continuously allowing the operator to adjust the melt composition, saving energy, increasing production, and maintaining tighter compositional tolerances than has been previously possible. The overall objectives of this project were to: -- design, develop, fabricate, test and project future costs of the LIBS probe on bench-size experiments; - test the unit in a pilot-scaled aluminum furnace under varying operating conditions of temperature and melt constituents; -- determine the instruments needed for use in industrial environment; -- compare LIBS Probe data to readings traditionally taken on the furnace; -- get full-scale data to resolve if, and how, the LIBS Probe design should be modified for operator acceptance. Extensive laboratory tests have proven the concept feasibility. Elemental concentrations below 0.1% wt. have been accurately measured. Further, the LIBS system has now been installed and is operating at a Commonwealth Aluminum plant in Ohio. The technology is crosscutting as it can be used in a wide variety of applications. In the Sensors and Automation Program the application was for the secondary aluminum industry. However, this project spawned a number of other applications, which are also reported here for completeness. The project was effective in that two commercial systems are now operating; one at Commonwealth Aluminum and another at a PPG fiberglass plant. Other commercial installations are being negotiated as of this writing. This project led to the following conclusions: 1. The LIBS System has been developed for industrial applications. This is the first time this has been accomplished. In addition, two

  13. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO₃ glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO₃ melt in Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2008-06-13

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO{sub 3}-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO{sub 3} glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; {sup [3]}O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO{sub 3} melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO{sub 3} melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  14. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO3 glass at high pressure: implication for triclustered MgSiO3 melt in Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2008-06-10

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; 3O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle. PMID:18535140

  15. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO3 glass at high pressure: implication for triclustered MgSiO3 melt in Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2008-06-10

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; 3O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  16. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO₃ glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO₃ melt in Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q.; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J.; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y.; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-02-09

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; [3]O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  17. Advanced technology delacquering and melting at Alcan Rolled Products, Oswego, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Newberry, V.; Jenkins, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    Alcan Rolled Products at Oswego, New York, commissioned Recycle II during May of 1995. Recycle II is an advanced technology UBC recycling facility designed to meet the most stringent environmental standards enforced to date in the United States, particularly with respect to NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. This paper addresses the exacting requirements and strategies of Alcan`s Recycle II project and Thorpe Technologies` design considerations and solutions for the supply of environmentally favorable melting furnace and delacquering systems. The furnaces are equipped with low NO{sub x} regenerative burners and furnace pressure and hearth gas flow controls designed specifically for processing the hearth gases through baghouses. The delacquering system is a new generation Apros concurrent flow unit designed for low NO{sub x} emissions.

  18. Application of hot melt extrusion for poorly water-soluble drugs: limitations, advances and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Guo, Zhefei; Li, Yongcheng; Pang, Huishi; Lin, Ling; Liu, Xu; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2014-01-01

    Hot melt extrusion (HME) is a powerful technology to enhance the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs by producing amorphous solid dispersions. Although the number of articles and patents about HME increased dramatically in the past twenty years, there are very few commercial products by far. The three main obstacles limiting the commercial application of HME are summarized as thermal degradation of heat-sensitive drugs at high process temperature, recrystallization of amorphous drugs during storage and dissolving process, and difficulty to obtain products with reproducible physicochemical properties. Many efforts have been taken in recent years to understand the basic mechanism underlying these obstacles and then to overcome them. This article reviewed and summarized the limitations, recent advances, and future prospects of HME. PMID:23651401

  19. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A. A.; Peeler, D. K.; Kim, D. S.; Vienna, J. D.; Piepel, G. F.; Schweiger, M. J.

    2015-11-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule.

  20. Effect of different conventional melt quenching technique on purity of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) nano crystal phase formed in lithium borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashif, Ismail; Soliman, Ashia A.; Sakr, Elham M.; Ratep, Asmaa

    2012-01-01

    The glass system (45Li2O + 45B2O3 + 10Nb2O5) was fabricated by the conventional melt quenching technique poured in water, at air, between two hot plates and droplets at the cooled surface. The glass and glass ceramics were studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The as quenched samples poured in water and between two hot plates were amorphous. The samples poured at air and on cooled surface were crystalline as established via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies. Differential thermal analysis was measured. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and the crystallization temperatures were calculated. Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) was the main phase in glass ceramic poured at air, droplets at the cooled surface and the heat treated glass sample at 500, 540 and 580 °C in addition to traces from LiNb3O8. Crystallite size of the main phases determined from the X-ray diffraction peaks is in the range of <100 nm. The fraction of crystalline (LiNbO3) phase decreases with increase in the heat treatment temperature.

  1. Containerless processing of glass forming melts: D-1, MEA/A-2 experiment 81F01 conducted on STS-61A flight, October 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, D. E.; Ray, C. S.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experiment 81F01, which was conducted in the Material Experiment Assembly MEA/A-2 on the D-1 Spacelab Mission (STS-61A), are presented. The general plan of the experiment was to heat, melt, and quench six spherical samples of different glass forming compositions while they were levitated in a single axis acoustic levitator furnace (SAAL). In addition, two non-melting sintered alumina samples were used to check the operational characteristics of the SAAL under reduced gravity conditions. Three of the eight samples were levitated between 1250 and 1500 C before the lack of coolant created an over-temperature condition that caused the SAAL to shut down prematurely. Two of the three samples processed were calcia-gallia-silica and soda-lime-silica glass forming compositions. Evidence of a two to three times increase in the tendency for glass formation was obtained for the calcia-gallia-silica. The final glass appeared reasonably homogeneous even though it was made from hot pressed powders containing deliberate heterogeneities. A photographic record was obtained of the microgravity sample processing sequences.

  2. Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.; Bardakci, T.; Kot, W.

    2013-11-13

    in melter operating temperature. Glass composition development was based on one of the HLW waste compositions specified by ORP that has a high concentration of aluminum. Small-scale tests were used to provide an initial screening of various glass formulations with respect to melt rates; more definitive screening was provided by the subsequent DM100 tests. Glass properties evaluated included: viscosity, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, gross glass phase separation and the 7- day Product Consistency Test (ASTM-1285). Glass property limits were based upon the reference properties for the WTP HLW melter. However, the WTP crystallinity limit (< 1 vol% at 950oC) was relaxed slightly as a waste loading constraint for the crucible melts.

  3. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  4. Slumped glass optics for x-ray telescopes: advances in the hot slumping assisted by pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, B.; Brizzolari, C.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vecchi, G.

    2015-09-01

    Slumped Glass Optics is a viable solution to build future X-ray telescopes. In our laboratories we use a direct hot slumping approach assisted by pressure, in which the glass optical surface is in contact with the mould, and a pressure is applied to enforce the replication of the mould shape on the glass optical surface. Several prototypes have been already produced and tested in X-rays, showing a continuous improvement in our technology. In this paper, we present the advances in our technology, in terms of slumped glass foils quality and expected performances upon an ideal integration. By using Eagle XG glass foils and Zerodur K20 for the slumping mould, we have fine tuned several process parameters: we present a critical analysis correlating the changes in the process to the improvements in different spatial frequency ranges encompassing the profile and roughness measurements. The use of a re-polished K20 mould, together with the optimized process parameters, lead to the latest result of glass foils with expected performance of less than 3 arcsec in single reflection at 1 keV X-ray energy. This work presents all the relevant steps forward in the hot slumping technology assisted by pressure, aimed at reaching angular resolutions of 5 arcsec for the whole mirror assembly.

  5. Superconducting Bi1.5Pb0.5Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x) ceramics by rapid melt quenching and glass crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1989-01-01

    A glass of nominal Bi(1.5)Pb(0.5)Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x) composition, prepared by rapid quenching of the melt, showed a glass transition temperature of 383 C, crystallization temperature of 446 C, melting temperature of 855 C, and bulk density of 5.69 g/cu cm in air. The activation energy for crystallization of the glass was estimated to be 292kJ/mol from non-isothermal DSC. On heating in oxygen, the glass showed a slow and continuous weight gain starting at approximately 530 C which reached a plateau at approximately 820 C. The weight gained during heating was retained on cooling to ambient conditions indicating an irreversible oxidation step. The influence of annealing conditions on the formation of various phases in the glass has been investigated. The Bi(2)Sr(2)Ca(0)Cu(1)O(6) phase crystallized out first followed by formation of other phases at higher temperatures. The high-T(sub c) phase, isostructural with Bi(2)Sr(2)Ca(2)Cu(3)O(10) was not detected below 840 C, but its fraction increased with the annealing time at 840 C. A sample annealed at 840 C for 243h in air and furnace cooled showed the highest T(sub c)(R=0) of 107.2K and a narrow transition width, delta T(sub c)(10 to 90 percent), of approximately 2 K. The high T(sub c) phase does not seem to crystallize out directly from the glass but is rather produced at high temperature by reaction between the phases formed at lower temperatures. The kinetics of 110K phase formation was sluggish. It appears that the presence of lead helps in the formation and/or stabilization of the 110 K phase.

  6. Irreversibility temperatures in superconducting oxides: The flux-line-lattice melting, the glass-liquid transition, or the depinning temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Suenaga, M. )

    1991-03-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the irreversibility temperatures follows an {ital H}={ital a}(1{minus}{ital T}{sub {ital r}}({ital H})/{ital T}{sub {ital c}}(0)){sup {ital n}} relationship with {ital n}{congruent}1.5, for pure and alloyed YBa{sub 2}(Cu{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}M{sub {ital x}}){sub 3}O{sub 7+{delta}} with {ital x}=0 and 0.02, where {ital M}=Al, Fe, Ni, and Zn, measured for an applied field parallel to the {ital c} axis. However, for {ital M}=Ni and {ital x}=0.04 and 0.06, {ital n}{congruent}2.0. This relationship is not applicable for either Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} or (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} powders. It is also shown that the irreversibility temperature is a strong function of the magnetic hysteresis width {Delta}{ital M} for pure and alloyed YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. These results and the measurements of the flux creep {Delta}{ital M}({ital t}) for these specimens suggest that {ital T}{sub {ital r}}({ital H}) is a depinning line rather than a lattice melting or glass-to-liquid phase-transition temperature. However, the conventional flux-creep model cannot account for all of the observed temporal dependences of {Delta}{ital M}({ital t}).

  7. KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption in silica glasses produced by melting synthetic silica powder

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuu, Nobu; Sasaki, Toshiya; Kojima, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Jun-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Hideharu

    2013-07-07

    KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption of silica glasses produced by electric melting and flame fusion of synthetic silica powder were investigated. The growth of KrF-laser-induced absorption was more gradual than that of ArF-laser-induced absorption. Induced absorption spectra exhibited a peak at about 5.8 eV, of which the position and width differed slightly among samples and laser species. Widths of ArF-laser-induced absorption spectra were wider than those of KrF-laser-induced spectra. KrF-laser-induced absorption is reproducible by two Gaussian absorption bands peaking at 5.80 eV with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.62 eV and at 6.50 eV with FWHM of 0.74 eV. For reproduction of ArF-laser-induced absorption, Gaussian bands at 5.41 eV with FWHM of 0.62 eV was necessary in addition to components used for reproducing KrF-laser-induced absorption. Based on the discussion of the change of defect structures evaluated from change of absorption components, we proposed that the precursor of the 5.8-eV band ascribed to E Prime center ({identical_to}Si{center_dot}) is {identical_to}Si-H HO-Si{identical_to} structures formed by the reaction between strained Si-O-Si bonds and interstitial H{sub 2} molecules during the irradiation.

  8. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 1150{degrees}C volume 2: Chapters 12-16 and appendices A-K

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  9. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 115{degrees}C volume 1: Chapters 1-11

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01

    A Composition Variation study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g} ), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  10. Novel glass inspection method for advanced photomask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Masaru; Kikuchi, Toshiharu; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Yasushi

    2007-05-01

    Recently, extremely-high-quality-quartz substrates have been demanded for advancing ArF-lithography. HOYA has developed a novel inspection method for interior defects as well as surface defects. The total internal reflection of the substrate is employed to produce an ideal dark field illumination. The novel inspection method can detect a "nano-pit" of 12nm-EDS, the Equivalent of the Diameter of a Sphere (EDS). It will meet the sensitivity for 32nm node and beyond. Moreover, a type of unique defect is detected, which induces Serious Transmittance Error for Arf-LiTHography. We call it the "STEALTH" defect. It is a killer defect in wafer printing; but it cannot be detected with any conventional inspection in the mask-making process so far. In this paper, the performance of the novel inspection method for quartz substrates and the investigation of "STEALTH" are reported.

  11. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    PubMed

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  12. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soinila, E.; Pihlajamäki, T.; Bossuyt, S.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  13. Short- and medium-range structure of multicomponent bioactive glasses and melts: An assessment of the performances of shell-model and rigid-ion potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    Classical and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to investigate the effect of a different treatment of interatomic forces in modeling the structural properties of multicomponent glasses and melts. The simulated system is a soda-lime phosphosilicate composition with bioactive properties. Because the bioactivity of these materials depends on their medium-range structural features, such as the network connectivity and the Qn distribution (where Qn is a tetrahedral species bonded to n bridging oxygens) of silicon and phosphorus network formers, it is essential to assess whether, and up to what extent, classical potentials can reproduce these properties. The results indicate that the inclusion of the oxide ion polarization through a shell-model (SM) approach provides a more accurate representation of the medium-range structure compared to rigid-ion (RI) potentials. Insight into the causes of these improvements has been obtained by comparing the melt-and-quench transformation of a small sample of the same system, modeled using Car-Parrinello MD (CPMD), to the classical MD runs with SM and RI potentials. Both classical potentials show some limitations in reproducing the highly distorted structure of the melt denoted by the CPMD runs; however, the inclusion of polarization in the SM potential results in a better and qualitatively correct dynamical balance between the interconversion of Qn species during the cooling of the melt. This effect seems to reflect the slower decay of the fraction of structural defects during the cooling with the SM potential. Because these transient defects have a central role in mediating the Qn transformations, as previously proposed and confirmed by the current simulations, their presence in the melt is essential to produce an accurate final distribution of Qn species in the glass.

  14. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, K. D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products)represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries - pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most. The physico-chemical processes that control the development of this region have a significant impact on the long-term glass-water reaction. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include Geochemical Reaction Path simulations, Glass Reactivity in Allowance for Alteration Layer simulations, Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers; thus providing the fundamental data needed to develop pore-scale equations that enable more accurate predictions of nuclear waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository.

  15. Lead isotopic composition of trinitite melt glass: evidence for the presence of Canadian industrial lead in the first atomic weapon test.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Jeremy J; Simonetti, Antonio; Wallace, Christine; Koeman, Elizabeth C; Burns, Peter C

    2013-08-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions for 51 spots of melt glass in 11 samples of trinitite have been determined by laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). Trinitite glass yields a large range of Pb isotopic compositions (i.e., (206)Pb/(204)Pb = 17.08-19.04), which reflect mixing between industrial Pb from materials used in the Trinity test and natural geologic components. Areas within trinitite melt glass containing high concentrations of both Cu and Pb, which are derived from the bomb and blast site-related components, were used for delineating the Pb isotopic composition corresponding to the anthropogenic Pb component. Comparison between the isotopic composition estimated here for the industrial Pb used in the Trinity test and those from known Pb deposits worldwide indicates close agreement with ore from the Buchans mine (Newfoundland, Canada). The Buchans mine was active during the time of the Trinity test and was operated by the American Smelting and Refining Company, which could have provided the Pb used in the test. The industrial Pb used in the Trinity test materials is not documented in the literature (or declassified) but could have been present in bricks, solder, pigs, or some other anthropogenic component related to the experiment. PMID:23829180

  16. Reduction-melting combined with a Na₂CO₃ flux recycling process for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    With large quantity of flux (Na2CO3), lead can be recovered from the funnel glass of waste cathode-ray tubes via reduction-melting at 1000°C. To reduce flux cost, a technique to recover added flux from the generated oxide phase is also important in order to recycle the flux recovered from the reduction-melting process. In this study, the phase separation of sodium and the crystallization of water-soluble sodium silicates were induced after the reduction-melting process to enhance the leachability of sodium in the oxide phase and to extract the sodium from the phase for the recovery of Na2CO3 as flux. A reductive atmosphere promoted the phase separation and crystallization, and the leachability of sodium from the oxide phase was enhanced. The optimum temperature and treatment time for increasing the leachability were 700°C and 2h, respectively. After treatment, more than 90% of the sodium in the oxide phase was extracted in water. NaHCO3 can be recovered by carbonization of the solution containing sodium ions using carbon dioxide gas, decomposed to Na2CO3 at 50°C and recycled for use in the reduction-melting process.

  17. Melting of Pb Charge Glass and Simultaneous Pb-Cr Charge Transfer in PbCrO3 as the Origin of Volume Collapse

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Runze; Hojo, Hajime; Watanuki, Tetsu; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Mizokawa, Takashi; Okada, Kengo; Kim, Hyunjeong; Machida, Akihiko; Sakaki, Kouji; Nakamura, Yumiko; et al

    2015-09-15

    A metal to insulator transition in integer or half integer charge systems can be regarded as crystallization of charges. The insulating state tends to have a glassy nature when randomness or geometrical frustration exists. In this paper, we report that the charge glass state is realized in a perovskite compound PbCrO3, which has been known for almost 50 years, without any obvious inhomogeneity or triangular arrangement in the charge system. PbCrO3 has a valence state of Pb2+0.5Pb4+0.5Cr3+O3 with Pb2+–Pb4+ correlation length of three lattice-spacings at ambient condition. A pressure induced melting of charge glass and simultaneous Pb–Cr charge transfer causesmore » an insulator to metal transition and ~10% volume collapse.« less

  18. Dynamics of a single atom in ternary metallic glass-forming Cu60TixZr40-x melts by molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Tokuyama, Michio

    2011-02-01

    The recently proposed universality near the glass transition [M. Tokuyama, Phys. Rev. EPLRAAN1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.031503 80, 031503 (2009)] is tested for the dynamics of a single atom in ternary metallic glass-forming Cu60TixZr40-x melts by using molecular-dynamics simulations for different compositions, x= 10, 20, and 30. First, a master curve for the dynamics of the atom, such as the mean-square and mean-fourth displacements, is shown to exist independently of x if the long-time self-diffusion coefficient DSL has the same value. Second, a master curve for the temperature dependence of DSL is shown to exist independently of x. Finally, master curves for characteristic length and time scales of the atom are also shown to exist independently of x.

  19. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Chathoth, S. M.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-09-28

    Extensive efforts have been made to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. In this work, we have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  20. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.; Chathoth, S. M.

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  1. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.; Chathoth, S. M.

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is themore » primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.« less

  2. Structure and disorder in basaltic glasses and melts: Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study of glasses in diopside-Ca-tschermakite join and diopside-anorthite eutectic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, Sung Keun

    2012-03-01

    Here, we report experimental results on the effects of composition on the structure of quaternary CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) glasses in diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and Ca-tschermakite (CaAl2SiO6) join and glass in the diopside-anorthite eutectic composition (Di64An36)—model systems for basaltic melts—using multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The 27Al 3QMAS NMR spectra of CMAS glasses in diopside-Ca-tschermakite join show predominant [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al species increases with increasing mole fraction of diopside (XDiopside). The structurally relevant quadrupolar coupling constant of [4]Al in the glasses decreases with increasing XDiopside, suggesting a decrease in network distortion around [4]Al. Approximately 3.3% of [5]Al is observed for Di64An36 glass, consistent with a previous study (Xue and Kanzaki, 2007). There are also non-negligible fraction of Al-O-Al and significant fractions of Si-O-Al in Di64An36 glass, indicating extensive mixing between Si and Al and violation of the Al-avoidance in basaltic glasses. The 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra of CMAS glasses show that three types of bridging oxygens (BO, Si-O-Si, Al-O-Al, and Si-O-Al) and two types of non-bridging oxygens (NBO, Ca-NBO, and mixed {Ca, Mg}-NBO) are partially resolved. The fraction of NBO in the basaltic glasses decreases with decreasing XDiopside. A presence of the prominent 3Ca-NBO peak (NBO surrounded by three Ca2+ cations) in the CMAS glass at an intermediate compositions (XDiopside = 0.5) suggests non-random distributions of Ca2+ and Mg2+ around NBOs and BOs, characterized either by preferential partitioning of Ca2+ into NBOs and/or structural arrangement toward unmixing of Ca2+ and Mg2+ around NBO. The observed structural changes in the CMAS glasses can provide an improved understanding of their structure-property relationships. The predominance of [4]Al and its extensive mixing with [4]Si is consistent with the negative enthalpy of mixing for CMAS glasses

  3. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    DOE PAGES

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed tomore » improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Finally, in this manuscript, we discuss the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.« less

  4. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Finally, in this manuscript, we discuss the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.

  5. Carbon dioxide in silica-undersaturated melt Part II: Effect of CO2 on quenched glass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morizet, Yann; Paris, Michael; Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Despite CO2 is the second most abundant volatile species implied in magmatic systems, its impact on the molecular structure of aluminosilicate glasses in complex systems is currently not well-constrained. Inasmuch, whether CO2 induces an increase in glass polymerization or not is yet not clear for complex glass compositions. Using the set of nephelinite glass samples investigated in Part I (Morizet et al., 2014), in which the CO2 solubility and speciation have been constrained as a function of the #K (molar K2O/K2O + Na2O), we have conducted a thorough investigation of the change in the silicate network structure associated to CO2 dissolution. The change in silicate structure has been studied as a function of volatiles solubility (CO2 up to 4.5 wt.%, H2O up to 3 wt.%) as well as a function of the #K (between 0 and 0.75) of the glasses. We used 29Si Solid-State NMR for probing the silicon local environment in the quenched glasses. We observe that in such depolymerized nephelinite compositions the exchange between Na and K in volatile-free glasses induces a change in the glass structure attributed to the Mixed Alkali Effect (MAE) invoked in previous works. The observed changes might be related to geometric changes in the glass structure (change in network species bond lengths or angles). The addition of H2O only produces a negligible change in the degree of polymerization being probed by the constant NBO/T (Non-Bridging Oxygen per Tetrahedron) as H2O is added to volatile-free glasses. In contrast, we observed that the addition of CO2 induces a strong change in the glass structure which might be interpreted as an increase in polymerization. Alternatively, considering the identified CO2 dissolution mechanism (mostly as non-bridging carbonates units), the glass structure changes might reflect an apparent glass polymerization through the creation of Si-O-C bonds rather a true polymerization through the creation of Si-O-Si bonds.

  6. Advances in the Glass Formulations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    The Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford site in Washington. The WTP that is being designed and constructed by a team led by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) will separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fractions with the majority of the mass (~90%) directed to LAW and most of the activity (>95%) directed to HLW. The pretreatment process, envisioned in the baseline, involves the dissolution of aluminum-bearing solids so as to allow the aluminum salts to be processed through the cesium ion exchange and report to the LAW Facility. There is an oxidative leaching process to affect a similar outcome for chromium-bearing wastes. Both of these unit operations were advanced to accommodate shortcomings in glass formulation for HLW inventories. A by-product of this are a series of technical challenges placed upon materials selected for the processing vessels. The advances in glass formulation play a role in revisiting the flow sheet for the WTP and hence, the unit operations that were being imposed by minimal waste loading requirements set forth in the contract for the design and construction of the plant. Another significant consideration to the most recent revision of the glass models are the impacts on resolution of technical questions associated with current efforts for design completion.

  7. Target rocks, impact glasses, and melt rocks from the Lonar crater, India: Highly siderophile element systematics and Sr-Nd-Os isotopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Toni; Luguet, Ambre; Wegner, Wencke; Acken, David; Koeberl, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The Lonar crater is a ~0.57-Myr-old impact structure located in the Deccan Traps of the Indian peninsula. It probably represents the best-preserved impact structure hosted in continental flood basalts, providing unique opportunities to study processes of impact cratering in basaltic targets. Here we present highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances and Sr-Nd and Os isotope data for target basalts and impactites (impact glasses and impact melt rocks) from the Lonar area. These tools may enable us to better constrain the interplay of a variety of impact-related processes such as mixing, volatilization, and contamination. Strontium and Nd isotopic compositions of impactites confirm and extend earlier suggestions about the incorporation of ancient basement rocks in Lonar impactites. In the Re-Os isochron plot, target basalts exhibit considerable scatter around a 65.6 Myr Re-Os reference isochron, most likely reflecting weathering and/or magma replenishment processes. Most impactites plot at distinctly lower 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios compared to the target rocks and exhibit up to two orders of magnitude higher abundances of Ir, Os, and Ru. Moreover, the impactites show near-chondritic interelement ratios of HSE. We interpret our results in terms of an addition of up to 0.03% of a chondritc component to most impact glasses and impact melt rocks. The magnitude of the admixture is significantly lower than the earlier reported 12-20 wt% of extraterrestrial component for Lonar impact spherules, reflecting the typical difference in the distribution of projectile component between impact glass spherules and bulk impactites.

  8. Crack Branching and Fracture Mirror Data of Glasses and Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    The fracture mirror and crack branching constants were determined from three glasses and nine advanced ceramics tested under various loading and specimen configurations in an attempt to use the constants as a data base for fractography. The ratios of fracture mirror or crack branching constant to fracture toughness were found to be approximately two for most ceramic materials tested. A demonstration of how to use the two constants as a tool for verifying stress measurements was presented for silicon nitride disk specimens subjected to high-temperature, constant stress-rate biaxial flexure testing.

  9. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  10. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-16

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP?s overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  11. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-07-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  12. Global melting of Zr57Ti5Ni8Cu20Al10 bulk metallic glass under microcompression

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Sheng; Choo, H.; Wang, Xun-Li; Liaw, Peter K

    2007-01-01

    Global melting was observed in micron-sized pillar samples tested under microcompression. In addition to a higher strength that was reproduced in samples with different sizes, a large plastic strain was also observed prior to the final fracture, as compared to bulk counterparts. The global melting was a result of the final fracture as evidenced by the acoustic emission at the end of the microcompression. However, the increased strain rate and large plastic strain might have contributed to the temperature increase prior to the fracture.

  13. Analysis of glass and glass melts during the vitrification process of fly and bottom ashes by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy. Part I: Normalization and plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panne, U.; Haisch, C.; Clara, M.; Niessner, R.

    1998-12-01

    For laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) analysis of the main components (Si, Al, and Ca) in glasses utilized for vitrification of ashes from waste incineration, a normalization procedure for line ratios is presented. Even in homogeneous glass samples, considerable pulse-to-pulse variations of the plasma electronic excitation temperature and electron density were observed because of changes in the material-laser interaction. A normalization procedure is outlined using Saha-Boltzmann equilibrium relationships to include the electronic excitation temperature and density in the calibration model. As a result of the normalization, the variation of the line ratios is reduced and linear calibrations for LIPS intensity ratios versus concentration ratios are achieved. For samples with high aluminum concentrations, the analysis was hampered by self-reversal effects.

  14. An advanced NMR protocol for the structural characterization of aluminophosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    van Wüllen, Leo; Tricot, Grégory; Wegner, Sebastian

    2007-10-01

    In this work a combination of complementary advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategies is employed to analyse the network organization in aluminophosphate glasses to an unprecedented level of detailed insight. The combined results from MAS, MQMAS and (31)P-{(27)Al}-CP-heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy (HETCOR) NMR experiments allow for a detailed speciation of the different phosphate and aluminate species present in the glass. The interconnection of these local building units to an extended three-dimensional network is explored employing heteronuclear dipolar and scalar NMR approaches to quantify P-O-Al connectivity by (31)P{(27)Al}-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC), -rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) and -HETCOR NMR as well as (27)Al{(31)P}-rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR experiments, complemented by (31)P-2D-J-RESolved MAS NMR experiments to probe P-O-P connectivity utilizing the through bond scalar J-coupling. The combination of the results from the various NMR approaches enables us to not only quantify the phosphate units present in the glass but also to identify their respective structural environments within the three-dimensional network on a medium length scale employing a modified Q notation, Q(n)(m),(AlO)(x), where n denotes the number of connected tetrahedral phosphate, m gives the number of aluminate species connected to a central phosphate unit and x specifies the nature of the bonded aluminate species (i.e. 4, 5 or 6 coordinate aluminium).

  15. Sulfur and iron speciation in gas-rich impact-melt glasses from basaltic shergottites determined by microXANES

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.R.; Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E.

    2008-04-28

    Sulfur and iron K XANES measurements were made on GRIM glasses from EET 79001. Iron is in the ferrous state. Sulfur speciation is predominately sulfide coordination but is Fe coordinated in Lith B and, most likely, Ca coordinated in Lith A. Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Moessbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO{sub 4} is deduced from MgO-SO{sub 3} correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. On Earth, volcanic rocks contain measurable quantities of sulfur present as both sulfide and sulfate. Carroll and Rutherford showed that oxidized forms of sulfur may comprise a significant fraction of total dissolved sulfur, if the oxidation state is higher than {approx}2 log fO{sub 2} units relative to the QFM buffer. Terrestrial samples containing sulfates up to {approx}25% in fresh basalts from the Galapagos Rift on one hand and high sulfide contents present in oceanic basalts on the other indicate that the relative abundance of sulfide and sulfate varies depending on the oxygen fugacity of the system. Basaltic shergottites (bulk) such as Shergotty, EET79001 and Zagami usually contain small amounts of sulfur ({approx}0.5%) as pyrrhotite. But, in isolated glass pockets containing secondary salts (known as GRIM glasses) in these meteorites, sulfur is present in high abundance ({approx}1-12%). To

  16. Containerless Processing: Fabrication of Advanced Functional Materials from Undercooled Oxide Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. S. Vijaya; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-07-01

    Materials science in Microgravity condition is one of newly established cutting edge science field. After the effort of space development and space utilization, microgravity of space environment has been considered as one of novel tools for materials science because it assures containerless levitation. Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the technologically important materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt. Recently, rare-earth ferrites and manganites have attracted great interest towards their wide applications in the field of electronic industry. Among these new hexagonal phases with a space group of P6 _{3}cm are technologically important materials because of multiferroic characteristics, i.e., the coexistence of ferroelectricity and magnetism in one compound. In the present study, containerless solidification of the R-Fe-O, and R-Mn-O melts were carried out to fabricate multiferroics under the controlled Po _{2}. Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the new materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt because it provides large undercooling prior to nucleation. In order to undercool the melt deeply below the melting temperature under a precisely controlled oxygen partial pressure, an aerodynamic levitator (ADL) combined with ZrO _{2} oxygen sensor was designed. A spherical RFeO _{3} and RMnO _{3} sample was levitated by an ADL and completely melted by a CO _{2} laser in an atmosphere with predetermined Po _{2}.The surface temperature of the levitated droplet was monitored by a two-color pyrometer. Then, the droplet was cooled by turning off the CO _{2} laser. The XRD results of the rapidly solidified LuFeO _{3} and LuMnO _{3} samples at Po _{2} of 1x10 ^{5} Pa confirms the existence of the hexagonal metastable LuFeO _{3} phase. On the other hand, orthorhombic RFeO _{3} (R=Yb, Er, Y and Dy)and hexagonal RMnO _{3} (R=Ho-Lu)phases were identified. The cross-sectioned scanning

  17. Submerged combustion melting processes for producing glass and similar materials, and systems for carrying out such processes

    SciTech Connect

    Charbonneau, Mark William

    2015-08-04

    Processes of controlling submerged combustion melters, and systems for carrying out the methods. One process includes feeding vitrifiable material into a melter vessel, the melter vessel including a fluid-cooled refractory panel in its floor, ceiling, and/or sidewall, and heating the vitrifiable material with a burner directing combustion products into the melting zone under a level of the molten material in the zone. Burners impart turbulence to the molten material in the melting zone. The fluid-cooled refractory panel is cooled, forming a modified panel having a frozen or highly viscous material layer on a surface of the panel facing the molten material, and a sensor senses temperature of the modified panel using a protected thermocouple positioned in the modified panel shielded from direct contact with turbulent molten material. Processes include controlling the melter using the temperature of the modified panel. Other processes and systems are presented.

  18. Sulfur Isotope Variation in Basaltic Melt Inclusions from Krakatau Revealed by a Newly Developed Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Technique for Silicate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, C. W.; Shimizu, N.; Kelley, K. A.; Cheek, L.

    2008-12-01

    Sulfur is a ubiquitous element with variable valance states (S2-, S0, S4+, S6+) allowing for its participation in a wide variety of chemical and biogeochemical processes. However, its potential as an isotopic tracer in magmatic processes has not been fully developed and is crucial to understanding of sulfur recycling in subduction zones and between Earth's major reservoirs, mantle, lithosphere and coupled hydrosphere-atmosphere. Previous studies of silicate glasses and melt inclusions have been hampered by lack of an in situ isotopic measurement technique with spatial resolution of 10 to 100 microns. We have developed a new secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analytical technique for measurement of 34S/32S ratios in silicate glasses utilizing the IMS 1280 at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. A beam of 133Cs+ ions with 13 keV energy and current of 1-2 nA is focused onto a 10 micron spot and rastered over 30 × 30 microns. A Normal Incidence Electron Gun was used to compensate excess charge. The rastered beam is then centered to the optical axis of the machine, and a mechanical aperture is placed on the image plane to limit the area of analysis to the central 15 × 15 microns. The energy slit width was adjusted to 50 eV. A mass resolving power of 5500 was sufficient for eliminating mass interferences. A suite of synthetic and natural glasses with δ34SVCDT values spanning from - 5.6‰ to 18.5‰ with SiO2 from 44-72 weight % were measured. Magnitude of the instrumental mass fractionation (α) for 34S/32S ratios is 0.991 and is constant for all the glasses measured despite their compositions. Precision of individual measurements of 34S/32S ratios is 0.4 ‰, or better. Preliminary δ34S measurements of olivine-hosted basaltic melt inclusions in pre- 1883 basaltic scoria from Krakatau volcano Indonesia vary from -5.6 to 7.9‰ with sulfur concentrations from 490 to 2170 ppm, respectively. Host olivines are Fo77-80 and inclusions generally need minor to no post

  19. Advanced Exploration Systems Logistics Reduction and Repurposing Trash-to-Gas and Heat Melt Compactor KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne J.; Layne, Andrew; Hummerick, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered: 1. Project Structure 2. "Trash to Gas" 3. "Smashing Trash! The Heat Melt Compactor" 4. "Heat Melt Compaction as an Effective Treatment for Eliminating Microorganisms from Solid Waste" Thermal degradation of trash reduces volume while creating water, carbon dioxide and ash. CO2 can be fed to Sabatier reactor for CH4 production to fuel LOX/LCH4 ascent vehicle. Optimal performance: HFWS, full temperature ramp to 500-600 C. Tar challenges exist. Catalysis: Dolomag did eliminate allene byproducts from the product stream. 2nd Gen Reactor Studies. Targeting power, mass, time efficiency. Gas separation, Catalysis to reduce tar formation. Microgravity effects. Downselect in August will determine where we should spend time optimizing the technology.

  20. Bose-glass melting in the cubic (K,Ba)BiO3 high-Tc oxide with columnar defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, T.; Conde-Gallardo, A.; Joumard, I.; Marcus, J.; van der Beek, C. J.; Konczykowski, M.

    2000-02-01

    The Bose-glass transition in the fully isotropic (K,Ba)BiO3 superconductor with columnar defects produced by irradiation with 7.2 GeV Ta ions was studied by transport and nonlinear susceptibility measurements. For fields smaller than the dose equivalent field Bφ, the Bose-glass transition line HBG(T) shifts progressively upwards with increasing dose, dHBG/dT~1+αB1/2φ. The critical exponents have been deduced from the scaling properties of the transport measurements; we obtain z=5.3+/-0.3 and ν=1.1+/-0.2. For tilted magnetic fields, the transition temperature scales as TBG(0)-TBG(θ)~\\|sin(θ)\\|1/ν, as recently suggested by Lidmar and Wallin.

  1. Temperature-programed time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry study of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate during glass-liquid transition, crystallization, melting, and solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Souda, Ryutaro; Guenster, Jens

    2008-09-07

    For this study, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to analyze the molecular orientation of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([bmim][OTf]) and its interaction with the adsorbed Na and LiI species at temperatures of 150-300 K. A glassy [bmim][OTf] film crystallizes at around 230 K, as observed from the increase in the [bmim]{sup +} yield. LiI and Na adsorbed on the glassy film are solvated, whereas they tend to form islands on a crystalline film. The crystalline surface inertness is ascribable to the termination with the CF{sub 3} and C{sub 4}H{sub 9} groups, whereas the exposure of polar SO{sub 3} and imidazole groups at the glassy film results in the solvation. Surface layering occurs during solvation of LiI on the glassy film in such a way that the [bmim]{sup +} ([OTf]{sup -}) moiety is exposed to the vacuum (oriented to the bulk). The LiI adsorbed on the glassy film is incorporated into the bulk at temperatures higher than 200 K because of the glass-liquid transition. No further uptake of LiI is observed during crystallization, providing a contrast to the results of normal molecular solids such as water and ethanol. The surface layers of the crystal melt at temperatures below the bulk melting point, as confirmed from the dissolution of adsorbed LiI, but the melting layer retains a short-range order similar to the crystal. The [bmim][OTf] can be regarded as a strongly correlated liquid with the combined liquid property and crystal-type local structure. The origin of this behavior is discussed.

  2. Theoretical Considerations of the Prigogine-Defay Ratio with Regard to the Glass-Forming Ability of Drugs from Undercooled Melts.

    PubMed

    Wyttenbach, Nicole; Kirchmeyer, Wiebke; Alsenz, Jochem; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Drug behavior in undercooled melts is highly important for pharmaceutics with regard to amorphous solid dispersions, and therefore, categories were recently introduced that differentiate glass formers (GFs) from other drugs that are nonglass formers (nGFs). The present study is based on the assumption that molecular properties relevant for the so-called Prigogine-Defay (PD) ratio would be indicative of a drug's glass-forming ability. The PD ratio depends in theory on the entropy of fusion and molar volume. Experimental data were gathered from a broad set of pharmaceutical compounds (n = 54) using differential scanning calorimetry. The obtained entropy of fusion and molar volume were indeed found to significantly discriminate GFs from nGFs. In a next step, the entropy of fusion was predicted by different in silico methods. A first group contribution method provided rather unreliable estimates for the entropy of fusion, while an alternative in silico approach seemed more promising for drug categorization. Thus, a significant discrimination model employed molar volume, a so-called effective hydrogen bond number, and effective number of torsional bonds (or torsional units) to categorize GFs and nGFs (p ≤ 0.0000). The results led to new insights into drug vitrification and to practical rules of thumb. The latter may serve as guidance in pharmaceutical profiling and early formulation development with respect to amorphous drug formulations.

  3. Effect of P addition on glass forming ability and soft magnetic properties of melt-spun FeSiBCuC alloy ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Yang, Y. Z.; Li, W.; Chen, X. C.; Xie, Z. W.

    2016-11-01

    The dependency of phosphorous content on the glass forming ability, thermal stability and soft magnetic properties of Fe83.4Si2B14-xPxCu0.5C0.1 (x=0,1,2,3,4) alloys was investigated. The experimental results showed that the substitution of B by P increased the glass forming ability in this alloy system. The Fe83.4Si2B10P4Cu0.5C0.1 alloy shows a fully amorphous character. Thermal stability of melt-spun ribbons increases and temperature interval between the first and second crystallization peaks enlarges with the increase of P content. And the saturation magnetic flux density (Bs) shows a slight increase with the increase of P content. The Fe83.4Si2B11P3Cu0.5C0.1 nanocrystalline alloy exhibits a high Bs about 200.6 emu/g. The Bs of fully amorphous alloy Fe83.4Si2B10P4Cu0.5C0.1 drops dramatically to 172.1 emu/g, which is lower than that of other nanocrystallines. Low material cost and excellent soft magnetic properties make the FeSiBPCuC alloys promise soft magnetic materials for industrial applications.

  4. Relationship between crystallization tendencies during cooling from melt and isothermal storage: toward a general understanding of physical stability of pharmaceutical glasses.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohsaku; Harada, Takuji; Miura, Keiko; Yoshihashi, Yasuo; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide; Moriyama, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    The lack of protocols to predict the physical stability has been one of the most important issues in the use of amorphous solid dispersions. In this paper, the crystallization behaviors of pharmaceutical glasses, which have large variations in their crystallization tendencies, have been investigated. Although each compound appears to have a wide variation in their crystallization time, the initiation time for crystallization could be generalized as a function of only Tg/T, where Tg and T are the glass transition temperature and storage temperature, respectively. All compounds in which crystallization was mainly governed by temperature had similar activation energies for crystallization initiation, ca. 210-250 kJ/mol, indicating that physical stability at any temperature is predictable from only Tg. Increased stability is expected for other compounds, where crystallization is inhibited by an large energetic barrier, and stochastic nucleation plays an important role in initiating crystallization. The difference in the dominant factor, either temperature or pressure, appeared to correlate with the nucleation mechanism, and this could be determined by a cool-heat cycle after melting using thermal analysis. This conclusion should make prediction of physical stability of amorphous formulations easier, although the investigation was conducted under ideal conditions, which eliminated surface effects.

  5. Residual glasses and melt inclusions in basalts from DSDP Legs 45 and 46 - Evidence for magma mixing. [Deep Sea Drilling Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, M. A.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Microprobe analyses of natural glasses in basalts recovered by Legs 45 and 46 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project are reported and interpreted in the context of other geochemical, petrographic and experimental data on the same rocks (Rhodes et al., 1978). Residual glass compositions in the moderately evolved aphyritic and abundantly phyric basalts within each site indicate that none of the units is related to any other or to a common parent by simple fractional crystallization. The compositional trends, extensive disequilibrium textures in the plagioclase phenocrysts and the presence in evolved lavas of refractory plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts bearing primitive melt inclusions provide evidence that magma mixing had a major role in the genesis of the Leg 45 and 46 basalts. The magma parental to these basalts was most likely characterized by high Mg/(Mg + Fe/+2/), CaO/Al2O3, CaO/Na2O and low lithophile concentrations. A mixing model involving incremental enrichment of magmaphile elements by repeated episodes of mixing of relatively primitive and moderately evolved magmas, followed by a small amount of fractionation is consistent with the characteristics of the basalts studied.

  6. Melting of Pb Charge Glass and Simultaneous Pb-Cr Charge Transfer in PbCrO3 as the Origin of Volume Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Runze; Hojo, Hajime; Watanuki, Tetsu; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Mizokawa, Takashi; Okada, Kengo; Kim, Hyunjeong; Machida, Akihiko; Sakaki, Kouji; Nakamura, Yumiko; Agui, Akane; Mori, Daisuke; Inaguma, Yoshiyuki; Schlipf, Martin; Rushchanskii, Konstantin; Lezaic, Marjana; Matsuda, Masaaki; Ma, Jie; Calder, Stuart A.; Isobe, Masahiko; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Azuma, Masaki

    2015-09-15

    A metal to insulator transition in integer or half integer charge systems can be regarded as crystallization of charges. The insulating state tends to have a glassy nature when randomness or geometrical frustration exists. In this paper, we report that the charge glass state is realized in a perovskite compound PbCrO3, which has been known for almost 50 years, without any obvious inhomogeneity or triangular arrangement in the charge system. PbCrO3 has a valence state of Pb2+0.5Pb4+0.5Cr3+O3 with Pb2+–Pb4+ correlation length of three lattice-spacings at ambient condition. A pressure induced melting of charge glass and simultaneous Pb–Cr charge transfer causes an insulator to metal transition and ~10% volume collapse.

  7. Rapid Glass Refiner Development Program, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    A rapid glass refiner (RGR) technology which could be applied to both conventional and advanced class melting systems would significantly enhance the productivity and the competitiveness of the glass industry in the United States. Therefore, Vortec Corporation, with the support of the US Department of Energy (US DOE) under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-90ID12911, conducted a research and development program for a unique and innovative approach to rapid glass refining. To provide focus for this research effort, container glass was the primary target from among the principal glass types based on its market size and potential for significant energy savings. Container glass products represent the largest segment of the total glass industry accounting for 60% of the tonnage produced and over 40% of the annual energy consumption of 232 trillion Btu/yr. Projections of energy consumption and the market penetration of advanced melting and fining into the container glass industry yield a potential energy savings of 7.9 trillion Btu/yr by the year 2020.

  8. Improved fabrication of melt electrospun tissue engineering scaffolds using direct writing and advanced electric field control.

    PubMed

    Ristovski, Nikola; Bock, Nathalie; Liao, Sam; Powell, Sean K; Ren, Jiongyu; Kirby, Giles T S; Blackwood, Keith A; Woodruff, Maria A

    2015-03-25

    Direct writing melt electrospinning is an additive manufacturing technique capable of the layer-by-layer fabrication of highly ordered 3d tissue engineering scaffolds from micron-diameter fibers. The utility of these scaffolds, however, is limited by the maximum achievable height of controlled fiber deposition, beyond which the structure becomes increasingly disordered. A source of this disorder is charge build-up on the deposited polymer producing unwanted coulombic forces. In this study, the authors introduce a novel melt electrospinning platform with dual voltage power supplies to reduce undesirable charge effects and improve fiber deposition control. The authors produced and characterized several 90° cross-hatched fiber scaffolds using a range of needle/collector plate voltages. Fiber thickness was found to be sensitive only to overall potential and invariant to specific tip/collector voltage. The authors also produced ordered scaffolds up to 200 layers thick (fiber spacing 1 mm and diameter 40 μm) and characterized structure in terms of three distinct zones: ordered, semiordered, and disordered. Our in vitro analysis indicates successful cell attachment and distribution throughout the scaffolds, with little evidence of cell death after seven days. This study demonstrates the importance of electrostatic control for reducing destabilizing polymer charge effects and enabling the fabrication of morphologically suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  9. Containerless Manufacture of Glass Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Contamination and crystallization reduced in proposed process. Solid optical fiber drawn from an acoustically levitated lump of molten glass. New material added in solid form, melted and then moved into main body of molten glass. Single axis acoustic levitation furnances levitate glass melts at temperature up to about 700 degrees C. Processing in unit limited to low-melting temperature glasses.

  10. Role of low melting point element Ga in pronounced β-relaxation behaviors in LaGa-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, R. J.; Zhao, L. Z.; Zhang, B.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to most metallic glasses (MGs) which exhibit weak β-relaxation peak in their dynamic mechanical spectra, the LaGa-based MGs we report here show a distinct β-relaxation peak with the ratio of β/α-relaxation peaks up to ˜0.32 in the mechanical relaxation measurements. Moreover, the β-relaxation behavior can be tuned by modification of the chemical composition and the concentration of flow units. The effects of gallium and structural origin of the β-relaxation in the MGs have been discussed. The LaGa-based MGs with pronounced slow β-relaxation could provide a model system to investigate some underlying issues of the relaxation and plastic mechanism of MGs.

  11. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Littleton, Harry; Griffin, John

    2011-07-31

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU's/year and 6.46 trillion BTU's/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  12. The Effects of Advanced 'Glass Cockpit' Displayed Flight Instrumentation on In-flight Pilot Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigerwald, John

    The Cognitive Continuum Theory (CCT) was first proposed 25 years ago to explain the relationship between intuition and analytical decision making processes. In order for aircraft pilots to make these analytical and intuitive decisions, they obtain information from various instruments within the cockpit of the aircraft. Advanced instrumentation is used to provide a broad array of information about the aircraft condition and flight situation to aid the flight crew in making effective decisions. The problem addressed is that advanced instrumentation has not improved the pilot decision making in modern aircraft. Because making a decision is dependent upon the information available, this experimental quantitative study sought to determine how well pilots organize and interpret information obtained from various cockpit instrumentation displays when under time pressure. The population for this study was the students, flight instructors, and aviation faculty at the Middle Georgia State College School of Aviation campus in Eastman, Georgia. The sample was comprised of two groups of 90 individuals (45 in each group) in various stages of pilot licensure from student pilot to airline transport pilot (ATP). The ages ranged from 18 to 55 years old. There was a statistically significant relationship at the p < .05 level in the ability of the participants to organize and interpret information between the advanced glass cockpit instrumentation and the traditional cockpit instrumentation. It is recommended that the industry explore technological solutions toward creating cockpit instrumentation that could match the type of information display to the type of decision making scenario in order to aid pilots in making decisions that will result in better organization of information. Understanding the relationship between the intuitive and analytical decisions that pilots make and the information source they use to make those decisions will aid engineers in the design of instrumentation

  13. Pressure-induced elastic and structural changes in hydrous basalt glasses: The effect of H2O on the gravitational stability of basalt melts at the base of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lei; Yang, De-Bin; Xie, Hong-Sen; Li, Fang-Fei; Hu, Bo; Yu, Yang; Xu, Wen-Liang; Gao, Chun-Xiao

    2014-11-01

    To understand the effect of hydration on the elastic properties of silicate melts, we conducted in situ high-pressure Brillouin scattering measurements on two hydrous basalt glasses with different water contents in diamond anvil cells. Second-order phase transitions were observed in the hydrous basalt glasses and are due to the topological rearrangement of the silicate network to a high [Si, Al]-O coordination. Up to a pressure of 10 GPa at 300 K, the extra 2.23 wt% H2O lowers the elastic moduli of FX-2 basalt glass (2.69 wt% H2O) by 10%-18%, but does not affect the pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli, compared with FX-1 (0.46 wt% H2O) basalt glass. The phase transition takes place at a higher pressure in FX-2 compared with FX-1, possibly because of the depolymerization of water to silicate glass. Water interacts with network-forming cations and creates Si-OH and Al-OH groups, and prohibits nonbridging oxygen ions from being connected to other nearby framework cations (i.e., [5,6](Si, Al)), resulting in the hysteresis of the second-order phase transition. The density contrasts of our hydrous basalt melts with previous mid-ocean ridge basalt and preliminary reference Earth model data indicate that basalt melts may need very low water content (<0.46 wt% H2O) to maintain gravitational stability at the base of the upper mantle. Our results show that the elastic properties of hydrous silicate melts may have important implications for the dynamic evolution and chemical differentiation of the mantle.

  14. Management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tube glass: Review of advances in recycling and best available technologies.

    PubMed

    Iniaghe, Paschal O; Adie, Gilbert U

    2015-11-01

    Cathode ray tubes are image display units found in computer monitors and televisions. In recent years, cathode ray tubes have been generated as waste owing to the introduction of newer and advanced technologies in image displays, such as liquid crystal displays and high definition televisions, among others. Generation and subsequent disposal of end-of-life cathode ray tubes presents a challenge owing to increasing volumes and high lead content embedded in the funnel and neck sections of the glass. Disposal in landfills and open dumping are anti-environmental practices considering the large-scale contamination of environmental media by the potential of toxic metals leaching from glass. Mitigating such environmental contamination will require sound management strategies that are environmentally friendly and economically feasible. This review covers existing and emerging management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tubes. An in-depth analysis of available technologies (glass smelting, detoxification of cathode ray tube glass, lead extraction from cathode ray tube glass) revealed that most of the techniques are environmentally friendly, but are largely confined to either laboratory scale, or are often limited owing to high cost to mount, or generate secondary pollutants, while a closed-looped method is antiquated. However, recycling in cementitious systems (cement mortar and concrete) gives an added advantage in terms of quantity of recyclable cathode ray tube glass at a given time, with minimal environmental and economic implications. With significant quantity of waste cathode ray tube glass being generated globally, cementitious systems could be economically and environmentally acceptable as a sound management practice for cathode ray tube glass, where other technologies may not be applicable.

  15. Management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tube glass: Review of advances in recycling and best available technologies.

    PubMed

    Iniaghe, Paschal O; Adie, Gilbert U

    2015-11-01

    Cathode ray tubes are image display units found in computer monitors and televisions. In recent years, cathode ray tubes have been generated as waste owing to the introduction of newer and advanced technologies in image displays, such as liquid crystal displays and high definition televisions, among others. Generation and subsequent disposal of end-of-life cathode ray tubes presents a challenge owing to increasing volumes and high lead content embedded in the funnel and neck sections of the glass. Disposal in landfills and open dumping are anti-environmental practices considering the large-scale contamination of environmental media by the potential of toxic metals leaching from glass. Mitigating such environmental contamination will require sound management strategies that are environmentally friendly and economically feasible. This review covers existing and emerging management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tubes. An in-depth analysis of available technologies (glass smelting, detoxification of cathode ray tube glass, lead extraction from cathode ray tube glass) revealed that most of the techniques are environmentally friendly, but are largely confined to either laboratory scale, or are often limited owing to high cost to mount, or generate secondary pollutants, while a closed-looped method is antiquated. However, recycling in cementitious systems (cement mortar and concrete) gives an added advantage in terms of quantity of recyclable cathode ray tube glass at a given time, with minimal environmental and economic implications. With significant quantity of waste cathode ray tube glass being generated globally, cementitious systems could be economically and environmentally acceptable as a sound management practice for cathode ray tube glass, where other technologies may not be applicable. PMID:26463115

  16. Coercivity of the Nd-Fe-B hot-deformed magnets diffusion-processed with low melting temperature glass forming alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelam, U. M. R.; Liu, Lihua; Akiya, T.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Sakuma, N.; Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Hono, K.

    2016-08-01

    Nd- and Pr-based alloys with bulk glass forming ability and low melting temperatures, Nd60Al10Ni10Cu20 and Pr60Al10Ni10Cu20, were used for grain boundary diffusion process to enhance the coercivity of hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity increment was proportional to the weight gain after the diffusion process. For the sample with 64% weight gain, the coercivity increased up to 2.8 T, which is the highest value for bulk Nd-Fe-B magnets that do not contain heavy rare-earth elements, Dy or Tb. Approximately half of the intergranular regions were amorphous and the remaining regions were crystalline. Magnetic isolation of the Nd2Fe14B grains by the Nd-rich amorphous/crystalline intergranular phases is attributed to the large coercivity enhancement. The coercivity does not change after the crystallization of the intergranular phase, indicating that the coercivity is not influenced by the strain at the interface with the crystalline intergranular phase.

  17. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  18. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  19. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOEpatents

    Bussod, Gilles Y.; Dick, Aaron J.; Cort, George E.

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  20. Recent advances in the development of holey optical fibers based on sulphide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smektala, F.; Brilland, L.; Chartier, T.; Nguyen, T. N.; Troles, J.; Niu, Y. F.; Danto, S.; Traynor, N.; Jouan, T.

    2006-02-01

    Microstructured optical fibers as new optical objects have been developed in the recent past years, firstly from silica glass and then from other oxide glasses such as tellurite or different heavy cations oxide glasses. However very few results have been reported concerning non-oxide glasses and more particularly chalcogenide glasses. In a photonic crystal fiber the arrangement of air holes along the transverse section of the fiber around a solid glassy core leads to unique optical properties, such as for example broadband single-mode guidance, adjustable dispersion, nonlinear properties. Since the effective modal area is adjustable thanks to geometrical parameters, chalcogenide microstructured fibers with small mode area are of interest for nonlinear components because of the intrinsic non linearity of chalcogenide glasses, several order of magnitude above these of the reference silica glass (100 to 1000 times the non linearity of silica glass). On the other hand, chalcogenide holey fibers with large mode area are of interest for infrared power transmission, in a wavelength range out of reach of silica fibers, and more particularly in the 3-5 μm atmospheric window. The aim of this paper is to present more specifically the recent results that have been achieved in the elaboration, light guidance and characterization of photonic crystal fibers from the sulfide Ge 20Ga 5Sb 10S 65 glass, which presents a large transparency window from 600 nm to 11 μm.

  1. Glass Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Research efforts span three general areas of glass science: glass refining, gel-derived glasses, and nucleation and crystallization of glasses. Gas bubbles which are present in a glass product are defects which may render the glass totally useless for the end application. For example, optical glasses, laser host glasses, and a variety of other specialty glasses must be prepared virtually defect free to be employable. Since a major mechanism of bubble removal, buoyant rise, is virtually inoperative in microgravity, glass fining will be especially difficult in space. On the other hand, the suppression of buoyant rise and the ability to perform containerless melting experiments in space allows the opportunity to carry out several unique bubble experiments in space. Gas bubble dissolution studies may be performed at elevated temperatures for large bubbles with negligible bubble motion. Also, bubble nucleation studies may be performed without the disturbing feature of heterogeneous bubble nucleation at the platinum walls. Ground based research efforts are being performed in support of these potential flight experiments.

  2. Hot Melt Extruded Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Posaconazole with Improved Bioavailability: Investigating Drug-Polymer Miscibility with Advanced Characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0–72) and Cmax of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0–72) and Cmax higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension. PMID:25143935

  3. Hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion of posaconazole with improved bioavailability: investigating drug-polymer miscibility with advanced characterisation.

    PubMed

    Fule, Ritesh; Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0-72) and C(max) of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0-72) and C(max) higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension.

  4. Advanced materials for aerospace and biomedical applications: New glasses for hermetic titanium seals

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Tallant, D.R.; Crowder, S.V.

    1996-11-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys have an outstanding strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance and so are materials of choice for a variety of aerospace and biomedical applications. Such applications are limited by the lack of a viable hermetic glass sealing technology. Conventional silicate sealing glasses are readily reduced by titanium to form interfacial silicides that are incompatible with a robust glass/metal seal. Borate-based glasses undergo a similar thermochemistry and are reduced to a titanium boride. The kinetics of this reactions, however, are apparently slower and so a deleterious interface does not form. Chemically durable lanthanoborate glasses were examined as candidate sealing compositions. The compositions, properties, and structures of several alkaline earth, alumina, and titania lanthanoborate glass forming systems were evaluated and this information was used as the basis for a designed experiment to optimize compositions for Ti-sealing. A number of viable compositions were identified and sealing procedures established. Finally, glass formation, properties, and structure of biocompatible Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}- and TiO{sub 2}-doped calcium phosphate systems were also evaluated.

  5. Oxynitride glass production procedure

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Schuetz, Stanley T.; O'Brien, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a process for the preparation of high quality oxynitride glasses without resorting to high pressures. Nitrogen-containing compounds such as Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 are first encapsulated in a low melting temperature glass. Particles of the encapsulated nitrogen-containing compound are mixed with other oxide glass-formers and melted in an atmosphere of flowing nitrogen and in the presence of buffering gas to form the oxynitride glass. Glasses containing up to 15 at % nitrogen have been prepared by this method.

  6. Melt spinning study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Containerless processing of materials provides an excellent opportunity to study nucleation phenomena and produce unique materials, primarily through the formation of metastable phases and deep undercoolings. Deep undercoolings can be readily achieved in falling drops of molten material. Extended solute solubilities and greatly refined microstructures can also be obtained in containerless processing experiments. The Drop Tube Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center has played an important role in enhancing that area of research. Previous experiments performed in the Drop Tube with refractory metals has shown very interesting microstructural changes associated with deep undercoolings. It is apparent also that the microstructure of the deep undercooled species may be changing due to the release of the latent heat of fusion during recalescence. For scientific purposes, it is important to be able to differentiate between the microstructures of the two types of metallic species. A review of the literature shows that although significant advances have been made with respect to the engineering aspects of rapid solidification phenomena, there is still much to be learned in terms of understanding the basic phenomena. The two major ways in which rapid solidification processing provides improved structures and hence improved properties are: (1) production of refined structures such as fine dendrites and eutectics, and (2) production of new alloy compositions, microstructures, and phases through extended solid solubility, new phase reaction sequences, and the formation of metallic-glass microstructures. The objective of this work has been to determine the optimal methodology required to extract this excess energy without affecting the thermo-physical parameters of the under-cooled melt. In normal containerless processing experiments recalescence occurs as the melt returns toward the melting point in order to solidify. A new type of experiment is sought in which the resultant

  7. Manufacturing unique glasses in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happe, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    An air suspension melting technique is described for making glasses from substances which to date have been observed only in the crystalline condition. A laminar flow vertical wind tunnel was constructed for suspending oxide melts that were melted using the energy from a carbon dioxide laser beam. By this method it is possible to melt many high-melting-point materials without interaction between the melt and crucible material. In addition, space melting permits cooling to suppress crystal growth. If a sufficient amount of under cooling is accompanied by a sufficient increase in viscosity, crystallization will be avoided entirely and glass will result.

  8. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  9. High-resolution solid-state NMR study of the effect of composition on network connectivity and structural disorder in multi-component glasses in the diopside and jadeite join: Implications for structure of andesitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, Sung Keun

    2014-12-01

    The structural evolution of andesitic melts with varying compositions remains one of the unsolved questions in high-temperature geochemistry and petrology. In this article, we report the structural details of model andesitic glasses [CaO-MgO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMNAS)] in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) join using high-resolution, multi-nuclear, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The 27Al NMR spectra of CMNAS glasses confirm that [4]Al is dominant. While a minor fraction of [5]Al is observed, its presence is only prevalent in the glasses with higher Ca-Mg content. Topological disorder in the glass network also tends to increase with Ca-Mg content as evidenced by the increase in the quadrupolar coupling constant (Cq) of [4]Al for glasses with increasing diopside contents (XDiopside). Despite the complex nature of the glasses studied here (with five oxide components), the 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra resolve diverse bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs), from which the degree of Al avoidance among framework cations (Si and Al) and preferential proximity among non-network cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) and each oxygen site can be estimated: presence of Al-O-Al in jadeite glass implies a violation of the Al-avoidance rule in the glasses and the decrease in the fraction of NBOs with increasing XDiopside is consistent with a decrease in their viscosity. Analysis of the peak position of {Ca, Mg}-mixed NBOs, along with the absence of Na-NBO peak, and the peak shape of Si-O-Al reveals preferential partitioning of Ca2+ and Mg2 into NBOs and the proximity of Na+ to BOs. The fraction of highly coordinated Al has been linked to thermodynamic and transport properties of the melts. Considering all the experimental Al coordination environments available in the literature, together with the current experimental studies, we attempt to establish the relationship between the fractions of highly coordinated Al and composition, particularly average

  10. Development and fabrication of advanced cover glass for a GaAs solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, P.G.; Kaminar, N.R.; Grounner, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes work on improving solar cell conversion efficiencies by modifying the cell cover glass. Two approaches were investigated during the course of this work: grooved cover glasses to reduce the effect of top contact obscuration and secondary concentrators to improve concentrator solar cell performances in tracking modules. The grooved cover glass work used an array of metallized V shaped grooves in a thin cover glass (plastic) window to deflect incident light rays away from solar cell front surface regions covered by the solar cell electrical contact metallization onto unobstructed, optically active regions of the solar cell. Secondary concentrators are being considered for use on concentrator solar cells to improve overall system conversion efficiency and reduce receiver module cost. Secondary concentrators designed and fabricated during this project consist of small glass cones to attach directly to the top of the receiver solar cell. When appropriately designed, these secondary concentrator glass cones increase sunlight concentration on the solar cell, improve solar flux uniformity on the cell, improve system tolerance to tracking error, and allow for concentration ratios greater than can be ordinarily achieved with acrylic Fresnel lenses.

  11. Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Kramlich, J.; Koppang, R.

    1991-05-01

    This project was initiated to fill a need in the glass industry for a non-contact temperature sensor for glass melts. At present, the glass forming industry (e.g., bottle manufacture) consumes significant amounts of energy. Careful control of temperature at the point the bottle is molded is necessary to prevent the bottle from being rejected as out-of-specification. In general, the entire glass melting and conditioning process is designed to minimize this rejection rate, maximize throughput and thus control energy and production costs. This program focuses on the design, development and testing of an advanced optically based pyrometer for glass melts. The pyrometer operates simultaneously at four wavelengths; through analytical treatment of the signals, internal temperature profiles within the glass melt can be resolved. A novel multiplexer alloys optical signals from a large number of fiber-optic sensors to be collected and resolved by a single detector at a location remote from the process. This results in a significant cost savings on a per measurement point basis. The development program is divided into two phases. Phase 1 involves the construction of a breadboard version on the instrument and its testing on a pilot-scale furnace. In Phase 2, a prototype analyzer will be constructed and tested on a commercial forehearth. This report covers the Phase 1 activities.

  12. Rehabilitation of advanced periodontal problems by using a combination of a glass fiber-reinforced composite resin bridge and splint.

    PubMed

    Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Aksoy, Gokhan; User, Atilla

    2008-02-01

    Rehabilitation of masticatory ability in patients with reduced periodontal tissue support is a multiple challenge in dentistry. It has been shown that tooth mobility is reduced by a splint in place. Splints may be constructed of various materials. Development of fiber-reinforced composite materials offers a new and conservative approach for tooth replacement and stabilization. This case report describes the rehabilitation and 2-year follow-up of a patient with advanced periodontal problems by using a glass fiber-reinforced composite resin material. PMID:18389738

  13. Regional albedo of Arctic first-year drift ice in advanced stages of melt from the combination of in situ measurements and aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divine, D. V.; Granskog, M. A.; Hudson, S. R.; Pedersen, C. A.; Karlsen, T. I.; Divina, S. A.; Gerland, S.

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents a case study of the regional (≈ 150 km) broadband albedo of first year Arctic sea ice in advanced stages of melt, estimated from a combination of in situ albedo measurements and aerial imagery. The data were collected during the eight day ICE12 drift experiment carried out by the Norwegian Polar Institute in the Arctic north of Svalbard at 82.3° N from 26 July to 3 August 2012. The study uses in situ albedo measurements representative of the four main surface types: bare ice, dark melt ponds, bright melt ponds and open water. Images acquired by a helicopter borne camera system during ice survey flights covered about 28 km2. A subset of > 8000 images from the area of homogeneous melt with open water fraction of ≈ 0.11 and melt pond coverage of ≈ 0.25 used in the upscaling yielded a regional albedo estimate of 0.40 (0.38; 0.42). The 95% confidence interval on the estimate was derived using the moving block bootstrap approach applied to sequences of classified sea ice images and albedo of the four surface types treated as random variables. Uncertainty in the mean estimates of surface type albedo from in situ measurements contributed some 95% of the variance of the estimated regional albedo, with the remaining variance resulting from the spatial inhomogeneity of sea ice cover. The results of the study are of relevance for the modeling of sea ice processes in climate simulations. It particularly concerns the period of summer melt, when the optical properties of sea ice undergo substantial changes, which existing sea ice models have significant diffuculty accurately reproducing.

  14. Study Of Phase Separation In Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.; Smith, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes an experimental study of effect of hydroxide content on phase separation in soda/silica glasses. Ordinary and gel glasses melted at 1,565 degree C, and melts stirred periodically. "Wet" glasses produced by passing bubbles of N2 saturated with water through melts; "dry" glasses prepared in similar manner, except N2 dried before passage through melts. Analyses of compositions of glasses performed by atomic-absorption and index-of-refraction measurements. Authors conclude hydroxide speeds up phase separation, regardless of method (gel or ordinary) by which glass prepared. Eventually helps material scientists to find ways to control morphology of phase separation.

  15. Evaluation of a Novel Temperature Sensing Probe for Monitoring and Controlling Glass Temperature in a Joule-Heated Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    A. D. Watkins; C. A. Musick; C. Cannon; N. M. Carlson; P. D. Mullenix; R. D. Tillotson

    1999-04-29

    A self-verifying temperature sensor that employs advanced contact thermocouple probe technology was tested in a laboratory-scale, joule-heated, refractory-lined glass melter used for radioactive waste vitrification. The novel temperature probe monitors melt temperature at any given level of the melt chamber. The data acquisition system provides the real-time temperature for molten glass. Test results indicate that the self-verifying sensor is more accurate and reliable than classic platinum/rhodium thermocouple and sheath assemblies. The results of this test are reported as well as enhancements being made to the temperature probe. To obtain more reliable temperature measurements of the molten glass for improving production efficiency and ensuring consistent glass properties, optical sensing was reviewed for application in a high temperature environment.

  16. Magnetic nature of the austenite-martensite phase transition and spin glass behaviour in nanostructured Mn2Ni1.6Sn0.4 melt-spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nidhi; Borgohain, Barsha; Srivastava, A. K.; Dhar, Ajay; Singh, H. K.

    2016-03-01

    Nanocrystalline ribbons of inverse Heusler alloy Mn2Ni1.6Sn0.4 have been synthesised by melt spinning of the arc-melted bulk precursor. The single-phase ribbons crystallize into a cubic structure and exhibit very fine crystallite size of <2 nm. Temperature-dependent magnetization ( M- T) measurements reveal ferromagnetic-austenite (FM-A)-antiferromagnetic-martensite (AFM-M) phase transition that begins at M S ≈ 249 K and finishes at M f ≈ 224 K. During warming, the reverse AFM-M to FM-A transitions begins at A s ≈ 240 K and finishes at A f ≈ 261 K. A re-entrant FM transition is observed in the M-phase at T_{{CM}} ≈ 145 K. These transitions are also confirmed by temperature-dependent resistivity ( ρ- T) measurements. The hysteretic behaviour of M- T and ρ- T in the temperature regime spanned by the A-M transition is a manifestation of the first-order phase transition. M- T and ρ- T data also provide unambiguous evidence in favour of spin glass at T < T_{{CM}}. The scaling of the glass freezing temperature ( T f) with frequency, extracted from the frequency-dependent AC susceptibility measurements, confirms the existence of canonical spin glass at T < T_{{CM}} ≈ 145 K. The occurrence of canonical spin glass has been explained in terms of the nanostructuring modified interactions between the coexisting FM and AFM correlations in the martensitic phase.

  17. GlassForm

    2011-09-16

    GlassForm is a software tool for generating preliminary waste glass formulas for a given waste stream. The software is useful because it reduces the number of verification melts required to develop a suitable additive composition. The software includes property models that calculate glass properties of interest from the chemical composition of the waste glass. The software includes property models for glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, and leach resistance as measured by the 7-daymore » product consistency test (PCT).« less

  18. Containerless processing of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happe, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Ground-based research on the containerless melting of glass and experiments performed during a flight on the SPAR 6 are described. Experiments leading to selection of the flight sample composition, a silica-modified gallia/calcia glass, and the preparation of a one quarter inch diameter flight sample are described. During the flight experiment, a sample of the glass was containerless melted and cooled to a clear glass in a single axis acoustic positioning apparatus. The functioning of the flight experimental hardware was evaluated. The evaluation of the sample is presented.

  19. Equilibrium first-order melting and second-order glass transitions of the vortex matter in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8.

    PubMed

    Beidenkopf, H; Avraham, N; Myasoedov, Y; Shtrikman, H; Zeldov, E; Rosenstein, B; Brandt, E H; Tamegai, T

    2005-12-16

    The thermodynamic phase diagram of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 was mapped by measuring local equilibrium magnetization M(H,T) in the presence of vortex shaking. Two equally sharp first-order magnetization steps are revealed in a single temperature sweep, manifesting a liquid-solid-liquid sequence. In addition, a second-order glass transition line is revealed by a sharp break in the equilibrium M(T) slope. The first- and second-order lines intersect at intermediate temperatures, suggesting the existence of four phases: Bragg glass and vortex crystal at low fields, glass and liquid at higher fields.

  20. Training Guidelines: Glass Furnace Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    Technological development in the glass industry is constantly directed towards producing high quality glass at low operating costs. Particularly, changes have taken place in melting methods which mean that the modern furnace operator has greater responsibilities than any of his predecessors. The complexity of control systems, melting rates, tank…

  1. INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; FENG Z; GAN H; PEGG IL

    2009-11-05

    Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.

  2. Effects of the degree of polymerization on the structure of sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts: An 17O NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Stebbins, Jonathan F.

    2009-02-01

    Revealing the atomic structure and disorder in oxide glasses, including sodium silicates and aluminosilicates, with varying degrees of polymerization, is a challenging problem in high-temperature geochemistry as well as glass science. Here, we report 17O MAS and 3QMAS NMR spectra for binary sodium silicate and ternary sodium aluminosilicate glasses with varying degrees of polymerization (Na 2O/SiO 2 ratio and Na 2O/Al 2O 3 ratio), revealing in detail the extent of disorder (network connectivity and topological disorder) and variations of NMR parameters with the glass composition. In binary sodium silicate glasses [Na 2O- k(SiO 2)], the fraction of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs, Na-O-Si) increases with the Na 2O/SiO 2 ratio ( k), as predicted from the composition. The 17O isotropic chemical shifts ( 17O δiso) for both bridging oxygen (BO) and NBO increase by about 10-15 ppm with the SiO 2 content (for k = 1-3). The quadrupolar coupling products of BOs and NBOs also increase with the SiO 2 content. These trends suggest that both NBOs and BOs strongly interact with Na; therefore, the Na distributions around BOs and NBOs are likely to be relatively homogenous for the glass compositions studied here, placing some qualitative limits on the extent of segregation of alkali channels from silica-enriched regions as suggested by modified random-network models. The peak width (in the isotropic dimension) and thus bond angle and length distributions of Si-O-Si and Na-O-Si increase with the SiO 2 content, indicating an increase in the topological disorder with the degree of polymerization. In the ternary aluminosilicate glasses [Na 2O] x[Al 2O 3] 1-xSiO 2, the NBO fraction decreases while the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Al fractions apparently increase with increasing Al 2O 3 content. The variation of oxygen cluster populations suggests that deviation from "Al avoidance" is more apparent near the charge-balanced join (Na/Al = 1). The Si-O-Si fraction, which is closely related to the activity

  3. Shattering the Glass Ceiling. Issues and Solutions in Promoting the Advancement of Women and Minorities to Executive Management in Corporate America. White Paper 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Microquest Corp., San Rafael, CA.

    Despite their progress in the workplace in recent years, women and minorities still remain greatly underrepresented in executive roles in major U.S. companies. The barriers, attitudes, and practices that deter the advancement of women and minorities into executive ranks collectively result in the phenomenon known as the "Glass Ceiling." The cases…

  4. Conversion of melt-derived microfibrous borate (13-93B3) and silicate (45S5) bioactive glass in a simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E

    2013-03-01

    Microfibrous bioactive glasses are showing a considerable capacity to heal soft tissue wounds, but little information is available on the mechanism of healing. In the present study, the conversion of microfibrous borate bioactive glass (diameter = 0.2-5 μm) with the composition designated 13-93B3 (5.5 Na2O, 11.1 K2O, 4.6 MgO, 18.5 CaO, 3.7 P2O5, 56.6 B2O3 wt%) was evaluated in vitro as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C using structural and chemical techniques. Silicate 45S5glass microfibers (45 SiO2, 24.5 Na2O, 24.5 CaO, 6 P2O5 wt%) were also studied for comparison. Microfibrous 13-93B3 glass degraded almost completely and converted to a calcium phosphate material within 7-14 days in SBF, whereas >85 % of the silica remained in the 45S5 microfibers, forming a silica gel phase. An amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) product that formed on the 13-93B3 microfibers crystallized at a slower rate to hydroxyapatite (HA) when compared to the ACP that formed on the 45S5 fibers. For immersion times >3 days, the 13-93B3 fibers released a higher concentration of Ca into the SBF than the 45S5 fibers. The fast and more complete degradation, slow crystallization of the ACP product, and higher concentration of dissolved Ca in SBF could contribute to the capacity of the microfibrous borate 13-93B3 glass to heal soft tissue wounds.

  5. Polycarboxylic acids as network modifiers for water durability improvement of inorganic-organic hybrid tin-silico-phosphate low-melting glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Menaa, Bouzid . E-mail: bouzidmenaa@noncry.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Mizuno, Megumi; Takahashi, Masahide . E-mail: masahide@noncry.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tokuda, Yomei; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2006-02-15

    We investigated the water durability of the inorganic-organic hybrid tin-silico-phosphate glasses Me{sub 2}SiO-SnO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (Me designs the organic methyl group) doped with organic acids (salicylic acid (SA), tartaric acid (TA), citric acid (Canada) and butane tetracarboxylic acid (BTCA)) containing one or more of carboxylic groups per molecule. The structure, thermal properties and durability of the final glasses obtained via a non-aqueous acid-base reaction were discussed owing to the nature and the concentration of the acid added. {sup 29}Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectra, respectively, showed clearly a modification of the network in the host glass matrix of the Me{sub 2}SiO-SnO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} system. The polycondensation enhancement to form -P-O-Si-O-P- linkages (PSP) and the increase of the Q {sup 2} unit (two bridging oxygens per phosphorus atom) over the Q {sup 3} unit (three bridging oxygens per phosphorus atom) as a function of the acid in the order SAglasses with the acids containing a large number of carboxylic groups per molecule. The presence of carboxylic groups of the acid acting as network modifier may retard the movement of water molecules through the glasses due to the steric hindrance strengthening the PSP connections in a chain-like structure.

  6. Recent Advances in the Development of Thick-Section Melt-Infiltrated C/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Jason R.; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian E.; Effinger, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Using a pressureless melt infiltration and in situ reaction process to form the silicon carbide (SiC) matrix, Ultramet has been developing a means to rapidly fabricate ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) targeting thicker sections. The process also employs a unique route for the application of oxide fiber interface coatings designed to protect the fiber and impart fiber-matrix debond. Working toward a 12 inch diameter, 2.5 inch thick demonstrator component, the effect of various processing parameters on room temperature flexure strength is being studied with plans for more extensive elevated temperature mechanical strength evaluation to follow this initial optimization process.

  7. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  8. The mineral phase evolution behaviour in the production of glass-ceramics from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by melting technology.

    PubMed

    Luan, Jingde; Chai, Meiyun; Li, Rundong; Yao, Pengfei; Khan, Agha Saood

    2016-01-01

    High energy consumption was the major obstacle to the widespread application of melting technology in the treatment of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. Aiming to lower the ash-melting temperature (AMT) for energy-saving, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and the scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the relations between AMT and the mineral evolution. The results indicated that the change of AMT was determined by the types and the contents of mineral crystals. The transition from refractory minerals to fluxing minerals was the key. The transition of the main crystalline phase from pseudowollastonite (Ca3(Si3O9)) to wollastonite (CaSiO3) played a significant role in AMT reduction. A quantum chemistry calculation was carried out to investigate the effect of crystal reaction activity on AMT. In the chemical reaction, the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital played a more important role than any other orbits. Cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)) were apt to enter into the crystal lattice of wollastonite and gehlenite mainly through Si (3), O (1), Si (6), O (10) and Al (2), O (10), and broke the covalent bonds of Si (3)-O (7), Al (1)-O (9) and Al (1)-O (15), respectively. This deconstruction behaviour provided convenient conditions for restructuring and promoted the formation of fluxing minerals. In melts, the excess SiO2 monomers which existed in the form of cristobalite and quartz caused AMT increase. PMID:26506987

  9. Effects of Quartz Particle Size and Sucrose Addition on Melting Behavior of a Melter Feed for High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, Jose; Hrma, Pavel R; Schweiger, Michael J; Swearingen, Kevin J; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E; Henager, Samuel H

    2010-08-11

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5°C/min up to 1200°C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 µm. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-μm quartz particles; particles >150 µm formed clusters. Particles of 5 µm completely dissolved by 900°C whereas particles >150 µm did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200°C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles.

  10. Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions in microdiamond from the gneisses of Kokchetav and Erzgebirge massifs: Diversified characteristics of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamond in UHP rocks due to host-rock buffering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shyh-Lung; Chu, Hao-Tsu; Yui, Tzen-Fu; Shen, Pouyan; Schertl, Hans-Peter; Liou, Juhn G.; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2006-03-01

    Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions were identified within metamorphic microdiamonds from garnets of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) gneisses of the Kokchetav and the Erzgebirge massifs by analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The chemical characteristics of these inclusions within microdiamonds are surprisingly similar among various gneissic rocks from both Kokchetav and Erzgebirge, but are significantly different from the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid inclusions within microdiamonds from garnets of the Kokchetav UHP marble. These contrasting findings not only provide constraints on the characteristics/compositions of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamonds, but also imply that the formation media must have been buffered by the hosting rocks, resulting in the observed diversities as reported here. In addition, depending on the rock types and thus on the nature of the formation media from which metamorphic microdiamonds were formed, the respective characteristic morphologies of the microdiamonds differ. The P/K-rich silica melt tends to form octahedral or cubo-octahedral microdiamonds within garnet in gneissic rocks, whereas the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid tends to form spheroids/cuboid microdiamonds with rugged surfaces within garnet in marble. Consequently, the buffered media in hosting rocks played a decisive role in determining the different morphologies and growth rates/mechanisms of metamorphic microdiamonds in general.

  11. Integral coolant channels supply made by melt-out method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Melt-out method of constructing strong, pressure-tight fluid coolant channels for chambers is accomplished by cementing pins to the surface and by depositing a melt-out material on the surface followed by two layers of epoxy-resin impregnated glass fibers. The structure is heated to melt out the low-melting alloy.

  12. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  13. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  14. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  15. Polymerization of silicate and aluminate tetrahedra in glasses, melts and aqueous solutions—II. The network modifying effects of Mg 2+ , K +, Na +, Li +, H +, OH -, F -, Cl -, H 2O, CO 2 and H 3O + on silicate polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H. W. S.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    1980-11-01

    The effect of the group IA and VIIA ions, as well as Mg 2+, and the molecules H 2O, CO 2, H 3O + and OH - on the energy of the Si-O bond in a H 6Si 2O 7 cluster has been calculated using semiempirical molecular orbital calculations (CNDO/2). Three types of elementary processes, i.e. substitution, addition, and polymerization reactions have been used to interpret data on the dynamic viscosity, surface tension and surface charge, hydrolytic weakening, diffusivity, conductivity, freezing point depression, and degree of polymerization of silicates in melts, glasses, and aqueous solutions. As a test of our calculational procedure, observed X-ray emission spectra of binary alkali silicate glasses were compared with calculated electronic spectra. The well known bondlength variations between the bridging bond [Si-O(br)] and the non-bridging bond [Si-O(nbr)] in alkali silicates are shown to be due to the propagation of oscillating bond-energy patterns through the silica framework. A kinetic interpretation of some results of our calculations is given in terms of the Bell-Evans-Polanyi reaction principle.

  16. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  17. An effective utilization of the slag from acid leaching of coal-waste: preparation of water glass with a low-temperature co-melting reaction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Duan, Xiaofang; Chen, Rongming; Cheng, Fangqin

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents an effective utilization of slag from acid leaching of coal-waste with a novel approach, namely low-temperature co-melting method, for preparation of sodium silicate (Na2O x nSiO2) using slag from acid leaching of coal-waste as feedstock. It is very interesting that the co-melting reaction temperature of the mixture of Na2CO3 and the feedstock (50-100 microm) was as low as 850 degrees C, which was significantly lower than the temperature used in traditional sodium silicate production (1400 degrees C). The optimum SiO2/Na2O ratio was identified as 7:3 according to the results of thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC), ICP-AES, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. In this condition, the main product was sodium disilicate (Na2O x 2SiO2), with water solubility of 85.0%. More importantly, the impurities such as aluminum in the feedstock, which had adverse effect on subsequent treatment, were concentrated almost completely in the filter residue as insoluble sodium alumunosilicates, i.e., Na(Si2Al)O6 x H2O. The lower co-melting temperature of this process demonstrates a significant energy-saving opportunity and thus a promising approach for highly effective utilization of coal-waste. Implications: Recently, alumina extraction from coal-waste has been extensively investigated and industrial applied in China. However, the slag-containing silica generated from the acid leaching process of coal-waste led to a secondary pollution, which hindered large-scale production. The proposed low-temperature co-melting method for preparation of sodium silicate (Na2O x nSiO2) using slag from acid leaching of coal-waste as feedstock indicated that it is an efficient approach for the recovery of silica from the acid-leached slag of coal-waste with minimal environmental impact.

  18. Glass transition dynamics and conductivity scaling in ionic deep eutectic solvents: The case of (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Satya N.; Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik, Justyna; Shirota, Hideaki; Biswas, Ranjit; Paluch, Marian

    2015-05-01

    A detailed investigation on the molecular dynamics of ionic deep eutectic solvents (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) is reported. The study was carried out employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy covering seven decades in frequency (10-1-106 Hz) and in a wide temperature range from 373 K down to 173 K, accessing the dynamic observables both in liquid and glassy state. The dielectric response of the ionic system has been presented in the dynamic window of modulus formalism to understand the conductivity relaxation and its possible connection to the origin of localized motion. Two secondary relaxation processes appear below glass transition temperature. Our findings provide suitable interpretation on the nature of secondary Johari-Goldstein process describing the ion translation and orientation of dipoles in a combined approach using Ngai's coupling model. A nearly constant loss feature is witnessed at shorter times/lower temperatures. We also discuss the ac conductivity scaling behavior using Summerfield approach and random free energy barrier model which establish the time-temperature superposition principle. These experimental observations have fundamental importance on theoretical elucidation of the conductivity relaxation and glass transition phenomena in molten ionic conductors.

  19. Glass transition dynamics and conductivity scaling in ionic deep eutectic solvents: The case of (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) melts

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathy, Satya N. Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik, Justyna; Paluch, Marian; Shirota, Hideaki; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-05-14

    A detailed investigation on the molecular dynamics of ionic deep eutectic solvents (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) is reported. The study was carried out employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy covering seven decades in frequency (10{sup −1}-10{sup 6} Hz) and in a wide temperature range from 373 K down to 173 K, accessing the dynamic observables both in liquid and glassy state. The dielectric response of the ionic system has been presented in the dynamic window of modulus formalism to understand the conductivity relaxation and its possible connection to the origin of localized motion. Two secondary relaxation processes appear below glass transition temperature. Our findings provide suitable interpretation on the nature of secondary Johari-Goldstein process describing the ion translation and orientation of dipoles in a combined approach using Ngai’s coupling model. A nearly constant loss feature is witnessed at shorter times/lower temperatures. We also discuss the ac conductivity scaling behavior using Summerfield approach and random free energy barrier model which establish the time-temperature superposition principle. These experimental observations have fundamental importance on theoretical elucidation of the conductivity relaxation and glass transition phenomena in molten ionic conductors.

  20. Workshop on Lunar Volcanic Glasses: Scientific and Resource Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delano, John W.; Heiken, Grant H.

    This workshop on lunar mare volcanism was the first since 1975 to deal with the major scientific advances that have occurred in this general subject, and the first ever to deal specifically with volcanic glasses. Lunar volcanic glasses are increasingly being recognized as the best geochemical and petrologic probes into the lunar mantle. Lunar volcanic glasses, of which 25 compositional varieties are presently known, appear to represent primary magmas that were produced by partial melting of differentiated mantle source regions at depths of perhaps 400 to 500 km. These high-magnesian picritic magmas were erupted onto the lunar surface in fire fountains associated with the release of indigenous lunar volatiles. The cosmic significance of this volatile component, in an otherwise depleted Moon, remains a lingering puzzle. The resource potential, if any, of the surface-correlated volatile sublimates on the volcanic glass spherules had not been systematically addressed prior to this workshop.

  1. Advanced flat top laser heating system for high pressure research at GSECARS: application to the melting behavior of germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Prakapenka, V.B.; Kubo, A.; Kuznetzov, A.; Laskin, A.; Shkurkhin, O.; Dera, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    2008-09-29

    Laser heating plays an essential role for in-situ high pressure high temperature studies into the physical and chemical properties of materials in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) and minerals at conditions relevant to the Earth's deep interior. High temperature experiments in the multi-Mbar (over 100 GPa) pressure range require the use of very small samples and consequently the utmost stability and controllability of the laser heating is crucial. To accomplish this, we have modified the laser heating system at GSECARS employing newly developed beam shaping optics combined with two diode-pumped, single mode fiber lasers. Varying the settings of the laser heating system, we were able to shape the beam to almost any desired intensity profile and size on the surface of the sample in the DAC, including tight focus, flat top, trident and doughnut types. The advantages and excellent performance of the flat top laser heating (FTLH) technique were demonstrated in melting experiments on germanium in the DAC at pressures up to 40 GPa.

  2. Melt electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Dalton, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Melt electrospinning is relatively under-investigated compared to solution electrospinning but provides opportunities in numerous areas, in which solvent accumulation or toxicity are a concern. These applications are diverse, and provide a broad set of challenges to researchers involved in electrospinning. In this context, melt electrospinning provides an alternative approach that bypasses some challenges to solution electrospinning, while bringing new issues to the forefront, such as the thermal stability of polymers. This Focus Review describes the literature on melt electrospinning, as well as highlighting areas where both melt and solution are combined, and potentially merge together in the future.

  3. Melt fracture revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J. M.

    2003-07-16

    In a previous paper the author and Demay advanced a model to explain the melt fracture instability observed when molten linear polymer melts are extruded in a capillary rheometer operating under the controlled condition that the inlet flow rate was held constant. The model postulated that the melts were a slightly compressible viscous fluid and allowed for slipping of the melt at the wall. The novel feature of that model was the use of an empirical switch law which governed the amount of wall slip. The model successfully accounted for the oscillatory behavior of the exit flow rate, typically referred to as the melt fracture instability, but did not simultaneously yield the fine scale spatial oscillations in the melt typically referred to as shark skin. In this note a new model is advanced which simultaneously explains the melt fracture instability and shark skin phenomena. The model postulates that the polymer is a slightly compressible linearly viscous fluid but assumes no slip boundary conditions at the capillary wall. In simple shear the shear stress {tau}and strain rate d are assumed to be related by d = F{tau} where F ranges between F{sub 2} and F{sub 1} > F{sub 2}. A strain rate dependent yield function is introduced and this function governs whether F evolves towards F{sub 2} or F{sub 1}. This model accounts for the empirical observation that at high shears polymers align and slide more easily than at low shears and explains both the melt fracture and shark skin phenomena.

  4. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  5. A long-term record of magma compositions at the Juan de Fuca ridge from analysis of sediment hosted volcanic glass: tests of the effects of sea level on melt production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, D.; Li, Y.; Langmuir, C. H.; Costa, K.; McManus, J. F.; Huybers, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    It is hypothesized that the pressure changes caused by sea level variations during glacial cycles can influence long-term rates of magmatism in ocean basins. This proposed coupling between oceanic magmatism and climate has important implications for temporal trends in rates of mid-ocean ridge (MOR) volcanism, the structure of the oceanic crust and the composition of oceanic magmas, including the flux of volatile elements from the mantle. Testing the extent to which climate cycles may or may not modulate the compositions of oceanic magmas is difficult, as it requires compositional records that stretch over timescales comparable to those of glacial cycles (i.e. 10s of kyrs), which do not currently exist. In this study we use fragments of volcanic glass found in sediment cores to construct compositional time-series for lavas erupted at the Juan de Fuca ridge, NW Pacific. These provide continuous records of magmatism over several 10s kyrs, with a temporal resolution of a few kyrs. The longest record in our current dataset spans ~80 kyrs and records two significant step-wise changes in the average compositions of the erupted magmas, linked to both variations in the extent of crustal fractionation (i.e. MgO) and also the composition of primary mantle melts (i.e. K2O/TiO2). These changes occur rapidly and are decoupled in time, with the MgO shift happening around ~20 kyrs before the change in K2O/TiO2. Compositional variations such as these, and the temporal offset between them, are generally consistent with models of the effect of sea-level variation on magma chemistry, which can modulate the melt flux to the ridge and the extent of mantle melting. To place our results in a chronological and climatic context we will compare our data to oxygen-isotope records collected from the same sediment horizons and chemical analysis of the host sediments. Our study demonstrates the potential of this method for investigating the magmatic behaviour of ridges over long timescales.

  6. S-Isotope Fractionation between Fluid and Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, A.; Holtz, F.; Shimizu, N.; Behrens, H.; Mandeville, C. W.; Simon, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Large amounts of sulfur (S) can be released from silicate melts during volcanic eruption. Degassing of magma can lead to S-isotope fractionation between fluid and melt. However, experimental data on fluid-melt S-isotope fractionation are scarce and no data exist for silicate melts at temperatures (T) > 1000°C. Recent advances in in situ S-isotope analyses using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) enable determinations of the isotopic composition in silicate glasses with low S content [1] and allow us to investigate experimentally fluid-melt S-isotope fractionation effects in magmatic systems. Isothermal decompression experiments were conducted in internally heated pressure vessels (IHPV). Volatile-bearing (~3 to ~8 wt% H2O, 140 to 2700 ppm S, 0 to 1000 ppm Cl) andesitic and basaltic glasses were synthesized at ~1040°C, ~500 MPa and log(fO2) = QFM to QFM+4 (QFM: quartz-magnetite-fayalite buffer). The decompression experiments were carried out at T = 1030 to 1200°C and similar fO2. Pressure (P) was released continuously from ~400 MPa to 150, 100 or 70 MPa with rates (r) ranging from 0.001 to 0.2 MPa/s. The samples were either rapidly quenched after decompression or annealed for various times (tA) at final conditions (1 to 72 h) before quenching. The volatile-bearing starting glasses and the partially degassed experimental glasses were analyzed by electron microprobe (e.g. Cl-, S-content), IR-spectroscopy (H2O content) and SIMS (δ34S). The gas-melt isotope fractionation factors (αg-m) were estimated following Holloway and Blank [2] and utilizing mass balance calculations. The results show that αg-m remains constant within error over the investigated range of r and tA, reflecting fluid-melt equilibrium fractionation of S isotopes for given T and fO2. Data obtained for oxidizing conditions (~QFM+4) are in agreement with observations in arc magmas [3] and close to what is predicted by previous theoretical and experimental data [4; 5; 6]; e.g. a α(SO2 gas - SO42

  7. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  8. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  9. Advanced method for making vitreous waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, J.M.; Harrison, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for making waste glass that circumvents the problems of dissolving nuclear waste in molten glass at high temperatures. Because the reactive mixing process is independent of the inherent viscosity of the melt, any glass composition can be prepared with equal facility. Separation of the mixing and melting operations permits novel glass fabrication methods to be employed.

  10. Integrating Glass Technology into Secondary School Technology Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacker, Michael; Grey, Paul

    1985-01-01

    Processing of the three major groups of modern glasses is described. Low-melting-point glasses and the roles of their ingredients are discussed. Other processes (calcining, melting, fining the batch, annealing, testing for stress, colorants) are explained. Finally, a secondary-level pilot program for glass technology is suggested. (CT)

  11. Estimation of Slow Crack Growth Parameters for Constant Stress-Rate Test Data of Advanced Ceramics and Glass by the Individual Data and Arithmetic Mean Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Holland, Frederic A.

    1997-01-01

    The two estimation methods, individual data and arithmetic mean methods, were used to determine the slow crack growth (SCG) parameters (n and D) of advanced ceramics and glass from a large number of room- and elevated-temperature constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') test data. For ceramic materials with Weibull modulus greater than 10, the difference in the SCG parameters between the two estimation methods was negligible; whereas, for glass specimens exhibiting Weibull modulus of about 3, the difference was amplified, resulting in a maximum difference of 16 and 13 %, respectively, in n and D. Of the two SCG parameters, the parameter n was more sensitive to the estimation method than the other. The coefficient of variation in n was found to be somewhat greater in the individual data method than in the arithmetic mean method.

  12. Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry. Phase 2: Prototype design, development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Koppang, R.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes an advanced multichannel, on-line optical system for the non-contact measurement of forehearth glass melt temperatures at depth. The analyzer employs multiple narrow infrared (IR) band measurements of glass radiation to reconstruct the glass temperature profiles at depth. The TAS replaces expensive Tri-plex thermocouples, which frequently have service lives as short as 6 months to 1 years. By using passive non-contact sensor heads and fiber optic cables, temperature sensitive electronic components can be located at a safe distance from the hostile process environment. This provides significantly better reliability of the vulnerable electro-optic components and ready access for maintenance.

  13. Space processing of chalcogenide glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Schramm, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technique of space processing for chalcogenide glass, and to define the process and equipment necessary. In the course of this program, successful long term levitation of objects in a 1-g environment was achieved. Glass beads 4 mm diameter were containerless melted and fused together.

  14. Probing and Modeling of Pressure-induced Structural Transformation in Oxide Melts at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Lee, S.; Mysen, B.; Fei, Y.; Eng, P.

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced bonding transitions in oxide melts give improved prospects for the non-linear pressure dependence of their macroscopic transport properties in the earth's interior. The inherent difficulties of current experimental technologies, however, pose major challenges for probing structural changes of prototypical model oxide melts at high pressure, making it one of the unsolved problems in geophysics. Recent advances in element specific experimental probe of local structures, such as high resolution solid- state NMR and x-ray Raman scattering unveils new structural insights into the pressure-induced changes in the bonding nature (either gradual or abrupt) of the archetypal oxides melts (e.g. Lee SK et al. Proc. Nat. Aca. Sci. 2008, 105, 7925; Lee SK et al. J. Phys. Chem. B. 2008 in press). Here, we report recent progress that we have made using these techniques. Non-random spatial distribution of aluminum in oxide glasses were for the first time revealed via through-space correlation NMR spectroscopy: four, five, six coordinated aluminums have differential proximity among each other but favoring the formation of clusters mainly composed of six coordinated Al. While silicate glasses studied here exhibit a general trend of decreasing non-bridging oxygen fraction with pressure, the details of their pressure dependence is significantly affected by the composition of melts, such as Na/Si, Si/Al ratio as well as types of network modifying cations. We account for these differences with a conceptual model that utilizes pressure flexibility (the resistance to structural changes with increased pressurization). An oxide melts with a large pressure flexibility, thus, may undergo a gradual structural transformation. In contrast, a melts with the opposite behavior undergoes an abrupt coordination transformation. The observed information of connectivity among network forming cations was used to calculate the crystal-melt partitioning coefficient and activity of silica in

  15. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  16. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Foaming Theory and Mitigation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.K.

    2001-07-24

    The objective of this research is to enhance the basic understanding of the role of glass chemistry, including the chemical kinetics of pre-melting, solid state reactions, batch melting, and the reaction pathways in glass and/or acid addition strategy changes on the overall melting process for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Macrobatch 3 (MB3).

  17. DWPF Melt Cell Crawler

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2003-04-08

    On December 2, 2002, Remote and Specialty Equipment Systems (RSES) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested to build a remotely operated crawler to assist in cleaning the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melt cell floor of glass, tools, and other debris. The crawler was to assist a grapple and vacuum system in cleaning the cell. The crawler was designed to push glass and debris into piles so that the grapple could pick up the material and place it in waste bins. The crawler was also designed to maneuver the end of the vacuum hose, if needed. In addition, the crawler was designed to clean the area beneath the cell worktable that was inaccessible to the grapple and vacuum system. Originally, the system was to be ready for deployment by December 17. The date was moved up to December 12 to better utilize the available time for clean up. The crawler was designed and built in 10 days and completed cleaning the melt cell in 8 days. Due to initial problems with the grapple and vacuum system, the crawler completed essentially all of the cleanup tasks by itself. The crawler also cleaned an area on the west side of the cell that was not initially slated for cleaning.

  18. Glass Furnace Model Version 2

    2003-05-06

    GFM2.0 is a derivative of the GFM code with substantially altered and enhanced capabilities. Like its predecessor, it is a fully three-dimensional, furnace simulation model that provides a more accurate representation of the entire furnace, and specifically, the glass melting process, by coupling the combustion space directly to the glass batch and glass melt via rigorous radiation heat transport models for both the combustion space and the glass melt. No assumptions are made with regardmore » to interfacial parameters of heat, flux, temperature distribution, and batch coverage as must be done using other applicable codes available. These critical parameters are calculated. GFM2.0 contains a processor structured to facilitate use of the code, including the entry of teh furnace geometry and operating conditions, the execution of the program, and display of the computational results. Furnace simulations can therefore be created in a straightforward manner.« less

  19. Academe's Glass Ceiling: Societal, Professional-Organizational, and Institutional Barriers to the Career Advancement of Academic Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Olga; Cummings, William

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 10 national systems of higher education found that less than 10 percent of professors were women, and the proportion of female professors was negatively related to institutional prestige. This academic "glass ceiling" was related to women's shorter careers, tenure issues during hard times, and women's lower level of academic…

  20. Surface Conductive Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the properties of surface-conducting glass and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on glass substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  1. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of

  2. Wearing blue light-blocking glasses in the evening advances circadian rhythms in the patients with delayed sleep phase disorder: An open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Yuichi; Kitajima, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Koike, Shigefumi; Nakao, Yasumi; Tsuchiya, Akiko; Hirose, Marina; Iwata, Nakao

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently discovered that blue wavelengths form the portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum that most potently regulates circadian rhythm. We investigated the effect of blue light-blocking glasses in subjects with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). This open-label trial was conducted over 4 consecutive weeks. The DSPD patients were instructed to wear blue light-blocking amber glasses from 21:00 p.m. to bedtime, every evening for 2 weeks. To ascertain the outcome of this intervention, we measured dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and actigraphic sleep data at baseline and after the treatment. Nine consecutive DSPD patients participated in this study. Most subjects could complete the treatment with the exception of one patient who hoped for changing to drug therapy before the treatment was completed. The patients who used amber lens showed an advance of 78 min in DLMO value, although the change was not statistically significant (p = 0.145). Nevertheless, the sleep onset time measured by actigraph was advanced by 132 min after the treatment (p = 0.034). These data suggest that wearing amber lenses may be an effective and safe intervention for the patients with DSPD. These findings also warrant replication in a larger patient cohort with controlled observations. PMID:27322730

  3. Epoxy/Glass Fiber Laminated Composites Integrated with Amino Functionalized ZrO2 for Advanced Structural Applications.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sudipta; Ahemad, Soyeb; Das, Subhankar; Wang, Jialai

    2016-01-27

    This work demonstrates the successful silanization of ZrO2 nanoparticles (ZN) and their incorporation in glass fiber/epoxy composites. Microscopic investigation under transmission electron microscope elucidates antiaggregation and size enhancement of silanized ZrO2 nanoparticles (SZNs). FTIR spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate the chemical nature of the SZNs prepared. EDX results reveal the presence of Si onto SZNs. Incorporation of SZNs shows a strong influence on tensile and flexural properties of hybrid multiscale glass fiber composite (SZGFRP) compared to that of the neat epoxy glass fiber composite (GFRP). A significant variation of tensile strength, stiffness, and toughness of ∼27%, 62%, and 110% is observed with respect to GFRP. Strength and modulus under bending are also enhanced to ∼22% and ∼38%, respectively. Failure mechanisms obtained from macroscopic and microscopic investigation demonstrate reduced interfacial delamination for SZGFRP. Additionally, increased roughness of the fiber surface in SZGFRP laminates produces better interfacial bonding arising from SZN incorporation in laminates. This symptomatic behavior exposes the espousal of organically modified ZrO2 to enhance the interfacial bonding for their use in next generation hybrid laminates. PMID:26714570

  4. Control of radioactive waste-glass melters

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D.F. ); Hrma, P. ); Bowan, B.W. II )

    1990-01-01

    Slurries of simulated high level radioactive waste and glass formers have been isothermally reacted and analyzed to identify the sequence of the major chemical reactions in waste vitrification, their effect on glass production rate, and the development of leach resistance. Melting rates of waste batches have been increased by the addition of reducing agents (formic acid, sucrose) and nitrates. The rate increases are attributable in part to exothermic reactions which occur at critical stages in the vitrification process. Nitrates must be balanced by adequate reducing agents to avoid the formation of persistent foam, which would destabilize the melting process. The effect of foaming on waste glass production rates is analyzed, and melt rate limitations defined for waste-glass melters, based upon measurable thermophysical properties. Minimum melter residence times required to homogenize glass and assure glass quality are much smaller than those used in current practice. Thus, melter size can be reduced without adversely affecting glass quality. Physical chemistry and localized heat transfer of the waste-glass melting process are examined, to refine the available models for predicting and assuring glass production rate. It is concluded that the size of replacement melters and future waste processing facilities can be significantly decreased if minimum heat transfer requirements for effective melting are met by mechanical agitation. A new class of waste glass melters has been designed, and proof of concept tests completed on simulated High Level Radioactive Waste slurry. Melt rates have exceeded 155 kg m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} with slurry feeds (32 lb ft{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}), and 229 kg kg m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} with dry feed (47 lb ft{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}). This is about 8 times the melt rate possible in conventional waste- glass melters of the same size. 39 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Infrared-transmitting fluoroaluminate glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng-Yin, Lin; He-Fang, Hu; Yi-Bo, Yuan

    1990-07-01

    The glass-forming ability in the system of RF2-AlF3-YF3 was studied. The relationships between some physical properties, including refractive index, density, characteristic temperatures and viscosity, and chemical composition are reported. The crystallization kinetics of glass in the melt-cooling and glass-reheating process are investigated. The experimental results show that this fluoroaluminate glass is characterized by a widely transparent region from 0.2 to 7 um, a low refractive index, a high Abbe's value and other good physical and chemical properties.

  6. Lunar volcanic glasses: scientific and resource potential. Abstracts of presented papers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delano, John W.; Heiken, Grant H.

    This workshop on lunar mare volcanism was the first since 1975 to deal with the major scientific advances that have occurred in this general subject, and the first ever to deal specifically with volcanic glasses. Lunar volcanic glasses are increasingly being recognized as the best geochemical and petrologic probes into the lunar mantle. Lunar volcanic glasses, of which 25 compositional varieties are presently known, appear to represent primary magmas that were produced by partial melting of differentiated mantle source regions at depths of perhaps 400 to 500 km. These high-magnesian picritic magmas were erupted onto the lunar surface in fire fountains associated with the release of indigenous lunar volatiles. The cosmic significance of this volatile component, in an otherwise depleted Moon, remains a lingering puzzle. The resource potential, if any, of the surface-correlated volatile sublimates on the volcanic glass spherules had not been systematically addressed prior to this workshop.

  7. Proceedings of a workshop on Lunar Volcanic Glasses: Scientific and Resource Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, John W. (Editor); Heiken, Grant H. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This workshop on lunar mare volcanism was the first since 1975 to deal with the major scientific advances that have occurred in this general subject, and the first ever to deal specifically with volcanic glasses. Lunar volcanic glasses are increasingly being recognized as the best geochemical and petrologic probes into the lunar mantle. Lunar volcanic glasses, of which 25 compositional varieties are presently known, appear to represent primary magmas that were produced by partial melting of differentiated mantle source regions at depths of perhaps 400 to 500 km. These high-magnesian picritic magmas were erupted onto the lunar surface in fire fountains associated with the release of indigenous lunar volatiles. The cosmic significance of this volatile component, in an otherwise depleted Moon, remains a lingering puzzle. The resource potential, if any, of the surface-correlated volatile sublimates on the volcanic glass spherules had not been systematically addressed prior to this workshop.

  8. The electronic structure of iron in rhyolitic glass at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Roskosz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The physical properties of silicate melts within the Earth's mantle affect the chemical and thermal evolution of the Earth's interior. The behavior of iron in mantle melts is poorly understood, but can be experimentally approximated by iron-bearing silicate glasses. Previous studies have conflicting conclusions on whether iron in lower mantle silicate melts goes through a high-spin to low-spin transition [1-3]. Additionally, the average coordination environment of iron in glasses is poorly constrained. XANES experiments on MORB glasses have demonstrated that both four and six-fold coordinated iron may exist in significant amounts regardless of oxidation state [4] while conventional Mossbauer experiments have observed five-fold coordinated Fe2+ with small amounts of four and six-fold coordinated Fe2+[5]. In an attempt to resolve these discrepancies, we have measured the hyperfine parameters of iron-bearing rhyolitic glass up to ~115 GPa in a neon pressure medium using time-resolved synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory, IL). Our spectra are well explained with a three-doublet model: two high-spin Fe2+-like sites with distinct quadrupole splittings and similar isomer shifts and one high-spin Fe3+-like site. Our results indicate that iron experiences changes in coordination with increasing pressure without undergoing a high-spin to low-spin transition. With the assumption that silicate glasses can be used to model structural behavior in silicate melts, our study predicts that iron in chemically-complex silica-rich melts in the lower mantle likely exists in a high-spin state. References: [1] Nomura, R. et al., Nature 473 (2011). [2] Gu, C. et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 (2012). [3] Mao, Z. et al., Am. Mineral. 99 (2014). [4] Wilke, M. et al., Chem. Geology 220 (2005). [5] Cottrell, E. and Kelley, A.K., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 305 (2011).

  9. Advanced waste form and melter development for treatment of troublesome high-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, James; Kim, Dong -Sang; Maio, Vincent

    2015-09-02

    A number of waste components in US defense high level radioactive wastes (HLW) have proven challenging for current Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) operations and have limited the ability to increase waste loadings beyond already realized levels. Many of these "troublesome" waste species cause crystallization in the glass melt that can negatively impact product quality or have a deleterious effect on melter processing. Recent efforts at US Department of Energy laboratories have focused on understanding crystallization behavior within HLW glass melts and investigating approached to mitigate the impacts of crystallization so that increases in waste loading can be realized. Advanced glass formulations have been developed to highlight the unique benefits of next-generation melter technologies such as the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Crystal-tolerant HLW glasses have been investigated to allow sparingly soluble components such as chromium to crystallize in the melter but pass out of the melter before accumulating.

  10. Effect of solvent on melting gel behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnah, Ahmed Abdulaziz

    Melting gel and hybrid glass are organic-inorganic materials derived from sol gel processing. The behavior of the melting gel is that it is a solid at room temperature, but when the melting gel is reheated to 110°C (T1) it becomes fluid. The melting gel has reversible behavior due to incomplete crosslinking between polysiloxane chains. When the melting gel is heated to its consolidation temperature of 150°C (T2) the gel no longer softens (T2>T1), because crosslinking is completed. The melting gel at the consolidation temperature becomes hybrid glass. Melting gel coatings were applied to titanium alloy substrates. Melting gels were prepared containing phenyl substitutions with 1.0 mole Phenyltrimethoxysilane (PhTMS) in ratio to 0.25 moles of Diphenyldimethoxysilane (DPhDMS). The methanol to DPhDMS ratio was varied to change the thickness of the coatings. The coatings were inspected visually to see that there is good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Nanoindenter tests were performed to determine hardness. The coated samples were placed in an oven and heated to 150ºC for 24, 48 or 96 hours before cooling back to room temperature, which took about 4 hours. The measurements of the hardness on samples containing 3 levels of solvent and heat treatment were collected by indentation technique. The best combination of solvent and temperature was 1:8 PhTMS:MeOH for all temperatures.

  11. Glass produced by underground nuclear explosions. [Rainier

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, L.; Piwinskii, A.; Ryerson, F.; Tewes, H.; Beiriger, W.

    1983-01-01

    Detonation of an underground nuclear explosive produces a strong shock wave which propagates spherically outward, vaporizing the explosive and nearby rock and melting, the surrounding rock. The vaporized material expands adiabatically, forming a cavity. As the energy is dissipated during the cavity formation process, the explosive and rock debris condense and mix with the melted rock. The melt flows to the bottom of the cavity where it is quenched by fractured rock fragments falling from above as the cavity collapses. Measurements indicate that about 740 tonnes of rock and/or soil are melted for every kiloton (10/sup 12/ calories) of explosive energy, or about 25% of the explosive energy goes to melting rock. The resulting glass composition reflects the composition of the unaltered rock with explosive debris. The appearance ranges from white pumice to dense, dark lava. The bulk composition and color vary with the amount of explosive iron incorporated into the glass. The refractory explosion products are mixed with the solidified melt, although the degree of mixing is variable. Electron microprobe studies of glasses produced by Rainier in welded tuff have produced the following results: glasses are dehydrated relative to the host media, glasses are extremely heterogeneous on a 20 ..mu..m scale, a ubiquitous feature is the presence of dark marble-cake regions in the glass, which were locally enriched in iron and may be related to the debris, optically amorphous regions provide evidence of shock melting, only limited major element redistribution and homogenization occur within the cavity.

  12. Constant permeability of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting

    SciTech Connect

    Bitoh, T.; Shibata, D.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting on the soft magnetic properties of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by casting has been investigated. Ring-shaped bulk specimens that were prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting (fluxed specimens) show a flat hysteresis curve, indicating a good linear relationship between the magnetic induction and the applied magnetic field. Although the permeability of the fluxed specimens is lower than that of the specimens prepared by conventional Cu-mold casting by one order of magnitude, their coercivities are almost same. These results show that it is possible to develop a new soft magnetic material that exhibits constant permeability with low core loss.

  13. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonterman, J. Ronald; Weinstein, Michael A.

    2006-10-27

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the energy efficiency and reduced emissions that can be obtained with a dual torch DC plasma transferred arc-melting system. Plasmelt Glass Technologies, LLC was formed to solicit and execute the project, which utilize a full-scale test melter system. The system is similar to the one that was originally constructed by Johns Manville, but Plasmelt has added significant improvements to the torch design and melter system that has extended the original JM short torch lives. The original JM design has been shown to achieve melt rates 5 to 10 times faster than conventional gas or electric melting, with improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. This project began on 7/28/2003 and ended 7/27/06. A laboratory scale melter was designed, constructed, and operated to conduct multiple experimental melting trials on various glass compositions. Glass quality was assessed. Although the melter design is generic and equally applicable to all sectors within the glass industry, the development of this melter has focused primarily on fiberglass with additional exploratory melting trials of frits, specialty, and minerals-melting applications. Throughput, energy efficiency, and glass quality have been shown to be heavily dependent on the selected glass composition. During this project, Plasmelt completed the proof-of-concept work in our Boulder, CO Lab to show the technical feasibility of this transferred-arc plasma melter. Late in the project, the work was focused on developing the processes and evaluating the economic viability of plasma melting aimed at the specific glasses of interest to specific client companies. Post project work is on going with client companies to address broader non-glass materials such as refractories and industrial minerals. Exploratory melting trials have been conducted on several glasses of commercial interest including: C-glass, E-glass, S-Glass, AR-Glass, B-glass, Lighting Glass, NE-Glass, and various

  14. Atomistic and Nanoscale Origins of Macroscopic Properties of Silicate Melts at High-Pressure: Spectroscopy & Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Fei, Y.; Cody, G.; Mysen, B.; Mao, H.; Eng, P.

    2005-12-01

    Atomic structure of amorphous oxide melts at high pressure controls their macroscopic properties and geophysical progresses in the Earth's interior. Advances in NMR spectroscopy, x-ray optics, and theoretical analyses enable us to determine the structure of silicate glasses and provides clues to the microscopic origins of melt properties and relevant geochemical processes, such as generation, migration, and dynamics of magmas at high pressures (e.g. Lee et al. Geophy. Res. Letts. 2003, 30, p1845; Lee et al. Phys. Rev. Letts. 2005, 94, p165507; Lee et al. Nature Materials 2005, accepted). Here we report recent progress on pressure-induced structural changes in various amorphous oxide glasses and melt at high pressures using multi-nuclear solid state NMR, and synchrotron X-rays, and quantum simulations. In prototypical amorphous borates, and silicates, as well as complex aluminosilicate glasses and melts, the fractions of highly coordinated framework units (e.g. five coordinated [5,6]Si, [5,6]Al, [4]B) increase with increasing pressure with multiple densification mechanisms. The distribution of these framework cations at high pressure is not completely random but favors formation of oxygen linking dissimilar Si pairs such as [5,6]Si-O-[4]Al. Whereas the general trend in the effect of pressure on the structure is similar in those amorphous oxides, detailed pressure-induced structural changes are largely dependent on the degree of polymerization in the melts, types and fractions of network modifying cations at isobaric conditions. Topological disorder due to Si-O bond length distribution increases with pressure and is also larger for more polymerized amorphous oxides. Na-23 NMR spectra for sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses revealed that Na-O distance in the binary sodium silicates increases with pressure but that in the aluminosilicate glasses decreases with pressure. These results demonstrate that the pressure-induced structural changes in the silicate melts

  15. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    1993-01-01

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

  16. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, T.D.

    1993-12-14

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

  17. Measurement of DWPF glass viscosity - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.

    2000-02-17

    This report details the results of a scoping study funded by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for the measurement of melt viscosities for simulated glasses representative of Macrobatch 2 (Tank 42/51 feed).

  18. The effect of spatially variable surfaces on PAR transmission, solar heating and primary production under first-year sea ice during advanced stages of melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossnagel, A.; Barber, D. G.; Mundy, C. J.; Ehn, J.; Gosselin, M.

    2009-12-01

    Melt ponds greatly increase the transmission of solar radiation through sea ice relative to snow covered or bare ice. This rise in transmitted irradiance has the potential to enhance solar heating of the underlying ocean and to increase water column primary production. In this paper we examine how a spatially variable melt pond-covered sea ice surface controls the under-ice light field of transmitted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and provide estimates of solar heating and primary production during this period. Data for this study were collected as part of the International Polar Year-Circumpolar Flaw Lead system study between 2 to 27 June 2008 in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. Conductivity, temperature, depth and PAR profiles were collected under a variety of drained white ice through to deep melt pond surfaces to a depth of 60 m. Melt pond depths and ice thickness ranged from 4 to 30 cm and 90 to 160 cm, respectively. The under-ice light field up to a depth of 12 m was highly variable, controlled by both increased transmission under melt ponds and shading by drained white ice patches between the ponds. Below 12 m, the light field became relatively homogeneous showing the depth to which the spatial heterogeneity of the surface had an effect on the transmitted PAR irradiance. This variable light field influenced the calculation of the attenuation coefficient (Kd) rendering it impossible to accurately estimate this apparent optical property from a single PAR profile. Therefore spatial variations in the ice properties and transmission have little effect on the light field below about 10-15m.

  19. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1986-01-01

    Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan.

  20. Sinterable. beta. - spodumene glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Knickerbocker, S.; Tuzzolo, M.R.; Lawhorne, S. . East Fishkill Lab.)

    1989-10-01

    This paper reports on {beta}-Spodumene glass-ceramic compositions melted and studied. Compositional variations were made in the three major components as well as through minor additions of other oxides. Sintering characteristics and microstructures were studied and values for crystallization temperature, melting temperature, and crystallized thermal expansion coefficient were recorded. It was found that sinterable {beta}-spodumene glass-ceramics could be made with a wide range of properties. Selection of an appropriate composition would be based on desired properties.

  1. Picritic glasses from Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Weber, W.S.; Dixon, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    ESTIMATES of the MgO content of primary Hawaiian tholeiitic melts range from 8wt% to as high as 25wt% (refs 1, 2). In general, these estimates are derived from analysis of the whole-rock composition of lavas, coupled with the compositions of the most magnesian olivine phenocrysts observed. But the best estimate of magma composition comes from volcanic glass, as it represents the liquid composition at the time of quenching; minimal changes occur during the quenching process. Here we report the discovery of tholeiitic basalt glasses, recovered offshore of Kilauea volcano, that contain up to 15.0 wt% MgO. To our knowledge, these are the most magnesian glasses, and have the highest eruption temperatures (??? 1,316 ??C), yet found. The existence of these picritic (high-MgO) liquids provides constraints on the temperature structure of the upper mantle, magma transport and the material and thermal budgets of the Hawaiian volcanoes. Furthermore, picritic melts are affected little by magma-reservoir processes, and it is therefore relatively straightforward to extrapolate back to the composition of the primary melt and its volatile contents.

  2. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  3. Study of the production of unique new glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happe, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A number of high new oxide glasses have been prepared by a laser-spin melting technique where droplets are ejected from a molten mass. Techniques have been developed for measuring the optical properties of most of the new glasses so produced. A preliminary study of processing equipment for producing new glasses in a zero gravity environment onboard manned space laboratory is reported. Induction and laser melting emerge as preferred techniques for melting spheroids of new glass compositions in space. Sample calculations for power required to induction melt new glass compositions are presented. Cooling rate calculations show that radiation cooling of the high melting materials results in very short cooling times for 1/2 inch diameters to temperatures where the spheroids can be handled.

  4. Volcanic Glasses: Construction Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Samuel E.

    1998-01-01

    Natural glass is the product of rapidly cooled molten rock. Two natural sources of the melt are volcanic eruption and meteoritic impact. Pure glass is an amorphous aggregate. Volcanic glass is a material that could be utilized in the construction of extraterrestrial outposts. Pumice and perlite are volcanic glasses currently used in the building industry. Samples of natural volcanic glass found in the lunar regolith were returned to Earth as part of the Apollo and Luna programs. An alpha proton X-ray spectrometer onboard the Pathfinder recently examined martian rocks located in the vicinity of the lander craft. Preliminary results of chemical composition by weight of SiO2 50-55%, Al203 11-13%, K20 1-2%, Na20 2-5%, CaO 4-6%, MgO 3-7%, FeO 12-14%, S03 2-5%, and MnO <1% were given for two rocks. Parenthetically, the values for K and Mn were perhaps too high, and the analysis was based on X-ray data only. The appreciable amount of silica already found on Mars and empirical evidence to support the hypothesis that the planet once had water sufficient to rapidly cool magma imply the possibility of discovering natural glass of volcanic origin in subsequent missions.

  5. Glass sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S.

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  6. Spectral characteristics of lunar impact melts - Implications for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, S.; Pieters, C. M.; Ryder, G.

    1997-03-01

    Remote geochemical mapping of lunar impact melt associated with complex craters may provide a key to a better understanding of impact melt formation and the impact cratering process. Ground-based NIR spectra and Clementine multispectral images provide high-resolution spectral and spatial information, respectively, about lunar impact melts. As part of an effort towards improving our ability to interpret these data, two suites of lunar samples have been measured in NASA's Reflectance Experiment Laboratory (RELAB) at Brown University. The samples include seven Apollo 17 crystalline impact melts as well as synthesized glass equivalents and 15 naturally occurring impact melts from four landing sites. The naturally occurring melts have a range of textures and compositions related to glass abundance.

  7. Display innovations through glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Lori L.

    2016-03-01

    Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in glass design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for glass manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.

  8. Towards increased waste loading in high level waste glasses: Developing a better understanding of crystallization behavior

    DOE PAGES

    Marra, James C.; Kim, Dong -Sang

    2014-12-18

    A number of waste components in US defense high level radioactive wastes (HLW) have proven challenging for current Joule heated ceramic melter (JCHM) operations and have limited the ability to increase waste loadings beyond already realized levels. Many of these ''troublesome'' waste species cause crystallization in the glass melt that can negatively impact product quality or have a deleterious effect on melter processing. Thus, recent efforts at US Department of Energy laboratories have focused on understanding crystallization behavior within HLW glass melts and investigating approaches to mitigate the impacts of crystallization so that increases in waste loading can be realized.more » Advanced glass formulations have been developed to highlight the unique benefits of next-generation melter technologies such as the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Crystal-tolerant HLW glasses have been investigated to allow sparingly soluble components such as chromium to crystallize in the melter but pass out of the melter before accumulating. The Hanford site AZ-101 tank waste composition represents a waste group that is waste loading limited primarily due to high concentrations of Fe2O3 (with higher Al2O3). Systematic glass formulation development utilizing slightly higher process temperatures and higher tolerance to spinel crystals demonstrated that an increase in waste loading of more than 20% could be achieved for this waste composition, and by extension higher loadings for wastes in the same group.« less

  9. Towards increased waste loading in high level waste glasses: Developing a better understanding of crystallization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, James C.; Kim, Dong -Sang

    2014-12-18

    A number of waste components in US defense high level radioactive wastes (HLW) have proven challenging for current Joule heated ceramic melter (JCHM) operations and have limited the ability to increase waste loadings beyond already realized levels. Many of these ''troublesome'' waste species cause crystallization in the glass melt that can negatively impact product quality or have a deleterious effect on melter processing. Thus, recent efforts at US Department of Energy laboratories have focused on understanding crystallization behavior within HLW glass melts and investigating approaches to mitigate the impacts of crystallization so that increases in waste loading can be realized. Advanced glass formulations have been developed to highlight the unique benefits of next-generation melter technologies such as the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Crystal-tolerant HLW glasses have been investigated to allow sparingly soluble components such as chromium to crystallize in the melter but pass out of the melter before accumulating. The Hanford site AZ-101 tank waste composition represents a waste group that is waste loading limited primarily due to high concentrations of Fe2O3 (with higher Al2O3). Systematic glass formulation development utilizing slightly higher process temperatures and higher tolerance to spinel crystals demonstrated that an increase in waste loading of more than 20% could be achieved for this waste composition, and by extension higher loadings for wastes in the same group.

  10. Melt-processing of lunar ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabes, B. D.; Poisl, W. H.; Allen, D.; Minitti, M.; Hawley, S.; Beck, T.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to produce useful ceramics materials from lunar resources using the by products of lunar oxygen production processes. Emphasis is being placed on both fabrication of a variety of melt-processed ceramics, and on understanding the mechanical properties of these materials. Previously, glass-ceramics were formed by casting large glass monoliths and heating these to grow small crystallites. The strengths of the resulting glass-ceramics were found to vary with the inverse square root of the crystal grain size. The highest strengths (greater than 300 MPa) were obtained with the smallest crystal sizes (less than 10 microns). During the past year, the kinetics of crystallization in simulated lunar regolith were examined in an effort to optimize the microstructure and, hence, mechanical properties of glass ceramics. The use of solar energy for melt-processing of regolith was examined, and strong (greater than 630 MPa) glass fibers were successfully produced by melt-spinning in a solar furnace. A study of the mechanical properties of simulated lunar glasses was completed during the past year. As on Earth, the presence of moisture was found to weaken simulated lunar glasses, although the effects of surface flaws was shown to outweigh the effect of atmospheric moisture on the strength of lunar glasses. The effect of atmospheric moisture on the toughness was also studied. As expected, toughness was found to increase only marginally in an anhydrous atmosphere. Finally, our efforts to involve undergraduates in the research lab fluorished this past year. Four undergraduates worked on various aspects of these projects; and two of them were co-authors on papers which we published.

  11. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Yttrium Aluminum Borate Glasses and Glass-ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J.; Brooks, M.; Crenshaw, T.; Morris, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Morgan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Raman spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics in the Y2O3-Al2O3-B2O3 system are reported. Glasses with B2O3 contents ranging from 40 to 60 mole percent were prepared by melting 20 g of the appropriate oxide or carbonate powders in alumina crucibles at 1400 C for 45 minutes. Subsequent heat treatments of the glasses at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C were performed in order to induce nucleation and crystallization. It was found that Na2CO3 added to the melt served as a nucleating agent and resulted in uniform bulk crystallization. The Raman spectra of the glasses are interpreted primarily in terms of vibrations of boron - oxygen structural groups. Comparison of the Raman spectra of the glass-ceramic samples with spectra of aluminate and borate crystalline materials reveal that these glasses crystallize primarily as yttrium aluminum borate, YAl3(BO3)4.

  12. Development of iodine waste forms using low-temperature sintering glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Rademacher, David

    2010-06-01

    This presentation will describe our recent work on the use of low temperature-sintering glass powders mixed with either AgI or AgI-zeolite to produce a stable waste form. Radioactive iodine ({sup 129}I, half-life of 1.6 x 10{sup 7} years) is generated in the nuclear fuel cycle and is of particular concern due to its extremely long half-life and its effects on human health. As part of the DOE/NE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the separation of {sup 129}I from spent fuel during fuel reprocessing is being studied. In the spent fuel reprocessing scheme under consideration, the iodine is released in gaseous form and collected using Ag-loaded zeolites, to form AgI. Although AgI has extremely low solubility in water, it has a relatively high vapor pressure at moderate temperatures (>550 C), thus limiting the thermal processing. Because of this, immobilization using borosilicate glass is not feasible. Therefore, a bismuth oxide-based glasses are being studied due to the low solubility of bismuth oxide in aqueous solution at pH > 7. These waste forms were processed at 500 C, where AgI volatility is low but the glass powder is able to first densify by viscous sintering and then crystallize. Since the glass is not melted, a more chemically stable glass can be used. The AgI-glass mixture was found to have high iodine leach resistance in these initial studies.

  13. Method for forming glass-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Daniel P.; Massey, Richard T.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

  14. Method for forming glass-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1985-08-26

    Disclosed is a method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

  15. Origin of sapphires from a lamprophyre dike at Yogo Gulch, Montana, USA: Clues from their melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palke, Aaron C.; Renfro, Nathan D.; Berg, Richard B.

    2016-09-01

    Gem corundum (sapphire) has been mined from an ultramafic lamprophyre dike at Yogo Gulch in central Montana for over 100 years. The sapphires bear signs of corrosion showing that they were not in equilibrium with the lamprophyre that transported them; however, their genesis is poorly understood. We report here the observation of minute glassy melt inclusions in Yogo sapphires. These inclusions are Na- and Ca-rich, Fe-, Mg-, and K-poor silicate glasses with compositions unlike that of the host lamprophyre. Larger, recrystallized melt inclusions contain analcime and calcite drawing a striking resemblance to leucocratic ocelli in the lamprophyre. We suggest here that sapphires formed through partial melting of Al-rich rocks, likely as the lamprophyre pooled at the base of the continental crust. This idea is corroborated by MELTS calculations on a kyanite-eclogite protolith which was presumably derived from a troctolite precursor. These calculations suggest that corundum can form through peritectic melting of kyanite. Linking the melt inclusions petrologically to the lamprophyre represents a significant advancement in our understanding of sapphire genesis and sheds light on how mantle-derived magmas may interact with the continental crust on their ascent to the surface.

  16. Porosity in metal-organic framework glasses.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A W; Jelfs, K E; Konstas, K; Doherty, C M; Hill, A J; Cheetham, A K; Bennett, T D

    2016-03-01

    The porosity of a glass formed by melt-quenching a metal-organic framework, has been characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The results reveal porosity intermediate between the related open and dense crystalline frameworks ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni. A structural model for the glass was constructed using an amorphous polymerization algorithm, providing additional insight into the gas-inaccessible nature of porosity and the possible applications of hybrid glasses.

  17. Analysis of leading edge and trailing edge cover glass samples before and after treatment with advanced satellite contamination removal techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotaling, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    Two samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment M0003-4 were analyzed for molecular and particulate contamination prior to and following treatment with advanced satellite contamination removal techniques (CO2 gas/solid jet spray and oxygen ion beam). The pre- and post-cleaning measurements and analyses are presented. The jet spray removed particulates in seconds. The low energy reactive oxygen ion beam removed 5,000 A of photo polymerized organic hydrocarbon contamination in less than 1 hour. Spectroscopic analytical techniques were applied to the analysis of cleaning efficiency including: Fourier transform infrared, Auger, x ray photoemissions, energy dispersive x ray, and ultraviolet/visible. The results of this work suggest that the contamination studied here was due to spacecraft self-contamination enhanced by atomic oxygen plasma dynamics and solar UV radiation. These results also suggest the efficacy for the jet spray and ion beam contamination control technologies for spacecraft optical surfaces.

  18. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  19. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  20. Disequilibrium melt distributions during static recrystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walte, N. P.; Bons, P. D.; Passchier, C. W.; Koehn, D.; Arnold, J.

    2003-04-01

    DISEQUILIBRIUM MELT DISTRIBUTIONS DURING STATIC RECRYSTALLISATION N.P. Walte (1), P.D. Bons (2), C.W. Passchier (1), D. Koehn (1), J. Arnold (1) (1) Institute for Earth Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany, (2) Institute for Earth Sciences, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (walte@mail.uni-mainz.de) The geometry of melt-filled pores in a partially molten rock strongly controls the permeability, rheology and initial segregation of melt. Current theory for monomineralic aggregates, using only the wetting angle and melt fraction as parameters, predicts a perfectly regular melt framework or equally shaped melt inclusions on grain boundary junctions. However, published melt-present high-temperature experiments with rock forming minerals such as quartz or olivine show considerable deviations from this predicted regular equilibrium melt geometry. Disequilibrium features, such as fully wetted grain boundaries, melt lenses, and large melt patches have been described, and were attributed to surface energy anisotropy of the minerals. This study used static analogue experiments with norcamphor plus ethanol liquid, that allow continuous in-situ observation of the evolving distribution of melt during static recrystallisation. The liquid-crystal surface energy of norcamphor is effectively isotropic. For the experiments an approximately 0.1 mm thin sample of norcamphor plus ethanole was placed between two glass plates and observed with a miroscope. Ethanol was used as a melt analogue because it allows to run experiments at room temperature, avoiding any temperature gradients. The wetting angle is approximately 15°, which is well below 60° and within the range reported for quartz and olivine plus melt experiments. The experiments show that all described disequilibrium features can form during fluid-enhanced static recrystallisation, especially where surrounding grains consume small, few-sided grains. These features are unstable and transient: a

  1. Sol-Gel Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  2. Characteristics of glass ionomer cements composed of glass powders in CaO-SrO-ZnO-SiO₂ system prepared by two different synthetic routes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Coughlan, Aisling; Placek, Lana; Wren, Anthony W; Towler, Mark R

    2013-12-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are composed of an acid degradable glass, polyacrylic acid and water. Sol-gel processing to prepare the glass phase has certain advantages, such as the ability to employ lower synthesis temperatures than melt quenching and glasses that are reported to have higher purity. A previous study reported the effects of glass synthesis route on GIC fabrication. However, in that study, the sol-gel derived glass exhibited a reduced concentration of cations. This study investigates increasing the cation content of a sol-gel derived glass, 12CaO.4SrO.36ZnO.48SiO2 (molar ratio) by heating before aging to reduce dissolution of cations. This glass was prepared by both sol-gel and melt-quenched routes. GICs were subsequently prepared using both glasses. The resultant cement based on the sol-gel derived glass had a shorter working time than the cement based on the melt-quenched one. Contrary to this, setting time was considerably longer for the cement based on the sol-gel derived glass than for the cement based on the melt-quenched one. The cements based on the sol-gel derived glass were stronger in both compression and biaxial flexure than the cements prepared from the melt-quenched glass. The differences in setting and mechanical properties were associated with both cation content in the glass phase and the different surface area of the resultant cements.

  3. Mathematical modeling of cold cap: Effect of bubbling on melting rate

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-12-31

    The rate of melting is a primary concern in the vitrification of radioactive wastes because it directly influences the life cycle of nuclear waste cleanup efforts. To increase glass melting performance, experimental and industrial all-electric waste glass melters employ various melt-rate enhancement techniques, the most prominent being the application of bubblers submerged into molten glass. This study investigates various ways in which bubbling affects melting rate in a waste glass melter. Using the recently developed cold cap model, we suggest that forced convection of molten glass, which increases the cold cap bottom temperature, is the main factor. Other effects, such as stirring the feed into molten glass or reducing the insulating effect of foaming, also play a role.

  4. Space processing of chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Ali, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are discussed as good infrared transmitters, possessing the strength, corrosion resistance, and scale-up potential necessary for large 10.6-micron windows. The disadvantage of earth-produced chalcogenide glasses is shown to be an infrared absorption coefficient which is unacceptably high relative to alkali halides. This coefficient is traced to optical nonhomogeneities resulting from environmental and container contamination. Space processing is considered as a means of improving the infrared transmission quality of chalcogenides and of eliminating the following problems: optical inhomogeneities caused by thermal currents and density fluctuation in the l-g earth environment; contamination from the earth-melting crucible by oxygen and other elements deleterious to infrared transmission; and, heterogeneous nucleation at the earth-melting crucible-glass interface.

  5. Model for the conversion of nuclear waste melter feed to glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel

    2014-02-01

    The rate of batch-to-glass conversion is a primary concern for the vitrification of nuclear waste, as it directly influences the life cycle of the cleanup process. This study describes the development of an advanced model of the cold cap, which augments the previous model by further developments on the structure and the dynamics of the foam layer. The foam layer on the bottom of the cold cap consists of the primary foam, cavities, and the secondary foam, and forms an interface through which the heat is transferred to the cold cap. Other model enhancements include the behavior of intermediate crystalline phases and the dissolution of quartz particles. The model relates the melting rate to feed properties and melter conditions, such as the molten glass temperature, foaminess of the melt, or the heat fraction supplied to the cold cap from the plenum space. The model correctly predicts a 25% increase in melting rate when changing the alumina source in the melter feed from Al(OH)3 to AlO(OH). It is expected that this model will be incorporated in the full glass melter model as its integral component.

  6. Survey of glass plutonium contents and poison selection

    SciTech Connect

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.; Ellison, A.J.G.; Shaw, H.

    1996-05-01

    If plutonium and other actinides are to be immobilized in glass, then achieving high concentrations in the glass is desirable. This will lead to reduced costs and more rapid immobilization. However, glasses with high actinide concentrations also bring with them undersirable characteristics, especially a greater concern about nuclear criticality, particularly in a geologic repository. The key to achieving a high concentration of actinide elements in a glass is to formulate the glass so that the solubility of actinides is high. At the same time, the glass must be formulated so that the glass also contains neutron poisons, which will prevent criticality during processing and in a geologic repository. In this paper, the solubility of actinides, particularly plutonium, in three types of glasses are discussed. Plutonium solubilities are in the 2-4 wt% range for borosilicate high-level waste (HLW) glasses of the type which will be produced in the US. This type of glass is generally melted at relatively low temperatures, ca. 1150{degrees}C. For this melting temperature, the glass can be reformulated to achieve plutonium solubilities of at least 7 wt%. This low melting temperature is desirable if one must retain volatile cesium-137 in the glass. If one is not concerned about cesium volatility, then glasses can be formulated which can contain much larger amounts of plutonium and other actinides. Plutonium concentrations of at least 15 wt% have been achieved. Thus, there is confidence that high ({ge}5 wt%) concentrations of actinides can be achieved under a variety of conditions.

  7. Turning nuclear waste into glass

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, Ian L.

    2015-02-15

    Vitrification has emerged as the treatment option of choice for the most dangerous radioactive waste. But dealing with the nuclear waste legacy of the Cold War will require state-of-the-art facilities and advanced glass formulations.

  8. Chemistry of uranium in aluminophosphate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, H. D.; Balazs, G. B.; Williams, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    The U(VI)-U(V)-U(IV) redox equilibria are investigated in two sodium aluminophosphate base compositions at a variety of melt temperatures, imposed oxygen fugacities, and uranium contents. Results show that the higher redox states of uranium are quite soluble in the phosphate glasses, although U(IV) readily precipitates from the melts as UO2. In addition, comparisons of the uranium redox equilibria established in phosphate melts versus those in silicate melts shows that the coordination sites of the individual uranium species are generally the same in both solvent systems although they differ in detail.

  9. A chemical study of individual green glasses and brown glasses from 15426 - Implications for their petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, M.-S.; Liu, Y.-G.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Systematic chemical analyses of individual Apollo 15 green glasses were performed in order to: (1) study chemical variations among them; (2) understand their petrogenesis and source region; and (3) study their possible relationships with mare basalts in general. Brown glasses were also analyzed in order to study their chemical variations and their petrogenetic relationships to green glasses and mare basalts. The chemical composition of green and brown glasses is shown and variation diagrams of Sc, Cr2O3, FeO, and Co abundances in green glasses are presented. Igneous fractionation, two component magma mixing, and partial melting of heterogeneous source materials are alternate scenarios to explain strong observed correlations. The composition of green glasses indicates that they were derived by partial melting of the fractionated cumulate source materials formed from a magma ocean which had experienced certain degrees of olivine and plagioclase fractional crystallization.

  10. Crystallization in heat-treated fluorochlorozirconate glasses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JA; Weber, JKR; Kolesnikov, AI; Schweizer, S

    2009-01-01

    Crystallization phenomena of fluorochlorozirconate glasses were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and inelastic neutron scattering. The precipitation of barium chloride nanoparticles from the glass matrix upon heat treatment was found to be suppressed when re-melting the glass with a reducing agent but not if the agent was present in the initial synthesis. Addition of small amounts of oxide to the predominantly fluoride melt was found to maintain the presence of nanoparticles but not to induce the predicted phase transition of the barium chloride nanoparticles from hexagonal to orthorhombic structure. Inelastic neutron scattering performed on an ‘as-made’ glass and a heat-treated glass showed an increase in ‘hardness’, consistent with a more ordered structure. PMID:19789720

  11. Glass Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA technologies have played part in growth and cost containment of studio glass art, among them a foam type insulation developed to meet a need for lightweight material that would reduce flame spread in aircraft fire. Foam comes in several forms and is widely used by glass artists, chiefly as an insulator for the various types of ovens used in glass working. Another Spinoff is alumina crucibles to contain molten glass. Before alumina crucibles were used, glass tanks were made of firebrick which tended to erode under high temperatures and cause impurities; this not only improved quality but made the process more cost effective. One more NASA technology that found its way into glass art working is a material known as graphite board, a special form of graphite originally developed for rocket motor applications. This graphite is used to exact compound angles and creates molds for poured glass artworks of dramatic design.

  12. Spherulite Crystallization Induces Fe-Redox Redistribution in Silicic Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; Cottrell, E; Tuffen, H; Logan, A; Kelley, K

    2009-01-01

    Rhyolitic obsidians from Krafla volcano, Iceland, record the interaction between mobile hydrous species liberated during crystal growth and the reduction of ferric iron in the silicate melt. We performed synchrotron {mu}-FTIR and {mu}-XANES measurements along a transect extending from a spherulite into optically distinct colorless and brown glass zones. Measurements show that the colorless glass is enriched in OH groups and depleted in ferric iron, while the brown glass shows the opposite relationship. The color shift between brown and clear glass is sharp, suggesting that the colorless glass zone was produced by a redox front that originated from the spherulite margin and moved through surrounding melt during crystallization. We conclude that the most likely reducing agent is hydrogen, produced by magnetite crystallization within the spherulite. The Krafla obsidians dramatically capture redox disequilibrium on the micoscale and highlight the importance of hydrous fluid liberation and late-stage crystallization to the redox signature of glassy lavas.

  13. Origin of melt pockets in mantle xenoliths from southern Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliani, Paola; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Bjerg, Ernesto

    2009-12-01

    Peridotite mantle xenoliths collected north of Gobernador Gregores, Patagonia, affected by cryptic and modal metasomatism bear melt pockets of unusually large size. Melt pockets consist of second generation olivine (ol2), clinopyroxene (cpx2) and spinel (sp2) ± relict amphibole (amph) immersed in a yellowish vesicular glass matrix. Amphibole breakdown was responsible for melt pocket generation as suggested by textural evidence and proved by consistent mass-balance calculations: amph → cpx2 + ol2 + sp2 + melt. Composition of calculated amphibole in amphibole-free melt pockets is very similar to that measured in amphibole-bearing melt pockets from the same xenolith, i.e. amphibole was consumed in the melt pocket generation process. In melt pockets devoid of relict amphibole, mass-balance calculations show remarkable differences between the calculated amphibole and the measured amphibole compositions in melt pockets from the same xenolith. The participation of minor proportions of a consumed reactant phase could be a reasonable explanation. In some samples the calculated phase proportion of glass is in excess compared to modal estimations based on backscattered electron images, probably because a portion of the generated melt was able to migrate out of the melt pockets. Compositional inhomogeneity of cpx2 and variable Ti Kd in cpx2 vs. glass in the same melt pocket reflect fast nucleation and growth and disequilibrium crystallisation, respectively. This and the difference between forsterite content in calculated equilibrium olivine and second generation olivine, suggest that mineral equilibrium was inhibited by rapid quenching of melt pockets.

  14. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  15. Welding/sealing glass-enclosed space in a vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1996-02-06

    A method of welding and sealing the edges of two juxtaposed glass sheets together to seal a vacuum space between the sheets comprises the steps of positioning a radiation absorbent material, such as FeO, VO{sub 2}, or NiO, between the radiation transmissive glass sheets adjacent the edges and then irradiating the absorbent material, preferably with a laser beam, through at least one of the glass sheets. Heat produced by the absorbed radiation in the absorbent material melts glass in the portions of both glass sheets that are adjacent the absorbent material, and the melted glass from both sheets flows together to create the weld when the melted glass cools and hardens. The absorbent material can be dissolved and diffused into the melted glass to the extent that it no longer absorbs enough energy to keep the glass melted, thus, with appropriate proportioning of absorbent material to source energy power and welding heat needed, the process can be made self-stopping. 8 figs.

  16. Welding/sealing glass-enclosed space in a vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1996-01-01

    A method of welding and sealing the edges of two juxtaposed glass sheets together to seal a vacuum space between the sheets comprises the steps of positioning a radiation absorbant material, such as FeO, VO.sub.2, or NiO, between the radiation transmissive glass sheets adjacent the edges and then irradiating the absorbant material, preferably with a laser beam, through at least one of the glass sheets. Heat produced by the absorbed radiation in the absorbant material melts glass in the portions of both glass sheets that are adjacent the absorbant material, and the melted glass from both sheets flows together to create the weld when the melted glass cools and hardens. The absorbant material can be dissolved and diffused into the melted glass to the extent that it no longer absorbs enough energy to keep the glass melted, thus, with appropriate proportioning of absorbant material to source energy power and welding heat needed, the process can be made self-stopping.

  17. Preparation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors from oxide-glass precursors

    DOEpatents

    Hinks, David G.; Capone, II, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconductor and precursor therefor from oxide mixtures of Ca, Sr, Bi and Cu. Glass precursors quenched to elevated temperatures result in glass free of crystalline precipitates having enhanced mechanical properties. Superconductors are formed from the glass precursors by heating in the presence of oxygen to a temperature below the melting point of the glass.

  18. Glasses having a low non-linear refractive index for laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Faulstich, Marga; Jahn, Walter; Krolla, Georg; Neuroth, Norbert

    1980-01-01

    Glass composition ranges are described which permit the introduction of laser activators into fluorphosphate glass with exceptionally high fluorine content while forming glasses of high crystallization stability and permitting the realization of large melt volumes. The high fluorine content imparts to the glasses an exceptionally low nonlinear refractive index n.sub.2 down to O,4 .times.10.sup.-13 esu.

  19. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  20. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Bal, B Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B; Bonewald, Lynda F; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2011-06-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed.

  1. Transit Scratchitti Removal and Glass Resurfacing by Controlled Fire Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Seongchan; Hong, Shane Y.

    Scratchitti vandalism, a new type of graffiti vandalism, in public transits systems and city neighborhood is a serious problem. To solve this problem, an innovative approach was developed-controlled fire polishing, which incorporates a technique of localized softening and surface tension. Intensive heat is positioned near to the scratch marks on the glass panel. The heat melts a thin layer of glass into liquid, changing the glass’s viscosity to a formable state. The glass is melted to a level close to the depth of the scratch, and allowed to cool down naturally. During the cooling process, the surface tension of the melted glass will even out the scratching indent. After cooling, the glass will be as even and smooth as it was originally. The process will enable the reuse of the damaged window/door and eliminate the otherwise waste by replacement new glass.

  2. Infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of hydrous silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.

    1992-01-01

    The focus of this project is the combined appication of infrared spectroscopy and stable isotope geochemistry to the study of hydrogen-bearing species dissolved in silicate melts and glasses. We are conducting laboratory experiments aimed at determining the fractionation of D and H between melt species (OH and H{sub 2}O) and hydrous vapor and the diffusivities of these species in glasses and melts. Knowledge of these parameters is critical to understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes during igneous processes and hydrothermal processes. These results also could be valuable in application of glass technology to development of nuclear waste disposal strategies.

  3. Redox Processes in Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicconi, M. R.; de Ligny, D.

    2015-12-01

    Studies into the redox state of magmas provide important constrains on the formation and evolution of planetary bodies Indeed, oxygen fugacity is a key parameter in controlling the physical and chemical properties of melts and therefore it determine the possible interactions between reservoirs within the mantle and between the mantle and surface. It follows that redox mechanisms play a key role in determining the dynamics of the (inner and outer) terrestrial planets. The redox conditions that have accompanied basalt evolution on planetary bodies are known to be different, albeit with some similarities. The strongly reducing environments of the moon and meteorites have led to significant reduced mineralogical assemblages, whereas analogous terrestrial materials predominantly contain the corresponding oxidized compounds. Important geochemical elements such as Fe, Cr, V, Ce and Eu, exist in magmatic systems with different valences and coordination geometries, and the key subjects which need to be understood are: factors influencing redox mechanisms, and the effect on mineral assemblage, element partitioning, mass transfers processes and rheology of the melts. Examples on the study of Ce, Eu and Fe in silicate glasses/melts and on the parameters influencing their oxidation states will be provided.

  4. Reversing and nonreversing heat capacity of poly(lactic acid) in the glass transition region by TMDSC

    SciTech Connect

    Pyda, Marek {nmn}; Wunderlich, Bernhard {nmn}

    2005-11-01

    A study of the glass transition of an amorphous and a semicrystalline poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is performed with adiabatic calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and temperature-modulated DSC (TMDSC). The reversing, total, and nonreversing apparent heat capacities of samples with different contents of L- and D-lactic acid and with various thermal histories were evaluated. Different modes of TMDSC analyses of amorphous and semicrystalline PLA were compared to the total heat capacity from standard DSC. The enthalpy relaxation and the cold crystallization in the glass transition region are largely irreversible. The melting is largely irreversible, but a 100% reversing fraction is observed at low temperatures from 375 to 420 K, which becomes small inside the major melting peak at about 440 K. From the TMDSC of amorphous PLA, the combined information on endothermic and exothermic enthalpy relaxation and glass transition were deconvoluted into the reversing and nonreversing components. The glass transition temperature from the reversing heat capacity and the enthalpy relaxation peaks from the nonreversing component shift to higher temperature for increasingly annealed PLA. The relaxation times for aging decrease on cooling until the glass transition is reached and then increase. This behavior is linked to cooperativity. All quantitative thermal analyses are based on the heat capacity of the solid and liquid, evaluated earlier with the advanced thermal analysis system (ATHAS).

  5. Glasses in coarse-grained micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, M. E.; Kurat, G.

    2009-06-01

    Micrometeorites (MMs, interplanetary dust particles with 25 - 500 μm diameters) carry the main mass of extraterrestrial matter that is captured by Earth. The coarse-grained MMs mainly consist of olivine aggregates, which - as their counterparts in CC chondrites - also contain pyroxenes and glass. We studied clear glasses in four coarse-grained crystalline MMs (10M12, M92-6b, AM9, and Mc7-10), which were collected from the ice at Cap Prudhomme, Antarctica. Previous studies of glasses (e.g., glass inclusions trapped in olivine and clear mesostasis glass) in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites showed that these phases could keep memory of the physical-chemical conditions to which extraterrestrial matter was exposed. Here we compare the chemical compositions of MM glasses and glasses from CM chondrites with that in experimentally heated objects from the Allende CV chondrite and with glasses from cometary particles. Our results show that MMs were heated to variable degrees (during entry through the terrestrial atmosphere), which caused a range from very little chemical modification of the glass to total melting of the precursor object. Such modifications include dissolution of minerals in the melted glass precursor and some loss of volatile alkali elements. The chemical composition of all precursor glasses in the MMs investigated is not primitive such as glasses in CM and CR chondrite objects. It shows signs of pre-terrestrial chemical modification, e.g., metasomatic enrichments in Na and Fe 2+ presumably in the solar nebula. Glasses of MMs heated to very low degree have a chemical composition indistinguishable from that of glasses in comet Wild 2 particles; giving additional evidence that interplanetary dust (e.g., Antarctic MMs) possibly represents samples from comets.

  6. A Disequilibrium Melting Spectrum: Partially Melted Crustal Xenoliths from the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field, NE China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, C. L.; McGee, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Disequilibrium melting has been established as a common process occurring during crustal anatexis and thus demonstrates that crustal assimilation by ascending mantle-derived magmas is likley not a closed system. Observations of extreme compositional heterogeneity within partial melts derived from crustal xenoliths have been documented in several recent examples, however, the retention or transfer of elements to and from residues and glasses, and their relative contributions to potential crustal contaminants warrants further investigation. Sampled lavas from the Huoshaoshan volcano in the Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field of Northeast China contain crustal xenoliths which preserve a spectrum of partial melting both petrographically and geochemically, thus providing an excellent, natural example of crustal anatexis. Correlations exist between the volume of silicic glass preserved within the xenoliths and bulk rock SiO2 (70-83 wt%), Al2O3 (16-8 wt%), glass 87Sr/86Sr (0.715-0.908), abundances of elements common in feldspars and micas (Sr, Ba, Rb) and elements common in accessory minerals (Y, Zr, Nb). These correlations are likely associated with the consumption of feldspars and micas and the varying retention of accessory phases during partial melting. The xenoliths which contain the greater volumes of silicic glass and residual quartz (interpreted as being the most melted) were found within pahoehoe lava, whilst the least melted xenoliths were found within scoria of the summit cone of Huoshaoshan; thus it is interpreted that the extent of melting is linked to the immersion time in the lava. Small-scale (mm) mingling and transfer of material from the enclosing lava to the xenolith is observed, however, modelling of potential contaminant compositions is inconsistent with crustal contamination during lava petrogenesis. It is inferred that crustal contamination in sampled lavas is localized within the open magmatic system and most likely occurs at the contact zone

  7. The Role of CO2 on Silica Undersaturated Melt Structure: Implication for Melt Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, B.; Morizet, Y.; Paris, M.; Gaillard, F.

    2012-12-01

    Silica undersaturated melts such as nephelinite and melilitite are very peculiar magmatic materials. Their occurrence on the Earth surface is often associated with carbonatites melts. These low-silica melts can dissolve a large quantity of CO2 issued from mantle fluid metasomatism. However, the melt structure, the way CO2 dissolves into these melts and the effect of different alkalis element are poorly constrained. We present preliminary experimental results on the melt structure of synthetic nephelinite (NBO/T = 1.25) and Ca-melilitite (NBO/T = 2.50) synthesized in the NKCMAS system and equilibrated at high-pressure (200-300 MPa), high-temperature (1250°C) with an excess C-O-H fluid phase. The nephelinite glasses were synthesized with varying K2O / K2O+Na2O (0-10 mol.% K2O) ratio so as to investigate the differential effect of those two cations. All experiments were conducted under oxidizing conditions (ΔNNO+5) resulting in binary fluid phase composition with CO2 and H2O species. The silicate melt structure, CO2 solubility and speciation were investigated using Micro-Raman and Solid State NMR spectroscopies for 13C, 1H, 29Si, 27Al and 23Na nuclei. The replacement of Na by K does not change the nephelinite melt structure for volatile-free sample suggesting that the basicity of these glasses is not dramatically affected by the presence of mixed alkali. Within 5 mol.% K2O, the CO2 solubility (measured in relative to Raman signature of the melt structure) is only slightly affected with an increasing CO2 solubility with increasing K2O content. As a function of pressure, we observe an increase in CO2 solubility consistent with previous studies. The 13C NMR investigation of the CO2 speciation show three different carbonates environments for CO2 in nephelinite melts attributed to non-network carbonates: 1) 170 ppm shift assigned to NBO-carb. Na or K; 2) 169 ppm assigned to NBO-carb. Ca; and 3) 165 ppm assigned to isolated Na+..CO32- carbonates. As K2O is increased into

  8. Melting of Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Japel, S; Boehler, R

    2005-04-11

    We review the transition melting studies carried out at Mainz, and describe a recently developed model used to explain that the relatively low melting slopes are due to the partially filled d-bands, and the persistence of the pressure induced s-d transition. The basic tenets of the model have now been reconfirmed by new measurements for Cu and Ni. The measurements show that Cu which has a filled 3d-band, has a melt slope that is about 2.5 greater than its neighbor Ni. In the case of Mo, the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting can be explained by accounting for the change in melt slope due to the bcc-cp transition observed in the shock studies. The Fe melt curve is revisited. The possible relevance of the Jahn-Teller effect and recently observed transition metal melts with Icosahedral Short-Range Order (ISRO) is discussed.

  9. Probing the atomic structure of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1): Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Probing the structural disorder in multi-component silicate glasses and melts with varying composition is essential to reveal the change of macroscopic properties in natural silicate melts. While a number of NMR studies for the structure of multi-component silicate glasses and melts including basaltic and andesitic glasses have been reported (e.g., Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014, 26, 42), many challenges still remain. The composition of multi-component basaltic melts vary with temperature, pressure, and melt fraction (Kushiro, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 2001, 71, 107). Especially, the eutectic point (the composition of first melt) of nepheline-forsterite-quartz (the simplest model of basaltic melts) moves with pressure from silica-saturated to highly undersaturated and alkaline melts. The composition of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1, the xenolith from Kilbourne Hole) also vary with pressure. In this study we report experimental results for the effects of composition on the atomic structure of Na2O-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NMAS) glasses in nepheline (NaAlSiO4)-forsterite (Mg2SiO4)-quartz (SiO2) eutectic composition and basaltic glasses generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1) using high-resolution multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of NMAS glasses in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition show only [4]Al. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of KLB-1 basaltic glasses show mostly [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al, the degree of configurational disorder, increases from 0 at XMgO [MgO/(MgO+Al2O3)]=0.55 to ~3% at XMgO=0.79 in KLB-1 basaltic glasses while only [4]Al are observed in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition. The current experimental results provide that the fraction of [5]Al abruptly increases by the effect of

  10. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

    2001-07-24

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  11. Energetics of glass fragmentation: Experiments on synthetic and natural glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.; Kennedy, L. A.

    2013-11-01

    Natural silicate glasses are an essential component of many volcanic rock types including coherent and pyroclastic rocks; they span a wide range of compositions, occur in diverse environments, and form under a variety of pressure-temperature conditions. In subsurface volcanic environments (e.g., conduits and feeders), melts intersect the thermodynamically defined glass transition temperature to form glasses at elevated confining pressures and under differential stresses. We present a series of room temperature experiments designed to explore the fundamental mechanical and fragmentation behavior of natural (obsidian) and synthetic glasses (Pyrex™) under confining pressures of 0.1-100 MPa. In each experiment, glass cores are driven to brittle failure under compressive triaxial stress. Analysis of the load-displacement response curves is used to quantify the storage of energy in samples prior to failure, the (brittle) release of elastic energy at failure, and the residual energy stored in the post-failure material. We then establish a relationship between the energy density within the sample at failure and the grain-size distributions (D-values) of the experimental products. The relationship between D-values and energy density for compressive fragmentation is significantly different from relationships established by previous workers for decompressive fragmentation. Compressive fragmentation is found to have lower fragmentation efficiency than fragmentation through decompression (i.e., a smaller change in D-value with increasing energy density). We further show that the stress storage capacity of natural glasses can be enhanced (approaching synthetic glasses) through heat treatment.

  12. Radioactive Waste Conditioning, Immobilisation, And Encapsulation Processes And Technologies: Overview And Advances (Chapter 7)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Lee, William E.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-10-19

    The main immobilization technologies that are available commercially and have been demonstrated to be viable are cementation, bituminization, and vitrification. Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either alkali borosilicate glass or alkali aluminophosphate glass. The exact compositions of nuclear waste glasses are tailored for easy preparation and melting, avoidance of glass-in-glass phase separation, avoidance of uncontrolled crystallization, and acceptable chemical durability, e.g., leach resistance. Glass has also been used to stabilize a variety of low level wastes (LLW) and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) low level wastes (MLLW) from other sources such as fuel rod cladding/decladding processes, chemical separations, radioactive sources, radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soils, medical research applications, and other commercial processes. The sources of radioactive waste generation are captured in other chapters in this book regarding the individual practices in various countries (legacy wastes, currently generated wastes, and future waste generation). Future waste generation is primarily driven by interest in sources of clean energy and this has led to an increased interest in advanced nuclear power production. The development of advanced wasteforms is a necessary component of the new nuclear power plant (NPP) flowsheets. Therefore, advanced nuclear wasteforms are being designed for robust disposal strategies. A brief summary is given of existing and advanced wasteforms: glass, glass-ceramics, glass composite materials (GCM’s), and crystalline ceramic (mineral) wasteforms that chemically incorporate radionuclides and hazardous species atomically in their structure. Cementitious, geopolymer, bitumen, and other encapsulant wasteforms and composites that atomically bond and encapsulate

  13. Communication: An obligatory glass surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, S.; Nguyen, D.; Zhao, K.; Lyding, J.; Wang, W. H.; Gruebele, M.

    2012-10-01

    Theory predicts, and experiments have shown, that dynamics is faster at glass surfaces than in the bulk, allowing the glass to settle into deeper energy landscape minima, or "age more." Is it possible that a glass surface could survive at temperatures where the bulk crystallizes, or that it could remain glassy after the bulk is heated all the way to its melting temperature and re-cooled? We image in real-time and with sub-nanometer resolution the two-state surface dynamics on a cerium-based glass surface, from deep within the glassy regime to above the crystallization temperature. Unlike other surfaces that we have studied, this glass surface remains amorphous even after the bulk re-crystallizes. The surface retains non-crystalline structure and two state dynamics of cooperatively rearranging regions even after heat annealing to just below the bulk melting temperature. The heat-annealed cooperatively rearranging regions are larger than originally, a sign that the surface is well aged. The surface dynamics depends weakly on temperature, showing no sign of the superexponential increase in bulk dynamics expected near Tg.

  14. Complexation of Sr in aqueous fluids equilibrated with silicate melts: effect of melt and fluid composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Manuela; Wilke, Max; Schmidt, Christian; Kvashnina, Kristina

    2010-05-01

    At crustal conditions, the fluid-melt partitioning of Sr is mainly controlled by the salinity of the fluid and the composition of the melt (Borchert et al., 2010). The data show a sharp increase in the Sr partition coefficient with the alumina saturation index (ASI) to a maximum of 0.3 at an ASI of 1.05. Because fluid-melt partitioning of a given element depends on its complexation in the fluid and its incorporation in the melt, these data imply a change in the Sr speciation at least one of the two phases. For silicate melts, Kohn et al. (1990) found only small changes in the first coordination shell of Sr in a suite of melts with various degrees of polymerization, and argued that incorporation of Sr in the melt should not play a major role in controlling Sr partitioning. For the aqueous fluid, Bai and Koster van Groos (1999) and Webster et al. (1989) suggested a control of the Sr partition coefficient by SrCl2 complexes based on the correlation between partition coefficient and Cl concentration in the fluid after quenching. Both hypotheses cannot explain our partitioning data. Thus, new information on Sr complexation is required. Here, we studied the complexation of Sr in peraluminous or peralkaline melt dissolved in aqueous fluids in-situ at elevated PT conditions using hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells (HDAC) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The starting materials were peraluminous or peralkaline glass and H2O or a chloridic solution. The glass was doped with high concentrations of 5000 or 10000 ppm Sr. We used bulk compositions with 10 to 15 wt.% glass to ensure that the melt was completely dissolved in the fluid at high PT conditions. For qualitative evaluation, we analyzed the starting glasses and various crystalline compounds and standard solutions. The experiments were performed at beamline ID26 at ESRF (Grenoble, France) using a high resolution emission spectrometer and Si(311) monochromator crystals for high resolution and Si

  15. Hafnium in peralkaline and peraluminous boro-aluminosilicate glass, and glass subcomponents: a solubility study.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Linda L.; Darab, John G.; Qian, Maoxu; Zhao, Donggao; Palenik, Christopher S.; Li, Hong; Strachan, Denis M.; Li, Liyu

    2003-10-15

    A relationship between the solubility of hafnia (HfO2) and the host glass composition was explored by determining the solubility limits of HfO2 in peralkaline and peraluminous borosilicate glasses in the system SiO2-Al2O3-B2O3-Na2O, and in glasses in the system SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3 in air at 1450 C. The only Hf-bearing phase to crystallize in the peralkaline borosilicate melts is hafnia, while in the boron-free melts sodium-hafnium silicates crystallize. All peraluminous borosilicate melts crystallize hafnia, but the slightly peraluminous glasses also have sector-zoned hafnia crystals that contain Al and Si. The more peraluminous borosilicate glasses also crystallize a B-containing mullite. The general morphology of the hafnia crystals changes as peralkalinity (Na2O/(Na2O+Al2O3)) decreases, as expected in melts with increasing viscosity. In all of the glasses with Na2O > Al2O3, the solubility of hafnia is linearly and positively correlated with Na2O/(Na2O + Al2O3) or Na2O - Al2O3 (excess sodium), despite the presence of 5 to 16 mol% B2O3. The solubility of hafnia is higher in the sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses than in the sodium-aluminosilicate glasses, suggesting that the boron is enhancing the effect that excess sodium has on the incorporation of Hf into the glass structure. The results of this solubility study are compared to other studies of high-valence cation solubility in B-free silicate melts. From this, for peralkaline B-bearing glasses, it is shown that, although the solubility limits are higher, the solution behavior of hafnia is the same as in B-free silicate melts previously studied. By comparison, also, it is shown that in peraluminous melts, there must be a different solution mechanism for hafnia: different than for peralkaline sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses and different than for B-free silicate melts studied by others.

  16. Bursting the bubble of melt inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Most silicate melt inclusions (MI) contain bubbles, whose significance has been alternately calculated, pondered, and ignored, but rarely if ever directly explored. Moore et al. (2015) analyze the bubbles, as well as their host glasses, and conclude that they often hold the preponderance of CO2 in the MI. Their findings entreat future researchers to account for the presence of bubbles in MI when calculating volatile budgets, saturation pressures, and eruptive flux.

  17. Tectonic and source controls on granite melt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.

    2012-12-01

    The composition and microstructure of the source, P-T evolution, degree of melting and number of melt extraction events, and whether melting is an equilibrium or disequilibrium process dictate the initial chemistry of granite melt at P and T, whereas this chemistry may be modified by physico-chemical processes during migration through the source and ascent through the crust. In addition to determining P-T evolution, tectonic setting determines any juvenile input to melt generation. Assuming melt extraction occurs at the melt connectivity transition (MCT), multiple cycles of melt build-up and loss are predicted along suprasolidus prograde P-T paths. Melt extraction changes the composition of the source and solid solution phases, so that successive melt batches have different chemistries. During migration, melt composition evolves by interaction with residue and crystallization-fractionation; glass compositions from melting experiments on crustal rocks do not match mafic granites, suggesting that natural melts selectively entrain peritectic minerals from the source, which equilibrate during ascent by dissolution-precipitation cycling. For CW P-T paths, decompression across hydrate-breakdown melting reactions is commonly invoked as important in the production of late orogenic granites, yet the amount of melt produced during decompression is dependent on the fertility of the crust at the T of interest and the amount may be quite small if melt is lost along the prograde P-T path. Rock-forming and accessory mineral behavior during melting is critical to the composition and isotopic fingerprint of the melt. Although various accessory minerals are the main hosts for Zr, U, Th and the REE it is not clear that breakdown of these under suprasolidus conditions necessarily will lead to saturation of the melt, since rock-forming minerals in the granulite facies become enriched these elements. Furthermore, in fluid absent melting, melt pockets may be located along hydrate grain

  18. Induction melting of simulated transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tenaglia, R.D.; McCall, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Coreless induction melting was investigated as a method to melt and consolidate waste material representative of the transuranic waste (TRU) stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Waste material was introduced onto the surface of a molten cast iron bath in a coreless induction furnace. Waste metallics were incorporated into the bath. Noncombustibles formed a slag which was poured or skimmed from the bath surface. Stack sampling was performed to characterize the off-gas and particulate matter evolved. Experimental melting tests were performed for a variety of types of wastes including metallics, chemical sludge, soil, concrete, and glass. Each test also included a representative level of combustible materials consisting of paper, wood, cloth, polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene. Metallic wastes were readily processed by induction melting with a minimum of slag production. Test waste consisting primarily of chemical sludge provided fluid slags which could be poured from the bath surface. Processing of wastes consisting of soil, concrete, or glass was limited by the inability to achieve fluid slags. It appears from test results that coreless induction melting is a feasible method to process INEL-type waste materials if two problems can be resolved. First, slag fluidity must be improved to facilitate the collection of slags formed from soil, concrete, or glass containing wastes. Secondly, refractory life must be further optimized to permit prolonged processing of the waste materials. The use of a chrome-bearing high-alumina refractory was found to resist slag line attach much better than a magnesia refractory, although some attack was still noted.

  19. Prize for a Faculty Member for Research in an Undergraduate Institution Lecture: Studies of the Structure and Properties of Oxide Glasses with Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affatigato, Mario

    2013-03-01

    This presentation will summarize the research work carried out by Prof. Affatigato and his undergraduate students over the past eighteen years. It will focus on some highlighted projects, namely: the determination of glass structure using laser ionization time of flight mass spectrometry; studies of glass modification by laser irradiation; bactericidal glass; and, most recently, glass manufacturing by aerolevitation and glasses for particle detection. The work on mass spectrometry will cover a broad range of oxide glass systems, including the borates, borosilicates, germanate, and gallate families. It has provided novel insights into the structure of glasses at intermediate length scales, measurements that are hard to obtain by any other techniques. The studies of glass structure modification will primarily center on vanadate glasses, which also form the basis for more recent electronic conductivity work at the heart of new particle calorimeter detectors. This project shows the power of serendipity and the strong capabilities of undergraduate students involved in advanced work and state of the art instrumentation. Bactericidal glass illustrates a nice collaborative project that involved simple borate glasses and helped pioneer their use in the human body--work that has led to significant medical developments by other colleagues and researchers. Finally, the aerolevitation project gives new insight into the crystallization and property behavior of glasses and melts at very high temperatures (from 2000 °C to 3000 °C). The work by Prof. Affatigato and his students has been supported by grants from the Research Corporation, the Petroleum Research Fund, and, primarily, by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  20. Nitrogen distribution between aqueous fluids and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Ruifang; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Keppler, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen between hydrous fluids and haplogranitic, basaltic, or albitic melts was studied at 1-15 kbar, 800-1200 °C, and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from the Fe-FeO buffer to 3log units above the Ni-NiO buffer. The nitrogen contents in quenched glasses were analyzed either by electron microprobe or by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), whereas the nitrogen contents in fluids were determined by mass balance. The results show that the nitrogen content in silicate melt increases with increasing nitrogen content in the coexisting fluid at given temperature, pressure, and fO2. Raman spectra of the silicate glasses suggest that nitrogen species change from molecular N2 in oxidized silicate melt to molecular ammonia (NH3) or the ammonium ion (NH4+) in reduced silicate melt, and the normalized Raman band intensities of the nitrogen species linearly correlate with the measured nitrogen content in silicate melt. Elevated nitrogen contents in silicate melts are observed at reduced conditions and are attributed to the dissolution of NH3/NH4+. Measured fluid/melt partition coefficients for nitrogen (DNfluid/ melt) range from 60 for reduced haplogranitic melts to about 10 000 for oxidized basaltic melts, with fO2 and to a lesser extent melt composition being the most important parameters controlling the partitioning of nitrogen. Pressure appears to have only a minor effect on DNfluid/ melt in the range of conditions studied. Our data imply that degassing of nitrogen from both mid-ocean ridge basalts and arc magmas is very efficient, and predicted nitrogen abundances in volcanic gases match well with observations. Our data also confirm that nitrogen degassing at present magma production rates is insufficient to accumulate the atmosphere. Most of the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have degassed very early in Earth's history and degassing was probably enhanced by the oxidation of the mantle.

  1. Metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Greer, A L

    1995-03-31

    Amorphous metallic alloys, relative newcomers to the world of glasses, have properties that are unusual for solid metals. The metallic glasses, which exist in a very wide variety of compositions, combine fundamental interest with practical applications. They also serve as precursors for exciting new nanocrystalline materials. Their magnetic (soft and hard) and mechanical properties are of particular interest.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  3. Target-projectile interaction during impact melting at Kamil Crater, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Agnese; D'Orazio, Massimo; Cordier, Carole; Folco, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    In small meteorite impacts, the projectile may survive through fragmentation; in addition, it may melt, and chemically and physically interact with both shocked and melted target rocks. However, the mixing/mingling between projectile and target melts is a process still not completely understood. Kamil Crater (45 m in diameter; Egypt), generated by the hypervelocity impact of the Gebel Kamil Ni-rich ataxite on sandstone target, allows to study the target-projectile interaction in a simple and fresh geological setting. We conducted a petrographic and geochemical study of macroscopic impact melt lapilli and bombs ejected from the crater, which were collected during our geophysical campaign in February 2010. Two types of glasses constitute the impact melt lapilli and bombs: a white glass and a dark glass. The white glass is mostly made of SiO2 and it is devoid of inclusions. Its negligible Ni and Co contents suggest derivation from the target rocks without interaction with the projectile (<0.1 wt% of projectile contamination). The dark glass is a silicate melt with variable contents of Al2O3 (0.84-18.7 wt%), FeOT (1.83-61.5 wt%), and NiO (<0.01-10.2 wt%). The dark glass typically includes fragments (from few μm to several mm in size) of shocked sandstone, diaplectic glass, lechatelierite, and Ni-Fe metal blebs. The metal blebs are enriched in Ni compared to the Gebel Kamil meteorite. The dark glass is thus a mixture of target and projectile melts (11-12 wt% of projectile contamination). Based on recently proposed models for target-projectile interaction and for impact glass formation, we suggest a scenario for the glass formation at Kamil. During the transition from the contact and compression stage and the excavation stage, projectile and target liquids formed at their interface and chemically interact in a restricted zone. Projectile contamination affected only a shallow portion of the target rocks. The SiO2 melt that eventually solidified as white glass behaved as

  4. The rock melting approach to drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, G.E.; Goff, S.J.; Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W. Jr.; Dreesen, D.S.; Winchester, W.

    1993-09-01

    During the early and mid-1970`s the Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrated practical applications of drilling and coring using an electrically-heated graphite, tungsten, or molybdenum penetrator that melts a hole as it is slowly pushed through the rock or soil. The molten material consolidates into a rugged glass lining that prevents hole collapse; minimizes the potential for cross-flow, lost circulation, or the release of hazardous materials without casing operations; and produces no cuttings in porous or low density (<1.7 g/cc) formations. Because there are no drilling fluids required, the rock melting approach reduces waste handling, treatment and disposal. Drilling by rock melting has been demonstrated to depths up to 30 m in caliche, clay, alluvium, cobbles, sand, basalt, granite, and other materials. Penetrating large cobbles without debris removal was achieved by thermal stress fracturing and lateral extrusion of portions of the rock melt into the resulting cracks. Both horizontal and vertical holes in a variety of diameters were drilled in these materials using modular, self-contained field units that operate in remote areas. Because the penetrator does not need to rotate, steering by several simple approaches is considered quite feasible. Melting is ideal for obtaining core samples in alluvium and other poorly consolidated soils since the formed-in-place glass liner stabilizes the hole, encapsulates volatile or hazardous material, and recovers an undisturbed core. Because of the relatively low thermal conductivity of rock and soil materials, the heat-affected zone beyond the melt layer is very small, <1 inch thick. Los Alamos has begun to update the technology and this paper will report on the current status of applications and designs for improved drills.

  5. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Crucible Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorier, T.H.

    2001-06-15

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the melting behavior of Macrobatch 3 (MB3) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This study focuses on the manipulation of the frit composition in order to enhance the melting rate of MB3, without sacrificing the quality of the final glass form. The goal is to find the proper frit composition so the development of this insulating layer is averted.

  6. High-Temperature Studies of Glass Dissolution Rates Close to Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Zhao, P; Williams, R; Rose, T; Rainer, A; Pawloski, G

    2004-06-14

    Most long-lived radionuclides associated with an underground nuclear test are incorporated into a melt glass and are released by glass dissolution to become part of the hydrologic source term (HST) (Pawloski et al., 2001). Although the rates of rhyolite glass dissolution are well known under conditions where the fluid is far from saturation with respect to glass, the rates are not well known under conditions where the fluid approaches saturation. These rates are commonly much lower than the far-fromsaturation rates, often by a factor greater than 100. In recent HST simulations (Pawloski et al., 2001; Pawloski et al., 2000; Tompson et al., 1999), we conservatively estimated steady-state release rates based on a far-from-saturation fluid conditions. In recent CHESHIRE near-field simulations (Pawloski et al., 2001), it was predicted that {approx}30% of the nuclear melt glass dissolved over 1000 years. Although the ''far-from-saturation rate'' approach provides a conservative estimate of glass dissolution, it may greatly overestimate the rates of melt glass dissolution. At CHESHIRE, less conservative estimates suggest that only {approx}1% of the nuclear melt glass will dissolve in 1000 years. Lower glass dissolution rates result in lower radionuclide release rates from nuclear melt glass. The following report documents glass dissolution experiments performed to measure glass dissolution rates close to saturation.

  7. Influence of hydroxyl content on selected properties of 45S5 bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew M

    2007-12-01

    Numerous material properties may be influenced by the concentration of chemically dissolved hydroxyl species within a glass. A tube furnace connected to a steam generator was used to create hydroxyl-saturated 45S5 glass under 1 atm of water at 1100 degrees C. Selected properties of as-melted and hydroxyl-saturated samples were compared to assess the sensitivity of 45S5 to excess hydroxylation. The glass transition temperature and the peak crystallization temperature of the treated 45S5 glass were reduced in comparison to the as-melted 45S5 glass. In addition, the treated glass exhibited a broad endothermic signal that may be indicative of enhanced viscous flow. A simple dissolution experiment indicated that the treated 45S5 glass was also less durable than the as-melted 45S5 glass. PMID:17559121

  8. Materials processing apparatus development for fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Sue; Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great potential for optical fiber communications due to the high transmittance when no microcrystallites occur during drawing operations. This work has developed apparatus to test the occurrence of microcrystallites during recrystallization in reduced gravity on the KC-135. The apparatus allows fluoride glass fiber, such as ZBLAN, to be melted and recrystallized during both the low and high g portions the parabolic flight.

  9. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

  10. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, Ray F.

    1994-01-01

    A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

  11. Glass formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Labardi, Massimiliano; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, M; Wang, Li-Min

    2016-05-01

    Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for glass formation and the glass stability of materials would benefit the screening of the glass formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the glass formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. Glass transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of glass transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule glass formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to glass formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the glass formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of beads of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to glass formation via kinetics. PMID:27155640

  12. Glass formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Labardi, Massimiliano; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, M.; Wang, Li-Min

    2016-05-01

    Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for glass formation and the glass stability of materials would benefit the screening of the glass formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the glass formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. Glass transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of glass transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule glass formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to glass formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the glass formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of beads of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to glass formation via kinetics.

  13. Influence of packing density and viscosity on the growth of dynamic heterogeneity while cooling metallic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kaikin; Chen, Changjiu; Koza, Michael M.; Chathoth, Suresh M.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most intriguing aspects of glass-forming melts is the existence of specially separated regions whose dynamics can differ from each other by several orders of magnitude and is known as dynamic heterogeneity (DH). In this letter, we have studied the growth of DH in three glass-forming metallic melts with different glass-forming ability, packing density and viscosity. The results show that when the temperature approaches the melting point, the size of DH grows exponentially in good glass-forming melts but linearly in poor ones. Additionally, the growth of DH with packing density and viscosity in the binary melt shows similar behavior, but in the ternary melt no significant change in the growth of DH exists while the viscosity increased. Interestingly, at a packing density of approximately 0.531 ± 0.003, the growth of DH is much faster in the studied metallic melts. These results indicate that the packing density of glass-forming liquids is the dominant factor that governs the growth of DH in metallic melts.

  14. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    DOE PAGES

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-03-18

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach.more » In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. Lastly, the ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.« less

  15. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass.

    PubMed

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. The ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc. PMID:26988919

  16. Chemistry of Actinides in Molten Glasses and Its Correlation to Structural Performance of Solid Glasses: Filling the Knowledge Gap (Project 81926)

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Boatner, Lynn; Schumacher, Ray F.

    2005-06-25

    This proposal focuses on the following basic objectives to generate critical information for the following research Needs: (a) to conduct spectroscopic speciation of uranium compounds in glass forming melts as a function of the acid-base composition of the glasses and melt temperatures, and to use these data to develop a general thermodynamic model for the dissolution of actinide species in oxidic glass matrices, (b) to build a scientific basis for a new methodology to measure the basicity of glasses via optical spectra of in-situ immobilized actinides and to use this optical basicity as a primary actinide structure indicator for solid glass matrices, (c) to define the local environment of actinides in solid glasses via fluorescence lifetime distribution methods, (d) to correlate the above spectral ''fingerprints'' of actinides in solid and molten glasses with glass stability and the leaching rates of individual actinide species from a glass matrix.

  17. Synthesis of Refractory Materials by Skull Melting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Borik, Mikhail A.; Lomonova, Elena E.

    This chapter discusses methods of growing refractory oxide single crystals and synthesis of refractory glasses by skull melting technique in a cold crucible. It shows the advantages of radiofrequency (RF) heating of dielectric materials in a cold crucible and points out some specific problems regarding the process of growing crystals by directional crystallization from the melt and by pulling on a seed from the melt. The distinctive features of the method of directional crystallization from the melt are discussed in detail on the example of technology of materials based on zirconia, i.e., cubic single crystals and partly stabilized single crystals. It is shown that the size and quality of crystals are functions of the process conditions, such as thermal conditions under crystallization, growth rate, and chemical composition. We provide an overview of research on the structure, phase composition, and physicochemical properties of crystals based on zirconia. The optical, mechanical, and electric properties of these crystals make them suitable for a number of technical and industrial applications in optics, electronics, materials processing, and medicine. In this chapter, we also consider some problems regarding the synthesis of refractory glasses by skull melting technique. The physicochemical and optical properties of glasses are given and their practical applications in technology are discussed. We note that one of the better developed and most promising applications of skull melting technique is the immobilization of liquid and solid waste (also radioactive waste) into solid-state materials by vitrification.

  18. Spectral characteristics of lunar impact melts and inferred mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Stefanie; Pieters, Carlé M.

    2010-07-01

    Two suites of lunar impact melt samples have been measured in NASA's Reflectance Experiment Laboratory (RELAB) at Brown University. Suite 1 comprises seven Apollo 17 crystalline impact melt breccias and seven quenched glass equivalents. Suite 2 is made up of 15 additional impact melt samples (from Apollo 12, 15, 16, and 17) which exhibit a range of textures and compositions related to cooling conditions and glass abundance. A few of these samples have cooled slowly and fully crystallized, and thus have the same spectral properties as igneous rocks of similar texture and composition; they cannot be uniquely distinguished without geologic context. However, most of the impact melts and melt breccias contain either quantities of quenched glass and/or have developed microcrystalline nonequilibrium textures with well-defined, diagnostic spectral properties. The microcrystalline textures are associated with a distinctive 600nm absorption feature, apparently due to submicroscopic ilmenite inclusions in a transparent host (typically fine-grained plagioclase). The reflectance properties of these lunar sample suites contribute to and constrain the identification and characterization of impact melts in remote sensing data.

  19. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  20. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively.

  1. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules.

    PubMed

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  2. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, task 17208: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J. W.; Marra, J. C.

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  3. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, Task 17208: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J. W.; Marra, J. C.

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  4. Experimental Constraints on the Partitioning and Valence of V and Cr in Garnet and Coexisting Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Sutton, S.; Berthet, S.; Newville, M.

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments with garnet and coexisting melt have been carried out across a range of oxygen fugacities (near hematite-magnetite (HM) to below the iron-wustite (IW) buffers) at 1.7 GPa to study the partitioning and valence of Cr and V in both phases. Experiments were carried out in a non end loaded piston cylinder apparatus, and the run products were analyzed with electron microprobe and xray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis at beamline 13-ID at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Lab. The valence of vanadium and chromium were determined using the position and intensity of the Ka pre-edge peaks, calibrated on a series of Cr and Vbearing standard glasses. This technique has been applied to V and Cr in glasses and V in spinels previously, and in these isotropic phases there are no orientational effects on the XANES spectra (Righter et al., 2006, Amer. Mineral. 91, 1643-1656). We also now demonstrate this to be true for V and Cr in garnet. Also, previous work has shown that V has a higher valence in the glass (or melt) than in the coexisting spinel. This is also true for V in garnet-glass pairs in this study. Vanadium valence in garnets varies from 2.7 below the IW buffer to 3.7 near HM, and for coexisting glass it varies from 3.2 to 4.3. Vanadium valence measured in some natural garnets from mantle localities indicates V in the more reduced range at 2.5. Comparisons will be made between fO2 estimated from V valence and other methods for garnet-bearing mantle samples. In contrast, Cr valence measured in garnet and coexisting glass for all experimental and natural samples is 2.9- 3.0, suggesting that the valence of Cr does not vary within either phase across a large fO2 range. These results demonstrate that while V varies from 2+ to 3+ to 4+ in garnet-melt systems, Cr does not, and this will ultimately affect the partitioning behavior of these two elements in natural systems. Garnet/melt D(Cr) are between 12 and 17 across this range

  5. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  6. Glasses for nuclear waste immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Ojovan, M.I.; Batyukhnova, O.G.

    2007-07-01

    Vitrification of nuclear wastes is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting waste form. Vitrification is a mature technology and has been used for high level nuclear waste (HLW) immobilisation for more than 40 years in France, Germany and Belgium, Russia, UK, Japan and the USA. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material (GCM). Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes, moreover in addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel GCM are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. The spectrum of wastes which are currently vitrified increases from HLW to low and intermediate wastes (LILW) such as legacy wastes in Hanford, USA and nuclear power plant operational wastes in Russia and Korea. (authors)

  7. Glass fining experiments in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    Ground based experiments were conducted to demonstrate that thermal migration actually operated in glass melts. Thermal migration consistent with the theory was found in one experiment on a borax melt, i.e., there was an approximately linear relation between the bubble diameter and bubble velocity for a given temperature and temperature gradient. It also appeared that nearby bubbles were attracted to one another, which could greatly aid fining. Interpretation of these results was not possible because of complications arising from gravity, i.e., floating of the bubbles, circulation currents due to buoyancy-driven natural connection, and flow of the melt out from the cell.

  8. Glass microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.E.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a glass microsphere having a diameter of about 54 micrometers or less and adapted for radiation therapy of a mammal. The glass consists of essentially an yttrium oxide-aluminosilicate glass composition lying substantially within a quadrilateral region of the ternary composition diagram of the yttria-alumina-silica system, the quadrilateral region being defined by its four corners having the following combination of weight proportions of the components: 20% silica, 10% alumina, 70% yttria; 70% silica, 10% alumina, 20% yttria; 70% silica, 20% alumina, 10% yttria; and 20% silica, 45% alumina, 35% yttria, the glass having a chemical durability such that subsequent to irradiation and administration of the microsphere to the mammal, the mircosphere will not release a significant amount of yttrium-90 into the mammal's system.

  9. Glass electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-25

    The objective of this research is a glass electrolyte for use in sodium/sulfur batteries that has a low resistivity (100 ohm-cm at 300/sup 0/C) and is stable in the cell environment. Experiments in this program are focussed on glasses in the quaternary system: soda, alumina, zirconia and silica. The FY 1983 research on glass analogs of NASICON, parallel thermodynamic calculations, and a review of the literature in the areas of glass conductivity and corrosion resistance led to selection of this system for more detailed investigation. The main program elements are: (1) conductivity measurements at 300 to 500/sup 0/C; (2) differential thermal analysis for determination of glass-transition and crystallization temperatures; (3) static corrosion tests at 400/sup 0/C using Na, Na/sub 2/S/sub 4/, and S; (4) mechanical strength and fracture toughness measurements; and (5) sodium/sulfur cell tests at 350/sup 0/C. Elements (1) and (2) are nearly completed; element (3) is being initiated using the glasses prepared for (1) and (2), and elements (4) and (5) will begin in the first and second quarters of FY 1985, respectively. Fourteen quaternary glasses having a broad range of compositions have been made. The resistivities of these glasses at 300/sup 0/C extended from 130 to 3704 ohm-cm; the activation energies for conduction extended from 0.488 to 0.684 eV, and the glass transition temperatures extended from 397 to 685/sup 0/C. Through a multiple linear regression analysis of these data response surfaces were generated for resistivity, activation energy for conduction, and glass transition temperature over the composition region within the quaternary system that is bounded by SiO/sub 2/, Na/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/AlO/sub 4/ and Na/sub 2/ZrO/sub 3/. These response surfaces indicated a new region of high conductivity and high glass transition temperature in the neighborhood of 42% soda, 31% silica and 27% alumina plus zirconia.

  10. The lunar highland melt-rock suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Size can be used as a criterion to select 18 large (larger than 1 cm) samples from among 148 melt-rock fragments of all sizes. This selection provides a suite of large samples which represent the important chemical variants among highland melt rocks; each large sample has enough material for a number of sample-destructive studies, as well as for future reference. Cluster analysis of the total data base of 148 highland melt rocks shows six distinct groups: anorthosite, gabbroic anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro ('highland basalt'), low K Fra Mauro, intermediate-K Fra Mauro, and high-K. Large samples are available for four of the melt-rock groups (gabbroic anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro, and intermediate-K Fra Mauro). This sample selection reveals two subgroups of anorthositic gabbro (one anorthite-poor with negative Eu anomaly and one anorthite-rich without Eu anomaly). There is a sharp distinction between those Apollo 16 melt rocks and glasses which have both been classified as 'gabbroic anorthosite'.

  11. On-Site Additive Manufacturing by Selective Laser Melting of Composite Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateri, M.; Khosravi, M.

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for cost reduction of future space missions by manufacturing parts on foreign planets. The suitability of Selective Laser Melting process for on-site production of metallic, ceramic and glass products on mars is examined.

  12. Gas atomization of cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; O'Handley, R. C.; Kalonji, G.

    1989-01-01

    XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and EDXS have been used to characterize a rapidly-solidified (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel generated in a cobalt-iron-phosphate glass matrix by gas atomization of melts. Of the two compositions tested, that containing 20 mol pct P2O5 exhibited randomly-oriented ferrite crystallization whose growth appears to have been diffusion-controlled. Unlike the ferrite, in which the iron has both tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, the iron in the glassy matrix was primarily of distorted-octahedral coordination. Calculations indicate that the cooling rates obtained with oxide melts vary strongly with droplet size, but less strongly with melt temperature.

  13. Origin of broad NIR photoluminescence in bismuthate glass and Bi-doped glasses at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mingying; Zollfrank, Cordt; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2009-07-15

    Bi-doped glasses with broadband photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range are presently receiving significant consideration for potential applications in telecommunications, widely tunable fiber lasers and spectral converters. However, the origin of NIR emission remains disputed. Here, we report on NIR absorption and emission properties of bismuthate glass and their dependence on the melting temperature. Results clarify that NIR emission occurs from the same centers as it does in Bi-doped glasses. The dependence of absorption and NIR emission of bismuthate glasses on the melting temperature is interpreted as thermal dissociation of Bi(2)O(3) into elementary Bi. Darkening of bismuthate glass melted at 1300 °C is due to the agglomeration of Bi atoms. The presence of Bi nanoparticles is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and element distribution mapping. By adding antimony oxide as an oxidation agent to the glass, NIR emission centers can be eliminated and Bi(3+) is formed. By comparing with atomic spectral data, absorption bands at ∼320 , ∼500 , 700 , 800 and 1000 nm observed in Bi-doped glasses are assigned to Bi(0) transitions [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, and broadband NIR emission is assigned to the transition [Formula: see text].

  14. Specialty glass raw materials: Status and developments

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.J.; Gray, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors highlight several key raw materials used in the specialty glass industry. The focus here is to update changes and shifts underway in the worldwide availability and processes that will impact both costs and efficient use of these products. The glass types that use these materials generally are those other than container, float, and fiber glass. Those high-volume consumers of glass raw materials are discussed in a companion paper in this volume. In the specialty glass field, the batch materials involve minerals, and the chemicals derived from them, which are less readily available domestically. These are much more critically defined by specifications of assay, contamination, and particle size, resulting in their being more expensive. They are seldom commodity products. The scope of materials for this fragmented industry includes those for leads, borosilicates, aluminosilicates, opals, sealing and frit glasses, optical glass, ophthalmic glass, cathode ray tubes (CRTs) for TV and display, and glass-ceramics as major segments. They use lead oxides, nearly all the alkalies and alkaline earth portions of the periodic table, as well as rare earths, transition element oxides, phosphates, boron minerals and chemicals, zircon, zinc, most of the halogens, and many of the anions. They often require very special particle size specifications. The requirements for these batch materials are often based on chemistry, the absence of contaminants that impact melting, very wide ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum, glass homogeneity, and freedom from solid and gaseous inclusions down to ppm levels in both size and number.

  15. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  16. Model for the conversion of nuclear waste melter feed to glass

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-02-01

    The rate of batch-to-glass conversion is a primary concern for the vitrification of nuclear waste, as it directly influences the life cycle of the cleanup process. This study describes the development of an advanced model of the cold cap, which augments the previous model by further developments on the structure and the dynamics of the foam layer. The foam layer on the bottom of the cold cap consists of the primary foam, cavities, and the secondary foam, and forms an interface through which the heat is transferred to the cold cap. Other model enhancements include the behavior of intermediate crystalline phases and the dissolution of quartz particles. The model relates the melting rate to feed properties and melter conditions, such as the molten glass temperature, foaminess of the feed, or the heat fraction supplied to the cold cap from the plenum space. The model correctly predicts a 25% increase in melting rate when changing the alumina source in the melter feed from Al(OH)3 to AlO(OH). It is expected that this model will be incorporated in the full glass melter model as its integral component.

  17. Glass formulation development and offgas analysis of microwave melter powder samples

    SciTech Connect

    Semones, G.B.; Hoffman, C.R.; Phillips, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    Production of nuclear materials for defense applications has resulted in the accumulation of vast amounts of nuclear waste. This contaminated waste is in a variety of forms that require subsequent reprocessing to isolate and encapsulate the nuclear (e.g., uranium, plutonium, strontium, cesium, and americium) and toxic (e.g., lead, chromium, and cadmium) constituents. The encapsulating material must possess good chemical and mechanical durability to resist leaching of the nuclear and toxic constituents into the environment during permanent storage at a waste repository. Glass is an ideal encapsulating material because its open structure allows the introduction of different waste forms and the final vitreous product possesses a high degree of chemical stability. Microwave heating and melting is a relatively new advancement in glass processing which uses microwave radiation to heat the glass formers to adequate temperatures for sintering or melting. An advantage to this technique is that it enables more rapid heating than traditional heating mechanisms. This decrease in cycle time may help to limit exposure to workers encapsulating radioactive and/or toxic waste.

  18. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

  19. Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. W.; Wang, X. D. E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Lou, H. B.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z. E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Wang, L. W.; Zhang, D. X.

    2014-12-14

    Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.

  20. Glass melter off-gas system

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for melting glass in a glass melter in such a way as to reduce deposition of particulates in the off-gas duct. Deposit accumulation is reduced by achieving an off-gas velocity above approximately 15 meters/second and an off-gas temperature as close as possible to, but not higher than, the glass softening point. Because the deposits are largely water-soluble, those that do form on the interior surface of the duct can be readily removed by injecting water or steam directly into the off-gas duct from its entrance or exit.

  1. Novel lead-iron phosphate glass

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    The invention described and claimed in the specification relates to the discovery that effective addition of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 to a lead phosphate glass results in a glass having enhanced chemical durability and physical stability, and consists essentially of the glass resulting from melting a mixture consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 40-66 percent PbO, 30-55 percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and an effective concentration up to 12 percent Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  2. Novel lead-iron phosphate glass

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1989-07-11

    The invention described and claimed in the specification relates to the discovery that effective addition of Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] to a lead phosphate glass results in a glass having enhanced chemical durability and physical stability, and consists essentially of the glass resulting from melting a mixture consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 40--66 percent PbO, 30--55 percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and an effective concentration up to 12 percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3].

  3. Bubble formation in additive manufacturing of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Peters, Daniel C.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-05-01

    Bubble formation is a common problem in glass manufacturing. The spatial density of bubbles in a piece of glass is a key limiting factor to the optical quality of the glass. Bubble formation is also a common problem in additive manufacturing, leading to anisotropic material properties. In glass Additive Manufacturing (AM) two separate types of bubbles have been observed: a foam layer caused by the reboil of the glass melt and a periodic pattern of bubbles which appears to be unique to glass additive manufacturing. This paper presents a series of studies to relate the periodicity of bubble formation to part scan speed, laser power, and filament feed rate. These experiments suggest that bubbles are formed by the reboil phenomena why periodic bubbles result from air being trapped between the glass filament and the substrate. Reboil can be detected using spectroscopy and avoided by minimizing the laser power while periodic bubbles can be avoided by a two-step laser melting process to first establish good contact between the filament and substrate before reflowing the track with higher laser power.

  4. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  5. Low temperature process for obtaining thin glass films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott T.

    1984-01-01

    A method for coating a substrate with a glass-like film comprises, applying to the substrate an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a polymeric network of partially hydrolyzed metal alkoxide into which network there is incorporated finely powdered glass, whereby there is achieved on the substrate a coherent and adherent initial film; and heating said film to a temperature sufficient to melt said powdered glass component, thereby converting said initial film to a final densified film.

  6. Low temperature process for obtaining thin glass films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.T.

    A method for coating a substrate with a glass-like film comprises, applying to the substrate an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a polymeric network of partially hydrolyzed metal alkoxide into which network there is incorporated finely powdered glass, whereby there is achieved on the substrate a coherent and adherent initial film; and heating said film to a temperature sufficient to melt said powdered glass component, thereby converting said initial film to a final densified film.

  7. Experimental design of a waste glass study

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G.F.; Redgate, P.E.; Hrma, P.

    1995-04-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed to support a future high-level waste glass plant at Hanford. A total of 147 glasses, covering a broad region of compositions melting at approximately 1150{degrees}C, were tested in five statistically designed experimental phases. This paper focuses on the goals, strategies, and techniques used in designing the five phases. The overall strategy was to investigate glass compositions on the boundary and interior of an experimental region defined by single- component, multiple-component, and property constraints. Statistical optimal experimental design techniques were used to cover various subregions of the experimental region in each phase. Empirical mixture models for glass properties (as functions of glass composition) from previous phases wee used in designing subsequent CVS phases.

  8. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  9. Cobalt-releasing 1393 bioactive glass-derived scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Alexander; Jokic, Bojan; Janackovic, Djordje; Fey, Tobias; Greil, Peter; Romeis, Stefan; Schmidt, Jochen; Peukert, Wolfgang; Lao, Jonathan; Jallot, Edouard; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-02-26

    Loading biomaterials with angiogenic therapeutics has emerged as a promising approach for developing superior biomaterials for engineering bone constructs. In this context, cobalt-releasing materials are of interest as Co is a known angiogenic agent. In this study, we report on cobalt-releasing three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds based on a silicate bioactive glass. Novel melt-derived "1393" glass (53 wt % SiO2, 6 wt % Na2O, 12 wt % K2O, 5 wt % MgO, 20 wt % CaO, and 4 wt % P2O5) with CoO substituted for CaO was fabricated and was used to produce a 3D porous scaffold by the foam replica technique. Glass structural and thermal properties as well as scaffold macrostructure, compressive strength, acellular bioactivity, and Co release in simulated body fluid (SBF) were investigated. In particular, detailed insights into the physicochemical reactions occurring at the scaffold-fluid interface were derived from advanced micro-particle-induced X-ray emission/Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis. CoO is shown to act in a concentration-dependent manner as both a network former and a network modifier. At a concentration of 5 wt % CoO, the glass transition point (Tg) of the glass was reduced because of the replacement of stronger Si-O bonds with Co-O bonds in the glass network. Compressive strengths of >2 MPa were measured for Co-containing 1393-derived scaffolds, which are comparable to values of human spongy bone. SBF studies showed that all glass scaffolds form a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer, and for 1393-1Co and 1393-5Co, CaP layers with incorporated traces of Co were observed. The highest Co concentrations of ∼12 ppm were released in SBF after reaction for 21 days, which are known to be within therapeutic ranges reported for Co(2+) ions.

  10. Remote Sensing of Lunar Mineralogy: The Glass Conundrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.; Tompkins, S.; Pieters, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    The term "lunar glasses" provokes different connotations depending on the context. Common usages include a) pyroclastic deposits consisting of "glass beads" derived from the deep interior, b) melt products created during impact events, and c) the ubiquitous and complex glass-welded weathering products, agglutinates. Each is distinct due to a specific geologic origin and composition, but all contain quench glass in some form. Spectral properties of a wide range of glass-bearing lunar materials is presented elsewhere [1], Discussed here are new spectra for a depth sequence of samples from Apollo 17 core 74002 collected at Shorty Crater. The data provide new insight into why Fe-Ti-rich quench glass is not directly observed remotely. Resolving this mystery allows the extensive glass-rich deposits at Aristarchus to be recognized as low-Ti pyroclastic glass.

  11. Development of Advanced Sensor Technologies for the United States Glass Industry - Final Report - 07/20/1995 - 08/19/1999

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, B. L.; Cannon, C.

    1999-12-01

    The glass industry, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), undertook a project to significantly improve temperature measurement in glass melters, thereby reducing energy usage through improved process control. AccuTru International determined that a new kind of protective sheath would improve the life and range of applications of the temperature measuring thermocouples. In cooperation with Corning, Inc., the University of Missouri-Rolla ceramics department conducted tests on a proprietary alumina sheath technology, which shows significant promise. In addition, AccuTru obtained DOE funding to develop a self-verifying sensor. The new sensor, with alumina sheath, was tested at a Corning facility, and the results exceeded expectations. Areas for additional development efforts were identified.

  12. Do cracks melt their way through solids?

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, P. R.

    1998-12-01

    Real-time, in situ fracture studies in the high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) show that microscopically thin regions of amorphous NiTi form ahead of moving crack tips in the B2-NiTi intermetallic compound during tensile straining at temperatures equal to or below 600K. The upper cutoff temperature of 600K for this stress-induced melting (or amorphization) is identical to the upper cutoff temperatures reported in the literature for both heavy-ion-induced amorphization of the intermetallic NiTi and ion-beam-mixing-induced amorphization of Ni and Ti multilayer. These results, together with the fact that the higher crystallization temperatures ({approximately}800K)of unrelaxed amorphous NiTi alloys obtained by rapid quenching can also be reduced to, but not lower than 600K, by heavy-ion irradiation, strongly suggest that structural relaxation processes enhanced or induced by dynamic atomic disordering allow the formation of a unique, fully-relaxed glassy state which is characterized by a unique isothermal crystallization temperature. We believe that this unique temperature is the Kauzmann glass-transition temperature, corresponding to the ideal glass having the same entropy as the crystalline state. As the glassy state with the lowest global free energy, the preferential formation of this ideal glass by disorder-induced amorphization processes can be understood as the most energetically-favored, kinetically-constrained melting response of crystalline materials driven far from equilibrium at low temperatures.

  13. Spectral Variations Among Crystalline and Glassy Apollo 17 Impact Melt Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, S.; Pieters, C. M.; Ryder, G.

    1996-03-01

    Remote geochemical mapping of lunar impact melt associated with complex craters is a key to better understanding of impact melt formation and the impact cratering process. Ground-based NIR spectra and Clementine multispectral images comprise a dataset with high-resolution spectral and spatial information, respectively. To interpret these data with respect to impact melt, two suites of lunar samples are being measured in NASA's Reflectance Experiment Laboratory (RELAB) at Brown University. The samples include seven Apollo 17 crystalline impact melts as well as synthesized glass equivalents, and 11 naturally occurring impact glasses from several landing sites. Acquisition and analysis of the laboratory spectra is the first step towards quantitatively modeling remote spectra to learn more about the composition and source of the melt found at complex craters. Furthermore, from the laboratory spectra, basic compositional parameters may be determined for application to Clementine data. Initial measurements of the Apollo 17 melt rocks have been completed and are presented below.

  14. Modeling of Glass Making Processes for Improved Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas P. Seward III

    2003-03-31

    The overall goal of this project was to develop a high-temperature melt properties database with sufficient reliability to allow mathematical modeling of glass melting and forming processes for improved product quality, improved efficiency and lessened environmental impact. It was initiated by the United States glass industry through the NSF Industry/University Center for Glass Research (CGR) at Alfred University [1]. Because of their important commercial value, six different types/families of glass were studied: container, float, fiberglass (E- and wool-types), low-expansion borosilicate, and color TV panel glasses. CGR member companies supplied production-quality glass from all six families upon which we measured, as a function of temperature in the molten state, density, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, infrared transmittance (to determine high temperature radiative conductivity), non-Newtonian flow behavior, and oxygen partial pres sure. With CGR cost sharing, we also studied gas solubility and diffusivity in each of these glasses. Because knowledge of the compositional dependencies of melt viscosity and electrical resistivity are extremely important for glass melting furnace design and operation, these properties were studied more fully. Composition variations were statistically designed for all six types/families of glass. About 140 different glasses were then melted on a laboratory scale and their viscosity and electrical resistivity measured as a function of temperature. The measurements were completed in February 2003 and are reported on here. The next steps will be (1) to statistically analyze the compositional dependencies of viscosity and electrical resistivity and develop composition-property response surfaces, (2) submit all the data to CGR member companies to evaluate the usefulness in their models, and (3) publish the results in technical journals and most likely in book form.

  15. Containerless glass fiber processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustic levitation furnace system is described that was developed for testing the feasibility of containerless fiber pulling experiments. It is possible to levitate very dense materials such as platinum at room temperature. Levitation at elevated temperatures is much more difficult. Samples of dense heavy metal fluoride glass were levitated at 300 C. It is therefore possible that containerless fiber pulling experiments could be performed. Fiber pulling from the melt at 650 C is not possible at unit gravity but could be possible at reduced gravities. The Acoustic Levitation Furnace is described, including engineering parameters and processing information. It is illustrated that a shaped reflector greatly increases the levitation force aiding the levitation of more dense materials.

  16. The effect of melt composition on the partitioning of oxidized sulfur between silicate melts and magmatic volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajacz, Zoltán

    2015-06-01

    Experiments were conducted at 500 MPa and 1240 °C in a piston cylinder apparatus to assess the effect of melt composition on the melt/volatile partition coefficient of sulfur (DSmelt/volatile) , which was used as a measure of the silicate melt's capacity to dissolve oxidized sulfur species. Iron-free, three- and four-component silicate melts were equilibrated with H2O-S fluids with sulfur concentrations ⩽2 mol% at an oxygen fugacity imposed by the Re-ReO2 buffer (1.4 log units above the Ni-NiO buffer). At these conditions, SO2 (S4+) is predicted to be the dominant sulfur species in the volatile phase and sulfate (S6+) is the dominant sulfur species in the silicate melt. The values of DSmelt /volatile were calculated by mass balance. The results show that DSmelt /volatile values increase exponentially with decreasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure. For example, in calcium-aluminosilicate melts, DSmelt /volatile changes from 0.005 to 0.3 as the degree of melt polymerization changes from the equivalent of a rhyolite to the equivalent of a basalt. At a constant degree of melt polymerization, DSmelt /volatile in equilibrium with sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) melts is more than an order of magnitude higher than in equilibrium with calcium-aluminosilicate (CAS) melts, and more than two orders of magnitude higher than in equilibrium with magnesium-aluminosilicate (MAS) melts. The value of DSmelt /volatile changes from 0.014 in MAS glasses to 3.4 in NAS glasses for the most depolymerized compositions in each series. Potassium has a similar effect on sulfate dissolution to that of Na. The variation of DSmelt /volatile in equilibrium with various calcium-sodium aluminosilicate (CNAS), magnesium-sodium aluminosilicate (MNAS) and magnesium-potassium aluminosilicate (MKAS) melts indicates that alkalis are only available for sulfate complexation when they are present in excess compared to the required amount to charge balance for the Si4+ to Al3

  17. Glass ceramic toughened with tetragonal zirconia

    DOEpatents

    Keefer, K.D.

    1984-02-10

    A phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic and a process for making it are disclosed. A mixture of particulate network-forming oxide, network-modifying oxide, and zirconium oxide is heated to yield a homogeneous melt, and this melt is then heat treated to precipitate an appreciable quantity of tetragonal zirconia, which is retained at ambient temperature to form a phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic. Nuclearing agents and stabilizing agents may be added to the mixture to facilitate processing and improve the ceramic's properties. Preferably, the mixture is first melted at a temperature from 1200 to 1700/sup 0/C and is then heat-treated at a temperature within the range of 800 to 1200/sup 0/C in order to precipitate tetragonal ZrO/sub 2/. The composition, as well as the length and temperature of the heat treatment, must be carefully controlled to prevent solution of the precipitated tetragonal zirconia and subsequent conversion to the monoclinic phase.

  18. Probing the structural disorder of basalts and slab-driven andesite melts: Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Whereas the structure of multi-component silicate melts has strong implication for the properties of natural silicate melts and relevant magmatic processes in Earth's mantle and crust, little is known about their atomic structures due to lack of suitable experimental probes of multi-component amorphous oxides. Although most of the progress in melt structure has been made for relatively simple binary and ternary silicate glasses, recent advances in high-resolution solid-state NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) unveil previously unknown structural details of multi-component silicate melts (Lee, S. K. and Sung, S., Chem. Geol., 2008, 256, 326; Lee et al., P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 2011, 108, 6847; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125). In this study we report experimental results on the effects of composition. atomic structure of CaO-MgO-Al_{2} O_{3} -SiO_{2} (CMAS) glasses in diopside (CaMgSi_{2}O_{6}) and Ca-tschermakite (CaAl_{2}SiO_{6}) join and glass in the diopside-anorthite eutectic composition (Di_{64}An_{36})—model systems for basaltic melts—using solid-state NMR. We also report the first high-resolution experimental results on the atomic structure of CaO-MgO-Na_{2}O-Al_{2}O_{3}-SiO_{2} (CMNAS) glasses in diopside and jadeite (NaAlSi_{2}O_{6}) join, and glass in the natural phonolite composition (CaO: MgO: Na_{2}O: K_{2}O: Al_{2}O_{3}: SiO_{2}= 1.4: 8.0: 9.0: 3.8: 13: 64 mol%), a model system for slab driven andesite melts. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of CMAS glasses in diopside-Ca-tschermakite join show predominant ^{[4]}Al and a non-negligible fraction of ^{[5]}Al. Approximately 3.3% of ^{[5]}Al is observed for Di_{64}An_{36} glass. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of CMNAS glasses in diopside and jadeite join show mostly ^{[4]}Al and a non-negligible fraction of ^{[5]}Al (X_{Diopside}=0.75, the mole fraction of diopside content). While the C_{q} (quadrupolar coupling constant) of ^{[4]}Al for glasses in

  19. Pinhole Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole glasses are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole glasses really give better vision? Some ways to use this question for motivation in teaching optics have been discussed. For this column we include a series of experiments that students can complete using a model of the eye and demonstrate issues related to pinhole vision correction.

  20. Final Report. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing, VSL-03R3460-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Isabelle S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Bazemore, Gina; Cecil, Richard; Hight, Kenneth; Mooers, Cavin; Lai, Shan-Tao T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-06-18

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  1. Simplicity in Pressure-induced Structural Change in Multi-component Silicate Melts in Earth's Interiors: Insights from Multi-nuclear NMR and Multi-edge Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical differentiation of the primary mantle was controlled by the properties of silicate melts at high pressure. These properties vary non-linearly with changes in pressure. Whereas the key to understanding these complex and non-linear changes in melt properties is the degree of melt-polymerization [e.g. non-bridging oxygen (NBO) fraction] at high pressure, the nature of changes in the melt structure at high pressures remains poorly constrained. While the NBO fraction at 1 atm is often regarded as a chemical constraint from which other properties of melt structure are predicted, the systematic relation between NBO fraction at high pressure and melt composition has not been available. The advances in multi-nuclear NMR and multi-edge inelastic x-ray scattering allow us to obtain details of the pressure-induced changes in the degree of melt polymerization and cation coordination number in multi-component melts up to 40 GPa (e.g. Lee Proc. Nat. Aca. Sci. 2011, 108, 6847; Sol. St. NMR. 2010, 38, 45; Lee et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2009, 103, 095501; Proc. Nat. Aca. Sci. 2008, 105, 7925). Here, we show that the fraction of highly coordinated Al in multi-component silicate melts at a given pressure vary nonlinearly with variations of NBO/T: [5,6]Al fraction at 8 GPa increases with decreasing degree of melt polymerization from ~8% for fully polymerized albite melt (NBO/T=0) to ~37% for partially depolymerized melt (NBO/T=0.29). Then it gradually decreases to ~15% with further increase in NBO/T of 0.67. This observed trend at a given pressure indicates competing densification mechanisms involving steric hindrance vs. changes of NBO fraction in the silicate melts. Furthermore, we also show that NBO fraction of silicate melts decreases slightly with increasing pressure at lower pressures but it abruptly increases with a further increase in pressure, regardless of composition. By introducing the transition pressure in which the NBO fraction is expected to be 50% of the

  2. Petrogenetic characteristics of molten slag from the pyrolysis/melting treatment of MSW.

    PubMed

    Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Motomura, Yoshinobu; Watanabe, Koichiro

    2009-03-01

    MSW slag materials derived from four pyrolysis melting plants in Japan were studied from the viewpoint of petrology in order to discriminate the glass and mineral phases and to propose a petrogenetic model for the formation process of molten slag. Slag material is composed of two major components: melt and refractory products. The melt products that formed during the melting process comprise silicate glass, and a suite of minerals as major constituents. The silicate glass is essentially composed of low and high silica glass members (typically 30% and 50% of SiO(2), respectively), from which minerals such as spinels, melilite, pseudowollastonite, and metallic inclusions have been precipitated. The refractory products consist mainly of pieces of metals, minerals and lithic fragments that survived through the melting process. Investigations demonstrated that the low silica melts (higher Ca and Al contents) were produced at upper levels of high temperature combustion chamber HTCC, at narrower temperature ranges (1250-1350 degrees C), while the high silica melts formed at broader temperature ranges (1250-1450 degrees C), at the lower levels of HTCC. The recent temperature ranges were estimated by using CaOAl(2)O(3)SiO(2) (CAS) ternary liquidus diagram that are reasonably consistent with those reported for a typical combustor. It was also understood that the samples with a higher CaO/SiO(2) ratio (>0.74-0.75) have undergone improved melting, incipient crystallization of minerals, and extensive homogenization. The combined mineralogical and geochemical examinations provided evidence to accept the concept of stepwise generation of different melt phases within the HTCC. The petrogenesis of the melt products may therefore be described as a two-phase melt system with immiscible characteristics that have been successively generated during the melting process of MSW. PMID:18922688

  3. Glass-clad semiconductor core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephanie Lynn

    Glass-clad optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core have garnered considerable recent attention for their potential utility as novel waveguides for applications in nonlinear optics, sensing, power delivery, and biomedicine. As research into these fibers has progressed, it has become evident that excessive losses are limiting performance and so greater understanding of the underlying materials science, coupled with advances in fiber processing, is needed. More specifically, the semiconductor core fibers possess three performance-limiting characteristics that need to be addressed: (a) thermal expansion mismatches between crystalline core and glass cladding that lead to cracks, (b) the precipitation of oxide species in the core upon fiber cooling, which results from partial dissolution of the cladding glass by the core melt, and (c) polycrystallinity; all of which lead to scattering and increased transmission losses. This dissertation systematically studies each of these effects and develops both a fundamental scientific understanding of and practical engineering methods for reducing their impact. With respect to the thermal expansion mismatch and, in part, the dissolution of oxides, for the first time to our knowledge, oxide and non-oxide glass compositions are developed for a series of semiconductor cores based on two main design criteria: (1) matching the thermal expansion coefficient between semiconductor core and glass cladding to minimize cracking and (2) matching the viscosity-temperature dependences, such that the cladding glass draws into fiber at a temperature slightly above the melting point of the semiconductor in order to minimize dissolution and improve the fiber draw process. The x[Na 2O:Al2O3] + (100 - 2x)SiO2 glass compositional family was selected due to the ability to tailor the glass properties to match the aforementioned targets through slight variations in composition and adjusting the ratios of bridging and non-bridging oxygen

  4. Cooling rate calculations for silicate glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnie, D. P., III; Dyar, M. D.

    1986-03-01

    Series solution calculations of cooling rates are applied to a variety of samples with different thermal properties, including an analog of an Apollo 15 green glass and a hypothetical silicate melt. Cooling rates for the well-studied green glass and a generalized silicate melt are tabulated for different sample sizes, equilibration temperatures and quench media. Results suggest that cooling rates are heavily dependent on sample size and quench medium and are less dependent on values of physical properties. Thus cooling histories for glasses from planetary surfaces can be estimated on the basis of size distributions alone. In addition, the variation of cooling rate with sample size and quench medium can be used to control quench rate.

  5. Freezing and melting of hydrogen confined in nanoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Kucheyev, S O; Van Cleve, E; Worsley, M A

    2014-06-01

    Thermodynamic properties of condensed hydrogen in geometric confinement remain poorly understood. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study solidification and melting of H2 in a series of Vycor-type nanoporous silica glasses with interconnected pores with average diameters in a wide range of ∼100-3000 Å. We find that the depression of freezing and melting temperatures for this quantum system follows the classical Gibbs-Thomson-like behavior, scaling inversely with the pore size when correlated to pore diameters measured directly by electron microscopy, rather than conventional gas sorption techniques. The shapes of pore size distributions derived from hydrogen thermoporometry are, however, more complex than those measured by gas sorption. The ratio between temperatures of the depression of freezing and melting suggests that the actual pore geometry in Vycor-type nanoporous glasses deviates from cylindrical. PMID:24823921

  6. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  7. Signatures of nonthermal melting.

    PubMed

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E

    2015-09-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  8. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  9. High-temperature study of defects and homogeneity in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Chang Hyun

    Glass frit has many useful applications in the glass and ceramic industries. Several attempts were made in this study to understand the origin of problems that generally occur when using glass frit. The effect of water/glass interactions on the rheology of glass suspension and the final properties of glass and glaze were studied. The dissolution of refractory inclusions and its influence on the bubble evolution, glass structure, and homogeneity of the resulting melt were also studied. The effects of long-term interaction of water with various frit suspensions were considered. The change in suspension rheology is associated with the ion concentration of the frit suspension, which strongly depends on the frit composition, additives, and solid content of frit suspension. Physical property and compositional variations resulted from dealkalization reactions between the frit particles and water. New investigative techniques for continuous monitoring and quantitative analysis of the dissolution of refractory inclusions in glass have been developed utilizing high-temperature microscopy with computer image analysis. The dissolution rates of refractory oxides in glass frit were measured utilizing hot-stage microscopy in the temperature range from 1050°C to 1400°C. The effects of dissolution on the structure of the final glass, were monitored by infrared spectroscopy. Homogenization of the resulting melts was studied using a Christiansen filter. It was found that melting temperature and time strongly influence the dissolution of refractory batch materials and subsequent homogenization rates, leading to large differences in final structures for glass melts and glazes which have not attained equilibrium.

  10. Pinhole Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole glasses are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole…

  11. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts.

  12. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  13. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  14. Langevin dynamics of polymeric manifolds in melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostiashvili, V. G.; Rehkopf, M.; Vilgis, T. A.

    1999-03-01

    The Martin-Siggia-Rose generating functional (MSR-GF) technique is used for treating the polymeric D-dimensional-manifold melt dynamics. The one- (test-) manifold dynamics and the collective dynamics are considered separately. The test-manifold dynamics is obtained by integrating out the melt collective variables. This is done within the dynamic random-phase approximation (RPA). The resulting effective-action functional of the test manifold is treated by making use of the self-consistent Hartree approximation. As a consequence, the generalized Rouse equation of the test manifold is derived, and its static and dynamic properties are studied. By making use the MSR-GF technique, the fluctuations around the RPA of the collective variables - mass density and response-field density - are investigated. As a result, the equations for the correlation and response functions are derived. The memory kernel can be specified for the ideal glass transition as a sum of all `water-melon' diagrams.

  15. Structure-melting relations in isomeric dibromobenzenes.

    PubMed

    Dziubek, Kamil F; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    1,4-Dibromobenzene melts at a considerably higher temperature than the 1,2- and 1,3-isomers. This melting-point difference is consistent with the molecular symmetry, as described by Carnelley's rule, and with the frequency of Br...Br halogen bonds. The lowest melting point of 1,3-dibromobenzene correlates with its two symmetry-independent molecules, indicating their inability to pack closely. Single crystals of 1,2- and 1,3-dibromobenzene have been grown under isochoric conditions in a diamond-anvil cell and at isobaric conditions in a glass capillary. Their structures have been determined in situ by X-ray diffraction. At 295 K 1,2-dibromobenzene crystallizes at 0.2 GPa as orthorhombic, space group Pbca, Z' = 1, and 1,3-dibromobenzene at 0.3 GPa as orthorhombic, space group P212121, Z' = 2. The same crystal phases are formed at ambient pressure by freezing these liquids below 256.15 and 248.45 K, respectively. The third isomer, 1,4-dibromobenzene, is a solid at room temperature and crystallizes as monoclinic, space group P21/a. Striking relations between the structures and melting points of the corresponding dibromobenzene and dichlorobenzene isomers have been discussed. PMID:24892596

  16. Low Cation Coordination in Oxide Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.; Weber, J. K. R.; Du, J.; Neuefeind, J.; Tumber, S. K.; Parise, J. B.

    2014-04-01

    The complete set of partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid are measured by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron and x-ray diffraction on Y2O3, and Ho2O3 melts at 2870 K. The average Y-O (or Ho-O) coordination of these isomorphic melts is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2O3 (or Ho2O3). Investigation of La2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation-oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that the coordination drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations, such as SiO2. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

  17. Low cation coordination in oxide melts.

    PubMed

    Skinner, L B; Benmore, C J; Weber, J K R; Du, J; Neuefeind, J; Tumber, S K; Parise, J B

    2014-04-18

    The complete set of partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid are measured by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron and x-ray diffraction on Y2O3, and Ho2O3 melts at 2870 K. The average Y-O (or Ho-O) coordination of these isomorphic melts is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2O3 (or Ho2O3). Investigation of La2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation-oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that the coordination drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations, such as SiO2. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses. PMID:24785072

  18. Structure-melting relations in isomeric dibromobenzenes.

    PubMed

    Dziubek, Kamil F; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    1,4-Dibromobenzene melts at a considerably higher temperature than the 1,2- and 1,3-isomers. This melting-point difference is consistent with the molecular symmetry, as described by Carnelley's rule, and with the frequency of Br...Br halogen bonds. The lowest melting point of 1,3-dibromobenzene correlates with its two symmetry-independent molecules, indicating their inability to pack closely. Single crystals of 1,2- and 1,3-dibromobenzene have been grown under isochoric conditions in a diamond-anvil cell and at isobaric conditions in a glass capillary. Their structures have been determined in situ by X-ray diffraction. At 295 K 1,2-dibromobenzene crystallizes at 0.2 GPa as orthorhombic, space group Pbca, Z' = 1, and 1,3-dibromobenzene at 0.3 GPa as orthorhombic, space group P212121, Z' = 2. The same crystal phases are formed at ambient pressure by freezing these liquids below 256.15 and 248.45 K, respectively. The third isomer, 1,4-dibromobenzene, is a solid at room temperature and crystallizes as monoclinic, space group P21/a. Striking relations between the structures and melting points of the corresponding dibromobenzene and dichlorobenzene isomers have been discussed.

  19. Melting temperature of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, J. H.; Zakharchenko, K. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Fasolino, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach to the melting of graphene based on nucleation theory for a first order phase transition from the two-dimensional (2D) solid to the 3D liquid via an intermediate quasi-2D liquid. The applicability of nucleation theory, supported by the results of systematic atomistic Monte Carlo simulations, provides an intrinsic definition of the melting temperature of graphene, Tm, and allows us to determine it. We find Tm≃4510 K, about 250 K higher than that of graphite using the same interatomic interaction model. The found melting temperature is shown to be in good agreement with the asymptotic results of melting simulations for finite disks and ribbons of graphene. Our results strongly suggest that graphene is the most refractory of all known materials.

  20. Methodology for the study of melt inclusions in Cr-spinel, and implications for parental melts of MORB from FAMOUS area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetsky, Vadim

    1996-08-01

    Melt inclusions trapped in Cr-spinel in mid-ocean ridge picrites (FAMOUS area, Atlantic Ocean) were studied using a heating stage and analyzed with both electron and ion microprobes. This new technique can provide information on the most primitive magma compositions, olivine-spinel-melt compositional relationships, crystallization temperature and geochemical diversity of parental melts. The study of melt inclusions in spinel can be applied to different high-Mg suites to show the effects of shallow level fractionation, mixing and contamination that usually affect the composition of volcanic rocks and glasses.