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Sample records for advanced gps receiver

  1. Chip Advancer For GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Thomas K.; Srinivasan, Jeffrey M.; Thomas, J. Brooks

    1989-01-01

    Instrument errors made negligible. For each integration interval, both delay and rate of change of delay initialized to small fraction of chip - for example, to order of 10 to the negative 7th power - thereby making feedback control and extraction of delay highly accurate and flexible. With appropriate selection of sampling rate relative to chip rate, commensurability errors reduced to extremely small levels. In Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, pseudorandom code sequence generated by simple digital logic incorporating effects of time, delay, and rate of change of delay. Flexibility in starting time and sum interval very useful in aligning correlation interval with beginnings and endings of data bits.

  2. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  3. Digital Signal Processor For GPS Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.; Meehan, T. K.; Srinivasan, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Three innovative components combined to produce all-digital signal processor with superior characteristics: outstanding accuracy, high-dynamics tracking, versatile integration times, lower loss-of-lock signal strengths, and infrequent cycle slips. Three components are digital chip advancer, digital carrier downconverter and code correlator, and digital tracking processor. All-digital signal processor intended for use in receivers of Global Positioning System (GPS) for geodesy, geodynamics, high-dynamics tracking, and ionospheric calibration.

  4. Counterrotator And Correlator For GPS Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. Brooks; Srinivasan, Jeffrey M.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate, all-digital, high-speed processor comprising correlator and down-converter developed for receivers in Global Positioning System (GPS). Processor reduces roundoff and commensurability errors to extremely small values. Use of digital chip and phase advancers provides outstanding control and accuracy in phase and feedback. Great flexibility imparted by provision for arbitrary starting time and integration length. Minimum-bit design requires minimum number of logical elements, thereby reducing size, power, and cost.

  5. Front end for GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess Brooks (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The front end in GPS receivers has the functions of amplifying, down-converting, filtering and sampling the received signals. In the preferred embodiment, only two operations, A/D conversion and a sum, bring the signal from RF to filtered quadrature baseband samples. After amplification and filtering at RF, the L1 and L2 signals are each sampled at RF at a high selected subharmonic rate. The subharmonic sample rates are approximately 900 MHz for L1 and 982 MHz for L2. With the selected subharmonic sampling, the A/D conversion effectively down-converts the signal from RF to quadrature components at baseband. The resulting sample streams for L1 and L2 are each reduced to a lower rate with a digital filter, which becomes a straight sum in the simplest embodiment. The frequency subsystem can be very simple, only requiring the generation of a single reference frequency (e.g. 20.46 MHz minus a small offset) and the simple multiplication of this reference up to the subharmonic sample rates for L1 and L2. The small offset in the reference frequency serves the dual purpose of providing an advantageous offset in the down-converted carrier frequency and in the final baseband sample rate.

  6. PiVoT GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennersten, Miriam Dvorak; Banes, Anthony Vince; Boegner, Gregory J.; Dougherty, Lamar; Edwards, Bernard L.; Roman, Joseph; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has built an open architecture, 24 channel space flight GPS receiver. The CompactPCI PiVoT GPS receiver card is based on the Mitel/GEC Plessey Builder-2 board. PiVoT uses two Plessey 2021 correlators to allow tracking of up to 24 separate GPS SV's on unique channels. Its four front ends can support four independent antennas, making it a useful card for hosting GPS attitude determination algorithms. It has been built using space quality, radiation tolerant parts. The PiVoT card will track a weaker signal than the original Builder 2 board. It also hosts an improved clock oscillator. The PiVoT software is based on the original Plessey Builder 2 software ported to the Linux operating system. The software is POSIX complaint and can easily be converted to other POSIX operating systems. The software is open source to anyone with a licensing agreement with Plessey. Additional tasks can be added to the software to support GPS science experiments or attitude determination algorithms. The next generation PiVoT receiver will be a single radiation hardened CompactPCI card containing the microprocessor and the GPS receiver optimized for use above the GPS constellation. PiVoT was flown successfully on a balloon in July, 2001, for its first non-simulated flight.

  7. Single-Receiver GPS Phase Bias Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, William I.; Haines, Bruce J.; Weiss, Jan P.; Harvey, Nathaniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Existing software has been modified to yield the benefits of integer fixed double-differenced GPS-phased ambiguities when processing data from a single GPS receiver with no access to any other GPS receiver data. When the double-differenced combination of phase biases can be fixed reliably, a significant improvement in solution accuracy is obtained. This innovation uses a large global set of GPS receivers (40 to 80 receivers) to solve for the GPS satellite orbits and clocks (along with any other parameters). In this process, integer ambiguities are fixed and information on the ambiguity constraints is saved. For each GPS transmitter/receiver pair, the process saves the arc start and stop times, the wide-lane average value for the arc, the standard deviation of the wide lane, and the dual-frequency phase bias after bias fixing for the arc. The second step of the process uses the orbit and clock information, the bias information from the global solution, and only data from the single receiver to resolve double-differenced phase combinations. It is called "resolved" instead of "fixed" because constraints are introduced into the problem with a finite data weight to better account for possible errors. A receiver in orbit has much shorter continuous passes of data than a receiver fixed to the Earth. The method has parameters to account for this. In particular, differences in drifting wide-lane values must be handled differently. The first step of the process is automated, using two JPL software sets, Longarc and Gipsy-Oasis. The resulting orbit/clock and bias information files are posted on anonymous ftp for use by any licensed Gipsy-Oasis user. The second step is implemented in the Gipsy-Oasis executable, gd2p.pl, which automates the entire process, including fetching the information from anonymous ftp

  8. A GPS Receiver for Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William A.; Heckler, Gregory W.; Holt, Greg N.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Beginning with the launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in October of 2008, NASA will once again begin its quest to land humans on the Moon. This effort will require the development of new spacecraft which will safely transport people from the Earth to the Moon and back again, as well as robotic probes tagged with science, re-supply, and communication duties. In addition to the next-generation spacecraft currently under construction, including the Orion capsule, NASA is also investigating and developing cutting edge navigation sensors which will allow for autonomous state estimation in low Earth orbit (LEO) and cislunar space. Such instruments could provide an extra layer of redundancy in avionics systems and reduce the reliance on support and on the Deep Space Network (DSN). One such sensor is the weak-signal Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver "Navigator" being developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). At the heart of the Navigator is a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based acquisition engine. This engine allows for the rapid acquisition/reacquisition of strong GPS signals, enabling the receiver to quickly recover from outages due to blocked satellites or atmospheric entry. Additionally, the acquisition algorithm provides significantly lower sensitivities than a conventional space-based GPS receiver, permitting it to acquire satellites well above the GPS constellation. This paper assesses the performance of the Navigator receiver based upon three of the major flight regimes of a manned lunar mission: Earth ascent, cislunar navigation, and entry. Representative trajectories for each of these segments were provided by NASA. The Navigator receiver was connected to a Spirent GPS signal generator, to allow for the collection of real-time, hardware-in-the-loop results for each phase of the flight. For each of the flight segments, the Navigator was tested on its ability to acquire and track GPS satellites under the dynamical

  9. High dynamic GPS receiver validation demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Statman, J. I.; Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Validation Demonstration establishes that the high dynamic Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver concept developed at JPL meets the dynamic tracking requirements for range instrumentation of missiles and drones. It was demonstrated that the receiver can track the pseudorange and pseudorange rate of vehicles with acceleration in excess of 100 g and jerk in excess of 100 g/s, dynamics ten times more severe than specified for conventional High Dynamic GPS receivers. These results and analytic extensions to a complete system configuration establish that all range instrumentation requirements can be met. The receiver can be implemented in the 100 cu in volume required by all missiles and drones, and is ideally suited for transdigitizer or translator applications.

  10. GPS high dynamic receiver tracking demonstration results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Statman, J. I.; Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    Demonstration results are presented for a high dynamic GPS receiver. The receiver tested is a breadboard unit capable of tracking one simulated satellite signal in pseudorange and range rate. The receiver makes approximate maximum likelihood estimates of pseudorange and range rate each 20 ms, and tracks these observables using a third order filter with a time constant of 0.14 s. Carrier phase is not tracked, which eliminates the typical failure mode of loss of carrier lock associated with PLLs at high dynamics. The receiver tracks with pseudorange lag errors of under 0.06 m when subjected to simulated 50 g turns with 40 g/s peak jerk. Pseudorange errors due to receiver noise alone are approximately 0.6 m rms at a carrier power to noise spectral density ratio of 34 dB-Hz. The tracking threshold SNR is approximately 28 dB-Hz, which provides 12 dB margin relative to the 40 dB-Hz that occurs with minimum specified satellite signal strength, 3.5 dB system noise figure, and 0 dBi antenna gain.

  11. Development of a Miniature Multifunctional GPS Receiver for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyano, Tomoyuki; Ishijima, Yoshiyuki; Kumagai, Susumu

    This paper presents the development of a miniature multifunctional GPS receiver at NASDA. The design and implementation method for a spaceborne GPS receiver has been investigated, and a breadboard model of a parallel signal search system incorporating matched filtering, an essential technique for next-generation GPS receivers, has been manufactured. The time to acquisition (TTA) of a GPS signal was measured on the breadboard model using a GPS simulator. The test results of the trial product show that TTA is within 60 msec, and time to first fix (TTFF) of the navigation calculation in a low-altitude orbit is within 5.3 min in the worst-case scenario.

  12. Processing In A GPS Receiver To Reduce Multipath Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Thomas K.

    1994-01-01

    Four techniques of ancillary real-time digital processing of signals in Global Positioning System, GPS, receiver introduced reducing effects of multipath propagation of signals on position estimates produced by receiver. Multipath range errors halved. Applied in addition to other signal-processing techniques and to other techniques designing as receiving antenna to make it insensitive to reflections of GPS signals from nearby objects.

  13. Pre-Flight Testing of Spaceborne GPS Receivers Using a GPS Constellation Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Davis, Edward; Alonso, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Global Positioning System (GPS) applications test facility has been established within the GSFC Guidance Navigation and Control Center. The GPS test facility is currently housing the Global Simulation Systems Inc. (GSSI) STR2760 GPS satellite 40-channel attitude simulator and a STR4760 12-channel navigation simulator. The facility also contains a few other resources such as an atomic time standard test bed, a rooftop antenna platform and a radome. It provides a new capability for high dynamics GPS simulations of space flight that is unique within the aerospace community. The GPS facility provides a critical element for the development and testing of GPS based technologies i.e. position, attitude and precise time determination used on-board a spacecraft, suborbital rocket or balloon. The GPS simulator system is configured in a transportable rack and is available for GPS component development as well as for component, spacecraft subsystem and system level testing at spacecraft integration and test sites. The GPS facility has been operational since early 1996 and has been utilized by space flight projects carrying GPS experiments, such as the OrbView-2 and the Argentine SAC-A spacecrafts. The SAC-A pre-flight test data obtained by using the STR2760 simulator and the comparison with preliminary analysis of the GPS data from SAC-A telemetry are summarized. This paper describes pre-flight tests and simulations used to support a unique spaceborne GPS experiment. The GPS experiment mission objectives and the test program are described, as well as the GPS test facility configuration needed to verify experiment feasibility. Some operational and critical issues inherent in GPS receiver pre-flight tests and simulations using this GPS simulator, and test methodology are described. Simulation and flight data are presented. A complete program of pre-flight testing of spaceborne GPS receivers using a GPS constellation simulator is

  14. Pre-Flight Testing of Spaceborne GPS Receivers using a GPS Constellation Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Davis, Edward; Alonso, R.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Global Positioning System (GPS) applications test facility has been established within the GSFC Guidance Navigation and Control Center. The GPS test facility is currently housing the Global Simulation Systems Inc. (GSSI) STR2760 GPS satellite 40-channel attitude simulator and a STR4760 12-channel navigation simulator. The facility also contains a few other resources such as an atomic time standard test bed, a rooftop antenna platform and a radome. It provides a new capability for high dynamics GPS simulations of space flight that is unique within the aerospace community. The GPS facility provides a critical element for the development and testing of GPS based technologies i.e. position, attitude and precise time determination used on-board a spacecraft, suborbital rocket balloon. The GPS simulation system is configured in a transportable rack and is available for GPS component development as well as for component, spacecraft subsystem and system level testing at spacecraft integration and tests sites. The GPS facility has been operational since early 1996 and has utilized by space flight projects carrying GPS experiments, such as the OrbView-2 and the Argentine SAC-A spacecrafts. The SAC-A pre-flight test data obtained by using the STR2760 simulator and the comparison with preliminary analysis of the GPS data from SAC-A telemetry are summarized. This paper describes pre-flight tests and simulations used to support a unique spaceborne GPS experiment. The GPS experiment mission objectives and the test program are described, as well as the GPS test facility configuration needed to verify experiment feasibility. Some operational and critical issues inherent in GPS receiver pre-flight tests and simulations using this GPS simulation, and test methodology are described. Simulation and flight data are presented. A complete program of pre-flight testing of spaceborne GPS receivers using a GPS constellation simulator is detailed.

  15. GPS Antenna Characterization Experiment (ACE): Receiver Design and Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martzen, Phillip; Highsmith, Dolan E.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Parker, Joel J. K.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    The GPS Antenna Characterization Experiment (ACE) is a research collaboration between Aerospace and NASA Goddard to characterize the gain patterns of the GPS L1 transmit antennas. High altitude GPS observations are collected at a ground station through a transponder-based or "bent-pipe" architecture where the GPS L1 RF spectrum is received at a platform in geosynchronous orbit and relayed to the ground for processing. The focus of this paper is the unique receiver algorithm design and implementation. The high-sensitivity GPS C/A-code receiver uses high fidelity code and carrier estimates and externally supplied GPS message bit data in a batch algorithm with settings for a 0 dB-Hz threshold. The resulting carrier-to-noise measurements are used in a GPS L1 transmit antenna pattern reconstruction. This paper shows initial transmit gain patterns averaged over each block of GPS satellites, including comparisons to available pre-flight gain measurements from the GPS vehicle contractors. These results provide never-before-seen assessments of the full, in-flight transmit gain patterns.

  16. Combined software GPS/Galileo receiver and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Jingnan; Li, Tao; McLeod, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    Modernized GPS and Galileo will be available to civil users at the end of this decade, thus there is a need for unified platform that can receive multi-frequency signal of GPS/Galileo to develop and test for growing variety of diverse applications. The unified platform for various applications will speed the design process and reduce its cost. Such a platform need an open architecture and design flexibility so that modifications and testing can be done conveniently and efficiently. The flexible, reconfigurable, combined and software based Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver will allow development, test and measurement of a variety of receiver architectures. This paper proposes a structure of combined multi-frequency software GPS/Galileo receiver for future GNSS receiver, which can utilize the planned GPS and Galileo publicly available signals. The receiver consists of a hardware multi-frequency front end responsible for both capturing all planned civil satellite-based radio-navigation signals. A followed programmable processor performs signal correlation. The correlator output then goes on signal processing totally using software. The correlator can be implemented either completely in software or using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) for real time processing. The software modules for signal processing are easily updated. Improvements in accuracy and integrity are also achieved by GPS/Galileo Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM). The combined software implementation of processing modules makes this system a truly versatile GNSS receiver suitable for various applications.

  17. Impact of Swarm GPS receiver updates on POD performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den IJssel, Jose; Forte, Biagio; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The Swarm satellites are equipped with state-of-the-art Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, which are used for the precise geolocation of the magnetic and electric field instruments, as well as for the determination of the Earth's gravity field, the total electron content and low-frequency thermospheric neutral densities. The onboard GPS receivers deliver high-quality data with an almost continuous data rate. However, the receivers show a slightly degraded performance when flying over the geomagnetic poles and the geomagnetic equator, due to ionospheric scintillation. Furthermore, with only eight channels available for dual-frequency tracking, the amount of collected GPS tracking data is relatively low compared with various other missions. Therefore, several modifications have been implemented to the Swarm GPS receivers. To optimise the amount of collected GPS data, the GPS antenna elevation mask has slowly been reduced from 10° to 2°. To improve the robustness against ionospheric scintillation, the bandwidths of the GPS receiver tracking loops have been widened. Because these modifications were first implemented on Swarm-C, their impact can be assessed by a comparison with the close flying Swarm-A satellite. This shows that both modifications have a positive impact on the GPS receiver performance. The reduced elevation mask increases the amount of GPS tracking data by more than 3 %, while the updated tracking loops lead to around 1.3 % more observations and a significant reduction in tracking losses due to severe equatorial scintillation. The additional observations at low elevation angles increase the average noise of the carrier phase observations, but nonetheless slightly improve the resulting reduced-dynamic and kinematic orbit accuracy as shown by independent satellite laser ranging (SLR) validation. The more robust tracking loops significantly reduce the large carrier phase observation errors at the geomagnetic poles and along the geomagnetic

  18. Specification of a NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver for a differential GPS ground system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccall, D. L.; Turner, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    One step towards the successful completion of a functional ground unit for the Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) will be in choosing a currently available GPS receiver that will accurately measure the propagation times of the satellite signals and have the capability to be electrically interfaced with and controlled by a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) PDP-11/34A computer. The minimum requirements and characteristics of a NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver are described. The specific technical specifications addressed include data accuracies and resolutions, receiver interface/external control, enclosure dimensions and mounting requirements, receiver operation, and environmental specifications.

  19. How Bad Receiver Coordinates Can Affect GPS Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadsey, H.

    1996-01-01

    Many sources of error are possible when the Global Positioning System (GPS) is used for time comparisons. Some of these errors have been listed by Lewandowski. Because of the complexity of the system, an error source could have more than one effect. This paper will present theoretical and observational results by offsetting a receiver's coordinates. The calculations show how an error as small as three meters in any direction can result in a timing error of more than 10 nanoseconds. The GPS receiver must be surveyed to better than 0.2 meter accuracy for the timing error to be sub-nanosecond.

  20. Going Up. A GPS Receiver Adapts to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, E. Glenn; Simpson, James E.

    2000-01-01

    Current plans for the space station call for the GPS receiver to be installed on the U.S. lab module of the station in early 2001 (ISS Assembly Flight SA), followed by the attachment of the antenna array in late 2001 (Flight 8A). At that point the U.S. ISS guidance and control system will be operational. The flight of SIGI on the space station represents a "coming of age" for GPS technology on spacecraft. For at least a decade, the promise of using GPS receivers to automate spacecraft operations, simplify satellite design, and reduce mission costs has enticed satellite designers. Integration of this technology onto spacecraft has been slower than some originally anticipated. However, given the complexity of the GPS sensor, and the importance of the functions it performs, its incorporation into mainstream satellite design has probably occurred at a very reasonable pace. Going from providing experimental payloads on small, unmanned satellites to performing critical operational functions on manned vehicles has been a major evolution. If all goes as planned in the next few months, GPS receivers will soon provide those critical functions on one of the most complex spacecraft in history, the International Space Station.

  1. Time transfer using multi-channel GPS receivers.

    PubMed

    Levine, J

    1999-01-01

    This report is on time transfer experiments using a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver constructed using a commercial GPS "engine" and a standard PC. The receiver measures the time difference between the local clock and a 1 pps signal synchronized to GPS time using data from up to 8 satellites. The receiver also reports the difference between GPS time as estimated using each of the satellites being tracked and the composite output pulses that have a rate of 1 Hz (1 pps signal). These data can be used to construct the standard 13-minute tracks as defined in the BIPM standard; the same data also can be averaged in other ways that make better use of the multi-channel capabilities of the hardware. The 13-minute averages can be directly compared with standard time-transfer receivers using common-view analysis. The results of the tests suggest that the methods currently used for national and international time and frequency coordination should be re-examined, and an alternative approach based on multi-channel receivers is suggested that should be more flexible, simpler, and easier to operate than the current system. PMID:18238436

  2. Performance Evaluation of Block Acquisition and Tracking Algorithms Using an Open Source GPS Receiver Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Ganesh K.; Akopian, David; Heckler, Gregory W.; Winternitz, Luke B.

    2011-01-01

    Location technologies have many applications in wireless communications, military and space missions, etc. US Global Positioning System (GPS) and other existing and emerging Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are expected to provide accurate location information to enable such applications. While GNSS systems perform very well in strong signal conditions, their operation in many urban, indoor, and space applications is not robust or even impossible due to weak signals and strong distortions. The search for less costly, faster and more sensitive receivers is still in progress. As the research community addresses more and more complicated phenomena there exists a demand on flexible multimode reference receivers, associated SDKs, and development platforms which may accelerate and facilitate the research. One of such concepts is the software GPS/GNSS receiver (GPS SDR) which permits a facilitated access to algorithmic libraries and a possibility to integrate more advanced algorithms without hardware and essential software updates. The GNU-SDR and GPS-SDR open source receiver platforms are such popular examples. This paper evaluates the performance of recently proposed block-corelator techniques for acquisition and tracking of GPS signals using open source GPS-SDR platform.

  3. Software Defined GPS Receiver for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Courtney B.; Robison, David E.; Koelewyn, Cynthia Lee

    2011-01-01

    JPL is providing a software defined radio (SDR) that will fly on the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the CoNNeCT project under NASA's SCaN program. The SDR consists of several modules including a Baseband Processor Module (BPM) and a GPS Module (GPSM). The BPM executes applications (waveforms) consisting of software components for the embedded SPARC processor and logic for two Virtex II Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) that operate on data received from the GPSM. GPS waveforms on the SDR are enabled by an L-Band antenna, low noise amplifier (LNA), and the GPSM that performs quadrature downconversion at L1, L2, and L5. The GPS waveform for the JPL SDR will acquire and track L1 C/A, L2C, and L5 GPS signals from a CoNNeCT platform on ISS, providing the best GPS-based positioning of ISS achieved to date, the first use of multiple frequency GPS on ISS, and potentially the first L5 signal tracking from space. The system will also enable various radiometric investigations on ISS such as local multipath or ISS dynamic behavior characterization. In following the software-defined model, this work will create a highly portable GPS software and firmware package that can be adapted to another platform with the necessary processor and FPGA capability. This paper also describes ISS applications for the JPL CoNNeCT SDR GPS waveform, possibilities for future global navigation satellite system (GNSS) tracking development, and the applicability of the waveform components to other space navigation applications.

  4. Code and codeless ionospheric measurements with NASA's Rogue GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Jeff M.; Meehan, Tom K.; Young, Lawrence E.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Rogue Receiver is an 8-satellite, non-multiplexed, highly digital global positioning system (GPS) receiver that can obtain dual frequency data either with or without knowledge of the P-code. In addition to its applications for high accuracy geodesy and orbit determination, the Rogue uses GPS satellite signals to measure the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere along the lines of sight from the receiver to the satellites. These measurements are used by JPL's Deep Space Network (DSN) for calibrating radiometric data. This paper will discuss Rogue TEC measurements, emphasizing the advantages of a receiver that can use the P-code, when available, but can also obtain reliable dual frequency data when the code is encrypted.

  5. Fast-Acquisition/Weak-Signal-Tracking GPS Receiver for HEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintemitz, Luke; Boegner, Greg; Sirotzky, Steve

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the technical background and design of the Navigator Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver -- . a radiation-hardened receiver intended for use aboard spacecraft. Navigator is capable of weak signal acquisition and tracking as well as much faster acquisition of strong or weak signals with no a priori knowledge or external aiding. Weak-signal acquisition and tracking enables GPS use in high Earth orbits (HEO), and fast acquisition allows for the receiver to remain without power until needed in any orbit. Signal acquisition and signal tracking are, respectively, the processes of finding and demodulating a signal. Acquisition is the more computationally difficult process. Previous GPS receivers employ the method of sequentially searching the two-dimensional signal parameter space (code phase and Doppler). Navigator exploits properties of the Fourier transform in a massively parallel search for the GPS signal. This method results in far faster acquisition times [in the lab, 12 GPS satellites have been acquired with no a priori knowledge in a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) scenario in less than one second]. Modeling has shown that Navigator will be capable of acquiring signals down to 25 dB-Hz, appropriate for HEO missions. Navigator is built using the radiation-hardened ColdFire microprocessor and housing the most computationally intense functions in dedicated field-programmable gate arrays. The high performance of the algorithm and of the receiver as a whole are made possible by optimizing computational efficiency and carefully weighing tradeoffs among the sampling rate, data format, and data-path bit width.

  6. Coastal sea level measurements using a single geodetic GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Löfgren, Johan S.; Haas, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a method to derive local sea level variations using data from a single geodetic-quality Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver using GPS (Global Positioning System) signals. This method is based on multipath theory for specular reflections and the use of Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) data. The technique could be valuable for altimeter calibration and validation. Data from two test sites, a dedicated GPS tide gauge at the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) in Sweden and the Friday Harbor GPS site of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) in USA, are analyzed. The sea level results are compared to independently observed sea level data from nearby and in situ tide gauges. For OSO, the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) agreement is better than 5 cm, while it is in the order of 10 cm for Friday Harbor. The correlation coefficients are better than 0.97 for both sites. For OSO, the SNR-based results are also compared with results from a geodetic analysis of GPS data of a two receivers/antennae tide gauge installation. The SNR-based analysis results in a slightly worse RMS agreement with respect to the independent tide gauge data than the geodetic analysis (4.8 cm and 4.0 cm, respectively). However, it provides results even for rough sea surface conditions when the two receivers/antennae installation no longer records the necessary data for a geodetic analysis.

  7. Digital signal processor and processing method for GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A digital signal processor and processing method therefor for use in receivers of the NAVSTAR/GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) employs a digital carrier down-converter, digital code correlator and digital tracking processor. The digital carrier down-converter and code correlator consists of an all-digital, minimum bit implementation that utilizes digital chip and phase advancers, providing exceptional control and accuracy in feedback phase and in feedback delay. Roundoff and commensurability errors can be reduced to extremely small values (e.g., less than 100 nanochips and 100 nanocycles roundoff errors and 0.1 millichip and 1 millicycle commensurability errors). The digital tracking processor bases the fast feedback for phase and for group delay in the C/A, P.sub.1, and P.sub.2 channels on the L.sub.1 C/A carrier phase thereby maintaining lock at lower signal-to-noise ratios, reducing errors in feedback delays, reducing the frequency of cycle slips and in some cases obviating the need for quadrature processing in the P channels. Simple and reliable methods are employed for data bit synchronization, data bit removal and cycle counting. Improved precision in averaged output delay values is provided by carrier-aided data-compression techniques. The signal processor employs purely digital operations in the sense that exactly the same carrier phase and group delay measurements are obtained, to the last decimal place, every time the same sampled data (i.e., exactly the same bits) are processed.

  8. Comparison of GPS receiver DCB estimation methods using a GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Kyu; Park, Jong-Uk; Min Roh, Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Jeong

    2013-07-01

    Two approaches for receiver differential code biases (DCB) estimation using the GPS data obtained from the Korean GPS network (KGN) in South Korea are suggested: the relative and single (absolute) methods. The relative method uses a GPS network, while the single method determines DCBs from a single station only. Their performance was assessed by comparing the receiver DCB values obtained from the relative method with those estimated by the single method. The daily averaged receiver DCBs obtained from the two different approaches showed good agreement for 7 days. The root mean square (RMS) value of those differences is 0.83 nanoseconds (ns). The standard deviation of the receiver DCBs estimated by the relative method was smaller than that of the single method. From these results, it is clear that the relative method can obtain more stable receiver DCBs compared with the single method over a short-term period. Additionally, the comparison between the receiver DCBs obtained by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) and those of the IGS Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM) showed a good agreement at 0.3 ns. As the accuracy of DCB values significantly affects the accuracy of ionospheric total electron content (TEC), more studies are needed to ensure the reliability and stability of the estimated receiver DCBs.

  9. Performance analysis of GPS receivers in impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Amin, Moeness

    2005-06-01

    The use of GPS has broadened to include mounting on or inside manned or autonomous vehicles which makes it subject to interference generated from motor emissions. Many sources of interference are typically modeled as impulsive noise whose characteristics may vary in terms of power, pulse width, and pulse occurrences. In this paper, we examine the effect of impulsive noise on GPS delay lock loops (DLL). We consider the DLL for the GPS Coarse Acquisition code (C/A), which is used in civilian applications, but also needed in military GPS receivers to perform signal acquisition and tracking. We focus on the statistics of the noise components of the early, late, punctual correlators, which contribute to the discriminator error. The discriminator noise components are produced from the correlation between the impulsive noise and the early, late and punctual reference C/A code. Due to long time averaging, these components assume Gaussian distributions. The discriminator error variance is derived, incorporating the front-end precorrelation filter. It is shown that the synchronization error variance is significantly affected by the power of the received impulsive noise, the precorrelation filter, and the sample rate.

  10. An alternative method for determining GPS receiver phase biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, Tobias; Schön, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is used in a broad variety of applications to determine very economically high precision parameters for positioning, navigation and timing. In comparison to traditional differential approaches, PPP with undifferenced phase measurements is highly attractive, since the effort on the user side can be reduced to minimum, e.g. due to an unnecessary reference station. The quality of obtained position solutions is comparable to those obtained from a differential approach. One of the most important limiting factor is the long integration time to determine (float) ambiguities. Furthermore, it is critical to consider adequately all occurring error sources. In this context, receiver phase biases are one of the limiting factors and very complex to model. At least they are highly correlated with the ambiguities during the estimation process, (Laurichesse et al. 2009). This contribution presents an alternative method to estimate carrier phase biases of different GPS/GNSS receivers and signals w.r.t. a reference receiver. Receiver phase biases are estimated on a zero baseline and in combination with a very stable and precise clock (H-Maser) using single differences. The presented method will be discussed in detail. This includes a critical look to the estimability of bias values for several GPS/GNSS receivers as well as a discussion on the stability and universality of these bias values. Finally relative phase biases are quantified and it will be discussed how GPS/GNSS observation equations have to be extended, to take these bias values correctly into account. References: Laurichesse D., Mercier F., Berthias J.P., Broca P., Cerri L. (2009): Integer ambiguity resolution on undifferenced GPS phase measurements and its application to PPP and satellite precise orbit determination, In: NAVIGATION, Journal of the Institute of Navigation, Volume 56, Number 2, pages: 135 - 149

  11. A dual Navstar GPS/Glonass satellite receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raby, P.; Harris, K.; Gibson, P.; Mans, P.; Morrison, G.

    This paper describes the design and construction of a dual Navstar GPS/Glonass navigation satellite receiver. The receiver extracts data from a digitally tracked -130dBm satellite signal at L band (1.6 GHz). The incoming signal is tracked using a digital Costas loop in conjunction with a full time early-late code tracking loop, to decode the spread spectrum signal. The satellite data is decoded and logged recording a variety of parameters necessary for global positioning and time transfer.

  12. Performance Assessment of Two GPS Receivers on Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Christine A.; Schutz, Bob E.

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle STS-69 was launched on September 7, 1995, carrying the Wake Shield Facility (WSF-02) among its payloads. The mission included two GPS receivers: a Collins 3M receiver onboard the Endeavour and an Osborne flight TurboRogue, known as the TurboStar, onboard the WSF-02. Two of the WSF-02 GPS Experiment objectives were to: (1) assess the ability to use GPS in a relative satellite positioning mode using the receivers on Endeavour and WSF-02; and (2) assess the performance of the receivers to support high precision orbit determination at the 400 km altitude. Three ground tests of the receivers were conducted in order to characterize the respective receivers. The analysis of the tests utilized the Double Differencing technique. A similar test in orbit was conducted during STS-69 while the WSF-02 was held by the Endeavour robot arm for a one hour period. In these tests, biases were observed in the double difference pseudorange measurements, implying that biases up to 140 m exist which do not cancel in double differencing. These biases appear to exist in the Collins receiver, but their effect can be mitigated by including measurement bias parameters to accommodate them in an estimation process. An additional test was conducted in which the orbit of the combined Endeavour/WSF-02 was determined independently with each receiver. These one hour arcs were based on forming double differences with 13 TurboRogue receivers in the global IGS network and estimating pseudorange biases for the Collins. Various analyses suggest the TurboStar overall orbit accuracy is about one to two meters for this period, based on double differenced phase residuals of 34 cm. These residuals indicate the level of unmodeled forces on Endeavour produced by gravitational and nongravitational effects. The rms differences between the two independently determined orbits are better than 10 meters, thereby demonstrating the accuracy of the Collins-determined orbit at this level as well as the

  13. Unprecented syntonization and syncronization accuracy via simultaneous viewing with GPS receivers: Construction characteristics of an NBS/GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.; Weiss, M.; Clements, A.; Allan, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The National Bureau of Standards/Global Positioning System (NBS/GPS) receiver is discussed. It is designed around the concept of obtaining high accuracy, low cost time and frequency comparisons between remote frequency standards and clocks with the intent to aid international time and frequency coordination. Preliminary tests of this comparison technique between Boulder, CO and Washington, D.C indicate the ability to do accurate time transfer to better that 10 ns, and frequency measurements to better than 1 part in 10 to the 14th power. The hardware and software of the receiver is detailed. The receiver is fully automatic with a built-in 0.1 ns resolution time interval counter. A microprocessor does data processing. Satellite signal stabilities are routinely at the 5 ns level for 15 s averages, and the internal receiver stabilities are at the 1 ns level.

  14. Building a GPS Receiver for Space Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirotzky, Steve; Heckler, G. W.; Boegner, G.; Roman, J.; Wennersten, M.; Butler, R.; Davis, M.; Lanham, A.; Winternitz, L.; Thompson, W.; Bamford, B.; Banes, V.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 4 years the Component Systems and Hardware branch at NASA GSFC has pursued an inhouse effort to build a unique space-flight GPS receiver. This effort has resulted in the Navigator GPS receiver. Navigator's first flight opportunity will come with the STS-125 HST-SM4 mission in August 2008. This paper covers the overall hardware design for the receiver and the difficulties encountered during the transition from the breadboard design to the final flight hardware design. Among the different lessons learned, the paper stresses the importance of selecting and verifying parts that are appropriate for space applications, as well as what happens when these parts are not accurately characterized by their datasheets. Additionally, the paper discusses what analysis needs to be performed when deciding system frequencies and filters. The presentation also covers how to prepare for thermal vacuum testing, and problems that may arise during vibration testing. It also contains what criteria should be considered when determining which portions of a design to create in-house, and which portions to license from a third party. Finally, the paper shows techniques which have proven to be extraordinarily helpful in debugging and analysis.

  15. Civil Application of Differential GPS Using a Single Channel Sequential Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) and its potential for area navigation, landing, and takeoff under minimum ceilings and advanced air traffic control operation is discussed. The following topics are reported: status of the GPS system; GPS signal availability for the civil community; alternative differential GPS concepts; predicted performance enhancement achievable with differential GPS and the operational improvements which will result; and a development program to test and evaluate differential GPS concepts, performance and operational procedures applicable to helicopters. Potential benefits which will be derived from helicopter use of GPS in the differential mode are identified.

  16. Preliminary study of low-cost GPS receivers for time synchronization of wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R.; Nagayama, T.; Jo, H.; Spencer, B. F., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    Growing public concern regarding the health of the aging civil infrastructure has spurred research in structural health monitoring (SHM). Recent advances in wireless smart sensor (WSS) technology has significantly lowered the cost of SHM systems and resulted in WSS being successfully implemented at full-scale. However, assuring accurate timesynchronized WSS nodes in a network is still a challenging problem. Generally, WSS synchronization is realized by communicating a sensors' CPU clock information over the network. However, such a synchronization approach becomes more challenging as the network size increases. Reliable communication is not easily achieved due to longer communication distance, larger numbers of sensors, and complexity of a distributed sensor network. Moreover, CPU clocks may not be sufficiently reliable for accurate time-synchronization due to substantial tolerance errors in crystal and/or temperature effects. In this study, the use of low-cost GPS receivers for time synchronizing WSSs is explored to resolve these issues. GPS sensors offer the potential to provide high-accuracy synchronization --- nano-second level even with low-cost GPS receivers. The GPS-assisted time synchronization approach overcomes network communication limitations to realize time-synchronization in large-scale networks of WSS.

  17. A Generic Receiver Tracking Model for GPS Ionospheric Amplitude Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Moraes, A. D.; Perrella, W. J.; Galera Monico, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillations result in rapid variations in phase and amplitude of the radio signal, which propagates through the ionosphere. Depending on the temporal and spatial situation, the scintillation can represent a problem in the availability and precision of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Scintillations affect the receiver performance, specially the tracking loop level. Depending on the scintillation level, the receiver might increase the measurement errors or even can lead to a loss of lock of the carrier and code loops. In extreme cases, the scintillation can result in full disrupting of the receiver. In this work we introduce a generic model to evaluate the effects of ionospheric amplitude scintillation on GPS receiver tracking loops. This model is based on α-μ distribution, which can be seen as a generalized fading model, that includes a variety of distributions such as Gamma, Nakagami-m, Exponential, Weibull, one-sided Gaussian and Rayleigh. Differently from the model based only on Nakagami-m, this one is not limited to S4< 0,71 which allows using it to predict amplitude scintillation effects for stronger scenarios. The estimation of α-μ coefficients, the empirical parameterization based on field measurements and the typical values estimated based on observations made during the last solar maximum are presented and discussed.

  18. Advances in SIS receiver technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frerking, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Significant advances in SIS receiver technology since the last Asilomar meeting include: superconductor materials, integrated inductive tuning elements, and planar mounting structures. The effect of these advances is to push the upper frequency operating limit from about 600 to 1500 GHz, and to enhance the feasibility of focal plane arrays of heterodyne receivers. A fundamental high frequency operating limit of SIS mixers is set by the superconducting energy gap. A practical limitation for high frequency operation of SIS junctions is their parasitic capacitance and resistance. The performance of the mixer will be degraded by the Resistor-Capacitor rolloff. Several designs were reported for inductive elements integrated on the same substrate as the SIS junctions to tune out the bulk junction capacitance. Most millimeter SIS-based heterodyne receivers have used waveguide coupling structures. Technology has advanced to the state where programs that have a high probability of success can be defined to produce arrays of SIS receivers for frequencies as high as 1500 GHz.

  19. Relative Attitude Determination of Earth Orbiting Formations Using GPS Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, E. Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Satellite formation missions require the precise determination of both the position and attitude of multiple vehicles to achieve the desired objectives. In order to support the mission requirements for these applications, it is necessary to develop techniques for representing and controlling the attitude of formations of vehicles. A generalized method for representing the attitude of a formation of vehicles has been developed. The representation may be applied to both absolute and relative formation attitude control problems. The technique is able to accommodate formations of arbitrarily large number of vehicles. To demonstrate the formation attitude problem, the method is applied to the attitude determination of a simple leader-follower along-track orbit formation. A multiplicative extended Kalman filter is employed to estimate vehicle attitude. In a simulation study using GPS receivers as the attitude sensors, the relative attitude between vehicles in the formation is determined 3 times more accurately than the absolute attitude.

  20. CASES: A Novel Low-Cost Ground-based Dual-Frequency GPS Software Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, B.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Bust, G. S.; Kintner, P. M.; Psaiki, M.; Humphreys, T. E.; Powell, S.; O'Hanlon, B.

    2010-12-01

    GPS receivers can be used for monitoring space weather events such as TEC variations and scintillation. The new CASES GPS sensor developed by ASTRA, Cornell and UTAustin represents a revolutionary advance in dual frequency GPS space-weather monitoring. CASES is a paperback-novel-sized dual-frequency GPS software receiver with robust dual-frequency tracking performance, stand-alone capability, and complete software upgradability. This sensor measures and calculates TEC with a relative accuracy of a few 0.01 TECU at a cadence of up to 100 Hz. It measures amplitude and phase at up to 100 Hz on both L1 and L2, for up to 12 satellites in view. It calculates the scintillation severity indicators S4, τ0, and σφ at a cadence that is user defined. It is able to track through scintillation with {S4, τ0, amplitude} combinations as severe as {0.8, 0.8 seconds, 43 dB-Hz (nominal)} (i.e., commensurate with vigorous post-sunset equatorial scintillation) with a mean time between cycle slips greater than 240 seconds and with a mean time between frequency-unlock greater than 1 hour. Other capabilities and options include: Various data interface solutions; In-receiver and network-wide calibration of biases, and detection and mitigation of multipath; Network-wide automated remote configuration of receivers, quality control, re-processing, archiving and redistribution of data in real-time; Software products for data-processing and visualization. The low price of the sensor means that many more instruments can be purchased on a fixed budget, which will lead to new kinds of opportunities for monitoring and scientific study, including networked applications. Other uses for CASES receivers include geodetic and seismic monitoring, measurement of precipitable water vapor in the troposphere at meso-scale resolution, and educational outreach.

  1. 47 CFR 87.151 - Special requirements for differential GPS receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for differential GPS receivers. 87.151 Section 87.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND... differential GPS receivers. (a) The receiver shall achieve a message failure rate less than or equal to...

  2. 47 CFR 87.151 - Special requirements for differential GPS receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special requirements for differential GPS receivers. 87.151 Section 87.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND... differential GPS receivers. (a) The receiver shall achieve a message failure rate less than or equal to...

  3. GPS & GLONASS Mass-Market Receivers: Positioning Performances and Peculiarities

    PubMed Central

    Dabove, Paolo; Manzino, Ambrogio M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, positioning with low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) sensors have rapidly developed around the world at both a commercial and academic research level. For many years these instruments have only acquired the GPS constellation but are now able to track the Global’naja Navigacionnaja Sputnikovaja Sistema (GLONASS) constellation. This characteristic is very interesting, especially if used in hard-urban environments or in hard conditions where satellite visibility is low. The goal of this research is to investigate the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for mass-market receivers in order to analyse the performance in real time (Network Real Time Kinematic—NRTK positioning) with post-processing approaches. Under these conditions, it is possible to confirm that mass-market sensors could be a valid alternative to a more expensive receiver for a large number of surveying applications, but with low cost hardware the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for fixing ambiguities is useless, if not dangerous. PMID:25429405

  4. GPS & GLONASS mass-market receivers: positioning performances and peculiarities.

    PubMed

    Dabove, Paolo; Manzino, Ambrogio M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, positioning with low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) sensors have rapidly developed around the world at both a commercial and academic research level. For many years these instruments have only acquired the GPS constellation but are now able to track the Global'naja Navigacionnaja Sputnikovaja Sistema (GLONASS) constellation. This characteristic is very interesting, especially if used in hard-urban environments or in hard conditions where satellite visibility is low. The goal of this research is to investigate the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for mass-market receivers in order to analyse the performance in real time (Network Real Time Kinematic-NRTK positioning) with post-processing approaches. Under these conditions, it is possible to confirm that mass-market sensors could be a valid alternative to a more expensive receiver for a large number of surveying applications, but with low cost hardware the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for fixing ambiguities is useless, if not dangerous. PMID:25429405

  5. GPS & GLONASS mass-market receivers: positioning performances and peculiarities.

    PubMed

    Dabove, Paolo; Manzino, Ambrogio M

    2014-11-25

    Over the last twenty years, positioning with low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) sensors have rapidly developed around the world at both a commercial and academic research level. For many years these instruments have only acquired the GPS constellation but are now able to track the Global'naja Navigacionnaja Sputnikovaja Sistema (GLONASS) constellation. This characteristic is very interesting, especially if used in hard-urban environments or in hard conditions where satellite visibility is low. The goal of this research is to investigate the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for mass-market receivers in order to analyse the performance in real time (Network Real Time Kinematic-NRTK positioning) with post-processing approaches. Under these conditions, it is possible to confirm that mass-market sensors could be a valid alternative to a more expensive receiver for a large number of surveying applications, but with low cost hardware the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for fixing ambiguities is useless, if not dangerous.

  6. The collection of GPS signal scattered off a wind-driven ocean with a down-looking GPS receiver: polarization properties versus wind speed and direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuffada, C.; Fung, A.; Okolicany, M.; Huang, E.; Parker, J.

    2001-01-01

    A GPS transmitter-receiver pair form a bistatic radar for ocean remote sensing when the receiving platform carries a downlooking antenna capable of collecting the GPS signal scattered off the ocean surface.

  7. Advancing Technology: GPS and GIS Outreach Training for Agricultural Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Allison; Arnold, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Global Information Systems (GIS) has made significant impacts on agricultural production practices. However, constant changes in the technologies require continuing educational updates. The outreach program described here introduces the operation, use, and applications of GPS receivers and GIS…

  8. Architecture and performance of a new GPS time transfer and positioning receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kido, T. I.; Ould, P. C.; Vanwechel, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the Interstate Electronics 4200 GPS Receiver System that has been developed for time transfer and low dynamic positioning applications. The receiver employs the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) l sub 1 C/A code and has three optional solution modes fo the clock/navigation state estimation.

  9. Precise orbit determination for the shuttle radar topography mission using a new generation of GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, W.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Desai, S.; Duncan, C.; Haines, B.; Kuang, D.; Lough, M.; Reichert, A.; Romans, L.; Srinivasan, J.; Webb, F.; Young, L.; Zumberge, J.

    2000-01-01

    The BlackJack family of GPS receivers has been developed at JPL to satisfy NASA's requirements for high-accuracy, dual-frequency, Y-codeless GPS receivers for NASA's Earth science missions. In this paper we will present the challenges that were overcome to meet this accuracy requirement. We will discuss the various reduced dynamic strategies, Space Shuttle dynamic models, and our tests for accuracy that included a military Y-code dual-frequency receiver (MAGR).

  10. Orbiting GPS Receiver Modified to Track New L2C Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Tom K.; Robison, David; Munson, Tim N.; Young, Larry E.; Stoyanov, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The L2C signal is a great step forward for civil applications of GPS, enabling high-accuracy dual-frequency measurements. Engineers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and ITT teamed to reprogram FPGA firmware and add tracking software on an orbiting receiver to track the new GPS L2C signal from SAC-C. SAC-C is an Argentinean science satellite and was launched in November 2000 with a BlackJack GPS receiver. This is a dual-frequency digital receiver with 48 tracking channels and four antennas. On SAC-C, it provides precise orbits, atmospheric occultation data, tests of GPS surface reflections, and serves as an orbiting test bed for new GPS development such as the L2C tracking reported here.

  11. Global Positioning System Time Transfer Receiver (GPS/TTR) prototype design and initial test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oaks, J.; Frank, A.; Falvey, S.; Lister, M.; Buisson, J.; Wardrip, C.; Warren, H.

    1982-01-01

    Time transfer equipment and techniques used with the Navigation Technology Satellites were modified and extended for use with the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. A prototype receiver was built and field tested. The receiver uses the GPS L1 link at 1575 MHz with C/A code only to resolve a measured range to the satellite. A theoretical range is computed from the satellite ephemeris transmitted in the data message and the user's coordinates. Results of user offset from GPS time are obtained by differencing the measured and theoretical ranges and applying calibration corrections. Results of the first field test evaluation of the receiver are presented.

  12. Learning Geospatial Analysis Skills with Consumer-Grade GPS Receivers and Low Cost Spatial Analysis Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linehan, Peter E.

    2006-01-01

    Spatial analysis technologies are increasingly important tools for all aspects of forest resource management. Field work previously accomplished with map, compass, and engineers' scale is now being augmented, or superseded, by the use of GPS and GIS. Professional-grade GPS receivers and commercial GIS software are preferred for their accuracy and…

  13. High-precision coseismic displacement estimation with a single-frequency GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bofeng; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Li, Xingxing

    2015-07-01

    To improve the performance of Global Positioning System (GPS) in the earthquake/tsunami early warning and rapid response applications, minimizing the blind zone and increasing the stability and accuracy of both the rapid source and rupture inversion, the density of existing GPS networks must be increased in the areas at risk. For economic reasons, low-cost single-frequency receivers would be preferable to make the sparse dual-frequency GPS networks denser. When using single-frequency GPS receivers, the main problem that must be solved is the ionospheric delay, which is a critical factor when determining accurate coseismic displacements. In this study, we introduce a modified Satellite-specific Epoch-differenced Ionospheric Delay (MSEID) model to compensate for the effect of ionospheric error on single-frequency GPS receivers. In the MSEID model, the time-differenced ionospheric delays observed from a regional dual-frequency GPS network to a common satellite are fitted to a plane rather than part of a sphere, and the parameters of this plane are determined by using the coordinates of the stations. When the parameters are known, time-differenced ionospheric delays for a single-frequency GPS receiver could be derived from the observations of those dual-frequency receivers. Using these ionospheric delay corrections, coseismic displacements of a single-frequency GPS receiver can be accurately calculated based on time-differenced carrier-phase measurements in real time. The performance of the proposed approach is validated using 5 Hz GPS data collected during the 2012 Nicoya Peninsula Earthquake (Mw 7.6, 2012 September 5) in Costa Rica. This shows that the proposed approach improves the accuracy of the displacement of a single-frequency GPS station, and coseismic displacements with an accuracy of a few centimetres are achieved over a 10-min interval.

  14. Development And Test of A Digitally Steered Antenna Array for The Navigator GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Heitor David; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Price, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS)-based navigation has become common for low-Earth orbit spacecraft as the signal environment is similar to that on the Earth s surface. The situation changes abruptly, however, for spacecraft whose orbital altitudes exceed that of the GPS constellation. Visibility is dramatically reduced and signals that are present may be very weak and more susceptible to interference. GPS receivers effective at these altitudes require increased sensitivity, which often requires a high-gain antenna. Pointing such an antenna can pose a challenge. One efficient approach to mitigate these problems is the use of a digitally steered antenna array. Such an antenna can optimally allocate gain toward desired signal sources and away from interferers. This paper presents preliminary results in the development and test of a digitally steered antenna array for the Navigator GPS research program at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. In particular, this paper highlights the development of an array and front-end electronics, the development and test of a real-time software GPS receiver, and implementation of three beamforming methods for combining the signals from the array. Additionally, this paper discusses the development of a GPS signal simulator which produces digital samples of the GPS L1C/A signals as they would be received by an arbitrary antenna array configuration. The simulator models transmitter and receiver dynamics, near-far and multipath interference, and has been a critical component in both the development and test of the GPS receiver. The GPS receiver system was tested with real and simulated GPS signals. Preliminary results show that performance improvement was achieved in both the weak signal and interference environments, matching analytical predictions. This paper summarizes our initial findings and discusses the advantages and limitations of the antenna array and the various beamforming methods.

  15. Improving the Quality of Low-Cost GPS Receiver Data for Monitoring Using Spatial Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Schwieger, Volker

    2016-06-01

    The investigations on low-cost single frequency GPS receivers at the Institute of Engineering Geodesy (IIGS) show that u-blox LEA-6T GPS receivers combined with Trimble Bullet III GPS antennas containing self-constructed L1-optimized choke rings can already obtain an accuracy in the range of millimeters which meets the requirements of geodetic precise monitoring applications (see [27]). However, the quality (accuracy and reliability) of low-cost GPS receiver data, particularly in shadowing environment, should still be improved, since the multipath effects are the major error for the short baselines. For this purpose, several adjoined stations with low-cost GPS receivers and antennas were set up next to the metal wall on the roof of the IIGS building and measured statically for several days. The time series of three-dimensional coordinates of the GPS receivers were analyzed. Spatial correlations between the adjoined stations, possibly caused by multipath effect, will be taken into account. The coordinates of one station can be corrected using the spatial correlations of the adjoined stations, so that the quality of the GPS measurements is improved. The developed algorithms are based on the coordinates and the results will be delivered in near-real-time (in about 30 minutes), so that they are suitable for structural health monitoring applications.

  16. Testing Results of the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Charles; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) utilizes a Space Integrated GPS/INS (SIGI) sensor to obtain navigation and attitude knowledge. Testing and analysis at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Guidance, Navigation, and Control's GPS Lab was conducted in order to validate the development of SIGI GPS receiver attitude firmware. The modifications to the International Space Station (ISS) SIGI receiver that were completed to meet the CRV requirements will be presented. The CRV is designed to be used as a life-boat in case of an emergency evacuation from the ISS. The need to return the ISS crew in a timely manner places challenging performance requirements on the SIGI sensor. This paper will summarize the performance of the SIGI GPS receiver for the CRV. The ability to track the GPS signals at any initial attitude and the performance of the SIGI GPS-only solution during reentry are detailed in this paper. A discussion regarding the use of the Global Satellite Systems GPS Signal Generator in testing the SIGI sensor will provide insight into the GPS validation process used at NASA Goddard.

  17. Predicting metabolic rate during level and uphill outdoor walking using a low-cost GPS receiver.

    PubMed

    de Müllenheim, Pierre-Yves; Dumond, Rémy; Gernigon, Marie; Mahé, Guillaume; Lavenu, Audrey; Bickert, Sandrine; Prioux, Jacques; Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of using speed and grade data obtained from a low-cost global positioning system (GPS) receiver to estimate metabolic rate (MR) during level and uphill outdoor walking. Thirty young, healthy adults performed randomized outdoor walking for 6-min periods at 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 km/h and on three different grades: 1) level walking, 2) uphill walking on a 3.7% mean grade, and 3) uphill walking on a 10.8% mean grade. The reference MR [metabolic equivalents (METs) and oxygen uptake (V̇o2)] values were obtained using a portable metabolic system. The speed and grade were obtained using a low-cost GPS receiver (1-Hz recording). The GPS grade (Δ altitude/distance walked) was calculated using both uncorrected GPS altitude data and GPS altitude data corrected with map projection software. The accuracy of predictions using reference speed and grade (actual[SPEED/GRADE]) data was high [R(2) = 0.85, root-mean-square error (RMSE) = 0.68 MET]. The accuracy decreased when GPS speed and uncorrected grade (GPS[UNCORRECTED]) data were used, although it remained substantial (R(2) = 0.66, RMSE = 1.00 MET). The accuracy was greatly improved when the GPS speed and corrected grade (GPS[CORRECTED]) data were used (R(2) = 0.82, RMSE = 0.79 MET). Published predictive equations for walking MR were also cross-validated using actual or GPS speed and grade data when appropriate. The prediction accuracy was very close when either actual[SPEED/GRADE] values or GPS[CORRECTED] values (for level and uphill combined) or GPS speed values (for level walking only) were used. These results offer promising research and clinical applications related to the assessment of energy expenditure during free-living walking. PMID:27402559

  18. Predicting metabolic rate during level and uphill outdoor walking using a low-cost GPS receiver.

    PubMed

    de Müllenheim, Pierre-Yves; Dumond, Rémy; Gernigon, Marie; Mahé, Guillaume; Lavenu, Audrey; Bickert, Sandrine; Prioux, Jacques; Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of using speed and grade data obtained from a low-cost global positioning system (GPS) receiver to estimate metabolic rate (MR) during level and uphill outdoor walking. Thirty young, healthy adults performed randomized outdoor walking for 6-min periods at 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 km/h and on three different grades: 1) level walking, 2) uphill walking on a 3.7% mean grade, and 3) uphill walking on a 10.8% mean grade. The reference MR [metabolic equivalents (METs) and oxygen uptake (V̇o2)] values were obtained using a portable metabolic system. The speed and grade were obtained using a low-cost GPS receiver (1-Hz recording). The GPS grade (Δ altitude/distance walked) was calculated using both uncorrected GPS altitude data and GPS altitude data corrected with map projection software. The accuracy of predictions using reference speed and grade (actual[SPEED/GRADE]) data was high [R(2) = 0.85, root-mean-square error (RMSE) = 0.68 MET]. The accuracy decreased when GPS speed and uncorrected grade (GPS[UNCORRECTED]) data were used, although it remained substantial (R(2) = 0.66, RMSE = 1.00 MET). The accuracy was greatly improved when the GPS speed and corrected grade (GPS[CORRECTED]) data were used (R(2) = 0.82, RMSE = 0.79 MET). Published predictive equations for walking MR were also cross-validated using actual or GPS speed and grade data when appropriate. The prediction accuracy was very close when either actual[SPEED/GRADE] values or GPS[CORRECTED] values (for level and uphill combined) or GPS speed values (for level walking only) were used. These results offer promising research and clinical applications related to the assessment of energy expenditure during free-living walking.

  19. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design of tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  20. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and Modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design and tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges of that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  1. Navigator GPS Receiver for Fast Acquisition and Weak Signal Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke; Moreau, Michael; Boegner, Gregory J.; Sirotzky, Steve

    2004-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing a new space-borne GPS receiver that can operate effectively in the full range of Earth orbiting missions from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to geostationary and beyond. Navigator is designed to be a fully space flight qualified GPS receiver optimized for fast signal acquisition and weak signal tracking. The fast acquisition capabilities provide exceptional time to first fix performance (TIFF) with no a priori receiver state or GPS almanac information, even in the presence of high Doppler shifts present in LEO (or near perigee in highly eccentric orbits). The fast acquisition capability also makes it feasible to implement extended correlation intervals and therefore significantly reduce Navigator s acquisition threshold. This greatly improves GPS observability when the receiver is above the GPS constellation (and satellites must be tracked from the opposite side of the Earth) by providing at least 10 dB of increased acquisition sensitivity. Fast acquisition and weak signal tracking algorithms have been implemented and validated on a hardware development board. A fully functional version of the receiver, employing most of the flight parts, with integrated navigation software is expected by mid 2005. An ultimate goal of this project is to license the Navigator design to an industry partner who will then market the receiver as a commercial product.

  2. Preliminary Analysis of the CASES GPS Receiver Performance during Simulated Seismic Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Rosa-Perkins, A.; Reynolds, A.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, I.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the ability of a new GPS software receiver, called CASES (Connected Autonomous Space Environment Sensor), to measure seismic displacements in realtime. Improvements in GPS technology over the last 20 years allow for precise measurement of ground motion during seismic events. For example, GPS data has been used to calculate displacement histories at an earthquake's epicenter and fault slip estimations with great accuracy. This is supported by the ability to measure displacements directly using GPS, bypassing the double integration that accelerometers require, and by higher clipping limits than seismometers. The CASES receiver developed by ASTRA in collaboration with Cornell University and the University of Texas, Austin represents a new geodetic-quality software-based GPS receiver that measures ionospheric space weather in addition to the usual navigation solution. To demonstrate, in a controlled environment, the ability of the CASES receiver to measure seismic displacements, we simulated ground motions similar to those generated during earthquakes, using a shake box instrumented with an accelerometer and a GPS antenna. The accelerometer measured the box's actual displacement. The box moved on a manually controlled axis that underwent varied one-dimensional motions (from mm to cm) at different frequencies and amplitudes. The CASES receiver was configured to optimize the accuracy of the position solution. We quantified the CASES GPS receiver performance by comparing the GPS solutions against the accelerometer data using various statistical analysis methods. The results of these tests will be presented. The CASES receiver is designed with multiple methods of accessing the data in realtime, ranging from internet connection, blue-tooth, cell-phone modem and Iridium modem. Because the CASES receiver measures ionospheric space weather in addition to the usual navigation solution, CASES provides not only the seimic signal, but also the ionospheric space weather

  3. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-06-30

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1-7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%-40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  4. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1-7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%-40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  5. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1–7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%–40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  6. Estimation and analysis of GPS receiver differential code biases using KGN in Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, B. K.; Cho, J. H.; Lee, S. J.

    2011-05-01

    The total electron content (TEC) estimation by the Global Positioning System (GPS) can be seriously affected by the differential code biases (DCB), referred to as inter-frequency biases (IFB), of the satellite and receiver so that an accuracy of GPS-TEC value is dependent on the error of DCBs estimation. In this paper, we proposed the singular value decomposition (SVD) method to estimate the DCB of GPS satellites and receivers using the Korean GPS network (KGN) in South Korea. The receiver DCBs of about 49 GPS reference stations in KGN were determined for the accurate estimation of the regional ionospheric TEC. They obtained from the daily solution have large biases ranging from +5 to +27 ns for geomagnetic quiet days. The receiver DCB of SUWN reference station was compared with the estimates of IGS and JPL global ionosphere map (GIM). The results have shown comparatively good agreement at the level within 0.2 ns. After correction of receiver DCBs and knowing the satellite DCBs, the comparison between the behavior of the estimated TEC and that of GIMs was performed for consecutive three days. We showed that there is a good agreement between KASI model and GIMs.

  7. Signal existence verification (SEV) for GPS low received power signal detection using the time-frequency approach.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Sun, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    The detection of low received power of global positioning system (GPS) signals in the signal acquisition process is an important issue for GPS applications. Improving the miss-detection problem of low received power signal is crucial, especially for urban or indoor environments. This paper proposes a signal existence verification (SEV) process to detect and subsequently verify low received power GPS signals. The SEV process is based on the time-frequency representation of GPS signal, and it can capture the characteristic of GPS signal in the time-frequency plane to enhance the GPS signal acquisition performance. Several simulations and experiments are conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed method for low received power signal detection. The contribution of this work is that the SEV process is an additional scheme to assist the GPS signal acquisition process in low received power signal detection, without changing the original signal acquisition or tracking algorithms.

  8. Telemetry Tests Of The Advanced Receiver II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Bevan, Roland P.; Marina, Miguel

    1993-01-01

    Report describes telemetry tests of Advanced Receiver II (ARX-II): digital radio receiving subsystem operating on intermediate-frequency output of another receiving subsystem called "multimission receiver" (MMR), detecting carrier, subcarrier, and data-symbol signals transmitted by spacecraft, and extracts Doppler information from signals. Analysis of data shows performance of MMR/ARX-II system comparable and sometimes superior to performances of Blk-III/BPA and Blk-III/SDA/SSA systems.

  9. Swarm GPS Receiver Performance under the Influence of Ionospheric Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Le; Schön, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm mission launched on 22 November 2013 is ESA's first constellation of satellites to study the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field and its interaction with the Earth system. This mission consists of three identical satellites in near-polar orbits , two flying almost side-by-side at an initial altitude of 460 km, the third flying in a higher orbit of about 530 km. Each satellite is equipped with a high precision 8-channels dual-frequency receiver for the precise orbit determination, which is also the essential fundament in order to take full advantage of the data information provided by this constellation, e.g. for the recovery of gravity field. The quality of the final orbit determination depends on the observation data from the receivers. In this contribution, we will analyze the performance of the Swarm on-board receivers, especially under the influence of ionospheric scintillation caused by ionospheric irregularities. This is a prerequisite for high quality satellite positioning as well as a sound study of the ionosphere. Ionospheric scintillation can lead to the phase disturbances, cycle slips or even loss of signal tracking. The RINEX observation data from Swarm Level 1b products are used to analyze the Swarm receiver performance. We will demonstrate the signal strength, code and phase noise, different linear combinations (geometry free, ionosphere free), as well as GDOP values for the 3 Swarm satellites. The first results show that the observation data are severely disturbed and the signals could be lost around the geomagnetic equator and geomagnetic poles where the ionosphere is active. The results also show that the receivers are more stable in those areas after the update in October 2015.

  10. From BlackJack to GOX: the transfer, test, and validation of the ROCSat-3 GPS occultation receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, Allen H.; Armatys, Michael; Bell, Bryan; Charles, Jeff; Lahmeyer, Chuck; Lee, Cynthia; Meehan, Tom; Munson, Tim; Robison, David; Srinivasan, Jeff; Stecheson, Ted; Young, Larry

    2004-01-01

    ROCSat-3's primary instrument is the GPS Occultation Receiver (GOX) and is based on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) proven BlackJack GPS Receiver. The COSMIC GOX receivers will demonstrate an important new operational data type for near-real-time assimilation into weather models by providing over 2500 atmospheric profiles per day with a global distribution.

  11. Range filtering for sequential GPS receivers with external sensor augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell

    1987-01-01

    The filtering of the satellite range and range-rate measurements from single channel sequential Global Positioning System receivers is usually done with an extended Kalman filter which has state variables defined in terms of an orthogonal navigation reference frame. An attractive suboptimal alternative is range-domain filtering, in which the individual satellite measurements are filtered separately before they are combined for the navigation solution. The main advantages of range-domain filtering are decreased processing and storage requirements and simplified tuning. Several range filter mechanization alternatives are presented, along with an innovative approach for combining the filtered range-domain quantities to determine the navigation state estimate. In addition, a method is outlined for incorporating measurements from auxiliary sensors such as altimeters into the navigation state estimation scheme similarly to the satellite measurements. A method is also described for incorporating inertial measurements into the navigation state estimator as a process driver.

  12. Advanced heat receiver conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesseli, James; Saunders, Roger; Batchelder, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Solar Dynamic space power systems are candidate electrical power generating systems for future NASA missions. One of the key components of the solar dynamic power system is the solar receiver/thermal energy storage (TES) subsystem. Receiver development was conducted by NASA in the late 1960's and since then a very limited amount of work has been done in this area. Consequently the state of the art (SOA) receivers designed for the IOC space station are large and massive. The objective of the Advanced Heat Receiver Conceptual Design Study is to conceive and analyze advanced high temperature solar dynamic Brayton and Stirling receivers. The goal is to generate innovative receiver concepts that are half of the mass, smaller, and more efficient than the SOA. It is also necessary that these innovative receivers offer ease of manufacturing, less structural complexity and fewer thermal stress problems. Advanced Brayton and Stirling receiver storage units are proposed and analyzed in this study which can potentially meet these goals.

  13. Portable device to assess dynamic accuracy of global positioning systems (GPS) receivers used in agricultural aircraft

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A device was designed to test the dynamic accuracy of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers used in aerial vehicles. The system works by directing a sun-reflected light beam from the ground to the aircraft using mirrors. A photodetector is placed pointing downward from the aircraft and circuitry...

  14. GPS receivers timing data processing using neural networks: optimal estimation and errors modeling.

    PubMed

    Mosavi, M R

    2007-10-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a network of satellites, whose original purpose was to provide accurate navigation, guidance, and time transfer to military users. The past decade has also seen rapid concurrent growth in civilian GPS applications, including farming, mining, surveying, marine, and outdoor recreation. One of the most significant of these civilian applications is commercial aviation. A stand-alone civilian user enjoys an accuracy of 100 meters and 300 nanoseconds, 25 meters and 200 nanoseconds, before and after Selective Availability (SA) was turned off. In some applications, high accuracy is required. In this paper, five Neural Networks (NNs) are proposed for acceptable noise reduction of GPS receivers timing data. The paper uses from an actual data collection for evaluating the performance of the methods. An experimental test setup is designed and implemented for this purpose. The obtained experimental results from a Coarse Acquisition (C/A)-code single-frequency GPS receiver strongly support the potential of methods to give high accurate timing. Quality of the obtained results is very good, so that GPS timing RMS error reduce to less than 120 and 40 nanoseconds, with and without SA. PMID:18098370

  15. GPS receivers timing data processing using neural networks: optimal estimation and errors modeling.

    PubMed

    Mosavi, M R

    2007-10-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a network of satellites, whose original purpose was to provide accurate navigation, guidance, and time transfer to military users. The past decade has also seen rapid concurrent growth in civilian GPS applications, including farming, mining, surveying, marine, and outdoor recreation. One of the most significant of these civilian applications is commercial aviation. A stand-alone civilian user enjoys an accuracy of 100 meters and 300 nanoseconds, 25 meters and 200 nanoseconds, before and after Selective Availability (SA) was turned off. In some applications, high accuracy is required. In this paper, five Neural Networks (NNs) are proposed for acceptable noise reduction of GPS receivers timing data. The paper uses from an actual data collection for evaluating the performance of the methods. An experimental test setup is designed and implemented for this purpose. The obtained experimental results from a Coarse Acquisition (C/A)-code single-frequency GPS receiver strongly support the potential of methods to give high accurate timing. Quality of the obtained results is very good, so that GPS timing RMS error reduce to less than 120 and 40 nanoseconds, with and without SA.

  16. Comparison of baseline results for the TI-4100 and Trimble 4000SDT geodetic GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    1992-10-01

    Many GPS networks which were initially surveyed with Texas Instruments TI-4100 receivers have now been resurveyed with mixtures of TI-4100 and Trimble 4000 receivers or exclusively with Trimble receivers. In order to make confident tectonic interpretation of displacements observed between such surveys, it is necessary to understand any biases which may be introduced by using different receiver types or by mixing receivers within a network. Therefore, one of the primary objectives of the Ecuador 1990 GPS campaign (February 1990) was to provide a direct long baseline comparison between the TI-4100 and Trimble 4000SDT GPS receivers. p ]During this campaign, TI and Trimble receivers were co-located at each end of a 1323 kilometer baseline (Jerusalen to Baltra). Solutions for this baseline show no variation with receiver type. Zero-length baseline solutions showed no evidence for any intrinsic bias caused by mixing the two receiver types. Short baseline solutions indicate a bias of -34±10 mm in the baseline vertical component; the sign of the bias indicates that either the assumed phase center location for the TI is too low or the assumed location for the Trimble is too high. The bias is explainable if the phase centers of the Trimble SDT and SST antennas are similarly located. p ]Solutions for baselines measured with codeless receivers (such as the Trimble) should be as precise as those for baselines measured with P-code receivers (such as the TI) as long as it is possible to resolve ambiguities. Resolution of the widelane ambiguity is the limiting factor in ambiguity resolution with any codeless receiver, and in the February 1990 campaigns it was not successful fore baselines longer than 100 km. Without explicit modeling of the ionospheric effect on the widelane, ambiguity resolution with codeless receivers will not be successful for baselines longer than about 100 km, depending on the local ionospheric conditions.

  17. Simulation of a navigator algorithm for a low-cost GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The analytical structure of an existing navigator algorithm for a low cost global positioning system receiver is described in detail to facilitate its implementation on in-house digital computers and real-time simulators. The material presented includes a simulation of GPS pseudorange measurements, based on a two-body representation of the NAVSTAR spacecraft orbits, and a four component model of the receiver bias errors. A simpler test for loss of pseudorange measurements due to spacecraft shielding is also noted.

  18. Flight Performance Evaluation of Three GPS Receivers for Sounding Rocket Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Diehl, James; Montenbruck, Oliver; Markgraf, Markus; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for the European Space Agency Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange,, near Kiruna, Sweden on February 19, 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. The receivers included an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver, a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver and a Mitel Orion receiver. All of them provide CIA code tracking on the L1 frequency to determine the user position and make use of Doppler measurements to derive the instantaneous velocity. Among the receivers, the G12 has been optimized for use under highly dynamic conditions and has earlier been flown successfully on NASA sounding rockets [Bull, ION-GPS-2000]. The Allstar is representative of common single frequency receivers for terrestrial applications and received no particular modification, except for the disabling of the common altitude and velocity constraints that would otherwise inhibit its use for space application. The Orion receiver, finally, employs the same Mitel chipset as the Allstar, but has received various firmware modifications by DLR to safeguard it against signal losses and improve its tracking performance [Montenbruck et al., ION-GPS-2000]. While the two NASA receivers were driven by a common wrap-around antenna, the DLR experiment made use of a switchable antenna system comprising a helical antenna in the tip of the rocket and two blade antennas attached to the body of the vehicle. During the boost a peak acceleration of roughly 17g's was achieved which resulted in a velocity of about 1100 m/s at the end of the burn. At apogee, the rocket reached a maximum altitude of over 80 km. A detailed analysis of the attained flight data will be given in the paper together with a evaluation of different receiver designs and antenna concepts.

  19. A Real-Time Capable Software-Defined Receiver Using GPU for Adaptive Anti-Jam GPS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S.; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities. PMID:22164116

  20. A real-time capable software-defined receiver using GPU for adaptive anti-jam GPS sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities.

  1. A real-time capable software-defined receiver using GPU for adaptive anti-jam GPS sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities. PMID:22164116

  2. GPS receiver algorithms for suppression of narrowband and structured wideband interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhani, Premal Harish

    This dissertation describes algorithms that enhance the acquisition and tracking performance of a GPS receiver in the presence of narrowband and structured wideband interference. As GPS becomes an essential element of the civil infrastructure in the areas of aviation, ground transportation, communications, and power distribution, its vulnerability to interference must be addressed. Unintentional interference typically takes the form of a narrowband signal. Structured wideband interference can result from the ground-based augmentation of GPS with pseudolites. Algorithms that enhance performance for these two situations are developed and described in detail. Pseudolites are a very useful augmentation to GPS that provide enhanced coverage in areas of high blockage or for critical missions such as aircraft landing. However, pseudolites may introduce what is known as near-far interference, where a pseudolite signal interferes with the acquisition and tracking of weaker satellite signals. I have applied the technique of successive interference cancellation (SIC) to improve acquisition performance in the presence of a pseudolite signal. An extension of SIC to the identification and cancellation of pseudolite multipath is also given. The performance of these algorithms is demonstrated on simulated and experimental data, showing significant improvement over conventional techniques. The low level of GPS signals makes them susceptible to narrowband interference, despite the inherent resistance to interference afforded by GPS spread spectrum modulation. In my research I have investigated a number of algorithms that can increase the robustness of GPS receivers in a hostile narrowband electromagnetic environment. This dissertation describes several adaptive estimators which are applied to simulated GPS data. Comparisons are made in terms of post-correlation signal-to-noise ratio, tracking errors, and computational requirements. Conventional techniques of high accuracy Doppler

  3. GPS/GLONASS Time Transfer with 20-Channel Dual GNSS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, P.; Riley, S.

    1996-01-01

    One of the world's two global navigation systems, the Global Positioning System (GPS), is already fully operational (April 1994) and the other, the Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) will become operational by the end of 1995 or early 1996. Each will offer, independently of the other, precise location and time transfer continuously anywhere in the world and indeed in space itself. Many potential users, in particular the civil aviation community, are keenly interested in a joint GPS/GLONASS operation since it would offer substantial advantages in defining and maintaining the integrity of the navigation aid. Results are presented on the characterization of GPS/GLONASS time comparison using a 20-channel dual receiver developed and constructed at the University of Leeds, UK.

  4. Proposed wireless system could interfere with key GPS receivers, U.S. officials testify

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-09-01

    A proposed $14 billion network that would increase broadband wireless access poses significant interference problems for existing GPS signals used for some critical U.S. federal science and public safety systems, said officials from NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other experts at an 8 September hearing of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The officials cautioned that a terrestrial wireless network plan proposed by LightSquared LLC—which includes using frequencies adjacent to the GPS band—needs additional testing before it is given a green light by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). In addition, the officials said that although they hope there is a win-win solution to increasing broadband wireless options without harming GPS signals, a recently revised plan that LightSquared indicates would reduce interference to a large majority of GPS receivers still would present problems for a number of high-precision GPS systems.

  5. Multi-PLL with two-stage fusion to mitigate ionospheric scintillation effects on GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Liu, Zhizhao; Chen, Wu

    2015-07-01

    Ionospheric scintillation poses a great threat to the reliability and accuracy of Global Positioning System (GPS) in various applications. It can increase tracking errors of the phase-locked loop (PLL) in a GPS receiver and even cause the PLL loss of lock under severe scintillations. To mitigate the effect of scintillation on GPS receivers, especially to reduce the occurrence of loss of lock, a multi-PLL with two-stage fusion (i.e., tracking fusion and output fusion) is proposed in this paper. This algorithm integrates several parallel sub-PLLs with different loop parameters into one channel to track one GPS satellite's signal. Every sub-PLL has its own discriminator, loop filter, carrier numerical controlled oscillator, and a tracking fusion (i.e., the first stage fusion). The tracking fusion of each sub-PLL integrates the Doppler frequency measurements from all other sub-PLLs to detect the state of its own sub-PLL and feeds back reliable Doppler frequency measurements. Simultaneously, the tracking fusion outputs the Doppler frequency measurements to the second stage fusion (i.e., output fusion), which integrates the outputs from all tracking fusions to provide continuous and accurate Doppler frequency measurements for the following positioning/navigation estimator. Performances of the proposed algorithm are tested using real-world GPS data with different levels of scintillations and compared with results from single-PLLs. For three real-world scintillation cases (S4 = 0.26-1.1, σϕ = 0.05-1.49 rad, and average C/N0 = 41.2-45.7 dB Hz), the multi-PLL algorithm performs more robustly than the single-PLLs and is able to keep tracking in all scintillation cases.

  6. Receiver Function Inversion Using Fitness Proportionate Niching (FPN) and Generalized Pattern Search (GPS) Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugda, M. T.; Workineh, A. T.; Homaifar, A.; Kim, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    In order to determine crustal thickness (H) and Vp/Vs ratio (κ) parameters and associated weights from Hκ stacking of receiver functions, an effort has been made to develop a technique that combines Fitness Proportionate Niching (FPN) and Generalized Pattern Search (GPS) techniques by employing their strengths. The problem here involves global optimization for the inversion of receiver functions based on Hκ stacking. Generally, the objective function of the Hκ stacking algorithm displays multimodal surfaces with multiple local maxima. Niching mechanism permits standard Genetic Algorithms (GAs) to identify different subpopulations representing various peaks by maintaining population diversity and avoiding early convergence so as to enable adequate exploration of the search space for the GA to discover multiple optima. In multimodal optimization, fitness sharing has been commonly used to generate stable subpopulations of individuals around multiple optimum points in the search space. In this study newly developed Fitness Proportionate Niching (FPN) of Genetic Algorithms is implemented to identify the different local maxima regions (niches). The basis for FPN is the idea of limited resources where individuals in a given niche share the resource of that niche in proportion to the fitness strength. Among the FPN identified niches, the niche of correct phases is designated for a faster search using GPS approach. Application of GPS technique provides quick and optimal solutions for the different parameters under investigation - the crustal thickness (H), Vp/Vs ratio (κ), and the three associated weights (W1, W2, W3). The GPS technique is among the very few provably convergent, derivative-free search methods for linearly constrained optimization problems. One of the key features of GPS technique is the repeatability of the outcomes unlike some heuristic search approaches. The number of iterations as well as the number of objective function evaluations will remain the

  7. Gravity field error analysis: Applications of GPS receivers and gradiometers on low orbiting platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrama, E.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as a tracking facility and a gradiometer as a separate instrument on a low orbiting platform offers a unique tool to map the Earth's gravitational field with unprecedented accuracies. The former technique allows determination of the spacecraft's ephemeris at any epoch to within 3 to 10 cm, the latter permits the measurement of the tensor of second order derivatives of the gravity field to within 0.01 to 0.0001 Eotvos units depending on the type of gradiometer. First, a variety of error sources in gradiometry where emphasis is placed on the rotational problem pursuing as well a static as a dynamic approach is described. Next, an analytical technique is described and applied for an error analysis of gravity field parameters from gradiometer and GPS observation types. Results are discussed for various configurations proposed on Topex/Poseidon, Gravity Probe-B, and Aristoteles, indicating that GPS only solutions may be computed up to degree and order 35, 55, and 85 respectively, whereas a combined GPS/gradiometer experiment on Aristoteles may result in an acceptable solution up to degree and order 240.

  8. Design study of a low cost civil aviation GPS receiver system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cnossen, R.; Gilbert, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    A low cost Navstar receiver system for civil aviation applications was defined. User objectives and constraints were established. Alternative navigation processing design trades were evaluated. Receiver hardware was synthesized by comparing technology projections with various candidate system designs. A control display unit design was recommended as the result of field test experience with Phase I GPS sets and a review of special human factors for general aviation users. Areas requiring technology development to ensure a low cost Navstar Set in the 1985 timeframe were identified.

  9. Robust nonstationary jammer mitigation for GPS receivers with instantaneous frequency error tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ben; Zhang, Yimin D.; Qin, Si; Amin, Moeness G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonstationary jammer suppression method for GPS receivers when the signals are sparsely sampled. Missing data samples induce noise-like artifacts in the time-frequency (TF) distribution and ambiguity function of the received signals, which lead to reduced capability and degraded performance in jammer signature estimation and excision. In the proposed method, a data-dependent TF kernel is utilized to mitigate the artifacts and sparse reconstruction methods are then applied to obtain instantaneous frequency (IF) estimation of the jammers. In addition, an error tolerance of the IF estimate is applied is applied to achieve robust jammer suppression performance in the presence of IF estimation inaccuracy.

  10. Phase center modeling for LEO GPS receiver antennas and its impact on precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, Adrian; Dach, R.; Montenbruck, O.; Hugentobler, U.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.

    2009-12-01

    Most satellites in a low-Earth orbit (LEO) with demanding requirements on precise orbit determination (POD) are equipped with on-board receivers to collect the observations from Global Navigation Satellite systems (GNSS), such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Limiting factors for LEO POD are nowadays mainly encountered with the modeling of the carrier phase observations, where a precise knowledge of the phase center location of the GNSS antennas is a prerequisite for high-precision orbit analyses. Since 5 November 2006 (GPS week 1400), absolute instead of relative values for the phase center location of GNSS receiver and transmitter antennas are adopted in the processing standards of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The absolute phase center modeling is based on robot calibrations for a number of terrestrial receiver antennas, whereas compatible antenna models were subsequently derived for the remaining terrestrial receiver antennas by conversion (from relative corrections), and for the GNSS transmitter antennas by estimation. However, consistent receiver antenna models for space missions such as GRACE and TerraSAR-X, which are equipped with non-geodetic receiver antennas, are only available since a short time from robot calibrations. We use GPS data of the aforementioned LEOs of the year 2007 together with the absolute antenna modeling to assess the presently achieved accuracy from state-of-the-art reduced-dynamic LEO POD strategies for absolute and relative navigation. Near-field multipath and cross-talk with active GPS occultation antennas turn out to be important and significant sources for systematic carrier phase measurement errors that are encountered in the actual spacecraft environments. We assess different methodologies for the in-flight determination of empirical phase pattern corrections for LEO receiver antennas and discuss their impact on POD. By means of independent K-band measurements, we show that zero-difference GRACE orbits can be

  11. Modeling and estimation of C1-P1 bias in GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Lahaye, F.; Héroux, P.; Liao, X.; Beck, N.; Olynik, M.

    2001-01-01

    Modern dual-frequency global positioning system (GPS) receivers are capable of providing direct measurements of both L1 C/A (C1) and P code (P1) without the use of the Y-codes under Anti-Spoofing. A discrepancy or bias between the C1 and P1 measurements from these receivers has however been of concern to operators and users of GPS reference networks. For the purpose of modeling and estimation, the nature and characteristics of the discrepancy must be investigated. The research results presented indicate that the discrepancy between the C1 and P1 measurements contains two different types of components: one is of constant type while another is time variant. A method has been developed for their modeling and estimation. The residual C1-P1 time series after a satellite-dependent bias removal agree at a few-centimeter level, indicating the effectiveness of the proposed model. This allows the C1-P1 discrepancy, both constant and non-constant components, to be removed from GPS reference network solutions. Numerical results are provided to support the analysis.

  12. Landslide monitoring using Geocubes, a wireless network of low-cost GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Lionel; Thom, Christian; Martin, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Many geophysical structures such as landslides, glaciers or even volcanoes are features characterized by small extend area and deformation rate in the order of 1 to 10cm per day. Their study needs ever more accurate positioning data with an increased space and time resolution. Using an ublox LEA-6T GPS receiver, the French national mapping agency IGN developed its own wireless multi-sensor geo-monitoring system named Geocube. The basic device is equipped with a GPS and a wireless communication media and can be completed with various sensor modules such as meteorological sensors, ground humidity and pressure or seismograph. Due to the low cost of each receiver, spatial dense surveying networks are deployed. Data are then continuously collected and transmitted to a processing computer in real-time as well as saved in situ on a Micro-SD card. Among them, raw GPS carrier phase data give access to real-time accurate relative positioning on all mesh nodes if small baselines are used. In order to achieve a high accuracy, a dedicated GPS data processing method based on a Kalman filter is proposed. It allows an epoch by epoch positioning providing a high time resolution. Special attention is paid on two points : adaptation to wireless networks of low-cost GPS and real-time ability. A first test of Geocubes usability under field conditions was carried out during summer 2012. A fifteen receivers network was deployed on the landslide of Super-Sauze (French Alps) for a two months trial. The experimental area, the deployed network and the acquisition protocol are presented. Position time series with a 30 seconds sampling rate are then derived from raw data for 10 mobile receivers on a forty days session. A sub-centimetric accuracy on an epoch by epoch positioning is reached despite difficult field conditions due to a 40° elevation mask in the south direction. Then, the measured deformations are compared with in situ rainfall measurements collected by a dedicated sensor added to

  13. Landslide monitoring using Geocubes, a wireless network of low-cost GPS receivers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Lionel; Thom, Christian; Martin, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Many geophysical structures such as landslides, glaciers or even volcanoes are features characterized by small extend area and deformation rate in the order of 1 to 10cm per day. Their study needs ever more accurate positioning data with an increased space and time resolution. Using an Ublox LEA-6T GPS receiver, the French national mapping agency IGN developed its own wireless multi-sensor geo-monitoring system named Geocube. The basic device is equipped with a GPS and a wireless communication media and can be completed with various sensor modules such as meteorological sensors, ground humidity and pressure or seismograph. Due to the low cost of each receiver, spatial dense surveying networks are deployed. Data are then continuously collected and transmitted to a processing computer in real-time as well as saved in situ on a Micro-SD card. Among them, raw GPS carrier phase data give access to real-time accurate relative positioning on all mesh nodes if small baselines are used. In order to achieve a high accuracy, a dedicated GPS data processing method based on a Kalman filter is proposed. It allows an epoch by epoch positioning providing a high time resolution. Special attention is paid on two points : adaptation to wireless networks of low-cost GPS and real-time ability. A first test of Geocubes usability under field conditions was carried out during summer 2012. A fifteen receivers network was deployed on the landslide of Super-Sauze (French Alps) for a two months trial. The experimental area, the deployed network and the acquisition protocol are presented. Position time series with a 30 seconds sampling rate are then derived from raw data for 10 mobile receivers on a forty days session. A sub-centimetric accuracy on an epoch by epoch positioning is reached despite difficult field conditions due to a 40° elevation mask in the south direction. Then, the measured deformations are compared with in situ rainfall measurements collected by a dedicated sensor added to

  14. Link calibration against receiver calibration: an assessment of GPS time transfer uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovera, G. D.; Torre, J.-M.; Sherwood, R.; Abgrall, M.; Courde, C.; Laas-Bourez, M.; Uhrich, P.

    2014-10-01

    We present a direct comparison between two different techniques for the relative calibration of time transfer between remote time scales when using the signals transmitted by the Global Positioning System (GPS). Relative calibration estimates the delay of equipment or the delay of a time transfer link with respect to reference equipment. It is based on the circulation of some travelling GPS equipment between the stations in the network, against which the local equipment is measured. Two techniques can be considered: first a station calibration by the computation of the hardware delays of the local GPS equipment; second the computation of a global hardware delay offset for the time transfer between the reference points of two remote time scales. This last technique is called a ‘link’ calibration, with respect to the other one, which is a ‘receiver’ calibration. The two techniques require different measurements on site, which change the uncertainty budgets, and we discuss this and related issues. We report on one calibration campaign organized during Autumn 2013 between Observatoire de Paris (OP), Paris, France, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA), Calern, France, and NERC Space Geodesy Facility (SGF), Herstmonceux, United Kingdom. The travelling equipment comprised two GPS receivers of different types, along with the required signal generator and distribution amplifier, and one time interval counter. We show the different ways to compute uncertainty budgets, leading to improvement factors of 1.2 to 1.5 on the hardware delay uncertainties when comparing the relative link calibration to the relative receiver calibration.

  15. The use of the AOA TTR-4P GPS receiver in operation at the BIPM for real-time restitution of GPS time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Claudine

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System is an outstanding tool for the dissemination of time. Using mono-channel C/A-code GPS time receivers, the restitution of GPS time through the satellite constellation presents a peak-to-peak discrepancy of several tens of nanoseconds without SA but may be as high as several hundreds of nanoseconds with SA. As a consequence, civil users are more and more interested in implementing hardware and software methods for efficient restitution of GPS time, especially in the framework of the project of a real-time prediction of UTC (UTCp) which could be available in the form of time differences (UTCp - GPS time). Previous work, for improving the real-time restitution of GPS time with SA, to the level obtained without SA, focused on the implementation of a Kalman filter based on past data and updated at each new observation. An alternative solution relies upon the statistical features of the noise brought about by SA; it has already been shown that the SA noise is efficiently reduced by averaging data from numerous satellites observed simultaneously over a sufficiently long time. This method was successfully applied to data from a GPS time receiver, model AOA TTR-4P, connected to the cesium clock kept at the BIPM. This device, a multi-channel, dual frequency, P-code GPS time receiver, is one of the first TTR-4P units in operation in a civil laboratory. Preliminary comparative studies of this new equipment with conventional GPS time receivers are described in this paper. The results of an experimental restitution of GPS time, obtained in June 1993, are also detailed: 3 to 6 satellites were observed simultaneously with a sample interval of 15 s, an efficient smoothing of SA noise was realized by averaging data on all observed satellites over more than 1 hour. When the GPS system is complete in 1994, 8 satellites will be observable continuously from anywhere in the world and the same level of uncertainty will be obtained using a shorter averaging

  16. Automated daily processing of more than 1000 ground-based GPS receivers for studying intense ionospheric storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Sparks, Lawrence; Wilson, Brian D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    To take advantage of the vast amount of GPS data, researchers use a number of techniques to estimate satellite and receiver interfrequency biases and the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere. Most techniques estimate vertical ionospheric structure and, simultaneously, hardware-related biases treated as nuisance parameters. These methods often are limited to 200 GPS receivers and use a sequential least squares or Kalman filter approach. The biases are later removed from the measurements to obtain unbiased TEC. In our approach to calibrating GPS receiver and transmitter interfrequency biases we take advantage of all available GPS receivers using a new processing algorithm based on the Global Ionospheric Mapping (GIM) software developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This new capability is designed to estimate receiver biases for all stations. We solve for the instrumental biases by modeling the ionospheric delay and removing it from the observation equation using precomputed GIM maps. The precomputed GIM maps rely on 200 globally distributed GPS receivers to establish the ''background'' used to model the ionosphere at the remaining 800 GPS sites.

  17. Performance assessment of GPS receivers during the September 24, 2011 solar radio burst event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Bilal; Alberti, Valentina; Marassi, Alessandro; Cianca, Ernestina; Messerotti, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    The sudden outburst of in-band solar radio noise from the Sun is recognized as one of the potential Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) sources that directly impact the performance of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. On September 24, 2011, the solar active region 1302 unleashed a moderate M7.1 soft X-ray flare associated with a very powerful radio burst at 1415 MHz. The Solar Radio Burst (SRB) event spanned over three distinct episodes of solar radio noise emission that reached the maximum radio flux density of 114,144 Solar Flux Units (SFU) at 13:04:46 UTC. This paper analyzes the impact of September 24, 2011 SRB event on the performance of a significant subset of NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers located in the sunlit hemisphere. The performance assessment is carried out in terms of Carrier-to-Noise power spectral density ratio (C/N0) degradation, dual-frequency pseudorange measurements availability, pseudorange residual errors, and dual-frequency positioning errors in the horizontal and vertical dimensions. We observed that during the SRB event the GPS C/N0 is reduced at most by 13 dB on L1 and 24 dB on L2. The C/N0 degradation caused the loss of lock on GPS L1 and L2 signals and significant code-tracking errors. We noticed that many stations experienced less than four satellite measurements, which are the minimum required number of measurements for position estimation. The deteriorated satellite-receiver geometry due to loss of signal lock and significant code-tracking errors during the solar radio burst event introduced large positioning errors in both the horizontal and vertical dimensions. Rise in vertical positioning error of 303 m and rise in horizontal positioning of 55 m could be noticed during the solar radio burst event.

  18. Flight Performance Evaluation of Three GPS Receivers for Sounding Rocket Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Diehl, James; Montenbruck, Oliver; Markgraf, Markus; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In preparation for the European Space Agency Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange, near Kiruna, Sweden on February 19, 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. The receivers included an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver, a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver and a Mitel Orion receiver. All of them provide C/A code tracking on the L1 frequency to determine the user position and make use of Doppler measurements to derive the instantaneous velocity. Among the receivers, the G12 has been optimized for use under highly dynamic conditions and has earlier been flown successfully on NASA sounding rockets. The Allstar is representative of common single frequency receivers for terrestrial applications and received no particular modification, except for the disabling of the common altitude and velocity constraints that would otherwise inhibit its use for space application. The Orion receiver, finally, employs the same Mitel chipset as the Allstar, but has received various firmware modifications by DLR to safeguard it against signal losses and improve its tracking performance. While the two NASA receivers were driven by a common wrap-around antenna, the DLR experiment made use of a switchable antenna system comprising a helical antenna in the tip of the rocket and two blade antennas attached to the body of the vehicle. During the boost a peak acceleration of roughly l7g's was achieved which resulted in a velocity of about 1100 m/s at the end of the burn. At apogee, the rocket reached an altitude of over 80 km. A detailed analysis of the attained flight data is given together with a evaluation of different receiver designs and antenna concepts.

  19. Direction finding of GPS receiver interference based on the nulling weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Amin, Moeness

    2007-04-01

    Most military applications of GPS require performing both jammer nulling and localization. While nulling can be achieved using adaptive gradient techniques applied to the input sampled data, high resolution direction of arrival estimation can precede using subspace and eigenstructure methods applied to the estimate of the covariance matrix. In this paper, we extract the jammer direction of arrival (DOA) information directly from the adaptive weights, in which case we assume interference nulling precedes interference localization. This high resolution DOA estimation approach based on available beamforming weight values leads to simplified receiver structure and allows a choice of IF or baseband processing as well as flexibility for analog, digital or mixed mode implementations.

  20. Real-Time Point Positioning Performance Evaluation of Single-Frequency Receivers Using NASA's Global Differential GPS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Iijima, Byron; Meyer, Robert; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Accad, Elie

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of a single-frequency receiver using the 1-Hz differential corrections as provided by NASA's global differential GPS system. While the dual-frequency user has the ability to eliminate the ionosphere error by taking a linear combination of observables, the single-frequency user must remove or calibrate this error by other means. To remove the ionosphere error we take advantage of the fact that the magnitude of the group delay in range observable and the carrier phase advance have the same magnitude but are opposite in sign. A way to calibrate this error is to use a real-time database of grid points computed by JPL's RTI (Real-Time Ionosphere) software. In both cases we evaluate the positional accuracy of a kinematic carrier phase based point positioning method on a global extent.

  1. First Results of Field Absolute Calibration of the GPS Receiver Antenna at Wuhan University.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhigang; Zhao, Qile; Chen, Guo; Wang, Guangxing; Dai, Zhiqiang; Li, Tao

    2015-11-13

    GNSS receiver antenna phase center variations (PCVs), which arise from the non-spherical phase response of GNSS signals have to be well corrected for high-precision GNSS applications. Without using a precise antenna phase center correction (PCC) model, the estimated position of a station monument will lead to a bias of up to several centimeters. The Chinese large-scale research project "Crustal Movement Observation Network of China" (CMONOC), which requires high-precision positions in a comprehensive GPS observational network motived establishment of a set of absolute field calibrations of the GPS receiver antenna located at Wuhan University. In this paper the calibration facilities are firstly introduced and then the multipath elimination and PCV estimation strategies currently used are elaborated. The validation of estimated PCV values of test antenna are finally conducted, compared with the International GNSS Service (IGS) type values. Examples of TRM57971.00 NONE antenna calibrations from our calibration facility demonstrate that the derived PCVs and IGS type mean values agree at the 1 mm level.

  2. First Results of Field Absolute Calibration of the GPS Receiver Antenna at Wuhan University

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhigang; Zhao, Qile; Chen, Guo; Wang, Guangxing; Dai, Zhiqiang; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    GNSS receiver antenna phase center variations (PCVs), which arise from the non-spherical phase response of GNSS signals have to be well corrected for high-precision GNSS applications. Without using a precise antenna phase center correction (PCC) model, the estimated position of a station monument will lead to a bias of up to several centimeters. The Chinese large-scale research project “Crustal Movement Observation Network of China” (CMONOC), which requires high-precision positions in a comprehensive GPS observational network motived establishment of a set of absolute field calibrations of the GPS receiver antenna located at Wuhan University. In this paper the calibration facilities are firstly introduced and then the multipath elimination and PCV estimation strategies currently used are elaborated. The validation of estimated PCV values of test antenna are finally conducted, compared with the International GNSS Service (IGS) type values. Examples of TRM57971.00 NONE antenna calibrations from our calibration facility demonstrate that the derived PCVs and IGS type mean values agree at the 1 mm level. PMID:26580616

  3. Receiver clock stability - An important aid in the GPS integrity problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBurney, Paul W.; Brown, R. Grover

    It is well known that the stability of the GPS receiver clock can be used to help 'coast' through periods of high GDOP. A somewhat analogous situation applies when the receiver is attempting to detect slow or incipient satellite failures. The clock, through its stability, provides an additional measurement which slowly degrades with time, but nevertheless provides the needed redundancy for failure detection. The geometric circumstances giving rise to the need for clock coasting are more complicated for failure detection than in the simple navigation problem. This is discussed in the paper. Also, a Kalman filter failure detection scheme which automatically accomplishes the needed clock coasting is presented. Finally, results of Monte Carlo simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of the scheme in both detecting and isolating the errant satellite are given in the paper.

  4. Standalone GPS L1 C/A Receiver for Lunar Missions.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Vincenzo; Blunt, Paul; Botteron, Cyril; Tian, Jia; Leclère, Jérôme; Wang, Yanguang; Basile, Francesco; Farine, Pierre-André

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) were originally introduced to provide positioning and timing services for terrestrial Earth users. However, space users increasingly rely on GNSS for spacecraft navigation and other science applications at several different altitudes from the Earth surface, in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), and feasibility studies have proved that GNSS signals can even be tracked at Moon altitude. Despite this, space remains a challenging operational environment, particularly on the way from the Earth to the Moon, characterized by weaker signals with wider gain variability, larger dynamic ranges resulting in higher Doppler and Doppler rates and critically low satellite signal availability. Following our previous studies, this paper describes the proof of concept "WeakHEO" receiver; a GPS L1 C/A receiver we developed in our laboratory specifically for lunar missions. The paper also assesses the performance of the receiver in two representative portions of an Earth Moon Transfer Orbit (MTO). The receiver was connected to our GNSS Spirent simulator in order to collect real-time hardware-in-the-loop observations, and then processed by the navigation module. This demonstrates the feasibility, using current technology, of effectively exploiting GNSS signals for navigation in a MTO. PMID:27005628

  5. Standalone GPS L1 C/A Receiver for Lunar Missions

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Vincenzo; Blunt, Paul; Botteron, Cyril; Tian, Jia; Leclère, Jérôme; Wang, Yanguang; Basile, Francesco; Farine, Pierre-André

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) were originally introduced to provide positioning and timing services for terrestrial Earth users. However, space users increasingly rely on GNSS for spacecraft navigation and other science applications at several different altitudes from the Earth surface, in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), and feasibility studies have proved that GNSS signals can even be tracked at Moon altitude. Despite this, space remains a challenging operational environment, particularly on the way from the Earth to the Moon, characterized by weaker signals with wider gain variability, larger dynamic ranges resulting in higher Doppler and Doppler rates and critically low satellite signal availability. Following our previous studies, this paper describes the proof of concept “WeakHEO” receiver; a GPS L1 C/A receiver we developed in our laboratory specifically for lunar missions. The paper also assesses the performance of the receiver in two representative portions of an Earth Moon Transfer Orbit (MTO). The receiver was connected to our GNSS Spirent simulator in order to collect real-time hardware-in-the-loop observations, and then processed by the navigation module. This demonstrates the feasibility, using current technology, of effectively exploiting GNSS signals for navigation in a MTO. PMID:27005628

  6. Standalone GPS L1 C/A Receiver for Lunar Missions.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Vincenzo; Blunt, Paul; Botteron, Cyril; Tian, Jia; Leclère, Jérôme; Wang, Yanguang; Basile, Francesco; Farine, Pierre-André

    2016-03-09

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) were originally introduced to provide positioning and timing services for terrestrial Earth users. However, space users increasingly rely on GNSS for spacecraft navigation and other science applications at several different altitudes from the Earth surface, in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), and feasibility studies have proved that GNSS signals can even be tracked at Moon altitude. Despite this, space remains a challenging operational environment, particularly on the way from the Earth to the Moon, characterized by weaker signals with wider gain variability, larger dynamic ranges resulting in higher Doppler and Doppler rates and critically low satellite signal availability. Following our previous studies, this paper describes the proof of concept "WeakHEO" receiver; a GPS L1 C/A receiver we developed in our laboratory specifically for lunar missions. The paper also assesses the performance of the receiver in two representative portions of an Earth Moon Transfer Orbit (MTO). The receiver was connected to our GNSS Spirent simulator in order to collect real-time hardware-in-the-loop observations, and then processed by the navigation module. This demonstrates the feasibility, using current technology, of effectively exploiting GNSS signals for navigation in a MTO.

  7. Selecting the optimum telemetry tracking antenna for receiving translated GPS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, William C.

    Three dual-channel circularly polarized antennas considered for receiving translated GPS signals were tested for feed-induced phase-noise performance. The tested specimens were: (1) a 12-ft diam. reflector with the 15-in diam. Symetrics feed having a scan rate of 21 Hz; (2) a 4-ft diam. reflector with the 7.5-in diam. Radscan type feed, having a scan rate of 29 Hz; and (3) a 4-ft diam. reflector utilizing an EMP single-axis single-channel monopulse S-band feed having a 10 by 4-in. ground plane. Of the three specimens tested, only the Symetrics antenna had any measurable phase noise on the boresight axis. The Radscan antenna outperformed the Symetric antenna in every parameter, primarily because the Radscan employs an open-ended waveguide which has a uniform phase front across its aperture. The Radscan antenna produces no phase noise even at large tracking bias.

  8. Observations of Conjugate MSTIDs using Networks of GPS Receivers in the American Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    We have used TEC values measured with several networks of GPS receivers that operate in the American sector to investigate the conjugacy properties of MSTIDs and equatorial plasma bubbles that commonly occur at these latitudes. TEC values corresponding to mid-latitude MSTIDs, also named electro-buoyance waves, map into the opposite hemisphere to ~10% of their original amplitude. Equatorial plasma bubbles sometime reach mid latitudes showing 100% conjugacy in both hemispheres. During disturbed conditions, we have observed MSTIDs, or plasma structures occurring over the Continental USA reaching latitudes that are commonly considered sub-auroral regions. We believe that the latter structures likely follow the Perkins instability and may be driven by a southward wind associated with the disturbed dynamo. We will also show data collected with satellites (CNOFS/DMSP/SWARM) passing over the southern hemisphere to diagnose the conjugacy of these structures. This paper will also discuss the physical implications of our conjugate observations.

  9. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  10. Seismo-traveling ionospheric disturbances of earthquake and tsunami waves observed by space- and ground-based GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. Y. G.; Chen, C. Y.; Lin, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) is a constellation of six microsatellites launched on April 15, 2006 and has been orbiting with 72° inclination at 700 to 800 km above the earth since December 2007. The main payload of the F3/C is the GPS Occultation eXperiment (GOX) which carries out probing the radio occultation (RO) total electron content between GPS satellite and F3/C. Therefore, F3/C provides us an excellent opportunity to vertically scan ionospheric electron density from 100 up to 800 km altitude. On the other hand, worldwide ground-based GPS receivers can be employed to observe traveling ionospheric disturbances of the TEC. Here, we present the ionosphere response to seismic and tsunami waves by means of F3/C RO TEC and worldwide ground-based GPS TEC as well as existing data of infrasondes, magnetometers, and Doppler sounding systems during the 11 March 2011 M9.0 Tohoku earthquake.

  11. Detecting ionospheric TEC perturbations caused by natural hazards using a global network of GPS receivers: The Tohoku case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komjathy, A.; Galvan, D. A.; Stephens, P.; Butala, M. D.; Akopian, V.; Wilson, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O.; Mannucci, A. J.; Hickey, M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in GPS data processing have demonstrated that ground-based GPS receivers are capable of detecting ionospheric TEC perturbations caused by surface-generated Rayleigh, acoustic and gravity waves. There have been a number of publications discussing TEC perturbations immediately following the M 9.0 Tohoku earthquake in Japan on March 11, 2011. Most investigators have focused on the ionospheric responses up to a few hours following the earthquake and tsunami. In our research, in addition to March 11, 2011 we investigate global ionospheric TEC perturbations a day before and after the event. We also compare indices of geomagnetic activity on all three days with perturbations in TEC, revealing strong geomagnetic storm conditions that are also apparent in processed GEONET TEC observations. In addition to the traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) produced by the earthquake and tsunami, we also detect "regular" TIDs across Japan about 5 hours following the Tohoku event, concluding these are likely due to geomagnetic activity. The variety of observed TEC perturbations are consistent with tsunami-generated gravity waves, auroral activity, regular TIDs and equatorial fluctuations induced by increased geomagnetic activity. We demonstrate our capabilities to monitor TEC fluctuations using JPL's real-time Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM) system. We show that a real-time global TEC monitoring network is able to detect the acoustic and gravity waves generated by the earthquake and tsunami. With additional real-time stations deployed, this new capability has the potential to provide real-time monitoring of TEC perturbations that could potentially serve as a plug-in to enhance existing early warning systems.

  12. An evaluation of a UAV guidance system with consumer grade GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Abigail Stella

    Remote sensing has been demonstrated an important tool in agricultural and natural resource management and research applications, however there are limitations that exist with traditional platforms (i.e., hand held sensors, linear moves, vehicle mounted, airplanes, remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and satellites). Rapid technological advances in electronics, computers, software applications, and the aerospace industry have dramatically reduced the cost and increased the availability of remote sensing technologies. Remote sensing imagery vary in spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions and are available from numerous providers. Appendix A presented results of a test project that acquired high-resolution aerial photography with a RPV to map the boundary of a 0.42 km2 fire area. The project mapped the boundaries of the fire area from a mosaic of the aerial images collected and compared this with ground-based measurements. The project achieved a 92.4% correlation between the aerial assessment and the ground truth data. Appendix B used multi-objective analysis to quantitatively assess the tradeoffs between different sensor platform attributes to identify the best overall technology. Experts were surveyed to identify the best overall technology at three different pixel sizes. Appendix C evaluated the positional accuracy of a relatively low cost UAV designed for high resolution remote sensing of small areas in order to determine the positional accuracy of sensor readings. The study evaluated the accuracy and uncertainty of a UAV flight route with respect to the programmed waypoints and of the UAV's GPS position, respectively. In addition, the potential displacement of sensor data was evaluated based on (1) GPS measurements on board the aircraft and (2) the autopilot's circuit board with 3-axis gyros and accelerometers (i.e., roll, pitch, and yaw). The accuracies were estimated based on a 95% confidence interval or similar methods. The

  13. Application of a novel multi-stage signal parameter estimator to high dynamic GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of a novel multistage estimator when applied to the estimation of the position, velocity, and acceleration of high dynamic Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers is discussed. For the present application, a two-stage specialization of the more general estimation scheme is considered, wherein the first-stage algorithm is selected to be a modified least-squares algorithm operating upon the differential signal model and referred to as differential least-squares (DLS) and the second stage is simply an extended Kalman filter (EKF). In terms of the threshold on received carrier power-to-noise power spectral density ratio (CNR), when compared to the single-stage EKF algorithm, the DLS-EKF algorithm is about 1.5-2.0 dB better in terms of threshold and outperforms the crossproduct AFC (automatic frequency control) loop by 2-5 dB. For the case when data modulation is present, the proposed scheme provides an improvement of about 6 dB in terms of CNR compared to an earlier approximate MLE (maximum likelihood estimation) scheme. There are also very significant improvements in terms of other performance measures.

  14. Error and Performance Analysis of MEMS-based Inertial Sensors with a Low-cost GPS Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minha; Gao, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as the Global Positioning System (GPS), have been widely utilized and their applications are becoming popular, not only in military or commercial applications, but also for everyday life. Although GPS measurements are the essential information for currently developed land vehicle navigation systems (LVNS), GPS signals are often unavailable or unreliable due to signal blockages under certain environments such as urban canyons. This situation must be compensated in order to provide continuous navigation solutions. To overcome the problems of unavailability and unreliability using GPS and to be cost and size effective as well, Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based inertial sensor technology has been pushing for the development of low-cost integrated navigation systems for land vehicle navigation and guidance applications. This paper will analyze the characterization of MEMS based inertial sensors and the performance of an integrated system prototype of MEMS based inertial sensors, a low-cost GPS receiver and a digital compass. The influence of the stochastic variation of sensors will be assessed and modeled by two different methods, namely Gauss-Markov (GM) and AutoRegressive (AR) models, with GPS signal blockage of different lengths. Numerical results from kinematic testing have been used to assess the performance of different modeling schemes.

  15. Operation of a single-channel, sequential Navstar GPS receiver in a helicopter mission environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, F. G.; Hamlin, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the future utilization of the Navstar Global Positioning System (GPS) by civil helicopters will provide an enhanced performance not obtainable with current navigations systems. GPS will supply properly equipped users with extremely accurate three-dimensional position and velocity information anywhere in the world. Preliminary studies have been conducted to investigate differential GPS concept mechanizations and cost, and to theoretically predict navigation performance and the impact of degradation of the GPS C/A code for national security considerations. The obtained results are encouraging, but certain improvements are needed. As a second step in the program, a single-channel sequential GPS navigator was installed and operated in the NASA SH-3G helicopter. A series of flight tests were conducted. It is found that performance of the Navstar GPS Z-set is quite acceptable to support area navigation and nonprecision approach operations.

  16. Tikhonov-based ARCE algorithm and its applications in rapid positioning using single frequency GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shijie; Wang, Zhenjie; Peng, Xiuying

    2008-10-01

    ARCE (Ambiguity Resolution Using Constraint Equation) is a new fast method to resolve the integer ambiguities based on LSE (Least-Squares Estimate) and null space, which is suitable for single frequency GPS receivers and whose necessary observation time span of fixing the integer ambiguities correctly is relatively long (say, at least one minute). In this paper, ARCE is improved for deformation monitoring when there is only one epoch phase observation. In this instance, the normal matrix is rank-deficient and it is impossible to fix the integer ambiguities correctly using ARCE if LSE is employed. In allusion to the above case, based on Tikhonov regularization theorem, a new regularizer is designed to transform the rank-deficient normal matrix to a full rank one. The accurate float ambiguity solutions are obtained and the corresponding search range of the integer ambiguities diminishes. So, the integer ambiguities can be fixed using ARCE. The effect of the single epoch algorithm is tested utilizing a baseline whose length over 3KM and the results show that the success rate of fixing the integer ambiguities using the new algorithm can achieve to over 90 percent.

  17. Reconfigurable Advanced Receiver Design and Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jianjing

    2005-01-01

    While the demand for real-time broadband information access has grown and continues to grow at a rapid Pace, the need for a reconfigurable receiver system has increased. To achieve the goal to communicate with multiple shuttles at a time, a filter bank in polyphase structure is introduced. This paper presents the design and implementation for high-speed, high-performance, and fixed-point polyphase filter banks. The polyphase filter structure is designed such that the use of a fixed-point system has minimum impact on the performance of the filter. The final hardware implementation is done on a Xilinx FPGA chip.

  18. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, Bruce P.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Striker, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  19. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

    1993-02-23

    A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  20. Advanced Stirling receiver development program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurio, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Critical technology experiments were designed and developed to evaluate the Stirling cavity heat pipe receiver for a space solar power system. Theoretical criteria were applied to the design of a module for containing energy storage phase change material while avoiding thermal ratcheting. Zero-g drop tower tests, without phase change, were conducted to affirm that the bubble location required to avoid ratcheting could be achieved without the use of container materials that are wetted by the phase change material. A full scale module was fabricated, but not tested. A fabrication method was successfully developed for the sodium evaporator dome, with a sintered screen wick, to be used as the focal point for the receiver. Crushing of the screen during hydroforming was substantially reduced over the results of other researchers by using wax impregnation. Superheating of the sodium in the wick under average flux conditions is expected to be under 10K. A 2000K furnace which will simulate solar flux conditions for testing the evaporator dome was successfully built and tested.

  1. Sea Level Records from Geodetic GPS Receivers: a New Coastal Sea Level Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfgren, J. S.; Haas, R.; Larson, K. M.; Scherneck, H.

    2012-12-01

    Global sea level rise and local sea level variations due to climate change has the potential for a significant impact on coastal societies. Thus, it is of great importance to monitor and understand how the sea level is changing. Existing techniques to measure sea level have provided important insights in this field during the last decades. However, further observations are necessary in order to fully understand the underlying processes. We present the possibility of a new coastal sea level dataset based on analysis of Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) data from existing permanent GPS stations at the coast. For a GPS antenna close enough to the ocean, the multipath signals, reflected off the sea surface, interfere with the direct satellite signals. This becomes especially visible as oscillations in the recorded SNR data. The analysis of the SNR oscillations provides the distance between the sea surface and the GPS antenna phase center. Thus, such an installation can be called a GPS tide gauge and can be used to monitor sea level. The advantage of a GPS tide gauge is that it allows both determination of the sea level and determination of the position with respect to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame, using a single geodetic instrument. This is particularly valuable in areas with land surface motion where the usefulness of traditional tide gauges is restricted. The technique has been verified through comparison to traditional tide gauges at two sites. The comparison of more than three months long time series resulted in correlation coefficients of better than 0.97 for both sites. For the station with low and high tidal range, the root-mean-square agreement between the GPS results and the tide gauge records were better than 5 and 10 cm, respectively. In this presentation we show preliminary results for sea level records world wide by applying this technique to several existing permanent GPS stations.

  2. L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Pelgrum, W.; van Graas, F.; Gunawardena, S.; Charney, D.; Peng, S.; Triplett, J.; Vikram, P.; Vemuru, A.

    2010-12-01

    L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP Jade Morton*, Wouter Pelgrum**, Sanjeev Gunawardena**, Frank van Graas**, Dan Charney*, Senlin Peng***, Jeff Triplett*, Ajay Vemuru** * Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Miami University ** Avionics Engineering Center, Ohio University *** Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech Ionosphere irregularities can cause scintillation of satellite-based radio communication, navigation, and surveillance signals. While these scintillation effects will impact the corresponding receiver and system performance, carefully recovered signal parameters serve as a means of studying the background state and dynamics of the ionosphere. In this presentation, we will describe our recent effort in establishing a unique spaced GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska to collect GPS and GLONASS satellite signals at various stages of the GNSS receiver processing. Preliminary receiver processing results as well as additional on-site diagnostic instrumentation measurements obtained from two active heating experiment campaigns will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations.

  3. Development of Soil Compaction Analysis Software (SCAN) Integrating a Low Cost GPS Receiver and Compactometer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinsang; Yun, Hongsik; Kim, Juhyong; Suh, Yongcheol; Hong, Sungnam; Lee, Dongha

    2012-01-01

    A software for soil compaction analysis (SCAN) has been developed for evaluating the compaction states using the data from the GPS as well as a compactometer attached on the roller. The SCAN is distinguished from other previous software for intelligent compaction (IC) in that it can use the results from various types of GPS positioning methods, and it also has an optimal structure for remotely managing the large amounts of data gathered from numerous rollers. For this, several methods were developed: (1) improving the accuracy of low cost GPS receiver’s positioning results; (2) modeling the trajectory of a moving roller using a GPS receiver’s results and linking it with the data from the compactometer; and (3) extracting the information regarding the compaction states of the ground from the modeled trajectory, using spatial analysis methods. The SCAN was verified throughout various field compaction tests, and it has been confirmed that it can be a very effective tool in evaluating field compaction states. PMID:22736955

  4. Simultaneous Observation of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances Using a GPS Receiver Network and the GRACE Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, N.; Saito, A.; Tsugawa, T.

    2007-12-01

    The variations of the thermospheric mass density and the ionospheric electron density inside Large Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (LSTIDs) were studied with the GRACE accelerometer data and the GPS total electron content (GPS TEC) data. LSTIDs were detected by a GPS receiver network in Japan, GEONET, which is operated by Geographical Survey Institute. The characteristics of the LSTIDs, such as time, location, amplitude, wavelength, and propagation velocity, were derived from the TEC data of GEONET. The thermospheric total mass density at 500km altitude was derived from the high-accuracy accelerometers on board the GRACE satellites. The GRACE satellites flew over the LSTIDs during two events in August 2003 and November 2003. In both two events, wave-like structures of the thermospheric mass density were detected. They propagated from the high latitude to the low latitude in about 300m/s and 500m/s, and the spatial scales of the structures were about 2000km and 2500km, respectively. The velocities and the spatial scales of these Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) were similar to those of LSTIDs detected by GEONET TEC in both events. In both two events, the ratio of the perturbation component of the neutral mass density to the background was about 11% and 18%, while that of the TEC was about 6% and 8%. These thermospheric total mass density variations of TADs are interpreted to cause the electron density variations of LSTIDs. We will discuss the relationship between LSTIDs measured by GPS receivers, and TADs detected by the GRACE accelerometers in this presentation.

  5. Real-time differential GPS/GLONASS trials in Europe using all-in-view 20-channel receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccio, S.; Lowe, D.; Walsh, D. M. A.; Daly, P.

    Following the initial development of 20-channel, all-in-view Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), GPS/GLONASS/Inmarsat-3, receivers at the Institute of Satellite Navigation (ISN), University of Leeds, a modification programme has been undertaken to allow real-time differential corrections to be sent from one 20-channel receiver to another identical receiver using a serial link between them. The differential correction software incorporates the RTCM SC-104 and RTCA DO-217 format developed specifically for GPS and adjusted by the ISN to allow simultaneous GLONASS operation.After successful laboratory testing, real-time differential GNSS tests were successfully completed in static mode between Aberdeen and Leeds via the SkyFix differential data-link, and in dynamic mode at DTEO Boscombe Down using a C-band data-link between the ground and a receiver on board the DRA BAC 1-11 aircraft. The aims of the tests were, (i) to demonstrate real-time differential GNSS position-fixing, (ii) to establish the accuracy improvements brought about, and (iii) to examine the effects of data-link latency and satellite PDOP on the solution accuracy.

  6. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China’s HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2–0.4 m and 0.2–0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3–5 dm for position and 0.3–0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method. PMID:26690149

  7. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-12-04

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China's HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2-0.4 m and 0.2-0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3-5 dm for position and 0.3-0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method.

  8. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China's HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2-0.4 m and 0.2-0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3-5 dm for position and 0.3-0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method. PMID:26690149

  9. Receiver DCB estimation and GPS vTEC study at a low latitude station in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ramendra; Kumar, Sushil; Jayachandran, P. T.

    2016-11-01

    The statistical estimation of receiver differential code bias (DCB) of the GSV4004B receiver at a low latitude station, Suva (lat. 18.15°S, long. 178.45°E, Geomag. Lat. 21.07°S), Fiji, and the subsequent behaviour of vTEC, are presented. By means of least squares linear regression fitting technique, the receiver DCB was determined using the GPS vTEC data recorded during the year 2010, CODE TEC and IRI-2012 model for 2010. To substantiate the results, minimization of the standard deviation (SD) method was also used for GPS vTEC data. The overall monthly DCB was estimated to be in the range of 62.6 TECU. The vTEC after removing the resultant monthly DCB was consistent with other low latitude observations. The GPS vTEC 2010 data after eliminating the resultant DCB were lower in comparison to Faraday rotation vTEC measurements at Suva during 1984 primarily due to higher solar activity during 1984 as compared to 2010. Seasonally, vTEC was maximum during summer and minimum during winter. The winter showed least vTEC variability whereas equinox showed the largest daytime variability. The geomagnetic disturbances effect showed that both vTEC and its variability were higher on magnetically disturbed days as compared to quiet days with maximum variability in the daytime. Two geomagnetic storms of moderate strengths with main phases in the local daytime showed long duration (∼52 h) increase in vTEC by 33-67% which can be accounted by changes in E×B drifts due to prompt penetration of storm-time auroral electric field in the daytime and disturbance dynamo electric field in the nighttime to low latitudes.

  10. Measuring snow liquid water content with low-cost GPS receivers.

    PubMed

    Koch, Franziska; Prasch, Monika; Schmid, Lino; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC) in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements. PMID:25384007

  11. Measuring Snow Liquid Water Content with Low-Cost GPS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Franziska; Prasch, Monika; Schmid, Lino; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC) in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements. PMID:25384007

  12. Three-dimensional ionospheric tomography using observation data of GPS ground receivers and ionosonde by neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. F.; Maruyama, T.; Ma, G.; Takeda, T.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we present a new method based on a Residual Minimization Training Neural Network (RMTNN) to reconstruct the three-dimensional electron density distribution of the local ionosphere with high spatial resolution (about 50 km × 50 km in east/west and 30 km in altitude) using GPS and ionosonde observation data. In this method we reconstruct an approximate three-dimensional electron density distribution as a computer tomographic image by making use of the excellent capability of a multilayer neural network to approximate an arbitrary function. For this application the network training is carried out by minimizing the squared residuals of an integral equation. We combine several additional techniques with the new method, i.e., input space discretization, use of ionosonde observation data to improve the vertical resolution, automatic estimation of the biases of the satellite and the ground receivers by using the parameter estimation method, and estimation of plasmasphere contributions to the total electron content on the basis of an assumption of diffusive equilibrium with constant scale height. Numerical experiments for the actual positions of the GPS satellites and the ground receivers are used to validate the reliability of the method. We also applied the method to the analysis of real observation data and compared the results with ionosonde observations which were not used for the network training.

  13. QPSK loop lock detection in the advanced receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Receiver (ARX 2) currently being developed uses a Costas crossover loop to acquire and track the phase of an incoming quadrature phase-shift-keyed (QPSK) signal. The performance is described for the QPSK lock detector to be implemented, taking into account the phase jitter in the tracking loop. Simulations are used to verify the results of the analysis.

  14. QPSK loop lock detection in the advanced receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1990-05-01

    The Advanced Receiver (ARX 2) currently being developed uses a Costas crossover loop to acquire and track the phase of an incoming quadrature phase-shift-keyed (QPSK) signal. The performance is described for the QPSK lock detector to be implemented, taking into account the phase jitter in the tracking loop. Simulations are used to verify the results of the analysis.

  15. Precise GPS orbits for geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1994-05-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become, in recent years, the main space-based system for surveying and navigation in many military, commercial, cadastral, mapping, and scientific applications. Better receivers, interferometric techniques (DGPS), and advances in post-processing methods have made possible to position fixed or moving receivers with sub-decimeter accuracies in a global reference frame. Improved methods for obtaining the orbits of the GPS satellites have played a major role in these achievements; this paper gives a personal view of the main developments in GPS orbit determination.

  16. Precise GPS orbits for geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become, in recent years, the main space-based system for surveying and navigation in many military, commercial, cadastral, mapping, and scientific applications. Better receivers, interferometric techniques (DGPS), and advances in post-processing methods have made possible to position fixed or moving receivers with sub-decimeter accuracies in a global reference frame. Improved methods for obtaining the orbits of the GPS satellites have played a major role in these achievements; this paper gives a personal view of the main developments in GPS orbit determination.

  17. Evaluation of advanced sodium receiver losses during operation of the IEA/SSPS central receiver system

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, R.; Rosa, F.; Jacobs, H.; Sanchez, M.

    1989-02-01

    This article presents the measurements and experiments conducted on the external receiver: the so-called Advanced Sodium Receiver (ASR) of the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Project of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in southern Spain. The basis of this experiment was to provide loss measurements for later use in determining receiver performance. The tests to evaluate thermal losses consisted in operating the receiver with the doors open and circulating the sodium in normal and reverse flow without providing any incident power from the heliostat field (flux-off technique). In this way, total thermal losses are calculated as the energy lost by the sodium. Radiative losses have been calculated based on theoretical calculations and some results have been compared with infrared thermography measurements. Conductive losses are small and have been estimated by flux-off experiments with the receiver doors closed. Convective losses were evaluated subtracting radiative and conductive losses from the total thermal losses. Optical losses were assessed using absorptance measurements of the receiver coating. A simplified analytical model has been developed to calculate losses and ASR efficiency during operation. In spite of the method's simplicity, the results are very similar to those found by other investigators, verified simulation programs and test results.

  18. A navigation algorithm for single channel low-cost GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsiani, H.; Noe, P. S.; Rhyne, V. T.; Painter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    A sequential navigation algorithm for a navigator using the Global Positioning System satellites is developed and tested for both noise-free and noisy system models. Data from a six-hour flight from California to Hawaii (C5A aircraft) simulates a true user to test the accuracy of the user's position for a sequential navigation system. For error reduction in the user's position in the sequential navigation system (considering 100 m as a maximum average error tolerated by any low-cost GPS user) an analysis of error sources in the sequential system has led to the use of range-ephemeris rate to translate ranges to a common point in time and to use velocity aiding at the time of a satellite disappearance. To reduce the user's position and velocity errors in a noisy navigation system an 'alpha-beta' two-pole filter is implemented whose optimum alpha is obtained experimentally. A user's position error of 73 m at noise range error of 30.48 (1sigma) is achieved.

  19. Efficient detection and signal parameter estimation with application to high dynamic GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system for deriving position, velocity, and acceleration information from a received signal emitted from an object to be tracked wherein the signal comprises a carrier signal phase modulated by unknown binary data and experiencing very high Doppler and Doppler rate, this invention provides combined estimation/detection apparatus for simultaneously detecting data bits and obtaining estimates of signal parameters such as carrier phase and frequency related to receiver dynamics in a sequential manner. There is a first stage for obtaining estimates of the signal parameters related to phase and frequency in the vicinity of possible data transitions on the basis of measurements obtained within a current data bit. A second stage uses the estimates from the first stage to decide whether or not a data transition has actually occurred. There is a third stage for removing data modulation from the received signal when a data transition has occurred and a fourth stage for using the received signal with data modulation removed therefrom to update global parameters which are dependent only upon receiver dynamics and independent of data modulation. Finally, there is a fifth stage for using the global parameters to determine the position, velocity, and acceleration of the object.

  20. The advanced receiver 2: Telemetry test results in CTA 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, S.; Bevan, R.; Marina, M.

    1991-01-01

    Telemetry tests with the Advanced Receiver II (ARX II) in Compatibility Test Area 21 are described. The ARX II was operated in parallel with a Block-III Receiver/baseband processor assembly combination (BLK-III/BPA) and a Block III Receiver/subcarrier demodulation assembly/symbol synchronization assembly combination (BLK-III/SDA/SSA). The telemetry simulator assembly provided the test signal for all three configurations, and the symbol signal to noise ratio as well as the symbol error rates were measured and compared. Furthermore, bit error rates were also measured by the system performance test computer for all three systems. Results indicate that the ARX-II telemetry performance is comparable and sometimes superior to the BLK-III/BPA and BLK-III/SDA/SSA combinations.

  1. Advanced laser sensing receiver concepts based on FPA technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P. L.; Petrin, R. R.; Jolin, J. L.; Foy, B. R.; Lowrance, J. L.; Renda, G.

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate performance of any remote sensor is ideally governed by the hardware signal-to-noise capability and allowed signal-averaging time. In real-world scenarios, this may not be realizable and the limiting factors may suggest the need for more advanced capabilities. Moving from passive to active remote sensors offers the advantage of control over the illumination source, the laser. Added capabilities may include polarization discrimination, instantaneous imaging, range resolution, simultaneous multi-spectral measurement, or coherent detection. However, most advanced detection technology has been engineered heavily towards the straightforward passive sensor requirements, measuring an integrated photon flux. The need for focal plane array technology designed specifically for laser sensing has been recognized for some time, but advances have only recently made the engineering possible. This paper will present a few concepts for laser sensing receiver architectures, the driving specifications behind those concepts, and test/modeling results of such designs.

  2. Applications of a hand-held GPS receiver in South American rain forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baksh, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A hand-held Global Positioning System receiver was used to determine the precise locations of villages, houses, gardens, and other cultural and environmental features in poorly mapped South American rain forests. The Magellan NAV 1000 unit profides extremely accurate latitude and longitude information, but determination of altitude is problematical. Overall, the receiver effectively allows anthropologists to obtain essential locational data useful for categorizing land uses, mapping tribal boundaries, and other applications in regions where environmental conditions are harsh and/or accessibility is difficult.

  3. Differences between GPS receiver antenna calibration models and influence on geodetic positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baire, Q.; Bruyninx, C.; Pottiaux, E.; Legrand, J.; Aerts, W.

    2012-12-01

    Since April 2011, the igs08.atx antenna calibration model is used in the routine IGS (International GNSS Service) data analysis. The model includes mean robot calibrations to correct for the offset and phase center variations of the GNSS receiver antennas. These so-called "type" calibrations are means of the individual calibrations available for a specific antenna/radome combination. The aim of this study is to quantify the offset on the computed station positions when using different receiver antenna calibration models in the analysis. First, type calibrations are compared to individual receiver antenna calibrations. We analyze the observations of the 43 EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) stations equipped with individually calibrated receiver antenna over the period covering 2003 to 2010 using the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique. The difference between individual and type calibrations has a larger impact on the vertical component: the position offsets reach 4 mm in the horizontal components and 10 mm in the vertical component. In a second step, the effect of different individual calibration models of the same antenna on the positioning is assessed. For that purpose, data from several GNSS stations equipped with an antenna which has been individually calibrated at two calibration agencies are used. Those agencies are GEO++, performing robot calibrations, and University of Bonn, performing anechoic chamber calibrations, both recognized by the IGS. Initial results show that the position offsets induced by different calibration methods can reach 3 mm in the horizontal components and 7 mm in the vertical component.

  4. Design approach for a microprocessor-based GPS time transfer receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ould, P. C.; Vanwechel, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The design concept and characteristics of a self-contained microprocessor-based Global Positioning System time transfer receiver is described. A prototype of this unit is currently in the test phase. It employs two-bit digital baseband correlation rather than analog IF correlation of the signals with the reference code. The correlator, numerically controlled oscillators and code generator are implemented in a special-purpose digital signal processor. The time is recovered in the digital code tracking loop, and final corrections are applied in the control processor. Other features of this design are: (1) drift-free digital mechanization; (2) high reliability of digital circuits; (3) flexible control capability of the microprocessor; and (4) potential for a high degree of digital VLSI chip development leading to compact, low-cost units.

  5. Advanced Receiver/Converter Experiments for Laser Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe T.; ONeill, Mark; Fork, Richard

    2004-01-01

    For several years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, UAH and ENTECH have been working on various aspects of space solar power systems. The current activity was just begun in January 2004 to further develop this new photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter technology. During the next few months, an improved prototype will be designed, fabricated, and thoroughly tested under laser illumination. The final paper will describe the new concept, present its advantages over other laser receiver/converter approaches (including planar photovoltaic arrays), and provide the latest experiment results on prototype hardware (including the effects of laser irradiance level and cell temperature). With NASA's new human exploration plans to first return to the Moon, and then to proceed to Mars, the new photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter technology could prove to be extremely useful in providing power to the landing sites and other phases of the missions. For example, to explore the scientifically interesting and likely resource-rich poles of the Moon (which may contain water) or the poles of Mars (which definitely contain water and carbon dioxide), laser power beaming could represent the simplest means of providing power to these regions, which receive little or no sunlight, making solar arrays useless there. In summary, the authors propose a paper on definition and experimental results of a novel photovoltaic concentrator approach for collecting and converting laser radiation to electrical power. The new advanced photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter offers higher performance, lighter weight, and lower cost than competing concepts, and early experimental results are confirming the expected excellent Performance levels. After the small prototypes are successfully demonstrated, a larger array with even better performance is planned for the next phase experiments and demonstrations. Thereafter, a near-term flight experiment of the new technology

  6. Characterization of Advanced Avalanche Photodiodes for Water Vapor Lidar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Halama, Gary E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2000-01-01

    Development of advanced differential absorption lidar (DIAL) receivers is very important to increase the accuracy of atmospheric water vapor measurements. A major component of such receivers is the optical detector. In the near-infrared wavelength range avalanche photodiodes (APD's) are the best choice for higher signal-to-noise ratio, where there are many water vapor absorption lines. In this study, characterization experiments were performed to evaluate a group of silicon-based APD's. The APD's have different structures representative of different manufacturers. The experiments include setups to calibrate these devices, as well as characterization of the effects of voltage bias and temperature on the responsivity, surface scans, noise measurements, and frequency response measurements. For each experiment, the setup, procedure, data analysis, and results are given and discussed. This research was done to choose a suitable APD detector for the development of an advanced atmospheric water vapor differential absorption lidar detection system operating either at 720, 820, or 940 nm. The results point out the benefits of using the super low ionization ratio (SLIK) structure APD for its lower noise-equivalent power, which was found to be on the order of 2 to 4 fW/Hz(sup (1/2)), with an appropriate optical system and electronics. The water vapor detection systems signal-to-noise ratio will increase by a factor of 10.

  7. Norwich Technologies' Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs

    SciTech Connect

    Stettenheim, Joel; McBride, Troy O.; Brambles, Oliver J.; Cashin, Emil A.

    2013-12-31

    This report summarizes the successful results of our SunShot project, Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs. With a limited budget of $252K and in only 12 months, we have (1) developed validated optical and thermal models and completed rigorous optimization analysis to identify key performance characteristics as part of developing first-generation laboratory prototype designs, (2) built optical and thermal laboratory prototypes and test systems with associated innovative testing protocols, and (3) performed extensive statistically relevant testing. We have produced fully functioning optical and thermal prototypes and accurate, validated models shown to capture important underlying physical mechanisms. The test results from the first-generation prototype establish performance exceeding the FOA requirement of thermal efficiency >90% for a CSP receiver while delivering an exit fluid temperature of > 650 °C and a cost < $150/kWth. Our vacuum-free SunTrap receiver design provides improvements over conventional vacuum-tube collectors, allowing dramatic reductions in thermal losses at high operating temperature.

  8. On principles, methods and recent advances in studies towards a GPS-based control system for geodesy and geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delikaraoglou, Demitris

    1989-01-01

    Although Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) are becoming increasingly important tools for geodynamic studies, their future role may well be fulfilled by using alternative techniques such as those utilizing the signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS). GPS, without the full implementation of the system, already offers a favorable combination of cost and accuracy and has consistently demonstrated the capability to provide high precision densification control in the regional and local areas of the VLBI and SLR networks. This report reviews VLBI and SLR vis-a-vis GPS and outlines the capabilities and limitations of each technique and how their complementary application can be of benefit to geodetic and geodynamic operations. It demonstrates, albeit with a limited data set, that dual-frequency GPS observations and interferometric type analysis techniques make possible the modelling of the GPS orbits for several days with an accuracy of a few meters. The use of VLBI or SLR sites as fiducial stations together with refinements in the orbit determination procedures can greatly reduce the systematic errors in the GPS satellite orbits used to compute the positions of non-fiducial locations. In general, repeatability and comparison with VLBI of the GPS determined locations are of the order of between 2 parts in 10 to the 7th power and 5 parts in 10 to the 8th power for baseline lengths less than 2000 km. This report is mainly a synthesis of problems, assumptions, methods and recent advances in the studies towards the establishment of a GPS-based system for geodesy and geodynamics and is one phase in the continuing effort for the development of such a system. To some, including the author, it seems reasonable to expect within the next few years that more evidence will show GPS to be as a powerful and reliable a tool as mobile VLBI and SLR are today, but largely more economical.

  9. QPSK carrier-acquisition performance in the advanced receiver 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinedi, S.; Shah, B.

    1990-02-01

    The frequency-acquisition performance of the Costas cross-over loop which is used in the Advanced Receiver 2 (ARX 2) to perform Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) carrier tracking is described. The performance of the Costas cross-over loop is compared to two other QPSK carrier tracking loops: the MAP estimation loop and the generalized Costas loop. Acquisition times and probabilities of acquisition as functions of both loop signal-to-noise ratio and frequency-offset to loop-bandwidth ratio are obtained using computer simulations for both type-2 and type-3 loops. It is shown that even though the MAP loop results in the smallest squaring loss for all signal-to-noise ratios, the MAP loop is sometimes outperformed by the other two loops in terms of acquisition time and probability.

  10. QPSK carrier-acquisition performance in the advanced receiver 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, S.; Shah, B.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency-acquisition performance of the Costas cross-over loop which is used in the Advanced Receiver 2 (ARX 2) to perform Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) carrier tracking is described. The performance of the Costas cross-over loop is compared to two other QPSK carrier tracking loops: the MAP estimation loop and the generalized Costas loop. Acquisition times and probabilities of acquisition as functions of both loop signal-to-noise ratio and frequency-offset to loop-bandwidth ratio are obtained using computer simulations for both type-2 and type-3 loops. It is shown that even though the MAP loop results in the smallest squaring loss for all signal-to-noise ratios, the MAP loop is sometimes outperformed by the other two loops in terms of acquisition time and probability.

  11. Costas loop lock detection in the advanced receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1989-11-01

    The advanced receiver currently being developed uses a Costas digital loop to demodulate the subcarrier. Previous analyses of lock detector algorithms for Costas loops have ignored the effects of the inherent correlation between the samples of the phase-error process. Accounting for this correlation is necessary to achieve the desired lock-detection probability for a given false-alarm rate. Both analysis and simulations are used to quantify the effects of phase correlation on lock detection for the square-law and the absolute-value type detectors. Results are obtained which depict the lock-detection probability as a function of loop signal-to-noise ratio for a given false-alarm rate. The mathematical model and computer simulation show that the square-law detector experiences less degradation due to phase jitter than the absolute-value detector and that the degradation in detector signal-to-noise ratio is more pronounced for square-wave than for sine-wave signals.

  12. Costas loop lock detection in the advanced receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1989-01-01

    The advanced receiver currently being developed uses a Costas digital loop to demodulate the subcarrier. Previous analyses of lock detector algorithms for Costas loops have ignored the effects of the inherent correlation between the samples of the phase-error process. Accounting for this correlation is necessary to achieve the desired lock-detection probability for a given false-alarm rate. Both analysis and simulations are used to quantify the effects of phase correlation on lock detection for the square-law and the absolute-value type detectors. Results are obtained which depict the lock-detection probability as a function of loop signal-to-noise ratio for a given false-alarm rate. The mathematical model and computer simulation show that the square-law detector experiences less degradation due to phase jitter than the absolute-value detector and that the degradation in detector signal-to-noise ratio is more pronounced for square-wave than for sine-wave signals.

  13. Accuracy analysis on C/A code and P(Y) code pseudo-range of GPS dual frequency receiver and application in point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiuying; Fan, Shijie; Guo, Jiming

    2008-10-01

    When the Anti-Spoofing (A-S) is active, the civilian users have some difficulties in using the P(Y) code for precise navigation and positioning. Z-tracking technique is one of the effective methods to acquire the P(Y) code. In this paper, the accuracy of pseudoranges from C/A code and P(Y) code for dual frequency GPS receiver is discussed. The principle of measuring the encrypted P(Y) code is described firstly, then a large data set from IGS tracking stations is utilized for analysis and verification with the help of a precise point positioning software developed by authors. Especially, P(Y) code pseudoranges of civilian GPS receivers allow eliminating/reducing the effect of ionospheric delay and improve the precision of positioning. The point positioning experiments for this are made in the end.

  14. GPS data analysis and results from the Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, T.; Floyd, M.; King, R. W.; Melbourne, T. I.; Szeliga, W. M.; Murray, M. H.; Phillips, D. A.; Puskas, C. M.; Boler, F. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the methods and results from the GPS data analysis part of the NSF Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) project operated by UNAVCO. Current analyses include GPS data from the 1100 Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) sites and approximately 700 other sites used to densify the network in some locations and to provide spatial extent on the North America and Pacific plates. Analyses from 1996 to present collectively include approximately 2050 unique sites over the 18-year period. The results from these analyses are updated daily for rapid solutions (~1 day latency) and weekly for initial analyses using IGS final orbits (2-3 week latency). Analyses are also run with 12- and 26-week latencies to add sites that were not available (either telemetry failures or manual download sites) during the initial analyses. Raw data are processed using two different GPS analysis programs: GAMIT at New Mexico Tech and GIPSY at Central Washington University. Combined results are then produced with GLOBK at MIT. All results are available through the UNAVCO web site in the form of time series and velocity fields in the NAM08 (Altamimi et al.'s, 2012, ITRF2008 North America Euler pole) and IGS08 frames. Daily SINEX files are provided in fiducial free and NAM08 frames. Event files are generated within a few days of earthquakes in the GAGE analysis region that generate co-seismic displacements greater than 1 mm. The median weighted root-mean-square (WRMS) scatters of combined position time series are less than 1 mm in north and east (NE) and 4 mm for vertical (U) over monthly durations. For all results processed thus far (~18 years of data for the longest running sites), WRMS scatters of the position residuals about linear trends, with offsets for earthquakes and antenna changes removed, are ~1.5 mm NE and 4.5 mm U. The top 10% of sites have short period scatters (month duration) of 0.5 mm NE and 1.9 mm U, while the long-term scatters increase to 0.8 mm NE and 3.3 mm

  15. A simulation of GPS and differential GPS sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a revolutionary advance in navigation. Users can determine latitude, longitude, and altitude by receiving range information from at least four satellites. The statistical accuracy of the user's position is directly proportional to the statistical accuracy of the range measurement. Range errors are caused by clock errors, ephemeris errors, atmospheric delays, multipath errors, and receiver noise. Selective Availability, which the military uses to intentionally degrade accuracy for non-authorized users, is a major error source. The proportionality constant relating position errors to range errors is the Dilution of Precision (DOP) which is a function of the satellite geometry. Receivers separated by relatively short distances have the same satellite and atmospheric errors. Differential GPS (DGPS) removes these errors by transmitting pseudorange corrections from a fixed receiver to a mobile receiver. The corrected pseudorange at the moving receiver is now corrupted only by errors from the receiver clock, multipath, and measurement noise. This paper describes a software package that models position errors for various GPS and DGPS systems. The error model is used in the Real-Time Simulator and Cockpit Technology workstation simulations at NASA-LaRC. The GPS/DGPS sensor can simulate enroute navigation, instrument approaches, or on-airport navigation.

  16. Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of oscillator noise on Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver performance, GPS navigation system self-test, GPS ground transmitter design to augment shuttle navigation, the effect of ionospheric delay modelling on GPS receiver design, and GPS receiver tracking of Shuttle transient maneuvers were investigated.

  17. Instructional Geocaching: An Analysis of GPS Receivers as Tools for Technology Integration into a Middle School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayben, Robert Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the instructional use of GPS through instructional geocaching activities engages students and promotes achievement in a middle school social studies classroom. The impact of instructional geocaching on addressing the needs of students with various learning styles was also examined. In addition, the…

  18. Single-frequency, dual-GNSS versus dual-frequency, single-GNSS: a low-cost and high-grade receivers GPS-BDS RTK analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odolinski, Robert; Teunissen, Peter J. G.

    2016-11-01

    The concept of single-frequency, dual-system (SF-DS) real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning has become feasible since, for instance, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has become operational in the Asia-Pacific region. The goal of the present contribution is to investigate the single-epoch RTK performance of such a dual-system and compare it to a dual-frequency, single-system (DF-SS). As the SF-DS we investigate the L1 GPS + B1 BDS model, and for DF-SS we take L1, L2 GPS and B1, B2 BDS, respectively. Two different locations in the Asia-Pacific region are analysed with varying visibility of the BDS constellation, namely Perth in Australia and Dunedin in New Zealand. To emphasize the benefits of such a model we also look into using low-cost ublox single-frequency receivers and compare such SF-DS RTK performance to that of a DF-SS, based on much more expensive survey-grade receivers. In this contribution a formal and empirical analysis is given. It will be shown that with the SF-DS higher elevation cut-off angles than the conventional 10° or 15° can be used. The experiment with low-cost receivers for the SF-DS reveals (for the first time) that it has the potential to achieve comparable ambiguity resolution performance to that of a DF-SS (L1, L2 GPS), based on the survey-grade receivers.

  19. Single-frequency, dual-GNSS versus dual-frequency, single-GNSS: a low-cost and high-grade receivers GPS-BDS RTK analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odolinski, Robert; Teunissen, Peter J. G.

    2016-06-01

    The concept of single-frequency, dual-system (SF-DS) real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning has become feasible since, for instance, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has become operational in the Asia-Pacific region. The goal of the present contribution is to investigate the single-epoch RTK performance of such a dual-system and compare it to a dual-frequency, single-system (DF-SS). As the SF-DS we investigate the L1 GPS + B1 BDS model, and for DF-SS we take L1, L2 GPS and B1, B2 BDS, respectively. Two different locations in the Asia-Pacific region are analysed with varying visibility of the BDS constellation, namely Perth in Australia and Dunedin in New Zealand. To emphasize the benefits of such a model we also look into using low-cost ublox single-frequency receivers and compare such SF-DS RTK performance to that of a DF-SS, based on much more expensive survey-grade receivers. In this contribution a formal and empirical analysis is given. It will be shown that with the SF-DS higher elevation cut-off angles than the conventional 10° or 15° can be used. The experiment with low-cost receivers for the SF-DS reveals (for the first time) that it has the potential to achieve comparable ambiguity resolution performance to that of a DF-SS (L1, L2 GPS), based on the survey-grade receivers.

  20. Advanced sensible heat solar receiver for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Timothy J.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis, through in-house efforts, has begun a study to generate a conceptual design of a sensible heat solar receiver and to determine the feasibility of such a system for space power applications. The sensible heat solar receiver generated in this study uses pure lithium as the thermal storage medium and was designed for a 7 kWe Brayton (PCS) operating at 1100 K. The receiver consists of two stages interconnected via temperature sensing variable conductance sodium heat pipes. The lithium is contained within a niobium vessel and the outer shell of the receiver is constructed of third generation rigid, fibrous ceramic insulation material. Reradiation losses are controlled with niobium and aluminum shields. By nature of design, the sensible heat receiver generated in this study is comparable in both size and mass to a latent heat system of similar thermal capacitance. The heat receiver design and thermal analysis was conducted through the combined use of PATRAN, SINDA, TRASYS, and NASTRAN software packages.

  1. Advanced sensible heat solar receiver for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Timothy J.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis, through in-house efforts, has begun a study to generate a conceptual design of a sensible heat solar receiver and to determine the feasibility of such a system for space power applications. The sensible heat solar receiver generated in this study uses pure lithium as the thermal storage medium and was designed for a 7 kWe Brayton (PCS) operating at 1100 K. The receiver consists of two stages interconnected via temperature sensing variable conductance sodium heat pipes. The lithium is contained within a niobium vessel and the outer shell of the receiver is constructed of third generation rigid, fibrous ceramic insulation material. Reradiation losses are controlled with niobium and aluminum shields. By nature of design, the sensible heat receiver generated in this study is comparable in both size and mass to a latent heat system of similar thermal capacitance. The heat receiver design and thermal analysis were conducted through the combined use of PATRAN, SINDA, TRASYS, and NASTRAN software packages.

  2. Application of GPS attitude determination to gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, E. G.; Cohen, Clark E.; Parkinson, Bradford W.

    1993-01-01

    Recent advances in the Global Positioning System (GPS) technology have initiated a new era in aerospace navigation and control. GPS receivers have become increasingly compact and affordable, and new developments have made attitude determination using subcentimeter positioning among two or more antennas feasible for real-time applications. GPS-based attitude control systems will become highly portable packages which provide time, navigation, and attitude information of sufficient accuracy for many aerospace needs. A typical spacecraft application of GPS attitude determination is a gravity gradient stabilized satellite in low Earth orbit that employs a GPS receiver and four body mounted patch antennas. The coupled, linearized equations of motion enable complete position and attitude information to be extracted from only two antennas. A discussion of the various error sources for spaceborne GPS attitude measurement systems is included. Attitude determination of better than 0.3 degrees is possible for 1 meter antenna separation. Suggestions are provided to improve the accuracy of the attitude solution.

  3. Advanced development receiver thermal vacuum tests with cold wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedgwick, Leigh M.

    1991-01-01

    The first ever testing of a full size solar dynamic heat receiver using high temperature thermal energy storage was completed. The heat receiver was designed to meet the requirements for operation on the Space Station Freedom. The purpose of the test program was to quantify the receiver thermodynamic performance, its operating temperatures, and thermal response to changes in environmental and power module interface boundary conditions. The heat receiver was tested in a vacuum chamber with liquid nitrogen cold shrouds and an aperture cold plate to partially simulate a low Earth orbit environment. The cavity of the receiver was heated by an infrared quartz lamp heater with 30 independently controllable zones to produce flux distributions typical of candidate concentrators. A closed Brayton cycle engine simulator conditioned a helium xenon gas mixture to specific interface conditions to simulate various operational modes of the solar dynamic power module. Inlet gas temperature, pressure, and flow rate were independently varied. A total of 58 simulated orbital cycles were completed during the test conduct period. The test hardware, execution of testing, test data, and post test inspections are described.

  4. Observations of small- to large-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with plasma bubbles with a transequatorial HF propagation experiment and spaced GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Susumu; Maruyama, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru; Kubota, Minoru; Ma, Guanyi; Chen, Yanhong; Li, Jinghua; Ha Duyen, Chau; Le Truong, Thanh

    2008-12-01

    The results from simultaneous observations of the nighttime transequatorial propagation (TEP) of HF radio waves between Australia and Japan and the GPS scintillation measurements in south China and Vietnam are presented in this paper. The results showed that there was good correspondence between the nighttime eastward traveling off-great circle propagation (OGCP) of broadcasting waves of Radio Australia from Shepparton, Australia, measured at Oarai, Japan, and the scintillations in GPS radio waves at Hainan, China. This shows that the nighttime eastward traveling OGCP in HF TEP is caused by a large-scale ionospheric structure associated with a plasma bubble. The zonal drift velocities of the large-scale ionospheric structure estimated by the change in the direction of arrival of the OGCP were similar to those of the small-scale irregularities associated with plasma bubbles measured by the GPS scintillation spaced-receiver technique. Our results show that the HF TEP measurement is quite useful for monitoring the plasma bubble occurrence over a wide area and for forecasting the arrival of the plasma bubble at places located to the east of it.

  5. A study of El Niño-Southern oscillation impacts to the South China Sea region using ground-based GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparta, Wayan; Iskandar, Ahmad; Singh Jit Singh, Mandeep; Alauddin Mohd Ali, Mohd; Yatim, Baharudin; Tangang, Fredolin

    2013-04-01

    We observe an ENSO activity by using ground-based GPS receiver as an effort to study the effects of global warming and climate change in the tropical region. The precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) meteorology in line with the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTa) is used to indicate their response on ENSO activities. The PWV data used in this study was taken from the station at Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu (UMSK) over 2011, together with NTUS station (in the Singapore), PIMO (in Philippines) and BAKO (in Indonesia) are also compared. The relationship between PWV and SSTa at all stations on weekly basis exhibited modest with correlation coefficients between -0.30 and -0.78 significantly at the 99% confidence level. The negative correlation indicates that during a La Niña phase, the PWV is increased when the sea surface temperatures getting cold causes warm air mass in the central Pacific moved to west Pacific. The increased of PWV causes the GPS signals will be getting slower.

  6. Enhancing Positioning Accuracy in Urban Terrain by Fusing Data from a GPS Receiver, Inertial Sensors, Stereo-Camera and Digital Maps for Pedestrian Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Przemyslaw, Baranski; Pawel, Strumillo

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents an algorithm for estimating a pedestrian location in an urban environment. The algorithm is based on the particle filter and uses different data sources: a GPS receiver, inertial sensors, probability maps and a stereo camera. Inertial sensors are used to estimate a relative displacement of a pedestrian. A gyroscope estimates a change in the heading direction. An accelerometer is used to count a pedestrian's steps and their lengths. The so-called probability maps help to limit GPS inaccuracy by imposing constraints on pedestrian kinematics, e.g., it is assumed that a pedestrian cannot cross buildings, fences etc. This limits position inaccuracy to ca. 10 m. Incorporation of depth estimates derived from a stereo camera that are compared to the 3D model of an environment has enabled further reduction of positioning errors. As a result, for 90% of the time, the algorithm is able to estimate a pedestrian location with an error smaller than 2 m, compared to an error of 6.5 m for a navigation based solely on GPS. PMID:22969321

  7. SCIGN; new Southern California GPS network advances the study of earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudnut, Ken; King, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    Southern California is a giant jigsaw puzzle, and scientists are now using GPS satellites to track the pieces. These puzzle pieces are continuously moving, slowly straining the faults in between. That strain is then eventually released in earthquakes. The innovative Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) tracks the motions of these pieces over most of southern California with unprecedented precision. This new network greatly improves the ability to assess seismic hazards and quickly measure the larger displacements that occur during and immediatelyafter earthquakes.

  8. 75 FR 38151 - Governors' Designees Receiving Advance Notification of Transportation of Nuclear Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION Governors' Designees Receiving Advance Notification of Transportation of Nuclear Waste On January... prior to transportation of certain shipments of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The advance notification... numbers of those individuals in each State who are responsible for receiving information on nuclear...

  9. Large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances observed using GPS receivers over high-latitude and equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrus, Intan Izafina; Abdullah, Mardina; Hasbi, Alina Marie; Husin, Asnawi; Yatim, Baharuddin

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the first results of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) observation during two moderate magnetic storm events on 28 May 2011 (SYM-H∼ -94 nT and Dst∼-80 nT) and 6 August 2011 (SYM-H∼-126 nT and Dst∼-113 nT) over the high-latitude region in Russia, Sweden, Norway, Iceland and Greenland and equatorial region in the Peninsular Malaysia using vertical total electron content (VTEC) from the Global Positioning System (GPS) observations measurement. The propagation of the LSTID signatures in the GPS TEC measurements over Peninsular Malaysia was also investigated using VTEC map. The LSTIDs were found to propagate both equatorward and poleward directions during these two events. The results showed that the LSTIDs propagated faster at high-latitude region with an average phase velocity of 1074.91 m/s than Peninsular Malaysia with an average phase velocity of 604.84 m/s. The LSTIDs at the high-latitude region have average periods of 150 min whereas the ones observed over Peninsular Malaysia have average periods of 115 min. The occurrences of these LSTIDs were also found to be the subsequent effects of substorm activities in the auroral region. To our knowledge, this is the first result of observation of LSTIDs over Peninsular Malaysia during the 24th solar cycle.

  10. The development of an advanced generic solar dynamic heat receiver thermal model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Roschke, E. J.; Kohout, L.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced generic solar dynamic heat receiver thermal model under development which can analyze both orbital transient and orbital average conditions is discussed. This model can be used to study advanced receiver concepts, evaluate receiver concepts under development, analyze receiver thermal characteristics under various operational conditions, and evaluate solar dynamic system thermal performances in various orbit conditions. The model and the basic considerations that led to its creation are described, and results based on a set of baseline orbit, configuration, and operational conditions are presented to demonstrate the working of the receiver model.

  11. Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Bruce D.

    2010-06-15

    The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above

  12. GPS as an orbit determination subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessey, Richard; Roberts, Pat; Knight, Robin; Vanvolkinburg, Bart

    1995-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers as a primary source of tracking data for low-Earth orbit satellites. GPS data is an alternative to using range, azimuth, elevation, and range-rate (RAER) data from the Air Force Satellite Control Network antennas, the Space Ground Link System (SGLS). This evaluation is applicable to missions such as Skipper, a joint U.S. and Russian atmosphere research mission, that will rely on a GPS receiver as a primary tracking data source. The Detachment 2, Space and Missile Systems Center's Test Support Complex (TSC) conducted the evaluation based on receiver data from the Space Test Experiment Platform Mission O (STEP-O) and Advanced Photovoltaic and Electronics Experiments (APEX) satellites. The TSC performed orbit reconstruction and prediction on the STEP-0 and APEX vehicles using GPS receiver navigation solution data, SGLS RAER data, and SGLS anglesonly (azimuth and elevation) data. For the STEP-O case, the navigation solution based orbits proved to be more accurate than SGLS RAER based orbits. For the APEX case, navigation solution based orbits proved to be less accurate than SGLS RAER based orbits for orbit prediction, and results for orbit reconstruction were inconclusive due to the lack of a precise truth orbit. After evaluating several different GPS data processing methods, the TSC concluded that using GPS navigation solution data is a viable alternative to using SGLS RAER data.

  13. GPS Measurement Of Attitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinardo, S. J.; Hushbeck, E. L.; Meehan, T. K.; Munson, T. N.; Purcell, G. H.; Srinivasan, J. M.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    Signals transmitted by satellites of Global Positioning System (GPS) measure orientation of baseline on ship, aircraft, or other vehicle with accuracy. Two GPS antennas and receivers placed at well separated points on platform. Receivers measure positions of ends of baseline as functions of time. Output processor computes vector difference between two positions and determines orientation of baseline. Combined with conventional GPS data, orientation data allows more precise navigation and mapping and enhances calculations related to performance and control of vehicle.

  14. Precise estimation of tropospheric path delays with GPS techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Tropospheric path delays are a major source of error in deep space tracking. However, the tropospheric-induced delay at tracking sites can be calibrated using measurements of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. A series of experiments has demonstrated the high sensitivity of GPS to tropospheric delays. A variety of tests and comparisons indicates that current accuracy of the GPS zenith tropospheric delay estimates is better than 1-cm root-mean-square over many hours, sampled continuously at intervals of six minutes. These results are consistent with expectations from covariance analyses. The covariance analyses also indicate that by the mid-1990s, when the GPS constellation is complete and the Deep Space Network is equipped with advanced GPS receivers, zenith tropospheric delay accuracy with GPS will improve further to 0.5 cm or better.

  15. Intensity of low-latitude nighttime F-region ionospheric density irregularities observed by ROCSAT and ground-based GPS receivers in solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang-Yi; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Chao, Chi-Kuang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the global correlation between the instantaneous total amplitude of ion density fluctuations observed by ROCSAT and the phase fluctuation of the total electron content (TEC) recorded by worldwide ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers during the high solar activity period of March 1999-December 2002 for Kp<3. The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is applied to compute the instantaneous total amplitude of ROCSAT ion densities. The event-based and climatological comparisons of the total amplitude and occurrence probability of irregularities observed by ROCSAT show that the total amplitude can reveal both the occurrence probability of irregularities and the associated intensity. The noise level of the total amplitude is about 103.5 (near 3000) ions/cm3. The high correlation (correlation coefficient=0.81) between the GPS TEC phase fluctuation index FP and instantaneous total amplitude of ROCSAT electron densities suggests that the total amplitude can be used to globally monitor the intensity of irregularities at equatorial and within the latitude belt of ±15°. The relationship between the ionospheric background ionization and the irregularity intensity is further investigated.

  16. Position, Navigation, and Timing: GPS Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth E.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and deployment of the Global Positioning System (GPS). This presentation also includes measuring space and time, GPS as a tool for science, development of high precision JPL GPS receivers, and technology and applications developments.

  17. Seismo-Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances Triggered by the M9.0 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Probed by FORMOSAT- 3/COSMIC and Ground-Based GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Liu, T. J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports seismo-traveling ionospheric disturbances in the electron density and total electron content (TEC) profiles of FORMOSAT- 3/COSMIC (F3/C) during the 11 March 2011 M9.0 Tohoku earthquake. The Abel inversion and the vertical gradient (differential) process act as the low- and high-pass filters, respectively. It is found that fluctuations with the wavelength of 70-50km and less become pronounced during the earthquake period. Results demonstrate that the radio occultation is suitable to probe vertical fluctuation structures in the ionosphere. On the other hand, the Fourier Transform analysis displays that the TEC fluctuations derived from GPS receiving stations in Japan yields prominent fluctuations of 2-3 and 5-6 mHz around epicenter right after the earthquake occurrence.

  18. The Continuous Generation of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles during the Passage of the Solar Terminator, Observed with a Densely-Clustered Network of GPS Receivers in Southeast Asia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhari, S. M.; Tsunoda, R. T.; Abdullah, M.; Hasbi, A. M.; Otsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Nishioka, M.; Tsugawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    Equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are three-dimensional structures of depleted plasma density that are often observed in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere. They are initiated near the magnetic dip equator, in the bottomside of the F layer, and develop with time, upward in altitude and poleward in latitude (into both hemispheres), taking the form of longitudinally-narrow, vertically-extended wedges that penetrate deep into the topside of the F layer. Moreover, these structures drift zonally as they evolve in time. Much of what is not yet known about EPBs stems from our inability (1) to capture spatial descriptions of these structures, and (2) to monitor their evolution as a function of time. An objective of this presentation is to report the existence and availability of total electron content (TEC) data from densely-clustered networks of GPS receivers that are capable of providing time-continuous descriptions of EPBs with both high spatial resolution and broad geographical coverage. The networks include the Malaysia Real-Time Kinematics GNSS Network (MyRTKnet), Sumatera GPS Array (SUGAR) network and International GNSS Service (IGS) located in Southeast Asia (SEA). These networks contain 127 GPS receivers with average spacing of about 50 to 100 km. With the ability to resolve space-time ambiguities, we are able to follow the temporal evolution of EPB structures over an extended longitude sector (90 to 120 degrees, East longitude). We will present results from a case study (April 5, 2011) in which 16 EPBs were detected in longitude and tracked in time. We show, for the first time, that the births of 10 out of 16 observed EPBs coincided with the time of passage of the solar terminator across the longitude of birth. The distance between birth locations varied between 100 and 550 km with 10-minute interval. These EPBs were found to persist for 50 minutes to 7 hours, while drifting eastward at a speed of 92 to 150 ms-1. The finding that as many as 16 EPBs can be

  19. Environmental applications of GPS

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, S.A.; Zueck, D.

    1999-07-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) has revolutionized air travel, ocean navigation, land navigation, and the collection of environmental data. Although a basic civilian GPS receiver can be purchased for as little as $100, the receiver is only the tip of a 12 billion dollar iceberg. This paper will discuss the history and basic operation of the Global Positioning System, a satellite-based precision positioning and timing service developed and operated by the Department of Defense. It will also describe the accuracy limitations of the civil GPS service and how accuracy can be enhanced by the use of differential GPS (DGPS), using either the free National Differential GPS system, or commercial differential monitor stations. Finally, the paper will discuss the future accuracy upgrades of civil GPS as a result of recent federal policy decisions.

  20. Advanced heat receiver conceptual design study. Final report, May 1986-July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kesseli, J.; Saunders, R.; Batchelder, G.

    1988-10-01

    Solar dynamic space power systems are candidate electrical power generating systems for future NASA missions. One of the key components of the solar dynamic power system is the solar receiver/thermal energy storage (TES) subsystem. Receiver development was conducted by NASA in the late 1960's and since then a very limited amount of work has been done in this area. Consequently the state of the art (SOA) receivers designed for the IOC space station are large and massive. The objective of the Advanced Heat Receiver Conceptual Design Study is to conceive and analyze advanced high temperature solar dynamic Brayton and Stirling receivers. The goal is to generate innovative receiver concepts that are half of the mass, smaller, and more efficient than the SOA. It is also necessary that these innovative receivers offer ease of manufacturing, less structural complexity and fewer thermal stress problems. Advanced Brayton and Stirling receiver storage units are proposed and analyzed in this study which can potentially meet these goals.

  1. Telemetry SNR improvement using the DSN Advanced Receiver with results for Pioneer 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Brown, D. H.; Vilnrotter, V. A.; Wiggins, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    A series of tracking tests was conducted in the spring of 1987 to demonstrate the reduced tracking threshold and the improved telemetry singal-to-noise-ratio performance of the DSN Advanced Receiver compared to current operational DSN systems. The Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which is now out of the solar system, was tracked on foud days. The Advanced Receiver achieved an improvement in telemetry SNR of 1 to 1.5 dB over the operational system. It was demonstrated that the spacecraft carrier signal is stable enough for tracking with a receiver carrier loop bandwidth of 0.5 Hz in the one-way mode and 0.1 Hz in the three-way mode, and that the Advanced Receiver is stable at 0.1 Hz. This reduces tracking threshold by 10 to 15 dB compared to current receivers, which have minimum loop bandwidths of 1 to 3 Hz. Thus, the Advanced Receiver will enable tracking of the Pioneer 10 spacecraft until its power source fails, circa 2000, which would not be possible with the current DSN system.

  2. Crop Dusting Using GPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and GPS-based swath guidance systems are used on agricultural aircraft for remote sensing, airplane guidance, and to support variable-rate aerial application of crop inputs such as insecticides, cotton growth regulators, and defoliants. Agricultural aircraf...

  3. Airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1992-01-01

    Proper interpretation of airborne gravimetry and altimetry requires good knowledge of aircraft trajectory. Recent advances in precise navigation with differential GPS have made it possible to measure gravity from the air with accuracies of a few milligals, and to obtain altimeter profiles of terrain or sea surface correct to one decimeter. These developments are opening otherwise inaccessible regions to detailed geophysical mapping. Navigation with GPS presents some problems that grow worse with increasing distance from a fixed receiver: the effect of errors in tropospheric refraction correction, GPS ephemerides, and the coordinates of the fixed receivers. Ionospheric refraction and orbit error complicate ambiguity resolution. Optimal navigation should treat all error sources as unknowns, together with the instantaneous vehicle position. To do so, fast and reliable numerical techniques are needed: efficient and stable Kalman filter-smoother algorithms, together with data compression and, sometimes, the use of simplified dynamics.

  4. Advances and Limitations of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations with GPS Occultation over Southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, F.; Wu, D. L.; Ao, C. O.; Mannucci, A. J.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    The typical atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the southeast (SE) Pacific Ocean is featured with a strong temperature inversion and a sharp moisture gradient across the ABL top. The strong moisture and temperature gradients result in a sharp refractivity gradient that can be precisely detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements. In this paper, the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere & Climate (COSMIC) GPS RO soundings, radiosondes and the high-resolution ECMWF analysis over the SE Pacific are analyzed. COSMIC RO is able to detect a wide range of ABL height variations (1-2 kilometer) as observed from the radiosondes. However, the ECMWF analysis systematically underestimates the ABL heights. The sharp refractivity gradient at the ABL top frequently exceeds the critical refraction (e.g., -157 N-unit per kilometer) and becomes the so-called ducting condition, which results in a systematic RO refractivity bias (or called N-bias) inside the ABL. Simulation study based on radiosonde profiles reveals the magnitudes of the N-biases are vertical resolution dependent. The N-bias is also the primary cause of the systematically smaller refractivity gradient (rarely exceeding -110 N-unit per kilometer) at the ABL top from RO measurement. However, the N-bias seems not affect the ABL height detection. Instead, the very large RO bending angle and the sharp refractivity gradient due to ducting allow reliable detection of the ABL height from GPS RO. The seasonal mean climatology of ABL heights derived from a nine-month composite of COSMIC RO soundings over the SE Pacific reveals significant differences from the ECMWF analysis. Both show an increase of ABL height from the shallow stratocumulus near the coast to a much higher trade wind inversion further off the coast. However, COSMIC RO shows an overall deeper ABL and reveals different locations of the minimum and maximum ABL heights as compared to the ECMWF analysis

  5. Advanced microstrip antenna developments. Volume 2: Microstrip GPS antennas for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, G. G.; Gross, B. D.

    1982-03-01

    This report describes the application of microstrip antenna technology to the design of general aviation (G/A) aircraft antennas for use with the Global Positioning System (GPS). For most G/A aircraft, only single frequency operation will be required. However, air-carrier and some large corporate aircraft may make use of dual-frequency operation. For this reason, some dual-frequency designs have been investigated. The main effort was given to the design of antennas with broad beamwidths which could be switched or steered to compensate for aircraft maneuvers, with the goal of maintaining near-hemispherical carriage in flight. A hybrid microstrip crossed-slot and sleeve-dipole element used with a suitable combining network gives a suitable, controllable broad-beam pattern. This element and its performance are described. In addition, radiation patterns are presented using scale-model aircraft and simple crossed-slot antennas.

  6. Loop Gain and Circuit Parameters for Residual Carrier Tracking in the Advanced DSN Block V Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A circuit level analysis for residual carrier tracking of a deep space network signal by a proposed Block V receiver as conceived by the Receiver Advanced Development Team is presented. The objective is to aid the circuit designer in selection of loop parameters to achieve the required performance objectives. The topics specifically addressed are: (1) loop stability and gain requirements, (2) loop component parametric equations, and (3) phase detector technology.

  7. 76 FR 67229 - Governors' Designees Receiving Advance Notification of Transportation of Certain Shipments of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Nuclear Waste and Spent Fuel On January 6, 1982 (47 FR 596 and 47 FR 600), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory... or their designees by NRC licensees prior to transportation of certain shipments of nuclear waste and... Receive Advance Notification of Nuclear Waste Shipments State Part 71 Part 73 ALABAMA Colonel Hugh...

  8. 77 FR 38859 - Governors' Designees Receiving Advance Notification of Transportation of Certain Shipments of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Nuclear Waste and Spent Fuel On January 6, 1982 (47 FR 596 and 47 FR 600), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory... or their designees by NRC licensees prior to transportation of certain shipments of nuclear waste and... Environmental Management Programs. Individuals to Receive Advance Notification of Nuclear Waste Shipments...

  9. 41 CFR 301-51.200 - For what expenses may I receive a travel advance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... personal check, or travelers check) Any time you are on official travel. (1) M&IE covered by the per diem... receive a travel advance? 301-51.200 Section 301-51.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES,...

  10. 41 CFR 301-51.200 - For what expenses may I receive a travel advance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... personal check, or travelers check) Any time you are on official travel. (1) M&IE covered by the per diem... receive a travel advance? 301-51.200 Section 301-51.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES,...

  11. 41 CFR 301-51.200 - For what expenses may I receive a travel advance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... personal check, or travelers check) Any time you are on official travel. (1) M&IE covered by the per diem... receive a travel advance? 301-51.200 Section 301-51.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES,...

  12. 41 CFR 301-51.200 - For what expenses may I receive a travel advance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... personal check, or travelers check) Any time you are on official travel. (1) M&IE covered by the per diem... receive a travel advance? 301-51.200 Section 301-51.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES,...

  13. 25 CFR 170.615 - Can a tribe receive advance payments for non-construction activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Can a tribe receive advance payments for non-construction activities? 170.615 Section 170.615 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Service Delivery for Indian Reservation Roads Contracts...

  14. 25 CFR 170.615 - Can a tribe receive advance payments for non-construction activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can a tribe receive advance payments for non-construction activities? 170.615 Section 170.615 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Service Delivery for Indian Reservation Roads Contracts...

  15. 25 CFR 170.615 - Can a tribe receive advance payments for non-construction activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe receive advance payments for non-construction activities? 170.615 Section 170.615 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Service Delivery for Indian Reservation Roads Contracts...

  16. 41 CFR 301-51.200 - For what expenses may I receive a travel advance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... personal check, or travelers check) Any time you are on official travel. (1) M&IE covered by the per diem... receive a travel advance? 301-51.200 Section 301-51.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES,...

  17. The Accuracy of a Simple, Low-Cost GPS Data Logger/Receiver to Study Outdoor Human Walking in View of Health and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Abraham, Pierre; Mahé, Guillaume; Sauvaget, Thomas; Leftheriotis, Georges; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Accurate and objective measurements of physical activity and lower-extremity function are important in health and disease monitoring, particularly given the current epidemic of chronic diseases and their related functional impairment. Purpose The aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy of a handy (lightweight, small, only one stop/start button) and low-cost (∼$75 with its external antenna) Global Positioning System (GPS) data logger/receiver (the DG100) as a tool to study outdoor human walking in perspective of health and clinical research studies. Methods. Healthy subjects performed two experiments that consisted of different prescribed outdoor walking protocols. Experiment 1. We studied the accuracy of the DG100 for detecting bouts of walking and resting. Experiment 2. We studied the accuracy of the DG100 for estimating distances and speeds of walking. Results Experiment 1. The performance in the detection of bouts, expressed as the percentage of walking and resting bouts that were correctly detected, was 92.4% [95% Confidence Interval: 90.6–94.3]. Experiment 2. The coefficients of variation [95% Confidence Interval] for the accuracy of estimating the distances and speeds of walking were low: 3.1% [2.9–3.3] and 2.8% [2.6–3.1], respectively. Conclusion The DG100 produces acceptable accuracy both in detecting bouts of walking and resting and in estimating distances and speeds of walking during the detected walking bouts. However, before we can confirm that the DG100 can be used to study walking with respect to health and clinical studies, the inter- and intra-DG100 variability should be studied. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00485147 PMID:21931593

  18. Optimal Preprocessing Of GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sien-Chong; Melbourne, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique for preprocessing data from Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver reduces processing time and number of data to be stored. Technique optimal in sense it maintains strength of data. Also sometimes increases ability to resolve ambiguities in numbers of cycles of received GPS carrier signals.

  19. Combining low-cost GPS receivers with upGPR to derive continuously liquid water content, snow height and snow water equivalent in Alpine snow covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Franziska; Schmid, Lino; Prasch, Monika; Heilig, Achim; Eisen, Olaf; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2015-04-01

    The temporal evolution of Alpine snowpacks is important for assessing water supply, hydropower generation, flood predictions and avalanche forecasts. Especially in high mountain regions with an extremely varying topography, it is until now often difficult to derive continuous and non-destructive information on snow parameters. Since autumn 2012, we are running a new low-cost GPS (Global Positioning System) snow measurement experiment at the high alpine study site Weissfluhjoch (2450 m a.s.l.) in Switzerland. The globally and freely broadcasted GPS L1-band (1.57542 GHz) was continuously recorded with GPS antennas, which are installed at the ground surface underneath the snowpack. GPS raw data, containing carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) as well as elevation and azimuth angle information for each time step of 1 s, was stored and analyzed for all 32 GPS satellites. Since the dielectric permittivity of an overlying wet snowpack influences microwave radiation, the bulk volumetric liquid water content as well as daily melt-freeze cycles can be derived non-destructively from GPS signal strength losses and external snow height information. This liquid water content information is qualitatively in good accordance with meteorological and snow-hydrological data and quantitatively highly agrees with continuous data derived from an upward-looking ground-penetrating radar (upGPR) working in a similar frequency range. As a promising novelty, we combined the GPS signal strength data with upGPR travel-time information of active impulse radar rays to the snow surface and back from underneath the snow cover. This combination allows determining liquid water content, snow height and snow water equivalent from beneath the snow cover without using any other external information. The snow parameters derived by combining upGPR and GPS data are in good agreement with conventional sensors as e.g. laser distance gauges or snow pillows. As the GPS sensors are cheap, they can easily

  20. The GPS Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.; Moreau, M. C.; Dahle-Melsaether, M. E.; Petrofski, W. P.; Stanton, B. J.; Thomason, S.; Harris, G. A.; Sena, R. P.; Temple, L. Parker, III

    2006-01-01

    Prior to the advent of artificial satellites, the concept of navigating in space and the desire to understand and validate the laws of planetary and satellite motion dates back centuries. At the initiation of orbital flight in 1957, space navigation was dominated by inertial and groundbased tracking methods, underpinned by the laws of planetary motion. It was early in the 1980s that GPS was first explored as a system useful for refining the position, velocity, and timing (PVT) of other spacecraft equipped with GPS receivers. As a result, an entirely new GPS utility was developed beyond its original purpose of providing PVT services for land, maritime, and air applications. Spacecraft both above and below the GPS constellation now receive the GPS signals, including the signals that spill over the limb of the Earth. The use of radionavigation satellite services for space navigation in High Earth Orbits is in fact a capability unique to GPS. Support to GPS space applications is being studied and planned as an important improvement to GPS. This paper discusses the formalization of PVT services in space as part of an overall GPS improvement effort. It describes the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV) and compares it to the Terrestrial Service Volume (TSV). It also discusses SSV coverage with the current GPS constellation, coverage characteristics as a function of altitude, expected power levels, and coverage figures of merit.

  1. Low-cost inertial/GPS for ballistic missiles with application to unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Chris E.; Jenkins, Philip N.; Osborn, Charles T.

    1996-05-01

    Many advances in inertial navigation have been made over the last decade. Small, lightweight inertial measurement units (IMU) have been developed which provide suitable accuracy at a reasonable cost for many unmanned systems. Price has also dropped to previously unheard of levels (under 10,000 dollars for large buys). IMUs can be augmented with global positioning system (GPS) receivers to provide highly accurate and robust navigation capability. GPS receivers have also dropped in size and cost and are becoming an attractive option for coupling with an inertial system. GPS systems alone are vulnerable to jamming and are not a good choice for military applications where jamming is a consideration. Current Army policy is not to use GPS as a mission essential element. The focus of this paper will be on low cost IMUs with GPS and their application to unmanned vehicles. In particular, the program to add guidance to the multiple launch rocket system extended range rocket will be discussed.

  2. Physical applications of GPS geodesy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Geodesy, the oldest science, has become an important discipline in the geosciences, in large part by enhancing Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities over the last 35 years well beyond the satellite constellation's original design. The ability of GPS geodesy to estimate 3D positions with millimeter-level precision with respect to a global terrestrial reference frame has contributed to significant advances in geophysics, seismology, atmospheric science, hydrology, and natural hazard science. Monitoring the changes in the positions or trajectories of GPS instruments on the Earth's land and water surfaces, in the atmosphere, or in space, is important for both theory and applications, from an improved understanding of tectonic and magmatic processes to developing systems for mitigating the impact of natural hazards on society and the environment. Besides accurate positioning, all disturbances in the propagation of the transmitted GPS radio signals from satellite to receiver are mined for information, from troposphere and ionosphere delays for weather, climate, and natural hazard applications, to disturbances in the signals due to multipath reflections from the solid ground, water, and ice for environmental applications. We review the relevant concepts of geodetic theory, data analysis, and physical modeling for a myriad of processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and discuss the extensive global infrastructure that has been built to support GPS geodesy consisting of thousands of continuously operating stations. We also discuss the integration of heterogeneous and complementary data sets from geodesy, seismology, and geology, focusing on crustal deformation applications and early warning systems for natural hazards. PMID:27552205

  3. Physical applications of GPS geodesy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Geodesy, the oldest science, has become an important discipline in the geosciences, in large part by enhancing Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities over the last 35 years well beyond the satellite constellation's original design. The ability of GPS geodesy to estimate 3D positions with millimeter-level precision with respect to a global terrestrial reference frame has contributed to significant advances in geophysics, seismology, atmospheric science, hydrology, and natural hazard science. Monitoring the changes in the positions or trajectories of GPS instruments on the Earth's land and water surfaces, in the atmosphere, or in space, is important for both theory and applications, from an improved understanding of tectonic and magmatic processes to developing systems for mitigating the impact of natural hazards on society and the environment. Besides accurate positioning, all disturbances in the propagation of the transmitted GPS radio signals from satellite to receiver are mined for information, from troposphere and ionosphere delays for weather, climate, and natural hazard applications, to disturbances in the signals due to multipath reflections from the solid ground, water, and ice for environmental applications. We review the relevant concepts of geodetic theory, data analysis, and physical modeling for a myriad of processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and discuss the extensive global infrastructure that has been built to support GPS geodesy consisting of thousands of continuously operating stations. We also discuss the integration of heterogeneous and complementary data sets from geodesy, seismology, and geology, focusing on crustal deformation applications and early warning systems for natural hazards.

  4. The Inter- and Intra-Unit Variability of a Low-Cost GPS Data Logger/Receiver to Study Human Outdoor Walking in View of Health and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Pierre; Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Gernigon, Marie; Mahé, Guillaume; Sauvaget, Thomas; Leftheriotis, Georges; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The present study evaluates the intra- and inter-unit variability of the GlobalSat® DG100 GPS data logger/receiver (DG100) when estimating outdoor walking distances and speeds. Methods Two experiments were performed using healthy subjects walking on a 400 m outdoor synthetic track. The two experiments consisted of two different outdoor prescribed walking protocols with distances ranging from 50 to 400 m. Experiment 1 examined the intra-unit variability of the DG100 (test-retest reproducibility) when estimating walking distances. Experiment 2 examined the inter-unit variability of four DG100 devices (unit to unit variability) when estimating walking distances and speeds. Results The coefficient of variation [95% confidence interval], for the reliability of estimating walking distances, was 2.8 [2.5–3.2] %. The inter-unit variability among the four DG100 units tested ranged from 2.8 [2.5–3.2] % to 3.9 [3.5–4.4] % when estimating distances and from 2.7 [2.4–3.0] % to 3.8 [3.4–4.2] % when estimating speeds. Conclusion The present study indicates that the DG100, an economical and convenient GPS data logger/receiver, can be reliably used to study human outdoor walking activities in unobstructed conditions. This device let facilitate the use of GPS in studies of health and disease. PMID:22363623

  5. Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The various integration problems in the Shuttle GPS system were investigated. The analysis of the Shuttle GPS link was studied. A preamplifier was designed since the Shuttle GPS antennas must be located remotely from the receiver. Several GPS receiver architecture trade-offs were discussed. The Shuttle RF harmonics and intermode that fall within the GPS receiver bandwidth were analyzed. The GPS PN code acquisition was examined. Since the receiver clock strongly affects both GPS carrier and code acquisition performance, a clock model was developed.

  6. The Meaning of Parenteral Hydration to Family Caregivers and Patients with Advanced Cancer Receiving Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marlene Z; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Burbach, Beth E.; de Rosa, Allison; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Context In the U.S., patients with advanced cancer who are dehydrated or have decreased oral intake virtually always receive parenteral hydration in acute care facilities but rarely in the hospice setting. Objectives To describe the meaning of hydration for terminally ill cancer patients in home hospice care and for their primary caregivers. Methods Phenomenological interviews were conducted at two time points with 85 patients and 84 caregivers enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial examining the efficacy of parenteral hydration in patients with advanced cancer receiving hospice care in the southern U.S. Transcripts were analyzed hermeneutically by the interdisciplinary research team until consensus on the theme labels was reached. Results Patients and their family caregivers both saw hydration as meaning hope and comfort. Hope was the view that hydration might prolong a life of dignity and enhance quality of life by reducing symptoms such as fatigue and increasing patients’ alertness. Patients and caregivers also described hydration as improving patients’ comfort by reducing pain, enhancing the effectiveness of pain medication, and nourishing the body, mind and spirit. Conclusion These findings differ from traditional hospice beliefs that dehydration enhances patient comfort given that patients and their families in the study viewed fluids as enhancing comfort, dignity and quality of life. Discussion with patients and families about their preferences for hydration may help tailor care plans to meet specific patient needs. PMID:22459230

  7. Analysis of Spaceborne GPS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmo, Mario L.; Davis, James L.; Elosegui, Pedro; Hill, Michael; ScireScapuzzo, Francesca

    1998-01-01

    A reasonable amount of literature can be found on the general topic of GPS receiving antennas, but very little has been published on spaceborne GPS receiving antennas. This very new topic seems to be so far more of interest for the industrial world than for the academic community. For satellite applications, microstrip antennas are usually preferred over other types of antennas mainly because of their non-electrical characteristics, such as small size, relatively lightweight, shape, possibility of integration with microwave integrated circuits, and relatively low costs. Careful design of patch antennas could meet all the requirements (electrical and non-electrical) of GPS receiving antenna to be mounted on a tethered satellite.

  8. Mechanisms Underpinning Increased Plasma Creatinine Levels in Patients Receiving Vemurafenib for Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hurabielle, Charlotte; Pillebout, Evangéline; Stehlé, Thomas; Pagès, Cécile; Roux, Jennifer; Schneider, Pierre; Chevret, Sylvie; Chaffaut, Cendrine; Boutten, Anne; Mourah, Samia; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Lebbé, Céleste; Flamant, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Context Serum creatinine has been reported to increase in patients receiving Vemurafenib, yet neither the prevalence nor the mechanism of this adverse event are known. Objective We aimed to evaluate the frequency and the mechanisms of increases in plasma creatinine level in patients receiving Vemurafenib for advanced melanoma. Methods We performed a retrospective monocentric study including consecutive patients treated with Vemurafenib for an advanced melanoma. We collected clinical and biological data concerning renal function before introduction of Vemurafenib and in the course of monthly follow-up visits from March 2013 to December 2014. Cystatin C-derived glomerular filtration rate was evaluated before and after Vemurafenib initiation, as increase in serum cystatin C is specific to a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate. We also performed thorough renal explorations in 3 patients, with measurement of tubular secretion of creatinine before and after Vemurafenib initiation and a renal biopsy in 2 patients. Results 70 patients were included: 97% of them displayed an immediate, and thereafter stable, increase in creatinine (+22.8%) after Vemurafenib initiation. In 44/52 patients in whom Vemurafenib was discontinued, creatinine levels returned to baseline. Serum cystatin C increased, although proportionally less than serum creatinine, showing that creatinine increase under vemurafenib was indeed partly due to a renal function impairment. In addition, renal explorations demonstrated that Vemurafenib induced an inhibition of creatinine tubular secretion. Conclusion Thus, Vemurafenib induces a dual mechanism of increase in plasma creatinine with both an inhibition of creatinine tubular secretion and slight renal function impairment. However, this side effect is mostly reversible when Vemurafenib is discontinued, and should not lead physicians to discontinue the treatment if it is effective. PMID:26930506

  9. 41 CFR 302-8.4 - May I receive an advance of funds for storage allowances covered by this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I receive an advance of funds for storage allowances covered by this part? 302-8.4 Section 302-8.4 Public Contracts and... PROPERTY 8-ALLOWANCES FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS (HHG) General § 302-8.4 May I receive...

  10. 41 CFR 302-8.4 - May I receive an advance of funds for storage allowances covered by this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I receive an advance of funds for storage allowances covered by this part? 302-8.4 Section 302-8.4 Public Contracts and... PROPERTY 8-ALLOWANCES FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS (HHG) General § 302-8.4 May I receive...

  11. 41 CFR 301-31.14 - May I receive a travel advance for transportation and/or subsistence expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I receive a travel advance for transportation and/or subsistence expenses? 301-31.14 Section 301-31.14 Public Contracts and... TRAVEL EXPENSES 31-THREATENED LAW ENFORCEMENT/INVESTIGATIVE EMPLOYEES § 301-31.14 May I receive a...

  12. Efficacy of prophylactic anti-diarrhoeal treatment in patients receiving Campto for advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffour, J; Gourgou, S; Seitz, J F; Senesse, P; Boutet, O; Castera, D; Kramar, A; Ychou, M

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of combined prophylactic and curative anti-diarrhoeal medication in advanced colorectal patients treated by irinotecan. Thirty-four pre-treated eligible patients were evaluated. There were 44% women, the median age was 65 and 38% of the patients had a 0 performance status. The patients received sucralfate(4g/d) and nifuroxazide(600 mg/d) prophylactic treatment on days 0-7. In the case of severe diarrhoea, preventive treatment was replaced by loperamide(12 mg/d) and diosmectite (9 g/d). Grade 3 delayed diarrhoea occurred in 18% of patients (90% CI: [9.5-28.9]) and 4.6% of cycles. No grade 4 delayed diarrhoea was observed. Twenty-nine patients (85%) received the preventive treatment at cycle 1, while 14% (90% CI: [6.2-25.7]) experienced grade 3 delayed diarrhoea in 3.7% of cycles for a median 4.5 days. The objective response rate was 8% (90% CI [1.4-23.1]) among the 25 assessable patients. Preventive combined treatment is effective in reducing the incidence of severe delayed diarrhoea, and it should be proposed to patients treated with mono-therapy Campto(r) and evaluated in poly-chemotherapy protocols. PMID:12552984

  13. Detection of VHF lightning from GPS orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Satellite-based VHF' lightning detection is characterized at GPS orbit by using a VHF receiver system recently launched on the GPS SVN 54 satellite. Collected lightning triggers consist of Narrow Bipolar Events (80%) and strong negative return strokes (20%). The results are used to evaluate the performance of a future GPS-satellite-based VHF global lightning monitor.

  14. Household Air Pollution Exposures of Pregnant Women Receiving Advanced Combustion Cookstoves in India: Implications for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Sambandam, Sankar; Ghosh, Santu; Mukhopadhyay, Krishnendu; Vaswani, Mayur; Arora, Narendra K.; Jack, Darby; Pillariseti, Ajay; Bates, Michael N.; Smith, Kirk R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Household air pollution (HAP) resulting from the use of solid cooking fuels is a leading contributor to the burden of disease in India. Advanced combustion cookstoves that reduce emissions from biomass fuels have been considered potential interventions to reduce this burden. Relatively little effort has been directed, however, to assessing the concentration and exposure changes associated with the introduction of such devices in households. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to describe HAP exposure patterns in pregnant women receiving a forced-draft advanced combustion cookstove (Philips model HD 4012) in the SOMAARTH Demographic Development & Environmental Surveillance Site (DDESS) Palwal District, Haryana, India. The monitoring was performed as part of a feasibility study to inform a potential large-scale HAP intervention (Newborn Stove trial) directed at pregnant women and newborns. METHODS This was a paired comparison exercise study with measurements of 24-hour personal exposures and kitchen area concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5), before and after the cookstove intervention. Women (N = 65) were recruited from 4 villages of SOMAARTH DDESS. Measurements were performed between December 2011 and March 2013. Ambient measurements of PM2.5 were also performed throughout the study period. FINDINGS Measurements showed modest improvements in 24-hour average concentrations and exposures for PM2.5 and CO (ranging from 16% to 57%) with the use of the new stoves. Only those for CO showed statistically significant reductions. CONCLUSION Results from the present study did not support the widespread use of this type of stove in this population as a means to reliably provide health-relevant reductions in HAP exposures for pregnant women compared with open biomass cookstoves. The feasibility assessment identified multiple factors related to user requirements and scale of adoption within

  15. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    The application of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation of spacecraft in High and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEO/GEO) has crossed a threshold and is now being employed in operational missions. Utilizing advanced GPS receivers optimized for these missions, space users have made extensive use of the sidelobe transmissions from the GPS satellites to realize navigation performance that far exceeds that predicted by pre-launch simulations. Unfortunately, the official specification for the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV), developed in 2006, assumes that only signals emanating from the main beam of the GPS transmit antenna are useful for navigation, which greatly under-estimates the number of signals available for navigation purposes. As a result, future high-altitude space users may be vulnerable to any GPS design changes that suppress the sidelobe transmissions, beginning with Block III space vehicles (SVs) 11-32. This paper presents proposed changes to the GPS system SSV requirements, as informed by data from recent experiments in the SSV and new mission applications that are enabled by GPS navigation in HEO/GEO regimes. The NASA/NOAA GOES-R series satellites are highlighted as an example of a mission that relies on this currently-unspecified GPS system performance to meet mission requirements.

  16. GPS Eye-in-the-Sky Software Takes Closer Look Below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    At NASA, GPS is a vital resource for scientific research aimed at understanding and protecting Earth. The Agency employs the band of GPS satellites for such functions as mapping Earth s ionosphere and developing earthquake-prediction tools. Extending this worldly wisdom beyond Earth, NASA researchers are even discussing the possibility of developing global positioning satellites around Mars, in anticipation of future manned missions. Despite all of its terrestrial accomplishments, traditional GPS still has its limitations. The Space Agency is working to address these with many new advances, including a "Global Differential GPS" technology that instantaneously provides a position to within 4 inches horizontally and 8 inches vertically, anywhere on Earth. According to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, no other related system provides the same combination of accuracy and coverage. Furthermore, traditional GPS cannot communicate beyond latitudes of 75deg. That means that most of Greenland and Antarctica cannot receive GPS signals. The Global Differential GPS technology approaches this area of the world using several different GPS signals. These signals overlap to compensate for the gaps in coverage. Now, scientists working in the extreme northernmost and southernmost areas of the world can have access to the same GPS technology that other scientists around the world rely on.

  17. Future Technologies for Earth Science with Spaceborne GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Meehan, T. K.; Srinivasan, J. M.; Young, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    Spaceborne Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers will one day make important contributions to atmospheric, ionospheric, and solid Earth science. A number of GPS microsatellite missions are already in preparation in several countries. These missions require GPS flight receivers with capabilities well beyond the needs of most space missions. Receiver and microsatellite future technology is discussed.

  18. High-temperature thermal storage systems for advanced solar receivers materials selections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. F.; Devan, J. H.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced space power systems that use solar energy and Brayton or Stirling heat engines require thermal energy storage (TES) systems to operate continuously through periods of shade. The receiver storage units, key elements in both Brayton and Stirling systems, are designed to use the latent heat of fusion of phase-change materials (PCMs). The power systems under current consideration for near-future National Aeronautics and Space Administration space missions require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1400 K range. The PCMs under current investigation that gave liquid temperatures within this range are the fluoride family of salts. However, these salts have low thermal conductivity, which causes large temperature gradients in the storage systems. Improvements can be obtained, however, with the use of thermal conductivity enhancements or metallic PCMs. In fact, if suitable containment materials can be found, the use of metallic PCMs would virtually eliminate the orbit associated temperature variations in TES systems. The high thermal conductivity and generally low volume change on melting of germanium and alloys based on silicon make them attractive for storage of thermal energy in space power systems. An approach to solving the containment problem, involving both chemical and physical compatibility, preparation of NiSi/NiSi2, and initial results for containment of germanium and NiSi/NiSi2, are presented.

  19. GPS Metric Tracking Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) applications become more prevalent for land- and air-based vehicles, GPS applications for space vehicles will also increase. The Applied Technology Directorate of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a lightweight, low-cost GPS Metric Tracking Unit (GMTU), the first of two steps in developing a lightweight, low-cost Space-Based Tracking and Command Subsystem (STACS) designed to meet Range Safety's link margin and latency requirements for vehicle command and telemetry data. The goals of STACS are to improve Range Safety operations and expand tracking capabilities for space vehicles. STACS will track the vehicle, receive commands, and send telemetry data through the space-based asset, which will dramatically reduce dependence on ground-based assets. The other step was the Low-Cost Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Transceiver (LCT2), developed by the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), which allows the vehicle to communicate with a geosynchronous relay satellite. Although the GMTU and LCT2 were independently implemented and tested, the design collaboration of KSC and WFF engineers allowed GMTU and LCT2 to be integrated into one enclosure, leading to the final STACS. In operation, GMTU needs only a radio frequency (RF) input from a GPS antenna and outputs position and velocity data to the vehicle through a serial or pulse code modulation (PCM) interface. GMTU includes one commercial GPS receiver board and a custom board, the Command and Telemetry Processor (CTP) developed by KSC. The CTP design is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processors to support GPS functions.

  20. Study of Lever-Arm Effect Using Embedded Photogrammetry and On-Board GPS Receiver on Uav for Metrological Mapping Purpose and Proposal of a Free Ground Measurements Calibration Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daakir, M.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Bosser, P.; Pichard, F.; Thom, C.; Rabot, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) on-board photogrammetry knows a significant growth due to the democratization of using drones in the civilian sector. Also, due to changes in regulations laws governing the rules of inclusion of a UAV in the airspace which become suitable for the development of professional activities. Fields of application of photogrammetry are diverse, for instance: architecture, geology, archaeology, mapping, industrial metrology, etc. Our research concerns the latter area. Vinci-Construction- Terrassement is a private company specialized in public earthworks that uses UAVs for metrology applications. This article deals with maximum accuracy one can achieve with a coupled camera and GPS receiver system for direct-georeferencing of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) without relying on Ground Control Points (GCPs) measurements. This article focuses specially on the lever-arm calibration part. This proposed calibration method is based on two steps: a first step involves the proper calibration for each sensor, i.e. to determine the position of the optical center of the camera and the GPS antenna phase center in a local coordinate system relative to the sensor. A second step concerns a 3d modeling of the UAV with embedded sensors through a photogrammetric acquisition. Processing this acquisition allows to determine the value of the lever-arm offset without using GCPs.

  1. Ionospheric corrections to precise time transfer using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Robert W.; Osborne, Allen W., III; Klobuchar, John A.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    1994-01-01

    The free electrons in the earth's ionosphere can retard the time of reception of GPS signals received at a ground station, compared to their time in free space, by many tens of nanoseconds, thus limiting the accuracy of time transfer by GPS. The amount of the ionospheric time delay is proportional to the total number of electrons encountered by the wave on its path from each GPS satellite to a receiver. This integrated number of electrons is called Total Electron Content, or TEC. Dual frequency GPS receivers designed by Allen Osborne Associates, Inc. (AOA) directly measure both the ionospheric differential group delay and the differential carrier phase advance for the two GPS frequencies and derive from this the TEC between the receiver and each GPS satellite in track. The group delay information is mainly used to provide an absolute calibration to the relative differential carrier phase, which is an extremely precise measure of relative TEC. The AOA Mini-Rogue ICS-4Z and the AOA TurboRogue ICS-4000Z receivers normally operate using the GPS P code, when available, and switch to cross-correlation signal processing when the GPS satellites are in the Anti-Spoofing (A-S) mode and the P code is encrypted. An AOA ICS-Z receiver has been operated continuously for over a year at Hanscom AFB, MA to determine the statistics of the variability of the TEC parameter using signals from up to four different directions simultaneously. The 4-channel ICS-4Z and the 8-channel ICS-4000Z, have proven capabilities to make precise, well calibrated, measurements of the ionosphere in several directions simultaneously. In addition to providing ionospheric corrections for precise time transfer via satellite, this dual frequency design allows full code and automatic codeless operation of both the differential group delay and differential carrier phase for numerous ionospheric experiments being conducted. Statistical results of the data collected from the ICS-4Z during the initial year of

  2. Bioenergy from Coastal bermudagrass receiving subsurface drip irrigation with advance-treated swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Keri B; Stone, Kenneth C; Hunt, Patrick G; Ro, Kyoung S; Vanotti, Matias B; Burns, Joseph C

    2009-07-01

    Coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) may be a potentially important source of bio-based energy in the southern US due to its vast acreage. It is often produced as part of a waste management plan with varying nutrient composition and energy characteristics on fields irrigated with livestock wastewater. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of subsurface drip irrigation with treated swine wastewater on both the quantity and quality of bermudagrass bioenergy. The treated wastewater was recycled from an advanced treatment system and used for irrigation of bermudagrass in two crop seasons. The experiment had nine water and drip line spacing treatments arrayed in a randomized complete block-design with four replicates. The bermudagrass was analyzed for calorific and mineral contents. Bermudagrass energy yields for 2004 and 2005 ranged from 127.4 to 251.4MJ ha(-1). Compared to irrigation with commercial nitrogen fertilizer, the least biomass energy density was associated with bermudagrass receiving treated swine wastewater. Yet, in 2004 the wastewater irrigated bermudagrass had greater hay yields leading to greater energy yield per ha. This decrease in energy density of wastewater irrigated bermudagrass was associated with increased concentrations of K, Ca, and Na. After thermal conversion, these compounds are known to remain in the ash portion thereby decreasing the energy density. Nonetheless, the loss of energy density using treated effluent via SDI may be offset by the positive influence of these three elements for their catalytic properties in downstream thermal conversion processes such as promoting a lesser char yield and greater combustible gas formation. PMID:19289275

  3. Advanced InSAR and GPS measurements for the detection of surface movements along the Alto Tiberina (Italy) normal fault system: data modeling and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Polcari, M.; Bignami, C.; Pepe, A.; Solaro, G.; Serpelloni, E.; Moro, M.; Albano, M.; Chiaraluce, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Alto Tiberina fault (ATF) is a low-angle (east-dipping at 15°), 70 km long normal fault (LANF) located in the Umbria-Marche Apennines (central Italy), an area characterized by a SW-NE oriented extension occurring at rates of ~2 mm/yr. Active extension is precisely measured by a dense distribution of GPS stations belonging to several networks, thanks also to additional sites recently installed in the framework of the INGV national RING network and of the ATF observatory. Advanced Interferometry SAR (A-InSAR) techniques play today a key role in Earth Sciences thanks to their capability to detect and monitor slow surface movements over wide areas. A-InSAR techniques, along with in-situ ground measurements, can provide suitable information on the causes of interseismic (seismic, creep) movements. Large datasets of SAR images of European (ERS 1-2 and ENVISAT) and Italian (COSMO-SKyMed) satellites have been used to retrieve surface velocity maps and relevant time series from 1992 to 2014, along both ascending and descending orbits. A network of artificial Corner Reflectors has also been deployed in the proximity of some GPS sites in order to calibrate the processing results of the COSMO-SkyMed SAR data-set and to derive velocity maps. We use an elastic Block Modeling (BM) approach in order to model GPS data by considering the major fault systems as bounds of rotating blocks, while estimating geodetic fault slip-rates.,Thanks to the latest imaging of its deep structure obtained from seismic profiles, the ATF is represented as a complex rough surface with the goal of evaluating the distribution of interseismic fault coupling. The preliminary results obtained show firstly that the observed extension is partially accommodated by interseismic deformation on the ATF, highlighting the important role of this LANF inside an active tectonic contest. Secondarily, using the ATF surface "topography", we found for the resolved areas an interesting correlation between

  4. GPS lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Global geodesy has improved dramatically over the past decade starting with the GPS for IERS and Geodynamics demonstration campaign in 1991 (GIG 91). At the time it took over a week of CPU time to process a network solution based on 21 global receivers and orbit overlaps were in the 40 cm range. Today it is possible to process a network solution based on 80 global receivers in less then one day of CPU time and orbit overlaps are in the 4 cm range. Special methods are under development for efficient processing of increasingly large regional networks which may contain hundreds or thousands of GPS receivers. Along the way there have been many lessons learned about GPS satellites, receivers, monuments, antennas, radomes, analysis, reference frames, error sources, and interpretation. A wide range of scientific disciplines have been impacted including studies of plate motion, post-glacial rebound, seasonal loading, deformation in plate boundary zones, coseismic displacements due to major earthquakes, postseiemic relaxation, and interseismic strain accumulation related to assessment of seismic hazards. Lessons learned will be presented in the context of new dense networks such as the Plate Boundary Observation (PBO).

  5. Physical applications of GPS geodesy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Geodesy, the oldest science, has become an important discipline in the geosciences, in large part by enhancing Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities over the last 35 years well beyond the satellite constellation’s original design. The ability of GPS geodesy to estimate 3D positions with millimeter-level precision with respect to a global terrestrial reference frame has contributed to significant advances in geophysics, seismology, atmospheric science, hydrology, and natural hazard science. Monitoring the changes in the positions or trajectories of GPS instruments on the Earth’s land and water surfaces, in the atmosphere, or in space, is important for both theory and applications, from an improved understanding of tectonic and magmatic processes to developing systems for mitigating the impact of natural hazards on society and the environment. Besides accurate positioning, all disturbances in the propagation of the transmitted GPS radio signals from satellite to receiver are mined for information, from troposphere and ionosphere delays for weather, climate, and natural hazard applications, to disturbances in the signals due to multipath reflections from the solid ground, water, and ice for environmental applications. We review the relevant concepts of geodetic theory, data analysis, and physical modeling for a myriad of processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and discuss the extensive global infrastructure that has been built to support GPS geodesy consisting of thousands of continuously operating stations. We also discuss the integration of heterogeneous and complementary data sets from geodesy, seismology, and geology, focusing on crustal deformation applications and early warning systems for natural hazards.

  6. 41 CFR 302-7.106 - What documentation is required to receive an advance under the commuted rate method?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What documentation is required to receive an advance under the commuted rate method? 302-7.106 Section 302-7.106 Public Contracts... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 7-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND PROFESSIONAL...

  7. 41 CFR 302-7.106 - What documentation is required to receive an advance under the commuted rate method?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What documentation is required to receive an advance under the commuted rate method? 302-7.106 Section 302-7.106 Public Contracts... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 7-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND PROFESSIONAL...

  8. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  9. Synergism of SLR and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bob E.

    1994-01-01

    The launch of GPS-35 (RPN 5) with a laser retroreflector has provided an opportunity to compare SLR-determined orbits of a GPS satellite with those determined by GPS receivers operated with the transmitted radio signals on the L(sub 1) and L(sub 2) frequencies. Operational considerations of the SLR and hardware design have influenced the amount and quality of SLR data collected on this satellite. As of February 1, 1994, all of the collected SLR data have been collected from northern hemisphere stations. Adequate southern hemisphere coverage is required to fully compare the results obtained from L(sub 1)/L(sub 2) and from SLR.

  10. Nutritional rehabilitation in patients with advanced head and neck cancer receiving radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Daly, J M; Hearne, B; Dunaj, J; LePorte, B; Vikram, B; Strong, E; Green, M; Muggio, F; Groshen, S; DeCosse, J J

    1984-10-01

    maintained mean mid-arm circumference and recovered mean serum albumin levels after radiation therapy in contrast with the orally fed group. Intensive outpatient tube-feeding nutritional support during radiation therapy in patients with advanced inoperable squamous cancer of the oropharynx significantly improved mean weight maintenance, mean caloric and protein intake, and mean serum albumin levels compared with patients who received optimal oral nutrition. Tumor response to radiation therapy, however, was unchanged.

  11. Optimal Preprocessing Of GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sien-Chong; Melbourne, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique for preprocessing data from Global Positioning System receiver reduces processing time and number of data to be stored. Optimal in sense that it maintains strength of data. Also increases ability to resolve ambiguities in numbers of cycles of received GPS carrier signals.

  12. Networked differential GPS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, K. Tysen (Inventor); Loomis, Peter V. W. (Inventor); Kalafus, Rudolph M. (Inventor); Sheynblat, Leonid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An embodiment of the present invention relates to a worldwide network of differential GPS reference stations (NDGPS) that continually track the entire GPS satellite constellation and provide interpolations of reference station corrections tailored for particular user locations between the reference stations Each reference station takes real-time ionospheric measurements with codeless cross-correlating dual-frequency carrier GPS receivers and computes real-time orbit ephemerides independently. An absolute pseudorange correction (PRC) is defined for each satellite as a function of a particular user's location. A map of the function is constructed, with iso-PRC contours. The network measures the PRCs at a few points, so-called reference stations and constructs an iso-PRC map for each satellite. Corrections are interpolated for each user's site on a subscription basis. The data bandwidths are kept to a minimum by transmitting information that cannot be obtained directly by the user and by updating information by classes and according to how quickly each class of data goes stale given the realities of the GPS system. Sub-decimeter-level kinematic accuracy over a given area is accomplished by establishing a mini-fiducial network.

  13. Total ionospheric electron content calibration using SERIES GPS satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, G.

    1986-01-01

    The current status of the Deep Space Network advanced systems research into ionospheric calibration techniques, based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data is described. A GPS-based calibration system is planned to replace the currently used Faraday rotation method by 1989. The SERIES receiver system determines the differential group delay of signals transmitted at two different carrier frequencies. This differential delay includes an ionospheric component and a GPS transmitter offset. The transmitter offsets are different for each GPS satellite. Tests were conducted to assess the effect of the offsets on the ionospheric calibration accuracy. From the obtained data, the total electron content and GPS transmitter offsets are calculated by a least squares estimation method employing a local model of total ionospheric electron content. The end product is an estimation of the total ionospheric content for an arbitrary line-of-sight direction. For the presented polynomial fitting technique, the systematic error due to mismodeling is estimated to be approximately 6 x 10 to the 16th power el/sq m, while the formal error is approximately 2 x 10 to the 16th power el/sq m. The final goal is an error of 3 x 10 to the 16th power el/sq m (approximately 0.7 ns at 2.3 GHz).

  14. GPS/INS Sensor Fusion Using GPS Wind up Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Walton R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of stabilizing an inertial navigation system (INS), includes the steps of: receiving data from an inertial navigation system; and receiving a finite number of carrier phase observables using at least one GPS receiver from a plurality of GPS satellites; calculating a phase wind up correction; correcting at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables using the phase wind up correction; and calculating a corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position using the corrected at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables; and performing a step selected from the steps consisting of recording, reporting, or providing the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position to another process that uses the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position. A GPS stabilized inertial navigation system apparatus is also described.

  15. Spaceborne GPS: Current Status and Future Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Hartman, Kate; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), developed by the Department of Defense is quickly revolutionizing the architecture of future spacecraft and spacecraft systems. Significant savings in spacecraft life cycle cost, in power, and in mass can be realized by exploiting GPS technology in spaceborne vehicles. These savings are realized because GPS is a systems sensor--it combines the ability to sense space vehicle trajectory, attitude, time, and relative ranging between vehicles into one package. As a result, a reduced spacecraft sensor complement can be employed and significant reductions in space vehicle operations cost can be realized through enhanced on-board autonomy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of spaceborne GPS, a description of spaceborne GPS receivers available now and in the near future, a description of the 1997-2000 GPS flight experiments, and the spaceborne GPS team's vision for the future.

  16. Integrated Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Dewayne Randolph

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a user-friendly Integrated GPS lab manual. This manual will help range engineers at NASA to integrate the use of GPS Simulators, GPS receivers, computers, MATLAB software, FUGAWI software and SATELLITE TOOL KIT software. The lab manual will be used in an effort to help NASA engineers predict GPS Coverage of planned operations and analyze GPS coverage of operation post mission. The Integrated GPS Laboratory was used to do GPS Coverage for two extensive case studies. The first scenario was an airplane trajectory in which an aircraft flew from Cape Canaveral to Los Angeles, California. In the second scenario, a rocket trajectory was done whereas a rocket was launched from Cape Canaveral to one thousand kilometers due east in the Atlantic Ocean.

  17. Spaceborne GPS Current Status and Future Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Hartman, Kate; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), developed by the Department of Defense, is quickly revolutionizing the architecture of future spacecraft and spacecraft systems. Significant savings in spacecraft life cycle cost, in power, and in mass can be realized by exploiting Global Positioning System (GPS) technology in spaceborne vehicles. These savings are realized because GPS is a systems sensor-it combines the ability to sense space vehicle trajectory, attitude, time, and relative ranging between vehicles into one package. As a result, a reduced spacecraft sensor complement can be employed on spacecraft and significant reductions in space vehicle operations cost can be realized through enhanced on- board autonomy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of spaceborne GPS, a description of spaceborne GPS receivers available now and in the near future, a description of the 1997-1999 GPS flight experiments and the spaceborne GPS team's vision for the future.

  18. 78 FR 44103 - Announcement of Public Meetings To Receive Comments on Draft Solicitation for Advanced Fossil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... following technology areas: (a) Advanced resource development, (b) carbon capture, (c) low-carbon power... FR 41046). Persons desiring to submit comments may do so either in writing according to...

  19. NASA's Global Differential GPS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Sever, Y.; Muellerschoen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The NASA Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) system provides an unparalleled combination of real time positioning accuracy and availability. Developed and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for NASA’s terrestrial, airborne, and spaceborne applications, the GDGPS system processes real time GPS data from a global network of more than 40 dual frequency GPS ground sites. It is the only network providing global, multiply-redundant, real time coverage of all GPS satellites, all the time. The system has demonstrated real time positioning accuracy of 10 cm horizontally, and 20 cm vertically for users anywhere in the world, on the ground and in the air. Real time orbit determination of low Earth satellites carrying precise GPS receivers was demonstrated to achieve accuracy of 10 30 cm 3D RMS (depending primarily on altitude). A track record of 99.99% availability extends from January 2000 to the present. We will describe the unique Internet-based architecture of the system, and the concept of reliability through redundancy, and discuss the capability of system to enhance many science and civil applications, as well as the potential of the system for GPS integrity monitoring and for GPS enhancements.

  20. An assisted GPS support for GPS simulators for embedded mobile positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Pradeep; Samant, Abhay; Sagiraju, Phani K.; Akopian, David

    2009-02-01

    During recent years, location technologies have emerged as a research area with many possible applications in wireless communications, surveillance, military equipment, etc. Location Based Services (LBS) such as safety applications have become very popular. For example, US Federal Communication Commission Enhanced 911 (E911) Mandate seeks to provide emergency services personnel with location information that will enable them to dispatch assistance to wireless 911 callers much more quickly. Assisted GPS (A-GPS) is an extension of the conventional Global Positioning System (GPS) which increases start-up sensitivity by as much as 25dB relative to conventional GPS and reduces start times to less than six seconds. In A-GPS assistance data is delivered to the receiver through communication links. This paper addresses the generation of the assistance for GPS simulators for testing A-GPS receivers. The proposed approach is to use IP-based links and location support standards for assistance delivery avoiding network-specific signaling mechanisms so that GPS receiver developers can use this information for testing A-GPS capabilities using basic GPS simulators. The approach is implemented for the GPS simulator developed by the National InstrumentsTM.

  1. Wakeshield WSF-02 GPS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Abusali, P. A. M.; Schroeder, Christine; Tapley, Byron; Exner, Michael; Mccloskey, rick; Carpenter, Russell; Cooke, Michael; Mcdonald, samantha; Combs, Nick; Duncan, Courtney; Dunn, Charles; Meehan, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Shuttle mission STS-69 was launched on September 7, 1995, 10:09 CDT, carrying the Wake Shield Facility (WSF-02). The WSF-02 spacecraft included a set of payloads provided by the Texas Space Grant Consortium, known as TexasSat. One of the TexasSat payloads was a GPS TurboRogue receiver loaned by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. On September 11, the WSF-02 was unberthed from the Endeavour payload bay using the remote manipulator system. The GPS receiver was powered on prior to release and the WSF-02 remained in free-flight for three days before being retrieved on September 14. All WSF-02 GPS data, which includes dual frequency pseudorange and carrier phase, were stored in an on-board recorder for post-flight analysis, but "snap- shots" of data were transmitted for 2-3 minutes at intervals of several hours, when permitted by the telemetry band- widdl The GPS experiment goals were: (1) an evaluation of precision orbit determination in a low altitude environment (400 km) where perturbations due to atmospheric drag and the Earth's gravity field are more pronounced than for higher altitude satellites with high precision orbit requirements, such as TOPEX/POSEIDON; (2) an assessment of relative positioning using the WSF GPS receiver and the Endeavour Collins receiver; and (3) determination of atmospheric temperature profiles using GPS signals passing through the atmosphere. Analysis of snap-shot telemetry data indicate that 24 hours of continuous data were stored on board, which includes high rate (50 Hz) data for atmosphere temperature profiles. Examination of the limited number of real-time navigation solutions show that at least 7 GPS satellites were tracked simultaneously and the on-board clock corrections were at the microsec level, as expected. Furthermore, a dynamical consistency test provided a further validation of the on-board navigation solutions. Complete analysis will be conducted in post-flight using the data recorded on-board.

  2. The pathophysiological mechanism of fluid retention in advanced cancer patients treated with docetaxel, but not receiving corticosteroid comedication

    PubMed Central

    Béhar, A.; Pujade-Lauraine, E.; Maurel, A.; Brun, M. D.; Lagrue, G.; Feuilhade De Chauvin, F.; Oulid-Aissa, D.; Hille, D.

    1997-01-01

    Aims Fluid retention is a phenomenon associated with taxoids. The principal objective of this study was to investigate the pathophysiological mechanism of docetaxel-induced fluid retention in advanced cancer patients. Methods Docetaxel was administered as a 1 h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks, for at least 4–6 consecutive cycles, to patients with advanced breast (n=21) or ovarian (n=3) carcinoma, who had received previous chemotherapy, 21 for advanced disease. Phase II clinical trials have shown that 5 day corticosteroid comedication, starting 1 day before docetaxel infusion, significantly reduces the incidence and severity of fluid retention. This prophylactic corticosteroid regimen is currently recommended for patients receiving docetaxel but was not permitted in this study because of its possible interference with the underlying pathophysiology of the fluid retention. Results Fluid retention occurred in 21 of the 24 patients but was mainly mild to moderate, with only five patients experiencing severe fluid retention. Eighteen patients received symptomatic flavonoid treatment, commonly prescribed after the last cycle. Specific investigations for fluid retention confirmed a relationship between cumulative docetaxel dose and development of fluid retention. Capillary filtration test analysis showed a two-step process for fluid retention generation, with progressive congestion of the interstitial space by proteins and water starting between the second and the fourth cycle, followed by insufficient lymphatic drainage. Conclusions A vascular protector such as micronized diosmine hesperidine with recommended corticosteroid premedication and benzopyrones may be useful in preventing and treating docetaxel-induced fluid retention. PMID:9205828

  3. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

  4. NASA's GPS tracking system for Aristoteles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. S.; Hajj, G.; Kursinski, E. R.; Kyriacou, C.; Meehan, T. K.; Melbourne, William G.; Neilan, R. E.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, Thomas P.

    1991-12-01

    NASA 's Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking system for Artistoteles receivers and a GPS flight receiver aboard Aristoteles is described. It will include a global network of GPS ground receivers and a GPS flight receiver aboard Aristoteles. The flight receiver will operate autonomously; it will provide real time navigation solutions for Aristoteles and tracking data needed by ESOC for operational control of the satellite. The GPS flight and ground receivers will currently and continuously track all visible GPS satellites. These observations will yield high accuracy differential positions and velocities of Aristoteles in a terrestrial frame defined by the locations of the globally distributed ground work. The precise orbits and tracking data will be made available to science investigators as part of the geophysical data record. The characteristics of the GPS receivers, both flight and ground based, that NASA will be using to support Aristoteles are described. The operational aspects of the overall tracking system, including the data functions and the resulting data products are summarized. The expected performance of the tracking system is compared to Aristoteles requirements and the need to control key error sources such as multipath is identified.

  5. Satellite Constellations for Atmospheric Sounding with GPS: A Revolution in Atmospheric and Ionospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; McCleese, D. J.; Melbourne, W. G.; Thornton, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    Spaceborne Global Positioning System (GPS) atmospheric science is blossoming. Proposed missions require high performance GPS flight receivers with capabilities beyond most space needs. With GPS technology maturing, and lower cost spaceborne receivers, GPS usage is expanding rapidly for space flight projects. Several of these are discussed, such as atmospheric occultation, ionospheric imaging, etc.

  6. Evaluation of a Mobile Phone for Aircraft GPS Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of spurious emissions from a mobile phone are conducted in a reverberation chamber for the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio frequency band. This phone model was previously determined to have caused interference to several aircraft GPS receivers. Interference path loss (IPL) factors are applied to the emission data, and the outcome compared against GPS receiver susceptibility. The resulting negative safety margins indicate there are risks to aircraft GPS systems. The maximum emission level from the phone is also shown to be comparable with some laptop computer's emissions, implying that laptop computers can provide similar risks to aircraft GPS receivers.

  7. GPS-Based Navigation And Orbit Determination for the AMSAT AO-40 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Moreau, Michael; Carpenter, Russell; Bauer, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The AMSAT OSCAR-40 (AO-40) spacecraft occupies a highly elliptical orbit (HEO) to support amateur radio experiments. An interesting aspect of the mission is the attempted use of GPS for navigation and attitude determination in HEO. Previous experiences with GPS tracking in such orbits have demonstrated the ability to acquire GPS signals, but very little data were produced for navigation and orbit determination studies. The AO-40 spacecraft, flying two Trimble Advanced Navigation Sensor (TANS) Vector GPS receivers for signal reception at apogee and at perigee, is the first to demonstrate autonomous tracking of GPS signals from within a HEO with no interaction from ground controllers. Moreover, over 11 weeks of total operations as of June 2002, the receiver has returned a continuous stream of code phase, Doppler, and carrier phase measurements useful for studying GPS signal characteristics and performing post-processed orbit determination studies in HEO. This paper presents the initial efforts to generate AO-40 navigation solutions from pseudorange data reconstructed from the TANS Vector code phase, as well as to generate a precise orbit solution for the AO-40 spacecraft using a batch filter.

  8. 41 CFR 302-9.12 - May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency or temporary storage of my POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I receive an advance... PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE General Rules § 302-9.12 May I receive an advance of funds for transportation...

  9. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Zhongli; Zhang, Wencheng; Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen; Xiao, Zefen; Tan, Wen; and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  10. On-sun testing of an advanced falling particle receiver system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Christian, Joshua M.; Yellowhair, Julius; Siegel, Nathan; Jeter, Sheldon; Golob, Matthew; Abdel-Khalik, Said I.; Nguyen, Clayton; Al-Ansary, Hany

    2016-05-01

    A 1 MWth high-temperature falling particle receiver was constructed and tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The continuously recirculating system included a particle elevator, top and bottom hoppers, and a cavity receiver that comprised a staggered array of porous chevron-shaped mesh structures that slowed the particle flow through the concentrated solar flux. Initial tests were performed with a peak irradiance of ~300 kW/m2 and a particle mass flow rate of 3.3 kg/s. Peak particle temperatures reached over 700 °C near the center of the receiver, but the particle temperature increase near the sides was lower due to a non-uniform irradiance distribution. At a particle inlet temperature of ~440 °C, the particle temperature increase was 27 °C per meter of drop length, and the thermal efficiency was ~60% for an average irradiance of 110 kW/m2. At an average irradiance of 211 kW/m2, the particle temperature increase was 57.1 °C per meter of drop length, and the thermal efficiency was ~65%. Tests with higher irradiances are being performed and are expected to yield greater particle temperature increases and efficiencies.

  11. Spaceborne GPS remote sensing for atmospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dasheng; Herman, Benjamin M.; Exner, M. L.; Schreiner, B.; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1995-11-01

    The global positioning system (GPS) is based on a constellation of 24 transmitter satellites orbiting the earth at approximately 21,000 km altitude. The original goal of the GPS was to provide global and all-weather precision positioning and navigation for the military. Since this original concept was developed, several civilian applications have been conceived that are making use of these satellites. GPS/MET is one such application. GPS/MET is sponsored by NSF, FAA, NOAA, and NASA. The goal of GPS/MET is to demonstrate the feasibility of recovering atmospheric temperature profiles from occulting radio signals from one of the 24 GPS transmitters. On April 3, 1995, a small radio receiver was launched into a 750 km low- earth orbit and 70 degree inclination. As this receiver orbits, occultations occur when the radio link between any one of the 24 GPS transmitters and the low-earth orbiting (LEO) receiver progressively descends or ascends through the earth's atmosphere. With the current constellation of GPS transmitters, approximately 500 such occultations occur in each 24-hour period per LEO receiver. Several hundred occultations have been analyzed to date, where some type of confirmational data has been available (i.e., radiosonde, satellite, numerical analysis gridded data). In this paper, we present a brief outline of the method followed by a few typical temperature soundings that have been obtained.

  12. Overview on advances in radiometric receiver design and technology: application to the MIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordi, Roberto; L'Abbate, Michele; Spera, Paolo

    1994-12-01

    MIMR (Multifrequency Imaging Microwave Radiometer) is an instrument under development for the European Space Agency (ESA) by the European Industry, with Alenia Spazio as Prime Contractor. It is a conical scanning passive microwave radiometer, which shall measure the Earth surface brightness temperature by processing the received electro- magnetic Earth surface radiation in linear polarization. Its output products will be of prime importance for monitoring of the environment, and will provide useful data for climatology and meteorology with day and night operation capabilities and near global daily coverage. The experience gained through various programs since 1972 with NIMBUS satellite's series utilizing ESMR, NEMS, SCAMS, SMMR instruments and DMSP-Block 5D-2 satellite with on-board SSM/I instrument led to the MIMR concept with better performance than the instruments already flown. MIMR has successfully passed a design phase, which has established an instrument baseline suited for accommodation on either the NASA EOS or ESA METOP spacecrafts, and a breadboarding activity devoted to key items. A Demonstrator model of the Instrument is currently under development, which shall prove by test its challenging performance: it will be representative of the flight design, performing measurements at 6.8, 36.5 and 89.0 GHz. Within this paper emphasis will be put on the receivers key design topics, as driven by performance and technology trade-offs, with an overview of the achieved performance in the frame of development activity.

  13. Health: support provided and received in advanced old age. A five-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Armi, F; Guilley, E; Lalive d'Epinay, C J

    2008-02-01

    While research focuses mainly on support provided to the elderly, this paper deals with the very old as a support provider to his family as much as a care recipient from both his family and a formal network. We hypothesize that elders with declining health will try to maintain the provision of services, even when they require and receive help.A total of 340 octogenarians from the Swiss Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study on the Oldest Old (SWILSOO) were interviewed up to five times over five years (N=1225 interviews). A multilevel model was applied to assess the effects of health, controlled for socio-demographic and family network variables, on the frequency of services that the old persons provided to their family and received from their family and formal networks. Health is operationalized in three statuses: ADL-dependent, ADL-independent frail, and robust.While the recourse to the informal network increased progressively with the process of frailty, the recourse to the formal network drastically increased for ADL-dependent individuals. Being ADL-dependent seriously altered the capacity to provide services, but ADL-independent frail persons were providers with the same frequency as the robust oldest old, showing their ability to preserve a principle of reciprocity in their exchanges with their family network. This continuity of roles may help frail persons to maintain their self-esteem and well-being.

  14. Advanced Stirling receiver development program, phase 1. Final report, December 1988-July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Lurio, C.A.

    1990-07-01

    Critical technology experiments were designed and developed to evaluate the Stirling cavity heat pipe receiver for a space solar power system. Theoretical criteria were applied to the design of a module for containing energy storage phase change material while avoiding thermal ratcheting. Zero-g drop tower tests, without phase change, were conducted to affirm that the bubble location required to avoid ratcheting could be achieved without the use of container materials that are wetted by the phase change material. A full scale module was fabricated, but not tested. A fabrication method was successfully developed for the sodium evaporator dome, with a sintered screen wick, to be used as the focal point for the receiver. Crushing of the screen during hydroforming was substantially reduced over the results of other researchers by using wax impregnation. Superheating of the sodium in the wick under average flux conditions is expected to be under 10K. A 2000K furnace which will simulate solar flux conditions for testing the evaporator dome was successfully built and tested.

  15. Augmented reality using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juwan; Kim, Haedong; Jang, Byungtae; Kim, Jungsik; Kim, Donghyun

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a prototype system to be developing using GPS (Global Positioning System) as a tracker in order to combine real images with virtual geographical images in real time. To cover long distances, this system is built using a monitor-based configuration and divided into two parts. One is the real scene acquisition system that includes a vehicle, a wireless CCD camera, a GPS attitude determination device and a wireless data communication device. The other is the processing and visualization system that includes a wireless data communication device, a PC with a video overlay card and a 3D graphics accelerator. The pilot area of the current system is the part of SERI (Systems Engineering Research Institute) which is the institute we are working for now. And virtual objects are generated with 3D modeling data of the main building, the new building to be planned, and so on in SERI. The wireless CCD camera attached to a vehicle acquires the real scenes. And GPS attitude determination device produces a wireless CCD camera's position and orientation data. And then this information is transmitted to the processing and visualization part by air. In the processing and visualization system, virtual images are rendered using the received information and combined with the real scenes. Applications are an enhanced bird's-eye view and disaster rescue work such as earthquake.

  16. GPS Moving Vehicle Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oaks, O. J.; Reid, Wilson; Wright, James; Duffey, Christopher; Williams, Charles; Warren, Hugh; Zeh, Tom; Buisson, James

    1996-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in the development of timing systems for remote locations, had a technical requirement for a Y code (SA/AS) Global Positioning System (GPS) precise time transfer receiver (TTR) which could be used both in a stationary mode or mobile mode. A contract was awarded to the Stanford Telecommunication Corporation (STEL) to build such a device. The Eastern Range (ER) als had a requirement for such a receiver and entered into the contract with NRL for the procurement of additional receivers. The Moving Vehicle Experiment (MVE) described in this paper is the first in situ test of the STEL Model 5401C Time Transfer System in both stationary and mobile operations. The primary objective of the MVE was to test the timing accuracy of the newly developed GPS TTR aboard a moving vessel. To accomplish this objective, a joint experiment was performed with personnel from NRL and the er at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) test range at Andros Island. Results and discussion of the test are presented in this paper.

  17. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

  18. Recent Activities in Spaceborne GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.

    1995-01-01

    After years of patient advocacy and paper studies by a diverse corps of enthusiasts, spaceborne GPS has at last become a presence in the world of flight projects. Owing to rapidly declining hardware costs, and the high value of autonomous onboard positioning, timing, and attitude determination, basic navigation receivers are coming to be seen as almost indispensable to future low earth orbiters.

  19. The Evolution of Global Positioning System (GPS) Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Sameer; Moore, Kevin B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes technological advances in the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is also known as the NAVSTAR GPS satellite constellation program developed in 1937, and changes in the nature of our world by GPS in the areas of agriculture, health, military, transportation, environment, wildlife biology, surveying and mapping, space applications, and…

  20. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  1. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-10-27

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤ vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  2. A pseudolite-based positioning system for legacy GNSS receivers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-03-27

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors.

  3. Early identification of non-responding locally advanced breast tumors receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Charehbili, Ayoub; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Kroep, Judith R.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Chan, Alan; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; Dijkstra, Jouke; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Wasser, Martin N. J. M.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) may be advantageous for monitoring tumor response during chemotherapy treatment, particularly in the early treatment stages. In this paper we perform a second analysis on the data of a clinical trial with 25 breast cancer patients that received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients were monitored using delayed contrast enhanced MRI and additionally with diffuse optical spectroscopy at baseline, after 1 cycle of chemotherapy, halfway therapy and before surgery. In this analysis hemoglobin content between tumor tissue and healthy tissue of the same breast is compared on all four monitoring time points. Furthermore, the predictive power of the tumor-healthy tissue difference of HbO2 for non-responder prediction is assessed. The difference in HbO2 content between tumor and healthy tissue was statistically significantly higher in responding tumors than in non-responding tumors at baseline (10.88 vs -0.57 μM, P=0.014) and after one cycle of chemotherapy (6.45 vs -1.31 μM, P=0.048). Before surgery this difference had diminished. In the data of this study, classification on the HbO2 difference between tumor and healthy tissue was able to predict tumor (non-)response at baseline and after 1 cycle with an area-under-curve of 0.95 and 0.88, respectively. While this result suggests that tumor response can be predicted before chemotherapy onset, one should be very careful with interpreting these results. A larger patient population is needed to confirm this finding.

  4. Review of hydraulic fracture mapping using advanced accelerometer-based receiver systems

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Uhl, J.E.; Engler, B.P.

    1997-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an important tool for natural gas and oil exploitation, but its optimization has been impeded by an inability to observe how the fracture propagates and what its overall dimensions are. The few experiments in which fractures have been exposed through coring or mineback have shown that hydraulic fractures are complicated multi-stranded structures that may behave much differently than currently predicted by models. It is clear that model validation, fracture optimization, problem identification and solution, and field development have all been encumbered by the absence of any ground truth information on fracture behavior in field applications. The solution to this problem is to develop techniques to image the hydraulic fracture in situ from either the surface, the treatment well, or offset wells. Several diagnostic techniques have been available to assess individual elements of the fracture geometry, but most of these techniques have limitations on their usefulness. For example, tracers and temperature logs can only measure fracture height at the wellbore, well testing and production history matching provide a productive length which may or may not be different from the true fracture length, and tiltmeters can provide accurate information on azimuth and type of fracture (horizontal or vertical), but length and height can only be extracted from a non-unique inversion of the data. However, there is a method, the microseismic technique, which possesses the potential for imaging the entire hydraulic fracture and, more importantly, its growth history. This paper discusses application of advanced technology to the microseismic method in order to provide detailed accurate images of fractures and their growth processes.

  5. GPSIM: A Personal Computer-Based GPS Simulator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, D.

    Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are now in use in many applications, ranging from GIS to route guidance, automatic vehicle location (AVL), air, land, and marine navigation, and many other transportation and geographical based applications. In many applications, the GPS receiver is connected to some form of intelligent electronic system which receives the positional data from the GPS unit and then performs the required operation. When developing and testing GPS-based systems, one of the problems is that it is usually necessary to create GPS-compatible geographical data to simulate a GPS operation in real time. This paper provides the details of a Personal Computer (PC)-based GPS simulator system called GPSIM. The system receives user way-points and routes from Windows-based screen forms and then simulates a GPS operation in real time by generating most of the commonly used GPS sentences. The user-specified waypoints are divided into a number of small segments, each segment specifying a small distance in the direction of the original waypoint. The GPS sentence corresponding to the geographical coordinates of each segment is then sent out of the PC serial port. The system described is an invaluable testing tool for GPS-based system developers and also for people training to learn to use GPS-based products.

  6. Precision GPS ephemerides and baselines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The required knowledge of the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite position accuracy can vary depending on a particular application. Application to relative positioning of receiver locations on the ground to infer Earth's tectonic plate motion requires the most accurate knowledge of the GPS satellite orbits. Research directed towards improving and evaluating the accuracy of GPS satellite orbits was conducted at the University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR). Understanding and modeling the forces acting on the satellites was a major focus of the research. Other aspects of orbit determination, such as the reference frame, time system, measurement modeling, and parameterization, were also investigated. Gravitational forces were modeled by truncated versions of extant gravity fields such as, Goddard Earth Model (GEM-L2), GEM-T1, TEG-2, and third body perturbations due to the Sun and Moon. Nongravitational forces considered were the solar radiation pressure, and perturbations due to thermal venting and thermal imbalance. At the GPS satellite orbit accuracy level required for crustal dynamic applications, models for the nongravitational perturbation play a critical role, since the gravitational forces are well understood and are modeled adequately for GPS satellite orbits.

  7. GPS-based relative navigation for the Proba-3 formation flying mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardaens, Jean-Sébastien; D'Amico, Simone; Cropp, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The primary objective of the Proba-3 mission is to build a solar coronagraph composed of two satellites flying in close formation on a high elliptical orbit and tightly controlled at apogee. Both spacecraft will embark a low-cost GPS receiver, originally designed for low-Earth orbits, to support the mission operations and planning during the perigee passage, when the GPS constellation is visible. The paper demonstrates the possibility of extending the utilization range of the GPS-based navigation system to serve as sensor for formation acquisition and coarse formation keeping. The results presented in the paper aim at achieving an unprecedented degree of realism using a high-fidelity simulation environment with hardware-in-the-loop capabilities. A modified version of the flight-proven PRISMA navigation system, composed of two single-frequency Phoenix GPS receivers and an advanced real-time onboard navigation filter, has been retained for this analysis. For several-day long simulations, the GPS receivers are replaced by software emulation to accelerate the simulation process. Special attention has been paid to the receiver link budget and to the selection of a proper attitude profile. Overall the paper demonstrates that, despite a limited GPS tracking time, the onboard navigation filter gets enough measurements to perform a relative orbit determination accurate at the centimeter level at perigee. Afterwards, the orbit prediction performance depends mainly on the quality of the onboard modeling of the differential solar radiation pressure acting on the satellites. When not taken into account, this perturbation is responsible for relative navigation errors at apogee up to 50 m. The errors can be reduced to only 10 m if the navigation filter is able to model this disturbance with 70% fidelity.

  8. Phenytoin toxicity in a patient receiving concomitant use of phenytoin and S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kida, Kazutoshi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kuboi, Youichi; Kano, Hisao; Amano, Sadao

    2011-06-01

    A 61-year-old man had been receiving phenytoin(225mg/day)and valproate(600mg/day)for several years as the treatment for seizures. He was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer,and S-1 plus cisplatin treatment was administered as neoadjuvant chemotherapy because bulky lymph node metastases were found at the time of the initial diagnosis. He complained of weakness of the lower extremities,light -headedness,and trembling of the upper extremities 2 months after the start of concomitant treatment with S-1 plus cisplatin. The serum phenytoin concentration increased to 21. 2mg/mL. Head computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any intracranial lesion such as brain metastasis. Therefore, we diagnosed phenytoin toxicity due to concomitant use of S-1 and phenytoin,and the dose of phenytoin was then decreased to 150 mg. Although the weakness of the lower extremities improved,light -headedness remained. Phenytoin and valproate treatments were stopped,and he was able to walk 7 days after the termination of therapy. It is important to predict the timing of phenytoin toxicity due to S-1,and therapeutic drug monitoring should be performed in patients receiving S-1 plus cisplatin and phenytoin. PMID:21677496

  9. Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Receiving Radio-Chemotherapy: A Novel Clinical-Pathologic Score Correlates With Global Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Berardi, Rossana; Mantello, Giovanna; Scartozzi, Mario; Del Prete, Stefano; Luppi, Gabriele; Martinelli, Roberto; Fumagalli, Marco; Grillo-Ruggieri, Filippo; Bearzi, Italo; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Marmorale, Cristina; Cascinu, Stefano

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the importance of downstaging of locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant treatment. Methods and Materials: The study included all consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) in different Italian centers from June 1996 to December 2003. A novel score was used, calculated as the sum of numbers obtained by giving a negative or positive point, respectively, to each degree of increase or decrease in clinical to pathologic T and N status. Results: A total of 317 patients were eligible for analysis. Neoadjuvant treatments performed were as follows: radiotherapy alone in 75 of 317 patients (23.7%), radiotherapy plus chemotherapy in 242 of 317 patients (76.3%). Worse disease-free survival was observed in patients with a lower score (Score 1 = -3 to +3 vs. Score 2 = +4 to +7; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results suggest that a novel score, calculated from preoperative and pathologic tumor and lymph node status, could represent an important parameter to predict outcome in patients receiving neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. The score could be useful to select patients for adjuvant chemotherapy after neoadjuvant treatment and surgery.

  10. Evaluating the Effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) Satellite Clock Error via GPS Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, Dinesh; Shafii, Shalini; Amin, Zainal Fitry M.; Jusoh, Asmariah; Zainun Ali, Siti

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock error using GPS simulation. Two conditions of tests are used; Case 1: All the GPS satellites have clock errors within the normal range of 0 to 7 ns, corresponding to pseudorange error range of 0 to 2.1 m; Case 2: One GPS satellite suffers from critical failure, resulting in clock error in the pseudorange of up to 1 km. It is found that increase of GPS satellite clock error causes increase of average positional error due to increase of pseudorange error in the GPS satellite signals, which results in increasing error in the coordinates computed by the GPS receiver. Varying average positional error patterns are observed for the each of the readings. This is due to the GPS satellite constellation being dynamic, causing varying GPS satellite geometry over location and time, resulting in GPS accuracy being location / time dependent. For Case 1, in general, the highest average positional error values are observed for readings with the highest PDOP values, while the lowest average positional error values are observed for readings with the lowest PDOP values. For Case 2, no correlation is observed between the average positional error values and PDOP, indicating that the error generated is random.

  11. Method and apparatus for relative navigation using reflected GPS signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ian R. (Inventor); Boegner, Jr., Gregory J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system to passively navigate an orbiting moving body towards an orbiting target using reflected GPS signals. A pair of antennas is employed to receive both direct signals from a plurality of GPS satellites and a second antenna to receive GPS signals reflected off an orbiting target. The direct and reflected signals are processed and compared to determine the relative distance and position of the orbiting moving body relative to the orbiting target.

  12. Current Arabian Plate Motion From Campaign GPS Measurements in Saudi Arabia: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuslmani, B.; Teferle, F. N.; Bingley, R. M.; Moore, T.

    2007-12-01

    Current investigations of the motions of the Arabian and its neighboring plates are primarily based on GPS measurements obtained in the surrounding areas of the Arabian plate, with few stations actually located on the Arabian plate itself in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In order to advance the knowledge of the dynamics of the Arabian plate and its intra-plate deformations, the General Directorate of Military Survey (GDMS), through collaboration with the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG), densified the GPS network in Saudi Arabia, covering nearly two thirds of the tectonic plate. Since July 2002, a network of 32 GPS stations has been established at locations of the Saudi Arabia geodetic network. At all of these GPS stations a concrete pillar has been used as the monument and the locations have been selected in order to give the broadest distribution of observing sites. During 2005, 27 additional GPS stations in the Hejaz and Asser Mountains, and the Farasan Islands, all in south-western Saudi Arabia, have been established, for which the past and future campaign GPS measurements will provide valuable data for investigations of crustal deformations close to the plate boundaries between the Nubia, Somalian and Arabian plates. In this presentation we will show results in the form of velocity field and plate motion estimates based on data from at least three campaigns occupying the initial 32 GDMS GPS network stations, but also from a number of IGS stations in the region. Our reference frame is aligned to ITRF2005 and uses approximately 40 IGS reference frame stations located on all major tectonic plates, e.g. Nubia and Somalia, surrounding the Arabian plate. Furthermore, we apply absolute satellite and receiver antenna phase center models together with newly available GPS products from a recent global re-processing effort.

  13. GPS-based navigation for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champetier, C.; Duhamel, T.; Frezet, M.

    1995-03-01

    We present in this paper a survey of the applications of the GPS (global positioning system) system for spacecraft navigation. The use of the GPS techniques for space missions is a striking example of dual-use of military technology; it can bring vast improvements in performances and, in some cases, for a reduced cost. We only deal in this paper with the functional aspects and performances of GPS uses without addressing the issues of hardware implementation where current developments are leading to an increased miniaturization of the GPS receiver hardware. We start this paper with a general overview of the GPS system and its various uses for space missions. We then focus on four areas where MATRA MARCONI Space has conducted detailed analyses of performances: autonomous navigation for geostationary spacecraft, relative navigation for space rendezvous, differential navigation for landing vehicles, absolute navigation for launchers and reentry vehicles.

  14. Positional Accuracy of Gps Satellite Almanac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihua; Zhou, Shangli

    2014-12-01

    How to accelerate signal acquisition and shorten starting time are key problems in the Global Positioning System (GPS). GPS satellite almanac plays an important role in signal reception period. Almanac accuracy directly affects the speed of GPS signal acquisition, the start time of the receiver, and even the system performance to some extent. Combined with precise ephemeris products released by the International GNSS Service (IGS), the authors analyse GPS satellite almanac from the first day to the third day in the 1805th GPS week (from August 11 to 13, 2014 in the Gregorian calendar). The results show that mean of position errors in three-dimensional coordinate system varies from about 1 kilometer to 3 kilometers, which can satisfy the needs of common users.

  15. Recent GPS Results at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk; Imfeld, Hans L.; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    The Alignment Engineering Group (AEG) makes use of GPS technology for fulfilling part of its above ground surveying tasks at SLAC since early 2002. A base station (SLAC M40) has been set up at a central location of the SLAC campus serving both as master station for real-time kinematic (RTK) operations and as datum point for local GPS campaigns. The Leica RS500 system is running continuously and the GPS data are collected both externally (logging PC) and internally (receiver flashcard). The external logging is facilitated by a serial to Ethernet converter and an Ethernet connection at the station. Internal logging (ring buffer) is done for data security purposes. The weatherproof boxes for the instrumentation are excellent shelters against rain and wind, but do heat up considerably in sun light. Whereas the GPS receiver showed no problems, the Pacific Crest PDL 35 radio shut down several times due to overheating disrupting the RTK operations. In order to prevent heat-induced shutdowns, a protection against direct sun exposure (shading) and a constant air circulation system (ventilation) were installed. As no further shutdowns have occurred so far, it appears that the two measures successfully mended the heat problem.

  16. Accuracy of WAAS-enabled GPS for the determination of position and speed over ground.

    PubMed

    Witte, T H; Wilson, A M

    2005-08-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) offers many advantages over conventional methods for the determination of subject speed during biomechanical studies. Recent advances in GPS technology, in particular the implementation of the Wide-Angle Augmentation System and European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (WAAS/EGNOS), mean that small, highly portable units are available offering the potential of superior accuracy in the determination of both position and speed. This study set out to examine the accuracy of a WAAS-enabled GPS unit for the determination of position and speed. Comparison with the new and published data showed significant enhancements in both position and speed accuracy over a non-WAAS system. Position data collected during straight line cycling showed significantly lower sample-to-sample variation (mean absolute deviation from straight line 0.11 vs. 0.78 m) and greater repeatability from trial to trial (mean absolute deviation from actual path 0.37 vs. 4.8 m) for the WAAS-enabled unit compared to the non-WAAS unit. The speed determined by the WAAS-enabled GPS receiver during cycling in a straight line was within 0.2 ms(-1) of the actual speed measured for 57% of the values with 82% lying within 0.4 ms(-1), however, the data tended towards underestimation of speed during circle cycling, with 65% of values within 0.2 ms(-1) and 87% within 0.4 ms(-1) of the actual value. Local dGPS and dual frequency techniques are more accurate still, however, traditional differential GPS (dGPS), employing FM radio transmission of correction data to a separate receiver, now offers no advantage over WAAS and appears redundant.

  17. Application of GPS Measurements for Ionospheric and Tropospheric Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendra Prasad, P.; Abdu, M. A.; Furlan, Benedito. M. P.; Koiti Kuga, Hélio

    solar maximum period. In the equatorial region the irregularity structures are highly elongated in the north-south direction and are discrete in the east-west direction with dimensions of several hundred km. With such spatial distribution of irregularities needs to determine how often the GPS receivers fails to provide navigation aid with the available constellation. The effects of scintillation on the performance of GPS navigation systems in the equatorial region can be analyzed through commissioning few ground receivers. Incidentally there are few GPS receivers near these latitudes. Despite the recent advances in the ionosphere and tropospheric delay modeling for geodetic applications of GPS, the models currently used are not very precise. The conventional and operational ionosphere models viz. Klobuchar, Bent, and IRI models have certain limitations in providing very precise accuracies at all latitudes. The troposphere delay modeling also suffers in accuracy. The advances made in both computing power and knowledge of the atmosphere leads to make an effort to upgrade some of these models for improving delay corrections in GPS navigation. The ionospheric group delay corrections for orbit determination can be minimized using duel frequency. However in single frequency measurements the group delay correction is an involved task. In this paper an investigation is carried out to estimate the model coefficients of ionosphere along with precise orbit determination modeling using GPS measurements. The locations of the ground-based receivers near equator are known very exactly. Measurements from these ground stations to a precisely known satellite carrying duel receiver is used for orbit determination. The ionosphere model parameters can be refined corresponding to spatially distributed GPS receivers spread over Brazil. The tropospheric delay effects are not significant for the satellites by choosing appropriate elevation angle. However it needs to be analyzed for user like

  18. Application of GPS tracking techniques to orbit determination for TDRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, B. J.; Lichten, S. M.; Malla, R. P.; Wu, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate two fundamentally different approaches to TDRS orbit determination utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and GPS-related techniques. In the first, a GPS flight receiver is deployed on the TDRSS spacecraft. The TDRS ephemerides are determined using direct ranging to the GPS spacecraft, and no ground network is required. In the second approach, the TDRSS spacecraft broadcast a suitable beacon signal, permitting the simultaneous tracking of GPS and TDRSS satellites from a small ground network. Both strategies can be designed to meet future operational requirements for TDRS-2 orbit determination.

  19. Disciplined rubidium oscillator with GPS selective availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewey, Wayne P.

    1993-01-01

    A U.S. Department of Defense decision for continuous implementation of GPS Selective Availability (S/A) has made it necessary to modify Rubidium oscillator disciplining methods. One such method for reducing the effects of S/A on the oscillator disciplining process was developed which achieves results approaching pre-S/A GPS. The Satellite Hopping algorithm used in minimizing the effects of S/A on the oscillator disciplining process is described, and the results of using this process to those obtained prior to the implementation of S/A are compared. Test results are from a TrueTime Rubidium based Model GPS-DC timing receiver.

  20. Landslide monitoring using multi-antenna GPS deformation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T.; Hu, Y.; Ding, X.; Chen, C.

    2007-12-01

    GPS has already widely applied in civil engineering, fault detecting and landslide monitoring in the last decade, because of its convenience and high precision. However, GPS receiver is very expensive. If we want to monitor the landslide twenty-four hours a day, we need to buy a lot of GPS receivers. In order to spend less cost, multi- antenna GPS deformation monitoring system was employed to monitor the landslide of the freeway at Guansi section in Taiwan. Moreover, the data from 3D laser scanner, rain gauge, inclinometer and water table meter were utilized to analysis the movement of this landslide to make sure the safety of the drivers.

  1. GENESIS: GPS Environmental and Earth Science Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews the GPS ENvironmental and Earth Science Information System (GENESIS). The objectives of GENESIS are outlined (1) Data Archiving, searching and distribution for science data products derived from Space borne TurboRogue Space Receivers for GPS science and other ground based GPS receivers, (2) Data browsing using integrated visualization tools, (3) Interactive web/java-based data search and retrieval, (4) Data subscription service, (5) Data migration from existing GPS archived data, (6) On-line help and documentation, and (7) participation in the WP-ESIP federation. The presentation reviews the products and services of Genesis, and the technology behind the system.

  2. Development of a regional GPS-based ionospheric TEC model for South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opperman, Ben D. L.; Cilliers, Pierre J.; McKinnell, Lee-Anne; Haggard, Ray

    Advances in South African space physics research and related disciplines require better spatial and time resolution ionospheric information than was previously possible with the existing ionosonde network. A GPS-based, variable degree adjusted spherical harmonic (ASHA) model was developed for near real-time regional ionospheric total electron content (TEC) mapping over South Africa. Slant TEC values along oblique GPS signal paths are quantified from a network of GPS receivers and converted to vertical TEC by means of the single layer mapping function. The ASHA model coefficients and GPS differential biases are estimated from vertical TEC at the ionospheric pierce points and used to interpolate TEC at any location within the region of interest. Diurnal TEC variations with one minute time resolution and time-varying 2D regional TEC maps are constructed. In order to validate the ASHA method, simulations with an IRI ionosphere were performed, while the ASHA results from actual data were compared with two independent GPS-based methodologies and measured ionosonde data.

  3. The performance analysis of a real-time integrated INS/GPS vehicle navigation system with abnormal GPS measurement elimination.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai

    2013-08-15

    The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC) and tightly coupled (TC) schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals) affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system.

  4. The Performance Analysis of a Real-Time Integrated INS/GPS Vehicle Navigation System with Abnormal GPS Measurement Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai

    2013-01-01

    The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC) and tightly coupled (TC) schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals) affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system. PMID:23955434

  5. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  6. A New Ionosphere Monitoring Technology Based on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, Claudio; Meza, Amalia; Azpilicueta, Francisco; van Zele, María Andrea; Gende, Mauricio; Díaz, Alejandro

    2004-04-01

    Although global positioning system (GPS) was originally planned as a satellite-based radio-navigation system for military purposes, civilian users have significantly increased their access to the system for both, commercial and scientific applications. Almost 400 permanent GPS tracking stations have been stablished around the globe with the main purpose of supporting scientific research. In addition, several GPS receivers on board of low Earth orbit satellites fitted with special antennas that focus on Earth’s horizon, are tracking the radio signals broadcasted by the high-orbiting GPS satellites, as they rise and set on Earth horizon. The data of these ground and space-born GPS receivers, readily accessible through Internet in a ‘virtual observatory’ managed by the International GPS Service, are extensively used for many researches and might possibly ignite a revolution in Earth remote sensing.

  7. GPS radio interferometry of travelling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Palamartchouk, K. S.; Perevalova, N. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents some results investigating the new possibilities of radio interferometry of Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) that are based on exploiting standard measurements of transionospheric radio signal characteristics and coordinate-time measurements using dual-frequency multichannel receivers of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method for GPS radio interferometry (SADM-GPS) is proposed for determining the characteristics of the TIDs dynamics by measuring variations of GPS phase derivatives with respect to time and spatial coordinates. These data are used to calculate corresponding values of the velocity vector, in view of a correction for satellite motions based on the current information available regarding the angular coordinates of the satellites. Subsequently, velocity and direction distributions are constructed and analyzed to verify the hypothesis of whether there is a predominant displacement. If it exists, then the pattern can be considered to be travelling, and the mean travel velocity can be determined from the velocity distribution. Through a computer simulation it was shown that multi-satellite GPS radio interferometry in conjunction with the SADM-GPS algorithm allows the detection and measurement of the velocity vector of TIDs in virtually the entire azimuthal range of possible TID propagation directions. The use of the proposed method is exemplified by an investigation of TIDs during the solar eclipse of 9 March 1997, using the GPS-radio interferometer GPSINT at Irkutsk.

  8. Assessment Study of Using Online (CSRS) GPS-PPP Service for Mapping Applications in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elazeem, Mohamed; Farah, Ashraf; Farrag, Farrag

    2011-09-01

    Many applications in navigation, land surveying, land title definitions and mapping have been made simpler and more precise due to accessibility of Global Positioning System (GPS) data, and thus the demand for using advanced GPS techniques in surveying applications has become essential. The differential technique was the only source of accurate positioning for many years, and remained in use despite of its cost. The precise point positioning (PPP) technique is a viable alternative to the differential positioning method in which a user with a single receiver can attain positioning accuracy at the centimeter or decimeter scale. In recent years, many organizations introduced online (GPS-PPP) processing services capable of determining accurate geocentric positions using GPS observations. These services provide the user with receiver coordinates in free and unlimited access formats via the internet. This paper investigates the accuracy of the Canadian Spatial Reference System (CSRS) Precise Point Positioning (PPP) (CSRS-PPP) service supervised by the Geodetic Survey Division (GSD), Canada. Single frequency static GPS observations have been collected at three points covering time spans of 60, 90 and 120 minutes. These three observed sites form baselines of 1.6, 7, and 10 km, respectively. In order to assess the CSRS-PPP accuracy, the discrepancies between the CSRS-PPP estimates and the regular differential GPS solutions were computed. The obtained results illustrate that the PPP produces a horizontal error at the scale of a few decimeters; this is accurate enough to serve many mapping applications in developing countries with a savings in both cost and experienced labor.

  9. 41 CFR 304-3.12 - Must I receive advance approval from my agency before I perform travel paid by a non-Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approval from my agency before I perform travel paid by a non-Federal source to attend a meeting? 304-3.12... agency before I perform travel paid by a non-Federal source to attend a meeting? Yes, you must receive advance approval from your agency before performing travel paid by a non-Federal source to attend...

  10. 41 CFR 304-3.12 - Must I receive advance approval from my agency before I perform travel paid by a non-Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... approval from my agency before I perform travel paid by a non-Federal source to attend a meeting? 304-3.12... agency before I perform travel paid by a non-Federal source to attend a meeting? Yes, you must receive advance approval from your agency before performing travel paid by a non-Federal source to attend...

  11. 41 CFR 302-9.11 - May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV? 302-9.11 Section 302-9.11 Public... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 9-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION AND EMERGENCY STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE General Rules § 302-9.11 May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of...

  12. Advanced Observation Operators for GPS Radio Occultation. Part 1; Validation of the 2D Ray Tracing Approach with CHAMP and SAC-C bending angle and refractivity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, P.; Joiner, J.

    2003-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultations (RO) bending angles and refractivity data characterize mostly the vertical structure of the Earth's atmosphere. We answer the question whether proper simulation of GPS RO data for data assimilation can be obtained with one-dimensional vertical operators, or if accounting also for horizontal atmospheric structures via ray-tracing makes a positive difference when compared with real data. We present a detailed implementation of a geometrical optics multi-plane two-dimensional (2D) ray-tracing as an observation operator to simulate GPS RO bending angles and refractivities within the Finite Volume Data Assimilation System (FVDAS). Comparisons of the outputs of that 2D observation operator with those of simpler ID observation operators are used to generate estimates of errors induced by neglecting tangent point drift (TPD) and horizontal gradients (HG). These error estimates are then confronted with errors estimates derived using 6335 real CHAMP and SAC-C occultations. The agreement for TPD-induced (HG-induced) errors is remarkably positive at altitudes 10-30 km (below 10 km). Comparisons in bending angles O - B STD of the outputs of the multi-plane 2D ray-tracer with those of a vertical Abel transform show reductions of about 8% of the usual O - B bending angle STD due to TPD in the stratosphere (3% due to HG, in the troposphere only). In terms of refractivity, the O - B STD reductions are about 1520% for TPD and 3-5% for HG in the same regions. These reductions are obtained using either 6-hour forecasts or analyses as backgrounds, and using Geometrical Optics (GO) or Canonical Transform (CT) data.

  13. GPS, GNSS, and Ionospheric Density Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, P. M.; O'Hanlon, B.; Humphreys, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric density and density gradients affect GNSS signals in two ways. They can introduce ranging errors or irregularities that form on the density gradients producing scintillation. Here we focus on the issue of ranging errors. There are two approaches to mitigating ranging errors produced by ionospheric density gradients which can be 20-30 m during major magnetic storms. The first approach is to use a reference receiver(s) to determine the ionospheric contribution to ranging errors. The ranging error is then transmitted to the user for correction within the mobile receiver. This approach is frequently referred to as differential GPS and, when multiple reference receivers are used, the system is referred to as an augmentation system. This approach is vulnerable to ionospheric gradients depending on the reference receiver spacing(s) and latency in applying the correction within the mobile receiver. The second approach is to transmit navigation signals at two frequencies and then use the relative delay between the two signals to both estimate the ranging error and calculate the correct range. Currently the dual frequency technique is used by US military receivers with an encryption key and some civilian receivers which must be stationary and average over times long compared to those required for navigation. However, the technology of space based radio navigation is changing. GPS will soon be a system with three frequencies and multiple codes. Furthermore Europe, Russia, and China are developing independent systems to complement and compete with GPS while India and Japan are developing local systems to enhance GPS performance in their regions. In this talk we address two questions. How do density gradients affect augmentation systems including the social consequences and will the new GPS/GNSS systems with multiple civilian frequencies be able to remove ionospheric errors. The answers are not at all clear.

  14. Gravity recovery analysis using GPS for STEP and a low-low satellite mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschroen, Ronald J.; Bertiger, Willy I.; Wu, Sien C.

    1993-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers on low Earth orbiting satellites can provide three-dimensional global tracking with sub-decimeter orbit accuracy. The precise GPS data can additionally be used to refine the Earth's gravity field. Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) is a proposed European Space Agency mission which will carry a flight GPS receiver. Using a realistic scenario for processing 5 days of GPS data, a covariance analysis is performed to obtain the expected improvement in the gravity field. Additionally, a similar analysis is then repeated for two low Earth orbiting satellites, each equipped with GPS receivers and with precise ranging measurements between them.

  15. Using SAR and GPS for Hazard Management and Response: Progress and Examples from the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. E.; Simons, M.; Hua, H.; Yun, S. H.; Agram, P. S.; Milillo, P.; Sacco, G. F.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Lundgren, P.; Milillo, G.; Manipon, G. J. M.; Moore, A. W.; Liu, Z.; Polet, J.; Cruz, J.

    2014-12-01

    ARIA is a joint JPL/Caltech project to automate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and GPS imaging capabilities for scientific understanding, hazard response, and societal benefit. We have built a prototype SAR and GPS data system that forms the foundation for hazard monitoring and response capability, as well as providing imaging capabilities important for science studies. Together, InSAR and GPS have the ability to capture surface deformation in high spatial and temporal resolution. For earthquakes, this deformation provides information that is complementary to seismic data on location, geometry and magnitude of earthquakes. Accurate location information is critical for understanding the regions affected by damaging shaking. Regular surface deformation measurements from SAR and GPS are useful for monitoring changes related to many processes that are important for hazard and resource management such as volcanic deformation, groundwater withdrawal, and landsliding. Observations of SAR coherence change have a demonstrated use for damage assessment for hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, and volcanic eruptions. These damage assessment maps can be made from imagery taken day or night and are not affected by clouds, making them valuable complements to optical imagery. The coherence change caused by the damage from hazards (building collapse, flooding, ash fall) is also detectable with intelligent algorithms, allowing for rapid generation of damage assessment maps over large areas at fine resolution, down to the spatial scale of single family homes. We will present the progress and results we have made on automating the analysis of SAR data for hazard monitoring and response using data from the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) COSMO-SkyMed constellation of X-band SAR satellites. Since the beginning of our project with ASI, our team has imaged deformation and coherence change caused by many natural hazard events around the world. We will present progress on our

  16. Operational Use of GPS Navigation for Space Shuttle Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Propst, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    The STS-118 flight of the Space Shuttle Endeavour was the first shuttle mission flown with three Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers in place of the three legacy Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN) units. This marked the conclusion of a 15 year effort involving procurement, missionization, integration, and flight testing of a GPS receiver and a parallel effort to formulate and implement shuttle computer software changes to support GPS. The use of GPS data from a single receiver in parallel with TACAN during entry was successfully demonstrated by the orbiters Discovery and Atlantis during four shuttle missions in 2006 and 2007. This provided the confidence needed before flying the first all GPS, no TACAN flight with Endeavour. A significant number of lessons were learned concerning the integration of a software intensive navigation unit into a legacy avionics system. These lessons have been taken into consideration during vehicle design by other flight programs, including the vehicle that will replace the Space Shuttle, Orion.

  17. USNO GPS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1981-01-01

    Initial test results indicated that the Global Positioning System/Time Transfer Unit (GPS/TTU) performed well within the + or - 100 nanosecond range required by the original system specification. Subsequent testing involved the verification of GPS time at the master control site via portable clocks and the acquisition and tracking of as many passes of the space vehicles currently in operation as possible. A description and discussion of the testing, system modifications, test results obtained, and an evaluation of both GPS and the GPS/TTU are presented.

  18. A New Indoor Positioning System Architecture Using GPS Signals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Wu; Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue

    2015-04-29

    The pseudolite system is a good alternative for indoor positioning systems due to its large coverage area and accurate positioning solution. However, for common Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, the pseudolite system requires some modifications of the user terminals. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a new pseudolite-based indoor positioning system architecture. The main idea is to receive real-world GPS signals, repeat each satellite signal and transmit those using indoor transmitting antennas. The transmitted GPS-like signal can be processed (signal acquisition and tracking, navigation data decoding) by the general receiver and thus no hardware-level modification on the receiver is required. In addition, all Tx can be synchronized with each other since one single clock is used in Rx/Tx. The proposed system is simulated using a software GPS receiver. The simulation results show the indoor positioning system is able to provide high accurate horizontal positioning in both static and dynamic situations.

  19. A New Indoor Positioning System Architecture Using GPS Signals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Wu; Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue

    2015-01-01

    The pseudolite system is a good alternative for indoor positioning systems due to its large coverage area and accurate positioning solution. However, for common Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, the pseudolite system requires some modifications of the user terminals. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a new pseudolite-based indoor positioning system architecture. The main idea is to receive real-world GPS signals, repeat each satellite signal and transmit those using indoor transmitting antennas. The transmitted GPS-like signal can be processed (signal acquisition and tracking, navigation data decoding) by the general receiver and thus no hardware-level modification on the receiver is required. In addition, all Tx can be synchronized with each other since one single clock is used in Rx/Tx. The proposed system is simulated using a software GPS receiver. The simulation results show the indoor positioning system is able to provide high accurate horizontal positioning in both static and dynamic situations. PMID:25938199

  20. Mapping where We Live and Play with GPS Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Deborah J.

    2006-01-01

    As a result of technological advances such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Geographic Information System (GIS), mapping practices and applications have become far more sophisticated. This article suggests family and consumer sciences students and professionals consider using GPS technology to map their communities as a strategy to…

  1. A pseudolite-based positioning system for legacy GNSS receivers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-01-01

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors. PMID:24681674

  2. A Pseudolite-Based Positioning System for Legacy GNSS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-01-01

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors. PMID:24681674

  3. World: A multipurpose GPS-network computer package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafarend, Erik W.; Lindlohr, Wolfgang

    WORLD is a multipurpose package to compute geodetic positions in geometry and gravity space. Here undifferenced GPS carrier beat phase observations are processed in the free network mode, namely by the prototype program called PUMA. Within two alternative model formulations, the classical Gauß-Markov Model and the so-called Mixed Model, simultaneously estimated / predicted parameters are those of type (i) Cartesian ground station coordinates (geodetic positioning), (ii) Cartesian satellite coordinates (orbit determination), (iii) receiver- and satellite-specific bias terms, (iv) initial epoch ambiguities and (v) proportional tropospheric corrections. The Mixed Model parameters appear from linearization as a point of stochastic prior information. Namely the weight matrices of stochastic prior information, e.g. for orbit parameters, is assumed to be known. Estimators of type BLUE and predictors of type inhom BLIP and hom BLUP are used. Chapter four discusses in all detail the real analysis of GPS satellite networks of free type. Most notable are the estimated bias terms α, β, γ, in a twofold classification model. The operability of PUMA is demonstrated by the use of multistation phase observations (Wild-Magnavox WM 101-receivers) in a local Berlin network (six station network). It is documented that in spite of the advanced phase observation modelling an internal relative baseline accuracy (utmost length 30 km) of the order of 3 to 5 ppm is achievable. In addition, the influence of orbital prior information on ground station measures, point position as well as accuracy, is demonstrated.

  4. Global Positioning System receiver evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    A Sandia project currently uses an outdated Magnavox 6400 Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as the core of its navigation system. The goal of this study was to analyze the performance of the current GPS receiver compared to newer, less expensive models and to make recommendations on how to improve the performance of the overall navigation system. This paper discusses the test methodology used to experimentally analyze the performance of different GPS receivers, the test results, and recommendations on how an upgrade should proceed. Appendices contain detailed information regarding the raw data, test hardware, and test software.

  5. GPS Multipath in Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilich, A.; Sella, G.

    2008-12-01

    Multipath, where a GNSS signal arrives by more than one path, is considered one of the last unmodeled errors remaining in GNSS. Multipath is of great concern because the additional path length traveled by the incoming signal biases the satellite-receiver range and therefore determination of position. Siting a GNSS station in an urban area, in the immediate vicinity of large reflecting objects such as rooftops, buildings, asphalt and concrete parking lots, grassy fields, and chainlink fences, is both a multipath nightmare and a necessary evil. We note that continuously-operating GNSS stations are becoming increasingly common in urban areas, which makes sense as these stations are often installed in support of civil infrastructure (e.g. departments of transportation, strong motion monitoring of buildings in earthquake-prone areas, surveying networks). Urban stations are well represented in geodetic networks such as the CORS (United States) and GeoNet (Japan) networks, with more stations likely to be installed in the coming years. What sources and types of urban multipath are the most detrimental to geodetic GPS positioning? Which reflecting objects are assumed to be a major source of multipath error, but the GPS data show otherwise? Are certain reflecting environments worse for specific applications, i.e. kinematic vs. static positioning? If forced to install a GNSS station in a highly reflective environment, is it possible to rank objects for their multipath severity? To answer these questions, we provide multipath examples taken from continuously- operating GNSS stations sited in urban environments. We concentrate on some of the most common obstacles and reflecting objects for urban sites - rooftops, parking lots, and fences. We analyze the multipath signature of these objects as manifested in the GPS phase, pseudorange, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observables, and also examine multipath impacts on the precision and accuracy of GPS-derived positions.

  6. Results of an Internet-Based Dual-Frequency Global Differential GPS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, R.; Bertiger, W.; Lough, M.

    2000-01-01

    Observables from a global network of 18 GPS receivers are returned in real-time to JPL over the open Internet. 30 - 40 cm RSS global GPS orbits and precise dual-frequency GPS clocks are computed in real-time with JPL's Real Time Gipsy (RTG) software.

  7. A simple method to improve autonomous GPS positioning for tractors.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gil, Jaime; Alonso-Garcia, Sergio; Gómez-Gil, Francisco Javier; Stombaugh, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Error is always present in the GPS guidance of a tractor along a desired trajectory. One way to reduce GPS guidance error is by improving the tractor positioning. The most commonly used ways to do this are either by employing more precise GPS receivers and differential corrections or by employing GPS together with some other local positioning systems such as electronic compasses or Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). However, both are complex and expensive solutions. In contrast, this article presents a simple and low cost method to improve tractor positioning when only a GPS receiver is used as the positioning sensor. The method is based on placing the GPS receiver ahead of the tractor, and on applying kinematic laws of tractor movement, or a geometric approximation, to obtain the midpoint position and orientation of the tractor rear axle more precisely. This precision improvement is produced by the fusion of the GPS data with tractor kinematic control laws. Our results reveal that the proposed method effectively reduces the guidance GPS error along a straight trajectory.

  8. A Simple Method to Improve Autonomous GPS Positioning for Tractors

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Gil, Jaime; Alonso-Garcia, Sergio; Gómez-Gil, Francisco Javier; Stombaugh, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Error is always present in the GPS guidance of a tractor along a desired trajectory. One way to reduce GPS guidance error is by improving the tractor positioning. The most commonly used ways to do this are either by employing more precise GPS receivers and differential corrections or by employing GPS together with some other local positioning systems such as electronic compasses or Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). However, both are complex and expensive solutions. In contrast, this article presents a simple and low cost method to improve tractor positioning when only a GPS receiver is used as the positioning sensor. The method is based on placing the GPS receiver ahead of the tractor, and on applying kinematic laws of tractor movement, or a geometric approximation, to obtain the midpoint position and orientation of the tractor rear axle more precisely. This precision improvement is produced by the fusion of the GPS data with tractor kinematic control laws. Our results reveal that the proposed method effectively reduces the guidance GPS error along a straight trajectory. PMID:22163917

  9. 41 CFR 302-9.11 - May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV? 302-9.11 Section 302-9.11 Public... General Rules § 302-9.11 May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my... storage of your POV. Effective Date Note: By FTR Amdt. 2011-01, 76 FR 18342, Apr. 1, 2011, § 302-9.11...

  10. The GPS Topex/Poseidon precise orbit determination experiment - Implications for design of GPS global networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, Ulf J.; Lichten, Stephen M.; Davis, Edgar S.; Theiss, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    Topex/Poseidon, a cooperative satellite mission between United States and France, aims to determine global ocean circulation patterns and to study their influence on world climate through precise measurements of sea surface height above the geoid with an on-board altimeter. To achieve the mission science aims, a goal of 13-cm orbit altitude accuracy was set. Topex/Poseidon includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) precise orbit determination (POD) system that has now demonstrated altitude accuracy better than 5 cm. The GPS POD system includes an on-board GPS receiver and a 6-station GPS global tracking network. This paper reviews early GPS results and discusses multi-mission capabilities available from a future enhanced global GPS network, which would provide ground-based geodetic and atmospheric calibrations needed for NASA deep space missions while also supplying tracking data for future low Earth orbiters. Benefits of the enhanced global GPS network include lower operations costs for deep space tracking and many scientific and societal benefits from the low Earth orbiter missions, including improved understanding of ocean circulation, ocean-weather interactions, the El Nino effect, the Earth thermal balance, and weather forecasting.

  11. Towards GPS Surface Reflection Remote Sensing of Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Axelrad, P.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the research to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. The characteristics of the GPS signals and equipment afford the possibility of new measurements not possible with existing radar and passive microwave systems. In particular, the GPS receiving systems are small and light-weight, and as such are particularly well suited to be deployed on small aircraft or satellite platforms with minimal impact. Our preliminary models and experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and fresh-water ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska suggesting correlation between forward scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered signals.

  12. Autonomous Navigation Improvements for High-Earth Orbiters Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Garrison, James; Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center is currently developing autonomous navigation systems for satellites in high-Earth orbits where acquisition of the GPS signals is severely limited This paper discusses autonomous navigation improvements for high-Earth orbiters and assesses projected navigation performance for these satellites using Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) measurements. Navigation performance is evaluated as a function of signal acquisition threshold, measurement errors, and dynamic modeling errors using realistic GPS signal strength and user antenna models. These analyses indicate that an autonomous navigation position accuracy of better than 30 meters root-mean-square (RMS) can be achieved for high-Earth orbiting satellites using a GPS receiver with a very stable oscillator. This accuracy improves to better than 15 meters RMS if the GPS receiver's signal acquisition threshold can be reduced by 5 dB-Hertz to track weaker signals.

  13. Aircraft landing using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David Gary

    The advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is revolutionizing the field of navigation. Commercial aviation has been particularly influenced by this worldwide navigation system. From ground vehicle guidance to aircraft landing applications, GPS has the potential to impact many areas of aviation. GPS is already being used for non-precision approach guidance; current research focuses on its application to more critical regimes of flight. To this end, the following contributions were made: (1) Development of algorithms and a flexible software architecture capable of providing real-time position solutions accurate to the centimeter level with high integrity. This architecture was used to demonstrate 110 automatic landings of a Boeing 737. (2) Assessment of the navigation performance provided by two GPS-based landing systems developed at Stanford, the Integrity Beacon Landing System, and the Wide Area Augmentation System. (3) Preliminary evaluation of proposed enhancements to traditional techniques for GPS positioning, specifically, dual antenna positioning and pseudolite augmentation. (4) Introduction of a new concept for positioning using airport pseudolites. The results of this research are promising, showing that GPS-based systems can potentially meet even the stringent requirements of a Category III (zero visibility) landing system. Although technical and logistical hurdles still exist, it is likely that GPS will soon provide aircraft guidance in all phases of flight, including automatic landing, roll-out, and taxi.

  14. A review of GPS-based tracking techniques for TDRS orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, B. J.; Lichten, S. M.; Malla, R. P.; Wu, S.-C.

    1993-01-01

    This article evaluates two fundamentally different approaches to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) orbit determination utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and GPS-related techniques. In the first, a GPS flight receiver is deployed on the TDRS. The TDRS ephemerides are determined using direct ranging to the GPS spacecraft, and no ground network is required. In the second approach, the TDRS's broadcast a suitable beacon signal, permitting the simultaneous tracking of GPS and Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System satellites by ground receivers. Both strategies can be designed to meet future operational requirements for TDRS-II orbit determination.

  15. 41 CFR 301-31.14 - May I receive a travel advance for transportation and/or subsistence expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-51.200 of this chapter for up to a 30-day period at a time to cover expenses allowable. Your travel... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I receive a travel... Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...

  16. 41 CFR 301-31.14 - May I receive a travel advance for transportation and/or subsistence expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-51.200 of this chapter for up to a 30-day period at a time to cover expenses allowable. Your travel... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I receive a travel... Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...

  17. 41 CFR 301-31.14 - May I receive a travel advance for transportation and/or subsistence expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-51.200 of this chapter for up to a 30-day period at a time to cover expenses allowable. Your travel... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I receive a travel... Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...

  18. 41 CFR 301-31.14 - May I receive a travel advance for transportation and/or subsistence expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-51.200 of this chapter for up to a 30-day period at a time to cover expenses allowable. Your travel... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May I receive a travel... Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...

  19. Combining GPS and VLBI earth-rotation data for improved universal time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) routinely measures Earth orientation in support of spacecraft tracking and navigation using very long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) with the deep-space tracking antennas. The variability of the most unpredictable Earth-orientation component, Universal Time 1 (UT1), is a major factor in determining the frequency with which the DSN measurements must be made. The installation of advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers at the DSN sites and elsewhere may soon permit routine measurements of UT1 variation with significantly less dependence on the deep-space tracking antennas than is currently required. GPS and VLBI data from the DSN may be combined to generate a precise UT1 series, while simultaneously reducing the time and effort the DSN must spend on platform-parameter calibrations. This combination is not straightforward, however, and a strategy for the optimal combination of these data is presented and evaluated. It appears that, with the aid of GPS, the frequency of required VLBI measurements of Earth orientation could drop from twice weekly to once per month. More stringent real-time Earth orientation requirements possible in the future would demand significant improvements in both VLBI and GPS capabilities, however.

  20. GPS Activities at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk

    2002-11-19

    The Alignment Engineering Group of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) started to use RTK (real-time kinematic) GPS equipment in order to perform structure mapping and GIS-related tasks on the SLAC campus. In a first step a continuously observing GPS station (SLAC M40) was set up. This station serves as master control station for all differential GPS activities on site and its coordinates have been determined in the well-defined global geodetic datum ITRF2000 at a given reference epoch. Some trials have been performed to test the RTK method. The tests have proven RTK to be very fast and efficient.

  1. A Bridge Deflection Monitoring with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figurski, M.; Gałuszkiewicz, M.; Wrona, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces results of investigation carried on by The Applied Geomatics Section in Military University of Technology. Research includes possibilities of monitoring dynamic behavior of a bridge using high rate GPS data. Whole event was executed with collaboration of The Road and Bridge Management and The Warsaw Geodesy Company. Interdisciplinary approach with this project allows authors to get reliable information about investigating constructions and their respond for true traffic loading detected by GPS receivers. Way of compute data and used software (TRACK) are also shown in this paper.

  2. Dual RF Astrodynamic GPS Orbital Navigator Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanipe, David B.; Provence, Robert Steve; Straube, Timothy M.; Reed, Helen; Bishop, Robert; Lightsey, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Dual RF Astrodynamic GPS Orbital Navigator Satellite (DRAGONSat) will demonstrate autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) in low Earth orbit (LEO) and gather flight data with a global positioning system (GPS) receiver strictly designed for space applications. ARD is the capability of two independent spacecraft to rendezvous in orbit and dock without crew intervention. DRAGONSat consists of two picosatellites (one built by the University of Texas and one built by Texas A and M University) and the Space Shuttle Payload Launcher (SSPL); this project will ultimately demonstrate ARD in LEO.

  3. System and method for generating attitude determinations using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clark E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A GPS attitude receiver for determining the attitude of a moving vehicle in conjunction with a first, a second, a third, and a fourth antenna mounted to the moving vehicle. Each of the antennas receives a plurality of GPS signals that each include a carrier component. For each of the carrier components of the received GPS signals there is an integer ambiguity associated with the first and fourth antennas, an integer ambiguity associated with second and fourth antennas, and an integer ambiguity associated with the third and fourth antennas. The GPS attitude receiver measures phase values for the carrier components of the GPS signals received from each of the antennas at a plurality of measurement epochs during an initialization period and at a measurement epoch after the initialization period. In response to the phase values measured at the measurement epochs during the initialization period, the GPS attitude receiver computes integer ambiguity resolution values representing resolution of the integer ambiguities. Then, in response to the computed integer ambiguity resolution values and the phase value measured at the measurement epoch after the initialization period, it computes values defining the attitude of the moving vehicle at the measurement epoch after the initialization period.

  4. GPS system simulation methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are presented: background; Global Positioning System (GPS) methodology overview; the graphical user interface (GUI); current models; application to space nuclear power/propulsion; and interfacing requirements. The discussion is presented in vugraph form.

  5. GPS IIF yaw attitude control during eclipse season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilssner, F.; Springer, T.; Enderle, W.

    2011-12-01

    On May 27, 2010, the first satellite of the Block II "follow-on" (Block IIF) series, the fourth generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft, has been successfully placed into orbit. GPS IIF-1, also referred to as space vehicle number (SVN) 62, has been injected into orbital plane B, slot position 2 of the GPS constellation. After completing three months of comprehensive in-orbit testing, the satellite entered service for the US Air Force (USAF) on August 26, 2010. A little over a year after the inaugural launch of GPS IIF-1, the USAF has now launched the second spacecraft of the IIF series (SVN-63). The IIF series includes a total of 12 satellites: SVN-62 through SVN-73. Despite having many technical advances over their predecessors such as enhanced rubidium frequency standards, more precise and powerful signals and an extended design life, the three-axis stabilized Block IIF satellites follow a completely different yaw attitude scheme, when passing through the Earth's shadow, to the Block IIA and IIR spacecraft. We will describe how high-rate carrier phase and pseudo-range measurements from a global GPS tracking network can be exploited to precisely monitor the yaw attitude behavior of SVN-62 and SVN-63 during their solar eclipse phases. The insights gained from this study have led to the development of a new GPS Block IIF yaw attitude model. We will show that the yaw rate of a Block IIF space vehicle is kept constant to the value needed to get the satellite back to near its nominal attitude when leaving the Earth's shadow and that a IIF satellite being in deep eclipse therefore needs to yaw significantly faster than an eclipsing IIF space vehicle passing only partly through the Earth's shadow. How the satellites' attitude control system (ACS) exactly computes this dynamical yaw rate parameter will be discussed here as well. Moreover, we will report on yaw attitude anomalies occurring when the GPS Block IIF satellites are shaded from the Sun by the

  6. Estimating Effects of Multipath Propagation on GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Sung; Hajj, George; Young, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    Multipath Simulator Taking into Account Reflection and Diffraction (MUSTARD) is a computer program that simulates effects of multipath propagation on received Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. MUSTARD is a very efficient means of estimating multipath-induced position and phase errors as functions of time, given the positions and orientations of GPS satellites, the GPS receiver, and any structures near the receiver as functions of time. MUSTARD traces each signal from a GPS satellite to the receiver, accounting for all possible paths the signal can take, including all paths that include reflection and/or diffraction from surfaces of structures near the receiver and on the satellite. Reflection and diffraction are modeled by use of the geometrical theory of diffraction. The multipath signals are added to the direct signal after accounting for the gain of the receiving antenna. Then, in a simulation of a delay-lock tracking loop in the receiver, the multipath-induced range and phase errors as measured by the receiver are estimated. All of these computations are performed for both right circular polarization and left circular polarization of both the L1 (1.57542-GHz) and L2 (1.2276-GHz) GPS signals.

  7. US Coast Guard differential GPS network

    SciTech Connect

    Alsip, D.H.; Butler, J.M.; Radice, J.T.

    1993-03-01

    In order to aid navigation and to prevent disasters such as oil spills, collisions, and wrecks of vessels and aircraft, the US Coast Guard is charged with establishing, maintaining, and operating electronic aids to navigation. In a technological advance developed and operated by the Department of Defense, the global positioning system (GPS) provides all-weather global coverage, 24 hours/day at unprecedented accuracies. GPS provides standard positioning service (SPS) and precise positioning service (PPS). By applying differential techniques to GPS, navigational accuracies of better than 10 meters can be achieved. For the first time, an all-weather system is possible to meet all the marine navigator's needs including harbor and harbor approach navigation. This should revolutionize navigation safety and efficiency, surveying operations, search and rescue operations, and underwater mine disposal efficiency and safety.

  8. Fluidized-bed technology enabling the integration of high temperature solar receiver CSP systems with steam and advanced power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Sakadjian, B.; Hu, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Flynn, T.; Santelmann, K.; Ma, Z.

    2015-06-05

    Solar Particle Receivers (SPR) are under development to drive concentrating solar plants (CSP) towards higher operating temperatures to support higher efficiency power conversion cycles. The novel high temperature SPR-based CSP system uses solid particles as the heat transfer medium (HTM) in place of the more conventional fluids such as molten salt or steam used in current state-of-the-art CSP plants. The solar particle receiver (SPR) is designed to heat the HTM to temperatures of 800 °C or higher which is well above the operating temperatures of nitrate-based molten salt thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The solid particles also help overcome some of the other challenges associated with molten salt-based systems such as freezing, instability and degradation. The higher operating temperatures and use of low cost HTM and higher efficiency power cycles are geared towards reducing costs associated with CSP systems. This paper describes the SPR-based CSP system with a focus on the fluidized-bed (FB) heat exchanger and its integration with various power cycles. Furthermore, the SPR technology provides a potential pathway to achieving the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) target of $0.06/kWh that has been set by the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot initiative.

  9. Fluidized-bed technology enabling the integration of high temperature solar receiver CSP systems with steam and advanced power cycles

    DOE PAGES

    Sakadjian, B.; Hu, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Flynn, T.; Santelmann, K.; Ma, Z.

    2015-06-05

    Solar Particle Receivers (SPR) are under development to drive concentrating solar plants (CSP) towards higher operating temperatures to support higher efficiency power conversion cycles. The novel high temperature SPR-based CSP system uses solid particles as the heat transfer medium (HTM) in place of the more conventional fluids such as molten salt or steam used in current state-of-the-art CSP plants. The solar particle receiver (SPR) is designed to heat the HTM to temperatures of 800 °C or higher which is well above the operating temperatures of nitrate-based molten salt thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The solid particles also help overcome somemore » of the other challenges associated with molten salt-based systems such as freezing, instability and degradation. The higher operating temperatures and use of low cost HTM and higher efficiency power cycles are geared towards reducing costs associated with CSP systems. This paper describes the SPR-based CSP system with a focus on the fluidized-bed (FB) heat exchanger and its integration with various power cycles. Furthermore, the SPR technology provides a potential pathway to achieving the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) target of $0.06/kWh that has been set by the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot initiative.« less

  10. Understanding why GPs see pharmaceutical representatives: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Helen; Walley, Tom

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Doctors are aware of the commercial bias in pharmaceutical representative information; nevertheless, such information is known to change doctors' prescribing, and augment irrational prescribing and prescribing costs. AIM: To explore GPs, reasons for receiving visits from pharmaceutical representatives. DESIGN OF STUDY: Qualitative study with semi-structured interviews. SETTING: One hundred and seven general practitioners (GPs) in practices from two health authorities in the North West of England. RESULTS: The main outcome measures of the study were: reasons for receiving/not receiving representative visits; advantages/disadvantages in receiving visits; and quality of representative-supplied information. Most GPs routinely see pharmaceutical representatives, because they bring new drug information speedily; they are convenient and accessible; and can be consulted with a saving of time and effort. Many GPs asserted they had the skills to critically appraise the evidence. Furthermore, the credibility and social characteristics of the representative were instrumental in shaping GPs' perceptions of representatives as legitimate information providers. GPs also received visits from representatives for reasons other than information acquisition. These reasons are congruent with personal selling techniques used in marketing communications. CONCLUSIONS: The study draws attention to the social and cultural contexts of GP-representative encounters and the way in which the acquisition of pharmacological information within the mercantile context of representative visits is legitimated. This highlights the need for doctors to critically appraise information supplied by representatives in relation to other information sources. PMID:12879831

  11. Towards Better Understanding of GPS-based Ionospheric TEC Perturbations Caused by Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komjathy, A.; Galvan, D. A.; Butala, M. D.; Stephens, P.; Mannucci, A. J.; Hickey, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    Natural hazards including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis, have been significant threats to humans throughout recorded history. The Global Positioning System satellites have become primary sensors to measure signatures associated with such natural hazards. These signatures typically include GPS-derived seismic deformation measurements, co-seismic vertical displacements, and real-time GPS-derived ocean buoy positioning estimates. Another way to use GPS observables is to compute the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) to measure and monitor post-seismic ionospheric disturbances caused by earthquakes, volcano eruptions, and tsunamis. Recent advances in GPS data processing have demonstrated that ground-based GPS receivers are capable of detecting ionospheric TEC perturbations generated by surface Rayleigh, acoustic and gravity waves. There have been a number of papers published discussing TEC perturbations immediately following the Tohoku earthquake in Japan on March 11, 2011. Due to the dense GPS network in Japan (GEONET) and high earthquake magnitude, these reports are the clearest observations to date of the effect of a major earthquake and tsunami on the ionosphere near the epicenter. Most investigators have focused on the ionospheric response up to a few hours following the earthquake and tsunami. In our research we investigate the ionospheric TEC perturbations up to a few days before and after the event. We also address the impact of geomagnetic activity during March 11. We compare TEC perturbations on that day with other days showing similar geomagnetic activities. Initial results have revealed that the earthquake and tsunami generated TEC perturbations that were observable and detectable in the GEONET data for up to 24 hours following the Tohoku event. We will investigate optimized GPS processing techniques to derive high-precision TEC perturbations. The primary application involving the ionosphere will be the real-time monitoring of the

  12. Analysis of L5 phase variations in GPS IIF satellites by the raw observation PPP approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Becker, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    GPS modernization along with Glonass modernization and the emerging Galileo and Compass system has been highly anticipated by every GNSS user since several years. The third civilian L5 signal transmitted by the modernized GPS satellites brings us to the GNSS multi-frequency era. The first GPS IIF satellite was launched in May 2010, until now there are eight block IIF satellites in service and the remaining four IIF satellites are planned to be launched by 2016. The introduction of the third frequency to GPS and the usage of advanced atomic clocks not only provide the users more possibilities but also enable higher positioning accuracy. Nevertheless phase variations are found on the new L5 observation of GPS SVN62. Further investigations suggest that the variations of this satellite are strongly dependent on the satellite inner temperature variation caused by sun illumination. Besides achieving precise positioning accuracy, PPP is also frequently used as a tool to analyze and evaluate various GNSS errors, for instance, tropospheric delays and receiver clock errors. Other than with differential GNSS, it is possible to separate different errors and to identify the error sources with PPP. Conventional PPP is based on the ionosphere-free linear combination, in order to eliminate the first-order ionospheric delays. However only dual frequencies can be used to build ionosphere-free linear combination, which leads to the waste of the information on the third frequency. Furthermore, the frequency dependent errors can not be separated and traced. A new PPP approach that avoids using any linear combination is proposed recently, which is called the raw observation PPP. One advantage of the raw observation PPP approach is that data of all frequencies and all GNSS systems can be jointly used. In addition, the frequency dependent errors are possible to be separated, identified and analyzed. In this paper the raw observation PPP is utilized to analyze the phase variations on L5

  13. Results from the GPS Flight Experiment on the High Earth Orbit AMSAT OSCAR-40 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor); Moreau, Michael C.; Davis, Edward P.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Kelbel, David; Davis, George W.; Axelrad, Penina

    2002-01-01

    A GPS receiver flying on the High Earth Orbit (HEO) AMSAT-OSCAR 40 (AO-40) spacecraft has been returning GPS observations from high above the altitude of the GPS constellation. AO-40, an amateur radio satellite launched November 16, 2000, is currently in a low inclination, 1000 by 59000 lan altitude orbit. This low-cost experiment utilizes a mid 1990's era, 6-channel, CIA code receiver configured with high gain receiving antennas for tracking above the GPS constellation. The receiver has performed well, despite operating significantly outside of its original design environment. It has regularly returned GPS observations from points all around the orbit, with over ten weeks of GPS tracking data collected to date. Signal to noise levels as high as 48 B-Hz have been recorded near apogee, when the spacecraft was at an altitude of close to 60000 km. GPS side lobe signals have been tracked on several occasions, primarily from Block IIR GPS satellites. Although the receiver has not computed a solution in real-time, point solutions have been computed on the ground using simultaneous measurements from four satellites. This experiment has provided important experience dealing with the many challenges inherent to GPS tracking at high altitudes, and the measurements returned are providing valuable information about the characteristics of GPS signals available for future HE0 users.

  14. Approaches for delineating landslide hazard areas using receiver operating characteristic in an advanced calibrating precision soil erosion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazvinei, P. T.; Zandi, J.; Ariffin, J.; Hashim, R. B.; Motamedi, S.; Aghamohammadi, N.; Moghaddam, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Soil erosion is undesirable natural event that causes land degradation and desertification. Identify the erosion-prone areas is a major component of preventive measures. Recent landslide damages at different regions lead us to develop a model of the erosion susceptibility map using empirical method (RUSLE). A landslide-location map was established by interpreting satellite image. Field observation data was used to validate the intensity of soil erosion. Further, a correlation analysis was conducted to investigate the "Receiver Operating Characteristic" and frequency ratio. Results showed a satisfactory correlation between the prepared RUSLE-based soil erosion map and actual landslide distribution. The proposed model can effectively predict the landslide events in soil-erosion area. Such a reliable predictive model is an effective management facility for the regional landslide forecasting system.

  15. Results of a phase I dose escalation study of eltrombopag in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma receiving doxorubicin and ifosfamide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this Phase I dose escalation study was to explore the safety and tolerability of eltrombopag, an oral, nonpeptide, thrombopoietin receptor agonist, in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and thrombocytopenia due to treatment with doxorubicin and ifosfamide (AI) combination chemotherapy. Methods Patients aged 18 or older with histologically confirmed, locally advanced or metastatic STS were treated with 1 cycle of AI followed by AI with eltrombopag starting at Cycle 2, using 2 different dosing schedules. The study design included an eltrombopag dose escalation phase starting at 75 mg daily to determine the optimal biological dose (OBD). Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and 15 received at least 1 dose of chemotherapy; 3 patients withdrew prior to receiving eltrombopag. Seven, 4, and 1 patients received 75 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg eltrombopag daily, respectively. No dose-limiting toxicities were reported. Due to slow recruitment, the study was closed prior to identifying an OBD. The most common hematologic adverse events (AEs) were thrombocytopenia (80%), neutropenia (73%), and anemia (67%). The most common nonhematologic AEs were fatigue (53%), alanine aminotransferase increased, constipation, and nausea (47% each). Eleven of 12 patients who received eltrombopag completed at least 2 chemotherapy cycles; all had increased platelet counts on Day 1 of Cycle 2 (cycle with eltrombopag) compared to Day 1 of Cycle 1 (cycle without eltrombopag). Conclusions Although data are limited, safety data were consistent with the known toxicities of AI combination chemotherapy or the side effect profile of eltrombopag seen in other studies. Available data suggest a potential pre- and post-chemotherapy dosing scheme for eltrombopag when administered with AI chemotherapy, and support further investigation of eltrombopag treatment in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:23497336

  16. GPS Ocean Reflection Experiment on Spartan 251

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L; Russo, Angela; Mickler, Dave; Armatys, Michael; Ferebee, Melvin J.

    1999-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that the GPS signal which has reflected from the ocean surface contains useful geophysical data from which the sea surface wind speed and other parameters can be extracted. This can be used for remote sensing, similar to present day use of radar altimeters or scatterometers, but with significantly smaller instrumentation because of the utilization of the existing GPS broadcast signal for illumination. Several campaigns of aircraft experimentation have been completed demonstrating this technique and reflected GPS data has been reliably collected from 25 km altitude on a balloon. However, there has not yet been a demonstration that the reflected GPS signal can be detected from orbit with sufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to make useful remote sensing measurements. A technology demonstration experiment was planned for a Space Shuttle flight in the late 2000 using the Spartan 251 recoverable carrier. This experiment would also have been the first flight validation of the PiVoT GPS receiver developed in house at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The "open-architecture" design of this receiver would allow the software modifications to be made which control code-correlator spacing to map out the shape of the reflected signal waveform, which is the most basic data product generated by this instrumentation. A moderate gain left-hand circularly polarized antenna, constructed from an array of off-the-shelf hemispherical antennas was to be used to give approximately 3 to 6 dB of additional gain. Preliminary SNR predictions have been done indicating that this antenna would offer sufficient gain to record waveform measurements. A system level description of the experiment instrumentation, including the receiver, antenna and data storage and retrieval will be given. The visibility of GPS reflections over the mission duration of several hours will be studied, including the effects of the limited beamwidth of the antenna. Spartan 251 has now

  17. Effect of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) on the Precision of GPS Relative Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, A. N.; Sathyamoorthy, D.; Suldi, A. M.; Hamid, J. R. A.

    2014-02-01

    The successful of GPS observations are dependent on several factors between satellite vehicles and GPS receivers, where low GPS power levels have led to the threat of radio frequency interference (RFI) on the GPS signals. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of RFI on the precision of positions of single and dual frequency receivers through relative positioning technique by taking into consideration the radius of GPS receiver from interference source, length of baseline and response of rejection. Several tests were conducted in real environment by simulating the interference signal towards GPS receivers in the nominated GPS L1 and L2 bands. Calculations were made to indentify the distance and interference signal power between interference source and GPS receiver in order to investigate the level of effect. To be able to study this effect on the precision of GPS positions, the 3D residual positions and geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) have been used. The findings of this study have demonstrated that a sufficient time for the GPS receiver to respond in particular interference signal power level and the radius from the interference source were made as compared to previous work. It was also indicated that the residual positions and GDOPs were affected proportionally when nearly to interference source but not similar for both days due to GPS coverage and other probable errors. Therefore, a good investigation on RFI towards GPS signals should be conducted in secured environment which can control the various GPS error parameters in order to obtain a reliable result on this effect.

  18. How and Why to Do VLBI on GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to establish the position of the center of mass of the Earth in the International Celestial Reference Frame, observations of the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) constellation using the IVS network are important. With a good frame-tie between the coordinates of the IVS telescopes and nearby GPS receivers, plus a common local oscillator reference signal, it should be possible to observe and record simultaneously signals from the astrometric calibration sources and the GPS satellites. The standard IVS solution would give the atmospheric delay and clock offsets to use in analysis of the GPS data. Correlation of the GPS signals would then give accurate orbital parameters of the satellites in the ICRF reference frame, i.e., relative to the positions of the astrometric sources. This is particularly needed to determine motion of the center of mass of the earth along the rotation axis.

  19. Processing GPS Occultation Data To Characterize Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George; Kursinski, Emil; Leroy, Stephen; Lijima, Byron; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Romans, Larry; Ao, Chi

    2005-01-01

    GOAS [Global Positioning System (GPS) Occultation Analysis System] is a computer program that accepts signal-occultation data from GPS receivers aboard low-Earth-orbiting satellites and processes the data to characterize the terrestrial atmosphere and, in somewhat less comprehensive fashion, the ionosphere. GOAS is very robust and can be run in an unattended semi-operational processing mode. It features sophisticated retrieval algorithms that utilize the amplitudes and phases of the GPS signals. It incorporates a module that, using an assumed atmospheric refractivity profile, simulates the effects of the retrieval processing system, including the GPS receiver. GOAS utilizes the GIPSY software for precise determination of orbits as needed for calibration. The GOAS output for the Earth s troposphere and mid-to-lower stratosphere consists of high-resolution (<1 km) profiles of density, temperature, pressure, atmospheric refractivity, bending angles of signals, and water-vapor content versus altitude from the Earth s surface to an altitude of 30 km. The GOAS output for the ionosphere consists of electron-density profiles from an altitude of about 50 km to the altitude of a satellite, plus parameters related to the rapidly varying structure of the electron density, particularly in the E layer of the ionosphere.

  20. The MARCOR GPS mobile data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothblatt, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Market research revealed several key demands for an Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio. The demands were for minimization of urban building blockage, easy programmability to minimize mobile data transmission costs, high accuracy for street map level coordination, interface capability with non-digital Specialized Mobile Radios (SMR), and a selling price close to that of alternatives such as Signposts and Loran-C. A team of experts was assembled to surmount these challenges and deliver a GPS radio for $500 to $1000, which operates at high accuracy in an urban environment and is plug-compatible with nearly all vehicle radios. Among the engineering and production breakthroughs described here are a unique Simultrac (Trademark) approach to satellite tracking, enabling up to eight GPS satellites to be used for position determination with a 2-channel receiver, and a receiver-in-a-microphone design. A powerful Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) allowed GPS to be brought within easy reach of millions of AVL users such as bus, taxi, and delivery vehicle fleets.

  1. Iranian Permanent GPS Network for Geodynamics (IPGN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, F.; Nankali, H. R.; Sedighi, M.; Djamour, Y.; Mosavi, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Iran is one of the most tectonically active zone in Alpine-Himalayan seismic belt where has been shaken by largely destroying historical and instrumental earthquakes. Iran is located in the convergence zone between Arabia and Eurasia with a velocity of 22 mm/yr nearly to the North. The shortening between Arabian and Eurasian plates in Iran is mainly distributed on Zagros and Alborz belts. Despite the historical and scientific awareness of seismic hazard in Iran, unfortunately this country lacked a Continuous GPS network to study geodynamic and tectonic movements. Such geodetic measurement can play an important role to understand the tectonic deformation then to evaluate the seismic hazard on Iran. Since early 2005 National Cartographic Center of Iran (NCC) is establishing a continuous GPS network named Iranian Permanent GPS Network for Geodynamics (IPGN). Taking into account the number of provided GPS receivers, (108) we made a priority based on two factors of seismicity and population. At the first, in order to study general tectonic behavior in Iran 41 stations, globally distributed in whole of Iran, were been considered. Three other areas in the priority list were: Centeral Alborz, North-West of Iran and North-East of Iran. The rest of receivers, i.e. ~60, were considered for these areas as local networks. These four networks are daily processed and give us a continuous monitoring of any surface deformation. In this paper we try to present the results obtained from the network

  2. The March 1985 demonstration of the fiducial network concept for GPS geodesy: A preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Dixon, T. H.; Vegos, C. J.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    The first field tests in preparation for the NASA Global Positioning System (GPS) Caribbean Initiative were conducted in late March and Early April of 1985. The GPS receivers were located at the POLARIS Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) stations at Westford, Massachusetts; Richmond, Florida; and Ft. Davis, Texas; and at the Mojave, Owens Valley, and Hat Creek VLBI stations in California. Other mobile receivers were placed near Mammoth Lakes, California; Pt. Mugu, California; Austin, Texas; and Dahlgren, Virginia. These sites were equipped with a combination of GPS receiver types, including SERIES-X, TI-4100 and AFGL dual frequency receivers. The principal objectives of these tests were the demonstration of the fiducial network concept for precise GPS geodesy, the performance assessment of the participating GPS receiver types, and to conduct the first in a series of experiments to monitor ground deformation in the Mammoth Lakes-Long Valley caldera region in California. Other objectives included the testing of the water vapor radiometers for the calibration of GPS data, the development of efficient procedures for planning and coordinating GPS field exercise, the establishment of institutional interfaces for future cooperating ventures, the testing of the GPS Data Analysis Software (GIPSY, for GPS Inferred Positioning SYstem), and the establishment of a set of calibration baselines in California. Preliminary reports of the success of the field tests, including receiver performance and data quality, and on the status of the data analysis software are given.

  3. Prognostic impact and the relevance of PTEN copy number alterations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) receiving bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Price, Timothy J; Hardingham, Jennifer E; Lee, Chee K; Townsend, Amanda R; Wrin, Joseph W; Wilson, Kate; Weickhardt, Andrew; Simes, Robert J; Murone, Carmel; Tebbutt, Niall C

    2013-06-01

    Loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression may be prognostic in colorectal cancer (CRC) and may have a correlation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression via hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) alpha, and the PI3K/mTOR pathways. We therefore have explored the prognostic association of PTEN loss and the potential that PTEN loss may be predictive of outcome with bevacizumab. Patients enrolled in the AGITG MAX trial, a randomized Phase III trial of capecitabine (C) +/- bevacizumab (B) (+/- mitomycin C [M]) with available tissues were analyzed for PTEN expression (loss vs. no loss) as assessed using a Taqman® copy number assay (CNA). Of the original 471 patients enrolled, tissues from 302 (64.1%) patients were analyzed. PTEN loss was observed in 38.7% of patients. There was no relationship between PTEN loss and KRAS or BRAF mutation. PTEN status was not prognostic for progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in multivariate analyses adjusting for other baseline factors; loss versus no loss PFS hazard ratio (HR) 0.9 (0.7-1.16), OS HR 1.04 (0.79-1.38). PTEN was not prognostic when assessed by KRAS and BRAF status. By using the comparison of C versus CB+CBM, PTEN status was not significantly predictive of the effectiveness of B for PFS or OS. PTEN status was not prognostic for survival in advanced colorectal cancer, irrespective of KRAS or BRAF status. PTEN status did not significantly predict different benefit with bevacizumb therapy.

  4. Impact of biliary stent-related events in patients diagnosed with advanced pancreatobiliary tumours receiving palliative chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lamarca, Angela; Rigby, Christina; McNamara, Mairéad G; Hubner, Richard A; Valle, Juan W

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact (morbidity/mortality) of biliary stent-related events (SRE) (cholangitis or stent obstruction) in chemotherapy-treated pancreatico-biliary patients. METHODS: All consecutive patients with advanced pancreatobiliary cancer and a biliary stent in-situ prior to starting palliative chemotherapy were identified retrospectively from local electronic case-note records (Jan 13 to Jan 15). The primary end-point was SRE rate and the time-to-SRE (defined as time from first stenting before chemotherapy to date of SRE). Progression-free survival and overall survival were measured from the time of starting chemotherapy. Kaplan-Meier, Cox and Fine-Gray regression (univariate and multivariable) analyses were employed, as appropriate. For the analysis of time-to-SRE, death was considered as a competing event. RESULTS: Ninety-six out of 693 screened patients were eligible; 89% had a metal stent (the remainder were plastic). The median time of follow-up was 9.6 mo (range 2.2 to 26.4). Forty-one patients (43%) developed a SRE during follow-up [cholangitis (39%), stent obstruction (29%), both (32%)]. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the SRE group and no-SRE groups. Recorded SRE-consequences were: none (37%), chemotherapy delay (24%), discontinuation (17%) and death (22%). The median time-to-SRE was 4.4 mo (95%CI: 3.6-5.5). Patients with severe comorbidities (P < 0.001) and patients with ≥ 2 baseline stents/biliary procedures [HR = 2.3 (95%CI: 1.2-4.44), P = 0.010] had a shorter time-to-SRE on multivariable analysis. Stage was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P = 0.029) in the multivariable analysis adjusted for primary tumour site, performance status and development of SRE (SRE group vs no-SRE group). CONCLUSION: SREs are common and impact on patient’s morbidity. Our results highlight the need for prospective studies exploring the role of prophylactic strategies to prevent/delay SREs. PMID

  5. Robust Real-Time Wide-Area Differential GPS Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P. (Inventor); Bertiger, William I. (Inventor); Lichten, Stephen M. (Inventor); Mannucci, Anthony J. (Inventor); Muellerschoen, Ronald J. (Inventor); Wu, Sien-Chong (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and a device for providing superior differential GPS positioning data. The system includes a group of GPS receiving ground stations covering a wide area of the Earth's surface. Unlike other differential GPS systems wherein the known position of each ground station is used to geometrically compute an ephemeris for each GPS satellite. the present system utilizes real-time computation of satellite orbits based on GPS data received from fixed ground stations through a Kalman-type filter/smoother whose output adjusts a real-time orbital model. ne orbital model produces and outputs orbital corrections allowing satellite ephemerides to be known with considerable greater accuracy than from die GPS system broadcasts. The modeled orbits are propagated ahead in time and differenced with actual pseudorange data to compute clock offsets at rapid intervals to compensate for SA clock dither. The orbital and dock calculations are based on dual frequency GPS data which allow computation of estimated signal delay at each ionospheric point. These delay data are used in real-time to construct and update an ionospheric shell map of total electron content which is output as part of the orbital correction data. thereby allowing single frequency users to estimate ionospheric delay with an accuracy approaching that of dual frequency users.

  6. Application of neural networks to South African GPS TEC modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habarulema, John Bosco; McKinnell, Lee-Anne; Cilliers, Pierre J.; Opperman, Ben D. L.

    2009-06-01

    The propagation of radio signals in the Earth's atmosphere is dominantly affected by the ionosphere due to its dispersive nature. Global Positioning System (GPS) data provides relevant information that leads to the derivation of total electron content (TEC) which can be considered as the ionosphere's measure of ionisation. This paper presents part of a feasibility study for the development of a Neural Network (NN) based model for the prediction of South African GPS derived TEC. The South African GPS receiver network is operated and maintained by the Chief Directorate Surveys and Mapping (CDSM) in Cape Town, South Africa. Vertical total electron content (VTEC) was calculated for four GPS receiver stations using the Adjusted Spherical Harmonic (ASHA) model. Factors that influence TEC were then identified and used to derive input parameters for the NN. The well established factors used are seasonal variation, diurnal variation, solar activity and magnetic activity. Comparison of diurnal predicted TEC values from both the NN model and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2001) with GPS TEC revealed that the IRI provides more accurate predictions than the NN model during the spring equinoxes. However, on average the NN model predicts GPS TEC more accurately than the IRI model over the GPS locations considered within South Africa.

  7. Strategies for sub-decimeter satellite tracking with GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Wu, Sien-Chong; Wu, Jiun-Tsong

    1986-01-01

    Decimeter tracking of low earth orbiters can be achieved with a variety of differential GPS techniques. A precisely known global network of GPS ground receivers and a receiver aboard the user satellite are needed, and all techniques must simultaneously estimate the user and GPS satellite orbits. Three basic strategies include a purely geometric, a fully dynamic, and a hybrid strategy, the last of which combines dynamic GPS solutions with a geometric user solution. Two powerful extensions of the hybrid strategy show the most promise. The first uses a quasi-optimal synthesis of dynamics and geometry in the user solution, while the second uses a novel gravity adjustment method to exploit data from repeat ground tracks in a computationally efficient way. The best of these techniques promise to deliver sub-decimeter accuracy down to the lowest possible orbits.

  8. Analysis of GPS Data Collected on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, K.; Plumb, J.; Zwally, J.; Abdalati, W.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For several years, GPS observations have been made year round at the Swiss Camp, Greenland. The GPS data are recorded for 12 hours every 10-15 days; data are stored in memory and downloaded during the annual field season. Traditional GPS analysis techniques, where the receiver is assumed not to move within a 24 hour period, is not appropriate at the Swiss Camp, where horizontal velocities are on the order of 30 cm/day. Comparison of analysis strategies for these GPS data indicate that a random walk parameterization, with a constraint of 1-2 x 10(exp -7) km/sqrt(sec) minimizes noise due to satellite outages without corrupting the estimated ice velocity. Low elevation angle observations should be included in the analysis in order to increase the number of satellites viewed at each data epoch. Carrier phase ambiguity resolution is important for improving the accuracy of receiver coordinates.

  9. An Interdisciplinary Approach at Studying the Earth-Sun System with GPS/GNSS and GPS-like Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Hajj, George; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Chao, Yi; Ao, Chi; Zumberge, James

    2005-01-01

    The value of Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) measurements to atmospheric science, space physics, and ocean science, is now emerging or showing a potential to play a major role in the evolving programs of NASA, NSF and NOAA. The objective of this communication is to identify and articulate the key scientific questions that are optimally, or perhaps uniquely, addressed by GPS or GPS-like observations, and discuss their relevance to existing or planned national Earth-science research programs. The GPS-based ocean reflection experiments performed to date have demonstrated the precision and spatial resolution suitable to altimetric applications that require higher spatial resolution and more frequent repeat than the current radar altimeter satellites. GPS radio occultation is promising as a climate monitoring tool because of its benchmark properties: its raw observable is based on extremely accurate timing measurements. GPS-derived temperature profiles can provide meaningful climate trend information over decadal time scales without the need for overlapping missions or mission-to-mission calibrations. By acquiring data as GPS satellites occult behind the Earth's limb, GPS also provides high vertical resolution information on the vertical structure of electron density with global coverage. New experimental techniques will create more comprehensive TEC maps by using signals reflected from the oceans and received in orbit. This communication will discuss a potential future GNSS Earth Observing System project which would deploy a constellation of satellites using GPS and GPS-like measurements, to obtain a) topography measurements based on GPS reflections with an accuracy and horizontal resolution suitable for eddy monitoring, and h) climate-records quality atmospheric temperature profiles. The constellation would also provide for measurements of ionospheric elec tron density. This is a good example of an interdisciplinary mission concept, with broad science objectives

  10. GPS-based certification for the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, C. L.; Young, L. E.; Wu, S. C.; Thomas, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    An MLS (microwave landing system) certification system based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) is described. To determine the position history of the flight inspection aircraft during runway approach, signals from the GPS satellites, together with on-board radar altimetry, are used. It is shown that the aircraft position relative to a fixed point on the runway at threshold can be determined to about 30 cm vertically and 1 m horizontally. A requirement of the system is that the GPS receivers be placed on each flight inspection aircraft and at selected ground sites. The effects of different error sources on the determination of aircraft instantaneous position and its dynamics are analyzed.

  11. Calibration and integrity verification techniques applied to GPS simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stulken, D. A.

    Automated calibration and signal verification techniques which are used in GPS simulators to ensure a high level of fidelity of the test stimulus employed in evaluating the performance of GPS receivers have been developed. The present techniques involve satellite signal power levels, jammer signal power levels, time of arrival of satellite signals, and the coordinated timing of simulated satellite signals with respect to the simulation of the host vehicle interface signals. From initial simulation and evaluation system design efforts, a new family of GPS RF signal generators were developed, the multiple channel signal generator and the single channel signal generator.

  12. Measuring Orientation Of The Earth With GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam P.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses feasibility of using Global Positioning System (GPS) to resolve short-term fluctuations (days or hours) in locations of points on crust of Earth to within centimeters or millimeters. With full constellation of satellites and ground receiving stations, system provides rapid (within 12 hours) determinations of variations in orientation. Measurements used to enhance precision of spacecraft navigation and in geophysical and meteorological studies of daily exchanges of angular momentum among fluid core, crust and mantle, oceans, and atmosphere.

  13. The GPS based precision orbit determination experiment on TOPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, William G.; Davis, Edgar S.; Yunck, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of the GPS-based precision orbit determination (POD) experiment on TOPEX are discussed. Problems facing this experiment include the careful design of all network receivers to control uncalibrated systematic group-delay biases and delay variations between channels, and the careful design of both the GPS-antenna-TOPEX satellite interface and the ground antennas to mimimize multipath. Questions of reference frames, geoid recovery, and the application of innovative orbit determination strategies must also be addressed.

  14. Autonomous Relative Navigation for Formation-Flying Satellites Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramling, Cheryl; Carpenter, J. Russell; Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center is currently developing advanced spacecraft systems to provide autonomous navigation and control of formation flyers. This paper discusses autonomous relative navigation performance for a formation of four eccentric, medium-altitude Earth-orbiting satellites using Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) and "GPS-like " intersatellite measurements. The performance of several candidate relative navigation approaches is evaluated. These analyses indicate that an autonomous relative navigation position accuracy of 1meter root-mean-square can be achieved by differencing high-accuracy filtered solutions if only measurements from common GPS space vehicles are used in the independently estimated solutions.

  15. Terrestrial Reference Frame from GPS and SLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jan; Bertiger, Willy; Desai, Shailen; Haines, Bruce; Sibois, Aurore

    2015-04-01

    We present strategies for realizing the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) using tracking data from terrestrial GPS receivers alone and in tandem with the GRACE and LAGEOS satellites. We generate solutions without apriori ties to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Our approach relies on processing multi-day orbit arcs to take advantage of the satellite dynamics, GPS receiver and transmitter calibrations derived from low-Earth orbiter (LEO) data, and estimation strategies tuned for realizing a stable and accurate TRF. We furthermore take advantage of the geometric diversity provided by GPS tracking from GRACE, and explore the impacts of including ground-based satellite laser range (SLR) measurements to LAGEOS-1 and -2 with local ties relating the two geodetic techniques. We process data from 2003-2014 and compute Helmert transformations relative to ITRF/IGb08. With GPS alone we achieve a 3D origin offset and rate of <7 mm and <1 mm/yr, and reduce the offset to <4 mm when GRACE is included in the global solutions. Scale bias and rate are 3.1 ppb and 0.01 ppb/yr in either solution. Including SLR tracking from 11 ground stations to the LAGEOS satellites from 2012-2014 yields a reduction in scale bias of 0.5-1.0 ppb depending on the weight assigned to the SLR measurements. However, scatter is increased due to the relatively sparse SLR tracking network. We conclude with approaches for improving the TRF realized from GPS and SLR combined at the measurement level.

  16. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, 08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  17. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  18. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 108 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1 SIN 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  19. Health Care Outcomes and Advance Care Planning in Older Adults Who Receive Home-Based Palliative Care: A Pilot Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; Cha, Stephen S.; Hanson, Gregory J.; Peterson, Stephanie M.; Rahman, Parvez A.; Naessens, James M.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Approximately 20% of seniors live with five or more chronic medical illnesses. Terminal stages of their lives are often characterized by repeated burdensome hospitalizations and advance care directives are insufficiently addressed. This study reports on the preliminary results of a Palliative Care Homebound Program (PCHP) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota to service these vulnerable populations. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate inpatient hospital utilization and the adequacy of advance care planning in patients who receive home-based palliative care. Methods: This is a retrospective pilot cohort study of patients enrolled in the PCHP between September 2012 and March 2013. Two control patients were matched to each intervention patient by propensity scoring methods that factor in risk and prognosis. Primary outcomes were six-month hospital utilization including ER visits. Secondary outcomes evaluated advance care directive completion and overall mortality. Results: Patients enrolled in the PCHP group (n=54) were matched to 108 controls with an average age of 87 years. Ninety-two percent of controls and 33% of PCHP patients were admitted to the hospital at least once. The average number of hospital admissions was 1.36 per patient for controls versus 0.35 in the PCHP (p<0.001). Total hospital days were reduced by 5.13 days. There was no difference between rates of ER visits. Advanced care directive were completed more often in the intervention group (98%) as compared to controls (31%), with p<0.001. Goals of care discussions were held at least once for all patients in the PCHP group, compared to 41% in the controls. PMID:25375663

  20. Elevated Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Intermediate-Term Outcomes in Patients Who Have Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease with Peripheral Artery Disease Receiving Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Chih; Yu, Chao-Chin; Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Chao, Ting-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), an inflammatory biomarker, has not been evaluated in patients who have advanced CKD with peripheral artery disease (PAD) undergoing percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), especially in Taiwan. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 148 advanced CKD (creatinine clearance rate ≤ 30 mL/min/1.73 m2) identified from a prospective registry in our hospital (303 PTA cases in total). Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank test was used to study event-free survival, and all univariables (p value < 0.1) were put into multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results During the mean follow-up time of 8.6 ± 7.8 months, 35.1% of the cases achieved primary composite endpoint (all-cause mortality or major amputation), 25.5% underwent death from any cause, and 14.9% underwent major or minor amputation. Rutherford grade 6, either NLR or NLR ≥ 3.76, and a history of hypertension had a positively prognostic impact on the occurrence of primary composite endpoint, whereas higher albumin level (≥ 3.0 mg/dL) and technical success had a significantly protective effect. History of hypertension, either NLR or NLR ≥ 3.76, and age were associated with all-cause mortality. In addition, Rutherford 6, higher albumin level (≥ 3.0 mg/dL), technical success, NLR, and age could predict the occurrence of major amputation. Conclusions NLR, but not C-reactive protein or platelet-lymphocyte ratio, is an important prognostic predictor of all major clinical outcomes in patients with advanced CKD and PAD receiving PTA. Further studies are warranted to establish a better strategy and healthcare program in this clinical setting. PMID:27713601

  1. Time and position accuracy using codeless GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. E.; Jefferson, D. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Thomas, J. B.; Vigue, Y.; Young, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System has allowed scientists and engineers to make measurements having accuracy far beyond the original 15 meter goal of the system. Using global networks of P-Code capable receivers and extensive post-processing, geodesists have achieved baseline precision of a few parts per billion, and clock offsets have been measured at the nanosecond level over intercontinental distances. A cloud hangs over this picture, however. The Department of Defense plans to encrypt the P-Code (called Anti-Spoofing, or AS) in the fall of 1993. After this event, geodetic and time measurements will have to be made using codeless GPS receivers. However, there appears to be a silver lining to the cloud. In response to the anticipated encryption of the P-Code, the geodetic and GPS receiver community has developed some remarkably effective means of coping with AS without classified information. We will discuss various codeless techniques currently available and the data noise resulting from each. We will review some geodetic results obtained using only codeless data, and discuss the implications for time measurements. Finally, we will present the status of GPS research at JPL in relation to codeless clock measurements.

  2. Application of GPS for transportation related engineering surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrell, Roger L.

    1986-09-01

    The Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation (SDHPT) has been using GPS for over two years to establish primary geodetic reference points for engineering projects and mapping control. In accordance with a Five Year GPS Implementation Plant developed in 1982, four GPS, unmanned, automatic Regional Reference Point (RRP) stations will be installed by September 1, 1986. Five additional stations are planned as justified. Each RRP will consist of a dual frequency GPS receiver that will ultimately track the satellites continuously. Operation of the receiver, telecommunications and other station keeping chores will be handled by a microcomputer. The RRP station network will be controlled through another centrally located microcomputer which is also interfaced with a larger mainframe system. Each RRP is designed to service an area bounded by a 200 KM radius and will act as the “other” receiver for roving field units operating in a GPS differential measurement mode. In order to meet the installation schedule, early decisions are being made concerning satellite tracking rates, operational scenarios, and telecommunications to facilitate development of the basic hardware and software systems. A period of continual enhancement to hardware, software and RRP operational procedures is expected as GPS technology expands.

  3. The Utility and Validity of Kinematic GPS Positioning for the Geosar Airborne Terrain Mapping Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam; Hensley, Scott; Chapin, Elaine; Kroger, Peter; Hussain, Mushtaq; Allred, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    GeoSAR is an airborne, interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) system for terrain mapping, currently under development by a consortium including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., a California mapping sciences company, and the California Department of Conservation (CaIDOC), with funding provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Topographic Engineering Center (TEC) and the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). IFSAR data processing requires high-accuracy platform position and attitude knowledge. On 9 GeoSAR, these are provided by one or two Honeywell Embedded GPS Inertial Navigation Units (EGI) and an Ashtech Z12 GPS receiver. The EGIs provide real-time high-accuracy attitude and moderate-accuracy position data, while the Ashtech data, post-processed differentially with data from a nearby ground station using Ashtech PNAV software, provide high-accuracy differential GPS positions. These data are optimally combined using a Kalman filter within the GeoSAR motion measurement software, and the resultant position and orientation information are used to process the dual frequency (X-band and P-band) radar data to generate high-accuracy, high -resolution terrain imagery and digital elevation models (DEMs). GeoSAR requirements specify sub-meter level planimetric and vertical accuracies for the resultant DEMS. To achieve this, platform positioning errors well below one meter are needed. The goal of GeoSAR is to obtain 25 cm or better 3-D positions from the GPS systems on board the aircraft. By imaging a set of known point target corner-cube reflectors, the GeoSAR system can be calibrated. This calibration process yields the true position of the aircraft with an uncertainty of 20- 50 cm. This process thus allows an independent assessment of the accuracy of our GPS-based positioning systems. We will present an overview of the GeoSAR motion measurement system, focusing on the use of GPS and the blending of position data from the

  4. Using GRACE as an Orbiting Fiducial Laboratory for GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, B. J.; Bar-Sever, Y. E.; Bertiger, W.; Byun, S.; Desai, S. D.; Hajj, G.

    2006-12-01

    Uncertainties in the phase-center variations (PCV) of the GPS transmitter antennas are among the limiting sources of error in GPS-based global geodesy. We have used data from the BlackJack GPS receivers onboard the twin GRACE satellites to develop new estimates of GPS satellite antenna PCV. The estimates are expressed as tracking observable (distance) corrections mapped in two dimensions (nadir angle and azimuth). We have developed maps for both ionosphere-free carrier phase (LC) and pseudorange (PC). The GRACE tandem mission offers a number of substantial advantages for developing GPS PCV maps. The scale (mean height) of our GRACE orbit solutions is well determined at the cm level from dynamical constraints, and there is no troposphere signal to confound interpretation of the measurements. The multipath environment is also very favorable. We discuss our strategy for determining the GPS satellite PCV estimates from these data, and describe evaluations of the estimates using independent GPS data from both the TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P; 1992--2005) and Jason-1 (2001 - ) missions. A heretofore unexplained 5--6 cm offset in the solved-for position of the T/P receiver antenna is reduced to less than 1 cm by applying the GRACE-based GPS PCV maps. The corresponding offset for Jason-1 is similarly decreased. Equally important, a spurious long-term (4-yr) drift in the daily estimated Jason-1 offsets is significantly reduced. These results hint at the potential benefits of these new GPS antenna PCV maps for wide-ranging geodetic applications wherein scale and long-term stability are important.

  5. Real-time Restitution of GPS Time Through a Kalman Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claudine

    1993-01-01

    The Global Positioning System is an outstanding tool for the dissemination of time. Equipped with C/A-code GPS time receivers, civil users may access the time scale GPS time, which is disseminated by the GPS satellites, and then the reference time scales UTC(USNO) and UTC. At a given instant, the restitution of GPS time through the satellite constellation presents a peak-to-peak discrepancy of several tens of nanoseconds without SA and several hundreds of nanoseconds with SA. The application of a Kalman filter to GPS timing data allows local access to GPS time through an estimation based on past data and updated at each new observation. The real-time restitution of GPS time, with implementation of SA, is then improved to the level obtained without SA. This paper gives details of the implementation of such a method together with a numerical test of its potential.

  6. Automatic data-quality monitoring for continuous GPS tracking stations in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T. K.; Wang, C. S.; Chao, B. F.; Chen, C. S.; Lee, C. W.

    2007-10-01

    Taiwan has more than 300 Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking stations maintained by the Ministry of the Interior (MOI), Academia Sinica, the Central Weather Bureau and the Central Geological Survey. In the future, GPS tracking stations may replace the GPS control points after being given a legal status. Hence, the data quality of the tracking stations is an increasingly significant factor. This study considers the feasibility of establishing a system for monitoring GPS receivers. This investigation employs many data-quality indices and examines the relationship of these indices and the positioning precision. The frequency stability of the GPS receiver is the most important index; the cycle slip is the second index and the multipath is the third index. An auto-analytical system for analysing GPS data quality and monitoring the MOI's tracking stations can quickly find and resolve problems, or changes in station environment, to maintain high data quality for the tracking stations.

  7. Civil helicopter flight operations using differential GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, F. G.; Loomis, P. V. W.

    1985-01-01

    The results of NASA flight trials of a dual-receiver differential global positioning system (DGPS) for civilian helicopter navigation applications, are presented. The three principal components of the DGPS system are described, including the GPS ground-reference system, a range tracking system, and an on-board sequential GPS receiver. The ground-based receiver in the DGPS operates at a known fixed location and receives C/A code signals from NAVSTAR satellites. System bias errors in the ground receiver are subtracted from the airborne solution for the navigational fix. Calculations of the differential bias error are carried out using an on-board PDP-11/34 M research computer. The ground-reference differential corrections for satellites are given in a table. It is shown that the differential correction signal of the DGPS contains only a small (0.1 rad/sec) high-frequency component which can be attributed to system error. A schematic diagram of the DGPS postflight data processing routine is provided.

  8. GPS application to mapping, charting and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senus, W. J.; Hill, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    GPSPAC, a receiver being developed for space applications by the Defense Mapping Agency and NASA, will use signals from GPS constellations to generate real-time values of host vehicle position and velocity. The GPSPAC has an L-band antenna and preamp capable of receiving the 1575 MHz and 1227 MHz spread spectrum signals; its stable oscillator at 5.115 MHz provides the basic frequency reference, resulting in a long term drift of less than one part in 10 to the -10th day. The GPSPAC performs many functions on board the spacecraft which were previously relegated to large-scale ground-based computer/receiver systems. A positional accuracy of better than 8 can be achieved for those periods when four or more NAVSTAR satellites are visible to the host satellite. The GPS geodetic receiver development, which will provide prototype receivers for utilization in terrestrial surveying operations, has the potential to significantly enhance the accuracy of point geodetic surveys over the current user hardware capability.

  9. Kinematic GPS Profiles to monitor surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charara, R.; Vigny, C.; Briole, P.

    2008-12-01

    GPS kinematic measurement consists in placing a GPS rover receiver that registers its position on a moving vehicule with a high frequency. The frequency of the data acquisition is chosen according to the number of points and the precision needed to characterize the rover trajectory. The position of the rover receiver can be determined with respect to another GPS reference station with a precision of a few centimeters. Consequently different kinematic profiles on trajectories can be realized in different contexts (volcano slopes, active faults,...). We first studied the correlation between different profiles on the same trajectory in the absense of any particular event. Then different individual profiles are interpolated and a single profiles is generated which we refer to as "tube". We also studied and analyzed the impact of different parameters such as the baseline length, the atmospheric errors and the number of individual profiles on the precision of the obtained tube. We present results of experimentations that were performed in Chili, Reunion Island and Greece and we show how the results can be influenced by the baselines lengths and topographies. In case of event (Earthquakes, volcanoes eruptions, landslides,...) this technique can be used to assess the amplitude of ground deformation. We estimate the thresholds (in term of amplitude and spatial extension) of detectable signals.

  10. Towards 10(exp 9) GPS geodesy: Vector baselines, Earth rotation and reference frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bob E.

    1994-01-01

    Effort during the period form January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993 were in the following areas: GPS orbit accuracy assessments and efforts to improve the accuracy; analysis and effects of GPS receiver antenna phase center variation; analysis of global GPS data being collected for the IGS campaign; and analysis of regional (south west Pacific) campaign data. A brief summary of each of the above activities is presented.

  11. Signal quality monitoring for GPS augmentation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelman, Alexander Michael

    waveforms. Transient responses of a multicorrelator GPS receiver to several distorted waveforms are also presented. The final section presents the first detailed characterization of healthy GPS satellite performance in the context of the ICAO model. Minor signal distortions on healthy satellites do not generally threaten operational safety, but must be taken into account when designing an SQM to meet stringent FAA performance requirements.

  12. GPS World, Innovation: Autonomous Navigation at High Earth Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William; Winternitz, Luke; Hay, Curtis

    2005-01-01

    Calculating a spacecraft's precise location at high orbital altitudes-22,000 miles (35,800 km) and beyond-is an important and challenging problem. New and exciting opportunities become possible if satellites are able to autonomously determine their own orbits. First, the repetitive task of periodically collecting range measurements from terrestrial antennas to high altitude spacecraft becomes less important-this lessens competition for control facilities and saves money by reducing operational costs. Also, autonomous navigation at high orbital altitudes introduces the possibility of autonomous station keeping. For example, if a geostationary satellite begins to drift outside of its designated slot it can make orbit adjustments without requiring commands from the ground. Finally, precise onboard orbit determination opens the door to satellites flying in formation-an emerging concept for many scientific space applications. The realization of these benefits is not a trivial task. While the navigation signals broadcast by GPS satellites are well suited for orbit and attitude determination at lower altitudes, acquiring and using these signals at geostationary (GEO) and highly elliptical orbits is much more difficult. The light blue trace describes the GPS orbit at approximately 12,550 miles (20,200 km) altitude. GPS satellites were designed to provide navigation signals to terrestrial users-consequently the antenna array points directly toward the earth. GEO and HE0 orbits, however, are well above the operational GPS constellation, making signal reception at these altitudes more challenging. The nominal beamwidth of a Block II/IIA GPS satellite antenna array is approximately 42.6 degrees. At GEO and HE0 altitudes, most of these primary beam transmissions are blocked by the Earth, leaving only a narrow region of nominal signal visibility near opposing limbs of the earth. This region is highlighted in gray. If GPS receivers at GEO and HE0 orbits were designed to use these

  13. Codeless GPS Applications to Multi-Path: CGAMP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Miller, R. B.; Jenkins, D.; Lemmon, J.; Gold, K.; Schreiner, W.; Snyder, G.

    1990-01-01

    Cordless Global Positioning System (GPS) Applications to Multi-Path (CGAMP) is meeting the challenge of exploiting the L-band signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites for the measurement of the impulse response of radio transmission channels over space-Earth paths. This approach was originally suggested by E. K. Smith and has been pursued by J. Lemmon, without an affordable implementation being identifiable. In addition to the high cost of a suitable P code correlating GPS receiver, there is also the major impediment of the often announced Department of Defense policy of selective availability/anti-spoof (SA/AS) that clouds reliable access to the wideband (20 MHz) P channel of the GPS signals without cryptographic access. A technique proposed by MacDoran utilizes codeless methods for exploiting the P channel signals implemented by the use of a pair of antennas and cross correlation signal detection.

  14. GPS-based satellite tracking system for precise positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Melbourne, W. G.; Thornton, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is developing a Global Positioning System (GPS) based measurement system to provide precise determination of earth satellite orbits, geodetic baselines, ionospheric electron content, and clock offsets between worldwide tracking sites. The system will employ variations on the differential GPS observing technique and will use a network of nine fixed ground terminals. Satellite applications will require either a GPS flight receiver or an on-board GPS beacon. Operation of the system for all but satellite tracking will begin by 1988. The first major satellite application will be a demonstration of decimeter accuracy in determining the altitude of TOPEX in the early 1990's. By then the system is expected to yield long-baseline accuracies of a few centimeters and instantaneous time synchronization to 1 ns.

  15. Indoor/Outdoor Seamless Positioning Using Lighting Tags and GPS Cellular Phones for Personal Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namie, Hiromune; Morishita, Hisashi

    The authors focused on the development of an indoor positioning system which is easy to use, portable and available for everyone. This system is capable of providing the correct position anywhere indoors, including onboard ships, and was invented in order to evaluate the availability of GPS indoors. Although the performance of GPS is superior outdoors, there has been considerable research regarding indoor GPS involving sensitive GPS, pseudolites (GPS pseudo satellite), RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) tags, and wireless LAN .However, the positioning rate and the precision are not high enough for general use, which is the reason why these technologies have not yet spread to personal navigation systems. In this regard, the authors attempted to implement an indoor positioning system using cellular phones with built-in GPS and infrared light data communication functionality, which are widely used in Japan. GPS is becoming increasingly popular, where GPGGS sentences of the NMEA outputted from the GPS receiver provide spatiotemporal information including latitude, longitude, altitude, and time or ECEF xyz coordinates. As GPS applications grow rapidly, spatiotemporal data becomes key to the ubiquitous outdoor and indoor seamless positioning services at least for the entire area of Japan, as well as to becoming familiar with satellite positioning systems (e.g. GPS). Furthermore, the authors are also working on the idea of using PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants), as cellular phones with built-in GPS and PDA functionality are also becoming increasingly popular.

  16. GPS compound eye attitude and navigation sensor and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, David A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a GPS system for navigation and attitude determination, comprising a sensor array including a convex hemispherical mounting structure having a plurality of mounting surfaces, and a plurality of antennas mounted to the mounting surfaces for receiving signals from space vehicles of a GPS constellation. The present invention also includes a receiver for collecting the signals and making navigation and attitude determinations. In an alternate embodiment the present invention may include two opposing convex hemispherical mounting structures, each of the mounting structures having a plurality of mounting surfaces, and a plurality of antennas mounted to the mounting surfaces.

  17. Using handheld GPS for data acquisition in blasting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Blasters in the field for years have been faced with the task of plotting blast locations for future reference and calculating scaled distances or seismograph placement from maps, aerial photo`s etc. With the constellation fully operational, GPS provides a satellite signal transmitted to a ground receiver which will display the desired coordinate positioning worldwide, 24 hours a day in any kind of weather conditions. There are a variety of GPS receivers available with varying levels of accuracy. The field trials of a handheld navigational quality instrument for plotting blast and seismograph locations along with other necessary industry related data is the basis of this paper.

  18. Snow Depth with GPS: Case Study from Minnesota 2010-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilich, A. L.; Slater, A. G.; Larson, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    Although originally designed to enable accurate positioning and time transfer, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has also proved useful for remote sensing applications. In this study, GPS signals are used to measure snow depth via GPS interferometric reflectometry (GPS-IR). In GPS-IR, a GPS antenna receives the desired direct signal as well as an indirect signal which reflects off of the ground or snow surface. These two signals interfere, and the composite signal recorded by the GPS receiver can be post-processed to yield the distance between the antenna and the reflecting surface, that is, distance to the snow surface. We present the results of a new snow depth product for the state of Minnesota over the winter of 2010-2011. Although single-station examples of GPS snow depth measurements can be found in the literature, this is one of the first studies to compute GPS snow depth over a large regional-scale network. We chose Minnesota because the state Department of Transportation runs a network of continuously operating reference stations (CORS) with many desired characteristics: freely available data, good GPS station distribution with good proximity to COOP weather stations, GPS stations located adjacent to farm fields with few sky obstructions, and receiver models known to have sufficient data quality for GPS-IR. GPS-IR with CORS has many advantages over traditional snow depth measurements. First, because we leverage existing CORS, no new equipment installations are required and data are freely available via the Internet. Second, GPS-IR with CORS measures a large area, approximately 100 m2 around the station and 20 m2 per satellite. We present snow depth results for over 30 GPS stations distributed across the state. We compare the GPS-IR snow depth product to COOP observations and SNODAS modeled estimates. GPS-IR snow depth is one of the few independent data sources available for assessment of SNODAS. Ideally snow depth via GPS-IR will be available for

  19. Sensing Human Activity: GPS Tracking

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Stefan; van Schaick, Jeroen; de Bois, Peter; de Haan, Remco

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement of GPS technology enables the use of GPS devices not only as navigation and orientation tools, but also as instruments used to capture travelled routes: as sensors that measure activity on a city scale or the regional scale. TU Delft developed a process and database architecture for collecting data on pedestrian movement in three European city centres, Norwich, Rouen and Koblenz, and in another experiment for collecting activity data of 13 families in Almere (The Netherlands) for one week. The question posed in this paper is: what is the value of GPS as ‘sensor technology’ measuring activities of people? The conclusion is that GPS offers a widely useable instrument to collect invaluable spatial-temporal data on different scales and in different settings adding new layers of knowledge to urban studies, but the use of GPS-technology and deployment of GPS-devices still offers significant challenges for future research. PMID:22574061

  20. Planned FDG PET-CT Scan in Follow-Up Detects Disease Progression in Patients With Locally Advanced NSCLC Receiving Curative Chemoradiotherapy Earlier Than Standard CT

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Schytte, Tine; Petersen, Henrik; Wu, Yi-long; Hansen, Olfred

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in surveillance of patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curatively intended chemoradiotherapy remains controversial. However, conventional chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) are of limited value in discriminating postradiotherapy changes from tumor relapse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of PET-CT scan in the follow-up for patients with locally advanced (LA) NSCLC receiving concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Between 2009 and 2013, eligible patients with stages IIB–IIIB NSCLC were enrolled in the clinical trial NARLAL and treated in Odense University Hospital (OUH). All patients had a PET-CT scan scheduled 9 months (PET-CT9) after the start of the radiation treatment in addition to standard follow-up (group A). Patients who presented with same clinical stage of NSCLC and received similar treatment, but outside protocol in OUH during this period were selected as control group (group B). Patients in group B were followed in a conventional way without PET-CT9. All patients were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by CCRT. Group A included 37 and group B 55 patients. The median follow-up was 16 months. Sixty-six (72%) patients were diagnosed with progression after treatment. At the time of tumor progression, patients in group A had better performance status (PS) than those in group B (P = 0.02). Because of death (2 patients), poor PS (3) or retreatment of relapse (9), only 23 patients had PET-CT9 in group A. Eleven (48%) patients were firstly diagnosed with progression by PET-CT9 without any clinical symptoms of progression. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8.8 months in group A and 12.5 months in group B (P = 0.04). Hazard function PFS showed that patients in group A had higher risk of relapse than in group B. Additional FDG PET-CT scan at 9 months in surveillance increases probability of early

  1. High plasma exposure to pemetrexed leads to severe hyponatremia in patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gota, Vikram; Kavathiya, Krunal; Doshi, Kartik; Gurjar, Murari; Damodaran, Solai E; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background Pemetrexed-platinum doublet therapy is a standard treatment for stage IIIb/IV nonsquamous non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While the regimen is associated with several grade ≥3 toxicities, hyponatremia is not a commonly reported adverse effect. Here we report an unusually high incidence of grade ≥3 hyponatremia in Indian patients receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet, and the pharmacological basis for this phenomenon. Methods Forty-six patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled for a bioequivalence study of two pemetrexed formulations. All patients received the pemetrexed-platinum doublet for six cycles followed by single-agent pemetrexed maintenance until progression. Pharmacokinetic blood samples were collected at predefined time points during the first cycle and the concentration-time profile of pemetrexed was investigated by noncompartmental analysis. Hyponatremic episodes were investigated with serum electrolytes, serum osmolality, urinary sodium, and urine osmolality. Results Sixteen of 46 patients (35%) had at least one episode of grade ≥3 hyponatremia. Twenty-four episodes of grade ≥3 hyponatremia were observed in 200 cycles of doublet chemotherapy. Plasma exposure to pemetrexed was significantly higher in patients with high-grade hyponatremia than in those with low-grade or no hyponatremia (P=0.063 and P=0.001, respectively). Pemetrexed clearance in high-grade hyponatremia was quite low compared with normal and low-grade hyponatremia (P=0.001 and P=0.055, respectively). Median pemetrexed exposure in this cohort was much higher than that reported in the literature from Western studies. Conclusion Higher exposure to pemetrexed is associated with grade ≥3 hyponatremia. The pharmacogenetic basis for higher exposure to pemetrexed in Indian patients needs further investigation. PMID:24940080

  2. A GPS-based Real-time Road Traffic Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanti, Kamal Kumar

    In recent years, monitoring systems are astonishingly inclined towards ever more automatic; reliably interconnected, distributed and autonomous operation. Specifically, the measurement, logging, data processing and interpretation activities may be carried out by separate units at different locations in near real-time. The recent evolution of mobile communication devices and communication technologies has fostered a growing interest in the GIS & GPS-based location-aware systems and services. This paper describes a real-time road traffic monitoring system based on integrated mobile field devices (GPS/GSM/IOs) working in tandem with advanced GIS-based application software providing on-the-fly authentications for real-time monitoring and security enhancement. The described system is developed as a fully automated, continuous, real-time monitoring system that employs GPS sensors and Ethernet and/or serial port communication techniques are used to transfer data between GPS receivers at target points and a central processing computer. The data can be processed locally or remotely based on the requirements of client’s satisfaction. Due to the modular architecture of the system, other sensor types may be supported with minimal effort. Data on the distributed network & measurements are transmitted via cellular SIM cards to a Control Unit, which provides for post-processing and network management. The Control Unit may be remotely accessed via an Internet connection. The new system will not only provide more consistent data about the road traffic conditions but also will provide methods for integrating with other Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). For communication between the mobile device and central monitoring service GSM technology is used. The resulting system is characterized by autonomy, reliability and a high degree of automation.

  3. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.; and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  4. Processing GPS Receiver Data for Improved Fermi GLAST Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Fermi GLAST s 5-year mission objectives: a) Explore the most extreme environments in the Universe. b) Search for signs of new laws of physics and what composes the mysterious Dark Matter. c) Explain how black holes accelerate immense jets of material to nearly light speed. d) Help crack the mysteries of gamma-ray bursts. e) Answer long-standing questions across a broad range of topics, including solar flares, pulsars and the origin of cosmic rays.

  5. A GPS coverage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skidmore, Trent A.

    1994-01-01

    The results of several case studies using the Global Positioning System coverage model developed at Ohio University are summarized. Presented are results pertaining to outage area, outage dynamics, and availability. Input parameters to the model include the satellite orbit data, service area of interest, geometry requirements, and horizon and antenna mask angles. It is shown for precision-landing Category 1 requirements that the planned GPS 21 Primary Satellite Constellation produces significant outage area and unavailability. It is also shown that a decrease in the user equivalent range error dramatically decreases outage area and improves the service availability.

  6. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  7. Evaluation of GPS Coverage for the X-33 Michael-6 Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundberg, John B.

    1998-01-01

    The onboard navigational system for the X-33 test flights will be based on the use of measurements collected from the Embedded Global Positioning System (GPS)/INS system. Some of the factors which will affect the quality of the GPS contribution to the navigational solution will be the number of pseudorange measurements collected at any instant in time, the distribution of the GPS satellites within the field of view, and the inherent noise level of the GPS receiver. The distribution of GPS satellites within the field of view of the receiver's antenna will depend on the receiver's position, the time of day, pointing direction of the antenna, and the effective cone angle of the antenna. The number of pseudorange measurements collected will depend upon these factors as well as the time required to lock onto a GPS satellite signal once the GPS satellite comes into the field of view of the antenna and the number of available receiver channels. The objective of this study is to evaluate the GPS coverage resulting from the proposed antenna pointing directions, the proposed antenna cone angles, and the effects due to the time of day for the X-33 Michael-6 trajectory from launch at Edwards AFB, California, to the start of the Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) phase on approach to Michael AAF, Utah.

  8. GPS Data Analysis for Earth Orientation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J.; Webb, F.; Lindqwister, U.; Lichten, S.; Jefferson, D.; Ibanez-Meier, R.; Heflin, M.; Freedman, A.; Blewitt, G.

    1994-01-01

    Beginning June 1992 and continuing indefinitely as part of our contribution to FLINN (Fiducial Laboratories for an International Natural Science Network), DOSE (NASA's Dynamics of the Solid Earth Program), and the IGS (International GPS Geodynamics Service), analysts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have routinely been reducing data from a globally-distributed network of Rogue Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers.

  9. Forward and Inverse Modeling of GPS Multipath for Snow Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nievinski, Felipe Geremia

    Snowpacks provide reservoirs of freshwater, storing solid precipitation and delaying runoff to be released later in the spring and summer when it is most needed. The goal of this dissertation is to develop the technique of GPS multipath reflectometry (GPS-MR) for ground-based measurement of snow depth. The phenomenon of multipath in GPS constitutes the reception of reflected signals in conjunction with the direct signal from a satellite. As these coherent direct and reflected signals go in and out of phase, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) exhibits peaks and troughs that can be related to land surface characteristics. In contrast to other GPS reflectometry modes, in GPS-MR the poorly separated composite signal is collected utilizing a single antenna and correlated against a single replica. SNR observations derived from the newer L2-frequency civilian GPS signal (L2C) are used, as recorded by commercial off-the-shelf receivers and geodetic-quality antennas in existing GPS sites. I developed a forward/inverse approach for modeling GPS multipath present in SNR observations. The model here is unique in that it capitalizes on known information about the antenna response and the physics of surface scattering to aid in retrieving the unknown snow conditions in the antenna surroundings. This physically-based forward model is utilized to simulate the surface and antenna coupling. The statistically-rigorous inverse model is considered in two parts. Part I (theory) explains how the snow characteristics are parameterized; the observation/parameter sensitivity; inversion errors; and parameter uncertainty, which serves to indicate the sensing footprint where the reflection originates. Part II (practice) applies the multipath model to SNR observations and validates the resulting GPS retrievals against independent in situ measurements during a 1-3 year period in three different environments---grasslands, alpine, and forested. The assessment yields a correlation of 0.98 and an RMS error

  10. GPS interferometric attitude and heading determination: Initial flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangraas, Frank; Braasch, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Attitude and heading determination using GPS interferometry is a well-understood concept. However, efforts have been concentrated mainly in the development of robust algorithms and applications for low dynamic, rigid platforms (e.g., shipboard). This paper presents results of what is believed by the authors to be the first realtime flight test of a GPS attitude and heading determination system. The system is installed in Ohio University's Douglas DC-3 research aircraft. Signals from four antennas are processed by an Ashtech 3DF 24-channel GPS receiver. Data from the receiver are sent to a microcomputer for storage and further computations. Attitude and heading data are sent to a second computer for display on a software generated artificial horizon. Demonstration of this technique proves its candidacy for augmentation of aircraft state estimation for flight control and navigation as well as for numerous other applications.

  11. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place In the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is managed by personnel from Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, either from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia, Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico or from Canada, Norway and Sweden. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requi6ng considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of a high accurate and useful system.

  12. Monitoring of D-layer using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubkov, Maxim; Bessarab, Fedor; Karpov, Ivan; Golubkov, Gennady; Manzheliy, Mikhail; Borchevkina, Olga; Kuverova, Veronika; Malyshev, Nikolay; Ozerov, Georgy

    2016-07-01

    entire emission layer on the propagation path affects the positioning errors during the passage of the satellite signal and forming the microwave and infrared radiation. Therefore, specific details of internal irregularities in layer structure caused by atmospheric processes do not play a significant role. Naturally, they are of interest to specific issues of radio physics and dynamics of the ionosphere, but do not have a noticeable effect on the received at the Earth GPS signals. This work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Researches (Grant No. 16-05-00052).

  13. Determining GPS average performance metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    Analytic and semi-analytic methods are used to show that users of the GPS constellation can expect performance variations based on their location. Specifically, performance is shown to be a function of both altitude and latitude. These results stem from the fact that the GPS constellation is itself non-uniform. For example, GPS satellites are over four times as likely to be directly over Tierra del Fuego than over Hawaii or Singapore. Inevitable performance variations due to user location occur for ground, sea, air and space GPS users. These performance variations can be studied in an average relative sense. A semi-analytic tool which symmetrically allocates GPS satellite latitude belt dwell times among longitude points is used to compute average performance metrics. These metrics include average number of GPS vehicles visible, relative average accuracies in the radial, intrack and crosstrack (or radial, north/south, east/west) directions, and relative average PDOP or GDOP. The tool can be quickly changed to incorporate various user antenna obscuration models and various GPS constellation designs. Among other applications, tool results can be used in studies to: predict locations and geometries of best/worst case performance, design GPS constellations, determine optimal user antenna location and understand performance trends among various users.

  14. Performance: GPs in the spotlight.

    PubMed

    Clews, Graham

    2009-08-13

    PCTs are having to review the level of service they are getting from GP practices. The balanced scorecard tool attempts to combine quality and efficiency indicators. GPs' concerns include publication of the scorecard data without agreement by the GPs. PMID:19810224

  15. Permanent GPS Station Sulp: Problems and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikosov, O.; Zablotskyj, F.; Savchuk, S.

    The permanent GPS station SULP is operating starting from September 2001. GPS observations are carrying out by means of the receiver Trimble 4700 and the antenna Zephyr mounted at the fundamental monument of the Astronomical Observatory of the National University "Lviv Polytechnic". Starting from October 2001, daily and hourly observation files are hosted by OLG Data Center. Analysis of these data is performing by WUT and GOP Analysis Centers. Station SULP was included into episodic GPS campaigns GEODUC (1995) and CEGRN (1994 - 1999, 2001). There- fore, besides the traditional task of providing the permanent high-precision GPS ob- servations for supporting the European networks EUREF and CEGRN, it is planned to use SULP station for the following problems. (1) Investigation of recent movements of the Earth's surface in Carpathian area, particularly in the frames of CERGOP project. (2) Studying of local peculiarities of the atmosphere and constructing of correspond- ing mathematical models. (3) Providing of coordinate data for geodetic activities in the Western Ukraine. GPS data analysis for the mentioned problems is performing by means of GAMIT software. The permanent stations, which surround the Carpathian mountain area, are included into the analysis together with 4 active Ukrainian perma- nent GPS stations. First results show the possibility of the geodetic monitoring based on the permanent station SULP.

  16. Single-Frequency GPS Relative Navigation in a High Ionosphere Orbital Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Patrick R.; Naasz, Bo J.

    2007-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a convenient source for space vehicle relative navigation measurements, especially for low Earth orbit formation flying and autonomous rendezvous mission concepts. For single-frequency GPS receivers, ionospheric path delay can be a significant error source if not properly mitigated. In particular, ionospheric effects are known to cause significant radial position error bias and add dramatically to relative state estimation error if the onboard navigation software does not force the use of measurements from common or shared GPS space vehicles. Results from GPS navigation simulations are presented for a pair of space vehicles flying in formation and using GPS pseudorange measurements to perform absolute and relative orbit determination. With careful measurement selection techniques relative state estimation accuracy to less than 20 cm with standard GPS pseudorange processing and less than 10 cm with single-differenced pseudorange processing is shown.

  17. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  18. Time aspects of the European Complement to GPS: Continental and transatlantic experimental phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhrich, Pierre J. M.; Juompan, B.; Tourde, R.; Brunet, M.; Dutrey, J.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The CNES project of a European Complement to GPS (CE-GPS) is conceived to fulfill the needs of Civil Aviation for a non-precise approach phase with GPS as sole navigation means. This generates two missions: a monitoring mission - alarm of failure - ,and a navigation mission - generating a GPS-like signal on board the geostationary satellites. The host satellites will be the Inmarsat constellation. The CE-GPS missions lead to some time requirements, mainly the accuracy of GPS time restitution and of monitoring clock synchronization. To demonstrate that the requirements of the CE-GPS could be achieved, including the time aspects, an experiment has been scheduled over the Last two years, using a part of the Inmarsat II F-2 payload and specially designed ground stations based on 10 channels GPS receivers. This paper presents a review of the results obtained during the continental phase of the CE-GPS experiment with two stations in France, along with some experimental results obtained during the transatlantic phase (three stations in France, French Guyana, and South Africa). It describes the synchronization of the monitoring clocks using the GPS Common-view or the C- to L-Band transponder of the Inmarsat satellite, with an estimated accuracy better than 10 ns (1 sigma).

  19. Characteristics of GPS Scintillation signals in the midst of "Patchy Pulsating" Aurora and Auroral Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushini, S. C.; Spanswick, E.; Donovan, E.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Langley, R. B.; Prikryl, P.; Jackel, B. J.; Skone, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aurora occurs in different well-known morphologies, or types, including the best-known arcs and patchy-pulsating aurora (PPA). Previous observational studies have demonstrated that the ionospheric effects of auroral precipitation affect the accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), including GPS, but how different types of aurora might affect GNSS differently has not been investigated to date. In an attempt to explore the relationship between auroral type and the resulting effects on GNSS, we have used data from a THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) All-Sky Imager (ASI) located at Sanikiluaq (~67º geomagnetic latitude), Canada. GPS data was also obtained from a Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) GPS receiver collocated with the THEMIS ASI. This GPS receiver is a custom-made GPS scintillation receiver capable of providing high-rate GPS signal power and phase and as well as scintillation data. A list of patchy pulsating aurora and auroral arc events were catalogued from the ASI data for the years 2008-2013. Corresponding scintillation data for these time periods were obtained from the GPS receiver. In order to determine the effects of PPA and arcs on GPS signals, the number of cycle slips observed during each were calculated. Results suggests PPA affects GPS in a more adverse manner than auroral arcs given its spatial extent. Even though the magnitude of phase scintillation index (σφ) observed in auroral arcs was much higher than in PPA, receiver was able to keep lock on to the signals much better during arcs compared to patchy aurora. Spectral characteristics of GPS scintillation signals during these events were also studied using wavelet derived "spatialograms" obtained from wavelet "scalograms". These studies seems to suggest that for PPA, large sized ionospheric irregularities (around 2 Km) dominate their spectral content compared to auroral arcs, where there is also contribution from smaller

  20. Navigating the Return Trip from the Moon Using Earth-Based Ground Tracking and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Kevin; Carpenter, Russell; Moreau, Michael C.; Lee, Taesul; Holt, Gregg N.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Constellation Program is planning a human return to the Moon late in the next decade. From a navigation perspective, one of the most critical phases of a lunar mission is the series of burns performed to leave lunar orbit, insert onto a trans-Earth trajectory, and target a precise re-entry corridor in the Earth s atmosphere. A study was conducted to examine sensitivity of the navigation performance during this phase of the mission to the type and availability of tracking data from Earth-based ground stations, and the sensitivity to key error sources. This study also investigated whether GPS measurements could be used to augment Earth-based tracking data, and how far from the Earth GPS measurements would be useful. The ability to track and utilize weak GPS signals transmitted across the limb of the Earth is highly dependent on the configuration and sensitivity of the GPS receiver being used. For this study three GPS configurations were considered: a "standard" GPS receiver with zero dB antenna gain, a "weak signal" GPS receiver with zero dB antenna gain, and a "weak signal" GPS receiver with an Earth-pointing direction antenna (providing 10 dB additional gain). The analysis indicates that with proper selection and configuration of the GPS receiver on the Orion spacecraft, GPS can potentially improve navigation performance during the critical final phases of flight prior to Earth atmospheric entry interface, and may reduce reliance on two-way range tracking from Earth-based ground stations.

  1. Multipath calibration in GPS pseudorange measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kee, Changdon (Inventor); Parkinson, Bradford W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Novel techniques are disclosed for eliminating multipath errors, including mean bias errors, in pseudorange measurements made by conventional global positioning system receivers. By correlating the multipath signals of different satellites at their cross-over points in the sky, multipath mean bias errors are effectively eliminated. By then taking advantage of the geometrical dependence of multipath, a linear combination of spherical harmonics are fit to the satellite multipath data to create a hemispherical model of the multipath. This calibration model can then be used to compensate for multipath in subsequent measurements and thereby obtain GPS positioning to centimeter accuracy.

  2. Continuous GPS Carrier-Phase Time Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jian

    Time transfer (TT) is the process of transmitting a timing signal from one place to another place. It has applications to the formation and realization of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), telecommunications, electrical power grids, and even stock exchanges. TT is the actual bottleneck of the UTC formation and realization since the technology of atomic clocks is almost always ahead of that of TT. GPS carrier-phase time transfer (GPSCPTT), as a mainstream TT technique accepted by most national timing laboratories, has suffered from the day-boundary-discontinuity (day-BD) problem for many years. This makes us difficult to observe a remote Cesium fountain clock behavior even after a few days. We find that day-BD comes from the GPS code noise. The day-BD can be lowered by ˜40% if more satellite-clock information is provided and if a few GPS receivers at the same station are averaged. To completely eliminate day-BD, the RINEX-Shift (RS) and revised RS (RRS) algorithms have been designed. The RS/RRS result matches the two-way satellite time/frequency transfer (TWSTFT) result much better than the conventional GPSCPTT result. With the RS/RRS algorithm, we are able to observe a remote Cesium fountain after half a day. We also study the BD due to GPS data anomalies (anomaly-BD). A simple curve-fitting strategy can eliminate the anomaly-BD. Thus, we achieve continuous GPSCPTT after eliminating both day-BD and anomaly-BD.

  3. Thymidylate synthase polymorphisms in genomic DNA as clinical outcome predictors in a European population of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving pemetrexed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied whether thymidylate synthase (TS) genotype has an independent prognostic/predictive impact on a European population of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving pemetrexed. Methods Twenty-five patients treated with pemetrexed-based regimens were included. Genomic DNA was isolated prior to treatment. The variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms, the G > C single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and the TS 6-bp insertion/deletion (6/6) in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) polymorphisms were analyzed and correlated with overall response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall-survival (OS) and toxicity. Results The genotype +6/+6 predicted a higher ORR among active/former smokers compared to +6/-6 genotype (100% vs. 50%; p = 0.085). Overall, the 3R/3R genotype predicted a higher ORR (100%) over the rest VNTR polymorphisms (p = 0.055). The presence of 3R/3R genotype significantly correlated with a superior ORR in patients without EGFR activating mutations (100%) compared to 2R/2R, 2R/3R and 3R/4R genotype (77.8%, 33.3% and 0% respectively; p = 0.017). After a median follow-up of 21 months, a trend towards a better PFS, although not significant, was found among subjects showing 3R/3R polymorphisms (p = 0.089). A significantly superior OS was found in patients showing 3R/3R genotype rather than other VNTR polymorphisms (p = 0.019). No significant correlation with the toxicity was observed. Conclusion In our series, 3R/3R polymorphism correlated with a superior OS. Also, this polymorphism, when associated to wild type EGFR, was related to a higher ORR to pemetrexed. Toxicity was not significantly correlated with a specific TS genotype. PMID:24726028

  4. “Picking up the pieces”—Meanings of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area

    PubMed Central

    Devik, Siri Andreassen; Hellzen, Ove; Enmarker, Ingela

    2015-01-01

    Rural home nursing care is a neglected area in the research of palliative care offered to older cancer patients. Because access to specialized services is hampered by long distances and fragmented infrastructure, palliative care is often provided through standard home nursing services and delivered by general district nurses. This study aimed to illuminate the lived experience and to interpret the meaning of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area in Norway. Narrative interviews were conducted with nine older persons, and a phenomenological hermeneutic approach was used to interpret the meaning of the lived experience. The analysis revealed three themes, each with subthemes: being content with what one gets, falling into place, and losing one's place. The phrase picking up the pieces was found useful to sum up the meaning of this lived experience. The three respective themes refer to how the pieces symbolize the remaining parts of life or available services in their environment, and how the older persons may see themselves as pieces or bricks in a puzzle. A strong place attachment (physical insideness, social insideness, and autobiographical insideness) is demonstrated by the informants in this study and suggests that the rural context may provide an advantageous healthcare environment. Its potential to be a source of comfort, security, and identity concurs with cancer patients’ strong desire for being seen as unique persons. The study shows that district nurses play an essential role in the provision of palliative care for older rural patients. However, the therapeutic value of being in one's familiar landscape seems to depend on how homecare nurses manage to locate it and use it in a more or less person-centred manner. Communication skills and attentiveness to psychosocial aspects of patient care stand out as important attributes for nursing in this context. PMID:26362533

  5. Status of Precise Orbit Determination for Jason-2 Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melachroinos, S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    The JASON-2 satellite, launched in June 2008, is the latest follow-on to the successful TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) and JASON-I altimetry missions. JASON-2 is equipped with a TRSR Blackjack GPS dual-frequency receiver, a laser retroreflector array, and a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination (POD). The most recent time series of orbits computed at NASA GSFC, based on SLR/DORIS data have been completed using both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008. These orbits have been shown to agree radially at 1 cm RMS for dynamic vs SLRlDORIS reduced-dynamic orbits and in comparison with orbits produced by other analysis centers (Lemoine et al., 2010; Zelensky et al., 2010; Cerri et al., 2010). We have recently upgraded the GEODYN software to implement model improvements for GPS processing. We describe the implementation of IGS standards to the Jason2 GEODYN GPS processing, and other dynamical and measurement model improvements. Our GPS-only JASON-2 orbit accuracy is assessed using a number of tests including analysis of independent SLR and altimeter crossover residuals, orbit overlap differences, and direct comparison to orbits generated at GSFC using SLR and DORIS tracking, and to orbits generated externally at other centers. Tests based on SLR and the altimeter crossover residuals provide the best performance indicator for independent validation of the NASAlGSFC GPS-only reduced dynamic orbits. For the ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 implementation of our GPS-only obits we are using the IGS05 and IGS08 standards. Reduced dynamic versus dynamic orbit differences are used to characterize the remaining force model error and TRF instability. We evaluate the GPS vs SLR & DORIS orbits produced using the GEODYN software and assess in particular their consistency radially and the stability of the altimeter satellite reference frame in the Z direction for both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 as a proxy to assess the consistency of the reference frame for altimeter satellite POD.

  6. Using GPS to Detect Imminent Tsunamis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y. Tony

    2009-01-01

    A promising method of detecting imminent tsunamis and estimating their destructive potential involves the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) data in addition to seismic data. Application of the method is expected to increase the reliability of global tsunami-warning systems, making it possible to save lives while reducing the incidence of false alarms. Tsunamis kill people every year. The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami killed about 230,000 people. The magnitude of an earthquake is not always a reliable indication of the destructive potential of a tsunami. The 2004 Indian Ocean quake generated a huge tsunami, while the 2005 Nias (Indonesia) quake did not, even though both were initially estimated to be of the similar magnitude. Between 2005 and 2007, five false tsunami alarms were issued worldwide. Such alarms result in negative societal and economic effects. GPS stations can detect ground motions of earthquakes in real time, as frequently as every few seconds. In the present method, the epicenter of an earthquake is located by use of data from seismometers, then data from coastal GPS stations near the epicenter are used to infer sea-floor displacements that precede a tsunami. The displacement data are used in conjunction with local topographical data and an advanced theory to quantify the destructive potential of a tsunami on a new tsunami scale, based on the GPS-derived tsunami energy, much like the Richter Scale used for earthquakes. An important element of the derivation of the advanced theory was recognition that horizontal sea-floor motions contribute much more to generation of tsunamis than previously believed. The method produces a reliable estimate of the destructive potential of a tsunami within minutes typically, well before the tsunami reaches coastal areas. The viability of the method was demonstrated in computational tests in which the method yielded accurate representations of three historical tsunamis for which well-documented ground

  7. Semi-Major Axis Knowledge and GPS Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Schiesser, Emil R.; Bauer, F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In recent years spacecraft designers have increasingly sought to use onboard Global Positioning System receivers for orbit determination. The superb positioning accuracy of GPS has tended to focus more attention on the system's capability to determine the spacecraft's location at a particular epoch than on accurate orbit determination, per se. The determination of orbit plane orientation and orbit shape to acceptable levels is less challenging than the determination of orbital period or semi-major axis. It is necessary to address semi-major axis mission requirements and the GPS receiver capability for orbital maneuver targeting and other operations that require trajectory prediction. Failure to determine semi-major axis accurately can result in a solution that may not be usable for targeting the execution of orbit adjustment and rendezvous maneuvers. Simple formulas, charts, and rules of thumb relating position, velocity, and semi-major axis are useful in design and analysis of GPS receivers for near circular orbit operations, including rendezvous and formation flying missions. Space Shuttle flights of a number of different GPS receivers, including a mix of unfiltered and filtered solution data and Standard and Precise Positioning, Service modes, have been accomplished. These results indicate that semi-major axis is often not determined very accurately, due to a poor velocity solution and a lack of proper filtering to provide good radial and speed error correlation.

  8. Semi-Major Axis Knowledge and GPS Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Schiesser, Emil R.; Bauer, F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In recent years spacecraft designers have increasingly sought to use onboard Global Positioning System receivers for orbit determination. The superb positioning accuracy of GPS has tended to focus more attention on the system's capability to determine the spacecraft's location at a particular epoch than on accurate orbit determination, per se. The determination of orbit plane orientation and orbit shape to acceptable levels is less challenging than the determination of orbital period or semi-major axis. It is necessary to address semi-major axis mission requirements and the GPS receiver capability for orbital maneuver targeting and other operations that require trajectory prediction. Failure to determine semi-major axis accurately can result in a solution that may not be usable for targeting the execution of orbit adjustment and rendezvous maneuvers. Simple formulas, charts, and rules of thumb relating position, velocity, and semi-major axis are useful in design and analysis of GPS receivers for near circular orbit operations, including rendezvous and formation flying missions. Space Shuttle flights of a number of different GPS receivers, including a mix of unfiltered and filtered solution data and Standard and Precise Positioning Service modes, have been accomplished. These results indicate that semi-major axis is often not determined very accurately, due to a poor velocity solution and a lack of proper filtering to provide good radial and speed error correlation.

  9. A GPS measurement system for precise satellite tracking and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S.-C.; Lichten, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is pursuing two key applications of differential positioning with the Global Positioning System (GPS): sub-decimeter tracking of earth satellites and few-centimeter determination of ground-fixed baselines. Key requirements of the two applications include the use of dual-frequency carrier phase data, multiple ground receivers to serve as reference points, simultaneous solution for use position and GPS orbits, and calibration of atmospheric delays using water vapor radiometers. Sub-decimeter tracking will be first demonstrated on the TOPEX oceanographic satellite to be launched in 1991. A GPS flight receiver together with at least six ground receivers will acquire delta range data from the GPS carriers for non-real-time analysis. Altitude accuracies of 5 to 10 cm are expected. For baseline measurements, efforts will be made to obtain precise differential pseudorange by resolving the cycle ambiguity in differential carrier phase. This could lead to accuracies of 2 or 3 cm over a few thousand kilometers. To achieve this, a high-performance receiver is being developed, along with improved calibration and data processing techniques. Demonstrations may begin in 1986.

  10. Using GPS To Teach More Than Accurate Positions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marie C.; Guth, Peter L.

    2002-01-01

    Undergraduate science majors need practice in critical thinking, quantitative analysis, and judging whether their calculated answers are physically reasonable. Develops exercises using handheld Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. Reinforces students' abilities to think quantitatively, make realistic "back of the envelope" assumptions, and…

  11. Theoretical Description of a Bistatic System for Ocean Altimetry Using the GPS Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, G.; Zuffada, C.; Thomas, J.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the fundamental characteristics of bistatic altimetry performed using the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal scattered off the ocean surface and collected by a receiver in space.

  12. Global Ionospheric TEC Perturbations Monitored by the GPS Global Network During Two Northern Hemisphere Winter Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Mannucci, A. J.; Sparks, L.; Pi, X.; Lindqwister, U. J.; Wilson, B. D.; Reyes, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    The global evolution of two major ionospheric storms, occurring on November 4, 1993 and November 26, 1994, respectively, is studied using measurements of total electron content (TEC) obtained from a worldwide network of ground-based GPS receivers.

  13. Operational aspects of CASA UNO '88-The first large scale international GPS geodetic network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth E.; Dixon, T. H.; Meehan, Thomas K.; Melbourne, William G.; Scheid, John A.; Kellogg, J. N.; Stowell, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    For three weeks, from January 18 to February 5, 1988, scientists and engineers from 13 countries and 30 international agencies and institutions cooperated in the most extensive GPS (Global Positioning System) field campaign, and the largest geodynamics experiment, in the world to date. This collaborative eperiment concentrated GPS receivers in Central and South America. The predicted rates of motions are on the order of 5-10 cm/yr. Global coverage of GPS observations spanned 220 deg of longitude and 125 deg of latitude using a total of 43 GPS receivers. The experiment was the first civilian effort at implementing an extended international GPS satellite tracking network. Covariance analyses incorporating the extended tracking network predicted significant improvement in precise orbit determination, allowing accurate long-baseline geodesy in the science areas.

  14. 75 FR 8928 - Announcement of IS-GPS-200, IS-GPS-705, IS-GPS-800 Interface Control Working Group (ICWG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Department of the Air Force Announcement of IS-GPS-200, IS-GPS-705, IS-GPS-800Interface Control Working Group... an Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) teleconference meeting for document/s IS-GPS-200E (NAVSTAR GPS Space Segment/Navigation User Interfaces), IS-GPS-705A (NAVSTAR GPS Space Segment/User Segment...

  15. GPS Array as a Sensor of Lithosphere, Troposphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Japanese dense array of GPS receivers (GEONET) started operation in 1993, and is currently composed of ~1200 stations. GPS (or GNSS in general) receivers can be compared to a Swiss army knife: it could be used not only for positioning (a knife) but also for various purposes, e.g. remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor or ionospheric electrons (screw driver, tin opener etc). Dense GPS arrays have been found extremely useful for variety of geophysical studies. In this lecture, I briefly review their historical achievements, recent highlights, and future perspectives. In Japan, first generation GPS stations were implemented in 1993 (the Kanto-Tokai region) and 1994 (nationwide) by GSI, Japan. Shortly after the launch, they successfully caught coseismic crustal movement of several major earthquakes, the 1994 October Shikotan (Mw8.3), the 1994 December Sanriku (Mw7.6), and the 1995 January Kobe (Mw7.0) earthquakes. These earthquakes accelerated the densification of the GPS network, achieving 1000 in the number of stations within the following 2-3 years. In addition to coseismic jumps, important discoveries continued in 1990s, e.g. large-scale afterslip of interplate thrust earthquakes and slow slip events (SSE). Later it was shown that tilt- and strainmeter can better observe short-term SSEs, and InSAR can draw more detailed maps of coseismic crustal movements. Now GPS array is recognized as a good tool to measure crustal movement with high temporal resolution and stability and with moderate sensitivity and spatial resolution. GPS data are also useful to study hydrosphere. Seasonal crustal movements in Japan mainly reflect changes in hydrological loads. Multipath signatures in GPS data also provide useful information on the environment around the antenna, e.g. soil moisture, snow depth and vegetation. I will compare the snow depth record over a winter inferred by analyzing GPS multipath signatures, and observed by a conventional apparatus. GPS can also measure

  16. Retrieval Assimilation and Modeling of Atmospheric Water Vapor from Ground- and Space-Based GPS Networks: Investigation of the Global and Regional Hydrological Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1999-01-01

    Uncertainty over the response of the atmospheric hydrological cycle (particularly the distribution of water vapor and cloudiness) to anthropogenic forcing is a primary source of doubt in current estimates of global climate sensitivity, which raises severe difficulties in evaluating its likely societal impact. Fortunately, a variety of advanced techniques and sensors are beginning to shed new light on the atmospheric hydrological cycle. One of the most promising makes use of the sensitivity of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to the thermodynamic state, and in particular the water vapor content, of the atmosphere through which the radio signals propagate. Our strategy to derive the maximum benefit for hydrological studies from the rapidly increasing GPS data stream will proceed in three stages: (1) systematically analyze and archive quality-controlled retrievals using state-of-the-art techniques; (2) employ both currently available and innovative assimilation procedures to incorporate these determinations into advanced regional and global atmospheric models and assess their effects; and (3) apply the results to investigate selected scientific issues of relevance to regional and global hydrological studies. An archive of GPS-based estimation of total zenith delay (TZD) data and water vapor where applicable has been established with expanded automated quality control. The accuracy of the GPS estimates is being monitored; the investigation of systematic errors is ongoing using comparisons with water vapor radiometers. Meteorological packages have been implemented. The accuracy and utilization of the TZD estimates has been improved by implementing a troposphere gradient model. GPS-based gradients have been validated as real atmospheric moisture gradients, establishing a link between the estimated gradients and the passage of weather fronts. We have developed a generalized ray tracing inversion scheme that can be used to analyze occultation data acquired from space

  17. GPS meteorology - Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevis, Michael; Businger, Steven; Herring, Thomas A.; Rocken, Christian; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new approach to remote sensing of water vapor based on the Global Positioning System (GPS). Geodesists and geophysicists have devised methods for estimating the extent to which signals propagating from GPS satellites to ground-based GPS receivers are delayed by atmospheric water vapor. This delay is parameterized in terms of a time-varying zenith wet delay (ZWD) which is retrieved by stochastic filtering of the GPS data. Given surface temperature and pressure readings at the GPS receiver, the retrieved ZWD can be transformed with very little additional uncertainty into an estimate of the integrated water vapor (IWV) overlying that receiver. Networks of continuously operating GPS receivers are being constructed by geodesists, geophysicists, and government and military agencies, in order to implement a wide range of positioning capabilities. These emerging GPS networks offer the possibility of observing the horizontal distribution of IWV or, equivalently, precipitate water with unprecedented coverage and a temporal resolution of the order of 10 min. These measurements could be utilized in operational weather forecasting and in fundamental research into atmospheric storm systems, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate change.

  18. Shuttle GPS R/PA configuration and specification study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, R. W. D.

    1979-01-01

    Changes in the technical specifications for a global positioning system (GPS) receiving system dedicated to space shuttle use are presented. Various hardware functions including acquisition, tracking, and measurement are emphasized. The anti-jam performance of the baseline GPS systems are evaluated. Other topics addressed include: the impact on R/PA design of the use of ground based transmitters; problems involved with the use of single channel tests sets; utility of various R/PA antenna interconnections topologies; the choice of the averaging interval for delta range measurements; and the use of interferometry techniques for the computation of orbiter attitude were undertaken.

  19. Ephemeris errors of GPS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical models are developed to examine the potential effects of solar radiation, the terrestrial gravitational field, and the estimated initial state of the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites, along with the capability of current models to account for the effects on the ephemeris of the GPS constellation. Of particular interest is the accuracy of the satellite position predictions for applications in geodesy. The main characteristics of the GPS orbits are reviewed and linear combinations of possible errors for 3 day ephemerides are examined. It is shown that the effects of the forces on the GPS orbits will be dynamic, yet can be expressed simply enough to maintain positioning accuracy to 1 percent. The calculations can also take into consideration solar wind pressure on the solar panels.

  20. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report: EOS AMSU-A1 and AMSU-A2 Receiver Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The AMSU-A receiver subsystem comprises two separated receiver assemblies; AMSU-A1 and AMSU-A2 (P/N 1356441-1). The AMSU-A1 receiver contains 13 channels and the AMSU-A2 receiver 2 channels. The AMSU-A1 receiver assembly is further divided into two parts; AMSU-A1-1 (P/N 1356429-1) and AMSU-A1-2 (P/N 1356409-1), which contain 9 and 4 channels, respectively. The receiver assemblies are highlighted and illustrate the functional block diagrams of the AMSU-A1 and AMSU-A2 systems. The AMSU-A receiver subsystem stands in between the antenna and signal processing subsystems of the AMSU-A instrument and comprises the RF and IF components from isolators to attenuators. It receives the RF signals from the antenna subsystem, down-converts the RF signals to IF signals, amplifies and defines the IF signals to proper power level and frequency bandwidth as specified for each channel, and inputs the IF signals to the signal processing subsystem. This test report presents the test data of the EOS AMSU-A Flight Model No. 1 (FM-1) receiver subsystem. The tests are performed per the Acceptance Test Procedure for the AMSU-A Receiver Subsystem, AE-26002/6A. The functional performance tests are conducted either at the component or subsystem level. While the component-level tests are performed over the entire operating temperature range predicted by thermal analysis, the subsystem-level tests are conducted at ambient temperature only.

  1. Delay/Doppler-Mapping GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen; Kroger, Peter; Franklin, Garth; LeBrecque, John; Lerma, Jesse; Lough, Michael; Marcin, Martin; Muellerschoen, Ronald; Spitzmesser, Donovan; Young, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    A radio receiver system that features enhanced capabilities for remote sensing by use of reflected Global Positioning System (GPS) signals has been developed. This system was designed primarily for ocean altimetry, but can also be used for scatterometry and bistatic synthetic-aperture radar imaging. Moreover, it could readily be adapted to utilize navigation-satellite systems other than the GPS, including the Russian Global Navigation Satellite System GLONASS) and the proposed European Galileo system. This remote-sensing system offers both advantages and disadvantages over traditional radar altimeters: One advantage of GPS-reflection systems is that they cost less because there is no need to transmit signals. Another advantage is that there are more simultaneous measurement opportunities - one for each GPS satellite in view. The primary disadvantage is that in comparison with radar signals, GPS signals are weaker, necessitating larger antennas and/or longer observations. This GPS-reflection remote-sensing system was tested in aircraft and made to record and process both (1) signals coming directly from GPS satellites by means of an upward-looking antenna and (2) GPS signals reflected from the ground by means of a downward-looking antenna. In addition to performing conventional GPS processing, the system records raw signals for postprocessing as required.

  2. Estimation and filtering techniques for high-accuracy GPS applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for determination of very precise orbits for satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS) are currently being studied and demonstrated. These techniques can be used to make cm-accurate measurements of station locations relative to the geocenter, monitor earth orientation over timescales of hours, and provide tropospheric and clock delay calibrations during observations made with deep space radio antennas at sites where the GPS receivers have been collocated. For high-earth orbiters, meter-level knowledge of position will be available from GPS, while at low altitudes, sub-decimeter accuracy will be possible. Estimation of satellite orbits and other parameters such as ground station positions is carried out with a multi-satellite batch sequential pseudo-epoch state process noise filter. Both square-root information filtering (SRIF) and UD-factorized covariance filtering formulations are implemented in the software.

  3. Results from a GPS Shuttle Training Aircraft flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Penny E.; Montez, Moises N.; Robel, Michael C.; Feuerstein, David N.; Aerni, Mike E.; Sangchat, S.; Rater, Lon M.; Cryan, Scott P.; Salazar, Lydia R.; Leach, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    A series of Global Positioning System (GPS) flight tests were performed on a National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). The objective of the tests was to evaluate the performance of GPS-based navigation during simulated Shuttle approach and landings for possible replacement of the current Shuttle landing navigation aid, the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS). In particular, varying levels of sensor data integration would be evaluated to determine the minimum amount of integration required to meet the navigation accuracy requirements for a Shuttle landing. Four flight tests consisting of 8 to 9 simulation runs per flight test were performed at White Sands Space Harbor in April 1991. Three different GPS receivers were tested. The STA inertial navigation, tactical air navigation, and MSBLS sensor data were also recorded during each run. C-band radar aided laser trackers were utilized to provide the STA 'truth' trajectory.

  4. The first geocenter estimation results using GPS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, R. P.; Wu, S. C.

    1990-01-01

    The center of mass of the Earth is the natural and unambiguous origin of a geocentric satellite dynamical system. A geocentric reference frame assumes that the origin of its coordinate axes is at the geocenter, in which all relevant observations and results can be referred and in which geodynamic theories or models for the dynamic behavior of Earth can be formulated. In practice, however, a kinematically obtained terrestrial reference frame may assume an origin other than the geocenter. A fast and accurate method of determining origin offset from the geocenter is highly desirable. Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements, because of their abundance and broad distribution, provide a powerful tool to obtain this origin offset in a short period of time. Two effective strategies have been devised. Data from the first Central and South America (Casa Uno) global GPS experiment were studied to demonstrate the ability of recovering the geocenter location with present-day GPS satellites and receivers.

  5. Atmosphere sounding by GPS radio occultation: First results from CHAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, Jens; Reigber, Christoph; Beyerle, Georg; König, Rolf; Marquardt, Christian; Schmidt, Torsten; Grunwaldt, Ludwig; Galas, Roman; Meehan, Thomas K.; Melbourne, William G.; Hocke, Klemens

    The first radio occultation measurements of the CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) satellite using Global Positioning System (GPS) signals have been performed on February 11, 2001. By the end of April 2001 more than 3000 occultations were recorded. Globally distributed vertical profiles of dry temperature and specific humidity are derived, of which a set of 438 vertical dry temperature profiles is compared with corresponding global weather analyses. The observed temperature bias is less than ∼1 K above the tropopause and even less than 0.5 K in the altitude interval from 12 to 20 km at latitudes >30°N. About 55% of the compared profiles reached the last kilometer above the Earth's surface. In spite of the activated anti-spoofing mode of the GPS system the state-of-the-art GPS flight receiver aboard CHAMP combined with favorable antenna characteristics allows for atmospheric sounding with high accuracy and vertical resolution.

  6. Receivers Gather Data for Climate, Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Signals from global positioning system (GPS) satellites are now being used for more than just location and navigation information. By looking at the radio waves from GPS satellites, a technology developed at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) not only precisely calculates its position, but can also use a technique known as radio occultation to help scientists study the Earth s atmosphere and gravity field to improve weather forecasts, monitor climate change, and enhance space weather research. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), a nonprofit group of universities in Boulder, Colorado, compares radio occultation to the appearance of a pencil when viewed though a glass of water. The water molecules change the path of visible light waves so that the pencil appears bent, just like molecules in the air bend GPS radio signals as they pass through (or are occulted by) the atmosphere. Through measurements of the amount of bending in the signals, scientists can construct detailed images of the ionosphere (the energetic upper part of the atmosphere) and also gather information about atmospheric density, pressure, temperature, and moisture. Once collected, this data can be input into weather forecasting and climate models for weather prediction and climate studies. Traditionally, such information is obtained through the use of weather balloons. In 1998, JPL started developing a new class of GPS space science receivers, called Black Jack, that could take precise measurements of how GPS signals are distorted or delayed along their way to the receiver. By 2006, the first demonstration of a GPS radio occultation constellation was launched through a collaboration among Taiwan s National Science Council and National Space Organization, the U.S. National Science Foundation, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other Federal entities. Called the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC

  7. A GPS Network Densification in Saudi Arabia in Support of Geophysical Investigations in the Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuslmani, B.; Al-Motari, E.; Bingley, R. M.; Teferle, F. N.; Moore, T.

    2006-12-01

    Current investigations of the motions of the Arabian and its neighboring plates are primarily based on GPS measurements obtained in the surrounding areas of the Arabian plate, with few stations actually located on the Arabian plate itself in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In order to advance the knowledge of the dynamics of the Arabian plate and its intra-plate deformations, the General Directorate of Military Survey (GDMS), through a collaboration with the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG), densified the GPS network in Saudi Arabia, covering nearly two thirds of the tectonic plate. Since July 2002, a network of 32 GPS stations has been established at locations of the Saudi Arabia geodetic network. At all of these GPS stations a concrete pillar has been used as the monument and the locations have been selected in order to give the broadest distribution of observing sites. During 2005, 27 additional GPS stations in the Hejaz and Asser Mountains in the south-western part of Saudi Arabia, have been established, with the GDMS GPS network now comprising a total of 59 stations. In this presentation we will introduce the new GPS network in Saudi Arabia established by GDMS and will present the initial results from campaigns in March 2003 and March 2005. We show preliminary estimates of absolute and relative Arabian plate motions inferred from the GPS network and a detailed comparison of the results based on the Bernese GPS software versions 4.2 and 5.0.

  8. Development of InSAR tropospheric correction maps using continuous GPS data and weather models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. W.; Kedar, S.; Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.; Fielding, E. J.; Fishbein, E.; Means, J. D.; Bock, Y.; Fang, P.; Jamason, P.; Squibb, M. B.; Bjorndahl, F.; Lofgren, J.

    2009-12-01

    As part of a NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology effort, we are building upon NASA's investment in the measurement of crustal deformation from continuous GPS by developing and implementing a system that will provide tropospheric delay correction maps to the InSAR community. SIO and JPL routinely produce independent, continuous GPS station position solutions using the GAMIT and GIPSY software packages, respectively, for the western North American region, including the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS network. These solutions, as well as combined and validated products, are available via a powerful portal environment known as GPS Explorer. Tropospheric zenith delay at each station is estimated as part of the solution process, and we now aim to add tropospheric products and related portal capabilities to GPS Explorer. GPS troposphere estimates have a high temporal resolution (typically 5 minutes), which suggests application in correcting the temporally variable tropospheric artifacts that obscure detection of ground deformation in InSAR. The spacing of GPS stations, however, is generally not sufficient to resolve short-wavelength tropospheric features. To overcome this limitation, we have tested the combination of GPS zenith delay solutions with delay data derived from weather forecast products (precipitable water vapor, surface temperature, and surface pressure). InSAR solutions over a short time period (unlikely to have significant deformation), when corrected by these combined GPS and weather model maps, have a reduced RMS compared to an uncorrected interferogram.

  9. Comparison of GLONASS and GPS time transfers between two west European time laboratories and VNIIFTRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, P.; Koshelyaevsky, N. B.; Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz; Petit, Gerard; Thomas, Claudine

    1992-01-01

    The University of Leeds built a Global Positioning System/Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System (GPS/GLONASS) receiver about five years ago and since then has provided continuous information about GLONASS time and its comparison with GPS time. For the last two years, VNIIFTRI (All Union Institute for Physical, Technical and Radiotechnical Measurements) and some other Soviet time laboratories have used Soviet built GLONASS navigation receivers for time comparisons. Since June 1991, VNIIFTIR has been operating a GPS time receiver on loan from the BIPM (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures). This offered, for the first time, an opportunity for direct comparison of time transfers using GPS and GLONASS. This experiment shows that even with relatively imprecise data recording and processing, in terms of time metrology, GLONASS can provide continental time transfer at a level of several tens of nanoseconds.

  10. The Integration, Testing and Flight of the EO-1 GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, David A.; Sanneman, Paul A.; Shulman, Seth E.; Sager, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System has long been hailed as the wave of the future for autonomous on-board navigation of low Earth orbiting spacecraft despite the fact that relatively few spacecraft have actually employed it for this purpose. While several missions operated out of the Goddard Space Flight Center have flown GPS receivers on board, the New Millenium Program (NMP) Earth Orbiting-1 (EO-1) spacecraft is the first to employ GPS for active, autonomous on-board navigation. Since EO-1 was designed to employ GPS as its primary source of the navigation ephemeris, special care had to be taken during the integration phase of spacecraft construction to assure proper performance. This paper is a discussion of that process: a brief overview of how the GPS works, how it fits into the design of the EO-1 Attitude Control System (ACS), the steps taken to integrate the system into the EO-1 spacecraft, the ultimate on-orbit performance during launch and early operations of the EO-1 mission and the performance of the on-board GPS ephemeris versus the ground based ephemeris. Conclusions will include a discussion of the lessons learned.

  11. Data Analysis of Permanent GPS Sites (RING) in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpelloni, E.; Cavaliere, A.; Pietrantonio, G.; Galvani, A.; Esposito, A.; Sepe, V.; Devoti, R.; Riguzzi, F.

    2007-12-01

    The RING (Rete Integrata Nazionale GPS) GPS network is the result of a scientific project started by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) in 2004 with the aim of increasing the number of continuous GPS stations (CGPS) in Italy in order to improve the knowledge of the geodynamics and tectonic processes acting in this area which is characterized by a complex set of independent or partially independent crustal blocks, within the slowly converging African and Eurasian plates. At present RING is a dense CGPS network of more than 110 stations covering the Italian area and integrating GPS receivers with broad-band seismometers and accelerometers in real time connection with three acquisition centers. In this work we describe the data analysis strategy of the whole GPS network (consisting of RING sites, other public Italian CGPS and some IGS sites for a total amount of about 300 stations) and some results in terms of position time series and velocities. The processing is performed adopting a distributed session approach, with more than 10 clusters, sharing common stations, each of them consisting of about 40 stations. Daily loosely constrained solutions are routinely produced for each cluster using the Bernese and Gamit softwares and then transformed into the ITRF05 reference frame. In the next months these solutions will be freely available as daily SINEX files on the public RING website http://ring.gm.ingv.it and subsequently other derived geodetic products (full time series, velocity field, etc.) will also be available.

  12. GPS aiding of ocean current determination. [Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The navigational accuracy of an oceangoing vessel using conventional GPS p-code data is examined. The GPS signal is transmitted over two carrier frequencies in the L-band at 1575.42 and 1227.6 MHz. Achievable navigational uncertainties of differenced positional estimates are presented as a function of the parameters of the problem, with particular attention given to the effect of sea-state, user equivalent range error, uncompensated antenna motion, varying delay intervals, and reduced data rate examined in the unaided mode. The unmodeled errors resulting from satellite ephemeris uncertainties are shown to be negligible for the GPS-NDS (Navigation Development) satellites. Requirements are met in relatively calm seas, but accuracy degradation by a factor of at least 2 must be anticipated in heavier sea states. The aided mode of operation is examined, and it is shown that requirements can be met by using an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to aid the GPS receiver operation. Since the use of an IMU would mean higher costs, direct Doppler from the GPS satellites is presented as a viable alternative.

  13. Line Focus Receiver Infrared Temperature Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelin, Tim

    2010-06-01

    For ongoing maintenance and performance purposes, solar parabolic trough field operators desire to know that the Heat Collection Elements (HCEs) are performing properly. Measuring their temperature is one way of doing this One 30MW field can contain approximately 10,000 HCE's. This software interfaces with a GPS receiver and an infrared camera. It takes global positioning data from the GPS and uses this information to automate the infrared image capture and temperature analysis of individual solar parabolic HCEs in a solar parabolic trough field With this software system an entire 30MW field can be surveyed in 2-3 days.

  14. Line Focus Receiver Infrared Temperature Survey System

    2010-06-01

    For ongoing maintenance and performance purposes, solar parabolic trough field operators desire to know that the Heat Collection Elements (HCEs) are performing properly. Measuring their temperature is one way of doing this One 30MW field can contain approximately 10,000 HCE's. This software interfaces with a GPS receiver and an infrared camera. It takes global positioning data from the GPS and uses this information to automate the infrared image capture and temperature analysis of individual solarmore » parabolic HCEs in a solar parabolic trough field With this software system an entire 30MW field can be surveyed in 2-3 days.« less

  15. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  16. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improvement in a calutron receiver for collecting the isotopes ts described. The electromagnetic separation of the isotopes produces a mass spectrum of closely adjacent beams of ions at the foci regions, and a dividing wall between the two pockets is arranged at an angle. Substantially all of the tons of the less abundant isotope enter one of the pockets and strike one side of the wall directly, while substantially none of the tons entering the other pocket strikes the wall directly.

  17. GPS Climatology: Long-term PWV Records from a Dense GPS Array (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-12-01

    More than ten years has passed since people recognized meteorological value of atmospheric delays observed by Global Positioning System (GPS) together with station coordinates. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) data are obtained from ~1000 receivers of GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) in Japan in near real time. After years of basic studies of GPS meteorology, Japan Meteorological Agency has recently started to incorporate GPS-PWV routinely into its atmospheric model for numerical weather prediction. Here we expand the concept and study longer term behaviors of the atmospheric water vapor, i.e. GPS climatology. We use zenith total delays (ZTD) at GPS stations over the last 12 years. We also use surface meteorological data from ~200 observatories to isolate delays due to water vapor (zenith wet delay, ZWD) by removing those by dry air (hydrostatic delay). ZWD is proportional to PWV, and we explore climatological signals in PWV, e.g. interannual changes due to El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), longer-term changes such as North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and secular increase due to global warming. Average temperature over Japan in this period shows relatively rapid increase in late 1990’s and 2000’s and moderate decrease in the first half of 2000’s. PWV showed similar long-term signals to the surface temperature changes as well as strong seasonal signatures. These changes negatively correlate with indices of PDO, an inter-decadal climate oscillation in the northern Pacific Ocean bringing colder climates in its western part during positive phases. Unlike surface temperature, PWV did not show significant net increase during the studied period. NAO is considered to be a part of Arctic Oscillation (AO), and strongly influence winter climate in northern Japan. Negative temperature anomalies prevailed there in the 2000-2001 winter, when the NAO index was negative, but such anomalies were not evident in PWV. In addition to such

  18. GPS/GNSS Interference from Iridium Data Transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, H. T.; Blume, F.; Estey, L.; White, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Iridium satellite communication system broadcasts in the 1610 to 1626.5 MHz band. The L1 frequencies broadcast by GPS, Galileo and GLONASS satellites are 1575.42 MHz, 1575.42 MHz and 1602 MHz + n × 0.5625 MHz, respectively (each GLONASS satellite uses a unique frequency). The proximity of the Iridium frequency band with the L1 frequencies of the GPS, Galileo and GLONASS systems leaves GNSS receivers susceptible to interference from Iridium data transmissions. Interference from Iridium transmissions can cause cycle slips and loss of lock on the carrier and code phases, thereby degrading the quality of GNSS observations and position estimates. In 2008, UNAVCO staff members observed that the percent of slips vs. the number of observations increased as the distance between a GPS choke ring antenna (TRM29659.00) and an Iridium antenna decreased. From those observations they suggested that Iridium antennas and GPS antennas should be separated by >30 m to minimize cycle slips caused by the interference from Iridium data transmissions. A second test conducted in 2009 using a newer Trimble GNSS choke ring antenna (TRM59800.00) showed similar results to the previous test despite the wider frequency range of the newer antenna. More recent testing conducted to investigate the response of new receiver models to iridium transmissions has shown that many GNSS enabled models, when combined with GNSS enabled antennas, have increased sensitivity to interference when compared to older GPS-only models. The broader frequency spectrum of the Low Noise Amplifiers (LNA) installed in many newer GNSS antennas can increase the impact of near-band RF interference on tracking performance. Our testing has shown that the quality of data collected at sites collocated with iridium communications is highly degraded for antenna separations exceeding 100m. Using older GPS antenna models (e.g. TRM29659.00) with newer GNSS enabled receivers can reduce this effect. To mitigate the effects that

  19. Optimization of GPS Interferometric Reflectometry for Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang

    GPS Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR), a passive microwave remote sensing technique utilizing GPS signal as a source of opportunity, characterizes the Earth's surface through a bistatic radar configuration. The key idea of GPS-IR is utilizing a ground-based antenna to coherently receive the direct, or line-of-sight (LOS), signal and the Earth's surface reflected signal simultaneously. The direct and reflected signals create an interference pattern of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), which contains the information about the Earth's surface environment. GPS-IR has proven its utility in a variety of environmental remote sensing applications, including the measurements of near-surface soil moisture, coastal sea level, snow depth and snow water equivalent, and vegetation biophysical parameters. A major approach of the GPS-IR technique is using the SNR data provided by the global network of the geodetic GPS stations deployed for tectonic and surveying applications. The geodetic GPS networks provide wide spatial coverage and have no additional cost for this capability expansion. However, the geodetic GPS instruments have intrinsic limitations: the geodetic-quality GPS antennas are designed to suppress the reflected signals, which is counter to the requirement of GPS-IR. As a result, it is desirable to refine and optimize the instrument and realize the full potential of the GPS-IR technique. This dissertation first analyzes the signal characteristics of four available polarizations of the GPS signal, and then discusses how these characteristics are related to and can be used for remote sensing applications of GPS-IR. Two types of antennas, a half-wavelength dipole antenna and a patch antenna, are proposed and fabricated to utilize the desired polarizations. Four field experiments are conducted to assess the feasibility of the design criteria and the performance of the proposed antennas. Three experiments are focused on snow depth measurement. The Table Mountain

  20. A Leo Satellite Navigation Algorithm Based on GPS and Magnetometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Harman, Rick; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become a standard method for low cost onboard satellite orbit determination. The use of a GPS receiver as an attitude and rate sensor has also been developed in the recent past. Additionally, focus has been given to attitude and orbit estimation using the magnetometer, a low cost, reliable sensor. Combining measurements from both GPS and a magnetometer can provide a robust navigation system that takes advantage of the estimation qualities of both measurements. Ultimately, a low cost, accurate navigation system can result, potentially eliminating the need for more costly sensors, including gyroscopes. This work presents the development of a technique to eliminate numerical differentiation of the GPS phase measurements and also compares the use of one versus two GPS satellites.

  1. The Accidental Tide Gauge: A GPS Reflection Case Study from Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Ray, Richard D.; Nievinski, Felipe G..; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    For the last decade, it has been known that reflected GPS signals observed with specialized instruments could be used to measure sea level. In this letter, data from an existing geodeticquality GPS site near Kachemak Bay, Alaska, are analyzed for a one-year time period. Daily sea-level variations are more than 7 m. Tidal coefficients have been estimated and compared with coefficients estimated from records from a traditional tide gauge at Seldovia Harbor, approximately 30 km away. The GPS and Seldovia estimates of M(sub 2) and S(sub 2) coefficients agree to better than 2%; much of this residual can be attributed to true differences in the tide over 30 km as it propagates up Kachemak Bay. For daily mean sea levels the agreement is 2.3 cm. Because a standard geodetic GPS receiver/antenna is used, this GPS instrument can measure long-term sea-level changes in a stable terrestrial reference frame.

  2. Indices of ionospheric GPS phase fluctuation derived by using Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Liu, J.

    2008-12-01

    Variations in phase and amplitude of the GPS signal have been used to monitor irregularities of the ionospheric electron density. Based on the Fourier analysis, fluctuations in the total electron content (TEC) recorded by ground-based GPS receivers have been derived the indices of Fp and fp to stand for the hourly and quarterly GPS phase fluctuations. However, it has been well known the ionospheric GPS phase fluctuation to be a non-stationary and nonlinear phenomenon. Therefore, base on the intrinsic and adaptive characters of Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we develop a new detrained procedure computing the indices of GPS phase fluctuation. Results confirm that the two indices derived by the HHT yield a better performance.

  3. Studies of Plasma Bubbles & Comparision of TEC Fluctuations and Scintillations at Varanasi Using GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, Shishir; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Abhay Kumar

    Ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and scintillations have been recorded continuously since January 2009 using a dual frequency GPS receiver at Varanasi, India (geographic lat. 25.30 N, long. 82.990 E). The trajectory of a GPS satellite plays an important role in observing the bubble characteristics. The GPS data with a sampling interval of 60 s were analyzed to determine TEC, the rate of change of TEC (ROT) and as well as ROTI, defined as the standard deviation of ROT. In this work we compare the S4 index of GPS scintillations with the ROTI values and there by investigated the evolution of large and small scale irregularities at scale length of few kilometers and 400 m respectively observed at low latitude station Varanasi. The effects of geomagnetic activity and geomagnetic storm on the generation of bubbles are studied using Kp index and Dst index respectively. Kew words: GPS, Plasma bubble, ROT, ROTI

  4. Utilizing GPS to Determine Ionospheric Delay over the Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Garrison, James L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Several spaceborne altimeters have been built and flown, and others are being developed to provide measurements of ocean and ice sheet topography. Until the launch of TOPEX, altimeters were single frequency systems incapable of removing the effects of ionospheric delay on the radar pulse. With the current state of the art in satellite altimetry, the ionosphere causes the largest single error when using single frequency altimeters. Ionospheric models provide the only recourse short of adding a second frequency to the altimeter. Unfortunately, measurements of the ionosphere are lacking over the oceans or ice sheets where they are most needed. A possible solution to the lack of data density may result from an expanded use of the Global Positioning System (GPS). This paper discusses how the reflection of the GPS signal from the ocean can be used to extend ionospheric measurements by simply adding a GPS receiver and downward-pointing antenna to satellites carrying single frequency altimeters. This paper presents results of a study assessing the feasibility and effectiveness of adding a GPS receiver and downward-pointing antenna to satellites carrying single frequency altimeters.

  5. Evaluation of Mobile Phone Interference With Aircraft GPS Navigation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Scott; Oria, A. J.; Guckian, Paul; Nguyen, Truong X.

    2004-01-01

    This report compiles and analyzes tests that were conducted to measure cell phone spurious emissions in the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio frequency band that could affect the navigation system of an aircraft. The cell phone in question had, as reported to the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration), caused interference to several GPS receivers on-board a small single engine aircraft despite being compliant with data filed at the time with the FCC by the manufacturer. NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and industry tests show that while there is an emission in the 1575 MHz GPS band due to a specific combination of amplifier output impedance and load impedance that induces instability in the power amplifier, these spurious emissions (i.e., not the intentional transmit signal) are similar to those measured on non-intentionally transmitting devices such as, for example, laptop computers. Additional testing on a wide sample of different commercial cell phones did not result in any emission in the 1575 MHz GPS Band above the noise floor of the measurement receiver.

  6. Assessment of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in Greenland using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Bevis, M. G.; Sasgen, I.; van Dam, T. M.; Wahr, J. M.; Wouters, B.; Bamber, J. L.; Willis, M. J.; Knudsen, P.; Helm, V.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Muresan, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenland GPS network (GNET) was constructed to provide a new means to assess viscoelastic and elastic adjustments driven by past and present-day changes in ice mass. Here we assess existing glacial isostatic adjustments (GIA) predictions by analysing 1995-2015 data from 61 continuous GPS receivers located along the margin of the Greenland ice sheet. Since GPS receivers measure both the GIA and elastic signals, we isolate GIA, by removing the elastic adjustments of the lithosphere due to present-day mass changes using high-resolution fields of ice surface elevation change derived from satellite and airborne altimetry measurements (ERS1/2, ICESat, ATM, ENVISAT, and CryoSat-2). For most GPS stations, our observed GIA rates contradict GIA predictions; particularly, we find huge uplift rates in southeast Greenland of up to 14 mm/yr while models predict rates of 0-2 mm/yr. Our results suggest possible improvements of GIA predictions, and hence of the poorly constrained ice load history and Earth structure models for Greenland.

  7. GPS/MEMS IMU/Microprocessor Board for Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James; Ott, William E.

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized instrumentation package comprising a (1) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, (2) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting largely of surface-micromachined sensors of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, and (3) a microprocessor, all residing on a single circuit board, is part of the navigation system of a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft [e.g., the International Space Station (ISS)] for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. Variants of the package may also be useful in terrestrial collision-detection and -avoidance applications. The navigation solution obtained by integrating the IMU outputs is fed back to a correlator in the GPS receiver to aid in tracking GPS signals. The raw GPS and IMU data are blended in a Kalman filter to obtain an optimal navigation solution, which can be supplemented by range and velocity data obtained by use of (l) a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard the robotic spacecraft and/or (2) a laser dynamic range imager aboard the ISS. The novelty of the package lies mostly in those aspects of the design of the MEMS IMU that pertain to controlling mechanical resonances and stabilizing scale factors and biases.

  8. Remote landslide mapping using a laser rangefinder binocular and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santangelo, M.; Cardinali, M.; Rossi, M.; Mondini, A. C.; Guzzetti, F.

    2010-12-01

    We tested a high-quality laser rangefinder binocular coupled with a GPS receiver connected to a Tablet PC running dedicated software to help recognize and map in the field recent rainfall-induced landslides. The system was tested in the period between March and April 2010, in the Monte Castello di Vibio area, Umbria, Central Italy. To test the equipment, we measured thirteen slope failures that were mapped previously during a visual reconnaissance field campaign conducted in February and March 2010. For reference, four slope failures were also mapped by walking the GPS receiver along the landslide perimeter. Comparison of the different mappings revealed that the geographical information obtained remotely for each landslide by the rangefinder binocular and GPS was comparable to the information obtained by walking the GPS around the landslide perimeter, and was superior to the information obtained through the visual reconnaissance mapping. Although our tests were not exhaustive, we maintain that the system is effective to map recent rainfall induced landslides in the field, and we foresee the possibility of using the same (or similar) system to map landslides, and other geomorphological features, in other areas.

  9. Jason-1 and Jason-2 POD Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melachroinos, Stavros; Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Rowlands, David D.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Beckley, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    The Jason-2 satellite, launched in June 2008, is the latest follow-on to the successful Jason-1 altimetry satellite mission launched in December 7, 2001. Both, Jason-2 and Jason-1 are equipped with a GPS dual-frequency receiver, a laser retroreflector array, and a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination (POD). A series of dynamic and reduced-dynamic Jason-2 orbits computed at NASA GSFC, based on GPS-only data and the std0905 standards, have been completed till cy74through cycle 74 using the IGS05 framework. These orbits, now publicly available, have been shown to agree radially at 1 cm RMS with the GSFC std0905 SLR/DORIS orbits and in comparison with orbits produced by JPL, ESA and CNES. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the IGS08 and repro1 framework for the Jason-2 and Jason-1 GPS POD processing with the NASA GSFC GEODYN software. . In our updated GPS POD, ambiguity fixing and updated time variable and static gravity fields. We also evaluate the implementation of non-tidal and degree-1 loading displacement as forward modeling to the tracking stations. Reduced-dynamic versus dynamic orbit differences are used to characterize the remaining force model errors and TRF instability. In particular, we assess their consistency radially and the stability of the altimeter satellite reference frame in the North/South direction as a proxy to assess the consistency of the reference frame.

  10. Preliminary Results of the GPS Flight Experiment on the High Earth Orbit AMSAT-OSCAR 40 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Michael C.; Bauer, Frank H.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Davis, Edward P.; Davis, George W.; Jackson, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    The GPS flight experiment on the High Earth Orbit (HEO) AMSAT-OSCAR 40 (AO-40) spacecraft was activated for a period of approximately six weeks between 25 September and 2 November, 2001, and the initial results have exciting implications for using GPS as a low-cost orbit determination sensor for future HEO missions. AO-40, an amateur radio satellite launched November 16, 2000, is currently in a low inclination, 1000 by 58,800 km altitude orbit. Although the GPS receiver was not initialized in any way, it regularly returned GPS observations from points all around the orbit. Raw signal to noise levels as high as 9 AMUs (Trimble Amplitude Measurement Units) or approximately 48 dB-Hz have been recorded at apogee, when the spacecraft was close to 60,000 km in altitude. On several occasions when the receiver was below the GPS constellation (below 20,000 krn altitude), observations were reported for GPS satellites tracked through side lobe transmissions. Although the receiver has not returned any point solutions, there has been at least one occasion when four satellites were tracked simultaneously, and this short arc of data was used to compute point solutions after the fact. These results are encouraging, especially considering the spacecraft is currently in a spin-stabilized attitude mode that narrows the effective field of view of the receiving antennas and adversely affects GPS tracking. Already AO-40 has demonstrated the feasibility of recording GPS observations in HEO using an unaided receiver. Furthermore, it is providing important information about the characteristics of GPS signals received by a spacecraft in a HEO, which has long been of interest to many in the GPS community. Based on the data returned so far, the tracking performance is expected to improve when the spacecraft is transitioned to a three axis stabilized, nadir pointing attitude in Summer, 2002.

  11. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Carrier phase GPS for AHS vehicle control. Resource materials. Final report, September 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Galijan, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describs the results of a PSA contract awarded to SRI International to analyze applications of advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) measurement techniques to provide data for lateral and longitudinal control of AHS vehicles. The report includes: (1) a review of control sensor requirements suggested by other PSA contractors and AHS researchers; (2) an indepth discussion of GPS principles of operation, advanced techniques for achieving extremely accurate GPS positioning and velocity data, and techniques for augmenting GPS to provide continuous high-accuracy data; (3) current and expected GPS capabilities and performance; (4) a review of other proposed sensor types for providing lateral and longitudinal control data; (5) a description of a notional architecture and operation of an AHS incorporating GPS; and (6) a preliminary evaluation by SRI of GPS operation in a typical AHS roadway environment.

  12. Silicon Photo-Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Horst

    The properties of photodiodes being exploitable in standard bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS technologies are summarized. In addition examples of advanced photodiodes will be introduced in order to show how the properties of integrated photodiodes can be improved significantly by minor process modifications. Furthermore, examples of optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs) for such important applications like optical storage systems and optical fiber receivers are described. New trends for the circuit topology of digital-video-disk (DVD) and digital-video-recording (DVR) read-OEICs are covered. Progress of OEIC receivers for optical data transmission and communication as well as optical interconnects is also summarized.

  13. Gravity wave detection by GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Arras, Christina; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role for the general atmospheric circulation due to the related transport of energy and momentum between different regions of the atmosphere. The momentum mostly generated in the troposphere is transported to upper atmospheric levels where GWs break or dissipate and transfer their momentum to the background wind (GW drag). The deposit of GW momentum can occur in the complete altitude range from the upper troposphere-stratosphere, the mesosphere, and even in the thermosphere. A global observation of GW parameters (e.g. potential energy and vertical flux of absolute horizontal momentum) is only possible with satellite data. The radio occultation (RO) technique uses GPS signals received aboard low Earth orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Atmospheric temperature profiles in the troposphere/stratosphere and ionospheric electron densities are derived with high vertical resolution. The GPS RO technique is sensitive to GWs with small ratios of vertical to horizontal wavelengths. In this presentation we give an overview about the derivation of GW parameters from RO temperature profiles, review some results of GW detection with RO data, and discuss the limitations of the RO technique. The focus of the presented results is (1) global GW activity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for different seasons, (2) influence of the topography on GW activity from the troposphere to the ionosphere in the Andean region of South America, and (3) the variation of ionospheric sporadic E layers.

  14. Mapping carbon monoxide using GPS tracked sensors.

    PubMed

    Milton, Richard; Steed, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a pilot study where we have mapped urban air pollution using mobile carbon monoxide (CO) sensors. Our objective is to use inexpensive Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to track the sensors and explore CO variations at a fine geographic scale. The critical issue in data processing is the treatment of the imprecise logs from the GPS. By using knowledge about the route and the geometry of the buildings, we are able to increase the position accuracy significantly, while at the same time showing that certain events, such as CO profiles while crossing roads, can be detected with a high degree of accuracy. Comparisons between data from our own mobile sensors and a fixed sensor site show good agreement in the vicinity of the fixed sensor, while at the same time identifying significant CO peaks within 100 m of this location. Using the mobile sensors to collect data along two of the main roads in the area, we are able to show CO variations along an urban canyon for parallel and perpendicular wind directions. Finally, a number of significant sources of CO were discovered during the course of the study, which suggest possible locations for fixed sensor sites in the future. We conclude by discussing the results in the context of the push towards large sensor networks and mobile communications. The potential for ad hoc mobile sensor networks may be very large.

  15. The GPS Burst Detector W-Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, D.D.; Phipps, P.

    1994-08-01

    The NAVSTAR satellites have two missions: navigation and nuclear detonation detection. The main objective of this paper is to describe one of the key elements of the Nuclear Detonation Detection System (NDS), the Burst Detector W-Sensor (BDW) that was developed for the Air Force Space and Missle Systems Center, its mission on GPS Block IIR, and how it utilizes GPS timing signals to precisely locate nuclear detonations (NUDET). The paper will also cover the interface to the Burst Detector Processor (BDP) which links the BDW to the ground station where the BDW is controlled and where data from multiple satellites are processed to determine the location of the NUDET. The Block IIR BDW is the culmination of a development program that has produced a state-of-the-art, space qualified digital receiver/processor that dissipates only 30 Watts, weighs 57 pounds, and has a 12in. {times} l4.2in. {times} 7.16in. footprint. The paper will highlight several of the key multilayer printed circuit cards without which the required power, weight, size, and radiation requirements could not have been met. In addition, key functions of the system software will be covered. The paper will be concluded with a discussion of the high speed digital signal processing and algorithm used to determine the time-of-arrival (TOA) of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from the NUDET.

  16. Characterization of Climate Change and Variability with GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, R.

    1999-01-01

    We compared zonal mean specific humidity derived from the 21 June-4 July 1995 Global Positioning System (GPS)/MET occultation observations with that derived from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) global analyses. The GPS/MET results indicate a drier troposphere, especially near the subtropical tradewind inversion. A small, moist bias in the GPS/MET upper northern-hemisphere troposphere compared to ECMWF may be due to a small radiosonde temperature bias. A diagram shows the difference (g/kg) between the GPS/MET zonal mean specific humidity and that for June-August derived from 1963-1973 radiosondes. Although the observing period is short, GPS and ECMWF results both indicate a significantly wetter boundary layer at most latitudes consistent with decadal trends observed in radiosonde data. GPS/MET results exhibit higher tropical convective available potential energy (CAPE), suggesting a more vigorous tropical Hadley circulation. Drier, free troposphere air in the descending branches of the Hadley circulation is due in part to a moist radiosonde bias but may also reflect some negative moisture feedback. Using 1992-1997 ground GPS observations and recent advancements in GPS technology, we removed an apparent altimetric drift (-1.2 +/- 0.4 mm/yr) due to columnar water vapor from the Topography (Ocean) Experiment (TOPEX) microwave radiometer, which brought the TOPEX mean sea level change estimates into better agreement with historical tide gauge records, suggesting global mean sea level is rising at a rate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr. We can also discern a statistically significant increase of 0.2 +/- 0.1 kg/square m/yr in mean columnar water vapor over the ocean from 1992-1997. Optimal fingerprinting can be used for the detection and attribution of tropospheric warming due to an anthropogenic greenhouse. Optimal fingerprinting distinguishes between different types of signals according to their spatial and temporal patterns, while minimizing the

  17. A Kalman filter implementation for precision improvement in low-cost GPS positioning of tractors.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gil, Jaime; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Ruben; Alonso-Garcia, Sergio; Gomez-Gil, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Low-cost GPS receivers provide geodetic positioning information using the NMEA protocol, usually with eight digits for latitude and nine digits for longitude. When these geodetic coordinates are converted into Cartesian coordinates, the positions fit in a quantization grid of some decimeters in size, the dimensions of which vary depending on the point of the terrestrial surface. The aim of this study is to reduce the quantization errors of some low-cost GPS receivers by using a Kalman filter. Kinematic tractor model equations were employed to particularize the filter, which was tuned by applying Monte Carlo techniques to eighteen straight trajectories, to select the covariance matrices that produced the lowest Root Mean Square Error in these trajectories. Filter performance was tested by using straight tractor paths, which were either simulated or real trajectories acquired by a GPS receiver. The results show that the filter can reduce the quantization error in distance by around 43%. Moreover, it reduces the standard deviation of the heading by 75%. Data suggest that the proposed filter can satisfactorily preprocess the low-cost GPS receiver data when used in an assistance guidance GPS system for tractors. It could also be useful to smooth tractor GPS trajectories that are sharpened when the tractor moves over rough terrain. PMID:24217355

  18. A Kalman Filter Implementation for Precision Improvement in Low-Cost GPS Positioning of Tractors

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Gil, Jaime; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Ruben; Alonso-Garcia, Sergio; Gomez-Gil, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Low-cost GPS receivers provide geodetic positioning information using the NMEA protocol, usually with eight digits for latitude and nine digits for longitude. When these geodetic coordinates are converted into Cartesian coordinates, the positions fit in a quantization grid of some decimeters in size, the dimensions of which vary depending on the point of the terrestrial surface. The aim of this study is to reduce the quantization errors of some low-cost GPS receivers by using a Kalman filter. Kinematic tractor model equations were employed to particularize the filter, which was tuned by applying Monte Carlo techniques to eighteen straight trajectories, to select the covariance matrices that produced the lowest Root Mean Square Error in these trajectories. Filter performance was tested by using straight tractor paths, which were either simulated or real trajectories acquired by a GPS receiver. The results show that the filter can reduce the quantization error in distance by around 43%. Moreover, it reduces the standard deviation of the heading by 75%. Data suggest that the proposed filter can satisfactorily preprocess the low-cost GPS receiver data when used in an assistance guidance GPS system for tractors. It could also be useful to smooth tractor GPS trajectories that are sharpened when the tractor moves over rough terrain. PMID:24217355

  19. Estimating Drivers’ Stress from GPS Traces

    PubMed Central

    Vhaduri, Sudip; Ali, Amin; Sharmin, Moushumi; Hovsepian, Karen; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Driving is known to be a daily stressor. Measurement of driver’s stress in real-time can enable better stress management by increasing self-awareness. Recent advances in sensing technology has made it feasible to continuously assess driver’s stress in real-time, but it requires equipping the driver with these sensors and/or instrumenting the car. In this paper, we present “GStress”, a model to estimate driver’s stress using only smartphone GPS traces. The GStress model is developed and evaluated from data collected in a mobile health user study where 10 participants wore physiological sensors for 7 days ( for an average of 10.45 hours/day) in their natural environment. Each participant engaged in 10 or more driving episodes, resulting in a total of 37 hours of driving data. We find that major driving events such as stops, turns, and braking increase stress of the driver. We quantify their impact on stress and thus construct our GStress model by training a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) on our data. We evaluate the applicability of GStress in predicting stress from GPS traces, and obtain a correlation of 0.72. By obviating any burden on the driver or the car, we believe, GStress can make driver’s stress assessment ubiquitous. PMID:25866847

  20. Topo-Iberia GPS network: installation complete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaradze, G.

    2009-04-01

    As part of the project, titled "Geociencias en Iberia: Estudios integrados de topografía y evolución 4D: Topo-Iberia", we have established a network of 26 continuous GPS stations, covering the Spanish part of the Iberian Peninsula (22 stations) and Morocco (4 stations). A major objective behind the establishment of this array is to monitor millimeter level deformation of the crust due to the collision of African and Eurasian (including Iberian) tectonic plates. More specific goals of the project include the identification of the areas and/or specific seismic faults which exhibit higher deformation rates, which could imply an increased seismic hazard in these specific areas. The network has been designed as two X-shaped transects crossing the peninsula from NE to SW and NW to SE, with relatively coarse distribution of the stations, superimposed with denser coverage in the seismically active areas of the Betics, Pyrenees and Cantabrian chains. The majority of the built monuments consist of 1.5-1.8 m tall concrete pillars of 40 cm in diameter anchored to the bedrock using iron rebars. One station in Huesca was built according the UNAVCO's short drilled braced monument (SDBM) specifications. All the monuments were equipped with the SCIGN leveling mounts to ensure the precise antenna alignment and re-alignment in case of the antenna replacement, as well as, tamper resistance of the monument mark. In places were the snow accumulation was possible the antennas were covered with plastic radomes. The instrumentation used is Trimble NetRS dual-frequency receivers with choke-ring antennas. The communication is mainly via cellular telephone system. As of December 2008, the network installation has been competed and all the stations are fully operational. Here we report the milestones of the installation of the network and, as well as, present the first preliminary results of the analysis of the data. Besides the newly established Topo-Iberia CGPS stations, we have included

  1. A statistical study of GPS loss of lock caused by ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugawa, T.; Nishioka, M.; Otsuka, Y.; Saito, A.; Kato, H.; Kubota, M.; Nagatsuma, T.; Murata, K. T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional total electron content (TEC) maps have been derived from ground-based GPS receiver networks and applied to studies of various ionospheric disturbances since mid-1990s. For the purpose of monitoring and researching ionospheric disturbances which can degrade GNSS navigations and cause loss-of-lock on GNSS signals, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Japan has developed TEC maps over Japan using the dense GPS network, GEONET, which consists of more than 1,200 GPS receivers and is operated by Geophysical Survey Institute, Japan. Currently, we are providing two-dimensional maps of absolute TEC, detrended TEC with 60, 30, 15-minute window, rate of TEC change index (ROTI), and loss-of-lock (LOL) on GPS signal over Japan. These data and quick-look maps since 1997 are archived and available in the website of NICT (http://wdc.nict.go.jp/IONO/). Recently developed GPS receiver networks in North America and Europe make it possible to obtain regional TEC maps with higher spatial and temporal resolution than the global weighted mean TEC maps in the IONEX format provided by several institutes such as International GNSS Service (IGS) and another global TEC map provided by MIT Haystack observatory. Recently, we have also developed the regional TEC maps over North America and Europe. These data and quick-look maps are also available in the NICT website. In this presentation, we will show some severe ionospheric events such as high latitude storm-time plasma bubbles and storm enhanced density events observed over Japan using the GPS-TEC database. These events cause loss-of-lock of GPS signals and large GPS positioning errors. We also discuss about the statistical characteristics of LOL on the GPS signal caused by ionospheric disturbances.

  2. GPS test range mission planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Iris P.; Hancock, Thomas P.

    The principal features of the Test Range User Mission Planner (TRUMP), a PC-resident tool designed to aid in deploying and utilizing GPS-based test range assets, are reviewed. TRUMP features time history plots of time-space-position information (TSPI); performance based on a dynamic GPS/inertial system simulation; time history plots of TSPI data link connectivity; digital terrain elevation data maps with user-defined cultural features; and two-dimensional coverage plots of ground-based test range assets. Some functions to be added during the next development phase are discussed.

  3. A demonstration of unified TDRS/GPS tracking and orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, B.; Lichten, S.; Srinivasan, J.; Young, L.

    1995-01-01

    We describe results from an experiment in which TDRS and GPS satellites were tracked simultaneously from a small (3 station) ground network in the western United States. We refer to this technique as 'GPS-like tracking' (GLT) since the user satellite - in this case TDRS - is essentially treated as a participant in the GPS constellation. In the experiment, the TDRS K(sub space-to-ground link (SGL) was tracked together with GPS L-band signals in enhanced geodetic-quality GPS receivers (TurboRogue). The enhanced receivers simultaneously measured and recorded both the TDRS SGL and the GPS carrier phases with sub-mm precision, enabling subsequent precise TDRS orbit determination with differential GPS techniques. A small number of calibrated ranging points from routine operations at the TDRS ground station (White Sands, NM) were used to supplement the GLT measurements in order to improve determination of the TDRS longitude. Various tests performed on TDRS ephemerides derived from data collected during this demonstration - including comparisons with the operational precise orbit generated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center - provide evidence that the TDRS orbits have been determined to better than 25 m with the GLT technique.

  4. Atmospheric refractivity profiling by the mountain-based GPS and the tomographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yunchang; Guo, Zhimei; Bi, Yanmeng; Tu, Mahong; Zheng, Feifei

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric refractivity sounding is of great importance to the meteorological and military applications. An experiment was conducted for sounding the atmospheric refractivity on the top of the Wuling Mountain in August, 2005. Profiles of the atmospheric refractivity were obtained by both the mountain-based GPS and the tomographic method. Comparison shows that there is a bias of -3.83N and a standard deviation of 7.03N between the mountain-based GPS and the radiosonde. A bias less than 1% among different receivers proves that the receivers tested can meet the demand of the radio occultation technique. A very good consistence among the profiles by the mountain-based GPS, the tomographic method and the radiosonde suggests the effectiveness of both the mountain-based GPS and the tomographic method, indicating the great potential in the future meteorological application.

  5. Near-optimal strategies for sub-decimeter satellite tracking with GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Wu, Sien-Chong; Wu, Jiun-Tsong

    1986-01-01

    Decimeter tracking of low Earth orbiters using differential Global Positioning System (GPS) techniques is discussed. A precisely known global network of GPS ground receivers and a receiver aboard the user satellite are needed, and all techniques simultaneously estimate the user and GPS satellite orbits. Strategies include a purely geometric, a fully dynamic, and a hybrid strategy. The last combines dynamic GPS solutions with a geometric user solution. Two powerful extensions of the hybrid strategy show the most promise. The first uses an optimized synthesis of dynamics and geometry in the user solution, while the second uses a gravity adjustment method to exploit data from repeat ground tracks. These techniques promise to deliver subdecimeter accuracy down to the lowest satellite altitudes.

  6. Geostationary repeaters - A low cost way to enhance civil user performance of GPS and GLONASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagle, J. R.; Kinal, G. V.

    Inmarsat proposes to implement a set of geostationary repeaters operating in the navigation L-band (approximately 1575 MHz) to serve as an overlay to the GPS (Global Positioning System) and GLONASS (the Soviet global navigation satellite system). One major motivation for the overlay is the need expressed by the aeronautical community for an independent, quick response (10 s) external integrity channel. An additional advantage of a navigation band solution is that it would be received by (virtually) unmodified GPS and/or (slightly) modified GLONASS receivers. The integrity, coverage, availability, and timing enhancements that are possible from geostationary augmentation to GPS are discussed. A description of the Inmarsat pseudonoise (PN) test program where GPS-compatible PN-signal formats are transmitted through current Inmarsat satellites is presented to demonstrate the simplicity and practicality of the geostationary repeater augmentation technique.

  7. Where in the world are my field plots? Using GPS effectively in environmental field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Chris E.; Barton, Christopher C.

    2004-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology is rapidly replacing tape, compass, and traditional surveying instruments as the preferred tool for estimating the positions of environmental research sites. One important problem, however, is that it can be difficult to estimate the uncertainty of GPS-derived positions. Sources of error include various satellite- and site-related factors, such as forest canopy and topographic obstructions. In a case study from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, hand-held, mapping-grade GPS receivers generally estimated positions with 1–5 m precision in open, unobstructed settings, and 20–30 m precision under forest canopy. Surveying-grade receivers achieved precisions of 10 cm or less, even in challenging terrain. Users can maximize the quality of their GPS measurements by “mission planning” to take advantage of high-quality satellite conditions. Repeated measurements and simultaneous data collection at multiple points can be used to assess accuracy and precision.

  8. Analysis of meteorological variables in the Australasian region using ground- and space-based GPS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; Choy, Suelynn; Fu, Erjiang Frank; Chane-Ming, Fabrice; Liou, Yuei-An; Pavelyev, Alexander G.

    2016-07-01

    Results of analysis of meteorological variables (temperature and moisture) in the Australasian region using the global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation (RO) and GPS ground-based observations verified with in situ radiosonde (RS) data are presented. The potential of using ground-based GPS observations for retrieving column integrated precipitable water vapour (PWV) over the Australian continent has been demonstrated using the Australian ground-based GPS reference stations network. Using data from the 15 ground-based GPS stations, the state of the atmosphere over Victoria during a significant weather event, the March 2010 Melbourne storm, has been investigated, and it has been shown that the GPS observations has potential for monitoring the movement of a weather front that has sharp moisture contrast. Temperature and moisture variability in the atmosphere over various climatic regions (the Indian and the Pacific Oceans, the Antarctic and Australia) has been examined using satellite-based GPS RO and in situ RS observations. Investigating recent atmospheric temperature trends over Antarctica, the time series of the collocated GPS RO and RS data were examined, and strong cooling in the lower stratosphere and warming through the troposphere over Antarctica has been identified, in agreement with outputs of climate models. With further expansion of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) system, it is expected that GNSS satellite- and ground-based measurements would be able to provide an order of magnitude larger amount of data which in turn could significantly advance weather forecasting services, climate monitoring and analysis in the Australasian region.

  9. Uav Onboard Photogrammetry and GPS Positionning for Earthworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daakir, M.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Bosser, P.; Pichard, F.; Thom, C.

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decade, Unmanned Airbone Vehicles (UAVs) have been largely used for civil applications. Airborne photogrammetry has found place in these applications not only for 3D modeling but also as a measurement tool. Vinci-Construction-Terrassement is a private company specialized in public works sector and uses airborn photogrammetry as a mapping solution and metrology investigation tool on its sites. This technology is very efficient for the calculation of stock volumes for instance, or for time tracking of specific areas with risk of landslides. The aim of the present work is to perform a direct georeferencing of images acquired by the camera leaning on an embedded GPS receiver. UAV, GPS receiver and camera used are low-cost models and therefore data processing is adapted to this particular constraint.

  10. CEA and CA19.9 as early predictors of progression in advanced/metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Petrioli, Roberto; Licchetta, Antonella; Roviello, Giandomenico; Pascucci, Alessandra; Francini, Edoardo; Bargagli, Gianluca; Conca, Raffaele; Miano, Salvatora Tindara; Marzocca, Giuseppe; Francini, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the changes of the tumor markers CEA and CA19.9 as early predictors of progression in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients participating in a clinical study and receiving chemotherapy and bevacizumab (Bev). Seventy-two patients had high baseline CEA or CA19.9 serum levels. By ROC analyses, the areas under the curves were 0.83 for variable CEA cutoff values for distinguishing progressive disease (PD) versus stable disease (SD)/partial remission (PR)/complete remission (CR), and 0.80 for variable CA19.9 cutoff values for distinguishing PD versus SD/PR/CR. Rises in CEA and CA19.9 may early signal the occurrence of progression in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy and Bev. PMID:22236191

  11. A LEO Satellite Navigation Algorithm Based on GPS and Magnetometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack; Harman, Rick; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become a standard method for low cost onboard satellite orbit determination. The use of a GPS receiver as an attitude and rate sensor has also been developed in the recent past. Additionally, focus has been given to attitude and orbit estimation using the magnetometer, a low cost, reliable sensor. Combining measurements from both GPS and a magnetometer can provide a robust navigation system that takes advantage of the estimation qualities of both measurements. Ultimately a low cost, accurate navigation system can result, potentially eliminating the need for more costly sensors, including gyroscopes.

  12. Using 1-Hz GPS data to measure deformations caused by the denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, K.M.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.

    2003-01-01

    The 3 November 2002 moment magnitude 7.9 Denali fault earthquake generated large, permanent surface displacements in Alaska and large-amplitude surface waves throughout western North America. We find good agreement between strong ground-motion records integrated to displacement and 1-hertz Global Positioning System (GPS) position estimates collected ??? 140 kilometers from the earthquake epicenter. One-hertz GPS receivers also detected seismic surface waves 750 to 3800 kilometers from the epicenter, whereas these waves saturated many of the seismic instruments in the same region. High-frequency GPS increases the dynamic range and frequency bandwidth of ground-motion observations, providing another tool for studying earthquake processes.

  13. The influence of gyro drift on system integrity of integrated GPS-INS precision navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaenzer, G.

    In highly maneuverable vehicle applications, the dynamic response of GPS receivers and the shadowing of the GPS antennas by parts of the vehicle may significantly reduce the accuracy and the integrity of the system. It is shown that the navigation errors of GPS can be significantly reduced by using differential mode and carrier phase measurements. A complementary INS sensor system will improve the integrity. In flight tests, accuracies better than 30 cm in position (3 components) and 7 cm/sec in velocity have been demonstrated.

  14. Accuracy Assessment of GPS Buoy Sea Level Measurements for Coastal Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, S.; Cheng, K.

    2008-12-01

    The GPS buoy in this study contains a geodetic antenna and a compact floater with the GPS receiver and power supply tethered to a boat. The coastal applications using GPS include monitoring of sea level and its change, calibration of satellite altimeters, hydrological or geophysical parameters modeling, seafloor geodesy, and others. Among these applications, in order to understand the overall data or model quality, it is required to gain the knowledge of position accuracy of GPS buoys or GPS-equipped vessels. Despite different new GPS data processing techniques, e.g., Precise Point Positioning (PPP) and virtual reference station (VRS), that require a prioir information obtained from the a regional GPS network. While the required a prioir information can be implemented on land, it may not be available on the sea. Hence, in this study, the GPS buoy was positioned with respect to a onshore GPS reference station using the traditional double- difference technique. Since the atmosphere starts to decorrelate as the baseline, the distance between the buoy and the reference station, increases, the positioning accuracy consequently decreases. Therefore, this study aims to assess the buoy position accuracy as the baseline increases and in order to quantify the upper limit of sea level measured by the GPS buoy. A GPS buoy campaign was conducted by National Chung Cheng University in An Ping, Taiwan with a 8- hour GPS buoy data collection. In addition, a GPS network contains 4 Continuous GPS (CGPS) stations in Taiwan was established with the goal to enable baselines in different range for buoy data processing. A vector relation from the network was utilized in order to find the correct ambiguities, which were applied to the long-baseline solution to eliminate the position error caused by incorrect ambiguities. After this procedure, a 3.6-cm discrepancy was found in the mean sea level solution between the long (~80 km) and the short (~1.5 km) baselines. The discrepancy between a

  15. One nanosecond time synchronization using series and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buennagel, A. A.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Young, L. E.

    1983-01-01

    Subnanosecond time sychronization between two remote rubidium frequency standards is verified by a traveling clock comparison. Using a novel, code ignorant Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver developed at JPL, the SERIES geodetic baseline measurement system is applied to establish the offset between the 1 Hz. outputs of the remote standards. Results of the two intercomparison experiments to date are presented as well as experimental details.

  16. A Low Cost GPS System for Real-Time Tracking of Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markgraf, M.; Montenbruck, O.; Hassenpflug, F.; Turner, P.; Bull, B.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to minimize the need for costly, complex, tracking radars, the German Space Operations Center has set up a research project for GPS based tracking of sounding rockets. As part of this project, a GPS receiver based on commercial technology for terrestrial applications has been modified to allow its use under the highly dynamical conditions of a sounding rocket flight. In addition, new antenna concepts are studied as an alternative to proven but costly wrap-around antennas.

  17. Precise Point Positioning for the Efficient and Robust Analysis of GPS Data from Large Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.; Heflin, M. B.; Jefferson, D. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Webb, F. H.

    1997-01-01

    Networks of dozens to hundreds of permanently operating precision Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are emerging at spatial scales that range from 10(exp 0) to 10(exp 3) km. To keep the computational burden associated with the analysis of such data economically feasible, one approach is to first determine precise GPS satellite positions and clock corrections from a globally distributed network of GPS receivers. Their, data from the local network are analyzed by estimating receiver- specific parameters with receiver-specific data satellite parameters are held fixed at their values determined in the global solution. This "precise point positioning" allows analysis of data from hundreds to thousands of sites every (lay with 40-Mflop computers, with results comparable in quality to the simultaneous analysis of all data. The reference frames for the global and network solutions can be free of distortion imposed by erroneous fiducial constraints on any sites.

  18. Precise Point Positioning for the Efficient and Robust Analysis of GPS Data From Large Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.; Heflin, M. B.; Jefferson, D. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Webb, F. H.

    1997-01-01

    Networks of dozens to hundreds of permanently operating precision Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are emerging at spatial scales that range from 10(exp 0) to 10(exp 3) km. To keep the computational burden associated with the analysis of such data economically feasible, one approach is to first determine precise GPS satellite positions and clock corrections from a globally distributed network of GPS receivers. Then, data from the local network are analyzed by estimating receiver specific parameters with receiver-specific data; satellite parameters are held fixed at their values determined in the global solution. This "precise point positioning" allows analysis of data from hundreds to thousands of sites every day with 40 Mflop computers, with results comparable in quality to the simultaneous analysis of all data. The reference frames for the global and network solutions can be free of distortion imposed by erroneous fiducial constraints on any sites.

  19. Ground Truth Accuracy Tests of GPS Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elosegui, P.; Oberlander, D. J.; Davis, J. L.; Baena, R.; Ekstrom, G.

    2005-12-01

    As the precision of GPS determinations of site position continues to improve the detection of smaller and faster geophysical signals becomes possible. However, lack of independent measurements of these signals often precludes an assessment of the accuracy of such GPS position determinations. This may be particularly true for high-rate GPS applications. We have built an apparatus to assess the accuracy of GPS position determinations for high-rate applications, in particular the application known as "GPS seismology." The apparatus consists of a bidirectional, single-axis positioning table coupled to a digitally controlled stepping motor. The motor, in turn, is connected to a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip that synchronously sequences through real historical earthquake profiles stored in Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory's (EPROM). A GPS antenna attached to this positioning table undergoes the simulated seismic motions of the Earth's surface while collecting high-rate GPS data. Analysis of the time-dependent position estimates can then be compared to the "ground truth," and the resultant GPS error spectrum can be measured. We have made extensive measurements with this system while inducing simulated seismic motions either in the horizontal plane or the vertical axis. A second stationary GPS antenna at a distance of several meters was simultaneously collecting high-rate (5 Hz) GPS data. We will present the calibration of this system, describe the GPS observations and data analysis, and assess the accuracy of GPS for high-rate geophysical applications and natural hazards mitigation.

  20. Shuttle Global Positioning (GPS) System design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P.; Huth, G. K.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations of certain aspects and problems of the shuttle global positioning system GPS, are presented. Included are: test philosophy and test outline; development of a phase slope specification for the shuttle GPS antenna; an investigation of the shuttle jamming vulnerability; and an expression for the GPS signal to noise density ratio for the thermal protection system.

  1. Error modeling for GPS geodetic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rim, Hyung Jin; Schutz, Bob E.; Tapley, Byron D.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive investigation was conducted to provide realistic error models for Global Positioning System (GPS) related numerical simulation. This study considers most of the important error sources for measurement and dynamic models which are currently being used for GPS geodetic applications. These error models were evaluated by comparing with real GPS data.

  2. Integrated navigation of aerial robot for GPS and GPS-denied environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Min, Hongkyu; Wada, Tetsuya; Nonami, Kenzo

    2016-09-01

    In this study, novel robust navigation system for aerial robot in GPS and GPS- denied environments is proposed. Generally, the aerial robot uses position and velocity information from Global Positioning System (GPS) for guidance and control. However, GPS could not be used in several environments, for example, GPS has huge error near buildings and trees, indoor, and so on. In such GPS-denied environment, Laser Detection and Ranging (LIDER) sensor based navigation system have generally been used. However, LIDER sensor also has an weakness, and it could not be used in the open outdoor environment where GPS could be used. Therefore, it is desired to develop the integrated navigation system which is seamlessly applied to GPS and GPS-denied environments. In this paper, the integrated navigation system for aerial robot using GPS and LIDER is developed. The navigation system is designed based on Extended Kalman Filter, and the effectiveness of the developed system is verified by numerical simulation and experiment.

  3. Ekofisk automatic GPS subsidence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mes, M.J.; Landau, H.; Luttenberger, C.

    1996-10-01

    A fully automatic GPS satellite-based procedure for the reliable measurement of subsidence of several platforms in almost real time is described. Measurements are made continuously on platforms in the North Sea Ekofisk Field area. The procedure also yields rate measurements, which are also essential for confirming platform safety, planning of remedial work, and verification of subsidence models. GPS measurements are more attractive than seabed pressure-gauge-based platform subsidence measurements-they are much cheaper to install and maintain and not subject to gauge drift. GPS measurements were coupled to oceanographic quantities such as the platform deck clearance, which leads to less complex offshore survey procedures. Ekofisk is an oil and gas field in the southern portion of the Norwegian North Sea. Late in 1984, it was noticed that the Ekofisk platform decks were closer to the sea surface than when the platforms were installed-subsidence was the only logical explanation. After the subsidence phenomenon was recognized, an accurate measurement method was needed to measure progression of subsidence and the associated subsidence rate. One available system for which no further development was needed, was the NAVSTAR GPS-measurements started in March 1985.

  4. Animal Tracking ARGOS vs GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. W.; Costa, D.; Arnould, J.; Weise, M.; Kuhn, C.; Simmons, S. E.; Villegas, S.; Tremblay, Y.

    2006-12-01

    ARGOS satellite tracking technology has enabled a tremendous increase in our understanding of the movement patterns of a diverse array of marine vertebrates from Sharks to marine mammals. Our current understanding has moved from simple descriptions of large scale migratory patterns to much more sophisticated comparisons of animal movements and behavior relative to oceanic features. Further, animals are increasingly used to carry sensors that can acquire water column temperature and salinity profiles. However, a major limitation of this work is the spatial precision of ARGOS locations. ARGOS provides 7 location qualities that range from 3,2,1,0,A,B,Z and correspond to locations with a precision of 150m to tens of kilometers. Until recently, GPS technology could not be effectively used with marine mammals because they did not spend sufficient time at the surface to allow complete acquisition of satellite information. The recent development of Fastloc technology has allowed the development of GPS tags that can be deployed on marine mammals. Here we compare the location quality and frequency derived from standard ARGOS PTTs to Fastloc GPS locations acquired from 11 northern elephant seals, 5 California and 5 Galapagos sea lions and 1 Cape and 3 Australian fur seals. Our results indicate that GPS technology will greatly enhance our ability to understand the movement patterns of marine vertebrates and the in-situ oceanographic data they collect.

  5. The application of NAVSTAR Differential GPS to civil helicopter operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beser, J.; Parkinson, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Principles concerning the operation of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are discussed. Selective availability issues concerning NAVSTAR GPS and differential GPS concepts are analyzed. Civil support and market potential for differential GPS are outlined. It is concluded that differential GPS provides a variation on the baseline GPS system, and gives an assured, uninterrupted level of accuracy for the civilian community.

  6. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  7. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  8. Integrated Advance Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report: EOS AMSU-A1 and AMSU-A2 Receivers Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This test report presents the test data of the EOS AMSU-A Flight Model No.1 (FM-1) receiver subsystem. The tests are performed per the Acceptance Test Procedure for the AMSU-A Reseiver Subsystem, AE-26002/6A. The functional performance tests are conducted either at the component or subsystem level. While the component-level tests are performed over the entire operating temperature range predicted by thermal analysis, the subsystem-level test are conducted at ambient temperature only.

  9. Military GPS handheld display development: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiel, Alicia P.; Smothers, Andrew D.

    1998-09-01

    The military Precision Lightweight Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver or 'PLGR' hand-held product eliminated many technical barriers to bring a low cost 'commercial' transflective display to be a standard military issue. This low cost display, combined with silicone keypad, provides a human interface that has been extremely successful at a current rate of 190 units built per day. With the PLGR and more recent PLGR-II success in meeting the challenges of the military GPS market with a low-cost display, the PLGR is now a platform to provide affordable military-commercial display solutions for the future. The paper will provide technical background on the display provided for the initial GPS hand- held award and the technology changes that were based on the voice of the customer. The display performance in the areas of contrast, Night Vision Goggle (NVG) compatibility, backlighting, and off axis viewability will be presented. Current and future challenges in hand-held and vehicular GPS products will also be presented with possible applications of new display technologies.

  10. Software for a GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    A special-purpose software Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver designed for remote sensing with reflected GPS signals is described in Delay/Doppler-Mapping GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System (NPO-30385), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The input accepted by this program comprises raw (open-loop) digitized GPS signals sampled at a rate of about 20 MHz. The program processes the data samples to perform the following functions: detection of signals; tracking of phases and delays; mapping of delay, Doppler, and delay/Doppler waveforms; dual-frequency processing; coherent integrations as short as 125 s; decoding of navigation messages; and precise time tagging of observable quantities. The software can perform these functions on all detectable satellite signals without dead time. Open-loop data collected over water, land, or ice and processed by this software can be further processed to extract geophysical information. Possible examples include mean sea height, wind speed and direction, and significant wave height (for observations over the ocean); bistatic-radar terrain images and measures of soil moisture and biomass (for observations over land); and estimates of ice age, thickness, and surface density (for observations over ice).

  11. GPS source solution of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Houlié, N.; Dreger, D.; Kim, A.

    2014-01-01

    We compute a series of finite-source parameter inversions of the fault rupture of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake based on 1 Hz GPS records only. We confirm that some of the co-seismic slip at shallow depth (<5 km) constrained by InSAR data processing results from early post-seismic deformation. We also show 1) that if located very close to the rupture, a GPS receiver can saturate while it remains possible to estimate the ground velocity (~1.2 m/s) near the fault, 2) that GPS waveforms inversions constrain that the slip distribution at depth even when GPS monuments are not located directly above the ruptured areas and 3) the slip distribution at depth from our best models agree with that recovered from strong motion data. The 95th percentile of the slip amplitudes for rupture velocities ranging from 2 to 5 km/s is ~55 ± 6 cm. PMID:24434939

  12. GPS orbit determination at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenewerk, Mark S.

    1992-01-01

    The National Geodetic Survey (NGS) independently generates precise ephemerides for all available Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. Beginning in 1991, these ephemerides were produced from double-differenced phase observations solely from the Cooperative International GPS Network (CIGNET) tracking sites. The double-difference technique combines simultaneous observations of two satellites from two ground stations effectively eliminating satellite and ground receiver clock errors, and the Selective Availability (S/A) signal degradation currently in effect. CIGNET is a global GPS tracking network whose primary purpose is to provide data for orbit production. The CIGNET data are collected daily at NGS and are available to the public. Each ephemeris covers a single week and is available within one month after the data were taken. Verification is by baseline repeatability and direct comparison with other ephemerides. Typically, an ephemeris is accurate at a few parts in 10(exp 7). This corresponds to a 10 meter error in the reported satellite positions. NGS is actively investigating methods to improve the accuracy of its orbits, the ultimate goal being one part in 10(exp 8) or better. The ephemerides are generally available to the public through the Coast Guard GPS Information Center or directly from NGS through the Geodetic Information Service. An overview of the techniques and software used in orbit generation will be given, the current status of CIGNET will be described, and a summary of the ephemeris verification results will be presented.

  13. The atmospheric information content of GPS Slant Total Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, Florian; Dick, Galina; Wickert, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Radio signals which are transmitted by GPS satellites and received by a ground-based station allow the estimation of the Zenith Total Delay (ZTD). Clearly, the ZTD is of limited value in weather forecasting because it does not contain information about horizontal (and vertical) atmospheric gradients. In this work we show that the estimated Slant Total Delays (STDs), i.e. the atmospheric induced signal travel time delays between the GPS satellites in view and the station, contain the desired additional information. To do so, we first determine artificial STDs in a Numerical Weather Model (NWM) by point-to-point raytracing and retrieve NWM refractivity gradients through a non-linear least square analysis. Then, we repeat this exercise but use real STDs instead to retrieve GPS refractivity gradients. This procedure is done station-by-station for ~200 stations in Germany and maps of NWM and GPS horizontal refractity gradients are generated. The remarkable close agreement between the maps (inspection by eye) leads to the conclusion that STDs carry the signature of the atmospheric asymmetry. The statistics supports this finding and since STDs are available in near-real time as well they are considered a valuable new data source for weather forecasting.

  14. GPS source solution of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake.

    PubMed

    Houlié, N; Dreger, D; Kim, A

    2014-01-01

    We compute a series of finite-source parameter inversions of the fault rupture of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake based on 1 Hz GPS records only. We confirm that some of the co-seismic slip at shallow depth (<5 km) constrained by InSAR data processing results from early post-seismic deformation. We also show 1) that if located very close to the rupture, a GPS receiver can saturate while it remains possible to estimate the ground velocity (~1.2 m/s) near the fault, 2) that GPS waveforms inversions constrain that the slip distribution at depth even when GPS monuments are not located directly above the ruptured areas and 3) the slip distribution at depth from our best models agree with that recovered from strong motion data. The 95(th) percentile of the slip amplitudes for rupture velocities ranging from 2 to 5 km/s is ~55 ± 6 cm. PMID:24434939

  15. IMU/GPS System Provides Position and Attitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching Fang

    2006-01-01

    A special navigation system is being developed to provide high-quality information on the position and attitude of a moving platform (an aircraft or spacecraft), for use in pointing and stabilization of a hyperspectral remote-sensing system carried aboard the platform. The system also serves to enable synchronization and interpretation of readouts of all onboard sensors. The heart of the system is a commercially available unit, small enough to be held in one hand, that contains an integral combination of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a differential GPS subsystem, and ancillary data-processing subsystems. The system utilizes GPS carrier-phase measurements to generate time data plus highly accurate and continuous data on the position, attitude, rotation, and acceleration of the platform. Relative to prior navigation systems based on IMU and GPS subsystems, this system is smaller, is less expensive, and performs better. Optionally, the system can easily be connected to a laptop computer for demonstration and evaluation. In addition to airborne and spaceborne remote-sensing applications, there are numerous potential terrestrial sensing, measurement, and navigation applications in diverse endeavors that include forestry, environmental monitoring, agriculture, mining, and robotics.

  16. Gender differences in French GPs' activity: the contribution of quantile regressions.

    PubMed

    Dumontet, Magali; Franc, Carine

    2015-05-01

    In any fee-for-service system, doctors may be encouraged to increase the number of services (private activity) they provide to receive a higher income. Studying private activity determinants helps to predict doctors' provision of care. In the context of strong feminization and heterogeneity in general practitioners' (GP) behavior, we first aim to measure the effects of the determinants of private activity. Second, we study the evolution of these effects along the private activity distribution. Third, we examine the differences between male and female GPs. From an exhaustive database of French GPs working in private practice in 2008, we performed an ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and quantile regressions (QR) on the GPs' private activity. Among other determinants, we examined the trade-offs within the GPs' household considering his/her marital status, spousal income, and children. While the OLS results showed that female GPs had less private activity than male GPs (-13%), the QR results emphasized a private activity gender gap that increased significantly in the upper tail of the distribution. We also find gender differences in the private activity determinants, including family structure, practice characteristics, and case-mix variables. For instance, having a youngest child under 12 years old had a positive effect on the level of private activity for male GPs and a negative effect for female GPs. The results allow us to understand to what extent the supply of care differs between male and female GPs. In the context of strong feminization, this is essential to consider for organizing and forecasting the GPs' supply of care.

  17. NASA's global differential GPS system and the TDRSS augmentation service for satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Young, Larry; Stocklin, Frank; Rush, John

    2004-01-01

    NASA is planning to launch a new service for Earth satellites providing them with precise GPS differential corrections and other ancillary information enabling decimeter level orbit determination accuracy, and nanosecond time-transfer accuracy, onboard, in real-time. The TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS) will broadcast its message on the S-band multiple access channel of NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The satellite's phase array antenna has been configured to provide a wide beam, extending coverage up to 1000 km altitude over the poles. Global coverage will be ensured with broadcast from three or more TDRSS satellites. The GPS differential corrections are provided by the NASA Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System, developed and operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The GDGPS System employs a global ground network of more than 70 GPS receivers to monitor the GPS constellation in real time. The system provides real-time estimates of the GPS satellite states, as well as many other real-time products such as differential corrections, global ionospheric maps, and integrity monitoring. The unique multiply redundant architecture of the GDGPS System ensures very high reliability, with 99.999% demonstrated since the inception of the system in Early 2000. The estimated real time GPS orbit and clock states provided by the GDGPS system are accurate to better than 20 cm 3D RMS, and have been demonstrated to support sub-decimeter real time positioning and orbit determination for a variety of terrestrial, airborne, and spaceborne applications. In addition to the GPS differential corrections, TASS will provide real-time Earth orientation and solar flux information that enable precise onboard knowledge of the Earth-fixed position of the spacecraft, and precise orbit prediction and planning capabilities. TASS will also provide 5 seconds alarms for GPS integrity failures based on the unique GPS integrity monitoring service of the

  18. The impact of early percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement on treatment completeness and nutritional status in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Beste M; Yonal, Oya; Demirel, Birsen; Dane, Faysal; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Kalayci, Cem; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Imeryuz, Nese

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the impact of early insertion of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-tube on nutritional status and completeness of concurrent chemotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Twenty-three patients were enrolled into this prospective study. Gastrostomy-tube was inserted in patients before the initiation of chemoradiotherapy. There was not any significant change in nutritional parameters of patients that used their tube during treatment. Despite the grade 3 mucositis, the planned concurrent chemotherapy could be given in 70% of the patients. However, nine patients had weak compliance and their body weight (P = 0.01) and body mass index (P = 0.01) deteriorated in the first 4 weeks of chemoradiotherapy. The completeness of concurrent chemo-rate was 44% in these patients. Toxicity, requiring aggressive supportive care, may limit the chemotherapy part of curative concomitant chemoradiotherapy. By providing adequate enteral nutrition the insertion of gastrostomy-tube can increase the completeness rate of concurrent chemotherapy.

  19. Program risk reduction through HWIL GPS/INS testing: an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupp, George B.; Lehnus, David S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper illustrates how risk for the Navy Lightweight Exo-Atmospheric Projectile (LEAP) Technology Demonstration program was reduced using hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing of the GPS/INS function in JHU/APL's Navigation and Guidance System Integration Laboratory (NAVSIL) facility. Under LEAP, a new STANDARD Missile based interceptor and a shipboard weapon system was built to demonstrate the potential of integrating the required technologies to defend against tactical ballistic missiles in outerspace (prior to atmospheric reentry). The LEAP system used an integrated GPS/INS package to provide accurate knowledge of interceptor attitude as well as position and velocity, which were critical to pointing the Kinetic Kill Vehicle at the target. The mission contained both high acceleration and high velocity while demanding high accuracy attitude estimates at the end of the short flight. The NAVSIL facility provided a high-fidelity HWIL approach to testing missile guidance systems that utilize GPS/INS guidance. Precise control and repeatability were provided for the two primary sensor inputs: GPS RF and the inertial measurements with instrument errors. HWIL tests were driven by high-fidelity all-digital 6-DOF missile motion simulations that accurately generated the translational and attitude dynamics in all phases of the mission from pre-launch through to the target. Real-time antenna pattern simulation was implemented to assess impact of signal level effects on GPS receiver performance. An innovative real-time technique was employed to simulate the frequency shift induced in the GPS receiver oscillator due to high-g forces, thus allowing accurate laboratory assessment of the receiver's ability to track, reacquire,a nd accurately navigate under g load. The resulting responsive high-fidelity HWIL testing capability provided critical support to development of the GPS/INS package and an independent assessment of expected GPS/INS performance during the mission.

  20. GPS Ionospheric Tomography over Japan with Constrained Least-squares Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, A.; Teraishi, S.; Ueno, G.; Fujita, N.; Tsugawa, T.

    2007-12-01

    An ionospheric tomography method was developed for the GPS total electron data observed by a dense GPS receiver network in Japan. GEONET is a GPS network operated by Geographical Survey Institute, Japan, and consists of about 1,200 receivers. Its high-density distribution of the receivers, and wide coverage provide a suitable data set to reconstruct the electron density distribution in the ionosphere with high spatial resolution. The newly developed GPS ionospheric tomography (GPS-IT) model is based on the constrained least-squares method (CLM). The three dimensional distribution of the ionospheric electron is derived at every data sampling time, 30 seconds. A priori information requested for the GPS-IT is the intensity of restriction for the spatial gradient of the electron density. The vertical gradient of the electron density is restricted to be low above 800km altitude. The vertical boundary condition at bottom-side is based on the IRI model and at topside is based on the plasmaspheric model. The horizontal boundary condition is that the gradient of the electron density is nearly zero. The derived electron density distribution shows a good agreement with the electron density measured by the IS observation of the MU radar, and ionosondes. This GPS-IT can also include the data from the MU radar, ionosondes, and in-situ density measurements. This flexibility and robustness is an advantage of this GPS-IT model with CLM. The introduction of the algorithm, and the electron density distribution obtained in the quiet and disturbed days will be presented.