Science.gov

Sample records for advanced glass melting

  1. Advanced coal-fired glass melting development program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The objective of Phase 1 of the current contract was to verify the technical feasibility and economic benefits of Vortec's advanced combustion/melting technology using coal as the fuel of choice. The objective of the Phase 2 effort was to improve the performance of the primary components and demonstrate the effective operation of a subscale process heater system integrated with a glass separator/reservoir. (VC)

  2. Manufacturing laser glass by continuous melting

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Suratwala, T; krenitsky, S; Takeuchi, K

    2000-07-01

    A novel, continuous melting process is being used to manufacture meter-sized plates of laser glass at a rate 20-times faster, 5-times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality than with previous one-at-a-time, ''discontinuous'' technology processes. This new technology for manufacturing laser glass, which is arguably the most difficult continuously-melted optical material ever produced, comes as a result of a $60 million, six-year joint R&D program between government and industry. The glasses manufactured by the new continuous melting process are Nd-doped phosphate-based glasses and are marketed under the product names LG-770 (Schott Glass Technologies) and LHG-8 (Hoya Corporation USA). With this advance in glass manufacturing technology, it is now possible to construct high-energy, high-peak-power lasers for use in fusion energy development, national defense, and basic physics research that would have been impractical to build using the old melting technology. The development of continuously melted laser glass required technological advances that have lead to improvements in the manufacture of other optical glass products as well. For example, advances in forming, annealing, and conditioning steps of the laser glass continuous melting process are now being used in manufacture of other large-size optical glasses.

  3. Waste glass melting stages

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600[degrees]C--1000[degrees]C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied.

  4. Waste glass melting stages

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600{degrees}C--1000{degrees}C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied.

  5. Thermodynamics of glass forming polymeric melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Prapti B.; Patel, Ashmi T.; Pratap, Arun

    2013-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs free energy difference (ΔG) between the under cooled melt and the corresponding equilibrium solid has been analyzed for two samples of glass forming polymeric melts; polyamid-6 (PA-6), polypropylene oxide (PPO) in the entire temperature range: i.e. Tm (melting temperature) to Tg (glass transition temperature).

  6. Microwave melting of ion-conducting glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, D.J.; Terjak, M.J.E.; Risbud, S.H.; Phillips, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    Glasses of the system AgI-Ag{sub 2}O-(0.95B{sub 2}O{sub 3}:0.05SiO{sub 2}) have been formed by microwave processing using a domestic multi-mode oven operating at 900 watts and 2.45 GHz. Microwave heating resulted in rapid melting times with homogeneity in the quenched glasses equivalent to or better than conventional melting at 730 C. The glass forming region in this pseudo-ternary system is compared with the conventionally melted glass forming region in the system AgI-Ag{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A reversible color difference has been observed between glasses conventionally melted and those melted by microwave for all glass compositions in the system.

  7. Method and apparatus for melting glass batch

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.; Walkup, Paul C.; Mudge, Lyle K.

    1988-01-01

    A glass melting system involving preheating, precalcining, and prefluxing of batch materials prior to injection into a glass furnace. The precursors are heated by convection rather than by radiation in present furnaces. Upon injection into the furnace, batch materials are intimately coated with molten flux so as to undergo or at least begin the process of dissolution reaction prior to entering the melt pool.

  8. Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting Research Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, John J.; McConnell, John F.; Henry, Vincent I.; MacDonald, Blake A.; Gallagher, Robert J.; Field, William B.; Walsh, Peter M.; Simmons, Michael C.; Adams, Michael E.; Leadbetter, James M.; Tomasewski, Jack W.; Operacz, Walter J.; Houf, William G.; Davis, James W.; Marvin, Bart G.; Gunner, Bruce E.; Farrell, Rick G.; Bivins, David P.; Curtis, Warren; Harris, James E.

    2004-08-01

    solution of proprietary glass production problems. As a consequence of the substantial increase in scale and scope of the initial furnace concept in response to industry recommendations, constraints on funding of industrial programs by DOE, and reorientation of the Department's priorities, the OIT Glass Program is unable to provide the support for construction of such a facility. However, it is the present investigators' hope that a group of industry partners will emerge to carry the project forward, taking advantage of the detailed furnace design presented in this report. The engineering, including complete construction drawings, bill of materials, and equipment specifications, is complete. The project is ready to begin construction as soon as the quotations are updated. The design of the research melter closely follows the most advanced industrial practice, firing by natural gas with oxygen. The melting area is 13 ft x 6 ft, with a glass depth of 3 ft and an average height in the combustion space of 3 ft. The maximum pull rate is 25 tons/day, ranging from 100% batch to 100% cullet, continuously fed, with variable batch composition, particle size distribution, and raft configuration. The tank is equipped with bubblers to control glass circulation. The furnace can be fired in three modes: (1) using a single large burner mounted on the front wall, (2) by six burners in a staggered/opposed arrangement, three in each breast wall, and (3) by down-fired burners mounted in the crown in any combination with the front wall or breast-wall-mounted burners. Horizontal slots are provided between the tank blocks and tuck stones and between the breast wall and skewback blocks, running the entire length of the furnace on both sides, to permit access to the combustion space and the surface of the glass for optical measurements and sampling probes. Vertical slots in the breast walls provide additional access for measurements and sampling. The furnace and tank are to be fully instrumented

  9. Production of Synthetic Nuclear Melt Glass.

    PubMed

    Molgaard, Joshua J; Auxier, John D; Giminaro, Andrew V; Oldham, Colton J; Gill, Jonathan; Hall, Howard L

    2016-01-04

    Realistic surrogate nuclear debris is needed within the nuclear forensics community to test and validate post-detonation analysis techniques. Here we outline a novel process for producing bulk surface debris using a high temperature furnace. The material developed in this study is physically and chemically similar to trinitite (the melt glass produced by the first nuclear test). This synthetic nuclear melt glass is assumed to be similar to the vitrified material produced near the epicenter (ground zero) of any surface nuclear detonation in a desert environment. The process outlined here can be applied to produce other types of nuclear melt glass including that likely to be formed in an urban environment. This can be accomplished by simply modifying the precursor matrix to which this production process is applied. The melt glass produced in this study has been analyzed and compared to trinitite, revealing a comparable crystalline morphology, physical structure, void fraction, and chemical composition.

  10. Development of continuous glass melting for production of Nd-doped phosphate glasses for the NIF and LMJ laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jack H.; McLean, M. J.; Hawley-Fedder, Ruth A.; Suratwala, Tayyab I.; Ficini-Dorn, G.; Trombert, Jean-Hugues

    1999-07-01

    The NIF and LMJ laser systems require about 3380 and 4752 Nd-doped laser glass slabs, respectively. Continuous laser glass melting and forming will be used for the first time to manufacture these slabs. Two vendors have been chosen to produce the glass: Hoya Corporation and Schott Glass Technologies. The laser glass melting systems that each of these two vendors have designed, built and tested are arguably the most advanced in the world. Production of the laser glass will begin on a pilot scale in the fall of 1998.

  11. Thermally efficient melting for glass making

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael S. K.; Painter, Corning F.; Pastore, Steven P.; Roth, Gary; Winchester, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is an integrated process for the production of glass utilizing combustion heat to melt glassmaking materials in a glassmaking furnace. The fuel combusted to produce heat sufficient to melt the glassmaking materials is combusted with oxygen-enriched oxidant to reduce heat losses from the offgas of the glassmaking furnace. The process further reduces heat losses by quenching hot offgas from the glassmaking furnace with a process stream to retain the heat recovered from quench in the glassmaking process with subsequent additional heat recovery by heat exchange of the fuel to the glassmaking furnace, as well as the glassmaking materials, such as batch and cullet. The process includes recovery of a commercially pure carbon dioxide product by separatory means from the cooled, residual offgas from the glassmaking furnace.

  12. Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter

    SciTech Connect

    David Rue

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

  13. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    This flight definition project has the specific objective of investigating the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in high temperature inorganic oxide, glass forming melts in microgravity. It is related to one1 of our previous NASA projects that was concerned with glass formation for high temperature containerless melts in microgravity. The previous work culminated in two experiments which were conducted aboard the space shuttle in 1983 and 1985 and which consisted of melting (at 1500 C) and cooling levitated 6 to 8 mm diameter spherical samples in a Single Axis Acoustic Levitator (SAAL) furnace. Compared to other types of materials, there have been relatively few experiments, 6 to 8, conducted on inorganic glasses in space. These experiments have been concerned with mass transport (alkali diffusion), containerless melting, critical cooling rate for glass formation, chemical homogeneity, fiber pulling, and crystallization of glass forming melts. One of the most important and consistent findings in all of these experiments has been that the glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization (better glass former) and more chemically homogeneous than equivalent glasses made on earth (1g). The chemical composition of the melt appears relatively unimportant since the same general results have been reported for oxide, fluoride and chalcogenide melts. These results for space-processed glasses have important implications, since glasses with a higher resistance to crystallization or higher chemical homogeneity than those attainable on earth can significantly advance applications in areas such as fiber optics communications, high power laser glasses, and other photonic devices where glasses are the key functional materials. The classical theories for nucleation and crystal growth for a glass or melt do not contain any parameter that is directly dependent upon the g-value, so it is not readily apparent why glasses prepared in microgravity should be

  14. Determination of Reactive Surface Area of Melt Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier,W.L.; Roberts, S.; Smith, D.K.; Hulsey, S.; Newton,L.; Sawvel, A.; Bruton, C.; Papelis, C.; Um, W.; Russell, C. E.; Chapman,J.

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of natural and manmade silicate glasses, and nuclear melt glass was undertaken in order to derive an estimate of glass reactive surface area. Reactive surface area is needed to model release rates of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass in the subsurface. Because of the limited availability of nuclear melt glasses, natural volcanic glass samples were collected which had similar textures and compositions as those of melt glass. A flow-through reactor was used to measure the reactive surface area of the analog glasses in the presence of simplified NTS site ground waters. A measure of the physical surface area of these glasses was obtained using the BET gas-adsorption method. The studies on analog glasses were supplemented by measurement of the surface areas of pieces of actual melt glass using the BET method. The variability of the results reflect the sample preparation and measurement techniques used, as well as textural heterogeneity inherent to these samples. Based on measurements of analog and actual samples, it is recommended that the hydraulic source term calculations employ a range of 0.001 to 0.01 m{sup 2}/g for the reactive surface area of nuclear melt glass.

  15. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2001-01-01

    This flight definition project has the specific objective of investigating the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in high temperature inorganic oxide, glass forming melts in microgravity. It is related to one of our previous NASA projects that was concerned with glass formation for high temperature containerless melts in microgravity. The previous work culminated in two experiments which were conducted aboard the space shuttle in 1983 and 1985 and which consisted of melting (at 1500 C) and cooling levitated 6 to 8 mm diameter spherical samples in a Single Axis Acoustic Levitator (SAAL) furnace. Compared to other types of materials, there have been relatively few experiments, 6 to 8, conducted on inorganic glasses in space. These experiments have been concerned with mass transport (alkali diffusion), containerless melting, critical cooling rate for glass formation, chemical homogeneity, fiber pulling, and crystallization of glass forming melts. One of the most important and consistent findings in all of these experiments has been that the glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization (better glass former) and more chemically homogeneous than equivalent glasses made on Earth (1 g). The chemical composition of the melt appears relatively unimportant since the same general results have been reported for oxide, fluoride and chalcogenide melts. These results for space-processed glasses have important implications, since glasses with a higher resistance to crystallization or higher chemical homogeneity than those attainable on Earth can significantly advance applications in areas such as fiber optics communications, high power laser glasses, and other photonic devices where glasses are the key functional materials.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of a glass melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Egelja, A.; Lottes, S. A.

    2000-05-09

    The glass production industry is one of the major users of natural gas in the US, and approximately 75% of the energy produced from natural gas is used in the melting process. Industrial scale glass melting furnaces are large devices, typically 5 or more meters wide, and twice as long. To achieve efficient heat transfer to the glass melt below, the natural gas flame must extend over a large portion of the glass melt. Therefore modern high efficiency burners are not used in these furnaces. The natural gas is injected as a jet, and a jet flame forms in the flow of air entering the furnace. In most current glass furnaces the energy required to melt the batch feed stock is about twice the theoretical requirement. An improved understanding of the heat transfer and two phase flow processes in the glass melt and solid batch mix offers a substantial opportunity for energy savings and consequent emission reductions. The batch coverage form and the heat flux distribution have a strong influence on the glass flow pattern. This flow pattern determines to a significant extent the melting rate and the quality of glass.

  17. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-09-23

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste uranium oxides The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  18. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  19. Bioactive ceramic glasses in situ synthesized by laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taca, Mihaela; Vasile, Eugeniu; Boroica, Lucica; Udrea, Mircea; Medianu, Rares; Munteanu, Maria Cristina

    2008-10-01

    The synthesis of bioactive glass from raw materials even during the laser deposition process, could provide formation of a biocompatible layer on the metallic prosthesis. During the laser irradiation melting and ultrarapid solidification of ceramic materials occur and glasses controlled by the process parameters (especially laser power and solidification rate) will be obtained. The aim of the present paper is to study the influence of the processing parameters on the laser synthesized glasses chemical composition, structure and bioactive behaviour.

  20. Containerless Processing of Glass Forming Melts in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The major objectives of this work are: (1) obtain quantitative evidence for the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization in containerless melts in micro-g; (2) study melt homogenization in the absence of gravity driven convection; (3) develop the procedures for preparing precursor samples suitable for flight experiments; (4) perform comparative property analysis of glasses melted on Earth and in micro-g; (5) determine the feasibility of preparing glass shells in micro-g for use as laser fusion targets; and (6) assess the operational performance of the single axis acoustic levitator/furnace apparatus for processing multicomponent, glass forming melts in micro-g. Ways of obtaining these goals are discussed.

  1. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  2. Glass Nanofibers from Fragile Melts Produced by Laser Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieste, O.; Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    Laser Spinning is a new technique enabling the production of large quantity of very long amorphous ceramic nanofibers. This technique has been successfully tested with different material compositions, probing its capability to produce fibers of inorganic oxides that cannot be produced by any other technique. Precise control of the process allows for the production of amorphous nanofibers of non-ready glass former materials and the unprecedented synthesis of glass nanofibers from very fragile melts. This outcome demonstrates the capability for the synthesis of glass nanofibers with applications in the field of fire retardant fabrics, catalysis or high refractory materials.

  3. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  4. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2004-11-02

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  5. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-10-07

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  6. Containerless processing of glass forming melts in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, D. E.; Ray, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    The near weightlessness of a material in the reduced gravity environment of space offers the opportunity of melting and cooling glass forming compositions without a container. This reduces the heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization which usually occurs at the walls of the container, thereby, extending the range of glass forming compositions. Based primarily on this idea, containerless glass forming experiments, which used a single axis acoustic levitator/furnace (SAAL), were conducted on SPAR rocket flights, 6 and 8, and on Space Shuttle mission, STS-7 and STS-61A. The experiments on the Space Shuttle were designed to include other studies related to melt homogenization and mixing, development of techniques for preparing uncontaminated preflight samples, and simple shaping experiments.

  7. Effect of glass-batch makeup on the melting process

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R; Schweiger, Michael J; Humrickhouse, Carissa J; Moody, J Adam; Tate, Rachel M; Rainsdon, Timothy T; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E; Arrigoni, Benjamin M; Marcial, Jose; Rodriguez, Carmen P; Tincher, Benjamin

    2010-03-29

    The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5-μm in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800°C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass-forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, ±75 μm in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800°C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160°C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B2O3, CaO, Li2O, MgO, and Na2O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

  8. Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

    2006-01-17

    This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore

  9. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-14

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  10. Experimental Investigation on Selective Laser Melting of Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateri, Miranda; Gebhardt, Andreas; Thuemmler, Stefan; Thurn, Laura

    Although laser-based Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes have been investigated extensively for use with different materials, fabrication of 3D glass objects using Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology is not well developed even though it has many applications. As such an experimental investigation on the process parameters of glass powder using SLM process was conducted and the results are summarized in this paper. Multiple 3D objects were fabricated and analyzed. Lastly Scanning Electron Microcopy (SEM) of the manufactured objects as well as effect of process parameters on dimensional accuracy, surface quality, and the density of the fabricated parts are presented in this paper.

  11. Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

  12. Stepwise melting of a model glass former under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Wales, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    The equilibrium thermodynamics of a binary Lennard-Jones model glass former are investigated using exchange Monte Carlo simulations, covering the crystalline and amorphous regions of configuration space in appropriate temperature ranges. We investigate both bulk and film mixtures, the latter being confined between noninteracting flat walls. Both the bulk and film systems exhibit a principal heat capacity peak at the melting point, but confinement leads to a significant depression in the melting temperature by about 25%. Microcanonical caloric curves, as well as analysis of the probability distributions of a bond-orientational order parameter, show that this transition has first-order character. However, the film system shows additional features at lower temperatures, which are interpreted in terms of localized partial melting, perpendicular to the confining walls and near the walls, with some increase in layering. This premelting is associated with local minima on the underlying potential energy surface that are not supported by the bulk system.

  13. Composite material based on fluoroplast and low melting oxyfluoride glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatieva, L. N.; Savchenko, N. N.; Lalayan, V. M.; Zverev, G. A.; Goncharuk, V. K.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Shaulov, A. Yu.; Berlin, A. A.; Bouznik, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work summarizes the results of studies of the samples fabricated through extrusion blending of mixtures composed of the perfluorocarbon polymer (polyvinylidene fluoride, PVDF), which presently undergoes intensive studies, and the inorganic glass (BF-glass) of the composition 3B2O3-97(40SnF2-30SnO-30P2O5). It is revealed as a result of application of the suggested technique the composite material whose structure depends on the component ratio in the mixture (from individual areas formed by each component to homogeneously distributed composite particles) has been fabricated. The peculiarities of formation of composites were studied on the basis of the results of studying their morphology, molecular structure and phase composition. It was revealed the preservation of the polymer molecular structure and the absence of interaction with the glass in the fabricated samples. We found that in the process of sample fabrication there occur melting of the mixture, mixing of particles and changing of the phase compositions. The polymer partially and the glass almost completely crystallize in the process of composite fabrication. Glass crystals fill polymer cavities forming agglomerates. Along with the increase of the amount of inorganic component crystals, the polymer monolithic nature is disrupted and an inversion occurs at a certain component ratio: polymer particles are located between crystals of the inorganic component, mixing with them and covering them. The glass crystallization is facilitated through pre-crushing in extruder mill.

  14. MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE MATERIALS FOR GLASS MELTING SENSOR SHEATHS

    SciTech Connect

    J. PETROVIC; R. CASTRO; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    Sensors for measuring the properties of molten glass require protective sensor sheaths in order to shield them from the extremely corrosive molten glass environment. MoSi{sub 2} has been shown to possess excellent corrosion resistance in molten glass, making it a candidate material for advanced sensor sheath applications. MoSi{sub 2}-coated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes, MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laminate composite tubes, and MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} functionally graded composite tubes have been produced by plasma spray-forming techniques for such applications.

  15. Coordination chemistry of Ti(IV) in silicate glasses and melts: III. Glasses and melts from ambient to high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, François; Brown, Gordon E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Gan, Hao; Rehr, John R.

    1996-08-01

    The local structural environment of Ti in five Na-, K-, and Ca-titanosilicate glass/melts with TiO 2 concentrations ranging from 2.7-30.5 wt% has been determined by in situ Ti K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy at temperatures ranging from 293-1650 K. In parallel, two Ti-model compounds (Ni 2.6Ti 0.7O 4 spinel and TiO 2 rutile) were studied under the same conditions to better understand the effects of temperature (anharmonicity) on the XAFS spectra. Temperature-induced anharmonicity was found to vary, largely as a function of the Ti-coordination, and increases significantly around Ti with increasing temperature when present as [6]Ti. In contrast, anharmonicity appears negligible around [4]Ti at temperatures below 1200 K. We predict that anharmonicity should be weak around [5]Ti as well. No clear evidence was found for a significant change in the average nearest-neighbor coordination environment of Ti in the Na- and K-titanosilicate glasses and melts that exhibit anomalous heat capacities variations just above their glass transition temperatures, Tg (860-930 K). The small (predicted and measured) linear thermal expansion of the ( [5]TiO 2+) sbnd O bond in these systems at high temperature is expected to have an insignificant effect on the local environment of [5]Ti during the glass-to-supercooled liquid transition. In the most dilute Ti-glass studied (KS1; 2.7 wt% TiO 2), the local environment around [4]Ti (especially the second-neighbor alkalis) is relatively ordered at ambient temperature, but this order decreases dramatically above Tg. Lower quench rates appear to favor [4]Ti over [5]Ti. The origin of the observed anomalous positive variations in heat capacities of these melts may be related to significant changes in the medium-range environment around Ti above Tg including the disappearance of percolation domains involving interfaces between alkali-rich and network-former rich regions during structural relaxation at Tg; these percolation

  16. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending.

  17. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    1999-01-01

    The following list summarizes the most important results that have been consistently reported for glass forming melts in microgravity: (1) Glass formation is enhanced for melts prepared in space; (2) Glasses prepared in microgravity are more chemically homogeneous and contain fewer and smaller chemically heterogeneous regions than identical glasses prepared on earth; (3) Heterogeneities that are deliberately introduced such as Pt particles are more uniformly distributed in a glass melted in space than in a glass melted on earth; (4) Glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization and have a higher mechanical strength and threshold energy for radiation damage; and (5) Glasses crystallized in space have a different microstructure, finer grains more uniformly distributed, than equivalent samples crystallized on earth. The preceding results are not only scientifically interesting, but they have considerable practical implications. These results suggest that the microgravity environment is advantageous for developing new and improved glasses and glass-ceramics that are difficult to prepare on earth. However, there is no suitable explanation at this time for why a glass melted in microgravity will be more chemically homogeneous and more resistant to crystallization than a glass melted on earth. A fundamental investigation of melt homogenization, nucleation, and crystal growth processes in glass forming melts in microgravity is important to understanding these consistently observed, but yet unexplained results. This is the objective of the present research. A lithium disilicate (Li2O.2SiO2) glass will be used for this investigation, since it is a well studied system, and the relevant thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for nucleation and crystal growth at 1-g are available. The results from this research are expected to improve our present understanding of the fundamental mechanism of nucleation and crystal growth in melts and liquids, and to lead

  18. MELTING, SOLIDIFICATION, REMELTING, AND SEPARATION OF GLASS AND METAL

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. A basic knowledge of the thermal, transport, and metallurgical phenomena that occur in the melting and solidification of glass, metal, and their mixtures is the foundation of the development of the separation methods. In association with this project, an innovative liquid-liquid extractor/separator will be developed to meet the separation needs for efficient extraction/separation devices for the various DOE liquid waste treatment processes.

  19. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-17

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  20. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  1. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Fox, Kevin M.

    2015-07-01

    glass formulations will reduce the cost of Hanford tank waste management by reducing the schedule for tank waste treatment and reducing the amount of HLW glass for storage, transportation, and disposal. Additional benefits will be realized if advanced glasses are developed that demonstrate more tolerance for key components in the waste (such as Al2O3, Cr2O3, SO3 and Na2O) above the currently defined WTP constraints. Tolerating these higher concentrations of key waste loading limiters may reduce the burden on (or even eliminate the need for) leaching to remove Cr and Al and washing to remove excess S and Na from the HLW fraction. Advanced glass formulations may also make direct vitrification of the HLW fraction without significant pretreatment more cost effective. Finally, the advanced glass formulation efforts seek not only to increase waste loading in glass, but also to increase glass production rate. When coupled with higher waste loading, ensuring that all of the advanced glass formulations are processable at or above the current contract processing rate leads to significant improvements in waste throughput (the amount of waste being processed per unit time),which could significantly reduce the overall WTP mission life. The integration of increased waste loading, reduced leaching/washing requirements, and improved melting rates provides a system-wide approach to improve the effectiveness of the WTP process.

  2. Correlation between average melting temperature and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhibin; Li, Jiangong

    2009-02-01

    The correlation between average melting temperature (⟨Tm⟩) and glass transition temperature (Tg) in metallic glasses (MGs) is analyzed. A linear relationship, Tg=0.385⟨Tm⟩, is observed. This correlation agrees with Egami's suggestion [Rep. Prog. Phys. 47, 1601 (1984)]. The prediction of Tg from ⟨Tm⟩ through the relationship Tg=0.385⟨Tm⟩ has been tested using experimental data obtained on a large number of MGs. This relationship can be used to predict and design MGs with a desired Tg.

  3. Entropy and structure of silicate glasses and melts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richet, P.; Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    Low-temperature adiabatic Cp measurements have been made on NaAlSi2O6, MgSiO3, Ca3Al2Si3O12 and Ca1.5Mg1.5Al2Si3O12 glasses. Above about 50 K, these and previous data show that the heat capacity is an additive function of composition to within ??1% throughout the investigated glassforming part of the system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2. In view of the determining role of oxygen coordination polyhedra on the low-temperature entropy, this is interpreted as indicating that Si and Al are tetrahedrally coordinated in all these glasses, in agreement with structural data; whereas Ca and Mg remain octahedrally coordinated. In contrast, heat capacities and entropies are not additive functions of composition for alkali aluminosilicates, indicating increases in the coordination numbers of alkali elements from about six to nine when alumina is introduced. A thermochemical consequence of additivity of vibrational entropies of glasses is that entropies of mixing are essentially configurational for calcium and magnesium aluminosilicate melts. For alkali-bearing liquids, it is probable that vibrational entropies contribute significantly to entropies of mixing. At very low temperatures, the additive nature of the heat capacity with composition is less well followed, likely as a result of specific differences in medium-range order. ?? 1993.

  4. Temperature Effects on Aluminoborosilicate Glass and Melt Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative determination of the atomic-scale structure of multi-component oxide melts, and the effects of temperature on them, is a complex problem. Ca- and Na- aluminoborosilicates are especially interesting, not only because of their major role in widespread technical applications (flat-panel computer displays, fiber composites, etc.), but because the coordination environments of two of their main network cations (Al3+ and B3+) change markedly with composition and temperature is ways that may in part be analogous to processes in silicate melts at high pressures in the Earth. Here we examine a series of such glasses with different cooling rates, chosen to evaluate the role modifier cation field strength (Ca2+ vs. Na+) and of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) content. To explore the effects of fictive temperature, fast quenched and annealed samples were compared. We have used B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to measure the different B and Al coordinations and calculated the contents of non-bridging oxygens (NBO). Lower cooling rates increase the fraction of [4]B species in all compositions. The conversion of [3]B to [4]B is also expected to convert NBO to bridging oxygens, which should affect thermodynamic properties such as configurational entropy and configurational heat capacity. For four compositions with widely varying compositions and initial NBO contents, analysis of the speciation changes with the same, simple reaction [3]B = [4]B + NBO yields similar enthalpy values of 25±7 kJ/mol. B-11 triple quantum MAS NMR allows as well the proportions of [3]B boroxol ring and non-ring sites to be determined, and reveals more [3]B boroxol ring structures present in annealed (lower temperature) glasses. In situ, high-temperature MAS NMR spectra have been collected on one of the Na-aluminoborosilicate and on a sodium borate glass at 14.1 T. The exchange of boron between the 3- and 4-coordinated sites is clearly observed well above the glass transition temperatures, confirming the

  5. An electromotive force series in a borosilicate glass-forming melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, H. D.; Balazs, G. B.; Carpenter, B. E.; Kirkley, J. E.; Minnix, L. M.; Jamison, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An electromotive force series for redox couples was defined as a function of oxygen fugacity in a borosilicate melt at 1150 C. The resulting order of relative reduction potentials can be used to estimate the amounts of redox species in glass during processing. The electromotive force series in this melt is comparable to those in other silicate glass-forming melts and in aqueous systems but differs in detail because of interaction of the solvents with individual redox couples.

  6. Lead extraction from cathode ray tube funnel glass melted under different oxidizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi

    2015-07-15

    Lead was extracted into hydrochloric acid from cathode ray tube funnel glass melted under reducing atmosphere, oxidizing atmosphere, or a sequential combination of both to mechanistically investigate effects of the melting atmosphere on lead extraction. Melting funnel glass in a reductive atmosphere led to the generation of metallic lead particles that were readily soluble in the acid, increasing the quantity of lead extracted into the acid. Meanwhile, the glass product obtained after melting funnel glass in an oxidative atmosphere exhibited higher corrosion resistance in the acid, and the quantity of lead extracted from the treated glass decreased. However, Na2CO3 addition to the glass during melting hindered the enhancement of corrosion resistance and the immobilization of lead in the acid. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of the treated glass samples showed that the positions of the peak or the profiles of the spectra attributed to Pb 4f, Si 2p, and O 1s signals were modified by oxidative melting, an indication that oxidative melting results in structural changes in the SiO2 framework of the glass.

  7. Nuclear Melt Glass Dissolution and Secondary Mineral Precipitation at 40 to 200C

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Viani, B; Pawloski, G; Rose, T

    2004-06-14

    Most long-lived radionuclides associated with an underground nuclear test are initially incorporated into melt glass and become part of the hydrologic source term (HST) only upon their release via glass dissolution (Pawloski et al., 2001). As the melt glass dissolves, secondary minerals precipitate. The types of secondary minerals that precipitate influence the water chemistry in and around the melt glass. The secondary minerals also provide a sorption sink to the released radionuclides. The changing water chemistry affects the rate of glass dissolution; it also affects the sorption behavior of the released radionuclides. This complex nature of glass dissolution and its important role in defining the HST requires a thorough understanding of glass dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation. The identity of secondary minerals formed at temperatures from 40 to 200 C are evaluated in this report to assist in that understanding.

  8. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  9. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass melting furnaces with modified-processes is not subject to the provisions of § 60.292 if the affected...

  10. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass melting furnaces with modified-processes is not subject to the provisions of § 60.292 if the affected...

  11. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass melting furnaces with modified-processes is not subject to the provisions of § 60.292 if the affected...

  12. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass melting furnaces with modified-processes is not subject to the provisions of § 60.292 if the affected...

  13. 40 CFR 60.293 - Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... glass melting furnace with modified-processes. 60.293 Section 60.293 Protection of Environment... from glass melting furnace with modified-processes. (a) An owner or operator of a glass melting furnaces with modified-processes is not subject to the provisions of § 60.292 if the affected...

  14. Glass science tutorial lecture {number_sign}6: The melting of silicate glasses, a review of selected topics

    SciTech Connect

    Swarts, E.L.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a two-day lecture given at Westinghouse Hanford Company in March, 1995 and includes the data used in the presentation. Topics included the special needs of a low-level waste vitrification process, glass melting, mechanisms of the formation of foam, glass refining (bubble removal), and homogenization (reduction of chemical heterogeneity to acceptable levels). 96 refs.

  15. High spatial resolution geochemistry and textural characteristics of 'microtektite' glass spherules in proximal Cretaceous-Paleogene sections: Insights into glass alteration patterns and precursor melt lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belza, Joke; Goderis, Steven; Smit, Jan; Vanhaecke, Frank; Baert, Kitty; Terryn, Herman; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    variably enriched in Sr, Ba, and Cs, indicating preferred adsorption from seawater during hydration. Despite the onset of ion-exchange reactions, which only seem to have affected the alkalis, the trace element composition of the green high-Si, Al glass is still largely representative of the original melt composition. Refining the geochemical signature of (altered) melt lithologies may advance our current understanding of glass stability in the natural environment and provide insight into the origin and emplacement of ejecta material during crater formation.

  16. Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-04-07

    A method is described for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term. 4 figs.

  17. Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    1992-01-01

    A method for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a "non-bridging oxygen" term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

  18. Local melting to design strong and plastically deformable bulk metallic glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yue-Sheng; Han, Xiao-Liang; Song, Kai-Kai; Tian, Yu-Hao; Peng, Chuan-Xiao; Wang, Li; Sun, Bao-An; Wang, Gang; Kaban, Ivan; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Recently, CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites reinforced by the TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity) effect have been explored in attempt to accomplish an optimal of trade-off between strength and ductility. However, the design of such BMG composites with advanced mechanical properties still remains a big challenge for materials engineering. In this work, we proposed a technique of instantaneously and locally arc-melting BMG plate to artificially induce the precipitation of B2 crystals in the glassy matrix and then to tune mechanical properties. Through adjusting local melting process parameters (i.e. input powers, local melting positions, and distances between the electrode and amorphous plate), the size, volume fraction, and distribution of B2 crystals were well tailored and the corresponding formation mechanism was clearly clarified. The resultant BMG composites exhibit large compressive plasticity and high strength together with obvious work-hardening ability. This compelling approach could be of great significance for the steady development of metastable CuZr-based alloys with excellent mechanical properties.

  19. Local melting to design strong and plastically deformable bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yue-Sheng; Han, Xiao-Liang; Song, Kai-Kai; Tian, Yu-Hao; Peng, Chuan-Xiao; Wang, Li; Sun, Bao-An; Wang, Gang; Kaban, Ivan; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Recently, CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites reinforced by the TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity) effect have been explored in attempt to accomplish an optimal of trade-off between strength and ductility. However, the design of such BMG composites with advanced mechanical properties still remains a big challenge for materials engineering. In this work, we proposed a technique of instantaneously and locally arc-melting BMG plate to artificially induce the precipitation of B2 crystals in the glassy matrix and then to tune mechanical properties. Through adjusting local melting process parameters (i.e. input powers, local melting positions, and distances between the electrode and amorphous plate), the size, volume fraction, and distribution of B2 crystals were well tailored and the corresponding formation mechanism was clearly clarified. The resultant BMG composites exhibit large compressive plasticity and high strength together with obvious work-hardening ability. This compelling approach could be of great significance for the steady development of metastable CuZr-based alloys with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:28211890

  20. Conformational Fluctuations of Polymers in a Melt Associated with Glass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaoka, Nobuyuki; Takano, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    The conformational fluctuations of a glassy short polymer melt are studied by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and principal component analysis (PCA). The distribution of PCA eigenvalues, which measure static fluctuations of the polymers, shows a clear difference between above and below the conventional glass transition temperature Tg. The approximate conformational entropy of the polymers also indicates a transition near Tg. This is evidence that the static properties of polymers in the melt signal the glass transition.

  1. Incorporation and distribution of rhenium in a borosilicate glass melt heat treated in a sealed ampoule

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2013-07-25

    We investigated a mass balance of rhenium (used as a surrogate for technetium-99) in a borosilicate glass that was mixed with excess Re source (KReO4) beyond its solubility and heat treated in a vacuum-sealed fused silica ampoule. Distribution of Re in the bulk of the glass, in a salt phase formed on the melt surface, and in condensate material deposited on the ampoule wall was evaluated to understand the Re migration into different phases during the reaction between the molten glass and KReO4. The information gained from this study will contribute to an effort to understand the mechanism of technetium retention in or escape from glass melt during early stages of glass batch melting, which is a goal of the present series of studies.

  2. Reaction of Inconel 690 and 693 in Iron Phosphate Melts: Alternative Glasses for Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E. Kim, Cheol-Woon

    2005-09-13

    The corrosion resistance of candidate materials used for the electrodes (Inconel 690 & 693) and the melt contact refractory (Monofrax K-3) in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) has been investigated at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) during the period from June 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (DE-FG02-04ER63831). The unusual properties and characteristics of iron phosphate glasses, as viewed from the standpoint of alternative glasses for vitrifying nuclear and hazardous wastes which contain components that make them poorly suited for vitrification in borosilicate glass, were recently discovered at UMR. The expanding national and international interest in iron phosphate glasses for waste vitrification stems from their rapid melting and chemical homogenization which results in higher furnace output, their high waste loading that varies from 32 wt% up to 75 wt% for the Hanford LAW and HLW, respectively, and the outstanding chemical durability of the iron phosphate wasteforms which meets all present DOE requirements (PCT and VHT). The higher waste loading in iron phosphate glasses, compared to the baseline borosilicate glass, can reduce the time and cost of vitrification considerably since a much smaller mass of glass will be produced, for example, about 43% less glass when the LAW at Hanford is vitrified in an iron phosphate glass according to PNNL estimates. In view of the promising performance of iron phosphate glasses, information is needed for how to best melt these glasses on the scale needed for practical use. Melting iron phosphate glasses in a JHM is considered the preferred method at this time because its design could be nearly identical to the JHM now used to melt borosilicate glasses at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Therefore, it is important to have information for the corrosion of candidate electrode

  3. SCOPING MELTING STUDIES OF HIGH ALUMINA WASTE GLASS COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, Jared O.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Vienna, John D.

    2015-09-04

    Glass property models will be used at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant to formulate durable high-level waste glasses for disposal. A major effort is focused on expanding glass property models to cover a broader range of wastes and higher waste-loaded glasses. As a part of this effort, a statistically designed matrix of high-alumina glass compositions was developed. Forty five compositions were selected from the matrix to evaluate glass properties. Of these compositions, thirty three produced homogeneous glasses. The other twelve compositions contained segregated phases and high crystallinity; these were iteratively modified in an attempt to produce homogeneous glass samples while altering the original composition as little as possible. This paper focuses on the characterization of the twelve inhomogeneous compositions and their modifications using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  4. Tomographic location of potential melt-bearing phenocrysts in lunar glass spherules

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, D.S.; Fogel, R.A.; Rivers, M.L.

    2005-02-04

    Apollo 17 orange glass spherules contain olivine phenocrysts with melt inclusions from depth. Tomography (<2micron/pxl) of >200 spherules located 1 phenocryst. We will try to find melt inclusions and obtain original magma volatiles and compositions. In 1971, Apollo 17 astronauts collected a 10 cm soil sample (74220) comprised almost entirely of orange glass spherules. Below this, a double drive-tube core sampled a 68 cm thick horizon comprised of orange glass and black beads (crystallized equivalents of orange glass). Primitive lunar glass spherules (e.g.-A17 orange glasses) are thought to represent ejecta from lunar mare fire fountains. The fire-fountains were apparently driven by a combination of C-O gas exsolution from orange glass melt and the oxidation of graphite. Upon eruption, magmas lost their volatiles (e.g., S, CO, CO{sub 2}) to space. Evidence for volatile escape remains as volatile-rich coatings on the exteriors of many spherules. Moreover, it showed that Type I and II Fe-Ni-rich metal particles found within orange glass olivine phenocrysts, or free-floating in the glass itself, are powerful evidence for the volatile driving force for lunar fire fountains. More direct evidence for the volatile mechanism has yet to be uncovered. Issues remaining include: the exact composition of magmatic volatiles; the hypothesized existence of graphite in the magma; the oxygen fugacity of the magma and of the lunar interior. In 1996 reported a single {approx}450 micron, equant olivine phenocryst, containing four glassy melt inclusions (or inclusion cores), the largest {approx}30micron in size, in a thin section of the 74001/2 drill core. The melt is assumed to sample the parent magma of the lunar basalts at depth, evidenced by the S content of the inclusion (600 ppm) which is 400 ppm greater than that of the orange glass host. Such melts potentially contain a full complement of the volatile components of the parent magma, which can be analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

  5. Bulk formation of metallic glasses and amorphous silicon from the melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures and compositions for producing metallic glasses in bulk at slow cooling rates were investigated. An attempt was made to form the amorphous phase of the tetrahedrally coordinated elements (Si or Ge) by undercooling the melt. The crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquids and glass formers were examined.

  6. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnbull, D.

    1979-01-01

    Crystal nucleation behavior in metallic alloys known to form glasses in melt quenching was characterized and from this characterization the possibility that massive amounts of certain alloys could be slow cooled to the glass state was assessed. Crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquid metals was examined experimentally, under containerless conditions, and theoretically.

  7. Bulk Formation of Metallic Glasses and Amorphous Silicon from the Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1985-01-01

    By using metallic glass compositions with a high relative glass transition temperature, such as Pd40Ni40P20, homogeneous nucleation also becomes negligible. Large (5g) masses of this alloys were obtained using a molten B2O3 flux. Presently, bulk glass formation in iron based glasses is being investigated. It is expected that if an undercooling of about 250K can be achieved in a Ge or Si melt, formation of the amorphous semiconductor phase (rather than the crystal) may be kinetically favored. The volumetric behavior of undercooled liquid Ga droplet dispersion is investigated by dilatometry. A theoretical model (both analytical and numerical) was developed for transient nucleation in glass forming melts. The model, originally designed for isothermal conditions, was extended to continuous quenching. It is being applied to glass formation in various metallic and oxide systems. A further refinement will be the inclusion of diffusion controlled interfacial rearrangements governing the growth of the crystal embryos.

  8. Surface-tension-driven flow in a glass melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, Thomas J.; Cole, Robert; Shankar Subramanian, R.

    1985-01-01

    Motion driven by surface tension gradients was observed in a vertical capillary liquid bridge geometry in a sodium borate melt. The surface tension gradients were introduced by maintaining a temperature gradient on the free melt surface. The flow velocities at the free surface of the melt, which were measured using a tracer technique, were found to be proportional to the applied temperature difference and inversely proportional to the melt viscosity. The experimentally observed velocities were in reasonable accord with predictions from a theoretical model of the system.

  9. Production and dissolution of nuclear explosive melt glasses at underground test sites in the Pacific Region

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W.L.; Smith, D.K.

    1998-11-06

    From 1975 to 1996 the French detonated 140 underground nuclear explosions beneath the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa in the South Pacific; from 1965 to 1971 the United States detonated three high yield nuclear tests beneath Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain. Approximately 800 metric tons of basalt is melted per kiloton of nuclear yield; almost lo7 metric tons of basalt were melted in these tests. Long-lived and toxic radionuclides are partitioned into the melt glass at the time of explosion and are released by dissolution with seawater under saturated conditions. A glass dissolution model predicts that nuclear melt glasses at these sites will dissolve in lo6 to lo7 yea

  10. An innovative energy-saving in-flight melting technology and its application to glass production.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yaochun; Watanabe, Takayuki; Yano, Tetsuji; Iseda, Toru; Sakamoto, Osamu; Iwamoto, Masanori; Inoue, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    The conventional method used for glass melting is air-fuel firing, which is inefficient, energy-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, an innovative in-flight melting technology was developed and applied to glass production for the purposes of energy conservation and environmental protection. Three types of heating sources, radio-frequency (RF) plasma, a 12-phase alternating current (ac) arc and an oxygen burner, were used to investigate the in-flight melting behavior of granulated powders. Results show that the melted particles are spherical with a smooth surface and compact structure. The diameter of the melted particles is about 50% of that of the original powders. The decomposition and vitrification degrees of the prepared powders decrease in the order of powders prepared by RF plasma, the 12-phase ac arc and the oxygen burner. The largest heat transfer is from RF plasma to particles, which results in the highest particle temperature (1810 °C) and the greatest vitrification degree of the raw material. The high decomposition and vitrification degrees, which are achieved in milliseconds, shorten the melting and fining times of the glass considerably. Our results indicate that the proposed in-flight melting technology is a promising method for use in the glass industry.

  11. An innovative energy-saving in-flight melting technology and its application to glass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yaochun; Watanabe, Takayuki; Yano, Tetsuji; Iseda, Toru; Sakamoto, Osamu; Iwamoto, Masanori; Inoue, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    The conventional method used for glass melting is air-fuel firing, which is inefficient, energy-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, an innovative in-flight melting technology was developed and applied to glass production for the purposes of energy conservation and environmental protection. Three types of heating sources, radio-frequency (RF) plasma, a 12-phase alternating current (ac) arc and an oxygen burner, were used to investigate the in-flight melting behavior of granulated powders. Results show that the melted particles are spherical with a smooth surface and compact structure. The diameter of the melted particles is about 50% of that of the original powders. The decomposition and vitrification degrees of the prepared powders decrease in the order of powders prepared by RF plasma, the 12-phase ac arc and the oxygen burner. The largest heat transfer is from RF plasma to particles, which results in the highest particle temperature (1810 °C) and the greatest vitrification degree of the raw material. The high decomposition and vitrification degrees, which are achieved in milliseconds, shorten the melting and fining times of the glass considerably. Our results indicate that the proposed in-flight melting technology is a promising method for use in the glass industry.

  12. Accurate surface tension measurement of glass melts by the pendant drop method.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Yuan; Wu, Ming-Ya; Hung, Yi-Lin; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2011-05-01

    A pendant drop tensiometer, coupled with image digitization technology and a best-fitting algorithm, was built to accurately measure the surface tension of glass melts at high temperatures. More than one thousand edge-coordinate points were obtained for a pendant glass drop. These edge points were fitted with the theoretical drop profiles derived from the Young-Laplace equation to determine the surface tension of glass melt. The uncertainty of the surface tension measurements was investigated. The measurement uncertainty (σ) could be related to a newly defined factor of drop profile completeness (Fc): the larger the Fc is, the smaller σ is. Experimental data showed that the uncertainty of the surface tension measurement when using this pendant drop tensiometer could be ±3 mN∕m for glass melts.

  13. Growth and melting of metallic nanoclusters in glass: A review of recent investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Kellermann, G.; Craievich, A. F.

    2008-12-15

    The mechanisms of nucleation and growth and the solid-to-liquid transition of metallic nanoclusters embedded in sodium borate glass were recently studied in situ via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). SAXS results indicate that, under isothermal annealing conditions, the formation and growth of Bi or Ag nanoclusters embedded in sodium borate glass occurs through two successive stages after a short incubation period. The first stage is characterized by the nucleation and growth of spherical metal clusters promoted by the diffusion of Bi or Ag atoms through the initially supersaturated glass phase. The second stage is named the coarsening stage and occurs when the (Bi-or Ag-) doping level of the vitreous matrix is close to the equilibrium value. The experimental results demonstrated that, at advanced stages of the growth process, the time dependence of the average radius and density number of the clusters is in agreement with the classical Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) theory. However, the radius distribution function is better described by a lognormal function than by the function derived from the theoretical LSW model. From the results of SAXS measurements at different temperatures, the activation energies for the diffusion of Ag and Bi through sodium borate glass were determined. In addition, via combination of the results of simultaneous WAXS and SAXS measurements at different temperatures, the crystallographic structure and the dependence of melting temperature T{sub m} on crystal radius R of Bi nanocrystals were established. The experimental results indicate that T{sub m} is a linear and decreasing function of nanocrystal reciprocal radius 1/R, in agreement with the Couchman and Jesser theoretical model. Finally, a weak contraction in the lattice parameters of Bi nanocrystals with respect to bulk crystals was established.

  14. Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

    2012-01-09

    The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

  15. DETERMINATION OF HLW GLASS MELT RATE USING X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.; Miller, D.; Immel, D.

    2011-10-06

    The purpose of the high-level waste (HLW) glass melt rate study is two-fold: (1) to gain a better understanding of the impact of feed chemistry on melt rate through bench-scale testing, and (2) to develop a predictive tool for melt rate in support of the on-going frit development efforts for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). In particular, the focus is on predicting relative melt rates, not the absolute melt rates, of various HLW glass formulations solely based on feed chemistry, i.e., the chemistry of both waste and glass-forming frit for DWPF. Critical to the successful melt rate modeling is the accurate determination of the melting rates of various HLW glass formulations. The baseline procedure being used at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is to; (1) heat a 4 inch-diameter stainless steel beaker containing a mixture of dried sludge and frit in a furnace for a preset period of time, (2) section the cooled beaker along its diameter, and (3) measure the average glass height across the sectioned face using a ruler. As illustrated in Figure 1-1, the glass height is measured for each of the 16 horizontal segments up to the red lines where relatively large-sized bubbles begin to appear. The linear melt rate (LMR) is determined as the average of all 16 glass height readings divided by the time during which the sample was kept in the furnace. This 'visual' method has proved useful in identifying melting accelerants such as alkalis and sulfate and further ranking the relative melt rates of candidate frits for a given sludge batch. However, one of the inherent technical difficulties of this method is to determine the glass height in the presence of numerous gas bubbles of varying sizes, which is prevalent especially for the higher-waste-loading glasses. That is, how the red lines are drawn in Figure 1-1 can be subjective and, therefore, may influence the resulting melt rates significantly. For example, if the red lines are drawn too low, a

  16. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takashi Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • We recovered Pb from cathode ray tube funnel glass using reduction melting process. • We modified the melting process to achieve Pb recovery with low energy consumption. • Pb in the funnel glass is efficiently recovered at 1000 °C by adding Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • Pb remaining in the glass after reduction melting is extracted with 1 M HCl. • 98% of Pb in the funnel glass was recovered by reduction melting and HCl leaching. - Abstract: Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900–1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1 g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1 M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

  17. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  18. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    DOE PAGES

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  19. Structure, dynamics, and electronic properties of lithium disilicate melt and glass.

    PubMed

    Du, Jincheng; Corrales, L Rene

    2006-09-21

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations within the framework of density functional theory have been performed to study the structural, dynamic, and electronic properties of lithium disilicate melt and the glass derived from quenching the melt. It is found that lithium ions have a much higher diffusion coefficient and show different diffusion mechanisms than the network forming silicon and oxygen ions in the melt. The simulated lithium disilicate glass structure has 100% four coordinated silicon, close to theoretical nonbridging oxygen to bridging oxygen ratio (2:3), and Q(n) distributions of 20.8%, 58.4%, and 20.8% for n=2,3,4, respectively. In the melt there are considerable amounts (10%-15%) of silicon coordination defects; however, the average silicon coordination number remains about 4, similar to that in the glass. The lithium ion coordination number increases from 3.7 in the glass to 4.4 in the melt mainly due to the increase of bridging oxygen in the first coordination shell. The bond length and bond angle distributions, vibrational density of states, and static structure factors of the simulated glass were determined where the latter was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurement. Atomic charges were obtained based on Bader and Hirshfeld population analyses [Atoms in Molecule: A Quantum Theory (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1990); Theor. Chim. Acta 44, 129 (1977)]. The average Bader charges found in lithium disilicate glass were -1.729, 3.419, and 0.915 for oxygen, silicon, and lithium, respectively. The corresponding Hirshfeld charges were -0.307, 0.550, and 0.229. The electronic densities of states of the melt and glass were calculated and compared with those of crystalline lithium disilicate.

  20. Generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in fully flexible polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Douglas, Jack F.; Freed, Karl F.

    2016-12-01

    The generalized entropy theory (GET) offers many insights into how molecular parameters influence polymer glass-formation. Given the fact that chain rigidity often plays a critical role in understanding the glass-formation of polymer materials, the GET was originally developed based on models of semiflexible chains. Consequently, all previous calculations within the GET considered polymers with some degree of chain rigidity. Motivated by unexpected results from computer simulations of fully flexible polymer melts concerning the dependence of thermodynamic and dynamic properties on the cohesive interaction strength (ɛ), the present paper employs the GET to explore the influence of ɛ on glass-formation in models of polymer melts with a vanishing bending rigidity, i.e., fully flexible polymer melts. In accord with simulations, the GET for fully flexible polymer melts predicts that basic dimensionless thermodynamic properties (such as the reduced thermal expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility) are universal functions of the temperature scaled by ɛ in the regime of low pressures. Similar scaling behavior is also found for the configurational entropy density in the GET for fully flexible polymer melts. Moreover, we find that the characteristic temperatures of glass-formation increase linearly with ɛ and that the fragility is independent of ɛ in fully flexible polymer melts, predictions that are again consistent with simulations of glass-forming polymer melts composed of fully flexible chains. Beyond an explanation of these general trends observed in simulations, the GET for fully flexible polymer melts predicts the presence of a positive residual configurational entropy at low temperatures, indicating a return to Arrhenius relaxation in the low temperature glassy state.

  1. The importance of melt TiO2 in affecting major and trace element partitioning between Fe-Ti oxides and lunar picritic glass melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, Nick; Liang, Yan; Hess, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Lunar mare basalts and picritic glasses have TiO2 abundances ranging from less than 1 wt.% to over 16%. Any high-Ti mare basalt or picritic glass petrogenetic model must include Fe-Ti oxides in the mantle source or invoke Fe-Ti oxide assimilation during magma ascent to the lunar surface. We conducted partitioning experiments to investigate high field strength element (HFSE), rare earth element (REE), and transition metal distribution between Fe-Ti oxides and lunar picritic glass melts over a range of melt compositions. Our results suggest that ilmenite-melt and armalcolite-melt HFSE, Cr, and V partition coefficients (DHFSE, DCr, DV) are strongly dependent on melt TiO2 content, whereas ilmenite-melt REE partition coefficients appear to be insensitive to melt composition. As TiO2 increases in picritic glass melts, HFSE, Cr, and V activities in melt also increase and Fe-Ti oxide-melt DHFSE, DCr and DV decrease. The effect of Ti on partitioning behavior can be attributed to the formation of Fe-O-Ti melt species in high-Ti melts. Ilmenite DHFSE range from compatible in oxides in equilibrium with low-Ti melts to incompatible in oxides in equilibrium with depolymerized high-Ti picritic glass melts. DHFSE are inversely correlated with TiO2 abundance in the melt and become nearly constant for melts with more than 6.8% TiO2. We present simple partitioning models that utilize the solubility of ilmenite and armalcolite in melt to effectively predict HFSE partition coefficients across a wide range of picritic glass melt compositions. The HFSE budget of ilmenite cumulates that crystallize from the lunar magma ocean strongly depends on the composition of the magma ocean. Low-Ti and high-Ti lunar basalts can be produced by an ilmenite or armalcolite bearing hybridized mantle source, or by assimilation of late-stage magma ocean cumulates. The dependence of DHFSE and DCr on melt TiO2 is consistent with the formation of lunar Type 1 armalcolite from high TiO2 picritic glass melt

  2. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4 cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  3. Chromium Phase Behavior in a Multi-Component Borosilicate Glass Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R; Vienna, John D; Wilson, B K; Plaisted, Trevor J; Heald, Steve M

    2006-07-31

    This paper reports the phase behavior of a multicomponent borosilicate glass melt with 0.3 mass% Cr2O3 at 800 1500°C in equilibrium with air. Both upper and lower liquidus temperatures were observed. When the temperature was between the upper and lower liquidus temperatures, eskolaite (Cr2O3) formed in melts with >2 mass% Cr2O3. Below the lower liquidus temperature, a dispersed chromate phase appeared in the melt that eventually became macroscopically segregated. The chemical durability of the glasses was virtually unaffected by chromium concentration. The particular glass studied was prototypic for the vitrification of high-Cr high-level radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford site. The results suggest a significant potential cost benefit for Hanford tank waste cleanup.

  4. Glass Melt Emissivity, Viscosity, and Foaming Monitoring with Millimeter-Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, S.K.; Daniel, William E.; Hadidi, Kamal; Bromberg, Leslie; Miller, Don; Rogers, L.A.

    2003-09-10

    Nuclear waste glass processing efficiencies, improved melter control to anomalies such as foaming, and environmental compliance would be facilitated by the availability of on-line monitoring technologies. It has been shown that the millimeter-wave (MMW) range of the electromagnetic spectrum (0.3-10 mm) is ideally suited to hot melter environments by having wavelengths long enough to penetrate optically obscure views yet short enough to provide spatial resolution with reliable refractory quasi-optical components. A thermal return reflection (TRR) method has been developed that allows a millimeter-wave pyrometer to determine emissivity by returning a portion of the thermal emission as a probe. Melt glass viscosities in the range 20 -2000 Poise and specific gravities have been measured by rates of flow and displacements inside hollow MMW ceramic waveguides immersed into the melts. Glass foaming has been observed by detecting the melt surface swelling followed by the increase in surface emissivity after gases break the surface.

  5. Microwave melt and offgas analysis results from a Ferro Corporation{reg_sign} glass frit

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.A.; Hoffman, C.R.; Knutson, P.T.

    1995-03-01

    In support of the Residue Treatment Technology (RTT) Microwave Solidification project, Waste Projects and Surface Water personnel conducted a series of experiments to determine the feasibility of encapsulating a surrogate sludge waste using the microwave melter. The surrogate waste was prepared by RTT and melted with five varying compositions of low melting glass frit supplied by the Ferro Corporation. Samples were melted using a 50% waste/50% glass frit and a 47.5% waste/47.5% glass frit/5% carbon powder. This was done to evaluate the effectiveness of carbon at reducing a sulfate-based surface scale which has been observed in previous experiments and in full-scale testing. These vitrified samples were subsequently submitted to Environmental Technology for toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. Two of the five frits tested in this experiment merit further evaluation as raw materials for the microwave melter. Ferro frit 3110 with and without carbon powder produced a crystalline product which passed TCLP testing. The quality of the melt product could be improved by increasing the melting temperature from 900{degrees}C to approximately 1150-1200{degrees}C. Ferro frit 3249 produced the optimal quality of glass based on visual observations, but failed TCLP testing for silver when melted without carbon powder. This frit requires a slightly higher melting temperature ({ge} 1200{degrees}C) compared to frit 3110 and produces a superior product. In conjunction with this work, Surface Water personnel conducted offgas analyses using a Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (TDMS) on selected formulations. The offgas analyses identified and quantified water vapor (H{sub 2}O), oxygen (O{sub 2}) and carbon oxides (CO and CO{sub 2}), sulfur (S) and sulfur oxides (SO and SO{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) that volatilized during glass formation.

  6. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    DOE PAGES

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; ...

    2016-05-18

    We report that nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. Wemore » find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. Lastly, the resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.« less

  7. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R.; Holliday, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. We find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. The resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.

  8. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R.; Holliday, K. S.

    2016-05-18

    We report that nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. We find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. Lastly, the resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.

  9. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of stress relaxation and slow quench in silica melts and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2014-03-01

    Quench rates and stress relaxation in molecular dynamics simulations of glasses are usually studied on time-scales which are many orders of magnitude faster that those in experiment. We present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica glass using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Structural variation will be discussed as a function of quench rate for glasses quenched 2 to 3 orders of magnitude slower than previously reported. Stress relaxation curves plotted in log t show time-temperature superposition holds over a wide-range of temperatures for 3% initial volume compression. Silica melts and glasses were modeled with the BKS interatomic potential and were produced through a melt-quench process. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. SUMMARY OF 2010 DOE EM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM STUDIES OF WASTE GLASS MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2011-01-19

    A collaborative study has been established under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management International Program between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) in St. Petersburg, Russia, to investigate potential improvements in melt rate via chemical additions to the glass frit. Researchers at KRI suggested a methodology for selecting frit additives based on empirical coefficients for optimization of glass melting available in the Russian literature. Using these coefficients, KRI identified B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO, and MnO as frit additives that were likely to improve melt rate without having adverse effects on crystallization of the glass or its chemical durability. The results of the melt rate testing in the SMK melter showed that the slurry feed rate (used as a gauge of melt rate) could be significantly increased when MnO or CuO were added to Frit 550 with the SMR-2 sludge. The feed rates increased by about 27% when MnO was added to the frit and by about 26% when CuO was added to the frit, as compared to earlier results for Frit 550 alone. The impact of adding additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the frit was minor when added with CuO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed a more significant, 39% improvement in melt rate when added with MnO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} also reduced the viscosity of the glasses during pouring. Samples of the glasses from the melt rate testing characterized at SRNL showed that there were no significant impacts on crystallization of the glasses. All of the glasses had very good chemical durability. Chemical composition measurements showed that the frit additives were present in concentrations below the targeted values in some of the glasses. Therefore, it is possible that higher concentrations of these additives may further improve melt rate, although the impacts of higher concentrations of these components on crystallization and durability would need to

  11. A new method for separating first row transition metals and actinides from synthetic melt glass

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Audrey Rae; Bond, Evelyn M.

    2016-01-14

    A new method was developed for separating Co, Fe, and Sc from complex debris matrices using the extraction chromatography resin DGA. The activation products Co-58, Mn-54, and Sc-46 were used to characterize the separation of the synthetic melt glass solutions. In the separation scheme that was developed, Au, Co, Cu, Fe, Sc, and Ti were separated from the rest of the sample constituents. In this paper, the synthetic melt glass separation method, efficiency, recoveries, and the length of procedure will be discussed. In conclusion, batch contact adsorption studies for Na and Sc for DGA resin are discussed as well.

  12. Thermally efficient melting and fuel reforming for glass making

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael S.; Painter, Corning F.; Pastore, Steven P.; Roth, Gary S.; Winchester, David C.

    1991-01-01

    An integrated process for utilizing waste heat from a glass making furnace. The hot off-gas from the furnace is initially partially cooled, then fed to a reformer. In the reformer, the partially cooled off-gas is further cooled against a hydrocarbon which is thus reformed into a synthesis gas, which is then fed into the glass making furnace as a fuel. The further cooled off-gas is then recycled back to absorb the heat from the hot off-gas to perform the initial cooling.

  13. Behavior of RuO sub 2 in a glass melt

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, P.R.; Cobb, W.T.

    1991-05-01

    Samples of a borosilicate glass melt containing 0.27 wt% of Ruo{sub 2} particles, approximately 1 {mu}m in diameter, were subjected to heat treatments at 1050{degrees}C in alumina and metallic crucibles and investigated by optical microscopy. The results indicate that RuO{sub 2} particles agglomerate before sedimentation. Agglomerations appear to be produced in the melt meniscus and the thin film of melt above the meniscus, where high velocity gradients bring the RuO{sub 2} particles into correct. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Advanced Modeling of Cold Crucible Induction Melting for Process Control and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Roach; D. B. Lopukh; A. P. Martynov; B. S. Polevodov; S. I. Chepluk

    2008-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University “LETI” (ETU) have collaborated on development and validation of an advanced numerical model of the cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) process. This work was conducted in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management Technology and Engineering (EM-20) International Program. The model predicts quasi-steady state temperature distributions, convection cell configurations, and flow field velocities for a fully established melt of low conductivity non-magnetic materials at high frequency operations. The INL/ETU ANSYS© finite element model is unique in that it has been developed specifically for processing borosilicate glass (BSG) and other glass melts. Specifically, it accounts for the temperature dependency of key material properties, some of which change by orders of magnitude within the temperature ranges experienced (temperature differences of 500oC are common) in CCIM processing of glass, including density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, and electrical resistivity. These values, and their responses to temperature changes, are keys to understanding the melt characteristics. Because the model has been validated, it provides the capability to conduct parametric studies to understand operational sensitivities and geometry effects. Additionally, the model can be used to indirectly determine difficult to measure material properties at higher temperatures such as resistivity, thermal conductivity and emissivity. The model can also be used to optimize system design and to predict operational behavior for specific materials and system configurations, allowing automated feedback control. This becomes particularly important when designing melter systems for full-scale industrial applications.

  15. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-01

    Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900-1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na(2)CO(3) at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na(2)CO(3) dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

  16. Sealing ceramic material in low melting point glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritoki, M.; Fujikawa, T.; Miyanaga, J.

    1984-01-01

    A structured device placed in an aerated crucible to pack ceramics molding substance that is to be processed was designed. The structure is wrapped by sealing material made of pyrex glass and graphite foil or sheet with a weight attached on top of it. The crucible is made of carbon; the ceramics material to be treated through heat intervenient press process is molding substance consisting mainly of silicon nitride.

  17. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  18. The use of self heating'' ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  19. The use of ``self heating`` ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-12-31

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  20. Thermal diffusivity of rhyolitic glasses and melts: effects of temperature, crystals and dissolved water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romine, William L.; Whittington, Alan G.; Nabelek, Peter I.; Hofmeister, Anne M.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity ( D) was measured using laser-flash analysis on pristine and remelted obsidian samples from Mono Craters, California. These high-silica rhyolites contain between 0.013 and 1.10 wt% H2O and 0 to 2 vol% crystallites. At room temperature, D glass varies from 0.63 to 0.68 mm2 s-1, with more crystalline samples having higher D. As T increases, D glass decreases, approaching a constant value of ˜0.55 mm2 s-1 near 700 K. The glass data are fit with a simple model as an exponential function of temperature and a linear function of crystallinity. Dissolved water contents up to 1.1 wt% have no statistically significant effect on the thermal diffusivity of the glass. Upon crossing the glass transition, D decreases rapidly near ˜1,000 K for the hydrous melts and ˜1,200 K for anhydrous melts. Rhyolitic melts have a D melt of ˜0.51 mm2 s-1. Thermal conductivity ( k = D· ρ· C P) of rhyolitic glass and melt increases slightly with T because heat capacity ( C P) increases with T more strongly than density ( ρ) and D decrease. The thermal conductivity of rhyolitic melts is ˜1.5 W m-1 K-1, and should vary little over the likely range of magmatic temperatures and water contents. These values of D and k are similar to those of major crustal rock types and granitic protoliths at magmatic temperatures, suggesting that changes in thermal properties accompanying partial melting of the crust should be relatively minor. Numerical models of shallow rhyolite intrusions indicate that the key difference in thermal history between bodies that quench to obsidian, and those that crystallize, results from the release of latent heat of crystallization. Latent heat release enables bodies that crystallize to remain at high temperatures for much longer times and cool more slowly than glassy bodies. The time to solidification is similar in both cases, however, because solidification requires cooling through the glass transition in the first case, and cooling only to the

  1. Following bioactive glass behavior beyond melting temperature by thermal and optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrou, X.; Zorba, T.; Kontonasaki, E.; Chrissafis, K.; Koidis, P.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.

    2004-04-01

    The thermal behavior of a well known bioactive glass, Bioglass®, is examined beyond its melting temperature as the crystallization and sintering of bioactive glass may influence its bioactivity and cellular reactions. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) followed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the glass transition (Tg), the crystallization (Tc), the melting (Tm) temperatures and the weight changes. The characterization of bioactive glass before and after the thermal treatment at different characteristic temperatures was accomplished with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All the phases, during the heating of the material until an exact temperature beyond its melting temperature were determined. A progressive increase of its crystallization degree was observed, during treatment up to 1200 °C. At this temperature a number of successive crystallizations and fusions take place. At higher temperatures the formation of amorphous Bioglass® with simultaneous appearance of new phases is observed, favouring the bioactivity that in glass-ceramics is influenced by the different phases present.

  2. Recent advancements in optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianfeng; Liu, Xiaohua; Liang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Xie, Jiaqing; Wang, Xibin

    2017-02-01

    Optical microstructures are increasingly applied in several fields, such as optical systems, precision measurement, and microfluid chips. Microstructures include microgrooves, microprisms, and microlenses. This paper presents an overview of optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding and highlights the applications of optical microstructures in mold fabrication and glass molding. The glass-mold interface friction and adhesion are also discussed. Moreover, the latest advancements in glass molding technologies are detailed, including new mold materials and their fabrication methods, viscoelastic constitutive modeling of glass, and microstructure molding process, as well as ultrasonic vibrationassisted molding technology.

  3. Melting, Solidification, Remelting, and Separation of Glass and Metal

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C.Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1998-11-02

    Several kinds of radioactive waste exist in mixed forms at DOE sites throughout the United States. These Wastes consist of radionuclides and some usefil bme materials. One purpose of waste treatment technologies is to vitrify the radionuclides into durable, stable glass-like materials to reduce the size of the waste form requiring final disposal. The other purpose is to recycle and reuse most of the usefi.d base materials. Thus, improved techniques for the separation of molten metal and glass are essential. Several high temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. These processes include the plasma hearth process, which is being developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and the arc melter vitrification process, which is being developed at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to suppoti these process. A separation method is also needed for the radioactively contaminated scrap metal recycling processe; in order to obtain highly refined recycled metals.

  4. Compositional Models of Glass/Melt Properties and their Use for Glass Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-18

    Nuclear waste glasses must simultaneously meet a number of criteria related to their processability, product quality, and cost factors. The properties that must be controlled in glass formulation and waste vitrification plant operation tend to vary smoothly with composition allowing for glass property-composition models to be developed and used. Models have been fit to the key glass properties. The properties are transformed so that simple functions of composition (e.g., linear, polynomial, or component ratios) can be used as model forms. The model forms are fit to experimental data designed statistically to efficiently cover the composition space of interest. Examples of these models are found in literature. The glass property-composition models, their uncertainty definitions, property constraints, and optimality criteria are combined to formulate optimal glass compositions, control composition in vitrification plants, and to qualify waste glasses for disposal. An overview of current glass property-composition modeling techniques is summarized in this paper along with an example of how those models are applied to glass formulation and product qualification at the planned Hanford high-level waste vitrification plant.

  5. Compositional Models of Glass/Melt Properties and their Use for Glass Formulation

    DOE PAGES

    Vienna, John D.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-18

    Nuclear waste glasses must simultaneously meet a number of criteria related to their processability, product quality, and cost factors. The properties that must be controlled in glass formulation and waste vitrification plant operation tend to vary smoothly with composition allowing for glass property-composition models to be developed and used. Models have been fit to the key glass properties. The properties are transformed so that simple functions of composition (e.g., linear, polynomial, or component ratios) can be used as model forms. The model forms are fit to experimental data designed statistically to efficiently cover the composition space of interest. Examples ofmore » these models are found in literature. The glass property-composition models, their uncertainty definitions, property constraints, and optimality criteria are combined to formulate optimal glass compositions, control composition in vitrification plants, and to qualify waste glasses for disposal. An overview of current glass property-composition modeling techniques is summarized in this paper along with an example of how those models are applied to glass formulation and product qualification at the planned Hanford high-level waste vitrification plant.« less

  6. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  7. Analysis of advanced optical glass and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Feng, Chen

    1991-01-01

    Optical lens systems performance utilizing optical materials comprising reluctant glass forming compositions was studied. Such special glasses are being explored by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) researchers utilizing techniques such as containerless processing in space on the MSFC Acoustic Levitation Furnace and on the High Temperature Acoustic Levitation Furnace in the conceptual design phase for the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) series of shuttle flights. The application of high refractive index and low dispersive power glasses in optical lens design was investigated. The potential benefits and the impacts to the optical lens design performance were evaluated. The results of the studies revealed that the use of these extraordinary glasses can result in significant optical performance improvements. Recommendations of proposed optical properties for potential new glasses were also made. Applications of these new glasses are discussed, including the impact of high refractive index and low dispersive power, improvements of the system performance by using glasses which are located outside of traditional glass map, and considerations in establishing glass properties beyond conventional glass map limits.

  8. Petrography of impact glasses and melt breccias from the El'gygytgyn impact structure, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittarello, Lidia; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The El'gygytgyn impact structure, 18 km in diameter and 3.6 Ma old, in Arctic Siberia, Russia, is the only impact structure on Earth mostly excavated in acidic volcanic rocks. The Late Cretaceous volcanic target includes lavas, tuffs, and ignimbrites of rhyolitic, dacitic, and andesitic composition, and local occurrence of basalt. Although the ejecta blanket around the crater is nearly completely eroded, bomb-shaped impact glasses, redeposited after the impact event, occur in lacustrine terraces within the crater. Here we present detailed petrographic descriptions of newly collected impact glass-bearing samples. The observed features contribute to constrain the formation of the melt and its cooling history within the framework of the impact process. The collected samples can be grouped into two types, characterized by specific features: (1) "pure" glasses, containing very few clasts or new crystals and which were likely formed during the early stages of cratering and (2) a second type, which represents composite samples with impact melt breccia lenses embedded in silicate glass. These mixed samples probably resulted from inclusion of unmelted impact debris during ejection and deposition. After deposition the glassy portions continued to deform, whereas the impact melt breccia inclusions that probably had already cooled down behaved as rigid bodies in the flow.

  9. Effects of alumina (Al2O3) addition on mechanical property of fabricated melt-derived bioactive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Hasmaliza; Yan, Phooi; Ibrahim, Nurul Farhana; Noor, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd

    2016-12-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) is advance materials that have the ability to form hydroxyapatite layer (HA) that accelerate bonding between bone tissues indicating a good biological response. However, BG fabricated with basic composition from SiO2-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 system exhibit lower mechanical strength. The present work aims to study the effects on alumina (Al2O3) addition in SiO2-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 system towards its mechanical performance. Bioactive glass (BG) was fabricated through melt-derived route. Various amount of alumina at (1 wt%, 2 wt%, 3 wt% and 4 wt%) was added in the system. BG with 2 wt% of alumina addition show highest compressive strength and significant improvement observed after sintered at 750°C and 950°C. XRD revealed the existence of crystalline peaks after the glass was sintered that might assist on the mechanical improvement. SEM shows reduction on porosity and enhancement on grain size for sintered bioactive glass.

  10. Atomic clusters triggering nucleation and solidification of the metallic glass melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gong; Zhang, Lijun; Zhan, Zaiji; Yu, Pengfei; Liaw, Peter K.; Liu, Riping

    2017-03-01

    The Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (atomic percent, at. %) melts embedded in a flux of the dehydrated B2O3 were under cooled by the repeated treatment of melting. The maximum melt undercooling of ΔT = 145 K achieved for this melt corresponds to a comparatively large relative undercooling of 0.15 times the melting-point temperature of Tm˜ about 953 K(ΔT/Tm = 0.15). The solidification and nucleation behaviors of the Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 undercooled melts triggered by Ni, Ti, Cu, and Zr clusters introduced by sputtering these pure metal targets are studied. An anomalous solidification triggered by Zr-atomic clusters above the Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 melting temperature of 140 K is observed. The instability of a metallic-glass (MG) liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature is present. The nucleation in the undercooled Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations and analyzed by the classical nucleation theory. This letter reveals an effective research method on investigating the instability of a MG liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature.

  11. Silicate melt inclusions and glasses in lunar soil fragments from the Luna 16 core sample

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    More than 2000 fragments were studied microscopically, and electron microprobe analyses were made of 39 selected areas, from a few square mm of polished surface, through 75- to 425-??m fragments of lunar soil from two samples of the Luna 16 core. The silicate melt inclusions and glasses differ in important details from those observed earlier in the Apollo samples. Melt inclusions in olivine contain epitaxially oriented daughter crystals, but also show a similar epitaxy around the outside of the crystals not observed in previous lunar samples. Melt inclusions in ilmenite suggest trapping at successive stages in a differentiation sequence. There is abundant evidence for late-stage silicate liquid immiscibility, with melt compositions similar but not identical to those from Apollo 11 and 12. A comparison of the alkali ratio of any given bulk rock analysis with that of its late-stage, high-silica melt shows gross differences for different rocks. This is pertinent to understanding late-stage differentiation processes. Glass fragments and spherules exhibit a wide range of crystallization textures, reflecting their wide range of compositions and cooling histories. No significant differences were found between the two portions of core examined (Zones A and D). ?? 1972.

  12. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, David K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule. The purpose of this advanced LAW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-term, mid-term, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced LAW glasses, property-composition models and their uncertainties, and an advanced glass algorithm to support WTP facility operations, including both Direct Feed LAW and full pretreatment flowsheets. Data are needed to develop, validate, and implement 1) new glass property-composition models and 2) a new glass formulation algorithm. Hence, this plan integrates specific studies associated with increasing the Na2O and SO3/halide concentrations in glass, because these components will ultimately dictate waste loadings for LAW vitrification. Of equal importance is the development of an efficient and economic strategy for 99Tc management. Specific and detailed studies are being implemented to understand the fate of Tc throughout

  13. Ni(2+) doped glass ceramic fiber fabricated by melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zaijin; Zheng, Shupei; Peng, Wencai; Zhang, Hang; Ma, Zhijun; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Chen, Danping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2015-11-02

    Glass ceramic fibers containing Ni(2+) doped LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were fabricated by a melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment. Fiber precursors were prepared by drawing at high temperature where fiber core glass was melted while fiber clad glass was softened. After heat treatment, LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were precipitated in the fiber core. Excited by 980 nm laser, efficient broadband near-infrared emission was observed in the glass ceramic fiber compared to that of precursor fiber. The melt-in-tube method can realize controllable crystallization and is suitable for fabrication of novel glass ceramic fibers. The Ni(2+)-doped glass ceramic fiber is promising for broadband optical amplification.

  14. Alkali aluminosilicate melts and glasses: structuring at the middle range order of amorphous matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, C.; neuville, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviours. It is well known that several parameters impact strongly these properties, such as for instance the temperature, pressure, chemical composition and volatiles concentration, finally influencing eruptive behaviour of volcanoes. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts, like for instance the Vesuvius (Italy) or Erebus (Antartica) magmas. In an oncoming paper in Chemical Geology (Le Losq and Neuville, 2012), we have communicated results of the study of mixing Na-K in tectosilicate melts containing a high concentration of silica (≥75mol%). In the present communication, we will enlarge this first point of view to tectosilicate melts presenting a lower silica concentration. We will first present our viscosity data, and then the Adam and Gibbs theory that allows theoretically modelling Na-K mixing in aluminosilicate melts by using the so-called "mixed alkali effect". On the basis of the rheological results, the Na-K mixing cannot be explained with the ideal "mixed alkali effect", which involves random exchange of Na-K cationic pairs. To go further and as rheological properties are directly linked with structural properties, we will present our first results obtained by Raman and NMR spectroscopy. These last ones provide important structural pieces of information on the polymerization state of glasses and melts, and also on the environment of tetrahedrally coordinated cations. Rheological and structural results all highlight that Na and K are not randomly distributed in aluminosilicate glasses and melts networks. Na melts present a network with some channels and a non-random distribution of Al and Si. K networks are different. They also present a non-random distribution of Al and Si, but in two sub

  15. Disorder-assisted melting and the glass transition in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Terentjev, Eugene

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical response of solids depends on temperature because the way atoms and molecules respond collectively to deformation is affected at various levels by thermal motion. This is a fundamental problem of solid state science and plays a crucial role in metallurgy, aerospace engineering, energy. In disordered solids (glass, amorphous semiconductors, ceramics, metallic glass, polymers) the vanishing of rigidity as a function of temperature is not well understood because continuum elasticity is inapplicable due to the disorder leading to nontrivial (nonaffine) components in the atomic displacements. Our theory explains the basic mechanism of the melting transition of amorphous solids in terms of the lattice energy lost to nonaffine motion, compared to which thermal vibrations turn out to play a negligible role. The theory is in good agreement with data on melting of amorphous polymers (where no alternative theory can be found in the literature) and offers new opportunities in materials science.

  16. Melt-cast organic glasses as high-efficiency fast neutron scintillators

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Joseph S.; Feng, Patrick L.

    2016-06-24

    In this work we report a new class of organic-based scintillators that combines several of the desirable attributes of existing crystalline, liquid, and plastic organic scintillators. The prepared materials may be isolated in single crystalline form or melt-cast to produce highly transparent glasses that have been shown to provide high light yields of up to 16,000 photons/MeVee, as evaluated against EJ-200 plastic scintillators and solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals. The prepared organic glasses exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and are compatible with wavelength shifters to reduce optical self-absorption effects that are intrinsic to pure materials such as crystalline organics. In conclusion, themore » combination of high scintillation efficiency, PSD capabilities, and facile scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes this new class of amorphous materials from existing alternatives.« less

  17. Melt-cast organic glasses as high-efficiency fast neutron scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph S.; Feng, Patrick L.

    2016-06-24

    In this work we report a new class of organic-based scintillators that combines several of the desirable attributes of existing crystalline, liquid, and plastic organic scintillators. The prepared materials may be isolated in single crystalline form or melt-cast to produce highly transparent glasses that have been shown to provide high light yields of up to 16,000 photons/MeVee, as evaluated against EJ-200 plastic scintillators and solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals. The prepared organic glasses exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and are compatible with wavelength shifters to reduce optical self-absorption effects that are intrinsic to pure materials such as crystalline organics. In conclusion, the combination of high scintillation efficiency, PSD capabilities, and facile scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes this new class of amorphous materials from existing alternatives.

  18. Disorder-Assisted Melting and the Glass Transition in Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical response of solids depends on temperature, because the way atoms and molecules respond collectively to deformation is affected at various levels by thermal motion. This is a fundamental problem of solid state science and plays a crucial role in materials science. In glasses, the vanishing of shear rigidity upon increasing temperature is the reverse process of the glass transition. It remains poorly understood due to the disorder leading to nontrivial (nonaffine) components in the atomic displacements. Our theory explains the basic mechanism of the melting transition of amorphous (disordered) solids in terms of the lattice energy lost to this nonaffine motion, compared to which thermal vibrations turn out to play only a negligible role. The theory is in good agreement with classic data on melting of amorphous polymers (for which no alternative theory can be found in the literature) and offers new opportunities in materials science.

  19. Vanadium K Xanes Studies of EET79001 Impact-Melt Glasses Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Some impact-melt glasses in shergottites are rich in Martian atmospheric noble gases and sulfur suggesting a possible association with regolith-derived secondary mineral assemblages in the shocked samples. Previously, we studied two glasses, # 506 (Lith C in Lith A) and # 507 (Lith C in Lith B) from EET79001 [1,2] and suggested that sulfur initially existed as sulfate in the glass precursor materials and, on shock-melting of the precursors, the sulfate was reduced to sulfides in the shock glasses. To examine the validity of this hypothesis, we used V K microXANES techniques to measure the valence states of vanadium in the Lith C glasses from Lith A and Lith B in EET79001 [3] to complement and com-pare with previous analogous measurements on,78 glass (Lith C in Lith A) [4,5]. We reported the preliminary results in [3]. Vanadium is ideal for addressing the redox issue because it has multiple valence states and is a well-studied element. Vanadium in basalts exists mostly as V(sup 3+), V(sup 4+) and V(sup 5+) in terrestrial samples, mainly as V(sup 3+) with minor V(sup 2+) and minor V(sup 4+) in lunar samples and as roughly equal mixtures of V(sup 3+) and V(sup 4+) in Martian meteorites. In this report, we discuss the application of the V K XANES results to decipher the nature of shock reduction occurring in the silicate glasses during the impact process.

  20. Velocity of a freely rising gas bubble in a soda-lime silicate glass melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornyak, E. J.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison is conducted between measured velocities for the buoyant rise of single bubbles of varying size and composition, in a soda-lime silicate glass melt, with the steady state velocities predicted by the Stokes and Hadamard-Rybczynski formulas. In all cases, the data are noted to fit the Hadamard-Rybczynski expression for steady state rise speed considerably better than the Stokes formula.

  1. Stokes-Einstein relation in dense metallic glass-forming melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chathoth, S. M.; Samwer, K.

    2010-11-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate atomic motion in a very fragile binary metallic melt and a multicomponent bulk glass-forming metallic melt. Both melts show a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation and display a change in the slope of In D dependence on In(η /T). We also observed that the values for the exponent in the fractional Stokes-Einstein relation are not in the commonly observed range for Cu46Zr42Al7Y5 melts. At low temperatures, the deviation from the Stokes-Einstein law is very significant and can be expressed in the form of a power law with exponent ξ =-1.82±0.08. The change in the slope is found to be associated with a change in friction coefficient while increasing the packing density of the melt. The abrupt change in the value of friction coefficient is independent of packing density, but it occurs at a common value of ζ =(3.2±0.1)×10-12 kg s-1 in these melts.

  2. Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2005-11-01

    The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

  3. Kinetic model for quartz and spinel dissolution during melting of high-level-waste glass batch

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-07-24

    The dissolution of quartz particles and the growth and dissolution of crystalline phases during the conversion of batch to glass potentially affects both the glass melting process and product quality. Crystals of spinel exiting the cold cap to molten glass below can be troublesome during the vitrification of iron-containing high-level wastes. To estimate the distribution of quartz and spinel fractions within the cold cap, we used kinetic models that relate fractions of these phases to temperature and heating rate. Fitting the model equations to data showed that the heating rate, apart from affecting quartz and spinel behavior directly, also affects them indirectly via concurrent processes, such as the formation and motion of bubbles. Because of these indirect effects, it was necessary to allow one kinetic parameter (the pre-exponential factor) to vary with the heating rate. The resulting kinetic equations are sufficiently simple for the detailed modeling of batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in glass melters. The estimated fractions and sizes of quartz and spinel particles as they leave the cold cap, determined in this study, will provide the source terms needed for modeling the behavior of these solid particles within the flow of molten glass in the melter.

  4. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L.

    2014-06-01

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value Umax at a temperature Tmax that lies between the glass-transition temperature Tg and the melting temperature Tm. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high Umax, a low Tmax / Tm, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / Tm. In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low Umax, a high Tmax / Tm, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / Tm. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in Umax seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (Tg / Tm) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of Tg / Tm and fragility, can show a good correlation with Umax. For all the systems, growth at Umax is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, Tmax / Tg = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  5. Structural aspects of glass-formation in Ni-Nb melts

    SciTech Connect

    Holland-Moritz, D.; Yang, F.; Gegner, J.; Meyer, A.; Hansen, T.; Ruiz-Martín, M. D.

    2014-05-28

    We report on investigations of the static structure factors of glass-forming Ni{sub 59.5}Nb{sub 40.5} alloy melts by combination of the containerless processing technique of electrostatic levitation with neutron diffraction. By application of the isotopic substitution method, the full set of partial structure factors was determined. The short-range order in liquid Ni{sub 59.5}Nb{sub 40.5} is characterized by a large nearest neighbor coordination number of Z{sub NN} = 14.3 and a chemical short-range order with an affinity for the formation of heterogeneous Nb-Ni nearest neighbors. The structure factors observed here in the liquid state closely resemble those reported for amorphous Nb-Ni solids. The comparison with earlier results on the short-range structure in Zr-based glass-forming melts suggests that a large local density of packing, chemical order, and structural frustration are, amongst others, common structural properties of these metallic glass-forming systems, which favor glass-formation.

  6. The glass transition, crystallization and melting in Au-Pb-Sb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Allen, J. L.; Fecht, H. J.; Perepezko, J. H.; Ohsaka, K.

    1988-01-01

    The glass transition, crystallization and melting of Au(55)Pb(22.5)Sb(22.5) alloys have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Crystallization on heating above the glass transition temperature Tg (45 C) begins at 64 C. Further crystallization events are observed at 172 C and 205 C. These events were found to correspond to the formation of the intermetallic compounds AuSb2, Au2Pb, and possibly AuPb2, respectively. Isothermal DSC scans of the glassy alloy above Tg were used to monitor the kinetics of crystallization. The solidification behavior and heat capacity in the glass-forming composition range were determined with droplet samples. An undercooling level of 0.3T(L) below the liquidus temperature T(L) was achieved, resulting in crystallization of different stable and metastable phases. The heat capacity C(P) of the undercooled liquid was measured over an undercooling range of 145 C.

  7. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES OF ENHANCED WASTE LOADING AND IMPROVED MELT RATE FOR HIGH ALUMINA CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K; David Peeler, D; James Marra, J

    2008-09-11

    The goal of this study was to determine the impacts of glass compositions with high aluminum concentrations on melter performance, crystallization and chemical durability for Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford waste streams. Glass compositions for Hanford targeted both high aluminum concentrations in waste sludge and a high waste loading in the glass. Compositions for SRS targeted Sludge Batch 5, the next sludge batch to be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which also has a relatively high aluminum concentration. Three frits were selected for combination with the SRS waste to evaluate their impact on melt rate. The glasses were melted in two small-scale test melters at the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute. The results showed varying degrees of spinel formation in each of the glasses. Some improvements in melt rate were made by tailoring the frit composition for the SRS feeds. All of the Hanford and SRS compositions had acceptable chemical durability.

  8. Flux Decoupling and Chemical Diffusion in Redox Dynamics in Aluminosilicate Melts and Glasses (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. F.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of redox dynamics in silicate melts and glasses suggest that, for many compositions and for many external environments, the reaction proceeds and is rate-limited by the diffusive flux of divalent-cation network modifiers. Application of ion-backscattering spectrometry either (i) on oxidized or reduced melts (subsequently quenched before analysis) or (ii) on similarly reacted glasses, both of basalt-composition polymerization, demonstrates that the network modifiers move relative to the (first-order-rigid) aluminosilicate network. Thus, the textures associated with such reactions are often surprising, and frequently include metastable or unstable phases and/or spatial compositional differences. This response is only possible if the motion of cations can be decoupled from that of anions. In many cases, decoupling is accomplished by the presence in the melt/glass of transition-metal cations, whose heterovalency creates distortions in the electronic band structure resulting in electronic defects: electron “holes” in the valence band or electrons in the conduction band. (The prevalence of holes or electrons being a function of bulk chemistry and oxygen activity.) These electronic species make the melt/glass a “defect semiconductor.” Because (a) the critical issue in reaction dynamics is the transport coefficient (the product of species mobility and species concentration) and (b) the electronic species are many orders of magnitude more mobile than are the ions, very low concentrations of transition-metal ions are required for flux decoupling. For example, 0.04 at% Fe keeps a magnesium aluminosilicate melt/glass a defect semiconductor down to 800°C [Cook & Cooper, 2000]. Depending on composition, high-temperature melts can see ion species having a high-enough transport coefficient to allow decoupling, e.g., alkali cations in a basaltic melt [e.g., Pommier et al., 2010]. In this presentation, these ideas will be illustrated by examining redox dynamics

  9. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  10. Computer Modeling of Thermal Convection in Melts to Explain Glass Formation in Low Gravity and on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2006-01-01

    Experiments conducted up to this time on glass forming melts in the low gravity environment of space show that glasses prepared in low-g are more chemically homogeneous and more resistant to crystallization than the comparable glasses prepared at 1-g on Earth. This result is somewhat surprising and opposite to the accepted concept on glass formation for a melt. A hypothesis based on "shear thinning" of a melt, a decrease in viscosity with increasing shear stress, is proposed as an explanation for the observed low-gravity results. This paper describes detailed simulation procedures to test the role of thermal convection in introducing shear stress in glass forming melts, using a lithium disilcate melt as a model. The simulation system in its idealized version consists of a cylinder that is heated at one end and cooled at the other with gravity acting in a transverse direction to the thermal gradient. The side wall of the cylinder is assumed to be insulating. The governing equations of motion and energy are solved using variable properties for viscosity (Arrehenius and non-Arrehenius behaviors) and density (constant and temperature dependent). Other parametric variables in the calculations include gravity level and gravity vector orientation. The shear stress in the system are then computed as a function of gravity from the calculated values of maximum melt velocity, and its effect on melt viscosity (shear thinning) is predicted. Also included and discussed are the modeling efforts related to other potential convective processes in glass forming melts and their possible effects on melt viscosity.

  11. Heat Transfer in Waste Glass Melts - Measurement and Implications for Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan

    Thermal properties of waste glass melts, such as high temperature density and thermal conductivity, are relevant to heat transfer processes in nuclear waste vitrification. Experimental measurement techniques were developed and applied to four nuclear waste glasses representative of those currently projected for treatment of Hanford HLW and LAW streams to study heat flow mechanisms in nuclear waste vitrification. Density measurement results by Archimedes' method indicated that densities of the melts investigated varied considerably with composition and temperature. Thermal diffusivities of waste melts were determined at nominal melter operating temperatures using a temperature-wave technique. Thermal conductivities were obtained by combining diffusivity data with the experimentally-acquired densities of the melts and their known heat capacities. The experimental results display quite large positive dependences of conductivities on temperature for some samples and much weaker positive temperature dependences for others. More importantly, there is observed a big change in the slopes of the conductivities versus temperature as temperature is increased for two of the melts, but not for the other two. This behavior was interpreted in terms of the changing contributions of radiation and conduction with temperature and composition dependence of the absorption coefficient. Based on the obtained thermal conductivities, a simple model for a waste glass melter was set up, which was used to analyze the relative contributions of conduction and radiation individually and collectively to the overall heat flow and to investigate factors and conditions that influence the radiation contribution to heat flow. The modeling results showed that unlike the case at lower temperatures, the radiant energy flow through waste melts could be predominant compared with conduction at temperature of about 900 °C or higher. However, heat flow due to radiation was roughly equal to that from

  12. Higher Fe{sup 2+}/total Fe ratio in iron doped phosphate glass melted by microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Ashis K.; Sinha, Prasanta K.; Das, Dipankar; Guha, Chandan; Sen, Ranjan

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Iron doped phosphate glasses prepared using microwave heating and conventional heating under air and reducing atmosphere. • Presence of iron predominantly in the ferrous oxidation state in all the glasses. • Significant concentrations of iron in the ferrous oxidation state on both octahedral and tetrahedral sites in all the glasses. • Ratio of Fe{sup 2+} with total iron is found higher in microwave prepared glasses in comparison to conventional prepared glasses. - Abstract: Iron doped phosphate glasses containing P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–MgO–ZnO–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were melted using conventional resistance heating and microwave heating in air and under reducing atmosphere. All the glasses were characterised by UV–Vis–NIR spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and wet colorimetry analysis. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed presence of iron predominantly in the ferrous oxidation state on two different sites in all the glasses. The intensity of the ferrous absorption peaks in UV–Vis–NIR spectrum was found to be more in glasses prepared using microwave radiation compared to the glasses prepared in a resistance heating furnace. Thermogravimetric analysis showed increasing weight gain on heating under oxygen atmosphere for glass corroborating higher ratio of FeO/(FeO + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in glass melted by direct microwave heating. Wet chemical analysis also substantiated the finding of higher ratio Fe{sup +2}/ΣFe in microwave melted glasses. It was found that iron redox ratio was highest in the glasses prepared in a microwave furnace under reducing atmosphere.

  13. A comparison of melt densities for several Apollo volcanic glass compositions up to 11 GPa: Implications for the role of Ti in melt compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Kaaden, K. E.; Agee, C. B.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    This study focuses on the density and compressibility of three lunar glass compositions encountered during the Apollo missions to the Moon. These glasses are hypothesized to have rapidly quenched as glass beads during lunar fire fountain eruptions. The lunar glass beads have distinctive colors that correspond to TiO2 content. The glasses of interest for this study are the Apollo 15 green glass Type C (A15C) which has a low TiO2 content of only 0.26 wt%, the Apollo 17 orange glass (74220-type), which has a moderately high TiO2 content of 9.12 wt%, and the Apollo 14 black glass which has the highest TiO2 content with 16.40 wt%. These glasses represent primary, unfractionated melts making them a prime candidate for experimental studies into lunar basalt density and eruptability during partial melting of the lunar mantle. Sink/float experiments were performed on both A15C and the A17 74220-type, and previously published data from the A14 black glass were used. Experiments were performed in both a piston cylinder apparatus for pressures up to 2.5 GPa and a Walker-style multi-anvil device for pressures greater than 2.5 GPa. Thus far we have estimated the density and compressibility of the orange glass successfully up to 8 GPa with future experiments planned for 10 GPa. Although these pressures exceed that of the lunar interior (~4.7 GPa), higher experimental pressures are important for determination of melt bulk modulus and identification of such factors as compositional effects on melt compressibility. Experiments have also been run on A15C for pressures relevant to the lunar interior. Our sink/float observations at 8 GPa confirm that the orange glass density curve can be approximated by a straight line at liquidus temperatures, while the black glass shows a strong decrease in slope with pressure, especially above 3 GPa. The different slopes between these two glasses creates a density crossover at approximately 6 GPa. SiO2, TiO2, and FeO are the largest compositional

  14. Mid-infrared bi-directional reflectance spectroscopy of impact melt glasses and tektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlok, Andreas; Stojic, Aleksandra; Weber, Iris; Hiesinger, Harald; Zanetti, Michael; Helbert, Joern

    2016-11-01

    We have analyzed 14 impact melt glass samples, covering the compositional range from highly felsic to mafic/basaltic, as part of our effort to provide mid-infrared spectra (7-14 μm) for MERTIS (Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer), an instrument onboard of the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Since Mercury was exposed to many impacts in its history, and impact glasses are also common on other bodies, powders of tektites (Irghizite, Libyan Desert Glass, Moldavite, Muong Nong, Thailandite) and impact glasses (from the Dellen, El'gygytgyn, Lonar, Mien, Mistastin, and Popigai impact structures) were analyzed in four size fractions of (0-25, 25-63, 93-125 and 125-250 μm) from 2.5 to 19 μm in bi-directional reflectance. The characteristic Christiansen Feature (CF) is identified between 7.3 μm (Libyan Desert Glass) and 8.2 μm (Dellen). Most samples show mid-infrared spectra typical of highly amorphous material, dominated by a strong Reststrahlen Band (RB) between 8.9 μm (Libyan Desert Glass) and 10.3 μm (Dellen). Even substantial amounts of mineral fragments hardly affect this general band shape. Comparisons of the SiO2 content representing the felsic/mafic composition of the samples with the CF shows felsic/intermediate glass and tektites forming a big group, and comparatively mafic samples a second one. An additional sign of a highly amorphous state is the lack of features at wavelengths longer than ∼15 μm. The tektites and two impact glasses, Irghizite and El'gygytgyn respectively, have much weaker water features than most of the other impact glasses. For the application in remote sensing, spectral features have to be correlated with compositional characteristics of the materials. The dominating RB in the 7-14 μm range correlates well with the SiO2 content, the Christiansen Feature shows similar dependencies. To distinguish between glass and crystalline phases of the same chemical composition, a comparison between CF the SCFM index (SiO2/(SiO2

  15. Crystal growth nucleation and Fermi energy equalization of intrinsic spherical nuclei in glass-forming melts.

    PubMed

    Tournier, Robert F

    2009-02-01

    The energy saving resulting from the equalization of Fermi energies of a crystal and its melt is added to the Gibbs free-energy change ΔG2ls associated with a crystal formation in glass-forming melts. This negative contribution being a fraction ε ls(T) of the fusion heat is created by the electrostatic potential energy -U0 resulting from the electron transfer from the crystal to the melt and is maximum at the melting temperature Tm in agreement with a thermodynamics constraint. The homogeneous nucleation critical temperature T2, the nucleation critical barrier ΔG2ls∗/kBT and the critical radius R∗2ls are determined as functions of εls(T). In bulk metallic glass forming melts, εls(T) and T2 only depend on the free-volume disappearance temperature T0l, and εls(Tm) is larger than 1 (T0l>Tm/3); in conventional undercooled melts εls(Tm) is smaller than 1 (T0l>Tm/3). Unmelted intrinsic crystals act as growth nuclei reducing ΔG2ls∗/kBT and the nucleation time. The temperature-time transformation diagrams of Mg65Y10Cu25, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, Pd43Cu27 Ni10P20, Fe83B17 and Ni melts are predicted using classic nucleation models including time lags in transient nucleation, by varying the intrinsic nucleus contribution to the reduction of ΔG2ls∗/kBT. The energy-saving coefficient ε nm(T) of an unmelted crystal of radius Rnm is reduced when Rnm ≪R∗2ls; εnm is quantified and corresponds to the first energy level of one s-electron moving in vacuum in the same spherical attractive potential -U0 despite the fact that the charge screening is built by many-body effects.

  16. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    SciTech Connect

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L.

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show “fast” growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing “slow” growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g} / T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g} / T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max} / T{sub g} = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  17. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts.

    PubMed

    Orava, J; Greer, A L

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U(max) at a temperature T(max) that lies between the glass-transition temperature T(g) and the melting temperature T(m). A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high U(max), a low T(max)/T(m), and a very broad peak in U vs. T/T(m). In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low U(max), a high T(max)/T(m), and a sharp peak in U vs. T/T(m). Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U(max) seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T(g)/T(m)) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T(g)/T(m) and fragility, can show a good correlation with U(max). For all the systems, growth at U(max) is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T(max)/T(g) = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  18. Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Karl F.

    2015-08-07

    While a wide range of non-trivial predictions of the generalized entropy theory (GET) of glass-formation in polymer melts agree with a large number of observed universal and non-universal properties of these glass-formers and even for the dependence of these properties on monomer molecular structure, the huge mathematical complexity of the theory precludes its extension to describe, for instance, the perplexing, complex behavior observed for technologically important polymer films with thickness below ∼100 nm and for which a fundamental molecular theory is lacking for the structural relaxation. The present communication describes a hugely simplified version of the theory, called the simplified generalized entropy theory (SGET) that provides one component necessary for devising a theory for the structural relaxation of thin polymer films and thereby supplements the first required ingredient, the recently developed Flory-Huggins level theory for the thermodynamic properties of thin polymer films, before the concluding third step of combining all the components into the SGET for thin polymer films. Comparisons between the predictions of the SGET and the full GET for the four characteristic temperatures of glass-formation provide good agreement for a highly non-trivial model system of polymer melts with chains of the structure of poly(n-α olefins) systems where the GET has produced good agreement with experiment. The comparisons consider values of the relative backbone and side group stiffnesses such that the glass transition temperature decreases as the amount of excess free volume diminishes, contrary to general expectations but in accord with observations for poly(n-alkyl methacrylates). Moreover, the SGET is sufficiently concise to enable its discussion in a standard course on statistical mechanics or polymer physics.

  19. Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Freed, Karl F

    2015-08-07

    While a wide range of non-trivial predictions of the generalized entropy theory (GET) of glass-formation in polymer melts agree with a large number of observed universal and non-universal properties of these glass-formers and even for the dependence of these properties on monomer molecular structure, the huge mathematical complexity of the theory precludes its extension to describe, for instance, the perplexing, complex behavior observed for technologically important polymer films with thickness below ∼100 nm and for which a fundamental molecular theory is lacking for the structural relaxation. The present communication describes a hugely simplified version of the theory, called the simplified generalized entropy theory (SGET) that provides one component necessary for devising a theory for the structural relaxation of thin polymer films and thereby supplements the first required ingredient, the recently developed Flory-Huggins level theory for the thermodynamic properties of thin polymer films, before the concluding third step of combining all the components into the SGET for thin polymer films. Comparisons between the predictions of the SGET and the full GET for the four characteristic temperatures of glass-formation provide good agreement for a highly non-trivial model system of polymer melts with chains of the structure of poly(n-α olefins) systems where the GET has produced good agreement with experiment. The comparisons consider values of the relative backbone and side group stiffnesses such that the glass transition temperature decreases as the amount of excess free volume diminishes, contrary to general expectations but in accord with observations for poly(n-alkyl methacrylates). Moreover, the SGET is sufficiently concise to enable its discussion in a standard course on statistical mechanics or polymer physics.

  20. Millimeter-Wave Measurements of High Level and Low Level Activity Glass Melts

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, S.K.; Daniel, William E., Jr.

    2006-06-01

    The primary objectives of the current research is to develop on-line sensors for characterizing molten glass in high-level and low-activity waste glass melters using millimeter-wave (MMW) technology and to use this technology to do novel research of melt dynamics. Existing and planned waste glass melters lack sophisticated diagnostics due to the hot, corrosive, and radioactive melter environments. Without process control diagnostics, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at Hanford operate by a feed forward process control scheme that relies on predictive models with large uncertainties. This scheme severely limits production throughput and waste loading. Also operations at DWPF have shown susceptibility to anomalies such as pouring, foaming, and combustion gas build up, which can seriously disrupt operations. Future waste chemistries will be even more challenging. The scientific goals of this project are to develop new reliable on-line monitoring capability for important glass process parameters such as temperature profiles, emissivity, density, viscosity, and other characteristics using the unique advantages of millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation that can be eventually implemented in the operating melters. Once successfully developed and implemented, significant cost savings would be realized in melter operations by increasing production through put, reduced storage volumes (through higher waste loading), and reduced risks (prevention or mitigation of anomalies).

  1. Ni/S/Cl systematics and the origin of impact-melt glasses in Martian meteorite Elephant Moraine 79001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Donovan, John J.; Vicenzi, Edward P.

    2016-04-01

    Martian meteorite Elephant Moraine A79001 (EET 79001) has received considerable attention for the unusual composition of its shock melt glass, particularly its enrichment in sulfur relative to the host shergottite. It has been hypothesized that Martian regolith was incorporated into the melt or, conversely, that the S-enrichment stems from preferential melting of sulfide minerals in the host rock during shock. We present results from an electron microprobe study of EET 79001 including robust measurements of major and trace elements in the shock melt glass (S, Cl, Ni, Co, V, and Sc) and minerals in the host rock (Ni, Co, and V). We find that both S and major element abundances can be reconciled with previous hypotheses of regolith incorporation and/or excess sulfide melt. However, trace element characteristics of the shock melt glass, particularly Ni and Cl abundances relative to S, cannot be explained either by the incorporation of regolith or sulfide minerals. We therefore propose an alternative hypothesis whereby, prior to shock melting, portions of EET 79001 experienced acid-sulfate leaching of the mesostasis, possibly groundmass feldspar, and olivine, producing Al-sulfates that were later incorporated into the shock melt, which then quenched to glass. Such activity in the Martian near-surface is supported by observations from the Mars Exploration Rovers and laboratory experiments. Our preimpact alteration model, accompanied by the preferential survival of olivine and excess melting of feldspar during impact, explains the measured trace element abundances better than either the regolith incorporation or excess sulfide melting hypothesis does.

  2. Effect of Sulfate on Rhenium Partitioning during Melting of Low-Activity Waste Glass Feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tongan; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    The volatile loss of technetium-99 (99Tc) is a major concern of the low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification at Hanford. We investigated the incorporation and volatile loss of Re (a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc) during batch-to-glass conversion up to 1100°C. The AN-102 feed, which is one of the representative Hanford LAW feeds, containing 0.59 wt% of SO3 (in glass if 100% retained) was used. The modified sulfate-free AN-102_0S feed was also tested to investigate the effect of sulfate on Re partitioning and retention during melting. After heating of the dried melter feed (mixture of LAW simulant and glass forming/modifying additives) to different temperatures, the heat-treated samples were quenched. For each heat-treated sample, the salts (soluble components in room temperature leaching), early glass forming melt (soluble components in 80°C leaching), and insoluble solids were separated by a two-step leaching and the chemical compositions of each phase were quantitatively analyzed. The final retention ratio of AN-102 and AN-102_0S in glass (insoluble solids) are 32% and 63% respectively. The presence of sulfate in the salt phase between 600 and 800°C leads to a significantly higher Re loss via volatilization from the salt layer. At ≥800°C, for both samples, there is no more incorporation of Re into the insoluble phase because: for AN-102_0S there is no salt left i.e., the split into the insoluble and gas phases is complete by 800°C and for AN-102 all the Re contained in the remaining salt phase is lost through volatilization. The present results on the effect of sulfate, although not directly applicable to LAW vitrification in the melter, will be used to understand the mechanism of Re incorporation into glass to eventually develop the methods that can increase the 99Tc retention during LAW vitrification at Hanford.

  3. Structure and dynamical intra-molecular heterogeneity of star polymer melts above glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Glynos, Emmanouil; Green, Peter F

    2015-01-28

    Structural and dynamical properties of star melts have been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of a bead-spring model. Star polymers are known to be heterogeneous, but a systematic simulation study of their properties in melt conditions near the glass transition temperature was lacking. To probe their properties, we have expanded from linear to star polymers the applicability of Dobkowski's chain-length dependence correlation function [Z. Dobkowski, Eur. Polym. J. 18, 563 (1982)]. The density and the isokinetic temperature, based on the canonical definition of the laboratory glass-transition, can be described well by the correlation function and a subtle behavior manifests as the architecture becomes more complex. For linear polymer chains and low functionality star polymers, we find that an increase of the arm length would result in an increase of the density and the isokinetic temperature, but high functionality star polymers have the opposite behavior. The effect between low and high functionalities is more pronounced for short arm lengths. Complementary results such as the specific volume and number of neighbors in contact provide further insights on the subtle relation between structure and dynamics. The findings would be valuable to polymer, colloidal, and nanocomposites fields for the design of materials in absence of solution with the desired properties.

  4. In-situ observation of bubble formation at silicon melt-silica glass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Toshiro; Maeda, Susumu; Higasa, Mitsuo; Kashima, Kazuhiko

    2011-03-01

    The generation mechanism of pinhole defects in the Czochralski (CZ)-grown silicon (Si) single crystals was clarified by in-situ observations of bubble formation at the interface between Si melt and a silica glass crucible in a small experimental apparatus. The nucleation and growth of bubbles were facilitated by creating small cavities on the inner wall of the crucible. Si melting was conducted in an argon (Ar) atmosphere, and the pressure was maintained at either 100 Torr or close to a vacuum (no Ar-gas flow). It was found that in the presence of Ar, bubbles formed in the cavities immediately after the cavities came in contact with the melt. However, no bubbles formed in a vacuum in the experimental apparatus. These results indicate that the bubbles formed in the cavities are largely filled with Ar, and the initial bubble volumes are nearly comparable with those of the cavities. In an initial stage of expansion of a bubble, estimated volumes changed nearly in accordance with the Boyle-Charles law. Further, participation of SiO gas in bubble growth may explain the deviation of the bubble volume from the theoretical value anticipated if only Ar gas was involved in the bubble growth.

  5. Putative Bioalteration Textures Hosted Within Impact Melt Glasses From the Ries Crater, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapers, H. M.; Osinski, G. R.; Banerjee, N. R.

    2009-05-01

    [5]. The bulk compositions of impact melts are diverse, reflecting heterogeneities in the target lithologies. Furthermore, impact melts often display heterogeneity on multiple scales. Given the probable ubiquity of impact glasses in hydrothermal settings throughout the Solar System, it is important to understand the biological components and potential of such systems. Impact derived endolithic habitats are being considered as possible locations for life on early Earth [6] and on the surface of other planets such as Mars [7]. Understanding the geomicrobiology of impact craters on Earth is critical in furthering the search for life on Mars. Studies constraining the biogeochemistry of impact craters may not only yield insight into early life and the origin of life on Earth, but furthermore, may comprise a potential habitat for life and past life on other terrestrial planets such as Mars. References: [1] M.V. Naumov (2005) Geofluids, 5, 165-184. [2] C.S. Cockell, P. Lee (2002) Biological Reviews, 77, 279-310. [3] Banerjee et. al. (2007) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 71, A58. [4] Staudigel et al. 2008. ES Rev. 89(3-4) 156-178. [5] Osinski G. R. (2003) MAPS 38(11), 1641-1667. [6] F. Westall, R.L. Folk (2003) Precambrian Res. 126. [7] Cockell C. S., et al. (2005) MAPS 40(12), 1901-1914

  6. Apollo 14 very low titanium glasses - Melting experiments in iron-platinum alloy capsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H.-K.; Lindsley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes two techniques that have been developed to produce Fe-Pt alloy capsules for hgh-pressure experiments, and reports liquidus-phase relations of the Apollo 14 very low titanium glasses determined using Fe-rich capsules (a/Fe/ approximately 0.6). The liquid is multiply saturated with olivine and clinopyroxene at equal to or greater than 22 kbar. The multiple saturation is at least 3 kbar higher than that determined using pure Fe capsules and corresponds to a source region at least 60 km deeper if olivine and clinopyroxene were the residual phases. However, independent data on iron activity or oxygen fugacity of the glasses are still needed in order to choose a container of optimum composition. Preliminary experiments in Fe-poor alloy capsules suggest that the valence state of iron and the crystallization sequence in the melt have changed, possibly as a result of oxidizing materials entrapped during the iron-plating processes. The FeO content of the charge decreases linearly with increasing run duration in experiments using pure Fe capsules. The observation that iron-rich globules grow with time suggests that the equilibrium Fe (bleb) + Fe2O3 (liq) = 3 FeO (liq) might be established in the liquid at high pressure. If this explanation is correct, an appreciable amount of 'FeO' in the liquid could actually be Fe2O3, and some natural lunar volcanic glasses may contain ferric iron as well.

  7. Molten salt dynamics in glass melts using millimeter-wave emissivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, S K.; Daniel, Jr., William E.; Miller, Donald H.

    2004-08-01

    Non-contact millimeter-wave measurements at a frequency of 137 GHz were used to detect the thermal emission and reflectivity from the molten surface of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) black frit glass as sodium sulfate salt was added. The experiments were carried out in the EV-16 melter at Clemson Environmental Technology Laboratory (CETL) with 245 lbs. (111 kG) of glass and a total of 4.2 lbs. (1.9 kG) of added salt. The dynamics of salt layer build up were observed from the initial formation of small drops of about 5 mm diameter or less to larger pools > 28 mm cross-section that were coincident with the increase in millimeter-wave surface level fluctuations causing the salt to flow back and forth until a continuous layer was formed. The millimeter-wave emissivity at 137 GHz of DWPF black frit glass melt and molten sodium sulfate salt at 950 C was determined to be 0.64 +/-0.05 and 0.44 +/-0.05, respectively.

  8. Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

  9. SIMS Calibration of Nitrogen in Silicate Glasses and Applications to Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, M. E.; Hervig, R. L.; Wallace, P. J.; Myers, M.; Wilson, C. J. N.

    2015-12-01

    Previous attempts to constrain N fluxes between the mantle, crust, and atmospheric reservoirs over geologic time have been inhibited due to the difficulty of detecting trace amounts of nitrogen, especially as triply-bonded N2 in oxidized magmas. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can detect nitrogen as N+, and as the molecular ions SiN-, NO-, and CN-. However, there are few matrix-matched, bulk-analyzed standards for N, which makes quantification of its signal challenging. Here, we use the implantation of known amounts of nitrogen into rhyolitic glasses containing a range of H2O, and subsequent depth-profile analysis of these samples to derive N calibration factors1,2. We use a primary beam of O- and detection of N+ ions. Results demonstrate that the useful yield (ions detected per atom sputtered) of N increases with H2O content, whereas the useful yield of the measured matrix ion (30Si) decreases with higher H2O. Quantification is also complicated by variable N background that scales inversely with observed higher sputtering rates in hydrated glasses. The former issue can be resolved by fitting a curve to the H2O vs. calibration factor plot and the latter by varying the primary beam density on low-H2O materials. Together, these approaches allow us to quantify the N content in variably hydrated rhyolitic glasses. Application of these calibrations to quartz-hosted melt inclusions from the Bishop3, 4 and Huckleberry Ridge Tuffs4 reveals un-degassed N contents of melts at depth. We show that N can be used in concert with other volatiles to tease out magmatic processes, such as recharge events and magma mixing. We conclude that unless these inclusions do not represent the bulk concentration of N in the melt, large silicic eruptions have not released enough N to significantly impact the atmospheric reservoir over geologic time. 1Burnett DS et al. (2015) Geostand Geoanalytical Res 39:265-276; 2Wilson RG et al. (1989) Secondary ion mass spectrometry. Wiley (New York

  10. Rheology of Pure Glasses and Crystal Bearing Melts: from the Newtonian Field to the Brittle Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordonnier, B.; Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Castro, J. M.; Hess, K.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition remains a central question of modern geology. If rocks can be perceived as a granular flow on geological time-scale, their behavior is brittle in dynamic areas. Understanding rock failure conditions is the main parameter in mitigating geological risks, more specifically the eruptive style transitions from effusive to explosive. If numerical simulations are the only way to fully understanding the physical processes involved, we are in a strong need of an experimental validation of the proposed models. here we present results obtained under torsion and uni-axial compression on both pure glasses and crystal bearing melts. We characterized the brittle onset of two phases magmas from 0 to 65% crystals. The strain-rates span a 5 orders magnitude range, from the Newtonian flow to the Brittle field (10-5 - 100 s-1). We particularly emphasize the time dependency of the measured rheology. The materials tested are a borosilicate glass from the National Bureau of Standards, a natural sample from Mt Unzen volcano and a synthetic sample. The lattest is an HPG8 melt with 7% sodium mole excess. The particles are quasi-isometric corundum crystalschosen for their shape and integrity under the stress range investigated. The crystal fraction ranges from 0 to 0.65. Concerning pure magmas, we recently demonstrated that the material passes from a Newtonian to a non-Nemtonian behavior with increasing strain-rate. This onset can mostly be explained by viscous-heating effects. However, for even greater strain-rates, the material cracks and finally fail. The brittle onset is here explained with the visco-elastic theory and corresponds to a Deborah number greater than 10-2. Concerning crystal bearing melts the departure from the Newtonian state is characterized by two effects: a shear-thinning and a time weakening effect. The first one is instantaneous and loading-unloading cyclic tests suggest an elastic contribution of the crystal network. The second one

  11. Insights into Silicate and Oxide Melt Structure from Amorphous, Non-Glass-Forming Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Many silicate and oxide liquids of interest in the Earth sciences and in technology cannot readily be quenched to glasses, either because of low silica contents (and hence low viscosity at the melting point and accompanying liquid 'fragility') or because of liquid-liquid unmixing at high temperature. Although in-situ, high temperature structural tools have been in use for decades and are rapidly developing, many methods are still most informative for glass samples quenched to ambient pressure and temperature, e.g. high-resolution solid-state NMR. Amorphous oxides, including alumina and silicate compositions, have widespread technological applications. These are generally deposited by a variety of high-energy sputtering methods, as films of thicknesses of 10's to 100's of nm. Using Al-27, Si-29, and O-17 NMR, we have recently shown that for such films, very similar short-range structure is seen in materials made by very different kinetic pathways, such as sol-gel synthesis vs. ion-beam sputtering. This path-independent structure suggests that these materials pass through transient equilibrium states during their formation, probably that of deeply supercooled liquids just above glass transition temperatures. In the HfO2-SiO2 and ZrO2-SiO2 systems, for example, samples have well-resolved O-17 NMR spectra, allowing quantitation of O sites with only Hf(Zr) neighbors (so-called "free" oxide ions), with mixed Hf(Zr) and Si neighbors, and Si only. The observed oxygen speciation agrees well with a simple thermodynamic model of one of the most fundamental equilibria in silicate systems, namely the reaction of bridging (Si-O-Si) and "free" (e.g. OHf3 and OHf4) oxide ions to produce "non-bridging" oxygens (e.g. Si-OHf2). This new approach to sampling such structural equilibria in compositions far outside the range of normal glass-forming liquids may provide new insights into more geological compositions as well, as well as in more general models of silicate melt chemistry.

  12. MEA/A-1 experiment 81F01 conducted on STS-7 flight, June 1983. Containerless processing of glass forming melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, D. E.; Ray, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    The space processing of containerless, glassforming melts on board the space shuttle flight STS-7 is investigated. Objectives include; (1) obtain quantitative evidence for the supression of heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization, (2) study melt homogenization without gravity driven convection, (3) procedural development for bubble free, high purity homogeneous melts inmicro-g, (4) comparative analysis of melts on Earth and in micro g, and (5) assess the apparatus for processing multicomponent, glass forming melts in a low gravity environment.

  13. A novel method to measure the glass and melting transitions of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Abiad, Mohamad G; Gonzalez, David C; Mert, Behic; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Carvajal, M Teresa

    2010-08-30

    A method to measure thermo-mechanical properties of pharmaceutical and polymeric powders was developed. The measurements are conducted by characterizing the material's response to applied acoustic waves. Measurements were performed using griseofulvin, felodipine and indomethacin as model drugs and polyethylene oxide (MW=200,000, 900,000, 2,000,000Da) as model polymers. The method employed measures the mechanical impedance enabled the calculation of the powder rheological and thermo-mechanical properties. Measurements attained with this new technique are compared with measurements made using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The new method detects the melting and glass transitions events while providing complementary information to that provided by DSC and DMA.

  14. Melting behavior of water in cylindrical pores: carbon nanotubes and silica glasses.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, M; Jazdzewska, M; Huang, L L; Gubbins, K E

    2008-08-28

    We report a study of the effects of confinement in multi-walled carbon nanotubes and mesoporous silica glasses (SBA-15) on the solid structure and melting of both H(2)O and D(2)O ice, using differential scanning calorimetry, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, and neutron diffraction. Multi-walled nanotubes of 2.4, 3.9 and 10 nm are studied, and the SBA-15 studied has pores of mean diameter 3.9 nm; temperatures ranging from approximately 110 to 290 K were studied. We find that the melting point is depressed relative to the bulk water for all systems studied, with the depression being greater in the case of the silica mesopores. These results are shown to be consistent with molecular simulation studies of freezing in silica and carbon materials. The neutron diffraction data show that the cubic phase of ice is stabilized by the confinement in carbon nanotubes, as well as in silica mesopores, and persists up to temperatures of about 240 K, above which there is a transition to the hexagonal ice structure.

  15. Technology development program for an advanced microsheet glass concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Dynamic Space Power Systems are candidate electrical power generating systems for future NASA missions. One of the key components in a solar dynamic power system is the concentrator which collects the sun's energy and focuses it into a receiver. In 1985, the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated the Advanced Solar Dynamic Concentrator Program with funding from NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST). The objectives of the Advanced Concentrator Program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived (7 to 10 years) space solar dynamic concentrators. The Advanced Concentrator Program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. The Advanced Microsheet Glass Concentrator Program, a reflector concept, that is currently being investigated both in-house and under contract is discussed.

  16. Silicate glasses and sulfide melts in the ICDP-USGS Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Horton, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electron-beam petrography of melt-rich suevite and melt-rock clasts from selected samples from the Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, reveal a variety of silicate glasses and coexisting sulfur-rich melts, now quenched to various sulfi de minerals (??iron). The glasses show a wide variety of textures, fl ow banding, compositions, devitrifi cation, and hydration states. Electron-microprobe analyses yield a compositional range of glasses from high SiO2 (>90 wt%) through a range of lower SiO2 (55-75 wt%) with no relationship to depth of sample. Some samples show spherical globules of different composition with sharp menisci, suggesting immiscibility at the time of quenching. Isotropic globules of higher interfacial tension glass (64 wt% SiO2) are in sharp contact with lower-surface-tension, high-silica glass (95 wt% SiO2). Immiscible glass-pair composition relationships show that the immiscibility is not stable and probably represents incomplete mixing. Devitrifi cation varies and some low-silica, high-iron glasses appear to have formed Fe-rich smectite; other glass compositions have formed rapid quench textures of corundum, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, magnetite, K-feldspar, plagioclase, chrome-spinel, and hercynite. Hydration (H2O by difference) varies from ~10 wt% to essentially anhydrous; high-SiO2 glasses tend to contain less H2O. Petrographic relationships show decomposition of pyrite and melting of pyrrhotite through the transformation series; pyrite? pyrrhotite? troilite??? iron. Spheres (~1 to ~50 ??m) of quenched immiscible sulfi de melt in silicate glass show a range of compositions and include phases such as pentlandite, chalcopyrite, Ni-As, monosulfi de solid solution, troilite, and rare Ni-Fe. Other sulfi de spheres contain small blebs of pure iron and exhibit a continuum with increasing iron content to spheres that consist of pure iron with small, remnant blebs of Fe-sulfi de. The Ni-rich sulfi de phases can be explained by

  17. Polymer Prize Talk: Segmental Dynamics in Polymers : From Cold Melts to Aging and Stressed Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Polymers are excellent glass formers. In the cold molten state they exhibit chemically-specific and strongly non-Arrenhius segmental relaxation which sets the time scale for the generic chain scale dynamics. In the amorphous solid or plastic state the temperature dependence of the alpha relaxation time changes, physical aging emerges, and a rich mechanical response occurs characterized by the dynamic yielding, strain softening and strain hardening processes. We have developed a statistical mechanical theory of activated segmental relaxation in cold melts by combining and extending methods of mode coupling, dynamic density functional and activated hopping theories. The approach is built on the concept of a confining nonequilibrium free energy which quantifies local dynamical constraints and the barrier hopping process. The localizing consequences of interchain caging forces are quantified by the amplitude of nanometer scale density fluctuations (compressibility) and backbone stiffness. Predictions for the kinetic glass and dynamic crossover temperatures, dynamic fragility, and thermal dependence of the segmental relaxation time are consistent with experiments. The theory has been generalized to treat alpha relaxation, physical aging, and nonlinear mechanical properties in the glass. The structural component of density fluctuations become (partially) frozen resulting in a crossover to Arrenhius relaxation. Physical aging is modeled based on a kinetic equation for collective density fluctuations. At intermediate time scales the relaxation time (shear modulus) grows as a power law (logarithmic) function of aging time with a temperature dependent exponent. Applied stress weakens dynamical constraints thereby accelerating relaxation and softening the elastic modulus. A constitutive equation has been constructed from which the temperature dependent dynamic yielding and mechanical response under constant strain rate, constant stress (creep), and other modes of deformation

  18. The effect of melt infiltration of borosilicate glass on biaxial flexural strength of porcelain-veneered zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Kyu Ji; Song, Kyung Woo; Jung, Jong Hyun; Ahn, Hyo Jin; Park, Il Song; Lee, Min Ho; Bae, Tae Sung

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of melt infiltration on the biaxial flexural strength of porcelain-bonded zirconia, borosilicate glasses were used in this study. Presintered yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) blocks were milled and used for disc specimens. Prior to veneering of porcelain, the infiltration of borosilicate glass on zirconia was performed at 1,100 °C for 1 h. After a biaxial flexural test with the crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/min, fractured surfaces and interfaces between zirconia and veneer porcelain were observed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The fracture strength of sintered zirconia and veneer porcelain was significantly increased by the melt infiltration of borosilicate glass (P < 0.05). The melt infiltration process of borosilicate glass greatly improved the Weibull modulus of sintered zirconia. However, the Weibull modulus of porcelain increased slightly. The sintered zirconia group showed a smooth fracture surface containing many pores, but the glass-infiltrated zirconia group showed a rough fracture surface.

  19. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-08-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2], and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history.

  20. Advanced processing of the Zerodur R glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Thomas A.

    1991-11-01

    The Zerodur glass ceramic is an extraordinary material possessing a very low thermal expansion over a broad temperature range. Depending on the size of the castings, a continuous or a discontinuous melting technology is used in the manufacture of Zerodur. Continuous melters are being operated regularly in Germany and recently in the United States. The latest generation of discontinuous melters started production of 8.2 m spincast telescope blanks in early 1991. Zerodur fusion is a special process to generate lightweighted mirror blanks and special components. It requires glassy material and generates bonds that are as strong as the bulk material. Further process development such as waterjet cutting and insertion technologies are underway and may generate components of unique shapes and performance.

  1. Eruption Depths, Magma Storage and Magma Degassing at Sumisu Caldera, Izu-Bonin Arc: Evidence from Glasses and Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Island arc volcanoes can become submarine during cataclysmal caldera collapse. The passage of a volcanic vent from atmospheric to under water environment involves complex modifications of the eruption style and subsequent transport of the pyroclasts. Here, we use FTIR measurements of the volatile contents of glass and melt inclusions in the juvenile pumice clasts in the Sumisu basin and its surroundings (Izu-Bonin arc) to investigate changes in eruption depths, magma storage and degassing over time. This study is based on legacy cores from ODP 126, where numerous unconsolidated (<65 ka), extremely thick (few m to >250 m), massive to normally graded pumice lapilli-tuffs were recovered over four cores (788C, 790A, 790B and 791A). Glass and clast geochemistry indicate the submarine Sumisu caldera as the source of several of these pumice lapilli-tuffs. Glass chips and melt inclusions from these samples were analyzed using FTIR for H2O and CO2 contents. Glass chips record variable H2O contents; most chips contain 0.6-1.6 wt% H2O, corresponding to eruption depths of 320-2100 mbsl. Variations in glass H2O and pressure estimates suggest that edifice collapse occurred prior-to or during eruption of the oldest of these samples, and that the edifice may have subsequently grown over time. Sanidine-hosted melt inclusions from two units record variably degassed but H2O-rich melts (1.1-5.6 wt% H2O). The lowest H2O contents overlap with glass chips, consistent with degassing and crystallization of melts until eruption, and the highest H2O contents suggest that large amounts of degassing accompanied likely explosive eruptions. Most inclusions, from both units, contain 2-4 wt% H2O, which further indicates that the magmas crystallized at pressures of ~50-100 MPa, or depths ~400-2800 m below the seafloor. Further glass and melt inclusion analyses, including major element compositions, will elucidate changes in magma storage, degassing and evolution over time.

  2. Precision grinding of advanced ceramics using superabrasives with glass bond

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanath, S.; Picone, J.

    1995-08-01

    Due to their superior properties such as high wear, heat resistance, low density, and high strength, advanced ceramic materials are being utilized in increasing number of applications and replacing metals and polymers. Wheels containing superabrasives (diamond or cubic boron nitride) are used to precision grind these materials to finished components in about 70% of the applications. The typical grinding wheel bonded by a thermosetting resin does not provide acceptable wheel life and material removal rates to make these ceramic materials commercially viable. Glass bonded superabrasive wheels developed recently and tailored for grinding of ceramics, have shown significant productivity through higher cut rates, longer wheel life values, and better form holding capabilities. Good strength of the ground ceramic work pieces indicates that the damage is maintained at low levels after grinding. Through case studies, this paper discusses the benefits of these new glass bonded wheel specifications, together with some of their limitations.

  3. Effects of milling media on the fabrication of melt-derived bioactive glass powder for biomaterial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Nurul Farhana; Mohamad, Hasmaliza; Noor, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd

    2016-12-01

    The present work aims to study the effects of using different milling media on bioactive glass produced through melt-derived method for biomaterial application. The bioactive glass powder based on SiO2-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 system was fabricated using two different types of milling media which are tungsten carbide (WC) and zirconia (ZrO2) balls. However, in this work, no P2O5 was added in the new composition. XRF analysis indicated that tungsten trioxide (WO3) was observed in glass powder milled using WC balls whereas ZrO2 was observed in glass powder milled using ZrO2 balls. Amorphous structure was detected with no crystalline peak observed through XRD analysis for both glass powders. FTIR analysis confirmed the formation of silica network with the existence of functional groups Si-O-Si (bend), Si-O-Si (tetrahedral) and Si-O-Si (stretch) for both glass powders. The results revealed that there was no significant effect of milling media on amorphous silica network glass structure which shows that WC and zirconia can be used as milling media for bioactive glass fabrication without any contamination. Therefore, the fabricated BG can be tested safely for bioactivity assessment in biological fluids environment.

  4. Structure and disorder in iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses and melts: High-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding of the effect of iron content on the structure (Si coordination environment and the degree of polymerization) of iron-bearing silicate melts and glasses is essential for studying their macroscopic properties and diverse geological processes in Earth's interior. Although the recent advances in high-resolution solid-state NMR techniques provide detailed structural information of a diverse iron-free oxide glasses with varying composition (e.g., Lee, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 2011, 108, 6847; Lee and Sung, Chem. Geol., 2008, 256, 326; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Lee et al., Phys. Rev., 103, 095501, 2009), their application to iron-bearing silicate glasses has a limited usefulness in resolving atomic configurations due to the effect of paramagnetic cation (i.e., Fe) on the NMR spectra. Here, we report the first ^{29}Si and ^{17}O NMR spectra for sodium-iron silicate glasses with varying iron content (Na_{2}O-Fe_{2}O_{3}-SiO_{2} glasses, up to 34.60 wt% Fe_{2}O_{3}), revealing previously unknown details of iron-induced changes in structure and disorder. While signal intensity decreases and peak width increases exponentially with increasing iron content [=Fe_{2}O_{3}/(Na_{2}O+Fe_{2}O_{3})], ^{29}Si MAS NMR spectra for sodium-iron silicate glasses present the slight peak shift and an asymmetrical peak broadening toward higher Q^{n} species with increasing iron content. This result implies an increase in the degree of polymerization with increasing iron content. Additionally, ^{29}Si spin-relaxation time (T_{1}) for the glasses decreases with increasing of iron content by several orders of magnitude. ^{17}O 3QMAS NMR spectra for the glasses show well-resolved non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Na-O-Si) and bridging oxygen (BO, Si-O-Si) even at relatively high iron content, providing the first direct experimental estimation of the degree of polymerization. In sodium-iron silicate glasses, the fraction of NBO decreases with increasing iron

  5. Water Content And Behavior In Mafic Glasses And Melt Inclusions: An Approach Using microRaman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, M.; di Muro, A.; Metrich, N.; Giordano, D.; Montagnac, G.; Behadj, O.; Massare, D.; Clochiatti, R.

    2008-12-01

    Determining water content in silicate melt inclusions is key information to understand magmatic processes. μRaman spectroscopy is a powerful and non destructive technique to assess the total water content in silicate glasses, at micrometer scale (spatial resolution of 1-2 μm). Its potential for analyzing water was demonstrated for hydrous, silicic glasses [1-3]. In complement we analyzed both anhydrous and different sets of hydrous glasses, covering a large range of polymerization degree (NBO/T from 0.01 for rhyolite to 0.74 for basanite). This study allowed us to propose a general equation to determine accurately (5-7% relative error) the water content on a large compositional range [4]. We present here a systematic determination of the water contents in natural mafic melt/glass inclusions hosted in olivine using Raman spectroscopy and a comparison with FTIR measurements. We have specifically selected basanitic water-rich melt inclusions from La Sommata (Vulcano Island) to assess the possible effects of the olivine post-entrapment crystallization and diffusion on the water concentration, using μRaman. Water was analyzed in inclusions having sizes from 10 to >200 μm, a few being trapped in a single crystal. Profiles, performed in the largest, show no significant water diffusion in the shrinkage bubble and water increase while MgO decreases within the 10-20 μm layer at the contact with the host olivine. Moreover, high-T experiments performed on these samples confirm the water loss during heating, a process that is not systematic but possibly depends on the melt inclusion position in the crystal. All this investigation will allows us to understand the behavior of water after entrapment and the interface processes between melt inclusion and its host mineral. [1] Thomas, Amer. Mineral. 2000. [2] Behrens et al., Chem. Geol. 2006. [3] Di Muro et al., Chem. Geol. 2006. [4] Mercier et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. (accepted).

  6. Geochemistry of volcanic glasses from the Louisville Seamount Trail (IODP Expedition 330): Implications for eruption environments and mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Beier, Christoph; Brandl, Philipp A.; Buchs, David M.; Krumm, Stefan H.

    2014-05-01

    glasses recovered from four guyots during drilling along the Louisville Seamount Trail, southwest Pacific, have been analyzed for major, trace, and volatile elements (H2O, CO2, S, and Cl), and oxygen isotopes. Compared to other oceanic island settings, they are geochemically homogeneous, providing no evidence of the tholeiitic stage that characterizes Hawai'i. The degrees and depth of partial melting remained constant over 1-3 Ma represented by the drill holes, and along-chain over several million years. The only exception is Hadar Guyot with compositions that suggest small degree preferential melting of an enriched source, possibly because it erupted on the oldest and thickest lithosphere. Incompatible element enriched glass from late-stage volcaniclastics implies lower degrees of melting as the volcanoes moved off the melting anomaly. Volcaniclastic glasses from throughout the igneous basement are degassed suggesting generation during shallow submarine eruptions (<20 mbsl) or as subaerial flows entered the sea. Drill depths may no longer reflect relative age due to postquench downslope movement. Higher volatile contents in late-stage volcaniclastics indicate submarine eruptions at 118-258 mbsl and subsidence of the edifices below sea level by the time they erupted, or generation in flank eruptions. Glass from intrusion margins suggests emplacement ˜100 m below the surface. The required uplift to achieve these paleo-quench depths and the subsequent subsidence to reach their current depths exceeds that expected for normal oceanic lithosphere, consistent with the Louisville melting anomaly being <100°C hotter than normal asthenosphere at 50-70 Ma when the guyots were erupted.

  7. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  8. Composition of glass from high-temperature rhyolite of the Snake River Plain Yellowstone hotspot track: implications for crustal melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, B. P.; Cathey, H. E.; Allen, C. M.; Campbell, I. H.

    2010-12-01

    Large volume explosive eruptions comprising the members of the Cougar Point Tuff (≥ 7,000 km3) erupted from the Bruneau-Jarbidge volcanic center of the Yellowstone hotspot are melt-dominated with crystal contents ranging from 10-15%. Zircons from all of the units have low δ18O ratios indicative of a heterogeneous, hydrothermally altered protolith that underwent melting in the mid to upper crust as the result of injection of basalt. This study investigates detailed variations in melt compositions by measuring elemental concentrations of 51 elements in individual glass shards from basal airfall tuffs by EPMA and LA-ICP-MS. Some eruptive units contain two distinct compositional modes of glass, indicating the presence of discrete liquid volumes in the magma reservoir system at the time of eruption. Multi-modal behavior is also observed for minerals indicating that the erupted magmas are complex, non-equilibrium assemblages. The overall elemental pattern in glass is for younger units to become more mafic (higher Fe) and for zirconium saturation temperatures and ɛNd to likewise increase. A few elements (B, Rb, Cs, Th, U) decrease in concentration with Fe. Most trace elements however remain fairly constant in composition over the 2.2 myr eruption interval and exhibit no systematic variation with respect to Fe concentration (Li, Be, Zn, Nb and REE). Elements that increase systematically with Fe include Sr, Ba, Eu, P, Zr, Hf and Sc indicating feldspar, zircon and apatite control on the melt composition. Compositional variations can be modeled by batch melting, suggesting that magma reservoirs are constructed by incremental extraction of melts from a crystal-liquid mush with episodic eruption and replenishment. Fractionation may play a role in generating compositional diversity within units.

  9. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  10. Ferrule and use thereof for cooling a melt spun hollow glass fiber as it emerges from a spinnerette

    DOEpatents

    Brown, William E.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement in the process of melt spinning thin walled, hollow fibers from relatively low melting glasses results if cooling of the emerging fiber is accomplished by use of a thin layer of gas to transfer heat from the fiber to a ferrule which fits closely to the spinnerette face and the individual fiber. The ferrule incorporates or is in contact with a heat sink and is slotted or segmented so that it may be brought into position around the moving fiber. Thinner walled, more uniform fibers may be spun when this method of cooling is employed.

  11. (29)Si NMR and SAXS investigation of the hybrid organic-inorganic glasses obtained by consolidation of the melting gels.

    PubMed

    Jitianu, Andrei; Cadars, Sylvian; Zhang, Fan; Rodriguez, Gabriela; Picard, Quentin; Aparicio, Mario; Mosa, Jadra; Klein, Lisa C

    2017-03-14

    This study is focused on structural characterization of hybrid glasses obtained by consolidation of melting gels. The melting gels were prepared in molar ratios of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) and dimethyldiethoxysilane (DMDES) of 75%MTES-25%DMDES and 65%MTES-35%DMDES. Following consolidation, the hybrid glasses were characterized using Raman, (29)Si and (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, synchrotron Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectroscopy revealed the presence of Si-C bonds in the hybrid glasses and 8-membered ring structures in the Si-O-Si network. Qualitative NMR spectroscopy identified the main molecular species, while quantitative NMR data showed that the ratio of trimers (T) to dimers (D) varied between 4.6 and 3.8. Two-dimensional (29)Si NMR data were used to identify two distinct types of T(3) environments. SAXS data showed that the glasses are homogeneous across the nm to micrometer length scales. The scattering cross section was one thousand times lower than what is expected when phase separation occurs. The SEM images show a uniform surface without defects, in agreement with the SAXS results, which further supports that the hybrid glasses are nonporous.

  12. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bista, S.; Stebbins, J. F.; Hankins, B.; Sisson, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of pressure on aluminosilicate melt and glass structure have been studied by both in-situ methods and by quenching and recovering glasses from high pressure and temperature. Significant increases in the coordination number of Al are now well known from the pressure range of 6-10 GPa. New results show that even at shallower mantle pressures of 1-3 GPa, typical aluminosilicate melts have significant concentrations of aluminum cations with coordination numbers greater than 4, with up to 10's of percents of AlO5 and AlO6. Here, we compare the densities and Al coordinations of glass samples recovered from piston-cylinder experiments carried out at 1 to 3 GPa and different temperatures. Samples of two different compositions (Ca3Al2Si6O18 and Na2Si3O7 with 0.5% Al2O3) were compressed and held at temperatures ranging from near to their ambient glass transitions (Tg) up to temperatures above the liquidus. Our 2 GPa sodium aluminosilicate and calcium aluminosilicate glasses quenched from near to Tg show about 5 and 6 percent recovered densification, respectively. In both compositions, samples that were quenched from above the melting point showed substantially lower recovered density and lower Al coordination number compared to the samples that were held near to Tg. For example, sodium aluminosilicate glass quenched from 510°C (near to Tg) had 70% more AlO5 than samples from 1200°C. Based on the measurement of actual cooling rates, fictive temperature differences for the glasses from these two extreme temperatures are not large enough to account for this apparent loss in density and Al-coordination during quench. The most likely cause for these differences is therefore probably the pressure drop during cooling from temperatures above liquidus, as the pressure medium does not respond quickly enough to the thermal contraction of the liquid and furnace parts to remain isobaric. Results from previous high T and P quenching studies thus give only minimum estimates

  13. Discovery of Critical Oxygen Content for Glass Formation in Zr80Pt20 Melt Spun Ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Sordelet; E.A. Rozhkova; X. Yang; M.J. Kramer

    2004-09-30

    Zr{sub 80}Pt{sub 20} alloys may form meta-stable quasicrystals either during devitrification of an amorphous phase or directly upon cooling from a liquid depending on processing conditions. To date, little attention has been given to the role of oxygen on the glass formation or devitrification behavior of Zr-Pt and similar alloys. This study reveals that oxygen content during melt spinning indeed strongly influences the formation of the as-quenched structure. A critical amount of oxygen was found to be required to form amorphous ribbons at a fixed quench rate. At lower oxygen levels (i.e., <500 ppm mass), a fully crystallized is formed; the structure is composed mainly of meta-stable {beta}-Zr with a small fraction of a quasicrystalline phase. At higher oxygen levels, the as-quenched structure transitions to a fully amorphous structure ({approx}1000 ppm mass), and with further oxygen addition forms a mixture of amorphous and quasicrystalline ({approx}1500 ppm mass) or crystalline phases (>2500 ppm mass). Details regarding the structure of the meta-stable {beta}-Zr phase in the low-oxygen ribbons are provided along with a discussion of the structural similarity between this phase and the quasicrystal structure that formed in this alloy.

  14. "Low-Li2O" Frits: Selecting Glasses that Support the Melt Rate Studies and Challenge the Current Durability Model

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-07-30

    During the progressive development of the cold cap model (as it applies to a potential melt rate predictive tool), the formation of an Al-Li-silicate phase was identified as an intermediate reaction phase that could possibly hinder melt rate for SB4. To test this theory, six glasses were designed (using Frit 320's composition as the baseline) to maintain a constant 20 wt% sum of alkali content (in frit) by varying Na{sub 2}O to Li{sub 2}O ratios. The Li{sub 2}O concentration ranged from 8 wt% down to 0% in either 2% or 1% increments with the differences being accounted for by an increase in Na{sub 2}O concentration. Although the primary objective of the ''lower Li{sub 2}O'' frits was to evaluate the potential for melt rate improvements, assessments of durability (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) were also performed. The results suggest that durable glasses can be produced with these ''lower Li{sub 2}O'' frits should it be necessary to pursue this option for improving melt rate. In addition to the series of glasses to support melt rate assessments, a series of frits were also developed to challenge the current durability model based on the limits proposed by Edwards et al. (2004). Although the ''new'' limits allow access into compositional regions of interest (i.e., higher alkali systems) which can improve melt rate and/or waste loading, there may still be ''additional'' conservatism. In this report, two series of glasses were developed to challenge the ''new'' durability limits for the SB4 system. In the first series, the total alkali of the Frit 320-based glasses (designed to support the melt rate program) was increased from 20 wt% to 21 wt% (in the frit), but the series also evaluated the possible impact of various Na{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}O mass ratio differences. The second series pushed the alkali limit in the frit even further with frits containing either 22 or 24 wt% total alkali as well as various Na{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}O mass ratios. The

  15. Tracking the Depleted Mantle Signature in Melt Inclusions and Residual Glass of Basaltic Martian Shergottites using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Usui, Tomohiro; Economos, Rita C.; Schmitt, Axel K.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-­phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-­normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-­system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for both Y98 bulk and MI analyses display a flattening of the LREE that suggests a crustal contribution to the Y98 parent melt. This observation has important implications for the origins of depleted and enriched shergottites.

  16. Structural environments of incompatible elements in silicate glass/melt systems: II. U IV, U V, and U VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Franã§Ois; Ponader, Carl W.; Calas, Georges; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The structural environments of trace to minor levels (≈2000 ppm to ≈3.0 wt%) of U in several silicate glasses were examined as a function of oxygen fugacity, melt composition, and melt polymerization using X-ray (XANES and EXAFS) and optical absorption spectroscopies. Glass compositions were diopside (CaMgSi 2O 6: DI), anorthite (CaAlSi 2O 8: AN), albite (NaAlSi 3O 8: AB), sodium trisilicate (Na 2Si 3O 7: TS), a peralkaline composition (Na 3.3AlSi 7O 17: PR, approximately halfway between AB and TS), and a calc-alkaline rhyolite composition (RH). A second set of silicate glasses of the same base compositions containing ≈2000 ppm to ≈3.0 wt% U and ≈0.6 to 2.5 wt% F or Cl was also synthesized. In the glasses synthesized under oxidizing conditions (in air), U VI occurs as uranyl groups with two axial oxygens at ≈ 1.77-1.85 ± 0.02 Å and four to five equatorial oxygens at ≈2.21-2.25 ± 0.03 Å. In glasses synthesized under more reducing conditions ( fO2 ≈ 10 -3-10 -7 atm), U V occurs in moderately distorted 6-coordinated polyhedra [ d(U V-O) ≈ 2.19-2.24 ± 0.03 Å], which may co-exist with smaller numbers of U VI species and/or U VI species. Under the most reducing conditions used ( fO2 ≈ 10 -8-10 -12 atm), U IV occurs in less distorted octahedra [ d(U IV-O) ≈ 2.26-2.29 ± 0.02 Å]. No clear evidence for U-F or U-Cl bonds was found for any of the halogen-containing glasses, suggesting that U-halogen "complexes" are not present. In addition, no U-U (second-neighbor) interactions were detected, indicating that no significant clustering of U atoms is present in any of the glasses studied. Bond strength-bond length calculations and constraints placed on local bonding by Pauling's second rule suggest that U IV and U V in 6-coordinated sites in silicate melts will preferentially bond to nonbridging oxygens (NBO's) rather than bridging oxygens (BO's). The unusually low 6-fold coordination of U IV and U V in relatively depolymerized silicate melts (e

  17. Dynamic processes in a silicate liquid from above melting to below the glass transition.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Marcio Luis Ferreira; Fokin, Vladimir Mihailovich; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra; Abyzov, Alexander S

    2011-11-21

    We collect and critically analyze extensive literature data, including our own, on three important kinetic processes--viscous flow, crystal nucleation, and growth--in lithium disilicate (Li(2)O·2SiO(2)) over a wide temperature range, from above T(m) to 0.98T(g) where T(g) ≈ 727 K is the calorimetric glass transition temperature and T(m) = 1307 K, which is the melting point. We found that crystal growth mediated by screw dislocations is the most likely growth mechanism in this system. We then calculated the diffusion coefficients controlling crystal growth, D(eff)(U), and completed the analyses by looking at the ionic diffusion coefficients of Li(+1), O(2-), and Si(4+) estimated from experiments and molecular dynamic simulations. These values were then employed to estimate the effective volume diffusion coefficients, D(eff)(V), resulting from their combination within a hypothetical Li(2)Si(2)O(5) "molecule". The similarity of the temperature dependencies of 1/η, where η is shear viscosity, and D(eff)(V) corroborates the validity of the Stokes-Einstein/Eyring equation (SEE) at high temperatures around T(m). Using the equality of D(eff)(V) and D(eff)(η), we estimated the jump distance λ ~ 2.70 Å from the SEE equation and showed that the values of D(eff)(U) have the same temperature dependence but exceed D(eff)(η) by about eightfold. The difference between D(eff)(η) and D(eff)(U) indicates that the former determines the process of mass transport in the bulk whereas the latter relates to the mobility of the structural units on the crystal/liquid interface. We then employed the values of η(T) reduced by eightfold to calculate the growth rates U(T). The resultant U(T) curve is consistent with experimental data until the temperature decreases to a decoupling temperature T(d)(U) ≈ 1.1-1.2T(g), when D(eff)(η) begins decrease with decreasing temperature faster than D(eff)(U). A similar decoupling occurs between D(eff)(η) and D(eff)(τ) (estimated from

  18. Mechanisms of silica refractory corrosion in glass-melting furnaces: Equilibrium predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Allendorf, SNL Karl E. Spear, Penn State University

    1999-10-17

    Corrosion of refractory silica brick used to line the roof or crown of many-glass-melting furnaces is a serious problem in furnaces using oxygen-fuel rather than air-fuel. In this work, the authors report equilibrium calculations for the Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} system that predict the formation of a variable-composition liquid-solution phase as a function of key furnace variables. Since thermodynamic data for the relevant liquid phases are unavailable in standard compilations, new data generated using the associate species model are included in the calculations. The calculations indicate that gas-phase NaOH concentrations less than {approximately}15 ppm will not react with the silica refractory under either air-fired or oxy-fired conditions, since this is the smallest equilibrium NaOH partial pressure in a system containing crystalline SiO{sub 2} (either cristobalite or tridymite) in equilibrium with a variable-composition sodium-silicate liquid phase at refractory temperatures in the range 1,400--1,700 C. The high water content ({approximately}65%) of oxygen-fired furnaces results in measured NaOH(g) concentrations as high as 300 ppm, which greatly exceeds the 1,600 C maximum of 68 ppm NaOH(g) for oxy-fired equilibrium with a liquid-SiO{sub 2} (crystalline) system. This indicates that there is a thermodynamic driving force for NaOH(g) to react with silica refractories in oxy-fired furnaces. The results of the calculations are used to define a critical temperature, above which corrosion is not expected to occur for a given NaOH(g) partial pressure.

  19. Polypropylene/glass fiber hierarchical composites incorporating inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles for advanced technological applications.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Naffakh, Mohammed

    2013-10-09

    Novel isotactic polypropylene (iPP)/glass fiber (GF) laminates reinforced with inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS2) nanoparticles as environmentally friendly fillers have been successfully fabricated by simple melt-blending and fiber impregnation in a hot-press without the addition of any compatibilizer. The influence of IF-WS2 concentration on the morphology, viscosity. and thermal and mechanical behavior of the hierarchical composites has been investigated. Results revealed an unprecedented 62 °C increase in the degradation temperature of iPP/GF upon addition of only 4.0 wt % IF-WS2. The coexistence of both micro- and nanoscale fillers resulted in synergistic effects on enhancing the stiffness, strength, crystallinity, thermal stability, glass transition (Tg) and heat distortion temperature (HDT) of the matrix. The approach used in this work is an efficient, versatile, scalable and economic strategy to improve the mechanical and thermal behavior of GF-reinforced thermoplastics with a view to extend their use in advanced technological applications. This new type of composite materials shows great potential to improve the efficiency and sustainability of many forms of transport.

  20. EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

    2010-07-28

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro

  1. Thermal analysis of reactions in soda-lime silicate glass batches containing melting accelerants: II, multicomponent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kug Sun; Lee, Sang Won; Speyer, R.F. )

    1993-03-01

    The glass melting reactions in a multicomponent system (sand-soda ash-calcite-dolomite-feldspar) were studied using data from DTA, TGA, and XRD interactively. The first-formed liquid phase occurred at 700C from eutectic melting among CaCO[sub 3], Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3], and MgO. Further liquid phase formed at the CaCO[sub 3]-Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] eutectic at 785C and a fusion reaction among SiO[sub 2], CaO, and the molten phase at 812C. Reactions between molten soda ash and silica grains to form a sodium disilicate coating also occurred in this temperature range. The effects of reaction accelerant additions (Na[sub 2], SO[sub 4], NaNO[sub 3], NaCl) on batch fusion were analyzed. Sodium chloride was found to be the most effective melting accelerant due to the formation of a NaCl-Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] eutectic liquid phase at [approximately]636C, which effectively attacked the silica relic. CO[sub 2] gas release terminated [approximately]80C earlier with 1 wt% NaCl additions to the base glass.

  2. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Skorski, Daniel C.; Matyas, Josef

    2013-07-01

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  3. The role of Al3+ on rheology and structural changes in sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel R.; Florian, Pierre; Henderson, Grant S.; Massiot, Dominique

    2014-02-01

    Because of their importance in both the geosciences and the glass-making industry, alkali aluminosilicate melts have been the focal point of many past studies, but despite progress many problems remain unresolved, such as the complex behaviour of the thermodynamic properties of aluminium-rich alkali silicate melts. This paper presents a study of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses and melts, containing 75 mol% SiO2 and different Al/(Al + Na) ratios. Their structure has been investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, as well as, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si 1D MAS NMR spectroscopy. Results confirm the role change of Na+ cations from network modifier to charge compensator in the presence of Al3+ ions. In addition, polymerization increases with increase of the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. These structural changes explain the observed variations in the viscosity of these melts. The viscosity data in turn allow us to calculate the configurational entropy of melts at the glass transition temperature [the Sconf(Tg)]. The variations of the Sconf(Tg) are strongly nonlinear, with sharp increases and decreases depending on the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. More importantly, a strong increase of the Sconf(Tg) is observed when a few Al2O3 is added to sodium silicate melt. A strong decrease is observed after crossing the tectosilicate join, when Al/(Al + Na) > 0.5 and when Al3+ ions are present in fivefold coordination, Al[5], in the glass. Furthermore, in situ27Al NMR spectra of the peraluminous melt show a clear increase of the Al[5] concentration with increasing temperature. When considered in combination with melt fragility and heat capacity, our data demonstrate that Al[5] is clearly a transient unit at high temperature in highly polymerized tectosilicate and peraluminous melts. However, when present in glasses, Al[5] increases the stability of the aluminosilicate network, hence the Tg of glasses. This could be explained by the ability of Al[5] to carry threefold coordinated oxygen atoms in its first coordination

  4. Advanced automated glass cockpit certification: Being wary of human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amalberti, Rene; Wilbaux, Florence

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents some facets of the French experience with human factors in the process of certification of advanced automated cockpits. Three types of difficulties are described: first, the difficulties concerning the hotly debated concept of human error and its non-linear relationship to risk of accident; a typology of errors to be taken into account in the certification process is put forward to respond to this issue. Next, the difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. The last difficulties to be considered are those related to the goals of certification itself on these new aircraft and the status of findings from human factor analyses (in particular, what should be done with disappointing results, how much can the changes induced by human factors investigation economically affect aircraft design, how many errors do we need to accumulate before we revise the system, what should be remedied when human factor problems are discovered at the certification stage: the machine? pilot training? the rules? or everything?). The growth of advanced-automated glass cockpits has forced the international aeronautical community to pay more attention to human factors during the design phase, the certification phase and pilot training. The recent creation of a human factor desk at the DGAC-SFACT (Official French services) is a direct consequence of this. The paper is divided into three parts. Part one debates human error and its relationship with system design and accident risk. Part two describes difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. Part three focuses on concrete outcomes of human factors for certification purposes.

  5. Density and compressibility of the molten lunar picritic glasses: Implications for the roles of Ti and Fe in the structures of silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; Agee, Carl B.; McCubbin, Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    The density and compressibility of four synthetic molten lunar picritic glasses was investigated from 0 to 10 GPa and 1748 to 2473 K. The picritic glasses were collected from the lunar surface during the Apollo missions, and they are hypothesized to have rapidly quenched as glass beads during pyroclastic fire fountain eruptions. The specific melt compositions investigated in the present study are the Apollo 15 green glass Type C (A15C, TiO2 = 0.26 wt%), the Apollo 14 yellow glass (A14Y, TiO2 = 4.58 wt%), the Apollo 17 orange glass 74220-type (A17O TiO2 = 9.12 wt%), and the Apollo 14 black glass (A14B, TiO2 = 16.40 wt%). These glasses are reported to represent primary unfractionated melts, making them a prime candidate for experimental studies into lunar basalt density and compressibility during partial melting of the lunar mantle. Sink-float experiments were conducted on the synthetic molten lunar glass compositions using a piston-cylinder apparatus (P < 2 GPa) and a Walker-style multi-anvil device (P > 2.5 GPa) in order to bracket the density of the melts. New sink-float data are reported for A15C, A14Y, and A17O, which are combined with previously published density and compressibility data on A15C, A17O, and A14B. Although the Ti-rich liquids are highly compressible at lower pressures, they become nearly incompressible at much higher pressures when compared to the molten low-Ti glasses. Consequently, the melts with the most TiO2 (A14B) are the least dense at higher pressures, a reversal of what is seen at lower pressures. This change in density and compressibility is attributed to changes in coordination of Ti and Fe in the silicate melt structure. As Ti4+ abundances in the silicate melt increase, predominantly [IV]Ti4+ and [IV]Fe2+ change to [VI]Ti4+ and [VI]Fe2+ in the melt structure. All of the data from the present study were used to calculate a Birch-Murnaghan equation-of-state (BM-EOS) for each melt composition. The BM-EOS model for each composition was

  6. Effect of composition and temperature on the properties of High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses melting above 1200{degrees}C (Draft)

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    Increasing the melting temperature of HLW glass allows an increase of waste loading (thus reducing product volume) and the production of more durable glasses at a faster melting rate. However, HLW glasses that melt at high temperatures differ in composition from glasses formulated for low temperature ({approximately}1150{degree}C). Consequently, the composition of high-temperature glasses falls in a region previously not well tested or understood. This report represents a preliminary study of property/composition relationships of high-temperature Hanford HLW glasses using a one-component-at-a-time change approach. A test matrix has been designed to explore a composition region expected for high-temperature high-waste loading HLW glasses to be produced at Hanford. This matrix was designed by varying several key components (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, UO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and others) starting from a glass based on a Hanford HLW all-blend waste. Glasses were fabricated and tested for viscosity, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, liquidus temperature, and PCT release. The effect of individual components on glass properties was assessed using first- and second- order empirical models. The first-order component effects were compared with those from low-temperature HLW glasses.

  7. THE RATIO OF THE GLASS TEMPERATURE TO THE MELTING POINT IN POLYMERS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PLASTICS , MELTING POINT, TRANSITION TEMPERATURE, POLYETHYLENE PLASTICS , VINYL PLASTICS , BUTADIENES, FLUORINE COMPOUNDS, STYRENE PLASTICS , POLYMERS...NYLON, PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CARBONATES, ESTERS, ACRYLIC RESINS, PHENOLIC PLASTICS , ANHYDRIDES, CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, PHTHALATES, UNITED KINGDOM.

  8. Containerless preparation of advanced optical glasses: Experiment 77F095

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happe, R. A.; Kim, K. S.

    1982-01-01

    Containerless processing of optical glasses was studied in preparation for space shuttle MEA flight experiments. Ground based investigation, experiment/hardware coordination activities and development of flight experiment and sample characterization plans were investigated. In the ground based investigation over 100 candidate glass materials for space processing were screened and promising compositions were identified. The system of Nb2O5-TiO2-CaO was found to be very rich with containerless glass compositions and as extensive number of the oxides combinations were tried resulting in a glass formation ternary phase diagram. The frequent occurrence of glass formation by containerless processing among the compositions for which no glass formations were previously reported indicated the possibility and an advantage of containerless processing in a terrestrial environment.

  9. Review and the state of the art: Sol-gel and melt quenched bioactive glasses for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Kumar, Vishal; Homa, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial development is currently the most active research area in the field of biomedical engineering. The bioglasses possess immense potential for being the ideal biomaterials due to their high adaptiveness to the biological environment as well as tunable properties. Bioglasses like 45S5 has shown great clinical success over the past 10 years. The bioglasses like 45S5 were prepared using melt-quenching techniques but recently porous bioactive glasses have been derived through sol-gel process. The synthesis route exhibits marked effect on the specific surface area, as well as degradability of the material. This article is an attempt to provide state of the art of the sol-gel and melt quenched bioactive bioglasses for tissue regeneration. Fabrication routes for bioglasses suitable for bone tissue engineering are highlighted and the effect of these fabrication techniques on the porosity, pore-volume, mechanical properties, cytocompatibilty and especially apatite layer formation on the surface of bioglasses is analyzed in detail. Drug delivery capability of bioglasses is addressed shortly along with the bioactivity of mesoporous glasses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1248-1275, 2016.

  10. Oxygen isotope partitioning between rhyolitic glass/melt and CO{sub 2}: An experimental study at 550-950{degrees}C and 1 bar

    SciTech Connect

    Palin, J.M.; Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.M.

    1996-06-01

    Oxygen isotope partitioning between gaseous CO{sub 2} and a natural rhyolitic glass and melt (77.7 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 0.16 wt% H{sub 2}O{sub total}) has been measured at 550-950{degrees}C and approximately 1 bar. Equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation factors ({alpha}{sub CO2-rhyolite} = ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O){sub rhyolite}) determined in exchange experiments of 100-255 day duration. These values agree well with predictions based on experimentally determined oxygen isotope fractionation factors for CO{sub 2}-silica glass and CO{sub 2}-albitic glass/melt, if the rhyolitic glass is taken to be a simple mixture of normative silica and alkali feldspar components. The results indicate that oxygen isotope partitioning in felsic glasses and melts can be modeled by linear combinations of endmember silicate constituents. Rates of oxygen isotope exchange observed in the partitioning experiments are consistent with control by diffusion of molecular H{sub 2}O dissolved in the glass/melt and are three orders of magnitude faster than predicted for rate control solely by diffusion of dissolved molecular CO{sub 2} under the experimental conditions. Additional experiments using untreated and dehydrated (0.09 wt% H{sub 2}O{sub total}) rhyolitic glass quantatively support these interpretations. We conclude that diffusive oxygen isotope exchange in rhyolitic glass/melt, and probably other polymerized silicate materials, it controlled by the concentrations and diffusivities of dissolved oxygen-bearing volatile species rather than diffusion of network oxygen under all but the most volatile-poor conditions. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Chemical Composition of Impact Glass and Suevite-Type Partial Melts of the Rab and Krk Islands and Their Relation with the Proposed Krk Impact Structure in Northern Adriatic, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čalogović, M.; Marjanac, T.; Fazinić, S.; Strmić-Palinkaš, S.; Tomša, A. M.; Marjanac, L.

    2015-09-01

    Chemical composition of Krk impact structure ejecta represented by incomplete melts and glasses indicate affinity with Pleistocene loess as target lithology, and suggests Pleistocene age of the impact.

  12. A composition-independent quantitative determination of the water content in silicate glasses and silicate melt inclusions by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajacz, Zoltán; Halter, Werner; Malfait, Wim J.; Bachmann, Olivier; Bodnar, Robert J.; Hirschmann, Marc M.; Mandeville, Charles W.; Morizet, Yann; Müntener, Othmar; Ulmer, Peter; Webster, James D.

    2005-12-01

    A new approach was developed to measure the water content of silicate glasses using Raman spectroscopy, which is independent of the glass matrix composition and structure. Contrary to previous studies, the compositional range of our studied silicate glasses was not restricted to rhyolites, but included andesitic, basaltic and phonolitic glasses. We used 21 glasses with known water contents for calibration. To reduce the uncertainties caused by the baseline removal and correct for the influence of the glass composition on the spectra, we developed the following strategy: (1) application of a frequency-dependent intensity correction of the Raman spectra; (2) normalization of the water peak using the broad T-O and T-O-T vibration band at 850-1250 cm-1 wavenumbers (instead of the low wavenumber T-O-T broad band, which appeared to be highly sensitive to the FeO content and the degree of polymerization of the melt); (3) normalization of the integrated Si-O band area by the total number of tetrahedral cations and the position of the band maximum. The calibration line shows a ±0.4 wt% uncertainty at one relative standard deviation in the range of 0.8-9.5 wt% water and a wide range of natural melt compositions. This method provides a simple, quick, broadly available and cost-effective way for a quantitative determination of the water content of silicate glasses. Application to silicate melt inclusions yielded data in good agreement with SIMS data.

  13. Gels and gel-derived glasses in the Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 system. [containerless melting in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    The containerless melting of high-purity multicomponent homogeneous gels and gel-monoliths offers a unique approach to making ultrapure multicomponent optical glasses in the reduced gravity environment of space. Procedures for preparing and characterizing gels and gel-derived glasses in the Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 system are described. Preparation is based on the polymerization reactions of alkoxysilane with trimethyl borate or boric acid and a suitable sodium compound. The chemistry of the gelling process is discussed in terms of process parameters and the gel compositions. The physicochemical nature of gels prepared by three different procedures were found to be significantly different. IR absorption spectra indicate finite differences in the molecular structures of the different gels. The melting of the gel powders and the transformation of porous gel-monoliths to transparent 'glass' without melting are described.

  14. Platinum group metal particles aggregation in nuclear glass melts under the effect of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanotin, Caroline; Puig, Jean; Neyret, Muriel; Marchal, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The viscosity of simulated high level radioactive waste glasses containing platinum group metal particles is studied over a wide range of shear stress, as a function of the particles content and the temperature, thanks to a stress imposed rheometer, coupled to a high-temperature furnace. The system shows a very shear thinning behavior. At high shear rate, the system behaves as a suspension of small clusters and individual particles and is entirely controlled by the viscosity of the glass matrix as classical suspensions. At low shear rate, above a certain fraction in platinum group metal particles, the apparition of macroscopic aggregates made up of chains of RuO2 particles separated by thin layers of glass matrix strongly influences the viscosity of the nuclear glass and leads, in particular, to the apparition of yield stress and thixotropic effects. The maximum size of these clusters as well as their effective volume fraction have been estimated by a balance between Van der Waals attractive forces and hydrodynamic forces due to shear flow. We showed experimentally and theoretically that this aggregation phenomenon is favored by an increase of the temperature, owing to the viscosity decrease of the glass matrix, leading to an unusual increase of the suspension viscosity.

  15. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  16. Reactions during melting of low-activity waste glasses and their effects on the retention of rhenium as a surrogate for technetium-99

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tongan; Kim, Dong-Sang; Tucker, Abigail E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-10-01

    Volatile loss of radioactive 99Tc to offgas is a concern with processing the low-activity waste (LAW) at Hanford site. We investigated the partitioning and incorporation of Re (a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc) into the glass melt during crucible melting of two simulated LAW feeds that resulted in a large difference in 99mTc/Re retention in glass from the small-scale melter tests. Each feed was prepared from a simulated liquid LAW and chemical and mineral additives (boric acid, silica sand, etc.). The as-mixed slurry feeds were dried at 105°C and heated to 600–1100°C at 5 K/min. The dried feeds and heat treated samples were leached with deionized water for 10 min at room temperature followed by 24-h leaching at 80°C. Chemical compositions of the resulting solutions and insoluble solids were analyzed. Volume expansion measurement and X-ray diffraction were performed on dried feeds and heat treated samples to characterize the progress of feed-to-glass conversion reactions. It was found that the incorporation of Re into glass melt virtually completed during the major feed-to-glass conversion reactions were going on at ≤ 700°C. The present results suggest that the different composition of the salt phase is responsible for the large difference in Re incorporation into glass melt during early stages of glass melting at ≤ 700°C. Additional studies with modified and simplified feeds are underway to understand the details on how the different salt composition affects the Re incorporation.

  17. Chemical Principles Revisited: The Chemistry of Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris; Kolb, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a detailed discussion on the chemistry of glass. Topics discussed include: natural glass, early history, modern glass composition, raw materials for glass melting, chemically modified glasses, modern glass forming, glass ceramics, and new developments in glass research. (BT)

  18. Melting Hanford LAW into Iron-Phosphate Glass in a CCIM

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Sharna Rossberg

    2011-09-01

    A vitrification test has been conducted using the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system at the Idaho National Laboratory. The test was conducted to demonstrate the vitrification of a Hanford low activity waste (LAW) that contains relatively large amounts of sulfate and sodium, compared to other radioactive Hanford waste streams. The high sulfate content limits the potential loading of this waste stream in conventional borosilicate glass, so this test demonstrated how this waste stream could be vitrified in an iron-phosphate glass that can tolerate higher levels of sulfate.

  19. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-08-10

    In this study, we present a model for the kinetics of multiple overlapping reactions. Mathematical representation of the kinetics of gas-evolving reactions is crucial for the modeling of the feed-to-glass conversion in a waste-glass melter. The model simulates multiple gas-evolving reactions that occur during heating of a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To obtain satisfactory kinetic parameters, we employed Kissinger's method combined with least-squares analysis. The power-law kinetics with variable reaction order sufficed for obtaining excellent agreement with measured thermogravimetric analysis data.

  20. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH - MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; PIERCE DA; POKORNY R; HRMA PR

    2012-02-07

    In this study, we present a model for the kinetics of multiple overlapping reactions. Mathematical representation of the kinetics of gas-evolving reactions is crucial for the modeling of the feed-to-glass conversion in a waste-glass melter. The model simulates multiple gas-evolving reactions that occur during heating of a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To obtain satisfactory kinetic parameters, we employed Kissinger's method combined with least-squares analysis. The power-law kinetics with variable reaction order sufficed for obtaining excellent agreement with measured thermogravimetric analysis data.

  1. Millimeter-Wave Measurements of High Level and Low Level Activity Glass Melts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Woskov

    2005-03-02

    EMSP supported research of millimeter-wave technology for nuclear waste glass melter monitoring has been very productive in establishing this field and showing great progress. This work has garnered significant recognition, winning an R&D 100 Award for viscosity monitoring, a Best Paper Award by the American Ceramic Society for nuclear waste glass monitoring, investment by the Glass Plus industry consortium to test this technology for glass fiber manufacture, investment by Savannah River Technology Center in purchasing key hardware components for additional tests, and Japanese initiated exchange visits between MIT and the vitrification facilities at Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in Tokai to review this technology. There are also potentially important spin offs to other areas including nuclear and fossil fuel power production, and National Institute of Health sponsored research as indicated below. Consequently, this work has the potential of becoming a major inter nationally recognized EMSP success story. A summary of the main accomplishments follows. The readers are referred to the cited reference publications for more details, many of which were EMSP supported by this work.

  2. Study of viscosity of aluminum melt during glass transition by molecular dynamics and Green-Kubo formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirova, E. M.; Pisarev, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics study of shear viscosity behavior of liquid aluminum is performed. The embedded atom method potential is used at the simulation of isobaric cooling. The viscosity is calculated using the Green-Kubo formula. The stress autocorrelation functions are obtained in the range 300-1200 K. The calculated kinematic viscosity is in agreement with the experimental data for the temperatures above melting temperature. The steep change of the shear viscosity is found below 650 K which we associate with the glass transition and is in a good agreement with the temperature which is obtained using the calorimetric criterion Kolotova et al (2015 J. Non-Cryst. Solids 429 98). The viscosity coefficient can not be calculated using the direct atomistic simulations below that temperature.

  3. Advances in photo-thermo-refractive glass composition modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, S. A.; Ignatiev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    The novel photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass developed in ITMO University is a very promising optical material for photonic and plasmonic applications. In this paper authors represent study of tin influence on photo thermo inducted crystallization process and make a comparison of the optical and holographic properties of the new and classic composition of glass. Also during this work was made overall optimization of chemical composition namely was optimized concentration of halides, fluorides, bromides which are responsible for crystalline phase properties. Ions of antimony, which playing key role in catching and transferring electrons emitted during the UV exposure and subsequent heating. Also was lowered the concentration of stray impurity ions which a capable to catch photo-electrons. Optical spectra show that new composition of PTR glass has no absorption band in visible range caused by metal nano particles of silver. That allows recording of pure phase holograms in wide spectral range. Furthermore new PTR glass allows receiving refractive index modulation up to 1500 ppm. And the UV exposures needed to achieve maximum changes in refraction index are 6-7 times lower than in classic glass.

  4. Air jet levitation furnace system for observing glass microspheres during heating and melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Dunn, S. L.

    1982-01-01

    A collimated hole structure air jet levitation system has been developed which can be used to levitate hollow glass microspheres used in inertial confinement fusion studies. An ellipsoidal furnace has been added to the system to provide a heating source. A video camera and a 16 mm movie camera connected to a microsphere system provide real time observation as well as permanent documentation of the experiments. Microspheres have been levitated at temperatures over 1400 C for over 10 minutes at a time.

  5. Structure of a composite material based on oxyfluoride glass and low-melting fluoroplast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'eva, L. N.; Savchenko, N. N.; Lalayan, V. M.; Zverev, G. A.; Usol'tseva, T. I.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Shaulov, A. Yu.; Berlin, A. A.; Buznik, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Aspects of the fabrication of composites obtained via the extrusion formation of mixtures composed of a perfluorocarbon polymer (F2MB) and a thermoplastic inorganic glass of the composition 3B2O3-97(40SnF2-30SnO-30P2O5) are investigated by analyzing the results from studies of their morphology, molecular structure, and phase composition.

  6. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  7. Effect of pressure on the carbon speciation in silicate glasses and melts: Insights from multi-nuclear solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Fei, Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    The pressure-induced structural changes in carbon-bearing silicate glasses and melts is essential to understand the changes in melt properties in the Earth interior and yield atomistic insights into the deep carbon cycle. Despite the extensive pioneering studies on carbon-bearing silicate glasses, spectroscopic and scattering studies at high pressure above ~4 GPa is limited due to the lack of suitable experimental probes. Here, we report the pressure-induced structural changes around C, Si and Al in albite and Na-trisilicate (Na2O:SiO2=1:3, NS3) glasses with varying pressure up to 8 GPa, using 27Al, 29Si and 13C solid-state high-resolution NMR. 27Al 3QMAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite glasses quenched from melts at high pressure up to 6 GPa show only [4]Al environments. The FWHM of [4]Al in albite glasses increases with increasing pressure, indicating that the overall densification of albite glasses at high pressure is accompanied by an increase in the topological disorder around Al. 29Si MAS NMR spectra for NS3 glasses at high pressure up to 8 GPa show the presence of highly coordinated Si, [5,6]Si, which contributes to an increases in the total configurational disorder in the NS3 glasses with pressure. 13C MAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite glasses show the presence of dominant fraction of CO2, and minor amounts of CO32-, and CO. At least three distinct carbonate species, such as [4]Si(CO3)[4]Si, [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al, and CO32- were observed. Among those species, the increase in the fraction of [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al species is most prevalent. 13C MAS NMR spectra for NS3 glasses show the presence of carbonate species. The peaks position of the carbonate species shifts to lower frequency upon compression, suggesting the pressure-induced structural distortion of CO32- in the glasses above 6 GPa. Spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time for molecular CO2 in carbon-bearing albite glasses increases with increasing pressure. T1 relaxation time for CO2 species at 6 GPa is 3

  8. Preparations of PbSe quantum dots in silicate glasses by a melt-annealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D. W.; Cheng, C.; Zhang, Y. N.; Xu, Z. S.

    2014-11-01

    Silicate glass containing PbSe quantum dots (QDs) has important prospective applications in near infra-red optoelectronic devices. In this study, single-stage and double-stage heat-treatment methods were used respectively to prepare PbSe QDs in silicate glasses. Investigation results show that the double-stage heat-treatment is a favorable method to synthesize PbSe QDs with strong photoluminescence (PL) intensity and narrow full weight at half maximum (FWHM) in PL peak. Therefore, the method to prepare PbSe QDs was emphasized on the double-stage heat-treatment. Transmission electron microscopy measurements show that the standard deviations of the average QD sizes from the samples heat-treated at the development temperature of 550 °C fluctuate slightly in the range of 0.6-0.8 nm, while this deviation increases up to 1.2 nm for the sample with the development temperature of 600 °C. In addition, the linear relationship between the QD size and holding time indicates that the crystallization behavior of PbSe QDs in silicate glasses is interface-controlled growth in early stage of crystallization. The growth rates of PbSe QDs are determined to be 0.24 nm/h at 550 °C and 0.72 nm/h at 600 °C. In short, the double-stage heat-treatment at 450 °C for 20 h followed by heat-treatment at 550 °C for 5 h is a preferred process for the crystallization of PbSe QDs in silicate glass. Through this treatment, PbSe QDs with a narrow size dispersion of 5.0 ± 0.6 nm can be obtained, the PL peak from this sample is highest in intensity and narrowest in FWHM among all samples, and the peak is centered on 1575 nm, very close to the most common wavelength of 1550 nm in fiber-optic communication systems.

  9. The influence of the conditions of ion exchange in CuSO4:Na2SO4 melt on the optical properties of surface layers of silicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demichev, I. A.; Sidorov, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of the temperature and duration of ion exchange in BK7 silicate glass in CuSO4:Na2SO4 melt on the optical properties of the glass surface layers has been investigated. It is shown that ion exchange occurs from the melt according to the Cu2+ ↔ 2Na+ scheme. Cu2+ ions penetrate the sample to a depth of about 1 µm. Reduction of Cu2+ ions near the glass surface gives rise to the Cu+ ↔ Na+ ion exchange in the glass. Measurements of refractive index profiles in the glass sample subjected to ion exchange have revealed the formation of two waveguides in the sample: near the surface and at a depth of more than 3 µm; the second waveguide is formed by Cu+ ions. It is shown that relatively low temperatures and short durations of ion exchange lead to the formation of copper molecular clusters Cu n in glass. An increase of ion exchange temperature and duration leads to decomposition of molecular clusters with formation of Cu2+ ions.

  10. Human factors of advanced technology (glass cockpit) transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year study of airline crews at two U.S. airlines who were flying an advanced technology aircraft, the Boeing 757 is discussed. The opinions and experiences of these pilots as they view the advanced, automated features of this aircraft, and contrast them with previous models they have flown are discussed. Training for advanced automation; (2) cockpit errors and error reduction; (3) management of cockpit workload; and (4) general attitudes toward cockpit automation are emphasized. The limitations of the air traffic control (ATC) system on the ability to utilize the advanced features of the new aircraft are discussed. In general the pilots are enthusiastic about flying an advanced technology aircraft, but they express mixed feelings about the impact of automation on workload, crew errors, and ability to manage the flight.

  11. Crustal accretion along the global mid-ocean ridge system based on basaltic glass and olivine-hosted melt inclusion compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, V. D.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The depth and distribution of crystallization at mid-ocean ridges controls the overall architecture of the oceanic crust, influences hydrothermal circulation, and determines geothermal gradients in the crust and uppermost mantle. Despite this, there is no overall consensus on how crystallization is distributed within the crust/upper mantle or how this varies with spreading rate. Here, we examine crustal accretion at mid-ocean ridges by combining crystallization pressures calculated from major element barometers on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses with vapor-saturation pressures from melt inclusions to produce a detailed map of crystallization depths and distributions along the global ridge system. We calculate pressures of crystallization from >11,500 MORB glasses from the global ridge system using two established major element barometers (1,2). Additionally, we use vapor-saturation pressures from >400 olivine-hosted melt inclusions from five ridges with variable spreading rates to constrain pressures and distributions of crystallization along the global ridge system. We show that (i) crystallization depths from MORB glasses increase and become less focused with decreasing spreading rate, (ii) maximum glass pressures are greater than the maximum melt inclusion pressure, which indicates that the melt inclusions do not record the deepest crystallization at mid-ocean ridges, and (iii) crystallization occurs in the lower crust/upper mantle at all ridges, indicating accretion is distributed throughout the crust at all spreading rates, including those with a steady-state magma lens. Finally, we suggest that the remarkably similar maximum vapor-saturation pressures (~ 3000 bars) in melt inclusion from all spreading rates reflects the CO2 content of the depleted upper mantle feeding the global mid-ocean ridge system. (1) Michael, P. & W. Cornell (1998), Journal of Geophysical Research, 103(B8), 18325-18356; (2) Herzberg, C. (2004), Journal of Petrology, 45(12), 2389.

  12. Statistical Mechanical Theory of Penetrant Diffusion in Polymer Melts and Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth

    We generalize our force-level, self-consistent nonlinear Langevin equation theory of activated diffusion of a dilute spherical penetrant in hard sphere fluids to predict the long-time diffusivity of molecular penetrants in supercooled polymer liquids and non-aging glasses. Chemical complexity is treated using an a priori mapping to a temperature-dependent hard sphere mixture model where polymers are disconnected into effective spheres based on the Kuhn length as the relevant coarse graining scale. A key parameter for mobility is the penetrant to polymer segment diameter ratio, R. Our calculations agree well with experimental measurements for a wide range of temperatures, penetrant sizes (from gas molecules with R ~0.3 to aromatic molecules with R ~1) and diverse amorphous polymers, over 10 decades variation of penetrant diffusivity. Structural parameter transferability is good. We have also formulated a theory at finite penetrant loading for the coupled penetrant-polymer dynamics in chemically (nearly) matched mixtures (e.g., toluene-polystyrene) which captures well the increase of penetrant diffusivity and decrease of polymer matrix vitrification temperature with increasing loading.

  13. Molecular dynamics of polymer crystallization revisited: Crystallization from the melt and the glass in longer polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the steady-state growth of the chain folded lamella and the cold crystallization across the glass transition temperature Tg are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation for a system of long polyethylene (PE)-like polymers made of 512 united atoms C512. The present paper aims to reconsider results of our previous simulations for short PE-like polymers C100 by carrying out very long simulations up to 1 μs for more realistic systems of much longer chains, thereby to establish the firm molecular image of chain-folded crystallization and clarify the specific molecular process of cold crystallization. We observe that the chain-folded lamella shows fast thickening-growth keeping marked tapered growth front. Despite the fast growth in much longer chains, the fold-surface is found to be predominantly of adjacent-reentry. Detailed inspections of the molecular pathway give an insightful image that can explain the apparently contradicting results. In addition, the fold-structure with specific spatial heterogeneity is found to give rise to heterogeneous mobility within the crystalline region. On the other hand, investigations of the cold crystallization during slow heating of the glassy film across Tg is found to give a granular texture made of small crystallites. The crystallites are found to nucleate preferentially near the free surfaces having lower Tg, and to be dominantly edge-on showing a definite tendency to orient their chain axes parallel to the free surface.

  14. 29 Si NMR and SAXS investigation of the hybrid organic–inorganic glasses obtained by consolidation of the melting gels

    SciTech Connect

    Jitianu, Andrei; Cadars, Sylvian; Zhang, Fan; Rodriguez, Gabriela; Picard, Quentin; Aparicio, Mario; Mosa, Jadra; Klein, Lisa C.

    2017-01-01

    This study is focused on structural characterization of hybrid glasses obtained by consolidation of melting gels. The melting gels were prepared in molar ratios of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) and dimethyldiethoxysilane (DMDES) of 75%MTES-25%DMDES and 65%MTES-35%DMDES. Following consolidation, the hybrid glasses were characterized using Raman, 29Si and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, synchrotron Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectroscopy revealed the presence of Si–C bonds in the hybrid glasses and 8-membered ring structures in the Si–O–Si network. Qualitative NMR spectroscopy identified the main molecular species, while quantitative NMR data showed that the ratio of trimers (T) to dimers (D) varied between 4.6 and 3.8. Two-dimensional 29Si NMR data were used to identify two distinct types of T3 environments. SAXS data showed that the glasses are homogeneous across the nm to micrometer length scales. The scattering cross section was one thousand times lower than what is expected when phase separation occurs. The SEM images show a uniform surface without defects, in agreement with the SAXS results, which further supports that the hybrid glasses are nonporous.

  15. Thermal collapse and hierarchy of polymorphs in a faujasite-type zeolite and its analogous melt-quenched glass.

    PubMed

    Palenta, Theresia; Fuhrmann, Sindy; Greaves, G Neville; Schwieger, Wilhelm; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2015-02-28

    We examine the route of structural collapse and re-crystallization of faujasite-type (Na,K)-LSX zeolite. As the first step, a rather stable amorphous high density phase HDAcollapse is generated through an order-disorder transition from the original zeolite via a low density phase LDAcollapse, at around 790 °C. We find that the overall amorphization is driven by an increase in the bond angle distribution within T-O-T and a change in ring statistics to 6-membered TO4 (T = Si(4+), Al(3+)) rings at the expense of 4-membered rings. The HDAamorph transforms into crystalline nepheline, though, through an intermediate metastable carnegieite phase. In comparison, the melt-derived glass of similar composition, HDAMQ, crystallizes directly into the nepheline phase without the occurrence of intermediate carnegieite. This is attributed to the higher structural order of the faujasite-derived HDAcollapse which prefers the re-crystallization into the highly symmetric carnegieite phase before transformation into nepheline with lower symmetry.

  16. Application of hot melt extrusion for poorly water-soluble drugs: limitations, advances and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Guo, Zhefei; Li, Yongcheng; Pang, Huishi; Lin, Ling; Liu, Xu; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2014-01-01

    Hot melt extrusion (HME) is a powerful technology to enhance the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs by producing amorphous solid dispersions. Although the number of articles and patents about HME increased dramatically in the past twenty years, there are very few commercial products by far. The three main obstacles limiting the commercial application of HME are summarized as thermal degradation of heat-sensitive drugs at high process temperature, recrystallization of amorphous drugs during storage and dissolving process, and difficulty to obtain products with reproducible physicochemical properties. Many efforts have been taken in recent years to understand the basic mechanism underlying these obstacles and then to overcome them. This article reviewed and summarized the limitations, recent advances, and future prospects of HME.

  17. Bioactive glass thin films synthesized by advanced pulsed laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, N.; Stan, George E.; Ristoscu, C.; Sopronyi, M.; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive materials play an increasingly important role in the biomaterials industry, and are extensively used in a range of applications, including biodegradable metallic implants. We report on Bioactive Glasses (BG) films deposition by pulsed laser techniques onto biodegradable substrates. The BG coatings were obtained using a KrF* excimer laser source (λ= 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns).Their thickness has been determined by Profilometry measurements, whilst their morphology has been analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The obtained coatings fairly preserved the targets composition and structure, as revealed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy analyses.

  18. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A. A.; Peeler, D. K.; Kim, D. S.; Vienna, J. D.; Piepel, G. F.; Schweiger, M. J.

    2015-11-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule.

  19. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO₃ glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO₃ melt in Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q.; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J.; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y.; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-02-09

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; [3]O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  20. The Advance Organizer: A Review of Research Using Glass's Technique of Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiten, John; And Others

    Using Glass's meta-analysis, of which "effect size" is the fundamental measure, 135 research studies on Ausubel's advance organizer theory were reviewed to determine its effect on learning and retention. Variables, such as grade level, subject area, organizer presentation mode, and ability level were also examined. In most of these…

  1. Can alteration experiments on impact melts from El'gygytgyn and volcanic glasses shed new light on the formation of the Martian surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellevang, Helge; Dypvik, Henning; Kalleson, Elin; Pittarello, Lidia; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-07-01

    This investigation involved three specimens: an altered felsic sample of impactite from the ICDP El'gygytgyn drill core D1c, and two reference volcanics from Iceland, namely a rhyolitic glass and a basaltic glass. The goal of this work was to better understand the alteration of impact melt and volcanic glass, and to apply the results to an investigation of alteration processes below the surface of Mars. Hydrothermal batch alteration experiments with the El'gygytgyn sample showed formation of various silica phases such as cristobalite, opal, and quartz. According to geochemical modeling, zeolites were also expected, but zeolite minerals already present in the impactite prior to the experiment may have masked possible experimental zeolite growth. Basaltic glass was altered to smectite, talc, and opal. The accompanying numerical modeling gave results that were similar or comparable to the laboratory experiments. Rhyolitic glass was kinetically more stable than basaltic glass, and showed only minor formation of calcite and feldspar during the 3-week experiment. The study showed that closed-system isochemical alteration of both siliceous and mafic glasses and melts results in the formation of smectites and zeolites. Therefore, to link alteration features on Mars to specific physical conditions, the exact identity of the mineral phases present in surface rocks must be known. Moreover, our simulations on closed-system isochemical alteration showed that the fraction of zeolites and silica formed relative to smectite depends on the source mineral altered. Therefore, fractions of these mineral groups present in the Martian soil may be used to better predict source rock characteristics.

  2. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  3. Mafic and silica-rich glasses in mantle xenoliths from Wau-en-Namus, Libya: Textural and geochemical evidence for peridotite-melt reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C.; Zanetti, A.; Thöni, M.; Konzett, J.; Klötzli, U.

    2012-01-01

    Anhydrous spinel peridotite xenoliths in Quaternary nepheline-basanite and melilite- or sodalite-bearing lavas of the Wau-en-Namus volcano in S Libya range from lherzolites to harzburgites recording melt extraction in a shallow setting (≤ 2 GPa). Primary clinopyroxenes have distinct trace element characteristics documenting LILE (large ion lithophile element) depletion or enrichment events predating the formation of glass pockets and veins in the xenoliths. These glasses are aluminous and alkali-rich, range in composition from ultrabasic to silicic (43-67 wt.% SiO 2) and may contain empty vugs and micro-phenocrysts of olivine, clinopyroxene, spinel, plagioclase, sodalite, apatite that are similar in composition to phenocrysts in the host lavas. Reactions of infiltrating melt and xenolith minerals are documented by diffuse Fe-Ca-rich rims of olivine in contact with glass, and by spongy-textured reaction domains caused by incongruent dissolution of primary pyroxenes and spinel. Some glasses have trace element characteristics similar to that of the host Ne-basanite, suggesting they were derived from the same source during entrainment and transport to the surface. Incompatible element enrichment and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the analyzed host lava are similar to HIMU (high μ; μ = 238Pb/ 204Pb)-type magmas, but the Pb isotopic composition is less radiogenic compared to other intra-plate Neogene magmatic rocks from N Africa.

  4. Containerless processing of glass forming melts: D-1, MEA/A-2 experiment 81F01 conducted on STS-61A flight, October 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, D. E.; Ray, C. S.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experiment 81F01, which was conducted in the Material Experiment Assembly MEA/A-2 on the D-1 Spacelab Mission (STS-61A), are presented. The general plan of the experiment was to heat, melt, and quench six spherical samples of different glass forming compositions while they were levitated in a single axis acoustic levitator furnace (SAAL). In addition, two non-melting sintered alumina samples were used to check the operational characteristics of the SAAL under reduced gravity conditions. Three of the eight samples were levitated between 1250 and 1500 C before the lack of coolant created an over-temperature condition that caused the SAAL to shut down prematurely. Two of the three samples processed were calcia-gallia-silica and soda-lime-silica glass forming compositions. Evidence of a two to three times increase in the tendency for glass formation was obtained for the calcia-gallia-silica. The final glass appeared reasonably homogeneous even though it was made from hot pressed powders containing deliberate heterogeneities. A photographic record was obtained of the microgravity sample processing sequences.

  5. Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.; Bardakci, T.; Kot, W.

    2013-11-13

    in melter operating temperature. Glass composition development was based on one of the HLW waste compositions specified by ORP that has a high concentration of aluminum. Small-scale tests were used to provide an initial screening of various glass formulations with respect to melt rates; more definitive screening was provided by the subsequent DM100 tests. Glass properties evaluated included: viscosity, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, gross glass phase separation and the 7- day Product Consistency Test (ASTM-1285). Glass property limits were based upon the reference properties for the WTP HLW melter. However, the WTP crystallinity limit (< 1 vol% at 950oC) was relaxed slightly as a waste loading constraint for the crucible melts.

  6. Structural and luminescence properties of Eu3+, Dy3+ and Tb3+ ions in lead germanate glasses obtained by conventional high-temperature melt-quenching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żur, Lidia

    2013-06-01

    The subject of this paper is the structural and luminescence properties of selected rare earth ions in lead germanate glasses. Glasses were obtained by conventional high-temperature melt-quenching technique. Europium, dysprosium and terbium ions were chosen as active dopants. The spectroscopic parameters for Eu3+, Dy3+ and Tb3+ ions were determined based on excitation and emission measurements as well as luminescence decay analysis. Especially, the luminescence intensity ratios R/O (Eu3+), Y/B (Dy3+) and G/B (Tb3+) were calculated. Luminescence lifetimes for 5D0 state of Eu3+ ions, 4F9/2 state of Dy3+ ions and 5D4 state of Tb3+ ions were also determined. The amorphous nature and local structure of the studied lead germanate glass systems was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy.

  7. Superconducting Bi1.5Pb0.5Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x) ceramics by rapid melt quenching and glass crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1989-01-01

    A glass of nominal Bi(1.5)Pb(0.5)Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x) composition, prepared by rapid quenching of the melt, showed a glass transition temperature of 383 C, crystallization temperature of 446 C, melting temperature of 855 C, and bulk density of 5.69 g/cu cm in air. The activation energy for crystallization of the glass was estimated to be 292kJ/mol from non-isothermal DSC. On heating in oxygen, the glass showed a slow and continuous weight gain starting at approximately 530 C which reached a plateau at approximately 820 C. The weight gained during heating was retained on cooling to ambient conditions indicating an irreversible oxidation step. The influence of annealing conditions on the formation of various phases in the glass has been investigated. The Bi(2)Sr(2)Ca(0)Cu(1)O(6) phase crystallized out first followed by formation of other phases at higher temperatures. The high-T(sub c) phase, isostructural with Bi(2)Sr(2)Ca(2)Cu(3)O(10) was not detected below 840 C, but its fraction increased with the annealing time at 840 C. A sample annealed at 840 C for 243h in air and furnace cooled showed the highest T(sub c)(R=0) of 107.2K and a narrow transition width, delta T(sub c)(10 to 90 percent), of approximately 2 K. The high T(sub c) phase does not seem to crystallize out directly from the glass but is rather produced at high temperature by reaction between the phases formed at lower temperatures. The kinetics of 110K phase formation was sluggish. It appears that the presence of lead helps in the formation and/or stabilization of the 110 K phase.

  8. KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption in silica glasses produced by melting synthetic silica powder

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuu, Nobu; Sasaki, Toshiya; Kojima, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Jun-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Hideharu

    2013-07-07

    KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption of silica glasses produced by electric melting and flame fusion of synthetic silica powder were investigated. The growth of KrF-laser-induced absorption was more gradual than that of ArF-laser-induced absorption. Induced absorption spectra exhibited a peak at about 5.8 eV, of which the position and width differed slightly among samples and laser species. Widths of ArF-laser-induced absorption spectra were wider than those of KrF-laser-induced spectra. KrF-laser-induced absorption is reproducible by two Gaussian absorption bands peaking at 5.80 eV with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.62 eV and at 6.50 eV with FWHM of 0.74 eV. For reproduction of ArF-laser-induced absorption, Gaussian bands at 5.41 eV with FWHM of 0.62 eV was necessary in addition to components used for reproducing KrF-laser-induced absorption. Based on the discussion of the change of defect structures evaluated from change of absorption components, we proposed that the precursor of the 5.8-eV band ascribed to E Prime center ({identical_to}Si{center_dot}) is {identical_to}Si-H HO-Si{identical_to} structures formed by the reaction between strained Si-O-Si bonds and interstitial H{sub 2} molecules during the irradiation.

  9. XAS study of Cl and K speciation in glasses quenched from alkalic silicate and carbonate-silicate melts at high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaev, Andrei; Safonov, Oleg; Huthwelker, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Data on microinclusions in kimberlitic diamonds and experimental results indicate that potassic Cl-bearing silicate and carbonate-silicate melts could be potential media for diamond nucleation and precursors of carbonatite-kimberlite magmatism in the Earth's mantle. These HP melts were presumably formed in equilibrium immiscible chloride or chloride-carbonate liquids [1, 2]. The immiscibility results from structural properties of the melts, in particular, from K and Cl speciation in them. We report preliminary results on X-ray absorption study of K and Cl local environments in the glasses quenched from melts in the systems NaAlSi2O6-KCl and CaMgSi2O6-CaCO3-Na2CO3-KCl at pressure 5 GPa. Experimental study of the system NaAlSi2O6-KCl [3] revealed a very strong shift of equilibrium between immiscible aluminosilicate and (K,Na)Cl melts NaAlSi2O6+ KCl = KAlSi2O6+ NaCl to the right, resulting in formation of the K-rich (up to 16 wt. % of K2O) aluminosilicate melt with 1.6-1.8 wt.% of Cl. It indicates active separation of K and Cl, which implies different structural positions of these ions in the aluminosilicate melt. Cl XAS spectra in most cases are fairly similar to the spectra of crystalline KCl with minor contribution of NaCl. Thus, chlorine is totally segregated into K(Na)Cl-like clusters of different sizes. K XAS spectra of the glasses could be represented as superposition of contributions from KCl and KAlSi3O8-NaAlSi3O8 glass [4]; the second component is dominant. Thus, in the glasses (and, presumably, in corresponding melts) K is predominantly bound to silicate units, represented by 4-membered rings as follows from Raman spectroscopy. Its CN is higher, than in crystalline leucite (>6). In contrast, Cl is coordinated exclusively by alkali ions in chloride clusters. System CaMgSi2O6-CaCO3-Na2CO3-KCl at 5 GPa shows a wide miscibility gap between Cl-bearing carbonate-silicate and Si-saturated chloride-carbonate melts [1], which converge with a decrease of the SiO2

  10. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 1150{degrees}C volume 2: Chapters 12-16 and appendices A-K

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  11. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 115{degrees}C volume 1: Chapters 1-11

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01

    A Composition Variation study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g} ), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  12. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    PubMed

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  13. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, K. D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products)represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries - pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most. The physico-chemical processes that control the development of this region have a significant impact on the long-term glass-water reaction. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include Geochemical Reaction Path simulations, Glass Reactivity in Allowance for Alteration Layer simulations, Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers; thus providing the fundamental data needed to develop pore-scale equations that enable more accurate predictions of nuclear waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository.

  14. Pressure determination in HDAC experiments, the behavior of isochoric water-silicate systems at high pressure, and implications for melt (glass) inclusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solferino, Giulio; Anderson, Alan J.

    2015-04-01

    The Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell (HDAC) could be seen as a synthetic fluid inclusion, where the composition of the trapped phase(s) and the type of fluid medium are controlled by the experimentalist. Accurate pressure determination in Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell (HDAC) experiments has proven to be a complex achievement. In this study we employed in-situ visualization of the alpha-beta quartz transformation via laser interferometry for the purpose. This inexpensive and convenient method allowed for an accuracy of less than 30-40 MPa in the pressure range 130-900 MPa, which is relevant for crust and shallower upper mantle investigations. Our experiments with water + haplogranite glass crossed into the undercooled liquid and melt state of the silicate phase, where the pressure medium contains a significant amount of solute. The principal goal of this experimental series was to compare the actual run pressure with that calculated for pure water pressure medium. We found that for runs where the alpha-to-beta transition temperature is ≤ 665 °C run pressure is lower than that computed for pure water. On the contrary, at ~780 °C the pressure in the HDAC is ~100 MPa greater than that estimated using pure water isochore. We employed a simplified model of haplogranite dissolution in water for an isochoric sample chamber to explain the negative sign and the variation of the observed discrepancy between measured and calculated pressure. We suggest that, beyond the change in the intrinsic properties of the fluid phase (e.g., compressibility) with increasing solute concentration, two factors control the P-T path in the HDAC: (1) hydration of the glass prior to the glass transition; and (2) changing volume of the aqueous pressure medium. The latter effects must be considered when investigating hydrothermal isochoric systems where the solid/melt phase is highly soluble in the fluid, such as in the determination of the P-T path during rehomogenization of water-rich melt

  15. Thermal analysis of reactions in soda-lime silicate glass batches containing melting accelerants: I, one- and two-component systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kug Sun; Speyer, R.F. )

    1993-03-01

    To identify each glass melting reaction in a multicomponent system, one-component and two-component reaction processes were studied using DTA, TGA, and XRD. Two-component mixtures were prepared by choosing pairs in the same ratio as in a commercial container glass batch composition (sand-soda ash-calcite-dolomite-feldspar). The presence of silica in the silicia-calcite system decreased the termination temperature of the decomposition of calcite, but did not alter the onset of decomposition. Similar behavior was found in the dolomite-silica system. A double carbonate (Na[sub 2]Ca(CO[sub 3])[sub 2]) formed via solid-state reaction in the calcite-soda ash system, and metasilicate/disilicate phases were detected during the fusion process in the soda ash-silica system. The effects of reaction accelerant additions in the soda ash-silica system were investigated using 1 wt% additions of sodium sulfate, sodium nitrate, and sodium chloride. Sodium chloride was the most effective melting accelerant, lowering the termination temperature of CO[sub 2] release by [approximately]80C compared with the soda ash-silica system with no additives. NaCl additions caused complete reaction and/or fusion of Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] prior to its melting temperature. Sodium sulfate additions acted to suppress metasilicate/disilicate formation by coating quartz grains and shifted consequent CO[sub 2] release to higher temperature.

  16. Lead isotopic composition of trinitite melt glass: evidence for the presence of Canadian industrial lead in the first atomic weapon test.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Jeremy J; Simonetti, Antonio; Wallace, Christine; Koeman, Elizabeth C; Burns, Peter C

    2013-08-06

    The Pb isotopic compositions for 51 spots of melt glass in 11 samples of trinitite have been determined by laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). Trinitite glass yields a large range of Pb isotopic compositions (i.e., (206)Pb/(204)Pb = 17.08-19.04), which reflect mixing between industrial Pb from materials used in the Trinity test and natural geologic components. Areas within trinitite melt glass containing high concentrations of both Cu and Pb, which are derived from the bomb and blast site-related components, were used for delineating the Pb isotopic composition corresponding to the anthropogenic Pb component. Comparison between the isotopic composition estimated here for the industrial Pb used in the Trinity test and those from known Pb deposits worldwide indicates close agreement with ore from the Buchans mine (Newfoundland, Canada). The Buchans mine was active during the time of the Trinity test and was operated by the American Smelting and Refining Company, which could have provided the Pb used in the test. The industrial Pb used in the Trinity test materials is not documented in the literature (or declassified) but could have been present in bricks, solder, pigs, or some other anthropogenic component related to the experiment.

  17. Compressibility of hydrated and anhydrous sodium silicate-based liquids and glasses, as analogues for natural silicate melts, by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachev, Sergey Nikolayevich

    A mathematical formalism was tested on compressibility studies of water, before applying it to the high pressure-temperature compressibility studies of hydrated and anhydrous sodium silicate-based liquids and glasses. The hypersonic sound velocity, refractive index and attenuation coefficient obtained using Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy technique were in agreement with literature data. From the measured sound velocities, the pressure dependence of the bulk moduli and density of liquid water were calculated, using Vinet equation of state. The formalism was extended to the Brillouin scattering studies of the elastic properties of alkaline-calcium silica hydrogels and float glass, which exhibits a dramatic increase in the pressure dependence of longitudinal velocity and a discontinuity in the compressibility at about 6 GPa. It is demonstrated that an apparent second-order transition to a new amorphous phase can form via the abrupt onset of a new compressional mechanism, which may be triggered by a shift in polymerization of the glass or an onset of a change in coordination of silicon. Brillouin scattering measurements were carried out on an aqueous solution of Na2O-2SiO2 and anhydrous Na2O-2SiO 2 glass and liquid at high P-T conditions. The "modified" platelet scattering geometry has allowed a determination of the longitudinal velocity independently from refractive index, and hence the adiabatic compressibility and density of liquids as a function of pressure and temperature. The observed increase in density of the melt and glass phases formed at high P-T conditions is likely associated with structural effects. The large values of KS' of the liquid phase illustrate that the means of compaction of the liquid differs substantially from that of the glass, and that the liquid is able to access a wider range of compaction mechanisms. The measured bulk modulus of Na2O-2SiO2 aqueous solution is closer to values of silicate melts than to that of end-member water at

  18. Reduction-melting combined with a Na₂CO₃ flux recycling process for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    With large quantity of flux (Na2CO3), lead can be recovered from the funnel glass of waste cathode-ray tubes via reduction-melting at 1000°C. To reduce flux cost, a technique to recover added flux from the generated oxide phase is also important in order to recycle the flux recovered from the reduction-melting process. In this study, the phase separation of sodium and the crystallization of water-soluble sodium silicates were induced after the reduction-melting process to enhance the leachability of sodium in the oxide phase and to extract the sodium from the phase for the recovery of Na2CO3 as flux. A reductive atmosphere promoted the phase separation and crystallization, and the leachability of sodium from the oxide phase was enhanced. The optimum temperature and treatment time for increasing the leachability were 700°C and 2h, respectively. After treatment, more than 90% of the sodium in the oxide phase was extracted in water. NaHCO3 can be recovered by carbonization of the solution containing sodium ions using carbon dioxide gas, decomposed to Na2CO3 at 50°C and recycled for use in the reduction-melting process.

  19. Melting of Pb Charge Glass and Simultaneous Pb-Cr Charge Transfer in PbCrO3 as the Origin of Volume Collapse

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Runze; Hojo, Hajime; Watanuki, Tetsu; ...

    2015-09-15

    A metal to insulator transition in integer or half integer charge systems can be regarded as crystallization of charges. The insulating state tends to have a glassy nature when randomness or geometrical frustration exists. In this paper, we report that the charge glass state is realized in a perovskite compound PbCrO3, which has been known for almost 50 years, without any obvious inhomogeneity or triangular arrangement in the charge system. PbCrO3 has a valence state of Pb2+0.5Pb4+0.5Cr3+O3 with Pb2+–Pb4+ correlation length of three lattice-spacings at ambient condition. A pressure induced melting of charge glass and simultaneous Pb–Cr charge transfer causesmore » an insulator to metal transition and ~10% volume collapse.« less

  20. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Finally, in this manuscript, we discuss the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.

  1. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    DOE PAGES

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; ...

    2014-07-12

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed tomore » improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Finally, in this manuscript, we discuss the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.« less

  2. Advances in the Glass Formulations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    The Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford site in Washington. The WTP that is being designed and constructed by a team led by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) will separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fractions with the majority of the mass (~90%) directed to LAW and most of the activity (>95%) directed to HLW. The pretreatment process, envisioned in the baseline, involves the dissolution of aluminum-bearing solids so as to allow the aluminum salts to be processed through the cesium ion exchange and report to the LAW Facility. There is an oxidative leaching process to affect a similar outcome for chromium-bearing wastes. Both of these unit operations were advanced to accommodate shortcomings in glass formulation for HLW inventories. A by-product of this are a series of technical challenges placed upon materials selected for the processing vessels. The advances in glass formulation play a role in revisiting the flow sheet for the WTP and hence, the unit operations that were being imposed by minimal waste loading requirements set forth in the contract for the design and construction of the plant. Another significant consideration to the most recent revision of the glass models are the impacts on resolution of technical questions associated with current efforts for design completion.

  3. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Chathoth, S. M.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-09-28

    Extensive efforts have been made to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. In this work, we have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  4. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; ...

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is themore » primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.« less

  5. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.; Chathoth, S. M.

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  6. Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition from RKKP targets (sol-gel vs melt-processing route)

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, J.V.; Teghil, R.; Fosca, M.; De Bonis, A.; Cacciotti, I.; Bianco, A.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Caminiti, R.; Ravaglioli, A.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings for bone tissue repair and regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulsed Lased Deposition allowed congruent transfer of target composition to coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target was prepared by sol-gel process suitable for compositional tailoring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium, widely used for orthopaedics and dental implants, was used as substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The physico-chemical properties of the prepared coatings are reported. -- Abstract: The deposition of innovative glass-ceramic composition (i.e. RKKP) coatings by Pulsed Lased Deposition (PLD) technique is reported. RKKP was synthesised following two methodologies: melt-processing and sol-gel, the latter being particularly suitable to tailor the compositional range. The PLD advantage with respect to other deposition techniques is the congruent transfer of the target composition to the coating. The physico-chemical properties of films were investigated by Scanning Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Angular and Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction, and Vickers microhardness. The deposition performed at 12 J/cm{sup 2} and 500 Degree-Sign C allows to prepare crystalline films with the composition that replicates rather well that of the initial targets. The 0.6 {mu}m thin melt-processing RKKP films, possessing the hardness of 25 GPa, and the 4.3 {mu}m thick sol-gel films with the hardness of 17 GPa were obtained.

  7. Crack Branching and Fracture Mirror Data of Glasses and Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    The fracture mirror and crack branching constants were determined from three glasses and nine advanced ceramics tested under various loading and specimen configurations in an attempt to use the constants as a data base for fractography. The ratios of fracture mirror or crack branching constant to fracture toughness were found to be approximately two for most ceramic materials tested. A demonstration of how to use the two constants as a tool for verifying stress measurements was presented for silicon nitride disk specimens subjected to high-temperature, constant stress-rate biaxial flexure testing.

  8. Volatile, Major and Trace Element Chemistry of Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions and Host Glasses in Cleft and Coaxial Segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. M.; Wanless, V. D.; Lytle, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    To assess the influence of hotspot anomalies on crustal accretion along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, we examine lavas and olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) erupted at segments adjacent to (Coaxial) and isolated from (Cleft) the Cobb Hotspot, which currently intersects the ridge at Axial Seamount. Coaxial samples (host basalt N = 7; MIs N=113) were collected from the center of an axial rise, ~60 km north of Axial Seamount. Cleft samples were collected within the axial graben, ~100 km south of Axial Seamount (host basalts N=3; MIs N=38). The MIs and host glasses were analyzed for major, trace and volatile element concentrations. Vapor-saturation pressures of each MI were determined using CO2-H2O concentrations. Entrapment depths for Coaxial MIs range from 0-16 km below seafloor (bsf) with a broad frequency peak centered about 1.5 km bsf. By contrast, the Cleft segment MIs have a narrower range of entrapment depths (0 to 12 km bsf), with a narrow and deeper frequency distribution centered around 3 km bsf. The average rare-earth element (REE) concentrations for the MIs closely resemble those of the host-basalt glasses. Coaxial MIs display variably depleted light and heavy REE patterns and indicate variable degrees of fractional crystallization. The Cleft MIs are uniformly depleted in light REEs only, and span a narrower compositional range, indicating similar crystallization histories. This suggests a model of accretion at Cleft, where relatively homogeneous mantle melts crystallize from ~10 km bsf to the seafloor, with significant storage and crystallization in a shallow (3 km depth) melt lens. At Coaxial, crystallization begins at greater depths (~15 km bsf) with a broader, shallower peak of MI entrapment depths and more variable trace element patterns. The peaks in crystallization depths are broadly consistent with the depths for seismically imaged melt lenses (Carbotte et al., 2006) at both segments. The broader peak of MI entrapment depths observed at Coaxial may

  9. Target rocks, impact glasses, and melt rocks from the Lonar crater, India: Highly siderophile element systematics and Sr-Nd-Os isotopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Toni; Luguet, Ambre; Wegner, Wencke; Acken, David; Koeberl, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The Lonar crater is a ~0.57-Myr-old impact structure located in the Deccan Traps of the Indian peninsula. It probably represents the best-preserved impact structure hosted in continental flood basalts, providing unique opportunities to study processes of impact cratering in basaltic targets. Here we present highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances and Sr-Nd and Os isotope data for target basalts and impactites (impact glasses and impact melt rocks) from the Lonar area. These tools may enable us to better constrain the interplay of a variety of impact-related processes such as mixing, volatilization, and contamination. Strontium and Nd isotopic compositions of impactites confirm and extend earlier suggestions about the incorporation of ancient basement rocks in Lonar impactites. In the Re-Os isochron plot, target basalts exhibit considerable scatter around a 65.6 Myr Re-Os reference isochron, most likely reflecting weathering and/or magma replenishment processes. Most impactites plot at distinctly lower 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios compared to the target rocks and exhibit up to two orders of magnitude higher abundances of Ir, Os, and Ru. Moreover, the impactites show near-chondritic interelement ratios of HSE. We interpret our results in terms of an addition of up to 0.03% of a chondritc component to most impact glasses and impact melt rocks. The magnitude of the admixture is significantly lower than the earlier reported 12-20 wt% of extraterrestrial component for Lonar impact spherules, reflecting the typical difference in the distribution of projectile component between impact glass spherules and bulk impactites.

  10. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  11. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-16

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP?s overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  12. Global melting of Zr57Ti5Ni8Cu20Al10 bulk metallic glass under microcompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng; Wang, Xun-Li; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K.

    2007-11-01

    Global melting was observed in micron-sized pillar samples tested under microcompression. In addition to a higher strength that was reproduced in samples with different sizes, a large plastic strain was also observed prior to the final fracture, as compared to bulk counterparts. The global melting was a result of the final fracture as evidenced by the acoustic emission at the end of the microcompression. However, the increased strain rate and large plastic strain might have contributed to the temperature increase prior to the fracture.

  13. Containerless Processing: Fabrication of Advanced Functional Materials from Undercooled Oxide Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. S. Vijaya; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-07-01

    Materials science in Microgravity condition is one of newly established cutting edge science field. After the effort of space development and space utilization, microgravity of space environment has been considered as one of novel tools for materials science because it assures containerless levitation. Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the technologically important materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt. Recently, rare-earth ferrites and manganites have attracted great interest towards their wide applications in the field of electronic industry. Among these new hexagonal phases with a space group of P6 _{3}cm are technologically important materials because of multiferroic characteristics, i.e., the coexistence of ferroelectricity and magnetism in one compound. In the present study, containerless solidification of the R-Fe-O, and R-Mn-O melts were carried out to fabricate multiferroics under the controlled Po _{2}. Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the new materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt because it provides large undercooling prior to nucleation. In order to undercool the melt deeply below the melting temperature under a precisely controlled oxygen partial pressure, an aerodynamic levitator (ADL) combined with ZrO _{2} oxygen sensor was designed. A spherical RFeO _{3} and RMnO _{3} sample was levitated by an ADL and completely melted by a CO _{2} laser in an atmosphere with predetermined Po _{2}.The surface temperature of the levitated droplet was monitored by a two-color pyrometer. Then, the droplet was cooled by turning off the CO _{2} laser. The XRD results of the rapidly solidified LuFeO _{3} and LuMnO _{3} samples at Po _{2} of 1x10 ^{5} Pa confirms the existence of the hexagonal metastable LuFeO _{3} phase. On the other hand, orthorhombic RFeO _{3} (R=Yb, Er, Y and Dy)and hexagonal RMnO _{3} (R=Ho-Lu)phases were identified. The cross-sectioned scanning

  14. Optical properties and infrared optics applications of composite films based on polyethylene and low-melting-point chalcogenide glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Pogreb, Roman; Sutovski, Semion; Levin, Mark

    2002-02-01

    A novel composite material based on medium-density polyethylene and thermoplastic chalcogenide glass has been produced. Both materials are highly transparent in the middle and far IR, but their refractive indices differ dramatically. The polymer and the glass have nearly equal viscosities at the temperature of polyethylene processing. This fact allowed the use of extrusion for homogenization. Single- and twin-screw extrusion processes yielded compositions that contain up to 40% of chalcogenide glass particles, which were dispersed in the polymer matrix. Highly homogeneous compositions that contain perfectly spherical glass particles 1 to 2 micrometers in diameter dispersed in the polymer matrix were obtained. Highly oriented structures involving chalcogenide glass fibers immersed in the polymer matrix were prepared at high stretch speeds. It was established that it is possible to produce a composite that is opaque in the visible and near IR, and highly transparent in the 2 to 25-micrometers wavelength band. The use of oriented films as IR laser light-shaping diffusers is possible. The composite films obtained were tried successfully as immersion adhesive layers for the contacting of IR fibers.

  15. Sulfur and iron speciation in gas-rich impact-melt glasses from basaltic shergottites determined by microXANES

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.R.; Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E.

    2008-04-28

    Sulfur and iron K XANES measurements were made on GRIM glasses from EET 79001. Iron is in the ferrous state. Sulfur speciation is predominately sulfide coordination but is Fe coordinated in Lith B and, most likely, Ca coordinated in Lith A. Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Moessbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO{sub 4} is deduced from MgO-SO{sub 3} correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. On Earth, volcanic rocks contain measurable quantities of sulfur present as both sulfide and sulfate. Carroll and Rutherford showed that oxidized forms of sulfur may comprise a significant fraction of total dissolved sulfur, if the oxidation state is higher than {approx}2 log fO{sub 2} units relative to the QFM buffer. Terrestrial samples containing sulfates up to {approx}25% in fresh basalts from the Galapagos Rift on one hand and high sulfide contents present in oceanic basalts on the other indicate that the relative abundance of sulfide and sulfate varies depending on the oxygen fugacity of the system. Basaltic shergottites (bulk) such as Shergotty, EET79001 and Zagami usually contain small amounts of sulfur ({approx}0.5%) as pyrrhotite. But, in isolated glass pockets containing secondary salts (known as GRIM glasses) in these meteorites, sulfur is present in high abundance ({approx}1-12%). To

  16. Influences of composition, melt viscosity and crystallization on the color strength and stability of multioxide glass frit/zircon-vanadium pigment systems for ceramic whitewares coatings applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, David Alonzo

    Color control is becoming increasingly important in the industrial processing of ceramics coatings. Multi-oxide glass frits are the predominant materials in ceramic whitewares coatings, and zircon doped pigments are the most commonly used colorants. The primary objective of this research was to determine if glass frits could be formulated to improve the fired color strength and high-temperature stability of ceramic coatings colored with zircon-vanadium (Zr-V) blue pigments. The results would also be applicable to other ceramic pigments that utilize the same zircon structure to incorporate colorant metal ions. A secondary goal was to relate the frit oxide composition, pigment content, firing temperature, melt viscosity and microstructural development to the fired color. A ceramic tile process was applied to fabricate sample coatings for the study. A coating's color was quantified and related to human perception with CIE L*, a* and b* values and pigment absorption factors (K/S), calculated based on spectral reflectance data. The research was successful in quantifying the influence of individual glass frit oxides on the fired color strength and high-temperature stability of the coatings. Opaque and transparent glossy frit compositions which yield excellent color strength and stability were formulated. Mathematical models for predicting a coating's color strength and stability given the frit oxide composition, Zr-V pigment loading and peak firing temperature were derived. Frit oxides of ZrO2, SrO, ZnO, Al2O3, Na 2O and K2O were found to have a significant influence on crystallization, pigment dissolution and color development. The properties, sizes, morphologies and quantities of crystalline phases that precipitated in the coatings during firing were related to the color. A technique for producing uniquely light yet high chroma colors through control of zircon precipitate particle size was demonstrated. In addition, a statistical model was developed for calculating the

  17. Advanced in the Forensic Analysis of Glass Fragments with a Focus on Refractive Index and Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Almirall, J R; Trejos, T

    2006-07-01

    Advances in technology provide forensic scientists with better tools to detect, to identify, and to individualize small amounts of trace evidence that have been left at a crime scene. The analysis of glass fragments can be useful in solving cases such as hit and run, burglaries, kidnappings, and bombings. The value of glass as "evidentiary material" lies in its inherent characteristics such as: (a) it is a fragile material that is often broken and hence commonly found in various types of crime scenes, (b) it can be easily transferred from the broken source to the scene, suspect, and/or victim, (c) it is relatively persistent, (d) it is chemically stable, and (e) it has measurable physical and chemical properties that can provide significant evidence of an association between the recovered glass fragments and the source of the broken glass. Forensic scientists have dedicated considerable effort to study and improve the detection and discrimination capabilities of analytical techniques in order to enhance the quality of information obtained from glass fragments. This article serves as a review of the developments in the application of both traditional and novel methods of glass analysis. The greatest progress has been made with respect to the incorporation of automated refractive index measurements and elemental analysis to the analytical scheme. Glass examiners have applied state-of-the-art technology including elemental analysis by sensitive methods such as ICPMS and LA-ICP-MS. A review of the literature regarding transfer, persistence, and interpretation of glass is also presented.

  18. Submerged combustion melting processes for producing glass and similar materials, and systems for carrying out such processes

    DOEpatents

    Charbonneau, Mark William

    2015-08-04

    Processes of controlling submerged combustion melters, and systems for carrying out the methods. One process includes feeding vitrifiable material into a melter vessel, the melter vessel including a fluid-cooled refractory panel in its floor, ceiling, and/or sidewall, and heating the vitrifiable material with a burner directing combustion products into the melting zone under a level of the molten material in the zone. Burners impart turbulence to the molten material in the melting zone. The fluid-cooled refractory panel is cooled, forming a modified panel having a frozen or highly viscous material layer on a surface of the panel facing the molten material, and a sensor senses temperature of the modified panel using a protected thermocouple positioned in the modified panel shielded from direct contact with turbulent molten material. Processes include controlling the melter using the temperature of the modified panel. Other processes and systems are presented.

  19. Sulfur Isotope Variation in Basaltic Melt Inclusions from Krakatau Revealed by a Newly Developed Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Technique for Silicate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, C. W.; Shimizu, N.; Kelley, K. A.; Cheek, L.

    2008-12-01

    Sulfur is a ubiquitous element with variable valance states (S2-, S0, S4+, S6+) allowing for its participation in a wide variety of chemical and biogeochemical processes. However, its potential as an isotopic tracer in magmatic processes has not been fully developed and is crucial to understanding of sulfur recycling in subduction zones and between Earth's major reservoirs, mantle, lithosphere and coupled hydrosphere-atmosphere. Previous studies of silicate glasses and melt inclusions have been hampered by lack of an in situ isotopic measurement technique with spatial resolution of 10 to 100 microns. We have developed a new secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analytical technique for measurement of 34S/32S ratios in silicate glasses utilizing the IMS 1280 at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. A beam of 133Cs+ ions with 13 keV energy and current of 1-2 nA is focused onto a 10 micron spot and rastered over 30 × 30 microns. A Normal Incidence Electron Gun was used to compensate excess charge. The rastered beam is then centered to the optical axis of the machine, and a mechanical aperture is placed on the image plane to limit the area of analysis to the central 15 × 15 microns. The energy slit width was adjusted to 50 eV. A mass resolving power of 5500 was sufficient for eliminating mass interferences. A suite of synthetic and natural glasses with δ34SVCDT values spanning from - 5.6‰ to 18.5‰ with SiO2 from 44-72 weight % were measured. Magnitude of the instrumental mass fractionation (α) for 34S/32S ratios is 0.991 and is constant for all the glasses measured despite their compositions. Precision of individual measurements of 34S/32S ratios is 0.4 ‰, or better. Preliminary δ34S measurements of olivine-hosted basaltic melt inclusions in pre- 1883 basaltic scoria from Krakatau volcano Indonesia vary from -5.6 to 7.9‰ with sulfur concentrations from 490 to 2170 ppm, respectively. Host olivines are Fo77-80 and inclusions generally need minor to no post

  20. Advanced Exploration Systems Logistics Reduction and Repurposing Trash-to-Gas and Heat Melt Compactor KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne J.; Layne, Andrew; Hummerick, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered: 1. Project Structure 2. "Trash to Gas" 3. "Smashing Trash! The Heat Melt Compactor" 4. "Heat Melt Compaction as an Effective Treatment for Eliminating Microorganisms from Solid Waste" Thermal degradation of trash reduces volume while creating water, carbon dioxide and ash. CO2 can be fed to Sabatier reactor for CH4 production to fuel LOX/LCH4 ascent vehicle. Optimal performance: HFWS, full temperature ramp to 500-600 C. Tar challenges exist. Catalysis: Dolomag did eliminate allene byproducts from the product stream. 2nd Gen Reactor Studies. Targeting power, mass, time efficiency. Gas separation, Catalysis to reduce tar formation. Microgravity effects. Downselect in August will determine where we should spend time optimizing the technology.

  1. Effects of heating conditions on the glass transition parameters of amorphous sucrose produced by melt-quenching.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Won; Thomas, Leonard C; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2011-04-13

    This research investigates the effects of heating conditions used to produce amorphous sucrose on its glass transition (T(g)) parameters, because the loss of crystalline structure in sucrose is caused by the kinetic process of thermal decomposition. Amorphous sucrose samples were prepared by heating at three different scan rates (1, 10, and 25 °C/min) using a standard differential scanning calorimetry (SDSC) method and by holding at three different isothermal temperatures (120, 132, and 138 °C) using a quasi-isothermal modulated DSC (MDSC) method. In general, the quasi-isothermal MDSC method (lower temperatures for longer times) exhibited lower T(g) values, larger ΔC(p) values, and broader glass transition ranges (i.e., T(g end) minus T(g onset)) than the SDSC method (higher temperatures for shorter times), except at a heating rate of 1 °C/min, which exhibited the lowest T(g) values, the highest ΔC(p), and the broadest glass transition range. This research showed that, depending on the heating conditions employed, a different amount and variety of sucrose thermal decomposition components may be formed, giving rise to wide variation in the amorphous sucrose T(g) values. Thus, the variation observed in the literature T(g) values for amorphous sucrose produced by thermal methods is, in part, due to differences in the heating conditions employed.

  2. Nanoencapsulation of a water soluble drug in biocompatible polyesters. Effect of polyesters melting point and glass transition temperature on drug release behavior.

    PubMed

    Karavelidis, Vassilios; Giliopoulos, Dimitrios; Karavas, Evangelos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios

    2010-12-23

    Five polyesters based on 1,3-propanediol or ethylene glycol and an aliphatic dicarboxylic acid were used for the preparation of Ropinirole HCl-loaded nanoparticles. The advantage of the present study is that the used polyesters - as well as poly(lactic acid) (PLA) - have similar degree of crystallinity but different melting points, varying from 46.7 to 166.4°C. Based on polymer toxicity on HUVEC, the biocompatibility of these aliphatic polyesters was found comparable to that of PLA and thus the studied polyesters could be used as drug carriers. Drug encapsulation in polyesters was performed via emulsification/solvent evaporation method. Particle size of drug-loaded nanoparticles was between 140 and 190 nm, as measured by light scattering. Drug loading content for all the polyesters varies between 10 and 16% and their entrapment efficiency is relatively high (32-48%). WAXD patterns of nanoparticles show that Ropinirole HCl lies in amorphous state within polymer matrices. Drug release diagrams reveal that the higher percentage of Ropinirole HCl is released during the first 6h after its insertion in the dissolution medium. Fast release rates of the drug are attributed to high hydrophilicity of Ropinirole HCl. Melting point (T(m)) and glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the host polymer matrices seem to be important parameters, since higher drug release rates are observed in polyesters with low T(m) and T(g).

  3. Melting of Pb Charge Glass and Simultaneous Pb-Cr Charge Transfer in PbCrO3 as the Origin of Volume Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Runze; Hojo, Hajime; Watanuki, Tetsu; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Mizokawa, Takashi; Okada, Kengo; Kim, Hyunjeong; Machida, Akihiko; Sakaki, Kouji; Nakamura, Yumiko; Agui, Akane; Mori, Daisuke; Inaguma, Yoshiyuki; Schlipf, Martin; Rushchanskii, Konstantin; Lezaic, Marjana; Matsuda, Masaaki; Ma, Jie; Calder, Stuart A.; Isobe, Masahiko; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Azuma, Masaki

    2015-09-15

    A metal to insulator transition in integer or half integer charge systems can be regarded as crystallization of charges. The insulating state tends to have a glassy nature when randomness or geometrical frustration exists. In this paper, we report that the charge glass state is realized in a perovskite compound PbCrO3, which has been known for almost 50 years, without any obvious inhomogeneity or triangular arrangement in the charge system. PbCrO3 has a valence state of Pb2+0.5Pb4+0.5Cr3+O3 with Pb2+–Pb4+ correlation length of three lattice-spacings at ambient condition. A pressure induced melting of charge glass and simultaneous Pb–Cr charge transfer causes an insulator to metal transition and ~10% volume collapse.

  4. Residual glasses and melt inclusions in basalts from DSDP Legs 45 and 46 - Evidence for magma mixing. [Deep Sea Drilling Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, M. A.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Microprobe analyses of natural glasses in basalts recovered by Legs 45 and 46 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project are reported and interpreted in the context of other geochemical, petrographic and experimental data on the same rocks (Rhodes et al., 1978). Residual glass compositions in the moderately evolved aphyritic and abundantly phyric basalts within each site indicate that none of the units is related to any other or to a common parent by simple fractional crystallization. The compositional trends, extensive disequilibrium textures in the plagioclase phenocrysts and the presence in evolved lavas of refractory plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts bearing primitive melt inclusions provide evidence that magma mixing had a major role in the genesis of the Leg 45 and 46 basalts. The magma parental to these basalts was most likely characterized by high Mg/(Mg + Fe/+2/), CaO/Al2O3, CaO/Na2O and low lithophile concentrations. A mixing model involving incremental enrichment of magmaphile elements by repeated episodes of mixing of relatively primitive and moderately evolved magmas, followed by a small amount of fractionation is consistent with the characteristics of the basalts studied.

  5. Effect of P addition on glass forming ability and soft magnetic properties of melt-spun FeSiBCuC alloy ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Yang, Y. Z.; Li, W.; Chen, X. C.; Xie, Z. W.

    2016-11-01

    The dependency of phosphorous content on the glass forming ability, thermal stability and soft magnetic properties of Fe83.4Si2B14-xPxCu0.5C0.1 (x=0,1,2,3,4) alloys was investigated. The experimental results showed that the substitution of B by P increased the glass forming ability in this alloy system. The Fe83.4Si2B10P4Cu0.5C0.1 alloy shows a fully amorphous character. Thermal stability of melt-spun ribbons increases and temperature interval between the first and second crystallization peaks enlarges with the increase of P content. And the saturation magnetic flux density (Bs) shows a slight increase with the increase of P content. The Fe83.4Si2B11P3Cu0.5C0.1 nanocrystalline alloy exhibits a high Bs about 200.6 emu/g. The Bs of fully amorphous alloy Fe83.4Si2B10P4Cu0.5C0.1 drops dramatically to 172.1 emu/g, which is lower than that of other nanocrystallines. Low material cost and excellent soft magnetic properties make the FeSiBPCuC alloys promise soft magnetic materials for industrial applications.

  6. Theoretical Considerations of the Prigogine-Defay Ration with Regard to the Glass-Forming Ability of Drugs from Undercooled Melts

    SciTech Connect

    Wyttenbach, Nicole; Kirchmeyer, Wiebke; Alsenz, Jochem; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-01-26

    Drug behavior in undercooled melts is highly important for pharmaceutics with regard to amorphous solid dispersions, and therefore, categories were recently introduced that differentiate glass formers (GFs) from other drugs that are nonglass formers (nGFs). The present study is based on the assumption that molecular properties relevant for the so-called Prigogine–Defay (PD) ratio would be indicative of a drug’s glass-forming ability. The PD ratio depends in theory on the entropy of fusion and molar volume. Experimental data were gathered from a broad set of pharmaceutical compounds (n = 54) using differential scanning calorimetry. The obtained entropy of fusion and molar volume were indeed found to significantly discriminate GFs from nGFs. In a next step, the entropy of fusion was predicted by different in silico methods. A first group contribution method provided rather unreliable estimates for the entropy of fusion, while an alternative in silico approach seemed more promising for drug categorization. Thus, a significant discrimination model employed molar volume, a so-called effective hydrogen bond number, and effective number of torsional bonds (or torsional units) to categorize GFs and nGFs (p ≤ 0.0000). The results led to new insights into drug vitrification and to practical rules of thumb. The latter may serve as guidance in pharmaceutical profiling and early formulation development with respect to amorphous drug formulations.

  7. Laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials: Reference position dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, D.; Escartín, A.; Cases, R.; Peña, J. I.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present the effect produced by modifying the reference position as well as the method of machining on the results obtained when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials are machined by laser ablation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulsewidths in the nanosecond range has been used. Morphology, depth and volume obtained by means of pulse bursts and grooves have been studied. Working within the same laser conditions, it has been shown that these values depend on the thermal, optical and mechanical features of the material processed. We have also studied the variation in the ablation yield when the position of the surface to be machined is modified. Material properties and work conditions are related to the results obtained. We have described and discussed the morphology, composition, microstructure and hardness of the materials processed.

  8. A Molecular Dynamics Model of Melting and Glass Transition in an Idealized Two-Dimensional Material. - 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-23

    SYNMBOL 7A NAME OF MONITORING OQiA.NIZATION - Massachusetts Institute I (it applicable) ONR 4~ of TechnologyI (x. AOORESS 1Ciry, Stt. and Z1IC00*J 7b...deformations in glasses to extensions of well defined mobile crystal de- fects, such as vacancies and dislocations (for a review see (21). In our view, 11... mobility of dislocations in the quasi-crystalline domains encapsulated by the liquid-like material. As can be expected, this latter component of

  9. Improved fabrication of melt electrospun tissue engineering scaffolds using direct writing and advanced electric field control.

    PubMed

    Ristovski, Nikola; Bock, Nathalie; Liao, Sam; Powell, Sean K; Ren, Jiongyu; Kirby, Giles T S; Blackwood, Keith A; Woodruff, Maria A

    2015-03-25

    Direct writing melt electrospinning is an additive manufacturing technique capable of the layer-by-layer fabrication of highly ordered 3d tissue engineering scaffolds from micron-diameter fibers. The utility of these scaffolds, however, is limited by the maximum achievable height of controlled fiber deposition, beyond which the structure becomes increasingly disordered. A source of this disorder is charge build-up on the deposited polymer producing unwanted coulombic forces. In this study, the authors introduce a novel melt electrospinning platform with dual voltage power supplies to reduce undesirable charge effects and improve fiber deposition control. The authors produced and characterized several 90° cross-hatched fiber scaffolds using a range of needle/collector plate voltages. Fiber thickness was found to be sensitive only to overall potential and invariant to specific tip/collector voltage. The authors also produced ordered scaffolds up to 200 layers thick (fiber spacing 1 mm and diameter 40 μm) and characterized structure in terms of three distinct zones: ordered, semiordered, and disordered. Our in vitro analysis indicates successful cell attachment and distribution throughout the scaffolds, with little evidence of cell death after seven days. This study demonstrates the importance of electrostatic control for reducing destabilizing polymer charge effects and enabling the fabrication of morphologically suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  10. Rapid Glass Refiner Development Program, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    A rapid glass refiner (RGR) technology which could be applied to both conventional and advanced class melting systems would significantly enhance the productivity and the competitiveness of the glass industry in the United States. Therefore, Vortec Corporation, with the support of the US Department of Energy (US DOE) under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-90ID12911, conducted a research and development program for a unique and innovative approach to rapid glass refining. To provide focus for this research effort, container glass was the primary target from among the principal glass types based on its market size and potential for significant energy savings. Container glass products represent the largest segment of the total glass industry accounting for 60% of the tonnage produced and over 40% of the annual energy consumption of 232 trillion Btu/yr. Projections of energy consumption and the market penetration of advanced melting and fining into the container glass industry yield a potential energy savings of 7.9 trillion Btu/yr by the year 2020.

  11. Containerless Manufacture of Glass Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Contamination and crystallization reduced in proposed process. Solid optical fiber drawn from an acoustically levitated lump of molten glass. New material added in solid form, melted and then moved into main body of molten glass. Single axis acoustic levitation furnances levitate glass melts at temperature up to about 700 degrees C. Processing in unit limited to low-melting temperature glasses.

  12. GlassForm

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-16

    GlassForm is a software tool for generating preliminary waste glass formulas for a given waste stream. The software is useful because it reduces the number of verification melts required to develop a suitable additive composition. The software includes property models that calculate glass properties of interest from the chemical composition of the waste glass. The software includes property models for glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, and leach resistance as measured by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT).

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Littleton, Harry; Griffin, John

    2011-07-31

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU's/year and 6.46 trillion BTU's/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  14. The Effects of Advanced 'Glass Cockpit' Displayed Flight Instrumentation on In-flight Pilot Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigerwald, John

    The Cognitive Continuum Theory (CCT) was first proposed 25 years ago to explain the relationship between intuition and analytical decision making processes. In order for aircraft pilots to make these analytical and intuitive decisions, they obtain information from various instruments within the cockpit of the aircraft. Advanced instrumentation is used to provide a broad array of information about the aircraft condition and flight situation to aid the flight crew in making effective decisions. The problem addressed is that advanced instrumentation has not improved the pilot decision making in modern aircraft. Because making a decision is dependent upon the information available, this experimental quantitative study sought to determine how well pilots organize and interpret information obtained from various cockpit instrumentation displays when under time pressure. The population for this study was the students, flight instructors, and aviation faculty at the Middle Georgia State College School of Aviation campus in Eastman, Georgia. The sample was comprised of two groups of 90 individuals (45 in each group) in various stages of pilot licensure from student pilot to airline transport pilot (ATP). The ages ranged from 18 to 55 years old. There was a statistically significant relationship at the p < .05 level in the ability of the participants to organize and interpret information between the advanced glass cockpit instrumentation and the traditional cockpit instrumentation. It is recommended that the industry explore technological solutions toward creating cockpit instrumentation that could match the type of information display to the type of decision making scenario in order to aid pilots in making decisions that will result in better organization of information. Understanding the relationship between the intuitive and analytical decisions that pilots make and the information source they use to make those decisions will aid engineers in the design of instrumentation

  15. Medium decoupling of dynamics at temperatures ~100 K above glass-transition temperature: a case study with (acetamide + lithium bromide/nitrate) melts.

    PubMed

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Biswas, Ranjit

    2012-05-07

    Time-resolved fluorescence Stokes shift and anisotropy measurements using a solvation probe in [0.78CH(3)CONH(2) + 0.22{f LiBr + (1-f) LiNO(3)}] melts reveal a strong decoupling of medium dynamics from viscosity. Interestingly, this decoupling has been found to occur at temperatures ∼50-100 K above the glass transition temperatures of the above melt at various anion concentrations (f(LiBr)). The decoupling is reflected via the following fractional viscosity dependence (η) of the measured average solvation and rotation times (<τ(s)> and <τ(r)>, respectively): <τ(x)> ∝ (η∕T)(p) (x being solvation or rotation), with p covering the range, 0.20 < p < 0.70. Although this is very similar to what is known for deeply supercooled liquids, it is very surprising because of the temperature range at which the above decoupling occurs for these molten mixtures. The kinship to the supercooled liquids is further exhibited via p which is always larger for <τ(r)> than for <τ(s)>, indicating a sort of translation-rotation decoupling. Multiple probes have been used in steady state fluorescence measurements to explore the extent of static heterogeneity. Estimated experimental dynamic Stokes shift for coumarin 153 in these mixtures lies in the range, 1000 < Δν(t)/cm(-1) < 1700, and is in semi-quantitative agreement with predictions from our semi-molecular theory. The participation of the fluctuating density modes at various length-scales to the observed solvation times has also been investigated.

  16. Medium decoupling of dynamics at temperatures ˜100 K above glass-transition temperature: A case study with (acetamide + lithium bromide/nitrate) melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Biswas, Ranjit

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence Stokes shift and anisotropy measurements using a solvation probe in [0.78CH3CONH2 + 0.22{f LiBr + (1-f) LiNO3}] melts reveal a strong decoupling of medium dynamics from viscosity. Interestingly, this decoupling has been found to occur at temperatures ˜50-100 K above the glass transition temperatures of the above melt at various anion concentrations (fLiBr). The decoupling is reflected via the following fractional viscosity dependence (η) of the measured average solvation and rotation times (⟨τs⟩ and ⟨τr⟩, respectively): ⟨τx⟩ ∝ (η/T)p (x being solvation or rotation), with p covering the range, 0.20 < p < 0.70. Although this is very similar to what is known for deeply supercooled liquids, it is very surprising because of the temperature range at which the above decoupling occurs for these molten mixtures. The kinship to the supercooled liquids is further exhibited via p which is always larger for ⟨τr⟩ than for ⟨τs⟩, indicating a sort of translation-rotation decoupling. Multiple probes have been used in steady state fluorescence measurements to explore the extent of static heterogeneity. Estimated experimental dynamic Stokes shift for coumarin 153 in these mixtures lies in the range, 1000 < Δνt/cm-1 < 1700, and is in semi-quantitative agreement with predictions from our semi-molecular theory. The participation of the fluctuating density modes at various length-scales to the observed solvation times has also been investigated.

  17. Management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tube glass: Review of advances in recycling and best available technologies.

    PubMed

    Iniaghe, Paschal O; Adie, Gilbert U

    2015-11-01

    Cathode ray tubes are image display units found in computer monitors and televisions. In recent years, cathode ray tubes have been generated as waste owing to the introduction of newer and advanced technologies in image displays, such as liquid crystal displays and high definition televisions, among others. Generation and subsequent disposal of end-of-life cathode ray tubes presents a challenge owing to increasing volumes and high lead content embedded in the funnel and neck sections of the glass. Disposal in landfills and open dumping are anti-environmental practices considering the large-scale contamination of environmental media by the potential of toxic metals leaching from glass. Mitigating such environmental contamination will require sound management strategies that are environmentally friendly and economically feasible. This review covers existing and emerging management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tubes. An in-depth analysis of available technologies (glass smelting, detoxification of cathode ray tube glass, lead extraction from cathode ray tube glass) revealed that most of the techniques are environmentally friendly, but are largely confined to either laboratory scale, or are often limited owing to high cost to mount, or generate secondary pollutants, while a closed-looped method is antiquated. However, recycling in cementitious systems (cement mortar and concrete) gives an added advantage in terms of quantity of recyclable cathode ray tube glass at a given time, with minimal environmental and economic implications. With significant quantity of waste cathode ray tube glass being generated globally, cementitious systems could be economically and environmentally acceptable as a sound management practice for cathode ray tube glass, where other technologies may not be applicable.

  18. Evidence for a Bose Glass Melting Line in a WGe Thin Film with a Square Antidot Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Long, L. E.; Lokhre, S.; Ye, T.; Metlushko, V. V.; Baert, M.; Rosseel, E.; van Bael, M. J.; Temst, K.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Bruynseraede, Y.

    2001-03-01

    We present AC magnetization data for a W0.67Ge0.33 thin film patterned with a square lattice of antidots (AD) of diameter 350 nm and separation 1 µm. We infer a tentative, complex H-T phase boundary having sharp cusps at matching fields H[n] = n(21 Oe) similar to those predicted by Radzihovsky (PRL 74 (1995) 4923) at a transition between strongly pinned and weakly pinned Bose glass phases, and at the Bose-Mott transition predicted by Vinokur and Nelson (PRB 48 (1993) 13060), in the case of correlated pinning centers. Detailed AC frequency (0.05-800 Hz) and drive (0.05-2.5 Oe) dependences of the real and imaginary susceptibilities are presented as measures of nonequilibrium vortex response, in order to verify equilibrium phase transition behavior. Research at U. Kentucky and U.I.C. is supported by the U.S. DoE Office of Science, Div. Materials Sciences, Grant #DE-FG02-97ER45653, and at K. U. Leuven by the Flemish Fund for Scientific Research and the Concerted Action Program.

  19. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  20. Coercivity of the Nd-Fe-B hot-deformed magnets diffusion-processed with low melting temperature glass forming alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelam, U. M. R.; Liu, Lihua; Akiya, T.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Sakuma, N.; Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Hono, K.

    2016-08-01

    Nd- and Pr-based alloys with bulk glass forming ability and low melting temperatures, Nd60Al10Ni10Cu20 and Pr60Al10Ni10Cu20, were used for grain boundary diffusion process to enhance the coercivity of hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity increment was proportional to the weight gain after the diffusion process. For the sample with 64% weight gain, the coercivity increased up to 2.8 T, which is the highest value for bulk Nd-Fe-B magnets that do not contain heavy rare-earth elements, Dy or Tb. Approximately half of the intergranular regions were amorphous and the remaining regions were crystalline. Magnetic isolation of the Nd2Fe14B grains by the Nd-rich amorphous/crystalline intergranular phases is attributed to the large coercivity enhancement. The coercivity does not change after the crystallization of the intergranular phase, indicating that the coercivity is not influenced by the strain at the interface with the crystalline intergranular phase.

  1. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  2. GLASS FORMULATION DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER (CCIM) ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - 9208

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J; Amanda Billings, A; David Peeler, D; Michael Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-08-27

    Over the past few years, Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) demonstrations have been completed using SRS sludge batches 2, 3 and 4 (SB2, SB3 and SB4) simulant compositions. These campaigns demonstrated the ability of the CCIM to effectively produce quality glasses at high waste loadings. The current Advanced Remediation Technology (ART) Phase II-A Project is aimed at demonstrating the CCIM technology under representative DWPF flowsheet conditions and to demonstrate extended operations of the melter. A glass composition development effort was completed to identify and recommend a frit composition and sludge batch 4 (SB4) simulant waste loading target for subsequent ART-Phase II-A CCIM demonstration testing. Based on the results of the glass formulation testing, it was recommended that the Frit 503-R6 composition (B{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 14 wt %; Li{sub 2}O = 9 wt %; Na{sub 2}O = 3 wt %; and SiO{sub 2} = 74 wt %) be utilized for the demonstration. Furthermore, a waste loading of 46 wt % was recommended. The recommended frit and waste loading would produce a glass with acceptable durability with a liquidus temperature adequately below the 1250 C nominal CCIM operating temperature. This frit composition and waste loading was found to result in a glass that met CCIM processing requirements for viscosity, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity. The recommended frit and waste loading level should also provide a buffer for sludge product compositional variation to support the Phase II-A CCIM demonstration.

  3. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOEpatents

    Bussod, Gilles Y.; Dick, Aaron J.; Cort, George E.

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  4. Glass-liquid transition, crystallization, and melting of a room temperature ionic liquid: thin films of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[trifluoromethanesulfonyl]imide studied with TOF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2008-12-04

    To discuss the relationship between liquid, crystalline, and glassy states of ionic liquids, TOF-SIMS was used to analyze the glass-liquid transition, crystallization, and melting of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[trifluoromethanesulfonyl]imide ([emim][Tf(2)N]) at the molecular level at temperatures of 150-280 K. The [emim][Tf(2)N] molecules can be deposited thermally on a Ni(111) surface without decomposition. LiI was adsorbed onto the thin film in order to investigate the glass-liquid transition; it was incorporated in deeper layers at temperatures higher than 180 K. Crystallization of the film at around 200-220 K was identifiable from the abrupt increase in the [emim](+) yield, which probably results from the steric effect of the structured cations and anions forming anisotropic bonds in a specific layered structure. The glass-liquid transition and crystallization of [emim][Tf(2)N] differ significantly from those of water and alcohol in terms of the morphological change of the film and the interaction with adsorbed LiI. This behavior might be explained by the absence of a liquid-liquid phase transition for [emim][Tf(2)N]. The vapor-deposited thin films (2.5 and 5.0 monolayers) crystallize at around 200 K, but they melt gradually at temperatures considerably lower than the bulk melting point (ca. 260 K) because of the evolution of a quasi-liquid layer and the disappearance of a crystal template.

  5. EPR and magnetic characterization of Fe2O3-TeO2 and CuO-TeO2 glasses obtained by melt quenching and sol-gel processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehelean, A.; Popa, A.; . Rada, S.; Culea, E.

    2015-05-01

    Samples of the xFe2O3·(1-x)TeO2 and xCuO·(1-x)TeO2 glass systems with x≤0.50 were prepared by melt quenching and sol-gel processes and were investigated by electron paramagnetic rezonance (EPR) spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. EPR data show the presence of Fe3+ and Cu2+ ions in the host glass matrices. Analysis of compositional evolution of EPR spectra reveals the distribution of Fe3+ and Cu2+ ions in the tellurate glass and offers information on their interactions and microvicinities. Magnetic susceptibility and EPR data prove that iron and cooper ions are present in the host tellurate glass as isolated species and species coupled by dipolar and exchange interactions of antiferromagnetic nature. These data show an important clustering tendency of iron and cooper ions in the studied tellurate glasses. As proved by EPR and magnetic susceptibility data, besides the Fe3+ and Cu2+ ions, Fe2+ and Cu+ species are also present in the studied tellurate glasses. The Fe3+→Fe2+ and Cu2+→Cu+ reduction processes occur in these samples with different intensities as function of the preparation technique and samples composition influencing their magnetic behavior.

  6. Glass Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Research efforts span three general areas of glass science: glass refining, gel-derived glasses, and nucleation and crystallization of glasses. Gas bubbles which are present in a glass product are defects which may render the glass totally useless for the end application. For example, optical glasses, laser host glasses, and a variety of other specialty glasses must be prepared virtually defect free to be employable. Since a major mechanism of bubble removal, buoyant rise, is virtually inoperative in microgravity, glass fining will be especially difficult in space. On the other hand, the suppression of buoyant rise and the ability to perform containerless melting experiments in space allows the opportunity to carry out several unique bubble experiments in space. Gas bubble dissolution studies may be performed at elevated temperatures for large bubbles with negligible bubble motion. Also, bubble nucleation studies may be performed without the disturbing feature of heterogeneous bubble nucleation at the platinum walls. Ground based research efforts are being performed in support of these potential flight experiments.

  7. Hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion of posaconazole with improved bioavailability: investigating drug-polymer miscibility with advanced characterisation.

    PubMed

    Fule, Ritesh; Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0-72) and C(max) of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0-72) and C(max) higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension.

  8. Hot Melt Extruded Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Posaconazole with Improved Bioavailability: Investigating Drug-Polymer Miscibility with Advanced Characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0–72) and Cmax of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0–72) and Cmax higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension. PMID:25143935

  9. Advanced materials for aerospace and biomedical applications: New glasses for hermetic titanium seals

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Tallant, D.R.; Crowder, S.V.

    1996-11-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys have an outstanding strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance and so are materials of choice for a variety of aerospace and biomedical applications. Such applications are limited by the lack of a viable hermetic glass sealing technology. Conventional silicate sealing glasses are readily reduced by titanium to form interfacial silicides that are incompatible with a robust glass/metal seal. Borate-based glasses undergo a similar thermochemistry and are reduced to a titanium boride. The kinetics of this reactions, however, are apparently slower and so a deleterious interface does not form. Chemically durable lanthanoborate glasses were examined as candidate sealing compositions. The compositions, properties, and structures of several alkaline earth, alumina, and titania lanthanoborate glass forming systems were evaluated and this information was used as the basis for a designed experiment to optimize compositions for Ti-sealing. A number of viable compositions were identified and sealing procedures established. Finally, glass formation, properties, and structure of biocompatible Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}- and TiO{sub 2}-doped calcium phosphate systems were also evaluated.

  10. Self-assembly and glass-formation in a lattice model of telechelic polymer melts: Influence of stiffness of the sticky bonds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F

    2016-06-07

    Telechelic polymers are chain macromolecules that may self-assemble through the association of their two mono-functional end groups (called "stickers"). A deep understanding of the relation between microscopic molecular details and the macroscopic physical properties of telechelic polymers is important in guiding the rational design of telechelic polymer materials with desired properties. The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for strongly interacting, self-assembling telechelic polymers provides a theoretical tool that enables establishing the connections between important microscopic molecular details of self-assembling polymers and their bulk thermodynamics. The original LCT for self-assembly of telechelic polymers considers a model of fully flexible linear chains [J. Dudowicz and K. F. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064902 (2012)], while our recent work introduces a significant improvement to the LCT by including a description of chain semiflexibility for the bonds within each individual telechelic chain [W.-S. Xu and K. F. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 024901 (2015)], but the physically associative (or called "sticky") bonds between the ends of the telechelics are left as fully flexible. Motivated by the ubiquitous presence of steric constraints on the association of real telechelic polymers that impart an additional degree of bond stiffness (or rigidity), the present paper further extends the LCT to permit the sticky bonds to be semiflexible but to have a stiffness differing from that within each telechelic chain. An analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy is provided for this model of linear telechelic polymer melts, and illustrative calculations demonstrate the significant influence of the stiffness of the sticky bonds on the self-assembly and thermodynamics of telechelic polymers. A brief discussion is also provided for the impact of self-assembly on glass-formation by combining the LCT description for this extended model of telechelic polymers with the

  11. Evidence for a homogeneous primary magma at Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion): A geochemical study of matrix glass, melt inclusions and Pélé's hairs of the 1998-2008 eruptive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemant, B.; Salaün, A.; Staudacher, T.

    2009-07-01

    Magmas erupted at Piton de la Fournaise volcano since 0.5 Ma, display a large petrological and chemical range (picrites, 2 types of transitional basalts and differentiated magmas) and low amplitude isotopic heterogeneities. The recent activity (1998-2008) includes all magma types except evolved magmas. Matrix glass compositions from quenched lavas and Pélé's hairs of the whole 1998-2008 period define a single differentiation trend from a common basaltic melt (MgO ~ 9%) for the first time identified in the 2007 magmas. More primitive melt compositions (MgO ~ 12.5%) are only evidenced by olivine crystals with high Fo contents (Fo 85-88.4). Evolutions of major and trace element of glass and mineral compositions are consistently modelled by a unique low pressure crystal fractionation process. The composition range of olivine melt inclusions is distinct from that of matrix glass and Pélé's hair and corresponds to equilibrium crystallisation in closed system of melts trapped from the main differentiation series at high temperature. The range of basaltic types at Piton de la Fournaise is the result of large variations in the differentiation degree (10 to 35% crystallisation) of a single primary basaltic melt and the addition in highly variable amounts (up to 50% in picrites) of co-genetic olivine or gabbroic cumulates. These cumulates may represent the shallow and dense bodies identified by seismic tomography and have likely been produced by the repetitive intrusion and differentiation of basalts along Piton de la Fournaise history. Depending on the shallow transfer paths, ascending magmas may disaggregate and incorporate various types of cumulates, explaining all particular features of basaltic magmas and picrites. These results emphasize the exceptional chemical homogeneity of the primary basaltic melt and of the differentiation process involved in volcanic activity of La Réunion hotspot since 0.5 Ma and the increasingly recognised role of melt-wall rock

  12. Oxynitride glass production procedure

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Schuetz, Stanley T.; O'Brien, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a process for the preparation of high quality oxynitride glasses without resorting to high pressures. Nitrogen-containing compounds such as Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 are first encapsulated in a low melting temperature glass. Particles of the encapsulated nitrogen-containing compound are mixed with other oxide glass-formers and melted in an atmosphere of flowing nitrogen and in the presence of buffering gas to form the oxynitride glass. Glasses containing up to 15 at % nitrogen have been prepared by this method.

  13. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  14. Manufacturing unique glasses in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happe, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    An air suspension melting technique is described for making glasses from substances which to date have been observed only in the crystalline condition. A laminar flow vertical wind tunnel was constructed for suspending oxide melts that were melted using the energy from a carbon dioxide laser beam. By this method it is possible to melt many high-melting-point materials without interaction between the melt and crucible material. In addition, space melting permits cooling to suppress crystal growth. If a sufficient amount of under cooling is accompanied by a sufficient increase in viscosity, crystallization will be avoided entirely and glass will result.

  15. Development and fabrication of advanced cover glass for a GaAs solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, P.G.; Kaminar, N.R.; Grounner, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes work on improving solar cell conversion efficiencies by modifying the cell cover glass. Two approaches were investigated during the course of this work: grooved cover glasses to reduce the effect of top contact obscuration and secondary concentrators to improve concentrator solar cell performances in tracking modules. The grooved cover glass work used an array of metallized V shaped grooves in a thin cover glass (plastic) window to deflect incident light rays away from solar cell front surface regions covered by the solar cell electrical contact metallization onto unobstructed, optically active regions of the solar cell. Secondary concentrators are being considered for use on concentrator solar cells to improve overall system conversion efficiency and reduce receiver module cost. Secondary concentrators designed and fabricated during this project consist of small glass cones to attach directly to the top of the receiver solar cell. When appropriately designed, these secondary concentrator glass cones increase sunlight concentration on the solar cell, improve solar flux uniformity on the cell, improve system tolerance to tracking error, and allow for concentration ratios greater than can be ordinarily achieved with acrylic Fresnel lenses.

  16. High-resolution solid-state NMR study of the effect of composition on network connectivity and structural disorder in multi-component glasses in the diopside and jadeite join: Implications for structure of andesitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, Sung Keun

    2014-12-01

    The structural evolution of andesitic melts with varying compositions remains one of the unsolved questions in high-temperature geochemistry and petrology. In this article, we report the structural details of model andesitic glasses [CaO-MgO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMNAS)] in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) join using high-resolution, multi-nuclear, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The 27Al NMR spectra of CMNAS glasses confirm that [4]Al is dominant. While a minor fraction of [5]Al is observed, its presence is only prevalent in the glasses with higher Ca-Mg content. Topological disorder in the glass network also tends to increase with Ca-Mg content as evidenced by the increase in the quadrupolar coupling constant (Cq) of [4]Al for glasses with increasing diopside contents (XDiopside). Despite the complex nature of the glasses studied here (with five oxide components), the 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra resolve diverse bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs), from which the degree of Al avoidance among framework cations (Si and Al) and preferential proximity among non-network cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) and each oxygen site can be estimated: presence of Al-O-Al in jadeite glass implies a violation of the Al-avoidance rule in the glasses and the decrease in the fraction of NBOs with increasing XDiopside is consistent with a decrease in their viscosity. Analysis of the peak position of {Ca, Mg}-mixed NBOs, along with the absence of Na-NBO peak, and the peak shape of Si-O-Al reveals preferential partitioning of Ca2+ and Mg2 into NBOs and the proximity of Na+ to BOs. The fraction of highly coordinated Al has been linked to thermodynamic and transport properties of the melts. Considering all the experimental Al coordination environments available in the literature, together with the current experimental studies, we attempt to establish the relationship between the fractions of highly coordinated Al and composition, particularly average

  17. Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Kramlich, J.; Koppang, R.

    1991-05-01

    This project was initiated to fill a need in the glass industry for a non-contact temperature sensor for glass melts. At present, the glass forming industry (e.g., bottle manufacture) consumes significant amounts of energy. Careful control of temperature at the point the bottle is molded is necessary to prevent the bottle from being rejected as out-of-specification. In general, the entire glass melting and conditioning process is designed to minimize this rejection rate, maximize throughput and thus control energy and production costs. This program focuses on the design, development and testing of an advanced optically based pyrometer for glass melts. The pyrometer operates simultaneously at four wavelengths; through analytical treatment of the signals, internal temperature profiles within the glass melt can be resolved. A novel multiplexer alloys optical signals from a large number of fiber-optic sensors to be collected and resolved by a single detector at a location remote from the process. This results in a significant cost savings on a per measurement point basis. The development program is divided into two phases. Phase 1 involves the construction of a breadboard version on the instrument and its testing on a pilot-scale furnace. In Phase 2, a prototype analyzer will be constructed and tested on a commercial forehearth. This report covers the Phase 1 activities.

  18. Study Of Phase Separation In Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.; Smith, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes an experimental study of effect of hydroxide content on phase separation in soda/silica glasses. Ordinary and gel glasses melted at 1,565 degree C, and melts stirred periodically. "Wet" glasses produced by passing bubbles of N2 saturated with water through melts; "dry" glasses prepared in similar manner, except N2 dried before passage through melts. Analyses of compositions of glasses performed by atomic-absorption and index-of-refraction measurements. Authors conclude hydroxide speeds up phase separation, regardless of method (gel or ordinary) by which glass prepared. Eventually helps material scientists to find ways to control morphology of phase separation.

  19. Precision molding of advanced glass optics: innovative production technology for lens arrays and free form optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongs, Guido; Bresseler, Bernd; Bergs, Thomas; Menke, Gert

    2012-10-01

    Today isothermal precision molding of imaging glass optics has become a widely applied and integrated production technology in the optical industry. Especially in consumer electronics (e.g. digital cameras, mobile phones, Blu-ray) a lot of optical systems contain rotationally symmetrical aspherical lenses produced by precision glass molding. But due to higher demands on complexity and miniaturization of optical elements the established process chain for precision glass molding is not sufficient enough. Wafer based molding processes for glass optics manufacturing become more and more interesting for mobile phone applications. Also cylindrical lens arrays can be used in high power laser systems. The usage of unsymmetrical free-form optics allows an increase of efficiency in optical laser systems. Aixtooling is working on different aspects in the fields of mold manufacturing technologies and molding processes for extremely high complex optical components. In terms of array molding technologies, Aixtooling has developed a manufacturing technology for the ultra-precision machining of carbide molds together with European partners. The development covers the machining of multi lens arrays as well as cylindrical lens arrays. The biggest challenge is the molding of complex free-form optics having no symmetrical axis. A comprehensive CAD/CAM data management along the entire process chain is essential to reach high accuracies on the molded lenses. Within a national funded project Aixtooling is working on a consistent data handling procedure in the process chain for precision molding of free-form optics.

  20. Magnetic nature of the austenite-martensite phase transition and spin glass behaviour in nanostructured Mn2Ni1.6Sn0.4 melt-spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nidhi; Borgohain, Barsha; Srivastava, A. K.; Dhar, Ajay; Singh, H. K.

    2016-03-01

    Nanocrystalline ribbons of inverse Heusler alloy Mn2Ni1.6Sn0.4 have been synthesised by melt spinning of the arc-melted bulk precursor. The single-phase ribbons crystallize into a cubic structure and exhibit very fine crystallite size of <2 nm. Temperature-dependent magnetization ( M- T) measurements reveal ferromagnetic-austenite (FM-A)-antiferromagnetic-martensite (AFM-M) phase transition that begins at M S ≈ 249 K and finishes at M f ≈ 224 K. During warming, the reverse AFM-M to FM-A transitions begins at A s ≈ 240 K and finishes at A f ≈ 261 K. A re-entrant FM transition is observed in the M-phase at T_{{CM}} ≈ 145 K. These transitions are also confirmed by temperature-dependent resistivity ( ρ- T) measurements. The hysteretic behaviour of M- T and ρ- T in the temperature regime spanned by the A-M transition is a manifestation of the first-order phase transition. M- T and ρ- T data also provide unambiguous evidence in favour of spin glass at T < T_{{CM}}. The scaling of the glass freezing temperature ( T f) with frequency, extracted from the frequency-dependent AC susceptibility measurements, confirms the existence of canonical spin glass at T < T_{{CM}} ≈ 145 K. The occurrence of canonical spin glass has been explained in terms of the nanostructuring modified interactions between the coexisting FM and AFM correlations in the martensitic phase.

  1. Recent advances with generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl

    The generalized entropy theory (GET) of glass-formation in polymers is a combination of the lattice cluster theory (LCT) for the configurational entropy density with the Adam-Gibbs (AG) theory for the structural relaxation time. A greatly simplified form of the GET (whose expression for the free energy is roughly double that of Flory-Huggins theory) accurately reproduces the four characteristic temperatures of glass-formation (the onset, crossover, glass transition, and Kauzmann temperatures) of the full GET to within 4K for a series of models of polymers composed of semi-flexible chains having the structure of poly(n-alpha olefins). The theory is now simple enough to be used in courses in polymer physics. Although the successes of the GET provide a strong validation of the final form of the AG theory provided the configurational entropy is used, the physical basis of the AG theory has remained an enigma. Hence, we have developed a new, more general, statistical mechanical derivation of AG theory that explains the previously perplexing observations that the string-like elementary excitations have the mass and temperature dependence of systems undergoing equilibrium self-assembly. This work is supported by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award No. DE- SC0008631.

  2. Training Guidelines: Glass Furnace Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    Technological development in the glass industry is constantly directed towards producing high quality glass at low operating costs. Particularly, changes have taken place in melting methods which mean that the modern furnace operator has greater responsibilities than any of his predecessors. The complexity of control systems, melting rates, tank…

  3. Sol-gel broadband antireflective coatings for advanced laser-glass amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floch, Herve G.; Belleville, Philippe F.; Pegon, Philippe M.

    1994-10-01

    The cost of a large laser system is a strong function of the overall electrical to final photon efficiency. To improve the stored energy and therefore the pumping efficiency of sophisticated and costly laser-glass amplifiers, we have developed a novel two-layer broadband antireflective coating for the blast-shield component. The blast-shield is an optic placed between the flashlamps and the laser disk amplifiers to prevent damage of laser disks by possible explosion of a flashlamp. The sol-gel antireflective coating was dip-coated at room temperature onto 8-cm diameter glass samples. The coating basically consisted of a halfwave- thick high-index material such as ZrO2-PVP (PolyVinyl Pyrrolidone) and a quarterwave- thick low-index material such as SiO2-siloxane. To improve the abrasion resistance of the coated part, a lubricating and water-repellent material was applied as a very thin overcoat. In addition to a 6.5 to 7.2% transmission gain over the spectrum of interest, the coating was moderately abrasion resistant and chemically durable. Flashlamp-induced damage to the antireflective coating for 1000 glow discharges at 10 to 12 J/cm2 were minimal and similar to uncoated parts.

  4. INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; FENG Z; GAN H; PEGG IL

    2009-11-05

    Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.

  5. Conversion of melt-derived microfibrous borate (13-93B3) and silicate (45S5) bioactive glass in a simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E

    2013-03-01

    Microfibrous bioactive glasses are showing a considerable capacity to heal soft tissue wounds, but little information is available on the mechanism of healing. In the present study, the conversion of microfibrous borate bioactive glass (diameter = 0.2-5 μm) with the composition designated 13-93B3 (5.5 Na2O, 11.1 K2O, 4.6 MgO, 18.5 CaO, 3.7 P2O5, 56.6 B2O3 wt%) was evaluated in vitro as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C using structural and chemical techniques. Silicate 45S5glass microfibers (45 SiO2, 24.5 Na2O, 24.5 CaO, 6 P2O5 wt%) were also studied for comparison. Microfibrous 13-93B3 glass degraded almost completely and converted to a calcium phosphate material within 7-14 days in SBF, whereas >85 % of the silica remained in the 45S5 microfibers, forming a silica gel phase. An amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) product that formed on the 13-93B3 microfibers crystallized at a slower rate to hydroxyapatite (HA) when compared to the ACP that formed on the 45S5 fibers. For immersion times >3 days, the 13-93B3 fibers released a higher concentration of Ca into the SBF than the 45S5 fibers. The fast and more complete degradation, slow crystallization of the ACP product, and higher concentration of dissolved Ca in SBF could contribute to the capacity of the microfibrous borate 13-93B3 glass to heal soft tissue wounds.

  6. Polycarboxylic acids as network modifiers for water durability improvement of inorganic-organic hybrid tin-silico-phosphate low-melting glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Menaa, Bouzid . E-mail: bouzidmenaa@noncry.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Mizuno, Megumi; Takahashi, Masahide . E-mail: masahide@noncry.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tokuda, Yomei; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2006-02-15

    We investigated the water durability of the inorganic-organic hybrid tin-silico-phosphate glasses Me{sub 2}SiO-SnO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (Me designs the organic methyl group) doped with organic acids (salicylic acid (SA), tartaric acid (TA), citric acid (Canada) and butane tetracarboxylic acid (BTCA)) containing one or more of carboxylic groups per molecule. The structure, thermal properties and durability of the final glasses obtained via a non-aqueous acid-base reaction were discussed owing to the nature and the concentration of the acid added. {sup 29}Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectra, respectively, showed clearly a modification of the network in the host glass matrix of the Me{sub 2}SiO-SnO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} system. The polycondensation enhancement to form -P-O-Si-O-P- linkages (PSP) and the increase of the Q {sup 2} unit (two bridging oxygens per phosphorus atom) over the Q {sup 3} unit (three bridging oxygens per phosphorus atom) as a function of the acid in the order SAglasses with the acids containing a large number of carboxylic groups per molecule. The presence of carboxylic groups of the acid acting as network modifier may retard the movement of water molecules through the glasses due to the steric hindrance strengthening the PSP connections in a chain-like structure.

  7. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  8. A Simple Scheme for Estimating Turbulent Heat Flux over Landfast Arctic Sea Ice from Dry Snow to Advanced Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, R. L.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; Else, B. G.; Swystun, K.; Barber, D. G.

    2015-05-01

    We describe a dynamic-parameter aggregation scheme to estimate hourly turbulent heat fluxes over landfast sea ice during the transition from winter to spring. Hourly albedo measurements are used to track the morphology of the surface as it evolved from a fairly smooth homogeneous dry snow surface to a rougher heterogeneous surface with spatially differential melting and melt ponds. The estimates of turbulent heat fluxes for 928 h are compared with eddy-covariance measurements. The model performance metrics (W m) for sensible heat flux were found to be: mean bias , root-mean-square error 6 and absolute accuracy 4, and for latent heat flux near zero, 3 and 2, respectively. The correlation coefficient between modelled and measured sensible heat fluxes was 0.82, and for latent heat fluxes 0.88. The turbulent heat fluxes were estimated more accurately without adjustments than with adjustments for atmospheric stability based on the bulk Richardson number. Overall, and across all metrics for both sensible and latent heat fluxes, the dynamic-parameter aggregation scheme outperformed the static Community Ice (C-ICE) scheme, part of the Community Climate System model, applied to the same winter-to-spring transition period.

  9. Application of ICH Q9 Quality Risk Management Tools for Advanced Development of Hot Melt Coated Multiparticulate Systems.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Elena; Becker, Karin; Hate, Siddhi; Hohl, Roland; Schiemenz, Wolfgang; Sacher, Stephan; Zimmer, Andreas; Salar-Behzadi, Sharareh

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to apply quality risk management based on the The International Conference on Harmonisation guideline Q9 for the early development stage of hot melt coated multiparticulate systems for oral administration. N-acetylcysteine crystals were coated with a formulation composing tripalmitin and polysorbate 65. The critical quality attributes (CQAs) were initially prioritized using failure mode and effects analysis. The CQAs of the coated material were defined as particle size, taste-masking efficiency, and immediate release profile. The hot melt coated process was characterized via a flowchart, based on the identified potential critical process parameters (CPPs) and their impact on the CQAs. These CPPs were prioritized using a process failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis and their critical impact on the CQAs was experimentally confirmed using a statistical design of experiments. Spray rate, atomization air pressure, and air flow rate were identified as CPPs. Coating amount and content of polysorbate 65 in the coating formulation were identified as critical material attributes. A hazard and critical control points analysis was applied to define control strategies at the critical process points. A fault tree analysis evaluated causes for potential process failures. We successfully demonstrated that a standardized quality risk management approach optimizes the product development sustainability and supports the regulatory aspects.

  10. The mineral phase evolution behaviour in the production of glass-ceramics from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by melting technology.

    PubMed

    Luan, Jingde; Chai, Meiyun; Li, Rundong; Yao, Pengfei; Khan, Agha Saood

    2016-01-01

    High energy consumption was the major obstacle to the widespread application of melting technology in the treatment of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. Aiming to lower the ash-melting temperature (AMT) for energy-saving, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and the scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the relations between AMT and the mineral evolution. The results indicated that the change of AMT was determined by the types and the contents of mineral crystals. The transition from refractory minerals to fluxing minerals was the key. The transition of the main crystalline phase from pseudowollastonite (Ca3(Si3O9)) to wollastonite (CaSiO3) played a significant role in AMT reduction. A quantum chemistry calculation was carried out to investigate the effect of crystal reaction activity on AMT. In the chemical reaction, the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital played a more important role than any other orbits. Cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)) were apt to enter into the crystal lattice of wollastonite and gehlenite mainly through Si (3), O (1), Si (6), O (10) and Al (2), O (10), and broke the covalent bonds of Si (3)-O (7), Al (1)-O (9) and Al (1)-O (15), respectively. This deconstruction behaviour provided convenient conditions for restructuring and promoted the formation of fluxing minerals. In melts, the excess SiO2 monomers which existed in the form of cristobalite and quartz caused AMT increase.

  11. Effects of Quartz Particle Size and Sucrose Addition on Melting Behavior of a Melter Feed for High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, Jose; Hrma, Pavel R; Schweiger, Michael J; Swearingen, Kevin J; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E; Henager, Samuel H

    2010-08-11

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5°C/min up to 1200°C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 µm. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-μm quartz particles; particles >150 µm formed clusters. Particles of 5 µm completely dissolved by 900°C whereas particles >150 µm did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200°C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles.

  12. Integral coolant channels supply made by melt-out method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Melt-out method of constructing strong, pressure-tight fluid coolant channels for chambers is accomplished by cementing pins to the surface and by depositing a melt-out material on the surface followed by two layers of epoxy-resin impregnated glass fibers. The structure is heated to melt out the low-melting alloy.

  13. Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions in microdiamond from the gneisses of Kokchetav and Erzgebirge massifs: Diversified characteristics of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamond in UHP rocks due to host-rock buffering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shyh-Lung; Chu, Hao-Tsu; Yui, Tzen-Fu; Shen, Pouyan; Schertl, Hans-Peter; Liou, Juhn G.; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2006-03-01

    Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions were identified within metamorphic microdiamonds from garnets of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) gneisses of the Kokchetav and the Erzgebirge massifs by analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The chemical characteristics of these inclusions within microdiamonds are surprisingly similar among various gneissic rocks from both Kokchetav and Erzgebirge, but are significantly different from the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid inclusions within microdiamonds from garnets of the Kokchetav UHP marble. These contrasting findings not only provide constraints on the characteristics/compositions of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamonds, but also imply that the formation media must have been buffered by the hosting rocks, resulting in the observed diversities as reported here. In addition, depending on the rock types and thus on the nature of the formation media from which metamorphic microdiamonds were formed, the respective characteristic morphologies of the microdiamonds differ. The P/K-rich silica melt tends to form octahedral or cubo-octahedral microdiamonds within garnet in gneissic rocks, whereas the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid tends to form spheroids/cuboid microdiamonds with rugged surfaces within garnet in marble. Consequently, the buffered media in hosting rocks played a decisive role in determining the different morphologies and growth rates/mechanisms of metamorphic microdiamonds in general.

  14. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  15. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  16. Properties and characteristics of optical glass

    SciTech Connect

    Marker, A.J. III.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of SPIE on properties and characteristics of optical glass. Topics covered include IR reflectance measurement of ion-implanted silica, specifying optical materials, and impurity absorption coefficient measurements in phosphate glass melted under oxidizing conditions.

  17. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  18. An effective utilization of the slag from acid leaching of coal-waste: preparation of water glass with a low-temperature co-melting reaction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Duan, Xiaofang; Chen, Rongming; Cheng, Fangqin

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents an effective utilization of slag from acid leaching of coal-waste with a novel approach, namely low-temperature co-melting method, for preparation of sodium silicate (Na2O x nSiO2) using slag from acid leaching of coal-waste as feedstock. It is very interesting that the co-melting reaction temperature of the mixture of Na2CO3 and the feedstock (50-100 microm) was as low as 850 degrees C, which was significantly lower than the temperature used in traditional sodium silicate production (1400 degrees C). The optimum SiO2/Na2O ratio was identified as 7:3 according to the results of thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC), ICP-AES, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. In this condition, the main product was sodium disilicate (Na2O x 2SiO2), with water solubility of 85.0%. More importantly, the impurities such as aluminum in the feedstock, which had adverse effect on subsequent treatment, were concentrated almost completely in the filter residue as insoluble sodium alumunosilicates, i.e., Na(Si2Al)O6 x H2O. The lower co-melting temperature of this process demonstrates a significant energy-saving opportunity and thus a promising approach for highly effective utilization of coal-waste. Implications: Recently, alumina extraction from coal-waste has been extensively investigated and industrial applied in China. However, the slag-containing silica generated from the acid leaching process of coal-waste led to a secondary pollution, which hindered large-scale production. The proposed low-temperature co-melting method for preparation of sodium silicate (Na2O x nSiO2) using slag from acid leaching of coal-waste as feedstock indicated that it is an efficient approach for the recovery of silica from the acid-leached slag of coal-waste with minimal environmental impact.

  19. Sulfation through the looking glass--recent advances in sulfotransferase research for the curious.

    PubMed

    Coughtrie, M W H

    2002-01-01

    Members of the cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULT) superfamily catalyse the sulfation of a multitude of xenobiotics, hormones and neurotransmitters. Humans have at least 10 functional SULT genes, and a number of recent advances reviewed here have furthered our understanding of SULT function. Analysis of expression patterns has shown that sulfotransferases are highly expressed in the fetus, and SULTs may in fact be a major detoxification enzyme system in the developing human. The X-ray crystal structures of three SULTs have been solved and combined with mutagenesis experiments and molecular modelling, they have provided the first clues as to the factors that govern the unique substrate specificities of some of these enzymes. In the future these and other studies will facilitate prediction of the fate of chemicals metabolised by sulfation. Variation in sulfation capacity may be important in determining an individual's response to xenobiotics, and there has been an explosion in information on sulfotransferase polymorphisms and their functional consequences, including the influence of SULT1A1 genotype on susceptibility to colorectal and breast cancer. Finally, the first gene knockout experiments with SULTs have recently been described, with the generation of estrogen sulfotransferase deficient mice in which reproductive capacity is compromised. Our improved understanding of these enzymes will have significant benefits in such diverse areas as drug design and development, cancer susceptibility, reproduction and development.

  20. Biomimetic self-healing of advanced composite structures using hollow glass fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2006-06-01

    The use of functional repair components stored inside hollow reinforcing fibres is being considered as a self-repair system for future composite structures. The incorporation of a self-healing capability within a variety of materials, including fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs), has been investigated by a number of workers previously. This paper considers the placement of self-healing plies within an FRP to mitigate damage occurrence and restore mechanical strength. The flexural strength results indicate that the inclusion of hollow fibres results in an initial strength reduction of 16% from a baseline FRP laminate. However, the effect of impact damage on the performance of the baseline FRP laminate and the laminate containing the hollow fibre layers was comparable, with a flexural strength typically 72-74% of the undamaged state. Self-healing of the damage site saw the laminate recover 87% of the undamaged baseline FRP laminate's strength. This study provides clear evidence that an FRP laminate containing hollow fibre layers can successfully self-heal. This result suggests that biomimetic repair is now possible for advanced composite structures.

  1. Making Highly Pure Glass Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed quasi-containerless method for making glass rods or fibers minimizes contact between processing equipment and product. Method allows greater range of product sizes and shapes than achieved in experiments on containerless processing. Molten zone established in polycrystalline rod. Furnace sections separated, and glass rod solidifies between them. Clamp supports solid glass as it grows in length. Pulling clamp rapidly away from melt draws glass fiber. Fiber diameter controlled by adjustment of pulling rate.

  2. Spectroscopic properties of Eu3+, Dy3+ and Tb3+ ions in lead silicate glasses obtained by the conventional high-temperature melt-quenching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żur, L.; Janek, J.; Sołtys, M.; Pisarska, J.; Pisarski, W. A.

    2013-11-01

    The luminescence properties of selected rare-earth ions in lead silicate glasses have been studied. Europium, dysprosium and terbium ions were chosen as active dopants. Based on excitation and emission measurements as well as luminescence decay analysis, some spectroscopic parameters for these lanthanide ions were determined. In particular, the intensity ratios R/O (Eu3+), Y/B (Dy3+) and G/B (Tb3+) were calculated. Luminescence lifetimes for the 5D0 state of Eu3+ ions, the 4F9/2 state of Dy3+ ions and the 5D4 state of Tb3+ ions were also determined.

  3. Glass transition dynamics and conductivity scaling in ionic deep eutectic solvents: The case of (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Satya N.; Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik, Justyna; Shirota, Hideaki; Biswas, Ranjit; Paluch, Marian

    2015-05-01

    A detailed investigation on the molecular dynamics of ionic deep eutectic solvents (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) is reported. The study was carried out employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy covering seven decades in frequency (10-1-106 Hz) and in a wide temperature range from 373 K down to 173 K, accessing the dynamic observables both in liquid and glassy state. The dielectric response of the ionic system has been presented in the dynamic window of modulus formalism to understand the conductivity relaxation and its possible connection to the origin of localized motion. Two secondary relaxation processes appear below glass transition temperature. Our findings provide suitable interpretation on the nature of secondary Johari-Goldstein process describing the ion translation and orientation of dipoles in a combined approach using Ngai's coupling model. A nearly constant loss feature is witnessed at shorter times/lower temperatures. We also discuss the ac conductivity scaling behavior using Summerfield approach and random free energy barrier model which establish the time-temperature superposition principle. These experimental observations have fundamental importance on theoretical elucidation of the conductivity relaxation and glass transition phenomena in molten ionic conductors.

  4. Glass transition dynamics and conductivity scaling in ionic deep eutectic solvents: The case of (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) melts

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathy, Satya N. Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik, Justyna; Paluch, Marian; Shirota, Hideaki; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-05-14

    A detailed investigation on the molecular dynamics of ionic deep eutectic solvents (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) is reported. The study was carried out employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy covering seven decades in frequency (10{sup −1}-10{sup 6} Hz) and in a wide temperature range from 373 K down to 173 K, accessing the dynamic observables both in liquid and glassy state. The dielectric response of the ionic system has been presented in the dynamic window of modulus formalism to understand the conductivity relaxation and its possible connection to the origin of localized motion. Two secondary relaxation processes appear below glass transition temperature. Our findings provide suitable interpretation on the nature of secondary Johari-Goldstein process describing the ion translation and orientation of dipoles in a combined approach using Ngai’s coupling model. A nearly constant loss feature is witnessed at shorter times/lower temperatures. We also discuss the ac conductivity scaling behavior using Summerfield approach and random free energy barrier model which establish the time-temperature superposition principle. These experimental observations have fundamental importance on theoretical elucidation of the conductivity relaxation and glass transition phenomena in molten ionic conductors.

  5. Melt fracture revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J. M.

    2003-07-16

    In a previous paper the author and Demay advanced a model to explain the melt fracture instability observed when molten linear polymer melts are extruded in a capillary rheometer operating under the controlled condition that the inlet flow rate was held constant. The model postulated that the melts were a slightly compressible viscous fluid and allowed for slipping of the melt at the wall. The novel feature of that model was the use of an empirical switch law which governed the amount of wall slip. The model successfully accounted for the oscillatory behavior of the exit flow rate, typically referred to as the melt fracture instability, but did not simultaneously yield the fine scale spatial oscillations in the melt typically referred to as shark skin. In this note a new model is advanced which simultaneously explains the melt fracture instability and shark skin phenomena. The model postulates that the polymer is a slightly compressible linearly viscous fluid but assumes no slip boundary conditions at the capillary wall. In simple shear the shear stress {tau}and strain rate d are assumed to be related by d = F{tau} where F ranges between F{sub 2} and F{sub 1} > F{sub 2}. A strain rate dependent yield function is introduced and this function governs whether F evolves towards F{sub 2} or F{sub 1}. This model accounts for the empirical observation that at high shears polymers align and slide more easily than at low shears and explains both the melt fracture and shark skin phenomena.

  6. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  7. Glass formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of containerless glass-forming experiments conducted aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985, using a single-axis acoustic levitator furnace apparatus. An attempt was made to obtain quantitative evidence for the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization in containerless melts under microgravity conditions, as well as to study melt homogenization in the absence of gravity-driven convection and assess the feasibility of laser fusion target glass microsphere preparation with a microgravity apparatus of the present type. A ternary calcia-gallia-silica glass thus obtained indicated a 2-3-fold increase in glass-formation tendency for this material composition in microgravity, by comparison with 1g.

  8. Driving bubbles out of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Surface tension gradient in melt forces gas bubbles to surface, increasing glass strength and transparency. Conventional chemical and buoyant fining are extremely slow in viscous glasses, but tension gradient method moves 250 um bubbles as rapidly as 30 um/s. Heat required for high temperature part of melt is furnished by stationary electrical or natural-gas heater; induction and laser heating are also possible. Method has many applications in industry processes.

  9. S-Isotope Fractionation between Fluid and Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, A.; Holtz, F.; Shimizu, N.; Behrens, H.; Mandeville, C. W.; Simon, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Large amounts of sulfur (S) can be released from silicate melts during volcanic eruption. Degassing of magma can lead to S-isotope fractionation between fluid and melt. However, experimental data on fluid-melt S-isotope fractionation are scarce and no data exist for silicate melts at temperatures (T) > 1000°C. Recent advances in in situ S-isotope analyses using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) enable determinations of the isotopic composition in silicate glasses with low S content [1] and allow us to investigate experimentally fluid-melt S-isotope fractionation effects in magmatic systems. Isothermal decompression experiments were conducted in internally heated pressure vessels (IHPV). Volatile-bearing (~3 to ~8 wt% H2O, 140 to 2700 ppm S, 0 to 1000 ppm Cl) andesitic and basaltic glasses were synthesized at ~1040°C, ~500 MPa and log(fO2) = QFM to QFM+4 (QFM: quartz-magnetite-fayalite buffer). The decompression experiments were carried out at T = 1030 to 1200°C and similar fO2. Pressure (P) was released continuously from ~400 MPa to 150, 100 or 70 MPa with rates (r) ranging from 0.001 to 0.2 MPa/s. The samples were either rapidly quenched after decompression or annealed for various times (tA) at final conditions (1 to 72 h) before quenching. The volatile-bearing starting glasses and the partially degassed experimental glasses were analyzed by electron microprobe (e.g. Cl-, S-content), IR-spectroscopy (H2O content) and SIMS (δ34S). The gas-melt isotope fractionation factors (αg-m) were estimated following Holloway and Blank [2] and utilizing mass balance calculations. The results show that αg-m remains constant within error over the investigated range of r and tA, reflecting fluid-melt equilibrium fractionation of S isotopes for given T and fO2. Data obtained for oxidizing conditions (~QFM+4) are in agreement with observations in arc magmas [3] and close to what is predicted by previous theoretical and experimental data [4; 5; 6]; e.g. a α(SO2 gas - SO42

  10. A long-term record of magma compositions at the Juan de Fuca ridge from analysis of sediment hosted volcanic glass: tests of the effects of sea level on melt production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, D.; Li, Y.; Langmuir, C. H.; Costa, K.; McManus, J. F.; Huybers, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    It is hypothesized that the pressure changes caused by sea level variations during glacial cycles can influence long-term rates of magmatism in ocean basins. This proposed coupling between oceanic magmatism and climate has important implications for temporal trends in rates of mid-ocean ridge (MOR) volcanism, the structure of the oceanic crust and the composition of oceanic magmas, including the flux of volatile elements from the mantle. Testing the extent to which climate cycles may or may not modulate the compositions of oceanic magmas is difficult, as it requires compositional records that stretch over timescales comparable to those of glacial cycles (i.e. 10s of kyrs), which do not currently exist. In this study we use fragments of volcanic glass found in sediment cores to construct compositional time-series for lavas erupted at the Juan de Fuca ridge, NW Pacific. These provide continuous records of magmatism over several 10s kyrs, with a temporal resolution of a few kyrs. The longest record in our current dataset spans ~80 kyrs and records two significant step-wise changes in the average compositions of the erupted magmas, linked to both variations in the extent of crustal fractionation (i.e. MgO) and also the composition of primary mantle melts (i.e. K2O/TiO2). These changes occur rapidly and are decoupled in time, with the MgO shift happening around ~20 kyrs before the change in K2O/TiO2. Compositional variations such as these, and the temporal offset between them, are generally consistent with models of the effect of sea-level variation on magma chemistry, which can modulate the melt flux to the ridge and the extent of mantle melting. To place our results in a chronological and climatic context we will compare our data to oxygen-isotope records collected from the same sediment horizons and chemical analysis of the host sediments. Our study demonstrates the potential of this method for investigating the magmatic behaviour of ridges over long timescales.

  11. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  12. Advanced method for making vitreous waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, J.M.; Harrison, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for making waste glass that circumvents the problems of dissolving nuclear waste in molten glass at high temperatures. Because the reactive mixing process is independent of the inherent viscosity of the melt, any glass composition can be prepared with equal facility. Separation of the mixing and melting operations permits novel glass fabrication methods to be employed.

  13. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  14. Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry. Phase 2: Prototype design, development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Koppang, R.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes an advanced multichannel, on-line optical system for the non-contact measurement of forehearth glass melt temperatures at depth. The analyzer employs multiple narrow infrared (IR) band measurements of glass radiation to reconstruct the glass temperature profiles at depth. The TAS replaces expensive Tri-plex thermocouples, which frequently have service lives as short as 6 months to 1 years. By using passive non-contact sensor heads and fiber optic cables, temperature sensitive electronic components can be located at a safe distance from the hostile process environment. This provides significantly better reliability of the vulnerable electro-optic components and ready access for maintenance.

  15. Integrating Glass Technology into Secondary School Technology Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacker, Michael; Grey, Paul

    1985-01-01

    Processing of the three major groups of modern glasses is described. Low-melting-point glasses and the roles of their ingredients are discussed. Other processes (calcining, melting, fining the batch, annealing, testing for stress, colorants) are explained. Finally, a secondary-level pilot program for glass technology is suggested. (CT)

  16. Space processing of chalcogenide glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Schramm, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technique of space processing for chalcogenide glass, and to define the process and equipment necessary. In the course of this program, successful long term levitation of objects in a 1-g environment was achieved. Glass beads 4 mm diameter were containerless melted and fused together.

  17. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  18. Two-point bend studies of glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhongzhi

    The principal objective of this research is to advance our understanding of how glass breaks. Glass, a material well known for its brittleness, has been used widely but within a frustrating limit of its strength. Generally, strength is not considered as an intrinsic property of glass, due to the difficulty of avoiding the presence of flaws on the sample surface. The fiber drawing system and two-point bending (TPB) equipment developed at Missouri S&T allow the fabrication of pristine glass fibers and failure strain measurements while minimizing the effects of strength limiting critical flaws. Several conditions affect the failure behavior of glasses, including glass composition, thermal history of melts and environmental conditions during the failure tests. Understanding how these conditions affect failure helps us understand how glass fails. In this dissertation, failure strains for many different silicate and borate glasses were measured under a variety of experimental conditions. Failure stresses for various silicate glasses were calculated using values of the nonlinear elastic moduli reported in the literature. Inert intrinsic strengths for alkali silicate glasses were related to the structure and corresponding bond strengths, and the dependence of the inert strengths on faceplate velocity is discussed. Inert failure strains were also obtained for sodium borate glasses. Up to ˜40% failure strain was measured for vitreous B2O 3. The addition of soda to boron oxide increases the dimensionality and connectivity of the glass structure and hence increases its resistance to deformation, as was observed in elasticity and brittleness measurements reported in the literature. The increase in deformation resistance produces lower failure strains, a behavior also seen for alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glasses where the reduction of non-bridging oxygen increases the structure stiffness and leads to lower inert failure strain. Fatigue effects on silicate glasses were

  19. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Foaming Theory and Mitigation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.K.

    2001-07-24

    The objective of this research is to enhance the basic understanding of the role of glass chemistry, including the chemical kinetics of pre-melting, solid state reactions, batch melting, and the reaction pathways in glass and/or acid addition strategy changes on the overall melting process for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Macrobatch 3 (MB3).

  20. Melting and melt-movement in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robert S.

    Researchers came together to discuss melting and melt-movement in the Earth at a 2-day Royal Society Discussion Meeting held in March 1992 at the Royal Society, London.In recent years, many new tools have become available to geologists studying igneous and metamorphic rocks. They can be examined at ever-higher magnifications: the composition within individual crystals can be measured; their isotopic, trace, and rare-earth element concentrations can be determined; and measurements of partition coefficients and melting behavior can be made in the laboratory at pressures and temperatures appropriate to in-situ rocks. Along with these improvements in instrumentation and experimental techniques, advances have been made in understanding the physics of melt generation and separation, and computers have been developed that are sufficiently powerful to model theoretical formulations of the behavior of melt in the Earth.

  1. Advanced Ceramic Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-11

    materials, toughened alumina, fiber -reinforced glass matrix composites, and multilayer-gradient materials for ballistic testing. Fabrication and...material systems: Multilayer advanced armor materials consisting of a hard ceramic faceplate bonded to a graphite fiber -reinforced glass matrix...toughened alumina, and fiber - applied studies of advanced reinforced ceramic matrix glass and glass -ceramic composites for ballistic testing. technologies

  2. Surface Conductive Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the properties of surface-conducting glass and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on glass substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  3. Settling of Spinel in a High-Level Waste Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Schill, Pert; Nemec, Lubomir

    2002-01-18

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors called melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150?C (or even higher in advanced melters) to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling. This process is slow and expensive. Moreover, the melters that are currently in use or are going to be used in the U.S. are sensitive to clogging and thus cannot process melt in which solid particles are suspended. These particles settle and gradually accumulate on the melter bottom. Such particles, most often small crystals of spinel (a mineral containing iron, nickel, chromium, and other minor oxides), inevitably occur in the melt when the content of the waste in the glass (called waste loading) increases above a certain limit. To avoid the presence of solid particles in the melter, the waste loading is kept rather low, in average 15% lower than in glass formulated for more robust melters.

  4. Settling of Spinel in A High-Level Waste Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Hrma; Pert Schill; Lubomir Nemec

    2002-01-07

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors call melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150 degree C (or even higher in advanced melters) to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling. This process is slow and expensive. Moreover, the melters that are currently in use or are going to be used in the U.S. are sensitive to clogging and thus cannot process melt in which solid particles are suspended. These particles settle and gradually accumulate on the melter bottom. Such particles, most often small crystals of spinel ( a mineral containing iron, nickel, chromium, and other minor oxides), inevitably occurred in the melt when the content of the waste in the glass (called waste loading) increases above a certain limit. To avoid the presence of solid particles in the melter, the waste loading is kept rather low, in average 15% lower than in glass formulated for more robust melters.

  5. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of

  6. Glassy dynamics of nanoparticles in semiflexible ring polymer nanocomposite melts

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Jiang, Yangwei; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2017-01-01

    By employing molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the dynamics of NPs in semiflexible ring polymer nanocomposite melts. A novel glass transition is observed for NPs in semiflexible ring polymer melts as the bending energy (Kb) of ring polymers increases. For NPs in flexible ring polymer melts (Kb = 0), NPs move in the classic diffusive behavior. However, for NPs in semiflexible ring polymer melts with large bending energy, NPs diffuse very slowly and exhibit the glassy state in which the NPs are all irreversibly caged be the neighbouring semiflexible ring polymers. This glass transition occurs well above the classical glass transition temperature at which microscopic mobility is lost, and the topological interactions of semiflexible ring polymers play an important role in this non-classical glass transition. This investigation can help us understand the nature of the glass transition in polymer systems. PMID:28290546

  7. Glassy dynamics of nanoparticles in semiflexible ring polymer nanocomposite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Jiang, Yangwei; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2017-03-01

    By employing molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the dynamics of NPs in semiflexible ring polymer nanocomposite melts. A novel glass transition is observed for NPs in semiflexible ring polymer melts as the bending energy (Kb) of ring polymers increases. For NPs in flexible ring polymer melts (Kb = 0), NPs move in the classic diffusive behavior. However, for NPs in semiflexible ring polymer melts with large bending energy, NPs diffuse very slowly and exhibit the glassy state in which the NPs are all irreversibly caged be the neighbouring semiflexible ring polymers. This glass transition occurs well above the classical glass transition temperature at which microscopic mobility is lost, and the topological interactions of semiflexible ring polymers play an important role in this non-classical glass transition. This investigation can help us understand the nature of the glass transition in polymer systems.

  8. Epoxy/Glass Fiber Laminated Composites Integrated with Amino Functionalized ZrO2 for Advanced Structural Applications.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sudipta; Ahemad, Soyeb; Das, Subhankar; Wang, Jialai

    2016-01-27

    This work demonstrates the successful silanization of ZrO2 nanoparticles (ZN) and their incorporation in glass fiber/epoxy composites. Microscopic investigation under transmission electron microscope elucidates antiaggregation and size enhancement of silanized ZrO2 nanoparticles (SZNs). FTIR spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate the chemical nature of the SZNs prepared. EDX results reveal the presence of Si onto SZNs. Incorporation of SZNs shows a strong influence on tensile and flexural properties of hybrid multiscale glass fiber composite (SZGFRP) compared to that of the neat epoxy glass fiber composite (GFRP). A significant variation of tensile strength, stiffness, and toughness of ∼27%, 62%, and 110% is observed with respect to GFRP. Strength and modulus under bending are also enhanced to ∼22% and ∼38%, respectively. Failure mechanisms obtained from macroscopic and microscopic investigation demonstrate reduced interfacial delamination for SZGFRP. Additionally, increased roughness of the fiber surface in SZGFRP laminates produces better interfacial bonding arising from SZN incorporation in laminates. This symptomatic behavior exposes the espousal of organically modified ZrO2 to enhance the interfacial bonding for their use in next generation hybrid laminates.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of Ionomer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    Viscoelastic prperties of a model telechelic ionomer, i.e., a melt of non-polar polymers with a charge at each chain end along with neutralizing counterions, have been examined using molecular dynamics simulation. Equlibrium calculation of the loss modulus G^''(φ) and storage modulus G^'(φ) shows plateau at lower temperatures when the systems are not relaxed. In this situation the specific heat (Cv) peak corresponds to the self-assembly of the system, at lower temperatures the specific heat begins to plateau. Similarities of the dynamic features found for telechelic melts with those observed in glass-forming liquids and entangled polymers have been shown. Furthremore, using an athermal 'probe', the properties of these materials is being distinctly classified as 'strong' glass or physical gels.

  10. Control of radioactive waste-glass melters

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D.F. ); Hrma, P. ); Bowan, B.W. II )

    1990-01-01

    Slurries of simulated high level radioactive waste and glass formers have been isothermally reacted and analyzed to identify the sequence of the major chemical reactions in waste vitrification, their effect on glass production rate, and the development of leach resistance. Melting rates of waste batches have been increased by the addition of reducing agents (formic acid, sucrose) and nitrates. The rate increases are attributable in part to exothermic reactions which occur at critical stages in the vitrification process. Nitrates must be balanced by adequate reducing agents to avoid the formation of persistent foam, which would destabilize the melting process. The effect of foaming on waste glass production rates is analyzed, and melt rate limitations defined for waste-glass melters, based upon measurable thermophysical properties. Minimum melter residence times required to homogenize glass and assure glass quality are much smaller than those used in current practice. Thus, melter size can be reduced without adversely affecting glass quality. Physical chemistry and localized heat transfer of the waste-glass melting process are examined, to refine the available models for predicting and assuring glass production rate. It is concluded that the size of replacement melters and future waste processing facilities can be significantly decreased if minimum heat transfer requirements for effective melting are met by mechanical agitation. A new class of waste glass melters has been designed, and proof of concept tests completed on simulated High Level Radioactive Waste slurry. Melt rates have exceeded 155 kg m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} with slurry feeds (32 lb ft{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}), and 229 kg kg m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} with dry feed (47 lb ft{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}). This is about 8 times the melt rate possible in conventional waste- glass melters of the same size. 39 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Advanced waste form and melter development for treatment of troublesome high-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, James; Kim, Dong -Sang; Maio, Vincent

    2015-09-02

    A number of waste components in US defense high level radioactive wastes (HLW) have proven challenging for current Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) operations and have limited the ability to increase waste loadings beyond already realized levels. Many of these "troublesome" waste species cause crystallization in the glass melt that can negatively impact product quality or have a deleterious effect on melter processing. Recent efforts at US Department of Energy laboratories have focused on understanding crystallization behavior within HLW glass melts and investigating approached to mitigate the impacts of crystallization so that increases in waste loading can be realized. Advanced glass formulations have been developed to highlight the unique benefits of next-generation melter technologies such as the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Crystal-tolerant HLW glasses have been investigated to allow sparingly soluble components such as chromium to crystallize in the melter but pass out of the melter before accumulating.

  12. Proceedings of a workshop on Lunar Volcanic Glasses: Scientific and Resource Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, John W. (Editor); Heiken, Grant H. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This workshop on lunar mare volcanism was the first since 1975 to deal with the major scientific advances that have occurred in this general subject, and the first ever to deal specifically with volcanic glasses. Lunar volcanic glasses are increasingly being recognized as the best geochemical and petrologic probes into the lunar mantle. Lunar volcanic glasses, of which 25 compositional varieties are presently known, appear to represent primary magmas that were produced by partial melting of differentiated mantle source regions at depths of perhaps 400 to 500 km. These high-magnesian picritic magmas were erupted onto the lunar surface in fire fountains associated with the release of indigenous lunar volatiles. The cosmic significance of this volatile component, in an otherwise depleted Moon, remains a lingering puzzle. The resource potential, if any, of the surface-correlated volatile sublimates on the volcanic glass spherules had not been systematically addressed prior to this workshop.

  13. The electronic structure of iron in rhyolitic glass at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Roskosz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The physical properties of silicate melts within the Earth's mantle affect the chemical and thermal evolution of the Earth's interior. The behavior of iron in mantle melts is poorly understood, but can be experimentally approximated by iron-bearing silicate glasses. Previous studies have conflicting conclusions on whether iron in lower mantle silicate melts goes through a high-spin to low-spin transition [1-3]. Additionally, the average coordination environment of iron in glasses is poorly constrained. XANES experiments on MORB glasses have demonstrated that both four and six-fold coordinated iron may exist in significant amounts regardless of oxidation state [4] while conventional Mossbauer experiments have observed five-fold coordinated Fe2+ with small amounts of four and six-fold coordinated Fe2+[5]. In an attempt to resolve these discrepancies, we have measured the hyperfine parameters of iron-bearing rhyolitic glass up to ~115 GPa in a neon pressure medium using time-resolved synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory, IL). Our spectra are well explained with a three-doublet model: two high-spin Fe2+-like sites with distinct quadrupole splittings and similar isomer shifts and one high-spin Fe3+-like site. Our results indicate that iron experiences changes in coordination with increasing pressure without undergoing a high-spin to low-spin transition. With the assumption that silicate glasses can be used to model structural behavior in silicate melts, our study predicts that iron in chemically-complex silica-rich melts in the lower mantle likely exists in a high-spin state. References: [1] Nomura, R. et al., Nature 473 (2011). [2] Gu, C. et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 (2012). [3] Mao, Z. et al., Am. Mineral. 99 (2014). [4] Wilke, M. et al., Chem. Geology 220 (2005). [5] Cottrell, E. and Kelley, A.K., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 305 (2011).

  14. Advances in the use of glass-ionomeric cement. Part 1: Experimental results and portrayal of a technique.

    PubMed

    Weber, B P; Philipps, B; Strauchmann, B; Lenarz, T

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method of cement microapplication using glass-ionomeric cement. The results of an experimental study to design a microapplication method of glass-ionomeric cement (Ionocem) are presented. Typical middle ear implant materials, as well as human temporal bones and middle ear ossicles, were used to test the efficiency of this application method. Two different versions of Ionocem, low and normal viscosity, were tested under different temperatures and with several application tools. Sufficient processing time could be achieved by cooling the cement down to 4 degrees C. A subcutaneous insulin syringe with a milled-off tip proved to be cost-effective, efficient and versatile. Using this instrument, durable and secure cementation between the parts tested could be achieved. This method may be of significant importance in otologic research and microsurgical routine. In part 2, experimental animal results will follow, as the method portrayed was used to secure parts of a totally implantable middle ear hearing device.

  15. DWPF Macrobatch 2 Melt Rate Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-01-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister production rate must be increased to meet canister production goals. Although a number of factors exist that could potentially increase melt rate, this study focused on two: (1) changes in frit composition and (2) changes to the feed preparation process to alter the redox of the melter feed. These two factors were investigated for Macrobatch 2 (sludge batch 1B) utilizing crucible studies and a specially designed ''melt rate'' furnace. Other potential factors that could increase melt rate include: mechanical mixing via stirring or the use of bubblers, changing the power skewing to redistribute the power input to the melter, and elimination of heat loss (e.g. air in leakage). The melt rate testing in FY00 demonstrated that melt rate can be improved by adding a different frit or producing a much more reducing glass by the addition of sugar as a reductant. The frit that melted the fastest in the melt rate testing was Frit 165. A paper stud y was performed using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to determine the impact on predicted glass viscosity, liquidus, durability, and operating window if the frit was changed from Frit 200 to Frit 165. PCCS indicated that the window was very similar for both frits. In addition, the predicted viscosity of the frit 165 glass was 46 poise versus 84 poise for the Frit 200 glass. As a result, a change from Frit 200 to Frit 165 is expected to increase the melt rate in DWPF without decreasing waste loading.

  16. Constant permeability of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting

    SciTech Connect

    Bitoh, T.; Shibata, D.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting on the soft magnetic properties of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by casting has been investigated. Ring-shaped bulk specimens that were prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting (fluxed specimens) show a flat hysteresis curve, indicating a good linear relationship between the magnetic induction and the applied magnetic field. Although the permeability of the fluxed specimens is lower than that of the specimens prepared by conventional Cu-mold casting by one order of magnitude, their coercivities are almost same. These results show that it is possible to develop a new soft magnetic material that exhibits constant permeability with low core loss.

  17. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonterman, J. Ronald; Weinstein, Michael A.

    2006-10-27

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the energy efficiency and reduced emissions that can be obtained with a dual torch DC plasma transferred arc-melting system. Plasmelt Glass Technologies, LLC was formed to solicit and execute the project, which utilize a full-scale test melter system. The system is similar to the one that was originally constructed by Johns Manville, but Plasmelt has added significant improvements to the torch design and melter system that has extended the original JM short torch lives. The original JM design has been shown to achieve melt rates 5 to 10 times faster than conventional gas or electric melting, with improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. This project began on 7/28/2003 and ended 7/27/06. A laboratory scale melter was designed, constructed, and operated to conduct multiple experimental melting trials on various glass compositions. Glass quality was assessed. Although the melter design is generic and equally applicable to all sectors within the glass industry, the development of this melter has focused primarily on fiberglass with additional exploratory melting trials of frits, specialty, and minerals-melting applications. Throughput, energy efficiency, and glass quality have been shown to be heavily dependent on the selected glass composition. During this project, Plasmelt completed the proof-of-concept work in our Boulder, CO Lab to show the technical feasibility of this transferred-arc plasma melter. Late in the project, the work was focused on developing the processes and evaluating the economic viability of plasma melting aimed at the specific glasses of interest to specific client companies. Post project work is on going with client companies to address broader non-glass materials such as refractories and industrial minerals. Exploratory melting trials have been conducted on several glasses of commercial interest including: C-glass, E-glass, S-Glass, AR-Glass, B-glass, Lighting Glass, NE-Glass, and various

  18. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    1993-01-01

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

  19. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, T.D.

    1993-12-14

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

  20. Advances since the paper by Zander and Glass (1949) on the pursuit of healing methods for pulpal exposures: historical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bergenholtz, Gunnar

    2005-08-01

    Clinical observations and experimental studies in humans and laboratory animals have demonstrated that healing and repair of pulpal exposures by caries, trauma, or iatrogenic causes are possible with a variety of wound treatment methods. Yet clinical trials have shown that predictable long-term pulp tissue preservation may be an elusive goal and has led to doubts about pulp capping and pulpotomy as valid clinical procedures. Nevertheless substantial knowledge has accumulated over the years on the mechanisms and the treatment factors that are important to promote/support continued vital pulp functions. This article highlights some key contributions to our current knowledge base, which have come to light during the more than 50 years since a pioneering experimental study by Zander and Glass was published in the Triple O journal.

  1. Melt Structure and Properties: Progress and Prognoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Recent advances in quantitative determinations of silicate glass structure are beginning to place important constraints on models of the physical and chemical properties of melts, but much remains to be done before such models can become entirely based on structure. For example, models of free energy and major component activities generally assume (lacking better constraints) that network species (e.g. Al, Si, "Qn" groups) and network modifiers (e.g. Na, Ca, K, Mg) each mix randomly. However, recent spectroscopic studies demonstrate strong ordering in the network (significant if incomplete Al avoidance; preference of Al for "Q4" groups, etc.) and between modifier cations differing greatly in field strength (e.g. K+, Mg2+). Solution models thus may need substantial revision, unless new studies of temperature effects on such ordering indicate approach to randomness at magmatic temperatures. Such studies are ongoing, facilitated by recent developments in hyper-quenching technology. On the other hand, discovery of such low-T ordering provides a likely (and long-suspected) mechanism for at least some of the configurational entropy in multicomponent melts, which in turn is a critical part of models of viscosity: at least in systems with high Al/Si ratios, for example, increase in Al/Si disorder with increasing T will a major part of this term. In many systems, however, the structural origins of Sconf remain mysterious. For both major and minor components, considerable information now exists to constrain models both of activity and of transport processes, but progress awaits development of useful model forms. Examples include new information on the local coordination of anions such as fluoride and chloride, which again show strong chemical ordering. Similarly, we now know a great deal about the concentration of minor "defect" species, that have been considered to be important to viscosity and diffusion (e.g. AlO5, SiO5, "excess" NBO). However, going from speculative

  2. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: WASTE VITRIFICATION THROUGH ELECTRIC MELTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of vitrification technology is to convert contaminated soils, sludges, and sediments into an oxide glass, rendering them suitable for landfilling as a nonhazardous material. The technology uses joule heating to melt the waste matrix, destroying organic compounds in ...

  3. Fiber glass pulling. [in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the viability of performing containerless glass fiber pulling in space. The optical transmission properties and glass-forming capabilities of the heavy metal fluorides are reviewed and the acoustic characteristics required for a molten glass levitation system are examined. The design limitations of, and necessary modifications to the acoustic levitation furnace used in the experiments are discussed in detail. Acoustic levitator force measurements were performed and a thermal map of the furnace was generated from thermocouple data. It was determined that the thermal capability of the furnace was inadequate to melt a glass sample in the center. The substitution of a 10 KW carbon monoxide laser for the original furnace heating elements resulted in improved melt heating.

  4. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1986-01-01

    Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan.

  5. Characteristics of laser surface melted aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Weinman, L S; Kim, C; Tucker, T R; Metzbower, E A

    1978-03-15

    Specimens of Al-Fe 1-4 w/o, 2024 and 6061 Al have been surface melted with a pulsed Nd-glass laser. A TEM and SEM study showed that the dendrite spacings were from 2500 A to 4000 A which corresponds to a cooling rate of over 10(6) degrees C/sec. Melt depths obtained were in the range of 30-100 microm. No significant surface vaporization was observed at energy densities up to 440 J/cm(2). Fracture surfaces of the commerical alloys demonstrated elongated porosity in the melt areas, probably due to internal hydrogen.

  6. Picritic glasses from Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Weber, W.S.; Dixon, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    ESTIMATES of the MgO content of primary Hawaiian tholeiitic melts range from 8wt% to as high as 25wt% (refs 1, 2). In general, these estimates are derived from analysis of the whole-rock composition of lavas, coupled with the compositions of the most magnesian olivine phenocrysts observed. But the best estimate of magma composition comes from volcanic glass, as it represents the liquid composition at the time of quenching; minimal changes occur during the quenching process. Here we report the discovery of tholeiitic basalt glasses, recovered offshore of Kilauea volcano, that contain up to 15.0 wt% MgO. To our knowledge, these are the most magnesian glasses, and have the highest eruption temperatures (??? 1,316 ??C), yet found. The existence of these picritic (high-MgO) liquids provides constraints on the temperature structure of the upper mantle, magma transport and the material and thermal budgets of the Hawaiian volcanoes. Furthermore, picritic melts are affected little by magma-reservoir processes, and it is therefore relatively straightforward to extrapolate back to the composition of the primary melt and its volatile contents.

  7. Composition of Crustal Melts at the Source Area: Information from Glassy Melt Inclusions in Anatectic Enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-vigil, A.; Cesare, B.; London, D.; Morgan, G. B., VI; Buick, I.; Hermann, J.; Bartoli, O.; Remusat, L.

    2014-12-01

    Crustal anatexis, together with melt extraction and ascent to upper crustal levels, generate plutons and volcanic edifices of granitoid composition. This process constitutes the main mechanism for the differentiation of the continental crust. A recent breakthrough in the study of crustal anatexis is the discovery of former melt inclusions in peritectic minerals of anatectic rocks. These melt droplets show now as glassy inclusions in rapidly cooled anatectic enclaves within volcanic rocks, or as polycrystalline aggregates (nanogranites) in migmatites. Analysis of glassy inclusions and of rehomogenized nanogranites provide direct information on the composition of crustal melts at the source of crustal magmas, on the extent of equilibration between melt and residue, and on the fluid regime during anatexis. A comprehensive geochemical study (≈350 EMP, 100 LA-ICPMS and 80 nanoSIMS analyses) of matrix glasses and glassy melt inclusions in Pl and Grt of anatectic enclaves within El Hoyazo dacite (Betic Cordillera, S Spain), recording melt compositions during regional anatexis at ≈700-850 °C and 0.5-0.7 GPa, shows that melts are leucogranitic (FeOt+MgO+TiO2=1.0-2.0 wt%), moderately to strongly peraluminous (ASI=1.10-1.25), with H2O concentrations well below saturation (3-5 wt%). They are heterogeneous and spread around the 0.5-0.7 GPa haplogranite H2O-undersaturated eutectics. Glassy inclusions in Pl are more heterogeneous, richer in normative Qtz and H2O, and poorer in FeOt and CaO compared to glassy inclusions in Grt and matrix glass. All glasses have moderate to high concentrations of LILE and low to very low concentrations in FRTE, HFSE and REE. Glass inclusions in Pl and Grt have higher concentrations of LILE, lower concentrations of Y, Zr, REE, and lower values of Th/U compared to matrix glasses. Surprisingly, and in spite of the compositional heterogeneity, glasses are at or close to equilibrium with their residue regarding most of the trace elements, except

  8. Process for Making Optical Fibers from Core and Cladding Glass Rods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-12

    77,577 PATENT APPLICATION Inventor’s Name: Sanghera et al. ORIGINAL 2 3 PROCESS FOR MAKING OPTICAL FIBERS FROM CORE AND CLADDING GLASS 4 RODS S...core and cladding glass rods and to the fibers 10 made by the process. More particularly, the invention relates to 11 separately melting core and...cladding glass rods and combining the 12 melts proximate a fiber drawing orifice so that the core glass is 13 surrounded by the cladding glass and

  9. Sol-gel optical thin films for an advanced megajoule-class Nd:glass laser ICF-driver

    SciTech Connect

    Floch, H.G.; Belleville, P.F.; Pegon, P.M.; Dijonneau, C.S.; Guerain, J.

    1995-12-31

    It is well established by manufacturers and users that optical coatings are generally prepared by the well known Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) technology. In the authors` opinion sol-gel technology is an effective and competitive alternative. The aim of this paper is to emphasize on the sol-gel thin film work carried out at Centre d`Etudes de Limeil-Valenton (CEL-V) and concerning the technology for high power lasers. The authors will briefly discuss the chemistry of the sol-gel process, the production of optical coatings and the related deposition techniques. Finally, the paper describes the preparation and performance of sol-gel optical coatings they have developed to fulfill the requirements of a future 2 MJ/500 TW (351 nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser so-called LMJ (Laser MegaJoules). This powerful laser is to be used for their national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, to demonstrate at the laboratory scale, ignition of deuterium-tritium fusion fuel. Moreover, the aim of this article is, hopefully, to provide a convincing argument that coatings and particularly optical coatings, are some of the useful products available from sol-gel technology, and that exciting developments in other areas are almost certain to emerge within the coming decade.

  10. Sol-gel optical thin films for an advanced megajoule-class Nd:glass laser ICF driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floch, Herve G.; Belleville, Philippe F.; Pegon, Philippe M.; Dijonneau, Corinne S.; Guerain, Jacques R.

    1995-12-01

    It is well established by manufacturers and users that optical coatings are generally prepared by the well known physical vapor deposition (PVD) technology. In the authors' opinion sol-gel technology is an effective and competitive alternative. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the sol-gel thin film work carried out at Centre d'Etudes de Limeil-Valenton (CEL-V) and concerning the technology for high power lasers. We briefly discuss the chemistry of the sol- gel process, the production of optical coatings, and the related deposition techniques. Finally, the paper describes the preparation and performance of sol-gel optical coatings we have developed to fulfill the requirements of a future 2 MJ/500 TW (351 nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser so-called LMJ (Laser MegaJoules). This powerful laser is to be used for our national inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, to demonstrate at the laboratory scale, ignition of deuterium-tritium fusion fuel. Moreover, the aim of this article is, hopefully, to provide a convincing argument that coatings and particularly optical coatings, are some of the useful products available from sol-gel technology , and that exciting developments in other areas are almost certain to emerge within the coming decade.

  11. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  12. Study of the production of unique new glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happe, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A number of high new oxide glasses have been prepared by a laser-spin melting technique where droplets are ejected from a molten mass. Techniques have been developed for measuring the optical properties of most of the new glasses so produced. A preliminary study of processing equipment for producing new glasses in a zero gravity environment onboard manned space laboratory is reported. Induction and laser melting emerge as preferred techniques for melting spheroids of new glass compositions in space. Sample calculations for power required to induction melt new glass compositions are presented. Cooling rate calculations show that radiation cooling of the high melting materials results in very short cooling times for 1/2 inch diameters to temperatures where the spheroids can be handled.

  13. Display innovations through glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Lori L.

    2016-03-01

    Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in glass design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for glass manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.

  14. Glass sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S.

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  15. High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jitang

    2017-03-01

    High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses from a cylinder into an intact sheet achieved by impact loading is investigated. Such a large deformation is caused by plastic flow, accompanied with geometrical confinement, shear banding/slipping, thermo softening, melting and joining. Temperature rise during the high-rate squeezing process makes a main effect. The inherent mechanisms are illustrated. Like high-pressure torsion (HPT), equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and surface mechanical attrition treatments (SMAT) for refining grain of metals, High-Rate Squeezing (HRS), as a multiple-functions technique, not only creates a new road of processing metallic glasses and other metallic alloys for developing advanced materials, but also directs a novel technology of processing, grain refining, coating, welding and so on for treating materials.

  16. High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jitang

    2017-01-01

    High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses from a cylinder into an intact sheet achieved by impact loading is investigated. Such a large deformation is caused by plastic flow, accompanied with geometrical confinement, shear banding/slipping, thermo softening, melting and joining. Temperature rise during the high-rate squeezing process makes a main effect. The inherent mechanisms are illustrated. Like high-pressure torsion (HPT), equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and surface mechanical attrition treatments (SMAT) for refining grain of metals, High-Rate Squeezing (HRS), as a multiple-functions technique, not only creates a new road of processing metallic glasses and other metallic alloys for developing advanced materials, but also directs a novel technology of processing, grain refining, coating, welding and so on for treating materials. PMID:28338092

  17. Towards increased waste loading in high level waste glasses: Developing a better understanding of crystallization behavior

    DOE PAGES

    Marra, James C.; Kim, Dong -Sang

    2014-12-18

    A number of waste components in US defense high level radioactive wastes (HLW) have proven challenging for current Joule heated ceramic melter (JCHM) operations and have limited the ability to increase waste loadings beyond already realized levels. Many of these ''troublesome'' waste species cause crystallization in the glass melt that can negatively impact product quality or have a deleterious effect on melter processing. Thus, recent efforts at US Department of Energy laboratories have focused on understanding crystallization behavior within HLW glass melts and investigating approaches to mitigate the impacts of crystallization so that increases in waste loading can be realized.more » Advanced glass formulations have been developed to highlight the unique benefits of next-generation melter technologies such as the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Crystal-tolerant HLW glasses have been investigated to allow sparingly soluble components such as chromium to crystallize in the melter but pass out of the melter before accumulating. The Hanford site AZ-101 tank waste composition represents a waste group that is waste loading limited primarily due to high concentrations of Fe2O3 (with higher Al2O3). Systematic glass formulation development utilizing slightly higher process temperatures and higher tolerance to spinel crystals demonstrated that an increase in waste loading of more than 20% could be achieved for this waste composition, and by extension higher loadings for wastes in the same group.« less

  18. Towards increased waste loading in high level waste glasses: Developing a better understanding of crystallization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, James C.; Kim, Dong -Sang

    2014-12-18

    A number of waste components in US defense high level radioactive wastes (HLW) have proven challenging for current Joule heated ceramic melter (JCHM) operations and have limited the ability to increase waste loadings beyond already realized levels. Many of these ''troublesome'' waste species cause crystallization in the glass melt that can negatively impact product quality or have a deleterious effect on melter processing. Thus, recent efforts at US Department of Energy laboratories have focused on understanding crystallization behavior within HLW glass melts and investigating approaches to mitigate the impacts of crystallization so that increases in waste loading can be realized. Advanced glass formulations have been developed to highlight the unique benefits of next-generation melter technologies such as the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Crystal-tolerant HLW glasses have been investigated to allow sparingly soluble components such as chromium to crystallize in the melter but pass out of the melter before accumulating. The Hanford site AZ-101 tank waste composition represents a waste group that is waste loading limited primarily due to high concentrations of Fe2O3 (with higher Al2O3). Systematic glass formulation development utilizing slightly higher process temperatures and higher tolerance to spinel crystals demonstrated that an increase in waste loading of more than 20% could be achieved for this waste composition, and by extension higher loadings for wastes in the same group.

  19. Development of iodine waste forms using low-temperature sintering glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Rademacher, David

    2010-06-01

    This presentation will describe our recent work on the use of low temperature-sintering glass powders mixed with either AgI or AgI-zeolite to produce a stable waste form. Radioactive iodine ({sup 129}I, half-life of 1.6 x 10{sup 7} years) is generated in the nuclear fuel cycle and is of particular concern due to its extremely long half-life and its effects on human health. As part of the DOE/NE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the separation of {sup 129}I from spent fuel during fuel reprocessing is being studied. In the spent fuel reprocessing scheme under consideration, the iodine is released in gaseous form and collected using Ag-loaded zeolites, to form AgI. Although AgI has extremely low solubility in water, it has a relatively high vapor pressure at moderate temperatures (>550 C), thus limiting the thermal processing. Because of this, immobilization using borosilicate glass is not feasible. Therefore, a bismuth oxide-based glasses are being studied due to the low solubility of bismuth oxide in aqueous solution at pH > 7. These waste forms were processed at 500 C, where AgI volatility is low but the glass powder is able to first densify by viscous sintering and then crystallize. Since the glass is not melted, a more chemically stable glass can be used. The AgI-glass mixture was found to have high iodine leach resistance in these initial studies.

  20. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Yttrium Aluminum Borate Glasses and Glass-ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J.; Brooks, M.; Crenshaw, T.; Morris, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Morgan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Raman spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics in the Y2O3-Al2O3-B2O3 system are reported. Glasses with B2O3 contents ranging from 40 to 60 mole percent were prepared by melting 20 g of the appropriate oxide or carbonate powders in alumina crucibles at 1400 C for 45 minutes. Subsequent heat treatments of the glasses at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C were performed in order to induce nucleation and crystallization. It was found that Na2CO3 added to the melt served as a nucleating agent and resulted in uniform bulk crystallization. The Raman spectra of the glasses are interpreted primarily in terms of vibrations of boron - oxygen structural groups. Comparison of the Raman spectra of the glass-ceramic samples with spectra of aluminate and borate crystalline materials reveal that these glasses crystallize primarily as yttrium aluminum borate, YAl3(BO3)4.

  1. Beyond the Melting Pot and Salad Bowl Views of Cultural Diversity: Advancing Cultural Diversity Education of Nutrition Educators.

    PubMed

    Setiloane, Kelebogile Tsametse

    2016-10-01

    This article outlines how the melting pot and salad bowl views of cultural diversity have influenced the cultural training of nutrition educators and other health professionals. It explores how these views are changing in reaction to the changing demographics and health disparities seen in the US today and how the cultural training of nutrition educators has not kept up with these changing views. Suggestions for how this cultural education could be modified include placing a greater emphasis on both the cultural self-awareness of nutrition educators and the sociopolitical historical factors that influence the cultural orientation of nutrition educators and their clients.

  2. Method for forming glass-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1985-08-26

    Disclosed is a method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

  3. Method for forming glass-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Daniel P.; Massey, Richard T.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

  4. Analysis of leading edge and trailing edge cover glass samples before and after treatment with advanced satellite contamination removal techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotaling, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    Two samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment M0003-4 were analyzed for molecular and particulate contamination prior to and following treatment with advanced satellite contamination removal techniques (CO2 gas/solid jet spray and oxygen ion beam). The pre- and post-cleaning measurements and analyses are presented. The jet spray removed particulates in seconds. The low energy reactive oxygen ion beam removed 5,000 A of photo polymerized organic hydrocarbon contamination in less than 1 hour. Spectroscopic analytical techniques were applied to the analysis of cleaning efficiency including: Fourier transform infrared, Auger, x ray photoemissions, energy dispersive x ray, and ultraviolet/visible. The results of this work suggest that the contamination studied here was due to spacecraft self-contamination enhanced by atomic oxygen plasma dynamics and solar UV radiation. These results also suggest the efficacy for the jet spray and ion beam contamination control technologies for spacecraft optical surfaces.

  5. Porosity in metal-organic framework glasses.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A W; Jelfs, K E; Konstas, K; Doherty, C M; Hill, A J; Cheetham, A K; Bennett, T D

    2016-03-07

    The porosity of a glass formed by melt-quenching a metal-organic framework, has been characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The results reveal porosity intermediate between the related open and dense crystalline frameworks ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni. A structural model for the glass was constructed using an amorphous polymerization algorithm, providing additional insight into the gas-inaccessible nature of porosity and the possible applications of hybrid glasses.

  6. Transcrystalline melt migration in clinopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, Yann; Provost, Ariel; Schiano, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Glass inclusions in clinopyroxene phenocrysts from La Sommata (Vulcano Island, Aeolian Arc) were reheated and submitted to a sustained thermal gradient. Each remelted inclusion undergoes a transient textural and chemical reequilibration and concomitantly begins to migrate along a crystallographic direction, at a small angle with the thermal gradient. The completion of morphological evolution requires a characteristic time that is governed by chemical diffusion. Chemical reequilibration results in the formation of a colored halo that delineates the former location and shape of the inclusion after it has migrated away. Transcrystalline migration proceeds by dissolution of the host clinopyroxene ahead and precipitation astern. Its rate is not limited by Fick's law, but by the crystal-melt interface kinetics. Clinopyroxene dissolution and growth are slower than for olivine in similar conditions but obey the same analytical law, which can be transposed to equally or more sluggish melting or crystallization events in nature. When a gas bubble is initially present, it responds to elastic forces by quickly shifting toward the cold end of the inclusion, where it soon becomes engulfed as an isolated fluid inclusion in the reprecipitated crystal. This study confirms that transcrystalline melt migration, beside its possible implications for small-scale melt segregation and fluid-inclusion generation in the Earth's mantle, provides an experimental access to interfacial kinetic laws in near-equilibrium conditions.

  7. Development of a laser glass for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Joseph S.; Campbell, John H.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2007-04-01

    We review the development of a new glass formulation and manufacturing technology for a neodymium-doped phosphate based laser glass used in the LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the French Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). The glass development process built on both accumulated experience and the utilization of glass science principles, and the resultant new glass offers superior laser properties in combination with improvements in physical properties to enhance manufacturing yield. Essentially in parallel, a continuous melting production line was also conceived, designed and operated to meet both the schedule and cost targets of the NIF. Prior to 1997, phosphate laser glasses were manufactured by a discontinuous pot-melting process with limited production rate and associated high costs. The continuous melting process met several technical challenges, including producing glass with low residual water content and absence of inclusions which become damage sites when used in the NIF laser system.

  8. Martian regolith in Elephant Moraine 79001 shock melts? Evidence from major element composition and sulfur speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, E. L.; Jugo, P. J.; Herd, C. D. K.; Wilke, M.

    2010-08-01

    Shock veins and melt pockets in Lithology A of Martian meteorite Elephant Moraine (EETA) 79001 have been investigated using electron microprobe (EM) analysis, petrography and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy to determine elemental abundances and sulfur speciation (S 2- versus S 6+). The results constrain the materials that melted to form the shock glasses and identify the source of their high sulfur abundances. The XANES spectra for EETA79001 glasses show a sharp peak at 2.471 keV characteristic of crystalline sulfides and a broad peak centered at 2.477 keV similar to that obtained for sulfide-saturated glass standards analyzed in this study. Sulfate peaks at 2.482 keV were not observed. Bulk compositions of EETA79001 shock melts were estimated by averaging defocused EM analyses. Vein and melt pocket glasses are enriched in Al, Ca, Na and S, and depleted in Fe, Mg and Cr compared to the whole rock. Petrographic observations show preferential melting and mobilization of plagioclase and pyrrhotite associated with melt pocket and vein margins, contributing to the enrichments. Estimates of shock melt bulk compositions obtained from glass analyses are biased towards Fe- and Mg- depletions because, in general, basaltic melts produced from groundmass minerals (plagioclase and clinopyroxene) will quench to a glass, whereas ultramafic melts produced from olivine and low-Ca pyroxene megacrysts crystallize during the quench. We also note that the bulk composition of the shock melt pocket cannot be determined from the average composition of the glass but must also include the crystals that grew from the melt - pyroxene (En 72-75Fs 20-21Wo 5-7) and olivine (Fo 75-80). Reconstruction of glass + crystal analyses gives a bulk composition for the melt pocket that approaches that of lithology A of the meteorite, reflecting bulk melting of everything except xenolith chromite. Our results show that EETA79001 shock veins and melt pockets represent local mineral

  9. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  10. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  11. Characteristics of glass ionomer cements composed of glass powders in CaO-SrO-ZnO-SiO₂ system prepared by two different synthetic routes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Coughlan, Aisling; Placek, Lana; Wren, Anthony W; Towler, Mark R

    2013-12-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are composed of an acid degradable glass, polyacrylic acid and water. Sol-gel processing to prepare the glass phase has certain advantages, such as the ability to employ lower synthesis temperatures than melt quenching and glasses that are reported to have higher purity. A previous study reported the effects of glass synthesis route on GIC fabrication. However, in that study, the sol-gel derived glass exhibited a reduced concentration of cations. This study investigates increasing the cation content of a sol-gel derived glass, 12CaO.4SrO.36ZnO.48SiO2 (molar ratio) by heating before aging to reduce dissolution of cations. This glass was prepared by both sol-gel and melt-quenched routes. GICs were subsequently prepared using both glasses. The resultant cement based on the sol-gel derived glass had a shorter working time than the cement based on the melt-quenched one. Contrary to this, setting time was considerably longer for the cement based on the sol-gel derived glass than for the cement based on the melt-quenched one. The cements based on the sol-gel derived glass were stronger in both compression and biaxial flexure than the cements prepared from the melt-quenched glass. The differences in setting and mechanical properties were associated with both cation content in the glass phase and the different surface area of the resultant cements.

  12. Disequilibrium melt distributions during static recrystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walte, N. P.; Bons, P. D.; Passchier, C. W.; Koehn, D.; Arnold, J.

    2003-04-01

    DISEQUILIBRIUM MELT DISTRIBUTIONS DURING STATIC RECRYSTALLISATION N.P. Walte (1), P.D. Bons (2), C.W. Passchier (1), D. Koehn (1), J. Arnold (1) (1) Institute for Earth Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany, (2) Institute for Earth Sciences, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (walte@mail.uni-mainz.de) The geometry of melt-filled pores in a partially molten rock strongly controls the permeability, rheology and initial segregation of melt. Current theory for monomineralic aggregates, using only the wetting angle and melt fraction as parameters, predicts a perfectly regular melt framework or equally shaped melt inclusions on grain boundary junctions. However, published melt-present high-temperature experiments with rock forming minerals such as quartz or olivine show considerable deviations from this predicted regular equilibrium melt geometry. Disequilibrium features, such as fully wetted grain boundaries, melt lenses, and large melt patches have been described, and were attributed to surface energy anisotropy of the minerals. This study used static analogue experiments with norcamphor plus ethanol liquid, that allow continuous in-situ observation of the evolving distribution of melt during static recrystallisation. The liquid-crystal surface energy of norcamphor is effectively isotropic. For the experiments an approximately 0.1 mm thin sample of norcamphor plus ethanole was placed between two glass plates and observed with a miroscope. Ethanol was used as a melt analogue because it allows to run experiments at room temperature, avoiding any temperature gradients. The wetting angle is approximately 15°, which is well below 60° and within the range reported for quartz and olivine plus melt experiments. The experiments show that all described disequilibrium features can form during fluid-enhanced static recrystallisation, especially where surrounding grains consume small, few-sided grains. These features are unstable and transient: a

  13. Mathematical modeling of cold cap: Effect of bubbling on melting rate

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-12-31

    The rate of melting is a primary concern in the vitrification of radioactive wastes because it directly influences the life cycle of nuclear waste cleanup efforts. To increase glass melting performance, experimental and industrial all-electric waste glass melters employ various melt-rate enhancement techniques, the most prominent being the application of bubblers submerged into molten glass. This study investigates various ways in which bubbling affects melting rate in a waste glass melter. Using the recently developed cold cap model, we suggest that forced convection of molten glass, which increases the cold cap bottom temperature, is the main factor. Other effects, such as stirring the feed into molten glass or reducing the insulating effect of foaming, also play a role.

  14. Sol-Gel Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  15. Origin of picritic green glass magmas by polybaric fractional fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary presentation is given of a model which explains the picritic lunar mare green glass compositions as composites or magmas derived by polybaric fractional melting. The model accommodates changes in source composition and solidus temperature. As in the Klein and Langmuir model, the final compositions of the melts signify only average depths of melting. The onset of melting is deeper, final segregation is shallower.

  16. Turning nuclear waste into glass

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, Ian L.

    2015-02-15

    Vitrification has emerged as the treatment option of choice for the most dangerous radioactive waste. But dealing with the nuclear waste legacy of the Cold War will require state-of-the-art facilities and advanced glass formulations.

  17. Containerless Processing of a Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranasinghe, Kisa; Ray, Chandra S.; Day, Delbert E.; Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Glasses of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2), and LS2 doped with 0.001wt% platinum (LS2 + 0.001 wt% Pt) compositions were melted, cooled and reheated at controlled rates while levitated (containerless) inside an Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) furnace at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL. The experiments were conducted in vacuum (approximately 10(exp -5) Pa) using spherical, 2.5 to 3 millimeter diameter, glass samples. The measured critical cooling rate for glass formation, R(sub c), for the LS2 and LS2+0.001 wt% Pt glasses processed at ESL were 14 plus or minus 2 Celsius per minute and 130 plus or minus 5 Celsius per minute, respectively. The values of R(sub c), for the same LS2 and LS2 + 0.001 wt% Pt glasses processed in a container were 62 plus or minus 3 Celsius per minute and 162 plus or minus 5 Celsius per minute, respectively. The effective activation energy for crystallization, E, for this LS2 glass processed without a container at ESL, 392 plus or minus 15 kiloJoules per mole, was higher than that, 270 plus or minus 15 kiloJoules per mole, for an identical glass processed in a container. These results suggest that the glass formation tendency for a containerless LS2 melt is significantly increased compared to an identical melt in contact with a container. The absence of heterogeneous nucleation sites that are inherently present in all melts held in containers, and or a change in the surface composition due to evaporation of Li2O during processing at ESL are likely reasons for the increased glass forming tendency of this containerless LS2 melt.

  18. Survey of glass plutonium contents and poison selection

    SciTech Connect

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.; Ellison, A.J.G.; Shaw, H.

    1996-05-01

    If plutonium and other actinides are to be immobilized in glass, then achieving high concentrations in the glass is desirable. This will lead to reduced costs and more rapid immobilization. However, glasses with high actinide concentrations also bring with them undersirable characteristics, especially a greater concern about nuclear criticality, particularly in a geologic repository. The key to achieving a high concentration of actinide elements in a glass is to formulate the glass so that the solubility of actinides is high. At the same time, the glass must be formulated so that the glass also contains neutron poisons, which will prevent criticality during processing and in a geologic repository. In this paper, the solubility of actinides, particularly plutonium, in three types of glasses are discussed. Plutonium solubilities are in the 2-4 wt% range for borosilicate high-level waste (HLW) glasses of the type which will be produced in the US. This type of glass is generally melted at relatively low temperatures, ca. 1150{degrees}C. For this melting temperature, the glass can be reformulated to achieve plutonium solubilities of at least 7 wt%. This low melting temperature is desirable if one must retain volatile cesium-137 in the glass. If one is not concerned about cesium volatility, then glasses can be formulated which can contain much larger amounts of plutonium and other actinides. Plutonium concentrations of at least 15 wt% have been achieved. Thus, there is confidence that high ({ge}5 wt%) concentrations of actinides can be achieved under a variety of conditions.

  19. Chemistry of uranium in aluminophosphate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, H. D.; Balazs, G. B.; Williams, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    The U(VI)-U(V)-U(IV) redox equilibria are investigated in two sodium aluminophosphate base compositions at a variety of melt temperatures, imposed oxygen fugacities, and uranium contents. Results show that the higher redox states of uranium are quite soluble in the phosphate glasses, although U(IV) readily precipitates from the melts as UO2. In addition, comparisons of the uranium redox equilibria established in phosphate melts versus those in silicate melts shows that the coordination sites of the individual uranium species are generally the same in both solvent systems although they differ in detail.

  20. Collescipoli - An unusual fusion crust glass. [chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozette, S.

    1979-01-01

    An electron microprobe study was conducted on glass fragments taken from the fusion crust and an internal glass-lined vein in the H-5 chondrite Collescipoli. Microprobe analyses of the glasses revealed an unusual fusion crust composition, and analyses of glass from inside the meteorite showed compositions expected for a melt of an H-group chondrite. Studies of fusion crusts by previous workers, e.g., Krinov and Ramdohr, showed that fusion crusts contain large amounts of magnetite and other oxidized minerals. The Collescipoli fusion crusts do contain these minerals, but they also contain relatively large amounts of reduced metal, sulphide, and a sodium-rich glass. This study seems to indicate that Collescipoli preserved an early type of fusion crust. Oxidation was incomplete in the fusion crust melt that drained into a crack. From this study it is concluded that fusion crust formation does not invariably result in complete oxidation of metal and sulphide phases.

  1. Properties of unconventional lithium bismuthate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, S.; Mandal, S.; Ghosh, A.

    1997-10-01

    Unconventional bismuthate glasses containing lithium oxide have been prepared by a conventional melt-quench technique. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and differential thermal analysis show that stable binary glasses of composition xLi2O-(100-x)Bi2O3 can be achieved for x=20-35 mol %. Systematic variation of the glass-transition temperature, density, and molar volume observed in these glasses indicates no significant structural change with composition. Differential thermal analysis and optical studies show that the strength of the glass network decreases with the increase of Li2O content in the glass matrix with a small deviation for the extra stable 30Li2O-70Bi2O3 glass composition. Studies of Raman spectra and molar volume ensure that all glasses are built up of [BiO6] octahedral units, while the influence of Li+ ions in the glass matrix is also confirmed from optical, Raman, and electrical studies. Wide transmitting window in the optical region having sharp cutoffs in both ultraviolet-visible and infrared regimes may make these glasses useful in spectral devices. High dielectric values in these glasses compared to glasses formed with conventional glass former can be attributed to the influence of the high polarizability of the unconventional network forming cations, Bi3+.

  2. The effect of glass synthesis route on mechanical and physical properties of resultant glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Wren, A; Clarkin, O M; Laffir, F R; Ohtsuki, C; Kim, I Y; Towler, M R

    2009-10-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) have potential orthopaedic applications. Solgel processing is reported as having advantages over the traditional melt-quench route for synthesizing the glass phase of GICs, including far lower processing temperatures and higher levels of glass purity and homogeneity. This work investigates a novel glass formulation, BT 101 (0.48 SiO(2)-0.36 ZnO-0.12 CaO-0.04 SrO) produced by both the melt-quench and the solgel route. The glass phase was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine whether the material was amorphous and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to measure the glass transition temperature (T (g)). Particle size analysis (PSA) was used to determine the mean particle size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the structure and composition of the glass. Both glasses, the melt-quench BT 101 and the solgel BT 101, were mixed with 50 wt% polyacrylic acid (M (w), 80,800) and water to form a GIC and the working time (T (w)) and the setting time (T (s)) of the resultant cements were then determined. The cement based on the solgel glass had a longer T (w) (78 s) as compared to the cement based on the melt derived glass (19 s). T (s) was also much longer for the cement based on the solgel (1,644 s) glass than for the cement based on the melt-derived glass (25 s). The cements based on the melt derived glass produced higher strengths in both compression (sigma(c)) and biaxial flexure (sigma(f)), where the highest strength was found to be 63 MPa in compression, at both 1 and 7 days. The differences in setting and mechanical properties can be associated to structural differences within the glass as determined by XPS which revealed the absence of Ca in the solgel system and a much greater concentration of bridging oxygens (BO) as compared to the melt-derived system.

  3. Glass recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Dalmijn, W.L.; Houwelingen, J.A. van

    1995-12-31

    Glass recycling in the Netherlands has grown from 10,000 to 300,000 tonnes per annum. The various advantages and problems of the glass cycle with reference to the state of the art in the Netherlands is given. Special attention is given to new technologies for the automated sorting of cullet with detection systems. In Western Europe the recycling of glass has become a success story. Because of this, the percentage of glass cullet used in glass furnaces has increased. To meet the quality demands of the glass industry, automated sorting for the removal of stones, non-ferrous metals and other impurities had to be developed and incorporated in glass recycling plants. In Holland, Germany and other countries, the amount of glass collected has reached a level that color-sorting becomes necessary to avoid market saturation with mixed cullet. Recently, two systems for color-sorting have been developed and tested for the separation of bottles and cullet in the size range of 20--50 mm. With the increased capacity of the new glass recycling plants, 120,000--200,000 tpy, the quality systems have also to be improved and automated. These quality control systems are based on the automated sorting technology developed earlier for the glass recycling plants. The data obtained are automatically processed and printed. The sampling system and its relation to the theory of Gy will be described. Results of both developments in glass recycling plants will be described.

  4. Glass Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA technologies have played part in growth and cost containment of studio glass art, among them a foam type insulation developed to meet a need for lightweight material that would reduce flame spread in aircraft fire. Foam comes in several forms and is widely used by glass artists, chiefly as an insulator for the various types of ovens used in glass working. Another Spinoff is alumina crucibles to contain molten glass. Before alumina crucibles were used, glass tanks were made of firebrick which tended to erode under high temperatures and cause impurities; this not only improved quality but made the process more cost effective. One more NASA technology that found its way into glass art working is a material known as graphite board, a special form of graphite originally developed for rocket motor applications. This graphite is used to exact compound angles and creates molds for poured glass artworks of dramatic design.

  5. Spherulite Crystallization Induces Fe-Redox Redistribution in Silicic Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; Cottrell, E; Tuffen, H; Logan, A; Kelley, K

    2009-01-01

    Rhyolitic obsidians from Krafla volcano, Iceland, record the interaction between mobile hydrous species liberated during crystal growth and the reduction of ferric iron in the silicate melt. We performed synchrotron {mu}-FTIR and {mu}-XANES measurements along a transect extending from a spherulite into optically distinct colorless and brown glass zones. Measurements show that the colorless glass is enriched in OH groups and depleted in ferric iron, while the brown glass shows the opposite relationship. The color shift between brown and clear glass is sharp, suggesting that the colorless glass zone was produced by a redox front that originated from the spherulite margin and moved through surrounding melt during crystallization. We conclude that the most likely reducing agent is hydrogen, produced by magnetite crystallization within the spherulite. The Krafla obsidians dramatically capture redox disequilibrium on the micoscale and highlight the importance of hydrous fluid liberation and late-stage crystallization to the redox signature of glassy lavas.

  6. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  7. Preparation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors from oxide-glass precursors

    DOEpatents

    Hinks, David G.; Capone, II, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconductor and precursor therefor from oxide mixtures of Ca, Sr, Bi and Cu. Glass precursors quenched to elevated temperatures result in glass free of crystalline precipitates having enhanced mechanical properties. Superconductors are formed from the glass precursors by heating in the presence of oxygen to a temperature below the melting point of the glass.

  8. Glasses having a low non-linear refractive index for laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Faulstich, Marga; Jahn, Walter; Krolla, Georg; Neuroth, Norbert

    1980-01-01

    Glass composition ranges are described which permit the introduction of laser activators into fluorphosphate glass with exceptionally high fluorine content while forming glasses of high crystallization stability and permitting the realization of large melt volumes. The high fluorine content imparts to the glasses an exceptionally low nonlinear refractive index n.sub.2 down to O,4 .times.10.sup.-13 esu.

  9. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  10. Welding/sealing glass-enclosed space in a vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1996-01-01

    A method of welding and sealing the edges of two juxtaposed glass sheets together to seal a vacuum space between the sheets comprises the steps of positioning a radiation absorbant material, such as FeO, VO.sub.2, or NiO, between the radiation transmissive glass sheets adjacent the edges and then irradiating the absorbant material, preferably with a laser beam, through at least one of the glass sheets. Heat produced by the absorbed radiation in the absorbant material melts glass in the portions of both glass sheets that are adjacent the absorbant material, and the melted glass from both sheets flows together to create the weld when the melted glass cools and hardens. The absorbant material can be dissolved and diffused into the melted glass to the extent that it no longer absorbs enough energy to keep the glass melted, thus, with appropriate proportioning of absorbant material to source energy power and welding heat needed, the process can be made self-stopping.

  11. Welding/sealing glass-enclosed space in a vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1996-02-06

    A method of welding and sealing the edges of two juxtaposed glass sheets together to seal a vacuum space between the sheets comprises the steps of positioning a radiation absorbent material, such as FeO, VO{sub 2}, or NiO, between the radiation transmissive glass sheets adjacent the edges and then irradiating the absorbent material, preferably with a laser beam, through at least one of the glass sheets. Heat produced by the absorbed radiation in the absorbent material melts glass in the portions of both glass sheets that are adjacent the absorbent material, and the melted glass from both sheets flows together to create the weld when the melted glass cools and hardens. The absorbent material can be dissolved and diffused into the melted glass to the extent that it no longer absorbs enough energy to keep the glass melted, thus, with appropriate proportioning of absorbent material to source energy power and welding heat needed, the process can be made self-stopping. 8 figs.

  12. Transit Scratchitti Removal and Glass Resurfacing by Controlled Fire Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Seongchan; Hong, Shane Y.

    Scratchitti vandalism, a new type of graffiti vandalism, in public transits systems and city neighborhood is a serious problem. To solve this problem, an innovative approach was developed-controlled fire polishing, which incorporates a technique of localized softening and surface tension. Intensive heat is positioned near to the scratch marks on the glass panel. The heat melts a thin layer of glass into liquid, changing the glass’s viscosity to a formable state. The glass is melted to a level close to the depth of the scratch, and allowed to cool down naturally. During the cooling process, the surface tension of the melted glass will even out the scratching indent. After cooling, the glass will be as even and smooth as it was originally. The process will enable the reuse of the damaged window/door and eliminate the otherwise waste by replacement new glass.

  13. Iron Diffusivity in Water Saturated Rhyolite Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. C.; Bell, A.

    2007-12-01

    We have quantified experimentally the bulk chemical diffusivity of iron and the solubility of magnetite in peraluminous, water-saturated rhyolite melt at 100 MPa and 800°C by performing experiments in which we equilibrated a single crystal of magnetite with water-saturated rhyolite melt. The oxygen fugacity of each run was buffered at nickel-nickel oxide (NNO) and the assemblage was saturated with a 1.8 wt. % NaCl eq. NaCl-KCl- FeCl2-HCl-H2O volatile phase. The experimental charge contained a cylinder of magnetite (activity Fe3O4=1), cored from a single crystal of magnetite and placed at the base of a gold capsule, synthetic rhyolite glass placed above the magnetite cylinder and aqueous vapor which occupied the remaining capsule volume. The concentration profiles of FeO (and Na2O, K2O, Al2O3, SiO2 and Cl) in the quenched melt (i.e., glass) were measured over a distance of 400 microns beginning at the magnetite-rhyolite interface and moving orthogonally away from this interface into the glass until the concentration of iron fell below the limit of detection. Diffusion profiles were fit by inverting the measured concentrations of iron in the melt through the error function and solving for the diffusion coefficient assuming a stationary planar boundary; the near-intersection of the error function regression with the origin justifies this assumption. The calculated bulk chemical diffusivity for iron in H2O- saturated rhyolite is 4 E-10 cm2 sec-1; this measured diffusivity is consistent, albeit one-half to one order of magnitude lower than data for other divalent elements (Ca, Mg, Sn) in rhyolite. The Co value used to fit the diffusion profiles is consistent with published data for the equilibrium concentration of iron in rhyolite melt and, thus, the data yield the solubility of iron in water-saturated rhyolite melt. The aluminum saturation index (ASI) of the melt, hence concentrations of Na2O, K2O and Al2O3, remains essentially constant in the melt across the entire

  14. A universal criterion of melting.

    PubMed

    Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2006-09-28

    Melting is analyzed dynamically as a problem of localization at a liquid-solid interface. A Lindemann-like criterion of melting is derived in terms of particular vibrational amplitudes, which turn out to equal a universal quotient (about one-tenth) of the molecular spacing, at the interface. The near universality of the Lindemann ratio apparently arises owing to strongly overdamped dynamics near melting, and despite the anharmonic interactions being system-specific. A similar criterion is derived for structural displacements in the bulk of the solid, in particular the premelted layer; the criterion is no longer strictly universal, but still depends only on the harmonic properties of the solid. We further compute the dependence of the magnitude of the elemental molecular translations, in deeply supercooled fluids, on the temperature and the high frequency elastic constants. We show explicitly that the surface tension between distinct liquid states, near the glass transition of a supercooled liquid, is nearly evenly split between entropic and energetic contributions.

  15. Fluctuating mobility generation and transport in glasses.

    PubMed

    Wisitsorasak, Apiwat; Wolynes, Peter G

    2013-08-01

    In the context of the random first order transition theory we use an extended mode coupling theory of the glass transition that includes activated events to account for spatiotemporal structures in rejuvenating glasses. We numerically solve fluctuating dynamical equations for mobility and fictive temperature fields which capture both mobility generation through activated events and facilitation effects. Upon rejuvenating, a source of high mobility at a glass surface initiates a growth front of mobility which propagates into the unstable low mobility region. The speed of the front quantitatively agrees with experiments on the rejuvenation of ultrastable glasses, which "melt" from their surface.

  16. A Disequilibrium Melting Spectrum: Partially Melted Crustal Xenoliths from the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field, NE China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, C. L.; McGee, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Disequilibrium melting has been established as a common process occurring during crustal anatexis and thus demonstrates that crustal assimilation by ascending mantle-derived magmas is likley not a closed system. Observations of extreme compositional heterogeneity within partial melts derived from crustal xenoliths have been documented in several recent examples, however, the retention or transfer of elements to and from residues and glasses, and their relative contributions to potential crustal contaminants warrants further investigation. Sampled lavas from the Huoshaoshan volcano in the Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field of Northeast China contain crustal xenoliths which preserve a spectrum of partial melting both petrographically and geochemically, thus providing an excellent, natural example of crustal anatexis. Correlations exist between the volume of silicic glass preserved within the xenoliths and bulk rock SiO2 (70-83 wt%), Al2O3 (16-8 wt%), glass 87Sr/86Sr (0.715-0.908), abundances of elements common in feldspars and micas (Sr, Ba, Rb) and elements common in accessory minerals (Y, Zr, Nb). These correlations are likely associated with the consumption of feldspars and micas and the varying retention of accessory phases during partial melting. The xenoliths which contain the greater volumes of silicic glass and residual quartz (interpreted as being the most melted) were found within pahoehoe lava, whilst the least melted xenoliths were found within scoria of the summit cone of Huoshaoshan; thus it is interpreted that the extent of melting is linked to the immersion time in the lava. Small-scale (mm) mingling and transfer of material from the enclosing lava to the xenolith is observed, however, modelling of potential contaminant compositions is inconsistent with crustal contamination during lava petrogenesis. It is inferred that crustal contamination in sampled lavas is localized within the open magmatic system and most likely occurs at the contact zone

  17. Kinetics of melt migration in upper mantle-type rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, G. N.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    1991-08-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the permeability of an aggregate of olivine plus a silicate melt, as well as the viscosity of the matrix. Melt migration couples were formed between discs composed of olivine with about 12% of a synthetic potassium-aluminum silicate glass and discs of polycrystalline San Carlos olivine. Four melt infiltration experiments were carried out at temperatures between 1050 and 1255°C at 300 MPa in a gas-medium apparatus; each couple was held at the experimental conditions for 2 h. At temperature, capillary forces cause the molten glass to infiltrate into the dunite along triple junctions because the dihedral angle is less than 60°. In order to analyze the resulting melt migration profiles, the coupled differential equations governing melt migration via "porous flow" driven by capillary forces and resisted by compaction/dilation of the matrix were solved numerically. The effects of dihedral angle, melt fraction exponent and amount of the melt in the source region on the spatial and temporal evolution of the melt distribution were investigated with numerical simulations for the initial and boundary conditions imposed by the experimental geometry. The permeability of the aggregate and the viscosity of the matrix were determined by comparison of the melt migration profiles obtained from the experiments with those generated from simulation. The permeability of the partially molten aggregate increased approximately linearly with increasing melt fraction and, at 1255°C, the permeability of the rock and viscosity of the olivine are about 8 × 10 -16 m 2 and 8 × 10 9 Pa s, respectively, for a grain size of 4.2 μm and a melt fraction of 0.145. These results predict a relatively high permeability at low melt fractions, indicating that only very small amounts of melt (˜ 0.1%) could be maintained in a dunitic mantle.

  18. Radioactive Waste Conditioning, Immobilisation, And Encapsulation Processes And Technologies: Overview And Advances (Chapter 7)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Lee, William E.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-10-19

    The main immobilization technologies that are available commercially and have been demonstrated to be viable are cementation, bituminization, and vitrification. Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either alkali borosilicate glass or alkali aluminophosphate glass. The exact compositions of nuclear waste glasses are tailored for easy preparation and melting, avoidance of glass-in-glass phase separation, avoidance of uncontrolled crystallization, and acceptable chemical durability, e.g., leach resistance. Glass has also been used to stabilize a variety of low level wastes (LLW) and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) low level wastes (MLLW) from other sources such as fuel rod cladding/decladding processes, chemical separations, radioactive sources, radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soils, medical research applications, and other commercial processes. The sources of radioactive waste generation are captured in other chapters in this book regarding the individual practices in various countries (legacy wastes, currently generated wastes, and future waste generation). Future waste generation is primarily driven by interest in sources of clean energy and this has led to an increased interest in advanced nuclear power production. The development of advanced wasteforms is a necessary component of the new nuclear power plant (NPP) flowsheets. Therefore, advanced nuclear wasteforms are being designed for robust disposal strategies. A brief summary is given of existing and advanced wasteforms: glass, glass-ceramics, glass composite materials (GCM’s), and crystalline ceramic (mineral) wasteforms that chemically incorporate radionuclides and hazardous species atomically in their structure. Cementitious, geopolymer, bitumen, and other encapsulant wasteforms and composites that atomically bond and encapsulate

  19. The Role of CO2 on Silica Undersaturated Melt Structure: Implication for Melt Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, B.; Morizet, Y.; Paris, M.; Gaillard, F.

    2012-12-01

    Silica undersaturated melts such as nephelinite and melilitite are very peculiar magmatic materials. Their occurrence on the Earth surface is often associated with carbonatites melts. These low-silica melts can dissolve a large quantity of CO2 issued from mantle fluid metasomatism. However, the melt structure, the way CO2 dissolves into these melts and the effect of different alkalis element are poorly constrained. We present preliminary experimental results on the melt structure of synthetic nephelinite (NBO/T = 1.25) and Ca-melilitite (NBO/T = 2.50) synthesized in the NKCMAS system and equilibrated at high-pressure (200-300 MPa), high-temperature (1250°C) with an excess C-O-H fluid phase. The nephelinite glasses were synthesized with varying K2O / K2O+Na2O (0-10 mol.% K2O) ratio so as to investigate the differential effect of those two cations. All experiments were conducted under oxidizing conditions (ΔNNO+5) resulting in binary fluid phase composition with CO2 and H2O species. The silicate melt structure, CO2 solubility and speciation were investigated using Micro-Raman and Solid State NMR spectroscopies for 13C, 1H, 29Si, 27Al and 23Na nuclei. The replacement of Na by K does not change the nephelinite melt structure for volatile-free sample suggesting that the basicity of these glasses is not dramatically affected by the presence of mixed alkali. Within 5 mol.% K2O, the CO2 solubility (measured in relative to Raman signature of the melt structure) is only slightly affected with an increasing CO2 solubility with increasing K2O content. As a function of pressure, we observe an increase in CO2 solubility consistent with previous studies. The 13C NMR investigation of the CO2 speciation show three different carbonates environments for CO2 in nephelinite melts attributed to non-network carbonates: 1) 170 ppm shift assigned to NBO-carb. Na or K; 2) 169 ppm assigned to NBO-carb. Ca; and 3) 165 ppm assigned to isolated Na+..CO32- carbonates. As K2O is increased into

  20. Probing the atomic structure of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1): Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Probing the structural disorder in multi-component silicate glasses and melts with varying composition is essential to reveal the change of macroscopic properties in natural silicate melts. While a number of NMR studies for the structure of multi-component silicate glasses and melts including basaltic and andesitic glasses have been reported (e.g., Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014, 26, 42), many challenges still remain. The composition of multi-component basaltic melts vary with temperature, pressure, and melt fraction (Kushiro, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 2001, 71, 107). Especially, the eutectic point (the composition of first melt) of nepheline-forsterite-quartz (the simplest model of basaltic melts) moves with pressure from silica-saturated to highly undersaturated and alkaline melts. The composition of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1, the xenolith from Kilbourne Hole) also vary with pressure. In this study we report experimental results for the effects of composition on the atomic structure of Na2O-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NMAS) glasses in nepheline (NaAlSiO4)-forsterite (Mg2SiO4)-quartz (SiO2) eutectic composition and basaltic glasses generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1) using high-resolution multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of NMAS glasses in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition show only [4]Al. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of KLB-1 basaltic glasses show mostly [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al, the degree of configurational disorder, increases from 0 at XMgO [MgO/(MgO+Al2O3)]=0.55 to ~3% at XMgO=0.79 in KLB-1 basaltic glasses while only [4]Al are observed in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition. The current experimental results provide that the fraction of [5]Al abruptly increases by the effect of

  1. Energetics of glass fragmentation: Experiments on synthetic and natural glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.; Kennedy, L. A.

    2013-11-01

    Natural silicate glasses are an essential component of many volcanic rock types including coherent and pyroclastic rocks; they span a wide range of compositions, occur in diverse environments, and form under a variety of pressure-temperature conditions. In subsurface volcanic environments (e.g., conduits and feeders), melts intersect the thermodynamically defined glass transition temperature to form glasses at elevated confining pressures and under differential stresses. We present a series of room temperature experiments designed to explore the fundamental mechanical and fragmentation behavior of natural (obsidian) and synthetic glasses (Pyrex™) under confining pressures of 0.1-100 MPa. In each experiment, glass cores are driven to brittle failure under compressive triaxial stress. Analysis of the load-displacement response curves is used to quantify the storage of energy in samples prior to failure, the (brittle) release of elastic energy at failure, and the residual energy stored in the post-failure material. We then establish a relationship between the energy density within the sample at failure and the grain-size distributions (D-values) of the experimental products. The relationship between D-values and energy density for compressive fragmentation is significantly different from relationships established by previous workers for decompressive fragmentation. Compressive fragmentation is found to have lower fragmentation efficiency than fragmentation through decompression (i.e., a smaller change in D-value with increasing energy density). We further show that the stress storage capacity of natural glasses can be enhanced (approaching synthetic glasses) through heat treatment.

  2. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

    2001-07-24

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  3. Preparation of Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses in the Bulk Form.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    34PAILES Raw tateriai- Used to 6 ,-)reoare ZULM.Ai! Glass -iI 2BLAN Gass Melts Pricr 7 to izrjved F’u’rnace Seals fif ZBLAN Glass Melts Dore wit-i ti-te...BEth dry ritrger arnd argor have beer, used as tc- v-, rnac-e aton-sphere, the glass being melti;ecu urcer a gas fl-w or a’orox i matel y 4 LPii...34O-ring") Gas Inlet Push Rod Seal (Ŕ-ring") Push Rod FIGURE 5 Furnace lised to mnelt ZBLAN glass . 1 12 S WAC MoistureAnalyze Pedet rol Panel FIGURE 3

  4. Complexation of Sr in aqueous fluids equilibrated with silicate melts: effect of melt and fluid composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Manuela; Wilke, Max; Schmidt, Christian; Kvashnina, Kristina

    2010-05-01

    At crustal conditions, the fluid-melt partitioning of Sr is mainly controlled by the salinity of the fluid and the composition of the melt (Borchert et al., 2010). The data show a sharp increase in the Sr partition coefficient with the alumina saturation index (ASI) to a maximum of 0.3 at an ASI of 1.05. Because fluid-melt partitioning of a given element depends on its complexation in the fluid and its incorporation in the melt, these data imply a change in the Sr speciation at least one of the two phases. For silicate melts, Kohn et al. (1990) found only small changes in the first coordination shell of Sr in a suite of melts with various degrees of polymerization, and argued that incorporation of Sr in the melt should not play a major role in controlling Sr partitioning. For the aqueous fluid, Bai and Koster van Groos (1999) and Webster et al. (1989) suggested a control of the Sr partition coefficient by SrCl2 complexes based on the correlation between partition coefficient and Cl concentration in the fluid after quenching. Both hypotheses cannot explain our partitioning data. Thus, new information on Sr complexation is required. Here, we studied the complexation of Sr in peraluminous or peralkaline melt dissolved in aqueous fluids in-situ at elevated PT conditions using hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells (HDAC) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The starting materials were peraluminous or peralkaline glass and H2O or a chloridic solution. The glass was doped with high concentrations of 5000 or 10000 ppm Sr. We used bulk compositions with 10 to 15 wt.% glass to ensure that the melt was completely dissolved in the fluid at high PT conditions. For qualitative evaluation, we analyzed the starting glasses and various crystalline compounds and standard solutions. The experiments were performed at beamline ID26 at ESRF (Grenoble, France) using a high resolution emission spectrometer and Si(311) monochromator crystals for high resolution and Si

  5. Bursting the bubble of melt inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Most silicate melt inclusions (MI) contain bubbles, whose significance has been alternately calculated, pondered, and ignored, but rarely if ever directly explored. Moore et al. (2015) analyze the bubbles, as well as their host glasses, and conclude that they often hold the preponderance of CO2 in the MI. Their findings entreat future researchers to account for the presence of bubbles in MI when calculating volatile budgets, saturation pressures, and eruptive flux.

  6. The relationship between glass viscosity and composition: A first principles model for vitrification of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1990-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility will incorporate high-level liquid waste into borosilicate glass for stabilization and permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The viscosity of the melt determines the rate of melting of the raw feed, the rate of gas bubble release due to foaming and fining, the rate of homogenization, and thus, the quality of the glass produced. The viscosity of the glass is in turn, a function of both glass composition and temperature. A model describing the viscosity dependence on composition, temperature, and glass structure (bonding) has been derived for glasses ranging from pure frits to frit plus 35 wt % simulated waste. 17 refs., 37 figs.

  7. The relationship between glass viscosity and composition: A first principles model for vitrification of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    540The Defense Waste Processing Facility will incorporate high-level liquid waste into borosilicate glass for stabilization and permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The viscosity of the melt determines the rate of melting of the raw feed, the rate of gas bubble release due to foaming and fining, the rate of homogenization, and thus, the quality of the glass produced. The viscosity of the glass is in turn, a function of both glass composition and temperature. A model describing the viscosity dependence on composition, temperature, and glass structure (bonding) has been derived for glasses ranging from pure frits to frit plus 35 wt % simulated waste. 17 refs., 37 figs.

  8. Glasses in the D'Orbigny angrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Maria Eugenia; Kurat, Gero; Zinner, Ernst; Métrich, Nicole; Brandstätter, Franz; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Sylvester, Paul

    2003-12-01

    The angrites are a small and heterogeneous group of achondritic meteorites with highly unusual chemical and mineralogical features. The abundant presence of glasses in D'Orbigny makes this rock a unique member of the angrite group. Glasses fill open spaces, form pockets, and occur as inclusions in olivines. Their physical settings exclude an incorporation from an external source. Major and trace element (rare earth elements [REE], Li, B, Be, transition elements, N and C) contents of these glasses and host olivines were measured combining laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA), and EMP techniques. Based on the major element composition, glasses filling voids could represent either a melt formed by melting an angritic rock or a melt from which angrites could have crystallized. Trace element contents of these glasses strongly indicate a direct link to the D'Orbigny bulk meteorite. They are incompatible with the formation of the glasses by partial melting of a chondritic source rock or by shock melting. The refractory elements (e.g., Al, Ti, Ca) have about 10 × CI abundances with CaO/TiO 2 and FeO/MnO ratios being approximately chondritic. Trace element abundances in the glasses appear to be governed by volatility and suggest that the refractory elements in the source had chondritic relative abundances. Although the glasses (and the whole rock) lack volatile elements such as Na and K, they are rich in some moderately volatile elements such as B, V, Mn, Fe (all with close to CI abundances), and Li (about 3-5 × CI). These elements likely were added to the glass in a sub-solidus metasomatic elemental exchange event. We have identified a novel mechanism for alteration of glass and rock compositions based on an exchange of Al and Sc for Fe and other moderately volatile elements in addition to the well-known metasomatic exchange reactions (e.g., Ca-Na and Mg

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  10. Target-projectile interaction during impact melting at Kamil Crater, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Agnese; D'Orazio, Massimo; Cordier, Carole; Folco, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    In small meteorite impacts, the projectile may survive through fragmentation; in addition, it may melt, and chemically and physically interact with both shocked and melted target rocks. However, the mixing/mingling between projectile and target melts is a process still not completely understood. Kamil Crater (45 m in diameter; Egypt), generated by the hypervelocity impact of the Gebel Kamil Ni-rich ataxite on sandstone target, allows to study the target-projectile interaction in a simple and fresh geological setting. We conducted a petrographic and geochemical study of macroscopic impact melt lapilli and bombs ejected from the crater, which were collected during our geophysical campaign in February 2010. Two types of glasses constitute the impact melt lapilli and bombs: a white glass and a dark glass. The white glass is mostly made of SiO2 and it is devoid of inclusions. Its negligible Ni and Co contents suggest derivation from the target rocks without interaction with the projectile (<0.1 wt% of projectile contamination). The dark glass is a silicate melt with variable contents of Al2O3 (0.84-18.7 wt%), FeOT (1.83-61.5 wt%), and NiO (<0.01-10.2 wt%). The dark glass typically includes fragments (from few μm to several mm in size) of shocked sandstone, diaplectic glass, lechatelierite, and Ni-Fe metal blebs. The metal blebs are enriched in Ni compared to the Gebel Kamil meteorite. The dark glass is thus a mixture of target and projectile melts (11-12 wt% of projectile contamination). Based on recently proposed models for target-projectile interaction and for impact glass formation, we suggest a scenario for the glass formation at Kamil. During the transition from the contact and compression stage and the excavation stage, projectile and target liquids formed at their interface and chemically interact in a restricted zone. Projectile contamination affected only a shallow portion of the target rocks. The SiO2 melt that eventually solidified as white glass behaved as

  11. Glass-rich chondrules in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Rubin, Alan E.

    1994-09-01

    There are two types of glass-rich chondrules in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (OC): (1) porphyritic chondrules containing 55-85 vol% glass or microcrystalline mesostasis and (2) nonporphyritic chondrules, containing 90-99 vol% glass. These two types are similar in mineralogy and bulk composition to previously described Al-rich chondrules in OC. In addition to Si-, Al- and Na-rich glass or Ca-Al-rich microcrystalline mesostasis, glass-rich chondrules contain dendritic and skeletal crystals of olivine, Al2O3-rich low-Ca pyroxene and fassaite. Some chondrules contain relict grains of forsterite +/- Mg-Al spinel. We suggest that glass-rich chondrules were formed early in nebular history by melting fine-grained precursor materials rich in refractory (Ca, Al, Ti) and moderately volatile (Na, K) components (possibly related to Ca-Al-rich inclusions) admixed with coarse relict forsterite and spinel grains derived from previously disrupted type-I chondrules.

  12. Determination of chemical speciations of cerium in nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Meiling; Li, Hong

    1996-12-31

    Cerium oxides have been widely used as a surrogate for plutonium in the investigation of the melt and durability behavior of simulated nuclear waste glasses. It is well known that there is a cerous-ceric equilibrium in silicate glasses under normal melting conditions. The position of this equilibrium depends on glass composition, melting temperature, furnace atmosphere, and possibly the total amounts of cerium in glass. The oxidation state of cerium affects total solubility of cerium in glass, solubilities of other components in glass, viscosities and liquidus temperatures of the melts, and the chemical durability of the glasses. A procedure was developed for the determination of the ceric and cerous distribution. The glass was ground to small particles of less than 300 meshes and was dissolved in mixture of HF and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The ceric oxide was graduately reduced to cerous species in the presence of HF acid during the dissolution. To compensate the change of the equilibrium during the dissolution, a calibration curve is made with a mixture of standard solution of ceric sulphate and one gram of glass of the same composition containing no cerium. Boric acid was added to complex the fluoride ions, and the resultant solution was titrated potentiometrically with 0.01 N ferrous ammonium sulphate solution. The corrected ceric concentration was obtained on the calibration curve. The total cerium content in the above solution was analyzed using ICP-AES and the cerous content was the difference between the total Ce and Ce(+4).

  13. Studies of Glassy Dynamics in Ionomer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Kumar, Sanat; Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2006-03-01

    In this work we investigate one of the challenging problems, the dynamics of ionomer aggregates using Molecular Dynamics simulations. Experimental results show that the glass transition temperature (Tg), diffusion and relaxation mechanisms can be influenced dramatically by ion-incorporation or by changing temperature of the system e.g., increase in ion content raises the Tg. In this work we show the dynamical behavior of ionomer melts as it goes from liquid to glass/gel state. In the context of ionomers, we investigated the analogy between reversible gelation and the glass transition, and show that many of the beneficial properties of ionomers and difficulties in understanding them can be understood in this framework.

  14. Slow kinetics of melt homogenization and strong nature of intermediate phase melts in chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boolchand, P.; Gunasekera, K.; Bhosle, S.

    2013-03-01

    The strong-fragile classification of melts is manifested in the T-dependence of viscosity. Strong (fragile) melts possess a T-independent (dependent) activation energy of viscosity leading to an Arrhenian (non-Arrhenian) behavior reflecting the robust (weak) nature of network structure. We have now measured complex Cp of binary GexSe100-x glasses as a function of x, and find that in dry and homogeneous melts, fragility (m(x)) shows a global minimum (m < 20) in the Intermediate Phase (IP) compositions (19.5% < x < 26%) but increases rapidly outside the IP. These findings have a direct bearing on synthesis of non-stoichiometric melt compositions at elevated temperatures in which IP melt compositions serve as a bottleneck to homogenize batches globally. The physical properties of dry and homogeneous glasses differ significantly from their inhomogeneous counterparts, and have led, in general, to differences in results reported by various groups. Supported by NSF grant DMR08-53957.

  15. High-Temperature Studies of Glass Dissolution Rates Close to Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Zhao, P; Williams, R; Rose, T; Rainer, A; Pawloski, G

    2004-06-14

    Most long-lived radionuclides associated with an underground nuclear test are incorporated into a melt glass and are released by glass dissolution to become part of the hydrologic source term (HST) (Pawloski et al., 2001). Although the rates of rhyolite glass dissolution are well known under conditions where the fluid is far from saturation with respect to glass, the rates are not well known under conditions where the fluid approaches saturation. These rates are commonly much lower than the far-fromsaturation rates, often by a factor greater than 100. In recent HST simulations (Pawloski et al., 2001; Pawloski et al., 2000; Tompson et al., 1999), we conservatively estimated steady-state release rates based on a far-from-saturation fluid conditions. In recent CHESHIRE near-field simulations (Pawloski et al., 2001), it was predicted that {approx}30% of the nuclear melt glass dissolved over 1000 years. Although the ''far-from-saturation rate'' approach provides a conservative estimate of glass dissolution, it may greatly overestimate the rates of melt glass dissolution. At CHESHIRE, less conservative estimates suggest that only {approx}1% of the nuclear melt glass will dissolve in 1000 years. Lower glass dissolution rates result in lower radionuclide release rates from nuclear melt glass. The following report documents glass dissolution experiments performed to measure glass dissolution rates close to saturation.

  16. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  17. Glass formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Labardi, Massimiliano; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, M.; Wang, Li-Min

    2016-05-01

    Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for glass formation and the glass stability of materials would benefit the screening of the glass formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the glass formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. Glass transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of glass transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule glass formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to glass formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the glass formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of beads of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to glass formation via kinetics.

  18. Glass formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Labardi, Massimiliano; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, M; Wang, Li-Min

    2016-05-07

    Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for glass formation and the glass stability of materials would benefit the screening of the glass formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the glass formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. Glass transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of glass transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule glass formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to glass formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the glass formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of beads of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to glass formation via kinetics.

  19. High chloride content calcium silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojing; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2017-03-08

    Chloride is known to volatilize from silicate glass melts and until now, only a limited number of studies on oxychloride silicate glasses have been reported. In this paper we have synthesized silicate glasses that retain large amounts of CaCl2. The CaCl2 has been added to the calcium metasilicate composition (CaO·SiO2). Glasses were produced via a melt quench route and an average of 70% of the chloride was retained after melting. Up to 31.6 mol% CaCl2 has been successfully incorporated into these silicate glasses without the occurrence of crystallization. (29)Si MAS-NMR spectra showed the silicon being present mainly as a Q(2) silicate species. This suggests that chloride formed Cl-Ca(n) species, rather than Si-Cl bonds. Upon increasing the CaCl2 content, the Tg reduced markedly from 782 °C to 370 °C. Glass density and glass crystallization temperature decreased linearly with an increase in the CaCl2 content. However, both linear regressions revealed a breakpoint at a CaCl2 content just below 20 mol%. This might be attributed to a significant change in the structure and is also correlated with the nature of the crystallizing phases formed upon heat treatment. The glasses with less than 19.2 mol% CaCl2 crystallized to wollastonite, whilst the compositions with CaCl2 content equal to or greater than 19.2 mol% are thought to crystallize to CaCl2. In practice, the crystallization of CaCl2 could not occur until the crystallization temperature fell below the melting point of CaCl2. The implications of the results along with the high chloride retention are discussed.

  20. Materials processing apparatus development for fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Sue; Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great potential for optical fiber communications due to the high transmittance when no microcrystallites occur during drawing operations. This work has developed apparatus to test the occurrence of microcrystallites during recrystallization in reduced gravity on the KC-135. The apparatus allows fluoride glass fiber, such as ZBLAN, to be melted and recrystallized during both the low and high g portions the parabolic flight.

  1. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, Ray F.

    1994-01-01

    A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

  2. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

  3. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, Task 17208: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J. W.; Marra, J. C.

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  4. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, task 17208: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J. W.; Marra, J. C.

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  5. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass.

    PubMed

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-03-18

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. The ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.

  6. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    DOE PAGES

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; ...

    2016-03-18

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach.more » In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. Lastly, the ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.« less

  7. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    SciTech Connect

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-03-18

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. Lastly, the ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.

  8. Experimental Constraints on the Partitioning and Valence of V and Cr in Garnet and Coexisting Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Sutton, S.; Berthet, S.; Newville, M.

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments with garnet and coexisting melt have been carried out across a range of oxygen fugacities (near hematite-magnetite (HM) to below the iron-wustite (IW) buffers) at 1.7 GPa to study the partitioning and valence of Cr and V in both phases. Experiments were carried out in a non end loaded piston cylinder apparatus, and the run products were analyzed with electron microprobe and xray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis at beamline 13-ID at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Lab. The valence of vanadium and chromium were determined using the position and intensity of the Ka pre-edge peaks, calibrated on a series of Cr and Vbearing standard glasses. This technique has been applied to V and Cr in glasses and V in spinels previously, and in these isotropic phases there are no orientational effects on the XANES spectra (Righter et al., 2006, Amer. Mineral. 91, 1643-1656). We also now demonstrate this to be true for V and Cr in garnet. Also, previous work has shown that V has a higher valence in the glass (or melt) than in the coexisting spinel. This is also true for V in garnet-glass pairs in this study. Vanadium valence in garnets varies from 2.7 below the IW buffer to 3.7 near HM, and for coexisting glass it varies from 3.2 to 4.3. Vanadium valence measured in some natural garnets from mantle localities indicates V in the more reduced range at 2.5. Comparisons will be made between fO2 estimated from V valence and other methods for garnet-bearing mantle samples. In contrast, Cr valence measured in garnet and coexisting glass for all experimental and natural samples is 2.9- 3.0, suggesting that the valence of Cr does not vary within either phase across a large fO2 range. These results demonstrate that while V varies from 2+ to 3+ to 4+ in garnet-melt systems, Cr does not, and this will ultimately affect the partitioning behavior of these two elements in natural systems. Garnet/melt D(Cr) are between 12 and 17 across this range

  9. Experimental Constraints on the Partitioning and Valence of V and Cr in Garnet and Coexisting Glass.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, S.; Righter, K.; Berthet, S.; Newville, M.

    2008-12-01

    A series of experiments with garnet and coexisting melt have been carried out across a range of oxygen fugacities (near hematite-magnetite (HM) to below the iron-wustite (IW) buffers) at 1.7 GPa to study the partitioning and valence of Cr and V in both phases. Experiments were carried out in a non-end loaded piston cylinder apparatus, and the run products were analyzed with electron microprobe and xray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis at beamline 13-ID at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Lab. The valences of vanadium and chromium were determined using the intensity of the K pre-edge peaks, calibrated on a series of Cr and V-bearing standard glasses. This technique has been applied to V and Cr in glasses and V in spinels previously, and in these isotropic phases there are no orientation effects on the XANES spectra (Righter et al., 2006, Amer. Mineral. 91, 1643-1656). We also now demonstrate this to be true for V and Cr in garnet. Also, previous work has shown that V has a higher valence in the glass (or melt) than in the coexisting spinel. This was also true for V in garnet-glass pairs in this study. Vanadium valence in garnets varied from 2.7 below the IW buffer to 3.7 near HM, and for coexisting glass it varied from 3.2 to 4.3. Vanadium valence measured in some natural garnets from mantle localities indicated V is slightly more reduced than 3. In contrast, Cr valence measured in garnet and coexisting glass for all experimental and natural samples was 2.9-3.0, suggesting that the valence of Cr does not vary within either phase across a large fO2 range. These results demonstrate that while V varies from slightly more reduced than 3+ to slightly more oxidized than 4+ in garnet-melt systems, Cr does not, and this will ultimately affect the partitioning behavior of these two elements in natural systems. Garnet/melt D(Cr) are between 12 and 17 across this range of fO2, whereas D(V) has the highest partition coefficient ~3, near the IW

  10. GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Fibrous glass fillers Binders used in the glass plastic industry Method of manufacturing glass plastics and glass plastic articles Properties of fiberglass Primary areas for use of glass fibre reinforced plastics

  11. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  12. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen; McCloy, John

    2016-02-01

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize large fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.

  13. Glass fining experiments in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    Ground based experiments were conducted to demonstrate that thermal migration actually operated in glass melts. Thermal migration consistent with the theory was found in one experiment on a borax melt, i.e., there was an approximately linear relation between the bubble diameter and bubble velocity for a given temperature and temperature gradient. It also appeared that nearby bubbles were attracted to one another, which could greatly aid fining. Interpretation of these results was not possible because of complications arising from gravity, i.e., floating of the bubbles, circulation currents due to buoyancy-driven natural connection, and flow of the melt out from the cell.

  14. Role of oxygen on the optical properties of borate glass doped with ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Baki, Manal; El-Diasty, Fouad

    2011-10-15

    Lithium tungsten borate glass (0.56-x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.4Li{sub 2}O-xZnO-0.04WO{sub 3} (0{<=}x{<=}0.1 mol%) is prepared by the melt quenching technique for photonic applications. Small relative values of ZnO are used to improve the glass optical dispersion and to probe as well the role of oxygen electronic polarizability on its optical characteristics. The spectroscopic properties of the glass are determined in a wide spectrum range (200-2500 nm) using a Fresnel-based spectrophotometric technique. Based on the Lorentz-Lorenz theory, as ZnO content increases on the expense of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} the glass molar polarizability increased due to an enhanced unshared oxide ion 2p electron density, which increases ionicity of the chemical bonds of glass. The role of oxide ion polarizability is explained in accordance with advanced measures and theories such as optical basicity, O 1s binding energy, the outer most cation binding energy in Yamashita-Kurosawa's interionic interaction parameter and Sun's average single bond strength. FT-IR measurements confirm an increase in bridging oxygen bonds, as a result of replacement of ZnO by B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which increase the UV glass transmission window and transmittance. - Graphical abstract: O1s, Yamashita-Kurosawa's parameter and average single bond strength of charge overlapping between electronic shells are used to explain enhanced oxide ion 2p electron density, which increases refractive index of glasses. Highlights: > New borate glass for photonic application is prepared. > The dispersion property of the glass is effectively controlled using small amounts of ZnO. > ZnO is used to probe the glass structure and investigate the role of oxygen on the obtained optical properties of the glasses. > Modern theories are used to explain enhanced unshared oxide ion 2p electron density, which increases ionicity of chemical bonds of the glass.

  15. Tempered glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1991-11-01

    This document describes a demonstration for making tempered glass using minimal equipment. The demonstration is intended for a typical student of materials science, at the high school level or above. (JL)

  16. The lunar highland melt-rock suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Size can be used as a criterion to select 18 large (larger than 1 cm) samples from among 148 melt-rock fragments of all sizes. This selection provides a suite of large samples which represent the important chemical variants among highland melt rocks; each large sample has enough material for a number of sample-destructive studies, as well as for future reference. Cluster analysis of the total data base of 148 highland melt rocks shows six distinct groups: anorthosite, gabbroic anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro ('highland basalt'), low K Fra Mauro, intermediate-K Fra Mauro, and high-K. Large samples are available for four of the melt-rock groups (gabbroic anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro, and intermediate-K Fra Mauro). This sample selection reveals two subgroups of anorthositic gabbro (one anorthite-poor with negative Eu anomaly and one anorthite-rich without Eu anomaly). There is a sharp distinction between those Apollo 16 melt rocks and glasses which have both been classified as 'gabbroic anorthosite'.

  17. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  18. Glass formulation development and offgas analysis of microwave melter powder samples

    SciTech Connect

    Semones, G.B.; Hoffman, C.R.; Phillips, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    Production of nuclear materials for defense applications has resulted in the accumulation of vast amounts of nuclear waste. This contaminated waste is in a variety of forms that require subsequent reprocessing to isolate and encapsulate the nuclear (e.g., uranium, plutonium, strontium, cesium, and americium) and toxic (e.g., lead, chromium, and cadmium) constituents. The encapsulating material must possess good chemical and mechanical durability to resist leaching of the nuclear and toxic constituents into the environment during permanent storage at a waste repository. Glass is an ideal encapsulating material because its open structure allows the introduction of different waste forms and the final vitreous product possesses a high degree of chemical stability. Microwave heating and melting is a relatively new advancement in glass processing which uses microwave radiation to heat the glass formers to adequate temperatures for sintering or melting. An advantage to this technique is that it enables more rapid heating than traditional heating mechanisms. This decrease in cycle time may help to limit exposure to workers encapsulating radioactive and/or toxic waste.

  19. Gas atomization of cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; O'Handley, R. C.; Kalonji, G.

    1989-01-01

    XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and EDXS have been used to characterize a rapidly-solidified (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel generated in a cobalt-iron-phosphate glass matrix by gas atomization of melts. Of the two compositions tested, that containing 20 mol pct P2O5 exhibited randomly-oriented ferrite crystallization whose growth appears to have been diffusion-controlled. Unlike the ferrite, in which the iron has both tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, the iron in the glassy matrix was primarily of distorted-octahedral coordination. Calculations indicate that the cooling rates obtained with oxide melts vary strongly with droplet size, but less strongly with melt temperature.

  20. Origin of broad NIR photoluminescence in bismuthate glass and Bi-doped glasses at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mingying; Zollfrank, Cordt; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2009-07-15

    Bi-doped glasses with broadband photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range are presently receiving significant consideration for potential applications in telecommunications, widely tunable fiber lasers and spectral converters. However, the origin of NIR emission remains disputed. Here, we report on NIR absorption and emission properties of bismuthate glass and their dependence on the melting temperature. Results clarify that NIR emission occurs from the same centers as it does in Bi-doped glasses. The dependence of absorption and NIR emission of bismuthate glasses on the melting temperature is interpreted as thermal dissociation of Bi(2)O(3) into elementary Bi. Darkening of bismuthate glass melted at 1300 °C is due to the agglomeration of Bi atoms. The presence of Bi nanoparticles is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and element distribution mapping. By adding antimony oxide as an oxidation agent to the glass, NIR emission centers can be eliminated and Bi(3+) is formed. By comparing with atomic spectral data, absorption bands at ∼320 , ∼500 , 700 , 800 and 1000 nm observed in Bi-doped glasses are assigned to Bi(0) transitions [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, and broadband NIR emission is assigned to the transition [Formula: see text].

  1. Magmatic infiltration and melting in the lower crust and upper mantle beneath the Cima volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.G.; McGuire, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    Xenoliths of lower crustal and upper mantle rocks from the Cima volcanic field (CVF) commonly contain glass pockets, veins, and planar trains of glass and/or fluid inclusions in primary minerals. Glass pockets occupy spaces formerly occupied by primary minerals of the host rocks, but there is a general lack of correspondence between the composition of the glass and that of the replaced primary minerals. The melting is considered to have been induced by infiltration of basaltic magma and differentiates of basaltic magma from complex conduits formed by hydraulic fracturing of the mantle and crustal rocks, and to have occurred during the episode of CVF magmatism between ???7.5 Ma and present. Variable compositions of quenched melts resulted from mixing of introduced melts and products of melting of primary minerals, reaction with primary minerals, partial crystallization, and fractionation resulting from melt and volatile expulsion upon entrainment of the xenoliths. High silica melts (> ??? 60% SiO2) may result by mixing introduced melts with siliceous melts produced by reaction of orthopyroxene. Other quenched melt compositions range from those comparable to the host basalts to those with intermediate Si compositions and elevated Al, alkalis, Ti, P, and S; groundmass compositions of CVF basalts are consistent with infiltration of fractionates of those basalts, but near-solidus melting may also contribute to formation of glass with intermediate silica contents with infiltration only of volatile constituents.

  2. Specialty glass raw materials: Status and developments

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.J.; Gray, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors highlight several key raw materials used in the specialty glass industry. The focus here is to update changes and shifts underway in the worldwide availability and processes that will impact both costs and efficient use of these products. The glass types that use these materials generally are those other than container, float, and fiber glass. Those high-volume consumers of glass raw materials are discussed in a companion paper in this volume. In the specialty glass field, the batch materials involve minerals, and the chemicals derived from them, which are less readily available domestically. These are much more critically defined by specifications of assay, contamination, and particle size, resulting in their being more expensive. They are seldom commodity products. The scope of materials for this fragmented industry includes those for leads, borosilicates, aluminosilicates, opals, sealing and frit glasses, optical glass, ophthalmic glass, cathode ray tubes (CRTs) for TV and display, and glass-ceramics as major segments. They use lead oxides, nearly all the alkalies and alkaline earth portions of the periodic table, as well as rare earths, transition element oxides, phosphates, boron minerals and chemicals, zircon, zinc, most of the halogens, and many of the anions. They often require very special particle size specifications. The requirements for these batch materials are often based on chemistry, the absence of contaminants that impact melting, very wide ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum, glass homogeneity, and freedom from solid and gaseous inclusions down to ppm levels in both size and number.

  3. Evaluation of NRL Glass for Fiber Optics. Phase I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-14

    quenched frit in a covered crucible. A one-inch diameter rod from Melt 3 was redrawn. The core glass has sufficient working range for redrawing, and no...The Properties of Glass, Reinhold Publishing Corp. (1950), 561 pp. 2. W. D. Kingery, Introduction to Ceramics , John Wiley and Sons, (1960), 781 pp. 3

  4. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

  5. Glass melter off-gas system

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for melting glass in a glass melter in such a way as to reduce deposition of particulates in the off-gas duct. Deposit accumulation is reduced by achieving an off-gas velocity above approximately 15 meters/second and an off-gas temperature as close as possible to, but not higher than, the glass softening point. Because the deposits are largely water-soluble, those that do form on the interior surface of the duct can be readily removed by injecting water or steam directly into the off-gas duct from its entrance or exit.

  6. Novel lead-iron phosphate glass

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    The invention described and claimed in the specification relates to the discovery that effective addition of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 to a lead phosphate glass results in a glass having enhanced chemical durability and physical stability, and consists essentially of the glass resulting from melting a mixture consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 40-66 percent PbO, 30-55 percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and an effective concentration up to 12 percent Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  7. Novel lead-iron phosphate glass

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1989-07-11

    The invention described and claimed in the specification relates to the discovery that effective addition of Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] to a lead phosphate glass results in a glass having enhanced chemical durability and physical stability, and consists essentially of the glass resulting from melting a mixture consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 40--66 percent PbO, 30--55 percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and an effective concentration up to 12 percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3].

  8. Glass melter off-gas system

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for melting glass in a glass melter in such a way as to reduce deposition of particulates in the off-gas duct. Deposit accumulation is reduced by achieving an off-gas velocity above approximately 15 meters/second and an off-gas temperature as close as possible to, but not higher than, the glass softening point. Because the deposits are largely water-soluble, those that do form on the interior surface of the duct can be readily removed by injecting water or steam directly into the off-gas duct from its entrance or exit.

  9. Compositional convection in viscous melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Stephen; Jaupart, Claude

    1989-04-01

    DURING solidification of multi-component melts, gradients in temperature and composition develop on different scales because of the large difference between their respective molecular diffusivities. Two consequences are the development of double-diffusive convection1 and the creation of mushy zones in which solid and liquid intimately coexist with a complex small-scale geometry2,3. Theoretical analysis requires simplifying assumptions that must be verified by laboratory experiments. Hitherto, experiments have been carried out with aqueous solutions which do not accurately represent the dynamics of melts with high Prandtl numbers, such as magmas. Here we describe the characteristics of compositional convection using a new experimental technique which allows the viscosity of the solution to be varied independently of chemical composition and liquidus temperature. A supereutectic melt was cooled from below, causing the growth of a horizontal layer of crystals. Convective instability occurred when the local solutal Rayleigh number of the compositional boundary layer ahead of the advancing crystallization front attained a value of ~3 on average. We observed a novel regime of convection in which the thermal boundary layer above the crystallization front was essentially unmodified by the motion of the plumes. The plumes carried a small heat flux and did not mix the fluid to a uniform temperature.

  10. IRON PHOSPHATE GLASSES: AN ALTERNATIVE FOR VITRIFYING CERTAIN NUCLEAR WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Cheol-Woon

    2004-06-28

    The unusual properties and beneficial characteristics of iron phosphate glasses, as viewed from the standpoint of alternative glasses for vitrifying nuclear and hazardous wastes (which contain components that make them poorly suited for vitrification in borosilicate glass), have been investigated by the University of Missouri-Rolla with support from the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP), DOE [DEFG07- 96ER45618]. During the past year, the corrosion resistance of Inconel 690 and 693 coupons submerged in an iron phosphate melt at 1050 C for up to 155 days has been investigated to determine whether iron phosphate glasses could be melted in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) equipped with such electrodes in the same manner as now being used to melt borosilicate glass. Substituting iron phosphate glasses for borosilicate glasses could significantly reduce the time and cost for clean up due to the higher waste loading possible in iron phosphate glass. The iron phosphate melt, which contained 30 wt% of the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW), did not corrode the Inconel 690 to any greater extent than what has been reported for Inconel 690 electrodes in the borosilicate melt in the JHM at the Defense Waste Processing Facility. Furthermore, Inconel 693 appeared to be an even better candidate for use in iron phosphate melts since its corrosion rate (0.7 {micro}m/day) was only about one half that (1.3 {micro}m/day) of Inconel 690. In the past year, the results of the research on iron phosphate glasses have been described in nine technical papers and one report and have been presented at four international and national meetings.

  11. Bubble formation in additive manufacturing of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Peters, Daniel C.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-05-01

    Bubble formation is a common problem in glass manufacturing. The spatial density of bubbles in a piece of glass is a key limiting factor to the optical quality of the glass. Bubble formation is also a common problem in additive manufacturing, leading to anisotropic material properties. In glass Additive Manufacturing (AM) two separate types of bubbles have been observed: a foam layer caused by the reboil of the glass melt and a periodic pattern of bubbles which appears to be unique to glass additive manufacturing. This paper presents a series of studies to relate the periodicity of bubble formation to part scan speed, laser power, and filament feed rate. These experiments suggest that bubbles are formed by the reboil phenomena why periodic bubbles result from air being trapped between the glass filament and the substrate. Reboil can be detected using spectroscopy and avoided by minimizing the laser power while periodic bubbles can be avoided by a two-step laser melting process to first establish good contact between the filament and substrate before reflowing the track with higher laser power.

  12. Melt Structure and Properties: a Spectroscopic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J.

    2006-12-01

    Entropy, volume, and their P/T derivatives are at the heart of models of the thermodynamics of silicate melts and magmas. Quantitative characterization of glass structure is leading to important new insights into the links from "Microscopic to Macroscopic" that can at least guide interpretations of data and in some cases even have predictive power. A few recent examples will be discussed here. The often-large configurational components to heat capacities, thermal expansivities, and compressibilities of melts strongly indicate that structural changes with temperature and pressure are of key importance. At least some aspects of thermal increases in configurational (as opposed to vibrational) disorder are amenable to spectroscopic detection, either with in situ methods or on glasses with varying quench rates and thus varying fictive temperatures. In some systems, such changes are now clear, and can be shown to make significant contributions to properties. These include network cation coordination in systems such as borate liquids (BO4 to BO3 at higher T), and Al-Si disordering in aluminosilicates. In general, however, progress in this rich problem has only begun. It has long been suspected from thermodynamic analyses (and theoretical simulations) that configurational changes in melts play a key role in volume compression at high pressure, over and above that which can be expressed in "normal" equations of state or from those expected from bond compression and bending. Scattering and spectroscopic studies have revealed some of the important aspects of pressure-induced structural changes, but again we are just at the beginning of full understanding. For example, binary silicate glasses quenched from high-P melts clearly record some systematic increases in Si coordination, while aluminosilicates record systematic pressure and compositional (modifier cation field strength) effects on Al coordination in recovered samples with large, quenched-in density increases

  13. Low temperature process for obtaining thin glass films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.T.

    A method for coating a substrate with a glass-like film comprises, applying to the substrate an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a polymeric network of partially hydrolyzed metal alkoxide into which network there is incorporated finely powdered glass, whereby there is achieved on the substrate a coherent and adherent initial film; and heating said film to a temperature sufficient to melt said powdered glass component, thereby converting said initial film to a final densified film.

  14. Low temperature process for obtaining thin glass films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott T.

    1984-01-01

    A method for coating a substrate with a glass-like film comprises, applying to the substrate an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a polymeric network of partially hydrolyzed metal alkoxide into which network there is incorporated finely powdered glass, whereby there is achieved on the substrate a coherent and adherent initial film; and heating said film to a temperature sufficient to melt said powdered glass component, thereby converting said initial film to a final densified film.

  15. The first success of glass eel production in the world: basic biology on fish reproduction advances new applied technology in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Hirohiko; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohta, Hiromi; Unuma, Tatsuya; Nomura, Kazuharu

    2005-04-01

    The eel has long been esteemed as an important food fish in the world, especially in Japan, and has been used as an experimental fish for many fields of fish physiology. However, the decreases in eel resources have been a serious concern in recent years. The catches of glass eels as seedlings for aquaculture have shown a long-term decrease in both Europe and East Asia. To increase eel resources, the development of techniques for artificial induction of maturation and spawning and rearing their larvae have been eagerly desired. Recent progress of reproductive physiology of fish, especially mechanisms of oocyte maturation and ovulation in female and of spermatozoa maturation in male, facilitate to establish techniques for hormonal induction of maturation and spawning in sexually immature eels. With persistent effort to development of rearing techniques of larvae, we have first succeeded to produce glass eel. These applied techniques are may contribute to understand the basic reproductive physiology of the eel.

  16. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  17. Nuclear Waste Glasses: Beautiful Simplicity of Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-01-01

    The behavior of glasses with a large number of components, such as waste glasses, is not more complex than the behavior of simple glasses. On the contrary, the presence of many components restricts the composition region of these glasses in a way that allows approximating composition-property relationships by linear functions. This has far-reaching practical consequences for formulating nuclear waste glasses. On the other hand, processing high-level and low-activity waste glasses presents various problems, such as crystallization, foaming, and salt segre-gation in the melter. The need to decrease the settling of solids in the melter to an acceptable level and to maximize the rate of melting presents major challenges to processing technology. However, the most important property of the glass product is its chemical durability, a somewhat vague concept in lieu of the assessment of the glass resistance to aqueous attack while the radioactivity decays over tens of thousands of years.

  18. Remote Sensing of Lunar Mineralogy: The Glass Conundrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.; Tompkins, S.; Pieters, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    The term "lunar glasses" provokes different connotations depending on the context. Common usages include a) pyroclastic deposits consisting of "glass beads" derived from the deep interior, b) melt products created during impact events, and c) the ubiquitous and complex glass-welded weathering products, agglutinates. Each is distinct due to a specific geologic origin and composition, but all contain quench glass in some form. Spectral properties of a wide range of glass-bearing lunar materials is presented elsewhere [1], Discussed here are new spectra for a depth sequence of samples from Apollo 17 core 74002 collected at Shorty Crater. The data provide new insight into why Fe-Ti-rich quench glass is not directly observed remotely. Resolving this mystery allows the extensive glass-rich deposits at Aristarchus to be recognized as low-Ti pyroclastic glass.

  19. Biomass preservation in impact melt ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Kieren Torres; Bailey, Melanie J.; Berhanu, Deborah; Bland, Phil A.; Cressey, Gordon; Howard, Lauren E.; Jeynes, Chris; Matthewman, Richard; Martins, Zita; Sephton, Mark A.; Stolojan, Vlad; Verchovsky, Sasha

    2013-12-01

    Meteorites can have played a role in the delivery of the building blocks of life to Earth only if organic compounds are able to survive the high pressures and temperatures of an impact event. Although experimental impact studies have reported the survival of organic compounds, there are uncertainties in scaling experimental conditions to those of a meteorite impact on Earth and organic matter has not been found in highly shocked impact materials in a natural setting. Impact glass linked to the 1.2-km-diameter Darwin crater in western Tasmania is strewn over an area exceeding 400km2 and is thought to have been ejected by a meteorite impact about 800kyr ago into terrain consisting of rainforest and swamp. Here we use pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to show that biomarkers representative of plant species in the local ecosystem--including cellulose, lignin, aliphatic biopolymer and protein remnants--survived the Darwin impact. We find that inside the impact glass the organic components are trapped in porous carbon spheres. We propose that the organic material was captured within impact melt and preserved when the melt quenched to glass, preventing organic decomposition since the impact. We suggest that organic material can survive capture and transport in products of extreme impact processing, at least for a Darwin-sized impact event.

  20. Do cracks melt their way through solids?

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, P. R.

    1998-12-01

    Real-time, in situ fracture studies in the high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) show that microscopically thin regions of amorphous NiTi form ahead of moving crack tips in the B2-NiTi intermetallic compound during tensile straining at temperatures equal to or below 600K. The upper cutoff temperature of 600K for this stress-induced melting (or amorphization) is identical to the upper cutoff temperatures reported in the literature for both heavy-ion-induced amorphization of the intermetallic NiTi and ion-beam-mixing-induced amorphization of Ni and Ti multilayer. These results, together with the fact that the higher crystallization temperatures ({approximately}800K)of unrelaxed amorphous NiTi alloys obtained by rapid quenching can also be reduced to, but not lower than 600K, by heavy-ion irradiation, strongly suggest that structural relaxation processes enhanced or induced by dynamic atomic disordering allow the formation of a unique, fully-relaxed glassy state which is characterized by a unique isothermal crystallization temperature. We believe that this unique temperature is the Kauzmann glass-transition temperature, corresponding to the ideal glass having the same entropy as the crystalline state. As the glassy state with the lowest global free energy, the preferential formation of this ideal glass by disorder-induced amorphization processes can be understood as the most energetically-favored, kinetically-constrained melting response of crystalline materials driven far from equilibrium at low temperatures.

  1. Modeling of Glass Making Processes for Improved Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas P. Seward III

    2003-03-31

    The overall goal of this project was to develop a high-temperature melt properties database with sufficient reliability to allow mathematical modeling of glass melting and forming processes for improved product quality, improved efficiency and lessened environmental impact. It was initiated by the United States glass industry through the NSF Industry/University Center for Glass Research (CGR) at Alfred University [1]. Because of their important commercial value, six different types/families of glass were studied: container, float, fiberglass (E- and wool-types), low-expansion borosilicate, and color TV panel glasses. CGR member companies supplied production-quality glass from all six families upon which we measured, as a function of temperature in the molten state, density, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, infrared transmittance (to determine high temperature radiative conductivity), non-Newtonian flow behavior, and oxygen partial pres sure. With CGR cost sharing, we also studied gas solubility and diffusivity in each of these glasses. Because knowledge of the compositional dependencies of melt viscosity and electrical resistivity are extremely important for glass melting furnace design and operation, these properties were studied more fully. Composition variations were statistically designed for all six types/families of glass. About 140 different glasses were then melted on a laboratory scale and their viscosity and electrical resistivity measured as a function of temperature. The measurements were completed in February 2003 and are reported on here. The next steps will be (1) to statistically analyze the compositional dependencies of viscosity and electrical resistivity and develop composition-property response surfaces, (2) submit all the data to CGR member companies to evaluate the usefulness in their models, and (3) publish the results in technical journals and most likely in book form.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT WASTE GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Kimura, Akihiko; Schaible, Micah J.; Tate, Rachel M.

    2010-10-26

    The loading of high-level waste in borosilicate glasses is limited by crystallinity constraints that cannot prevent crystal accumulation on the melter bottom and in the glass discharge riser of the melter. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is studying variations in composition that are designed to constrain high-level waste glass compositions and develop the crystal-tolerant high-level waste glasses. These glasses will allow high waste loading without decreasing the lifetime of the melter by keeping the small spinel crystals suspended in the molten glass. Adding ~1 wt% of NiO to the baseline glass caused large spinel crystals to form up to 210 µm in size and resulted in the highest accumulation rate, ~ 227 mm/year, of all tested glasses. Noble metals that were added to high-Ni glass prevented large spinel crystals from forming and decreased the accumulation rate ~ 8.5 times. Adding ~5 wt% of Fe2O3 to the baseline glass resulted in a high number density of ~10-μm spinel crystals that remained suspended in the glass melt even after 17 days at 850°C. The accumulation rate of spinel crystals in high-chromia crucibles was only slightly higher compared with the accumulation rate in double crucibles. Only baseline glass exhibited about 2.6 times faster accumulation rate because of increased number of bigger crystals. These crystals were the result of glass enrichment with chromium that was leached out from the walls of high-chromia crucibles.

  3. Measurements of liquid and glass structures using in-situ high energy x-ray and neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Richard; Benmore, C. J.; Skinner, Lawrie; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Tumber, Sonia; Jennings, G; Santodonato, Louis J; Jin, D; Du, Jincheng; Parise, John B

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of high temperature molten materials and their evolution to the amorphous state is often hampered by unwanted reactions with container surfaces. This work used aerodynamic levitation in combination with laser beam heating to study high melting point materials that can form supercooled liquids or glasses. Details of the instruments that are being used at the Advanced Photon Source and the Spallation Neutron Source to study molten oxides with high energy x-ray scattering and neutron diffraction with isotope substitution are presented. Examples of measurements are used to illustrate the use of the instruments. Plans for further development and application of the capabilities are presented.

  4. Containerless glass fiber processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustic levitation furnace system is described that was developed for testing the feasibility of containerless fiber pulling experiments. It is possible to levitate very dense materials such as platinum at room temperature. Levitation at elevated temperatures is much more difficult. Samples of dense heavy metal fluoride glass were levitated at 300 C. It is therefore possible that containerless fiber pulling experiments could be performed. Fiber pulling from the melt at 650 C is not possible at unit gravity but could be possible at reduced gravities. The Acoustic Levitation Furnace is described, including engineering parameters and processing information. It is illustrated that a shaped reflector greatly increases the levitation force aiding the levitation of more dense materials.

  5. Probing the structural disorder of basalts and slab-driven andesite melts: Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Whereas the structure of multi-component silicate melts has strong implication for the properties of natural silicate melts and relevant magmatic processes in Earth's mantle and crust, little is known about their atomic structures due to lack of suitable experimental probes of multi-component amorphous oxides. Although most of the progress in melt structure has been made for relatively simple binary and ternary silicate glasses, recent advances in high-resolution solid-state NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) unveil previously unknown structural details of multi-component silicate melts (Lee, S. K. and Sung, S., Chem. Geol., 2008, 256, 326; Lee et al., P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 2011, 108, 6847; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125). In this study we report experimental results on the effects of composition. atomic structure of CaO-MgO-Al_{2} O_{3} -SiO_{2} (CMAS) glasses in diopside (CaMgSi_{2}O_{6}) and Ca-tschermakite (CaAl_{2}SiO_{6}) join and glass in the diopside-anorthite eutectic composition (Di_{64}An_{36})—model systems for basaltic melts—using solid-state NMR. We also report the first high-resolution experimental results on the atomic structure of CaO-MgO-Na_{2}O-Al_{2}O_{3}-SiO_{2} (CMNAS) glasses in diopside and jadeite (NaAlSi_{2}O_{6}) join, and glass in the natural phonolite composition (CaO: MgO: Na_{2}O: K_{2}O: Al_{2}O_{3}: SiO_{2}= 1.4: 8.0: 9.0: 3.8: 13: 64 mol%), a model system for slab driven andesite melts. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of CMAS glasses in diopside-Ca-tschermakite join show predominant ^{[4]}Al and a non-negligible fraction of ^{[5]}Al. Approximately 3.3% of ^{[5]}Al is observed for Di_{64}An_{36} glass. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of CMNAS glasses in diopside and jadeite join show mostly ^{[4]}Al and a non-negligible fraction of ^{[5]}Al (X_{Diopside}=0.75, the mole fraction of diopside content). While the C_{q} (quadrupolar coupling constant) of ^{[4]}Al for glasses in

  6. The effect of melt composition on the partitioning of oxidized sulfur between silicate melts and magmatic volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajacz, Zoltán

    2015-06-01

    Experiments were conducted at 500 MPa and 1240 °C in a piston cylinder apparatus to assess the effect of melt composition on the melt/volatile partition coefficient of sulfur (DSmelt/volatile) , which was used as a measure of the silicate melt's capacity to dissolve oxidized sulfur species. Iron-free, three- and four-component silicate melts were equilibrated with H2O-S fluids with sulfur concentrations ⩽2 mol% at an oxygen fugacity imposed by the Re-ReO2 buffer (1.4 log units above the Ni-NiO buffer). At these conditions, SO2 (S4+) is predicted to be the dominant sulfur species in the volatile phase and sulfate (S6+) is the dominant sulfur species in the silicate melt. The values of DSmelt /volatile were calculated by mass balance. The results show that DSmelt /volatile values increase exponentially with decreasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure. For example, in calcium-aluminosilicate melts, DSmelt /volatile changes from 0.005 to 0.3 as the degree of melt polymerization changes from the equivalent of a rhyolite to the equivalent of a basalt. At a constant degree of melt polymerization, DSmelt /volatile in equilibrium with sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) melts is more than an order of magnitude higher than in equilibrium with calcium-aluminosilicate (CAS) melts, and more than two orders of magnitude higher than in equilibrium with magnesium-aluminosilicate (MAS) melts. The value of DSmelt /volatile changes from 0.014 in MAS glasses to 3.4 in NAS glasses for the most depolymerized compositions in each series. Potassium has a similar effect on sulfate dissolution to that of Na. The variation of DSmelt /volatile in equilibrium with various calcium-sodium aluminosilicate (CNAS), magnesium-sodium aluminosilicate (MNAS) and magnesium-potassium aluminosilicate (MKAS) melts indicates that alkalis are only available for sulfate complexation when they are present in excess compared to the required amount to charge balance for the Si4+ to Al3

  7. Physical phenomena in containerless glass processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.