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Sample records for advanced graphite creep

  1. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  2. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of

  3. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  4. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  5. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  6. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any

  7. A Comparison of the Irradiation Creep Behavior of Several Graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Windes, Will

    2016-01-01

    Graphite creep strain data from the irradiation creep capsule Advanced Graphite Creep-1 (AGC-1) are reported. This capsule was the first (prototype) of a series of five or six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment, which was designed to fully characterize the effects of neutron irradiation and the radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphite. The creep strain data and analysis are reported for the six graphite grades incorporated in the capsule. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at approximately 700 C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). The specimen s final dose, temperature, and stress conditions have been reported by INL and were used during this analysis. The derived creep coefficients (K) were calculated for each grade and were found to compare well to literature data for the creep coefficient, even under the wide range of AGC-1 specimen temperatures. Comparisons were made between AGC-1 data and historical grade data for creep coefficients.

  8. Examination of Experimental Data for Irradiation - Creep in Nuclear Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasheran, Amir Sassan

    The objective of this dissertation was to establish credibility and confidence levels of the observed behavior of nuclear graphite in neutron irradiation environment. Available experimental data associated with the OC-series irradiation -induced creep experiments performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were examined. Pre- and postirradiation measurement data were studied considering "linear" and "nonlinear" creep models. The nonlinear creep model considers the creep coefficient to vary with neutron fluence due to the densification of graphite with neutron irradiation. Within the range of neutron fluence involved (up to 0.53 times 10^{26} neutrons/m ^2, E > 50 KeV), both models were capable of explaining about 96% and 80% of the variation of the irradiation-induced creep strain with neutron fluence at temperatures of 600^circC and 900^circC, respectively. Temperature and reactor power data were analyzed to determine the best estimates for the actual irradiation temperatures. It was determined according to thermocouple readouts that the best estimate values for the irradiation temperatures were well within +/-10 ^circC of the design temperatures of 600^circC and 900 ^circC. The dependence of the secondary creep coefficients (for both linear and nonlinear models) on irradiation temperature was determined assuming that the variation of creep coefficient with temperature, in the temperature range studied, is reasonably linear. It was concluded that the variability in estimate of the creep coefficients is definitely not the results of temperature fluctuations in the experiment. The coefficients for the constitutive equation describing the overall growth of grade H-451 graphite were also studied. It was revealed that the modulus of elasticity and the shear modulus are not affected by creep and that the electrical resistivity is slightly (less than 5%) changed by creep. However, the coefficient of thermal expansion does change with creep. The consistency of

  9. Modeling irradiation creep of graphite using rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Apu; Eapen, Jacob; Raj, Anant; Murty, K. L.; Burchell, T. D.

    2016-05-01

    We have examined irradiation induced creep of graphite in the framework of transition state rate theory. Experimental data for two grades of nuclear graphite (H-337 and AGOT) have been analyzed to determine the stress exponent (n) and activation energy (Q) for plastic flow under irradiation. We show that the mean activation energy lies between 0.14 and 0.32 eV with a mean stress-exponent of 1.0 ± 0.2. A stress exponent of unity and the unusually low activation energies strongly indicate a diffusive defect transport mechanism for neutron doses in the range of 3-4 × 1022 n/cm2.

  10. A revised description of graphite irradiation induced creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Mark A.; Bradford, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The UK fleet of advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR) have been operating for a substantial period of time and rely on data obtained from material test reactor (MTR) programs, dating back to the 1960s and through to the end of the 1980s, to support current and future operation. Historically an empirical approach to the irradiation behaviour of graphite has been used and, due to the nature of the available MTR data and the lack of a consistent set of data containing all the relevant measurements, this is still largely the case at present. Differences in interpretation of the available MTR data can have a significant impact on the assessed integrity of core components. Consequently, a thorough review of the basis of the current models is being carried out, and new models are being developed as necessary. This paper presents some new interpretations of the available low fluence MTR data for irradiation creep and application of a revised model to some high fluence MTR data.

  11. MICROMECHANICS IN CONTINOUS GRAPHITE FIBER/EPOXY COMPOSITES DURING CREEP

    SciTech Connect

    C. ZHOU; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Micro Raman spectroscopy and classic composite shear-lag models were used to analyze the evolution with time of fiber and matrix strain/stress around fiber breaks in planar model graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites. Impressive agreements were found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The local matrix creep leads to an increase in the load transfer length around the break under a constant load. This increases the chance of fiber breakage in the neighboring intact fibers.

  12. Modeling irradiation creep of graphite using rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Apu; Eapen, Jacob; Raj, Anant; Murty, K. L.; Burchell, T. D.

    2016-02-20

    In this work we examined irradiation induced creep of graphite in the framework of transition state rate theory. Experimental data for two grades of nuclear graphite (H-337 and AGOT) were analyzed to determine the stress exponent (n) and activation energy (Q) for plastic flow under irradiation. Here we show that the mean activation energy lies between 0.14 and 0.32 eV with a mean stress-exponent of 1.0 ± 0.2. A stress exponent of unity and the unusually low activation energies strongly indicate a diffusive defect transport mechanism for neutron doses in the range of 3-4 x 1022 n/cm2.

  13. Modeling irradiation creep of graphite using rate theory

    DOE PAGES

    Sarkar, Apu; Eapen, Jacob; Raj, Anant; ...

    2016-02-20

    In this work we examined irradiation induced creep of graphite in the framework of transition state rate theory. Experimental data for two grades of nuclear graphite (H-337 and AGOT) were analyzed to determine the stress exponent (n) and activation energy (Q) for plastic flow under irradiation. Here we show that the mean activation energy lies between 0.14 and 0.32 eV with a mean stress-exponent of 1.0 ± 0.2. A stress exponent of unity and the unusually low activation energies strongly indicate a diffusive defect transport mechanism for neutron doses in the range of 3-4 x 1022 n/cm2.

  14. Compressive Creep Response of T1000G/RS-14 Graphite/Polycyanate Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Starbuck, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The response of a T1000G/RS-14 graphite/polycyanate composite material system to transverse compressive loads is quantified via experimentation. The primary objective of the work was to quantify the effects of process environment and test environment on the T1000G/RS-14 compressive creep response. Tests were conducted on both the neat resin and the composite material system. In addition to the creep tests, static compressive strength tests were conducted to define the stress-strain response. The creep behavior for the RS-14 resin was quantified by conducting a series of tests to study the effects of different process environments (air and nitrogen), different cure temperatures, and different test environments (air and vacuum). The combined effect on the RS-14 resin compressive creep of processing in nitrogen and testing under vacuum versus processing in air and testing in air was a 47% decrease in the creep strain after 2177 hr. The test environment appeared to have a greater effect on the resin creep than the process environment. Following the conclusion of the resin creep tests, composite transverse compressive creep tests were conducted. The composite creep test cylinder was post-cured in a nitrogen environment prior to machining test specimens and all tests were conducted in a vacuum environment. The series of tests investigated the effects of initial stress level and test temperature on the creep behavior. At the end of the 2000-hr tests at 275{degrees}F on specimens stressed at 10,000 psi, the nitrogen-processed and vacuum-tested conditions reduced the composite transverse compressive creep strain by 19% compared to processing in air and testing in air. The effects of process and test environment on the creep behavior are not as great for the composite system as they were for the neat resin, primarily because of the low resin content in the composite material system. At the 275{degrees}F test temperature there was a significant increase in the composite

  15. A Review of Graphite Irradiation Creep Data from the "OC-Series" of Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Mark A.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    2012-09-01

    The OC-Series graphite irradiation creep experiments were conducted in the early 1970s in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) at ORNL. The OC Series consisted of 5 experiments, Capsules 1, 3 and 5 were irradiated at 900°C and Capsules 2 and 4 were irradiated at 600°C. Each capsule contained four columns of specimens, two loaded in compression and two un-loaded. The loaded columns had specimens of different diameter to generate two stress levels, 13.8 MPa and 20.7 MPa. Some of the data from these experiments were presented in extended abstracts at a Carbon Conference (Kennedy et al, 1977: Kennedy and Eatherly, 1979). The data presented some challenges to the accepted approach to irradiation induced creep in graphite adopted in the UK, specifically lateral creep strain behaviour and the effect of irradiation induced creep strain on material properties, e.g. CTE and Poisson’s Ratio. A recent review of irradiation induced creep (Davies & Bradford, 2004) included an anlaysis of the available OC-series data (Mobasheran, 1990) and led to a request to ORNL for an examination of the original OC-Series dataset. An initial search of the ORNL archive revealed additional data from the OC-Series experiment including previously unknown irradiation annealing experiments. This report presents a re-analysis of the available data from the OC-Series archive.

  16. Creep behavior for advanced polycrystalline SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Kohyama, Akira

    1997-08-01

    A bend stress relaxation (BSR) test is planned to examine irradiation enhanced creep in polycrystalline SiC fibers which are under development for use as fiber reinforcement in SiC/SiC composite. Baseline 1 hr and 100 hr BSR thermal creep {open_quotes}m{close_quotes} curves have been obtained for five selected advanced SiC fiber types and for standard Nicalon CG fiber. The transition temperature, that temperature where the S-shaped m-curve has a value 0.5, is a measure of fiber creep resistance. In order of decreasing thermal creep resistance, with the 100 hr BSR transition temperature given in parenthesis, the fibers ranked: Sylramic (1261{degrees}C), Nicalon S (1256{degrees}C), annealed Hi Nicalon (1215{degrees}C), Hi Nicalon (1078{degrees}C), Nicalon CG (1003{degrees}C) and Tyranno E (932{degrees}C). The thermal creep for Sylramic, Nicalon S, Hi Nicalon and Nicalon CG fibers in a 5000 hr irradiation creep BSR test is projected from the temperature dependence of the m-curves determined during 1 and 100 hr BSR control tests.

  17. Creep analysis of fuel plates for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Yahr, G.T.

    1994-11-01

    The reactor for the planned Advanced Neutron Source will use closely spaced arrays of fuel plates. The plates are thin and will have a core containing enriched uranium silicide fuel clad in aluminum. The heat load caused by the nuclear reactions within the fuel plates will be removed by flowing high-velocity heavy water through narrow channels between the plates. However, the plates will still be at elevated temperatures while in service, and the potential for excessive plate deformation because of creep must be considered. An analysis to include creep for deformation and stresses because of temperature over a given time span has been performed and is reported herein.

  18. Experimental Plan for EDF Energy Creep Rabbit Graphite Irradiations- Rev. 2 (replaces Rev. 0 ORNL/TM/2013/49).

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2014-07-01

    The experimental results obtained here will assist in the development and validation of future models of irradiation induced creep of graphite by providing the following data: Inert creep stain data from low to lifetime AGR fluence Inert creep-property data (especially CTE) from low to lifetime AGR fluence Effect of oxidation on creep modulus (by indirect comparison with experiment 1 and direct comparison with experiment 3 NB. Experiment 1 and 3 are not covered here) Data to develop a mechanistic understanding, including oAppropriate creep modulus (including pinning and high dose effects on structure) oInvestigation of CTE-creep strain behavior under inert conditions oInformation on the effect of applied stress/creep strain on crystallite orientation (requires XRD) oEffect of creep strain on micro-porosity (requires tomography & microscopy) This document describes the experimental work planned to meet the requirements of project technical specification [1] and EDF Energy requests for additional Pre-IE work. The PIE work is described in detail in this revision (Section 8 and 9).

  19. Creep behavior for advanced polycrystalline SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Kohyama, Akira

    1997-04-01

    A bend stress relaxation (BSR) test has been utilized to examine irradiation enhanced creep in polycrystalline SiC fibers which are under development for use as fiber reinforcement in SiC/SiC composite. Qualitative, S-shaped 1hr BSR curves were compared for three selected advanced SiC fiber types and standard Nicalon CG fiber. The temperature corresponding to the middle of the S-curve (where the BSR parameter m = 0.5) is a measure of a fiber`s thermal stability as well as it creep resistance. In order of decreasing thermal creep resistance, the measured transition temperatures were Nicalon S (1450{degrees}C), Sylramic (1420{degrees}C), Hi-Nicalon (1230{degrees}C) and Nicalon CG (1110{degrees}C).

  20. Finite Element Based Stress Analysis of Graphite Component in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Core Using Linear and Nonlinear Irradiation Creep Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation creep plays a major role in the structural integrity of the graphite components in high temperature gas cooled reactors. Finite element procedures combined with a suitable irradiation creep model can be used to simulate the time-integrated structural integrity of complex shapes, such as the reactor core graphite reflector and fuel bricks. In the present work a comparative study was undertaken to understand the effect of linear and nonlinear irradiation creep on results of finite element based stress analysis. Numerical results were generated through finite element simulations of a typical graphite reflector.

  1. Advances in Non-Contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Canepari, Stacy; White, Erica Bischoff; Cretegny, Laurent; Rogers, jan

    2009-01-01

    As the required service temperatures for superalloys increases, so do the demands on testing for development of these alloys. Non-contact measurement of creep of refractory metals using electrostatic levitation has been demonstrated at temperatures up to 2300 C using samples of only 20-40 mg. These measurements load the spherical specimen by inertial forces due to rapid rotation. However, the first measurements relied on photon pressure to accelerate the samples to the high rotational rates of thousands of rotations per second, limiting the applicability to low stresses and high temperatures. Recent advances in this area extend this measurement to higher stresses and lower-temperatures through the use of an induction motor to drive the sample to such high rotational speeds. Preliminary results on new measurements on new materials will be presented.

  2. Development of a constitutive model for creep and life prediction of advanced silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.L.; Liu, K.C.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1992-12-31

    A constitutive model capable of describing deformation and predicting rupture life was developed for high temperature ceramic materials under general thermal-mechanical loading conditions. The model was developed based on the deformation and fracture behavior observed from a systematic experimental study on an advanced silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic material. Validity of the model was evaluated with reference to creep and creep rupture data obtained under constant and stepwise-varied loading conditions, including the effects of annealing on creep and creep rupture behavior.

  3. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  4. Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eapen, Jacob; Murty, Korukonda; Burchell, Timothy

    2014-06-02

    Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

  5. Irradiation creep of candidate materials for advanced nuclear plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-10-01

    In the present paper, irradiation creep results of an intermetallic TiAl alloy and two ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are summarized. In situ irradiation creep measurements were performed using homogeneous implantation with α- and p-particles to maximum doses of 0.8 dpa at displacement damage rates of 2-8 × 10-6 dpa/s. The strains of miniaturized flat dog-bone specimens were monitored under uniaxial tensile stresses ranging from 20 to 400 MPa at temperatures of 573, 673 and 773 K, respectively. The effects of material composition, ODS particle size, and bombarding particle on the irradiation creep compliance was studied and results are compared to literature data. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was investigated in detail by TEM and is discussed with respect to irradiation creep models.

  6. Thermal and Irradiation Creep Behavior of a Titanium Aluminide in Advanced Nuclear Plant Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Per; Chen, Jiachao; Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Titanium aluminides are well-accepted elevated temperature materials. In conventional applications, their poor oxidation resistance limits the maximum operating temperature. Advanced reactors operate in nonoxidizing environments. This could enlarge the applicability of these materials to higher temperatures. The behavior of a cast gamma-alpha-2 TiAl was investigated under thermal and irradiation conditions. Irradiation creep was studied in beam using helium implantation. Dog-bone samples of dimensions 10 × 2 × 0.2 mm3 were investigated in a temperature range of 300 °C to 500 °C under irradiation, and significant creep strains were detected. At temperatures above 500 °C, thermal creep becomes the predominant mechanism. Thermal creep was investigated at temperatures up to 900 °C without irradiation with samples of the same geometry. The results are compared with other materials considered for advanced fission applications. These are a ferritic oxide-dispersion-strengthened material (PM2000) and the nickel-base superalloy IN617. A better thermal creep behavior than IN617 was found in the entire temperature range. Up to 900 °C, the expected 104 hour stress rupture properties exceeded even those of the ODS alloy. The irradiation creep performance of the titanium aluminide was comparable with the ODS steels. For IN617, no irradiation creep experiments were performed due to the expected low irradiation resistance (swelling, helium embrittlement) of nickel-base alloys.

  7. Creep and fatigue research efforts on advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    1990-01-01

    Two of the more important materials problems encountered in turbine blades of aircraft engines are creep and fatigue. To withstand these high-temperature phenomena, modern engines utilize single-crystal, nickel-base superalloys as the material of choice in critical applications. This paper will present recent research activities at NASA's Lewis Research Center on single-crystal blading material, related to creep and fatique. The goal of these research efforts is to improve the understanding of microstructure-property relationships and thereby guide material development.

  8. Creep and fatigue research efforts on advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    1987-01-01

    Two of the more important materials problems encountered in turbine blades of aircraft engines are creep and fatigue. To withstand these high-temperature phenomena modern engines utilize single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys as the material of choice in critical applications. Recent research activities at Lewis on single-crystal blading material as well as future research initiatives on metal matrix composites related to creep and fatigue are discussed. The goal of these research efforts is improving the understanding of microstructure-property relationships and thereby guide material development.

  9. Experimental Creep Life Assessment for the Advanced Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy is planning to develop the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for potential use on future space missions. The ASRG provides substantial efficiency and specific power improvements over radioisotope power systems of heritage designs. The ASRG would use General Purpose Heat Source modules as energy sources and the free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) to convert heat into electrical energy. Lockheed Martin Corporation of Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, is integrating the ASRG systems, and Sunpower, Inc., of Athens, Ohio, is designing and building the ASC. NASA Glenn Research Center of Cleveland, Ohio, manages the Sunpower contract and provides technology development in several areas for the ASC. One area is reliability assessment for the ASC heater head, a critical pressure vessel within which heat is converted into mechanical oscillation of a displacer piston. For high system efficiency, the ASC heater head operates at very high temperature (850 C) and therefore is fabricated from an advanced heat-resistant nickel-based superalloy Microcast MarM-247. Since use of MarM-247 in a thin-walled pressure vessel is atypical, much effort is required to assure that the system will operate reliably for its design life of 17 years. One life-limiting structural response for this application is creep; creep deformation is the accumulation of time-dependent inelastic strain under sustained loading over time. If allowed to progress, the deformation eventually results in creep rupture. Since creep material properties are not available in the open literature, a detailed creep life assessment of the ASC heater head effort is underway. This paper presents an overview of that creep life assessment approach, including the reliability-based creep criteria developed from coupon testing, and the associated heater head deterministic and probabilistic analyses. The approach also

  10. Creep and creep rupture of laminated graphite/epoxy composites. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 1 Oct. 1979 - 30 Sep. 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    An incremental numerical procedure based on lamination theory is developed to predict creep and creep rupture of general laminates. Existing unidirectional creep compliance and delayed failure data is used to develop analytical models for lamina response. The compliance model is based on a procedure proposed by Findley which incorporates the power law for creep into a nonlinear constitutive relationship. The matrix octahedral shear stress is assumed to control the stress interaction effect. A modified superposition principle is used to account for the varying stress level effect on the creep strain. The lamina failure model is based on a modification of the Tsai-Hill theory which includes the time dependent creep rupture strength. A linear cumulative damage law is used to monitor the remaining lifetime in each ply.

  11. Cavitation mechanisms during tensile creep of an advanced silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Lofaj, F.; Okada, A.; Usami, H.

    1996-12-31

    Creep cavitation was investigated by electron microscopic methods after tensile creep tests of a self-reinforced silicon nitride conducted at temperatures ranging from 1250 to 1400{degrees}C. Fast and intensive cavitation in the amorphous secondary phase and slow growth of cavities inside the large silicon nitride grains were observed. Two basic types of cavities in glassy boundary phase were found; rounded cavities on the facets of large grains and irregular cavities in pockets among the matrix grains. A driving force for cavitation in boundary phase on large grain facets is concluded to be local tensile stress on local irregularities of facets produced on the interfaces between large grains and finer matrix grains during grain boundary sliding (GBS). Dilatant hydrostatic tensile stresses generated in a matrix due to GBS were thought to be responsible for cavitation in multigrain junctions. Small cavities formed on the facets and large cavities penetrating through the whole large grains of silicon nitride were found after long-term tests. The stresses transferred from matrix to large grains are suggested as a driving force for slow growth of small cavities on the facets and their later penetration inside the large silicon nitride grains. Basic cavitation mechanisms in amorphous phase are thought to be GBS and viscous flow while solution-precipitation is responsible for cavity growth in large silicon nitride grains.

  12. Advances in Non-contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Canepari, Stacy; Rogers, Jan. R.

    2009-01-01

    Our team has developed a novel approach to measuring creep at extremely high temperatures using electrostatic levitation (ESL). This method has been demonstrated on niobium up to 2300 C, while ESL has melted tungsten (3400 C). High-precision machined spheres of the sample are levitated in the NASA MSFC ESL, a national user facility, and heated with a laser. The laser is aligned off-center so that the absorbed photons transfer their momentum to the sample, causing it to rotate at up to 250,000+ RPM. The rapid rotation loads the sample through centripetal acceleration, causing it to deform. The deformation of the sample is captured on high-speed video, which is analyzed by machine-vision software from the University of Massachusetts. The deformations are compared to finite element models to determine the constitutive constants in the creep relation. Furthermore, the noncontact method exploits stress gradients within the sample to determine the stress exponent in a single test. This method was validated in collaboration with the University of Tennessee for niobium at 1985 C, with agreement within the uncertainty of the conventional measurements. A similar method is being employed on Ultra-High-Temperature ZrB2- SiC composites, which may see application in rocket nozzles and sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles.

  13. Structural Benchmark Creep Testing for the Advanced Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bowman, Randy R.; Shah, Ashwin R.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has identified the high efficiency Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) as a candidate power source for use on long duration Science missions such as lunar applications, Mars rovers, and deep space missions. For the inherent long life times required, a structurally significant design limit for the heater head component of the ASRG Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) is creep deformation induced at low stress levels and high temperatures. Demonstrating proof of adequate margins on creep deformation and rupture for the operating conditions and the MarM-247 material of construction is a challenge that the NASA Glenn Research Center is addressing. The combined analytical and experimental program ensures integrity and high reliability of the heater head for its 17-year design life. The life assessment approach starts with an extensive series of uniaxial creep tests on thin MarM-247 specimens that comprise the same chemistry, microstructure, and heat treatment processing as the heater head itself. This effort addresses a scarcity of openly available creep properties for the material as well as for the virtual absence of understanding of the effect on creep properties due to very thin walls, fine grains, low stress levels, and high-temperature fabrication steps. The approach continues with a considerable analytical effort, both deterministically to evaluate the median creep life using nonlinear finite element analysis, and probabilistically to calculate the heater head s reliability to a higher degree. Finally, the approach includes a substantial structural benchmark creep testing activity to calibrate and validate the analytical work. This last element provides high fidelity testing of prototypical heater head test articles; the testing includes the relevant material issues and the essential multiaxial stress state, and applies prototypical and accelerated temperature profiles for timely results in a

  14. In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2012-09-01

    An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 °C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

  15. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions.

  16. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  17. Graphite Gamma Scan Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mark W. Drigert

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the measurement and data analysis of the radio isotopic content for a series of graphite specimens irradiated in the first Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, AGC-1. This is the first of a series of six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphites. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL at approximately 700 degrees C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). Details of the irradiation conditions and other characterization measurements performed on specimens in the AGC-1 capsule can be found in “AGC-1 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Report” ORNL/TM 2013/242. Two specimens from six different graphite types are analyzed here. Each specimen is 12.7 mm in diameter by 25.4 mm long. The isotope with the highest activity was 60Co. Graphite type NBG-18 had the highest content of 60Co with an activity of 142.89 µCi at a measurement distance of 47 cm.

  18. Fatigue-creep lifetime analysis of four advanced central receiver concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.

    1981-01-01

    Four advanced central receiver concepts were analyzed for their fatigue-creep design lifetimes. Using the flux profiles provided by the designers, the thermal hydraulic performance of an individual tube in a receiver panel was ascertained by computer analysis. A linear model of the tube crown strain for the tube on given thermal and structural finite element analyses were performed. The computed stresses and strains were used in evaluation of the creep and fatigue design lifetimes by N-47 and compared to the desired lifetime of 30 years. Three of the four designs met or exceeded the desired lifetime and the fourth met the desired lifetime when the factor of safety incorporated in N-47 was reduced. All four designs were judged adequate for the current level of design effort.

  19. Recent advances in graphite/epoxy motor cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, William G.; Christensen, Paul E.; York, James L.

    1993-11-01

    Much has been published concerning improvements and enhancements in materials and technology used in the design and construction of solid rocket motors. However, there are important aspects of the improvement process that are seldom discussed, particularly process control and continuous improvement. This has been applied successfully to the resolution of challenges, which remained at the termination of the Filament Wound Case (FWC) Program. The FWC Program for the Space Shuttle boosters was terminated in 1986. At that time, although the FWC met all requirements, there were issues with composites that needed improvement. This paper discusses the success in resolving those challenges and describes how the continuous improvement methodologies were implemented at Hercules for design and fabrication of graphite/epoxy motor cases. Advancements in materials and engineering data are first evaluated. The implementation of an approach that includes concurrent engineering, process controls, statistical process controls, continuous improvement, and product acceptance are then discussed. The successes in recent years have been realized from application of these principles. Discrepancies have been reduced by an order of magnitude. Delaminations have been virtually eliminated. Voids have been reduced to 'hardly detectable.' Enhancements in manufacturing technology and cost reductions have also been realized. The application of process control and continuous improvement principles has resulted in 100 percent flight performance success while simultaneously achieving improved vehicle performance.

  20. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Carroll; Laura Carroll

    2011-09-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  1. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

    2012-10-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

  2. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  3. In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2010-08-01

    Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

  4. AGC-2 Graphite Pre-irradiation Data Package

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2010-08-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  5. Graphite/Polyimide Composites. [conference on Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B. (Editor); Davis, J. G., Jr. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed under the Composites for Advanced Space Transportation System Project is reported. Specific topics covered include fabrication, adhesives, test methods, structural integrity, design and analysis, advanced technology developments, high temperature polymer research, and the state of the art of graphite/polyimide composites.

  6. Deformation Microstructures and Creep Mechanisms in Advanced ZR-Based Cladding Under Biazal Loading

    SciTech Connect

    K. Linga Murty

    2008-08-11

    Investigate creep behavior of Zr-based cladding tubes with attention to basic creep mechanisms and transitions in them at low stresses and/or temperatures and study the dislocation microstructures of deformed samples for correlation with the underlying micromechanism of creep

  7. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  8. Advanced Procedures for Long-Term Creep Data Prediction for 2.25 Chromium Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Mark T.; Wilshire, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A critical review of recent creep studies concluded that traditional approaches such as steady-state behavior, power law equations, and the view that diffusional creep mechanisms are dominant at low stresses should be seriously reconsidered. Specifically, creep strain rate against time curves show that a decaying primary rate leads into an accelerating tertiary stage, giving a minimum rather than a secondary period. Conventional steady-state mechanisms should therefore be abandoned in favor of an understanding of the processes governing strain accumulation and the damage phenomena causing tertiary creep and fracture. Similarly, creep always takes place by dislocation processes, with no change to diffusional creep mechanisms with decreasing stress, negating the concept of deformation mechanism maps. Alternative descriptions are then provided by normalizing the applied stress through the ultimate tensile stress and yield stress at the creep temperature. In this way, the resulting Wilshire equations allow accurate prediction of 100,00 hours of creep data using only property values from tests lasting 5000 hours for a series of 2.25 chromium steels, namely grades 22, 23, and 24.

  9. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  10. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    SciTech Connect

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the

  11. Boron/aluminum graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication feasibility and potential of an adhesively bonded metal and resin matrix fiber-composite hybrid are determined as an advanced material for aerospace and other structural applications. The results show that using this hybrid concept makes possible a composite design which, when compared with nonhybrid composites, has greater transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  12. Boron/aluminum-graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fabrication feasibility and to assess the potential of adhesively-bonded metal and resin matrix fiber composite hybrids as an advanced material, for aerospace and other structural applications. The results of fabrication studies and of evaluation of physical and mechanical properties show that using this hybrid concept it is possible to design a composite which, when compared to nonhybrid composites, has improved transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for perdicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  13. Structural Benchmark Creep Testing for Microcast MarM-247 Advanced Stirling Convertor E2 Heater Head Test Article SN18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Brewer, Ethan J.; Pawlik, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    This report provides test methodology details and qualitative results for the first structural benchmark creep test of an Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) heater head of ASC-E2 design heritage. The test article was recovered from a flight-like Microcast MarM-247 heater head specimen previously used in helium permeability testing. The test article was utilized for benchmark creep test rig preparation, wall thickness and diametral laser scan hardware metrological developments, and induction heater custom coil experiments. In addition, a benchmark creep test was performed, terminated after one week when through-thickness cracks propagated at thermocouple weld locations. Following this, it was used to develop a unique temperature measurement methodology using contact thermocouples, thereby enabling future benchmark testing to be performed without the use of conventional welded thermocouples, proven problematic for the alloy. This report includes an overview of heater head structural benchmark creep testing, the origin of this particular test article, test configuration developments accomplished using the test article, creep predictions for its benchmark creep test, qualitative structural benchmark creep test results, and a short summary.

  14. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experiments—a major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  15. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints is reported. The program consists of two concurrent tasks: (1) design and test of specific built up attachments; and (2) evaluation of standard advanced bonded joint concepts. A data base for the design and analysis of advanced composite joints for use at elevated temperatures (561K (550 deg F)) to design concepts for specific joining applications, and the fundamental parameters controlling the static strength characteristics of such joints are evaluated. Data for design and build GR/PI of lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Results for compression and interlaminar shear strengths of Celion 6000/PMR-15 laminates are given. Static discriminator test results for type 3 and type 4 bonded and bolted joints and final joint designs for TASK 1.4 scale up fabrication and testing are presented.

  16. The Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatments on the Tensile and Creep Behavior of an Advanced Nickel-Based Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    As part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a study of stabilization heat treatment options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, ME 209, was performed. Using a simple, physically based approach, the effect of stabilization heat treatments on tensile and creep properties was analyzed in this paper. Solutions temperature, solution cooling rate, and stabilization temperature/time were found to have a significant impact on tensile and creep properties. These effects were readily quantified using the following methodology. First, the effect of solution cooling rate was assessed to determine its impact on a given property. The as-cooled property was then modified by using two multiplicative factors which assess the impact of solution temperature and stabilization parameters. Comparison of experimental data with predicted values showed this physically based analysis produced good results that rivaled the statistical analysis employed, which required numerous changes in the form of the regression equation depending on the property and temperature in question. As this physically based analysis uses the data for input, it should be noted that predictions which attempt to extrapolate beyond the bounds of the data must be viewed with skepticism. Future work aimed at expanding the range of the stabilization/aging parameters explored in this study would be highly desirable, especially at the higher solution cooling rates.

  17. Comparison between the Strength Levels of Baseline Nuclear-Grade Graphite and Graphite Irradiated in AGC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Mark Christopher

    2015-07-01

    This report details the initial comparison of mechanical strength properties between the cylindrical nuclear-grade graphite specimens irradiated in the second Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC-2) experiment with the established baseline, or unirradiated, mechanical properties compiled in the Baseline Graphite Characterization program. The overall comparative analysis will describe the development of an appropriate test protocol for irradiated specimens, the execution of the mechanical tests on the AGC-2 sample population, and will further discuss the data in terms of developing an accurate irradiated property distribution in the limited amount of irradiated data by leveraging the considerably larger property datasets being captured in the Baseline Graphite Characterization program. Integrating information on the inherent variability in nuclear-grade graphite with more complete datasets is one of the goals of the VHTR Graphite Materials program. Between “sister” specimens, or specimens with the same geometry machined from the same sub-block of graphite from which the irradiated AGC specimens were extracted, and the Baseline datasets, a comprehensive body of data will exist that can provide both a direct and indirect indication of the full irradiated property distributions that can be expected of irradiated nuclear-grade graphite while in service in a VHTR system. While the most critical data will remain the actual irradiated property measurements, expansion of this data into accurate distributions based on the inherent variability in graphite properties will be a crucial step in qualifying graphite for nuclear use as a structural material in a VHTR environment.

  18. Non Destructive Thermal Analysis and In Situ Investigation of Creep Mechanism of Graphite and Ceramic Composites using Phase-sensitive THz Imaging & Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasonic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, XI-Cheng; Hurley, David; Redo-Scanchez, Albert

    2012-11-26

    In this project, we conducted a comprehensive study on nuclear graphite properties with terahertz (THz) imaging. Graphite samples from Idaho National Laboratory were carefully imaged by continuous wave (CW) THz. The CW THz imaging of graphite shows that the samples from different billet with different fabricating conditions have different pore size and structure. Based on this result, we then used a phase sensitive THz system to study the graphite properties. In this exploration, various graphite were studied. By imaging nuclear graphite samples in reflection mode at nine different incident polarization angles using THz time-domain spectroscopy, we find that different domain distributions and levels of porosity will introduce polarization dependence in THz reflectivity. Sample with higher density is less porous and has a smaller average domain distribution. As a consequence, it is less polarization-dependent and the polarization-dependent frequency is higher. The results also show that samples oxidized at higher temperatures tend to be more polarization dependent. The graphite from the external billet is more polarization dependent compared to that from the center billet. In addition, we performed laser-based ultrasonic measurements on these graphite samples. The denser, unoxidized samples allow surface acoustic waves to propagate more rapidly than in the samples that had already undergone oxidation. Therefore, for the oxidized samples, the denser samples show less polarization-dependence, higher polarization-dependent frequency, and allow the surface acoustic waves propagate faster.

  19. Deterministic Multiaxial Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancements for CARES/Creep Integrated Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of sum, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of Ns methodology and the

  20. On The Creep Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms Found in an Advanced Polycrystalline Nickel-Base Superalloy at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutchman, Hallee Zox

    Polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys are used as turbine disks in the hot section in jet engines, placing them in a high temperature and stress environment. As operating temperatures increase in search of better fuel efficiency, it becomes important to understand how these higher temperatures are affecting mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms in the substructure. Not only are operating temperatures increasing, but there is a drive to design next generation alloys in shorter time periods using predictive modeling capabilities. This dissertation focuses on mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms found in two different advanced polycrystalline alloy systems, information which will then be used to build advanced predictive models to design the next generation of alloys. The first part of this dissertation discusses the creep behavior and identifying active deformation mechanisms in an advanced polycrystalline Ni-based superalloy (ME3) that is currently in operation, but at higher temperatures and stresses than are experienced in current engines. Monotonic creep tests were run at 700°C and between 655-793MPa at 34MPa increments, on two microstructures (called M1 and M2) produced by different heat treatments. All tests were crept to 0.5% plastic strain. Transient temperature and transient stress tests were used determine activation energy and stress exponents of the M1 microstructure. Constant strain rate tests (at 10-4s-1) were performed on both microstructures as well. Following creep testing, both M1 and M2 microstructures were fully characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for basic microstructure information, and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) to determine active deformation mechanism. It was found that in the M1 microstructure, reorder mediated activity (such as discontinuous faulting and microtwinning) is dominant at low stresses (655-724 MPa). Dislocations in the gamma matrix, and overall planar

  1. Radiation Effects in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The requirements for a solid moderator are reviewed and the reasons that graphite has become the solid moderator of choice discussed. The manufacture and properties of some currently available near-isotropic and isotropic grades are described. The major features of a graphite moderated reactors are briefly outlined. Displacement damage and the induced structural and dimensional changes in graphite are described. Recent characterization work on nano-carbons and oriented pyrolytic graphites that have shed new light on graphite defect structures are reviewed, and the effect of irradiation temperature on the defect structures is highlighted. Changes in the physical properties of nuclear graphite caused by neutron irradiation are reported. Finally, the importance of irradiation induced creep is presented, along with current models and their deficiencies.

  2. Recent Advances in Preparation, Structure, Properties and Applications of Graphite Oxide.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Suneel Kumar; Pionteck, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    Graphite oxide, also referred as graphitic oxide or graphitic acid, is an oxidized bulk product of graphite with a variable composition. However, it did not receive immense attention until it was identified as an important and easily obtainable precursor for the preparation of graphene. This inspired many researchers to explore facts related to graphite oxide in exploiting its fascinating features. The present article culminates up-dated review on different preparative methods, morphology and characterization of physical/chemical properties of graphite oxide by XRD, XPS, FTIR, Raman, NMR, UV-visible, and DRIFT analyses. Finally, recent developments on intercalation and applications of GO in multifaceted areas of catalysis, sensor, supercapacitors, water purification, hydrogen storage and magnetic shielding etc. has also been reviewed.

  3. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an experimental program to develop several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints for lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Tasks accomplished include: a literature survey; design of static discriminator specimens; design allowables testing; fabrication of test panels and specimens; small specimen testing; and standard joint testing. Detail designs of static discriminator specimens for each of the four major attachment types are presented. Test results are given for the following: (1) transverse tension of Celion 3000/PMR-15 laminate; (2) net tension of a laminate for both a loaded and unloaded bolt hole; (3) comparative testing of bonded and co-cured doublers along with pull-off tests of single and double bonded angles; (4) single lap shear tests, transverse tension and coefficient of thermal expansion tests of A7F (LARC-13 amide-imide modified) adhesive; and (5) tension tests of standard single lap, double lap, and symmetric step lap bonded joints. Also, included are results of a finite element analysis of a single lap bonded composite joint.

  4. Porous graphitic carbon nanosheets derived from cornstalk biomass for advanced supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Tian, Chungui; Sun, Li; Zhou, Wei; Yu, Peng; Yin, Jie; Fu, Honggang

    2013-05-01

    Porous graphitic carbon nanosheets (PGCS) are synthesized by an in situ self-generating template strategy based on the carburized effect of iron with cornstalks. Cornstalks firstly coordinate with [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) ions to form the cornstalk-[Fe(CN)(6)](4-) precursor. After carbonization and removal of the catalyst, PGCS are obtained. Series experiments indicate that PGCS can only be formed when using an iron-based catalyst that can generate a carburized phase during the pyrolytic process. The unique structures of PGCS exhibit excellent capacitive performance. The PGCS-1-1100 sample (synthesized from 0.1 M [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) with a carbonization temperature of 1100 °C), which shows excellent electrochemical capacitance (up to 213 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1)), cycling stability, and rate performance in 6 M KOH electrolyte. In the two-electrode symmetric supercapacitors, the maximum energy densities that can be achieved are as high as 9.4 and 61.3 Wh kg(-1) in aqueous and organic electrolytes, respectively. Moreover, high energy densities of 8.3 and 40.6 Wh kg(-1) are achieved at the high power density of 10.5 kW kg(-1) in aqueous and organic electrolytes, respectively. This strategy holds great promise for preparing PGCS from natural resources, including cornstalks, as advanced electrodes in supercapacitors.

  5. Implementation and evaluation of fuel creep using advanced light-water reactor materials in FRAPCON 3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Spencer

    As current reactors approach the end of their operable lifetime, new reactors are needed if nuclear power is to continue being generated in the United States. Some utilities have already began construction on newer, more advanced LWR reactors, which use the same fuel as current reactors and have a similar but updated design. Others are researching next generation (GEN-IV) reactors which have new designs that utilize alternative fuel, coolants and other reactor materials. Many of these alternative fuels are capable of achieving higher burnups and are designed to be more accident tolerant than the currently used UO2 fuel. However, before these new materials can be used, extensive research must be done in order to obtain a detailed understanding of how the new fuels and other materials will interact. New fuels, such as uranium nitride (UN) and uranium carbide (UC) have several advantages over UO2, such as increased burnup capabilities and higher thermal conductivities. However, there are issues with each that prevent UC and UN from being used as direct replacements for UO2. Both UC and UN swell at a significantly higher rate than UO2 and neither fuel reacts favorably when exposed to water. Due to this, UC and UN are being considered more for GEN-IV reactors that use alternative coolant rather than for current LWRs. In an effort to increase accident tolerance, silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered for use as an alternative cladding. The high strength, high melting point and low oxidation of SiC make it an attractive cladding choice, especially in an accident scenario. However, as a ceramic, SiC is not ductile and will not creep outwards upon pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI) which can cause a large build up in interfacial pressure. In order to understand the interaction between the high swelling fuels and unyielding SiC cladding, data on the properties and behaviors of these materials must be gathered and incorporated into FRAPCON. FRAPCON is a fuel

  6. Brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  7. Creeping eruption

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Creeping eruption is a human infection with dog or cat hookworm larvae (immature worms). Causes Hookworm eggs are found in the stool of infected dogs and cats. When the eggs hatch, the larvae ...

  8. Deterministic and Probabilistic Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancement to CARES/Creep: Multiaxial Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Structures Using Continuum Damage Mechanics and the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep ripture criterion However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of stress, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and

  9. Advanced rechargeable aluminium ion battery with a high-quality natural graphite cathode

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Di-Yan; Wei, Chuan-Yu; Lin, Meng-Chang; ...

    2017-02-13

    There has been some interest in aluminium ion batteries with aluminium anodes, graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes has increased; however, much remains to be done to increase the cathode capacity and to understand details of the anion–graphite intercalation mechanism. An aluminium ion battery cell made using pristine natural graphite flakes achieves a specific capacity of B110 mAhg-1 with Coulombic efficiency B98%, at a current density of 99mAg-1 (0.9 C) with clear discharge voltage plateaus (2.25–2.0 V and 1.9–1.5 V). The cell has a capacity of 60mAhg-1 at 6 C, over 6,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiency B 99%. Raman spectroscopymore » shows two different intercalation processes involving chloroaluminate anions at the two discharging plateaus, while C–Cl bonding on the surface, or edges of natural graphite, is found using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Lastly, theoretical calculations are employed to investigate the intercalation behaviour of choloraluminate anions in the graphite electrode.« less

  10. Advanced rechargeable aluminium ion battery with a high-quality natural graphite cathode

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Di-Yan; Wei, Chuan-Yu; Lin, Meng-Chang; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Hsin-An; Gong, Ming; Wu, Yingpeng; Yuan, Chunze; Angell, Michael; Hsieh, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yu-Hsun; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dai, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Recently, interest in aluminium ion batteries with aluminium anodes, graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes has increased; however, much remains to be done to increase the cathode capacity and to understand details of the anion–graphite intercalation mechanism. Here, an aluminium ion battery cell made using pristine natural graphite flakes achieves a specific capacity of ∼110 mAh g−1 with Coulombic efficiency ∼98%, at a current density of 99 mA g−1 (0.9 C) with clear discharge voltage plateaus (2.25–2.0 V and 1.9–1.5 V). The cell has a capacity of 60 mAh g−1 at 6 C, over 6,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiency ∼ 99%. Raman spectroscopy shows two different intercalation processes involving chloroaluminate anions at the two discharging plateaus, while C–Cl bonding on the surface, or edges of natural graphite, is found using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Finally, theoretical calculations are employed to investigate the intercalation behaviour of choloraluminate anions in the graphite electrode. PMID:28194027

  11. Advanced rechargeable aluminium ion battery with a high-quality natural graphite cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di-Yan; Wei, Chuan-Yu; Lin, Meng-Chang; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Hsin-An; Gong, Ming; Wu, Yingpeng; Yuan, Chunze; Angell, Michael; Hsieh, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yu-Hsun; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dai, Hongjie

    2017-02-01

    Recently, interest in aluminium ion batteries with aluminium anodes, graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes has increased; however, much remains to be done to increase the cathode capacity and to understand details of the anion-graphite intercalation mechanism. Here, an aluminium ion battery cell made using pristine natural graphite flakes achieves a specific capacity of ~110 mAh g-1 with Coulombic efficiency ~98%, at a current density of 99 mA g-1 (0.9 C) with clear discharge voltage plateaus (2.25-2.0 V and 1.9-1.5 V). The cell has a capacity of 60 mAh g-1 at 6 C, over 6,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiency ~ 99%. Raman spectroscopy shows two different intercalation processes involving chloroaluminate anions at the two discharging plateaus, while C-Cl bonding on the surface, or edges of natural graphite, is found using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Finally, theoretical calculations are employed to investigate the intercalation behaviour of choloraluminate anions in the graphite electrode.

  12. Compression creep of filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graesser, D. L.; Tuttle, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Axial and transverse strain fields induced in composite laminates subjected to compressive creep loading were compared for several types of laminate layups. Unidirectional graphite/epoxy as well as multi-directional graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK layups were studied. Specimens with and without holes were tested. The specimens were subjected to compressive creep loading for a 10-hour period. In-plane displacements were measured using moire interferometry. A computer based data reduction scheme was developed which reduces the whole-field displacement fields obtained using moire to whole-field strain contour maps. Only slight viscoelastic response was observed in matrix-dominated laminates, except for one test in which catastrophic specimen failure occurred after a 16-hour period. In this case the specimen response was a complex combination of both viscoelastic and fracture mechanisms. No viscoelastic effects were observed for fiber-dominated laminates over the 10-hour creep time used. The experimental results for specimens with holes were compared with results obtained using a finite-element analysis. The comparison between experiment and theory was generally good. Overall strain distributions were very well predicted. The finite element analysis typically predicted slightly higher strain values at the edge of the hole, and slightly lower strain values at positions removed from the hole, than were observed experimentally. It is hypothesized that these discrepancies are due to nonlinear material behavior at the hole edge, which were not accounted for during the finite-element analysis.

  13. Synthesis of ultrathin nitrogen-doped graphitic carbon nanocages as advanced electrode materials for supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yueming; Xu, Chaofa; Chen, Guangxu; Liu, Zhaohui; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji; Zheng, Nanfeng; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-03-01

    Synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbons with large surface area, high conductivity, and suitable pore size distribution is highly desirable for high-performance supercapacitor applications. Here, we report a novel protocol for template synthesis of ultrathin nitrogen-doped graphitic carbon nanocages (CNCs) derived from polyaniline (PANI) and their excellent capacitive properties. The synthesis of CNCs involves one-pot hydrothermal synthesis of Mn3O4@PANI core-shell nanoparticles, carbonization to produce carbon coated MnO nanoparticles, and then removal of the MnO cores by acidic treatment. The CNCs prepared at an optimum carbonization temperature of 800 °C (CNCs-800) have regular frameworks, moderate graphitization, high specific surface area, good mesoporosity, and appropriate N doping. The CNCs-800 show high specific capacitance (248 F g(-1) at 1.0 A g(-1)), excellent rate capability (88% and 76% capacitance retention at 10 and 100 A g(-1), respectively), and outstanding cycling stability (~95% capacitance retention after 5000 cycles) in 6 M KOH aqueous solution. The CNCs-800 can also exhibit great pseudocapacitance in 0.5 M H2SO4 aqueous solution besides the large electrochemical double-layer capacitance. The excellent capacitance performance coupled with the facile synthesis of ultrathin nitrogen-doped graphitic CNCs indicates their great application potential in supercapacitors.

  14. Design fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Graphite/polyimide (Gr/PI) bolted and bonded joints were investigated. Possible failure modes and the design loads for the four generic joint types are discussed. Preliminary sizing of a type 1 joint, bonded and bolted configuration is described, including assumptions regarding material properties and sizing methodology. A general purpose finite element computer code is described that was formulated to analyze single and double lap joints, with and without tapered adherends, and with user-controlled variable element size arrangements. An initial order of Celion 6000/PMR-15 prepreg was received and characterized.

  15. Creep Measurement Video Extensometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaster, Mark; Vickerman, Mary; Padula, Santo, II; Juhas, John

    2011-01-01

    Understanding material behavior under load is critical to the efficient and accurate design of advanced aircraft and spacecraft. Technologies such as the one disclosed here allow accurate creep measurements to be taken automatically, reducing error. The goal was to develop a non-contact, automated system capable of capturing images that could subsequently be processed to obtain the strain characteristics of these materials during deformation, while maintaining adequate resolution to capture the true deformation response of the material. The measurement system comprises a high-resolution digital camera, computer, and software that work collectively to interpret the image.

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of creep damage and life prediction of Ni-base superalloy used in advanced gas turbine blades by electrochemical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komazaki, Shin-ichi; Shoji, Tetsuo; Abe, Iwao; Okada, Ikuo

    1999-12-01

    In order to develop a creep life assessment technique for directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy CM247LC, changes in electrochemical properties due to creep have been investigated. Experimental results on electrochemical polarization measurements revealed that the peak current density "Ip" and "Ipr" which appeared at a specific potential during potentiodynamic polarization reactivation measurements in dilute glyceregia solution linearly increased with a life fraction in early stage of the creep life and were uniquely correlated with Arrhenius type parameter "(t/tr)exp(-Qc/RT)." As a consequence, the creep life fraction can be estimated with high accuracy by the electrochemical technique.

  17. Design, Fabrication and Test of Graphite/Polyimide Composite Joints and Attachments for Advanced Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Standard and advanced bonded joint concepts were evaluated to develop a data base for the design and analysis of advanced composite joints for use at elevated temperatures (561K (550F)). Design concepts for specific joint applications and the fundamental parameters controlling the static strength characteristics of such joints were identified. Test results are presented for rail shear and sandwich beam compression tests and tension tests of moisture conditioned specimens and bonded on "T" sections. Coefficients of thermal expansion data are presented for A7F (LARC 13 Amide-imide modified) adhesion. Static discriminator test results for type 1 and type 2 bonded and bolted preliminary attachment concepts are presented and discussed.

  18. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumal, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    The design and evaluation of built-up attachments and bonded joint concepts for use at elevated temperatures is documented. Joint concept screening, verification of GR/PI material, fabrication of design allowables panels, definition of test matrices, and analysis of bonded and bolted joints are among the tasks completed. The results provide data for the design and fabrication of lightly loaded components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft.

  19. Graphite on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    We propose potential geometry for fabrication of the graphite sheets with atomically smooth edges. For such sheets with Bernal stacking, the electron-electron interaction and topology should cause sufficiently high density of states resulting in the high temperature of either spin ordering or superconducting pairing.

  20. Irradiation creep of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1998-03-01

    A study of irradiation creep in vanadium-base alloys is underway with experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States. Test specimens are thin-wall sealed tubes with internal pressure loading. The results from the initial ATR irradiation at low temperature (200--300 C) to a neutron damage level of 4.7 dpa show creep rates ranging from {approx}0 to 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}/dpa/MPa for a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. These rates were generally lower than reported from a previous experiment in BR-10. Because both the attained neutron damage levels and the creep strains were low in the present study, however, these creep rates should be regarded as only preliminary. Substantially more testing is required before a data base on irradiation creep of vanadium alloys can be developed and used with confidence.

  1. Initial Comparison of Baseline Physical and Mechanical Properties for the VHTR Candidate Graphite Grades

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Mark C.

    2014-09-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled configuration capable of producing thermal energy for power generation as well as process heat for industrial applications that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is establishing accurate as-manufactured mechanical and physical property distributions in nuclear-grade graphites by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a thorough comparison between these values in different graphite grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons both in specific properties and in the associated variability between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between each of the grades of graphite that are considered “candidate” grades from four major international graphite producers. These particular grades (NBG-18, NBG-17, PCEA, IG-110, and 2114) are the major focus of the evaluations presently underway on irradiated graphite properties through the series of Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL from which billets are formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration. NBG-17 graphite from SGL is essentially NBG-18 with the grain size reduced by a factor of two. PCEA, petroleum coke graphite from GrafTech with a similar grain size to NBG-17, is formed via an extrusion process and was initially considered the favored grade for the prismatic layout. IG-110 and 2114, from Toyo Tanso and Mersen (formerly Carbone Lorraine), respectively, are fine-grain grades produced via an isomolding

  2. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  3. High-Temperature Creep Behavior Of Fiber-Reinforced Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, Donald W.; Titran, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Study conducted to determine feasibility of using composite materials in advanced space power systems, described in 22-page report. Tungsten fibers reduce creep and mass in advanced power systems. Reinforcing niobium alloys with tungsten fibers increases their resistances to creep by factors of as much as 10.

  4. Credential Creep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollag, Burton

    2007-01-01

    When Brenda M. Coppard was studying occupational therapy in the late 1980s, a bachelor's degree was the standard ticket to enter the profession. By the 1990s, a master's degree was expected. Today a doctorate is becoming the norm. Ms. Coppard has pushed for more advanced degrees. In 1999 the associate professor of occupational therapy helped…

  5. Continuous creep measurements on the North Anatolian Fault at Ismetpasa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, Haluk; Aytun, Alkut; Aktug, Bahadir; Dogru, Asli; Mencin, David; Ergintav, Semih; Bilham, Roger

    2016-04-01

    A graphite creep-meter was installed across the North Anatolian fault near a wall at Ismetpasa, Turkey, that has been offset by fault creep processes more than 51 cm since its construction in 1957. The creep-meter is 40-cm-deep, 16.5-m-long and crosses the fault at 30 degrees within a 2 cm diameter telescopic PVC conduit. The SW end of the 6-mm-diameter graphite rod is fastened to a buried stainless steel tripod, and motion of its free end relative to a similar tripod at its NE end is monitored by two sensors: an LVDT with 6 μm resolution and 13 mm range, and a Hall-effect rotary transducer with 30 μm resolution and 1.5 m range. The two sensors track each other to better than 1%. Data are sampled every 30 minutes and are publically available via the Iridium satellite with a delay of less than 1 hour. Since May 2014, for periods of months the surface fault has been inactive, followed by several weeks or months of slow slip at rates of ≈3 mm/yr and with cumulative slip amplitude less than 1 mm, terminated by a pair of distinct creep events with durations of up to 8 days and amplitudes of up to 2.3 mm, after which slip ceases until the next episode. Maximum slip rates on the surface fault are 0.54 mm/hour at the onset of a creep event. The decay time constant of the two pairs of creep events we have observed varies from 3 to 5 hours, similar to those observed by Altay and Sav, (1982) who operated a creepmeter here from 1980-1989. The decadal creep rate observed by these authors was 7.35±0.9 mm/yr, whereas our currently observed least-squares creep-rate is 5.4±1 mm/yr based on 19 months of data. Since most of the annual of the creep occurs in large creep events (80%), we anticipate that our rate will change with elapsed time, and our uncertainty will decrease accordingly. As expected, the 2014-2016 observed creep rate is somewhat lower than the regional creep on the fault deduced from Insar analysis and GPS observations (≈7-8 mm/yr), but both the amplitude of

  6. Endochronic theory of transient creep and creep recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Chen, L.

    1979-01-01

    Short time creep and creep recovery were investigated by means of the endochronic theory of viscoplasticity. It is shown that the constitutive equations for constant-strain-rate stress-strain behavior, creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation can all ber derived from the general constitutive equation by imposing appropriate constraints. In this unified approach, the effect of strain-hardening is naturally accounted for when describing creep and creep recovery. The theory predicts with reasonable accuracy the creep and creep recovery behaviors for Aluminum 1100-0 at 150 C. It was found that the strain-rate history at prestraining stage affects the subsequent creep. A critical stress was also established for creep recovery. The theory predicts a forward creep for creep recovery stress greater than the critical stress. For creep recovery stress less than the critical stress, the theory then predicts a normal strain recovery.

  7. Fabrication and physical testing of graphite composite panels utilizing woven graphite fabric with current and advanced state-of-the-art resin systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C. S.

    1979-01-01

    Three weaves were evaluated; a balanced plain weave, a balanced 8-harness satin weave, and a semiunidirectional crowfoot satin weave. The current state-of-the-art resin system selected was Fiberite's 934 Epoxy; the advanced resin systems evaluated were Phenolic, Phenolic/Novolac, Benzyl and Bismaleimide. The panels were fabricated for testing on NASA/Ames Research Center's Composites Modification Program. Room temperature mechanical tests only were performed by Hitco; the results are presented.

  8. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    DOEpatents

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  9. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High Temperature Strenth and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, PJ

    2004-09-30

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation-Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metals. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815EC (1500EC) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  10. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High-Temperature Strength and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2001-06-15

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation - Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metal. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815 C (1500 C) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800 H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  11. A Comparison of Creep-Rupture Tested Cast Alloys HR282, IN740 and 263 for Possible Application in Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbine and Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P D; Evens, N; Yamamoto, Y; Maziasz, P

    2011-02-27

    Cast forms of traditionally wrought Ni-base precipitation-strengthened superalloys are being considered for service in the ultra-supercritical conditions (760°C, 35MPa) of next-generation steam boilers and turbines. After casting and homogenization, these alloys were given heat-treatments typical for each in the wrought condition to develop the gamma-prime phase. Specimens machined from castings were creep-rupture tested in air at 800°C. In their wrought forms, alloy 282 is expected to precipitate M23C6 within grain boundaries, alloy 740 is expected to precipitate several grain boundary phases including M23C6, G Phase, and η phase, and alloy 263 has M23C6 and MC within its grain boundaries. This presentation will correlate the observed creep-life of these cast alloys with the microstructures developed during creep-rupture tests, with an emphasis on the phase identification and chemistry of precipitated grain boundary phases. The suitability of these cast forms of traditionally wrought alloys for turbine and boiler components will also be discussed.

  12. Advanced Na-NiCl2 Battery Using Nickel-Coated Graphite with Core-Shell Microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hee-Jung; Canfield, Nathan L; Jung, Keeyoung; Sprenkle, Vincent L; Li, Guosheng

    2017-04-05

    Stationary electric energy storage devices (rechargeable batteries) have gained increasing prominence due to great market needs, such as smoothing the fluctuation of renewable energy resources and supporting the reliability of the electric grid. With regard to raw materials availability, sodium-based batteries are better positioned than lithium batteries due to the abundant resource of sodium in Earth's crust. However, the sodium-nickel chloride (Na-NiCl2) battery, one of the most attractive stationary battery technologies, is hindered from further market penetration by its high material cost (Ni cost) and fast material degradation at its high operating temperature. Here, we demonstrate the design of a core-shell microarchitecture, nickel-coated graphite, with a graphite core to maintain electrochemically active surface area and structural integrity of the electron percolation pathway while using 40% less Ni than conventional Na-NiCl2 batteries. An initial energy density of 133 Wh/kg (at ∼C/4) and energy efficiency of 94% are achieved at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C.

  13. Creep Life of Ceramic Components Using a Finite-Element-Based Integrated Design Program (CARES/CREEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Powers, L. M.; Jadaan, O. M.

    1998-01-01

    The desirable properties of ceramics at high temperatures have generated interest in their use for structural applications such as in advanced turbine systems. Design lives for such systems can exceed 10,000 hours. The long life requirement necessitates subjecting the components to relatively low stresses. The combination of high temperatures and low stresses typically places failure for monolithic ceramics in the creep regime. The objective of this paper is to present a design methodology for predicting the lifetimes of structural components subjected to creep rupture conditions. This methodology utilized commercially available finite element packages and takes into account the time-varying creep strain distributions (stress relaxation). The creep life of a component is discretized into short time steps, during which the stress and strain distributions are assumed constant. The damage is calculated for each time step based on a modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. Failure is assumed to occur when the normalized accumulated damage at any point in the component is greater than or equal to unity. The corresponding time will be the creep rupture life for that component. Examples are chosen to demonstrate the CARES/CREEP (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/CREEP) integrated design programs, which is written for the ANSYS finite element package. Depending on the component size and loading conditions, it was found that in real structures one of two competing failure modes (creep or slow crack growth) will dominate. Applications to benechmark problems and engine components are included.

  14. Creep Life of Ceramic Components Using a Finite-Element-Based Integrated Design Program (CARES/CREEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. M.; Jadaan, O. M.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    The desirable properties of ceramics at high temperatures have generated interest in their use for structural application such as in advanced turbine engine systems. Design lives for such systems can exceed 10,000 hours. The long life requirement necessitates subjecting the components to relatively low stresses. The combination of high temperatures and low stresses typically places failure for monolithic ceramics in the creep regime. The objective of this paper is to present a design methodology for predicting the lifetimes of structural components subjected to creep rupture conditions. This methodology utilizes commercially available finite element packages and takes into account the time-varying creep strain distributions (stress relaxation). The creep life, of a component is discretized into short time steps, during which the stress and strain distributions are assumed constant. The damage is calculated for each time step based on a modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. Failure is assumed to occur when the normalized accumulated damage at any point in the component is greater than or equal to unity. The corresponding time will be the creep rupture life for that component. Examples are chosen to demonstrate the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/CREEP (CARES/CREEP) integrated design program, which is written for the ANSYS finite element package. Depending on the component size and loading conditions, it was found that in real structures one of two competing failure modes (creep or slow crack growth) will dominate. Applications to benchmark problems and engine components are included.

  15. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  16. NGNP Graphite Selection and Acquisition Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.; Bratton, R.; Windes, W.

    2007-09-30

    The nuclear graphite (H-451) previously used in the United States for High-Temperature Reactors (HTRs) is no longer available. New graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A complete properties database for these new, available, candidate grades of graphite must be developed to support the design and licensing of NGNP core components. Data are required for the physical, mechanical (including radiation-induced creep), and oxidation properties of graphites. Moreover, the data must be statistically sound and take account of in-billet, between billets, and lot-to-lot variations of properties. These data are needed to support the ongoing development1 of the risk-derived American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) graphite design code (a consensus code being prepared under the jurisdiction of the ASME by gas-cooled reactor and NGNP stakeholders including the vendors). The earlier Fort St. Vrain design of High-Temperature Reactor (HTRs) used deterministic performance models for H-451, while the NGNP will use new graphite grades and risk-derived (probabilistic) performance models and design codes, such as that being developed by the ASME. A radiation effects database must be developed for the currently available graphite materials, and this requires a substantial graphite irradiation program. The graphite Technology Development Plan (TDP)2 describes the data needed and the experiments planned to acquire these data in a timely fashion to support NGNP design, construction, and licensing. The strategy for the selection of appropriate grades of graphite for the NGNP is discussed here. The final selection of graphite grades depends upon the chosen reactor type and vendor because the reactor type (pebble bed or prismatic block) has a major influence on the graphite chosen by the designer. However, the time required to obtain the needed irradiation data for the selected NGNP graphite is sufficiently

  17. Graphite Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draine, B. T.

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory measurements are used to constrain the dielectric tensor for graphite, from microwave to X-ray frequencies. The dielectric tensor is strongly anisotropic even at X-ray energies. The discrete dipole approximation is employed for accurate calculations of absorption and scattering by single-crystal graphite spheres and spheroids. For randomly oriented single-crystal grains, the so-called 1/3{--}2/3 approximation for calculating absorption and scattering cross sections is exact in the limit a/λ \\to 0 and provides better than ∼10% accuracy in the optical and UV even when a/λ is not small, but becomes increasingly inaccurate at infrared wavelengths, with errors as large as ∼40% at λ =10 μ {{m}}. For turbostratic graphite grains, the Bruggeman and Maxwell Garnett treatments yield similar cross sections in the optical and ultraviolet, but diverge in the infrared, with predicted cross sections differing by over an order of magnitude in the far-infrared. It is argued that the Maxwell Garnett estimate is likely to be more realistic, and is recommended. The out-of-plane lattice resonance of graphite near 11.5 μm may be observable in absorption with the MIRI spectrograph on James Webb Space Telescope. Aligned graphite grains, if present in the interstellar medium, could produce polarized X-ray absorption and polarized X-ray scattering near the carbon K edge.

  18. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  19. Creep Analysis for a Wide Stress Range Based on Stress Relaxation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, Holm; Naumenko, Konstantin; Gorash, Yevgen

    Many materials exhibit a stress range dependent creep behavior. The power-law creep observed for a certain stress range changes to the viscous type creep if the stress value decreases. Recently published experimental data for advanced heat resistant steels indicates that the high creep exponent (in the range 5-12 for the power-law behavior) may decrease to the low value of approximately 1 within the stress range relevant for engineering structures. The aim of this paper is to confirm the stress range dependence of creep behavior based on the experimental data of stress relaxation. An extended constitutive model for the minimum creep rate is introduced to consider both the linear and the power law creep ranges. To take into account the primary creep behavior a strain hardening function is introduced. The material constants are identified for published experimental data of creep and relaxation tests for a 12%Cr steel bolting material at 500°C. The data for the minimum creep rate are well-defined only for moderate and high stress levels. To reconstruct creep rates for the low stress range the data of the stress relaxation test are applied. The results show a gradual decrease of the creep exponent with the decreasing stress level. Furthermore, they illustrate that the proposed constitutive model well describes the creep rates for a wide stress range.

  20. Creep degradation in oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened Ni-base alloys in wrought bar form are studied for creep degradation effects similar to those found in thin gage sheet. The bar products evaluated included ODS-Ni, ODS-NiCr, and three types of advanced ODS-NiCrAl alloys. Tensile test specimens were exposed to creep at various stress levels at 1365 K and then tensile tested at room temperature. Low residual tensile properties, change in fracture mode, the appearance of dispersoid-free bands, grain boundary cavitation, and internal oxidation in the microstructure were interpreted as creep degradation effects. This work showed that many ODS alloys are subject to creep damage. Degradation of tensile properties occurred after very small amounts of creep strain, ductility being the most sensitive property. All the ODS alloys which were creep damaged possessed a large grain size. Creep damage appears to have been due to diffusional creep which produced dispersoid-free bands around boundaries acting as vacancy sources. Low angle and possibly twin boundaries acted as vacancy sources.

  1. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  2. Advanced risk assessment of the effects of graphite fibers on electronic and electric equipment, phase 1. [simulating vulnerability to airports and communities from fibers released during aircraft fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pocinki, L. S.; Kaplan, L. D.; Cornell, M. E.; Greenstone, R.

    1979-01-01

    A model was developed to generate quantitative estimates of the risk associated with the release of graphite fibers during fires involving commercial aircraft constructed with graphite fiber composite materials. The model was used to estimate the risk associated with accidents at several U.S. airports. These results were then combined to provide an estimate of the total risk to the nation.

  3. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  4. Creep behavior of tungsten/niobium and tungsten/niobium-1 percent zirconium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, Donald W.; Titran, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    The creep behavior and microstructural stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium and niobium 1 percent zirconium was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in order to assess the potential of this material for use in advanced space power systems. The creep behavior of the composite materials could be described by a power law creep equation. A linear relationship was found to exist between the minimum creep rate of the composite and the inverse of the composite creep rupture life. The composite materials had an order of magnitude increase in stress to achieve 1 percent creep strain and in rupture strength at test temperatures of 1400 and 1500 K compared to unreinforced material. The composite materials were also stronger than the unreinforced materials by an order of magnitude when density was taken into consideration. Results obtained on the creep behavior and microstructural stability of the composites show significant potential improvement in high temperature properties and mass reduction for space power system components.

  5. Creep behaviour and creep mechanisms of normal and healing ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Gail Marilyn

    Patients with knee ligament injuries often undergo ligament reconstructions to restore joint stability and, potentially, abate osteoarthritis. Careful literature review suggests that in 10% to 40% of these patients the graft tissue "stretches out". Some graft elongation is likely due to creep (increased elongation of tissue under repeated or sustained load). Quantifying creep behaviour and identifying creep mechanisms in both normal and healing ligaments is important for finding clinically relevant means to prevent creep. Ligament creep was accurately predicted using a novel yet simple structural model that incorporated both collagen fibre recruitment and fibre creep. Using the inverse stress relaxation function to model fibre creep in conjunction with fibre recruitment produced a superior prediction of ligament creep than that obtained from the inverse stress relaxation function alone. This implied mechanistic role of fibre recruitment during creep was supported using a new approach to quantify crimp patterns at stresses in the toe region (increasing stiffness) and linear region (constant stiffness) of the stress-strain curve. Ligament creep was relatively insensitive to increases in stress in the toe region; however, creep strain increased significantly when tested at the linear region stress. Concomitantly, fibre recruitment was evident at the toe region stresses; however, recruitment was limited at the linear region stress. Elevating the water content of normal ligament using phosphate buffered saline increased the creep response. Therefore, both water content and fibre recruitment are important mechanistic factors involved in creep of normal ligaments. Ligament scars had inferior creep behaviour compared to normal ligaments even after 14 weeks. In addition to inferior collagen properties affecting fibre recruitment and increased water content, increased glycosaminoglycan content and flaws in scar tissue were implicated as potential mechanisms of scar creep

  6. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  7. Creep failure analysis for ceramic composites containing viscous interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerlein, I.J.; An, L.; Raj, R.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes an experimental and theoretical study of the creep fracture of advanced ceramic composites under steady axial tension. Such composites consist of a high fraction of elongated ceramic grains, varying substantially in aspect ratio and embedded in a glassy matrix phase. For creep testing, a model test system was prepared, which consisted of well-aligned elongated mica platelets ({approximately} 60 vol%) and residual glass phase ({approximately} 40 vol%) in its final heat-treatment stage. The creep curves of several specimens under various applied loads and at a temperature (800 C) higher than the T{sub g} of the glass matrix ({approximately} 650 C) were obtained up to creep fracture. Micrographs of the creep fracture surfaces revealed substantial grain pull-out and cavitation in the matrix phase with virtually no transgranular fracture. The objective of this work is to simulate the creep response and fracture based on the accumulation of localized void growth and microstructural parameters, using a computational mechanics technique, called viscous break interaction (VBI), developed to compute stress fields around strongly interacting fractures or voids in composites with fibrous microstructures. To simulate the creep process up to fracture, a Monte Carlo model is developed which couples VBI with a statistical description of grain length. Both the experimental and simulation results show that random lengths and random overlap of the aligned grains naturally lead to (i) local and microstructure-sensitive damage evolution up to ultimate failure and (ii) substantial variation in failure times of seemingly identical specimens.

  8. Nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Mercuri, R. A.; Criscione, J. M.

    1985-07-02

    A high strength, high coefficient of thermal expansion fine-grained isotropic graphite article produced from 30% to 70% of attritor milled gilsonite coke or other high CTE carbon filler particles and minor amounts of a binder such a coal tar pitch and petroleum pitch, the article being formed by warm isostatic molding at a temperature of between 50/sup 0/ C. and 70/sup 0/ C. under a pressure between 100 and 1000 psi for a time between 1 and 10 minutes. The particle size of the fillers ranges up to 150 microns.

  9. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  10. TSX graphite for extended use in the N-Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1985-08-01

    This report reviews the limited amount of irradiation data available for grade TSX graphite with the purpose of obtaining reasonable estimates of material behavior. The results are enhanced by obtaining generalized behavior characteristics demonstrated by similar grades of graphite, such as CSF, AGOT, and PGA. Intent of this work is to furnish the necessary coefficients to describe the material behavior for inclusion in the constitutive equations for the anisotropic graphite grade TSX. Estimates of the free-dimensional changes of TSX graphite as a function of temperature and fluence have been made and shown to be in good agreement with the data. The effects of irradiation on other physical properties, such as elastic moduli, conductivity, and coefficient of thermal expansion, are also described. The irradiation creep characteristics of TSX graphite are also estimated on the basis of data for similar grades of graphite in the US and Europe. Crude approximations of stresses generated in the keyed structure were made to demonstrate the magnitude of the problem. The results clearly predict that the filler-block keys will fail and the tube-block keys will not. It is also indicated that the overall stack height growth will be increased by 25 to 38 mm (1 to 1.5 in.) because of creep.

  11. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    High levels of mechanical performance in tension, flexure, fatigue, and creep loading situations of graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are discussed. At test temperatures of up to 813 K it was found that the major limiting factor was the oxidative instability of the reinforcing graphite fibers. Particular points to note include the following: (1) a wide variety of graphite fibers were found to be comparable with the glass matrix composite fabrication process; (2) choice of fiber, to a large extent, controlled resultant composite performance; (3) composite fatigue performance was found to be excellent at both 300 K and 703 K; (4) composite creep and stress rupture at temperatures of up to 813 K was limited by the oxidative stability of the fiber; (5) exceptionally low values of composite thermal expansion coefficient were attributable to the dimensional stability of both matrix and fiber; and (6) component fabricability was demonstrated through the hot pressing of hot sections and brazing using glass and metal joining phases.

  12. Preparation of graphitic articles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Nemer, Martin; Weigle, John C.

    2010-05-11

    Graphitic structures have been prepared by exposing templates (metal, metal-coated ceramic, graphite, for example) to a gaseous mixture that includes hydrocarbons and oxygen. When the template is metal, subsequent acid treatment removes the metal to yield monoliths, hollow graphitic structures, and other products. The shapes of the coated and hollow graphitic structures mimic the shapes of the templates.

  13. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  14. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years.

  15. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  16. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  17. Environmental effects and viscoelastic behavior of laminated graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    Primarily because of the polymeric matrix, graphite/epoxy composites are viscoelastic materials which exhibit creep and delayed failures. Guided by the time-temperature superposition principle, the authors are developing accelerated characterization techniques to predict the long term compliance behavior and creep rupture strength of composite materials based on short term tests at elevated temperatures. The effect of a post-cure cycle on the compliance and creep rupture strength of composite materials is discussed. The Zhurkov type failure law is applied to experimental creep rupture data of a typical laminate and is shown to correlate the data. A beneficial mechanical strengthening effect is described which significantly affects the failure strengths of specimens which have been under creep loading for a period of time. This aging effect is reversible if the specimen is allowed to recover before being loaded to failure. Other environmental aspects of composite materials are also reviewed.

  18. Creep fracture during solute-drag creep and superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Taleff, E.M.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Henshall, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    Creep fracture behavior has been studied in Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Mn alloys undergoing solute-drag creep and in microduplex stainless steel undergoing both solute-drag creep and superplastic deformation. Failure in these materials is found to be controlled by two mechanisms, neck formation and cavitation. The mechanism of creep fracture during solute-drag creep in Al-Mg is found to change from necking-controlled fracture to cavitation-controlled fracture as Mn content is increased. Binary Al-Mg material fails by neck formation during solute-drag creep, and cavities are formed primarily in the neck region due to high hydrostatic stresses. Ternary alloys of Al-Mg- Mn containing 0.25 and 0.50 wt % Mn exhibit more uniform cavitation, with the 0.50 Mn alloy clearly failing by cavity interlinkage. Failure in the microduplex stainless steel is dominated by neck formation during solute-drag creep deformation but is controlled by cavity growth and interlinkage during superplastic deformation. Cavitation was measured at several strains, and found to increase as an exponential function of strain. An important aspect of cavity growth in the stainless steel is the long latency time before significant cavitation occurs. For a short latency period, cavitation acts to significantly reduce ductility below that allowed by neck growth alone. This effect is most pronounced in materials with a high strain-rate sensitivity, for which neck growth occurs very slowly.

  19. Rationalization of Creep Data of Creep-Resistant Steels on the Basis of the New Power Law Creep Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Yang, M.; Song, X. L.; Jia, J.; Xiang, Z. D.

    2016-07-01

    The conventional power law creep equation (Norton equation) relating the minimum creep rate to creep stress and temperature cannot be used to predict the long-term creep strengths of creep-resistant steels if its parameters are determined only from short-term measurements. This is because the stress exponent and activation energy of creep determined on the basis of this equation depend on creep temperature and stress and these dependences cannot be predicted using this equation. In this work, it is shown that these problems associated with the conventional power law creep equation can be resolved if the new power law equation is used to rationalize the creep data. The new power law creep equation takes a form similar to the conventional power law creep equation but has a radically different capability not only in rationalizing creep data but also in predicting the long-term creep strengths from short-term test data. These capabilities of the new power law creep equation are demonstrated using the tensile strength and creep test data measured for both pipe and tube grades of the creep-resistant steel 9Cr-1.8W-0.5Mo-V-Nb-B (P92 and T92).

  20. AFRPL Graphite Performance Prediction Program. Improved Capability for the Design and Ablation Performance Prediction of Advanced Air Force Solid Propellant Rocket Nozzles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    additional verifications are required since in several cases only one motor tiring was used to validate the kinetic expressions for a particular...thennosetting resin. Graphitization between densification cycles was conducted at 2800’C. The final thermal treatment was a 10000C pyrolysis . No definition

  1. Predicted reversal and recovery of surface creep on the Hayward fault following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, D. A.; Bürgmann, R.

    2008-10-01

    Offset cultural features suggest that creep rates along the Hayward fault have remained constant since 1920 until the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake despite evidence in the earthquake record of an enduring stress shadow after 1906. We re-construct the stressing history on the Hayward fault in order to predict when creep, assumed to have slowed, likely resumed at historical rates. The resumption of creep is dependent on the stressing history imposed from postseismic processes. Basic viscoelastic models produce stress histories that allow creep to resume within a couple decades. A detachment zone model for the Bay Area predicts that creep would not resume for 70+ years after the 1906 earthquake, in disagreement with historical creep observations. The recovery of creep is also advanced by potential left-lateral slip that could have been induced by the 1906 earthquake. Calculations for a friction-less fault suggest that 30-210 mm of left-lateral slip could have occurred.

  2. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  3. Development of design data for graphite reinforced epoxy and polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheck, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques and design data were characterized for a graphite/epoxy composite system that is useful from 75 K to 450 K, and a graphite/polyimide composite system that is useful from 75 K to 589 K. The Monsanto 710 polyimide resin was selected as the resin to be characterized and used with the graphite fiber reinforcement. Material was purchased using the prepreg specification for the design data generation for both the HT-S/710 and HM-S/710 graphite/polyimide composite system. Lamina and laminate properties were determined at 75 K, 297 K, and 589 K. The test results obtained on the skin-stringer components proved that graphite/polyimide composites can be reliably designed and analyzed much like graphite/epoxy composites. The design data generated in the program includes the standard static mechanical properties, biaxial strain data, creep, fatigue, aging, and thick laminate data.

  4. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  5. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro–Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro–Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate. PMID:27274696

  6. Modeling Creep Processes in Aging Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olali, N. V.; Voitovich, L. V.; Zazimko, N. N.; Malezhik, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    The photoelastic method is generalized to creep in hereditary aging materials. Optical-creep curves and mechanical-creep or optical-relaxation curves are used to interpret fringe patterns. For materials with constant Poisson's ratio, it is sufficient to use mechanical- or optical-creep curves for this purpose

  7. Creep, fatigue and creep-fatigue interactions in modified 9% Chromium - 1% Molybdenum (P91) steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyanasundaram, Valliappa

    Grade P91 steel, from the class of advanced high-chrome ferritic steels, is one of the preferred materials for many elevated temperature structural components. Creep-fatigue (C-F) interactions, along with oxidation, can accelerate the kinetics of damage accumulation and consequently reduce such components' life. Hence, reliable C-F test data is required for meticulous consideration of C-F interactions and oxidation, which in turn is vital for sound design practices. It is also imperative to develop analytical constitutive models that can simulate and predict material response under various long-term in-service conditions using experimental data from short-term laboratory experiments. Consequently, the major objectives of the proposed research are to characterize the creep, fatigue and C-F behavior of grade P91 steels at 625 C and develop robust constitutive models for simulating/predicting their microstructural response under different loading conditions. This work will utilize experimental data from 16 laboratories worldwide that conducted tests (creep, fatigue and C-F) on grade P91 steel at 625°C in a round-robin (RR) program. Along with 7 creep deformation and rupture tests, 32 pure fatigue and 46 C-F tests from the RR are considered in this work. A phenomenological constitutive model formulated in this work needs just five fitting parameters to simulate/predict the monotonic, pure fatigue and C-F behavior of grade P91 at 625 C. A modified version of an existing constitutive model is also presented for particularly simulating its isothermal creep deformation and rupture behavior. Experimental results indicate that specimen C-F lives, as measured by the 2% load drop criterion, seem to decrease with increasing strain ranges and increasing hold times at 625°C. Metallographic assessment of the tested specimens shows that the damage mode in both pure fatigue and 600 seconds hold time cyclic tests is predominantly transgranular fatigue with some presence of

  8. Study of irradiation creep of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    Thin-wall tubing was produced from the 832665 (500 kg) heat of V-4 wt.% Cr-4 wt.% Ti to study its irradiation creep behavior. The specimens, in the form of pressurized capsules, were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor experiments (ATR-A1 and HFIR RB-12J, respectively). The ATR-A1 irradiation has been completed and specimens from it will soon be available for postirradiation examination. The RB-12J irradiation is not yet complete.

  9. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  10. Creep in electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  11. Steady-State Creep of Rock Salt: Improved Approaches for Lab Determination and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, R.-M.; Salzer, K.; Popp, T.; Lüdeling, C.

    2015-11-01

    Actual problems in geotechnical design, e.g., of underground openings for radioactive waste repositories or high-pressure gas storages, require sophisticated constitutive models and consistent parameters for rock salt that facilitate reliable prognosis of stress-dependent deformation and associated damage. Predictions have to comprise the active mining phase with open excavations as well as the long-term development of the backfilled mine or repository. While convergence-induced damage occurs mostly in the vicinity of openings, the long-term behaviour of the backfilled system is dominated by the damage-free steady-state creep. However, because in experiments the time necessary to reach truly stationary creep rates can range from few days to years, depending mainly on temperature and stress, an innovative but simple creep testing approach is suggested to obtain more reliable results: A series of multi-step tests with loading and unloading cycles allows a more reliable estimate of stationary creep rate in a reasonable time. For modelling, we use the advanced strain-hardening approach of Günther-Salzer, which comprehensively describes all relevant deformation properties of rock salt such as creep and damage-induced rock failure within the scope of an unified creep ansatz. The capability of the combination of improved creep testing procedures and accompanied modelling is demonstrated by recalculating multi-step creep tests at different loading and temperature conditions. Thus reliable extrapolations relevant to in-situ creep rates (10^{-9} to 10^{-13} s^{-1}) become possible.

  12. Circular Functions Based Comprehensive Analysis of Plastic Creep Deformations in the Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Vahid

    2016-12-01

    Analytically based model is presented for behavioral analysis of the plastic deformations in the reinforced materials using the circular (trigonometric) functions. The analytical method is proposed to predict creep behavior of the fibrous composites based on basic and constitutive equations under a tensile axial stress. New insight of the work is to predict some important behaviors of the creeping matrix. In the present model, the prediction of the behaviors is simpler than the available methods. Principal creep strain rate behaviors are very noteworthy for designing the fibrous composites in the creeping composites. Analysis of the mentioned parameter behavior in the reinforced materials is necessary to analyze failure, fracture, and fatigue studies in the creep of the short fiber composites. Shuttles, spaceships, turbine blades and discs, and nozzle guide vanes are commonly subjected to the creep effects. Also, predicting the creep behavior is significant to design the optoelectronic and photonic advanced composites with optical fibers. As a result, the uniform behavior with constant gradient is seen in the principal creep strain rate behavior, and also creep rupture may happen at the fiber end. Finally, good agreements are found through comparing the obtained analytical and FEM results.

  13. Prediction of creep-rupture life of unidirectional titanium matrix composites subjected to transverse loading

    SciTech Connect

    John, R.; Khobaib, M.; Smith, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMCs) incorporating unidirectional fiber reinforcement are considered as enabling materials technology for advanced engines which require high specific strength and elevated temperature capability. The resistance of unidirectional TMCs to deformation under longitudinally applied sustained loading at elevated temperatures has been well documented. Many investigators have shown that the primary weakness of the unidirectional TMC is its susceptibility to failure under very low transverse loads, especially under sustained loading. Hence, a reliable model is required to predict the creep-rupture life of TMCs subjected to different transverse stress levels over a wide range of temperatures. In this article, the authors propose a model to predict the creep-rupture life of unidirectional TMC subjected to transverse loading based on the creep-rupture life of unidirectional TMC subjected to transverse loading based on the creep-rupture behavior of the corresponding fiberless matrix. The model assumes that during transverse loading, the effective load-carrying matrix ligament along a row of fibers controls the creep-rupture strength and the fibers do not contribute to the creep resistance of the composite. The proposed model was verified using data obtained from different TMC fabricated using three matrix compositions, which exhibited distinctly different types of creep behavior. The results show that the creep-rupture life of the transverse TMC decreases linearly with increasing ratio of the fiber diameter to the ply thickness. The creep-rupture life is also predicted to be independent of fiber spacing along the length of the specimen.

  14. Principles and practices of irradiation creep experiment using pressurized mini-bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai; Burchell, Timothy D; McDuffee, Joel Lee

    2013-01-01

    This article is to describe the key design principles and application practices of the newly developed in-reactor irradiation creep testing technology using pressurized mini-bellows. Miniature creep test frames were designed to fit into the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) rabbit capsule whose internal diameter is slightly less than 10 mm. The most important consideration for this in-reactor creep testing technology was the ability of the small pressurized metallic bellows to survive irradiation at elevated temperatures while maintaining applied load to the specimen. Conceptual designs have been developed for inducing tension and compression stresses in specimens. Both the theoretical model and the in-furnace test confirmed that a gas-pressurized bellows can produce high enough stress to induce irradiation creep in subsize specimens. Discussion focuses on the possible stress range in specimens induced by the miniature gas-pressurized bellows and the limitations imposed by the size and structure of thin-walled bellows. A brief introduction to the in-reactor creep experiment for graphite is provided to connect to the companion paper describing the application practices and irradiation creep data. An experimental and calculation procedure to obtain in-situ applied stress values from post irradiation in-furnace force measurements is also presented.

  15. Creep of dry clinopyroxene aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystricky, Misha; Mackwell, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    We have determined diffusional and dislocation creep rheologies for clinopyroxenite Ca1.0Mg0.8Fe0.2Si2O6 under dry conditions by deforming natural and hot-pressed samples at confining pressures of 300-430 MPa and temperatures of 1100°-1250°C with the oxygen fugacity buffered by either nickel-nickel oxide or iron-wüstite powders. The coarse-grained natural Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite yielded a stress exponent of n = 4.7 ± 0.2 and an activation energy for creep of Q = 760 ± 40 kJ mol-1, consistent with deformation in the dislocation creep regime. The strength of the natural clinopyroxenite is consistent with previous high-temperature measurements of dislocation creep behavior of Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite by Kirby and Kronenberg [1984] and Boland and Tullis [1986]. Fine-grained clinopyroxenite was prepared from ground powders of the natural clinopyroxenite. Hot-pressed samples were deformed under similar conditions to the natural samples. Mixed-mode deformation behavior was observed, with diffusional creep (n = 1) at lower differential stresses and dislocation creep (with n and Q similar to those of the natural samples) at higher differential stresses. Within the dislocation creep field the predried hot-pressed samples generally yielded creep rates that were about an order of magnitude faster than the natural samples. Thus, even at the highest differential stresses, a component of strain accommodation by grain boundary diffusion was present in the hot-pressed samples. Optical and electron microscope investigations of the deformation microstructures of the natural and hot-pressed samples show evidence for mechanical twinning and activation of dislocation slip systems. When extrapolated to geological conditions expected in the deep crust and upper mantle on Earth and other terrestrial planets, the strength of dry single-phase clinopyroxene aggregates is very high, exceeding that of dry olivine-rich rocks.

  16. Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Components Using the Finite Element Based Integrated Design Program (CARES/Creep)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1997-01-01

    The desirable properties of ceramics at high temperatures have generated interest in their use for structural applications such as in advanced turbine systems. Design lives for such systems can exceed 10,000 hours. Such long life requirements necessitate subjecting the components to relatively low stresses. The combination of high temperatures and low stresses typically places failure for monolithic ceramics in the creep regime. The objective of this work is to present a design methodology for predicting the lifetimes of structural components subjected to multiaxial creep loading. This methodology utilizes commercially available finite element packages and takes into account the time varying creep stress distributions (stress relaxation). In this methodology, the creep life of a component is divided into short time steps, during which, the stress and strain distributions are assumed constant. The damage, D, is calculated for each time step based on a modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. For components subjected to predominantly tensile loading, failure is assumed to occur when the normalized accumulated damage at any point in the component is greater than or equal to unity.

  17. Graphite Nanoreinforcements for Aerospace Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drzal, Lawrence T.

    2005-01-01

    New advances in the reinforcement of polymer matrix composite materials are critical for advancement of the aerospace industry. Reinforcements are required to have good mechanical and thermal properties, large aspect ratio, excellent adhesion to the matrix, and cost effectiveness. To fulfill the requirements, nanocomposites in which the matrix is filled with nanoscopic reinforcing phases having dimensions typically in the range of 1nm to 100 nm show considerably higher strength and modulus with far lower reinforcement content than their conventional counterparts. Graphite is a layered material whose layers have dimensions in the nanometer range and are held together by weak Van der Waals forces. Once these layers are exfoliated and dispersed in a polymer matrix as nano platelets, they have large aspect ratios. Graphite has an elastic modulus that is equal to the stiffest carbon fiber and 10-15 times that of other inorganic reinforcements, and it is also electrically and thermally conductive. If the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with excellent mechanical properties, superior thermal stability, and very good electrical and thermal properties at very low reinforcement loadings.

  18. Extended-time-scale creep measurement on Maraging cantilever blade springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virdone, Nicole; Agresti, Juri; Bertolini, Alessandro; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Stellacci, Rosalia; Kamp, Justin; Mantovani, Maddalena; Sannibale, Virginio; Tarallo, Marco; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2008-08-01

    Two controlled temperature facilities were built to induce an accelerated creep rate in a Maraging steel GAS spring and to measure the material's creep over an artificially extended period of time. The data acquisition of the first experiment lasted for almost a year, but then the blades were allowed to creep for six more years before measuring the permanent deformation integrated over time. The data from this first experiment was polluted by a defect in the data acquisition software, but yielded overall creep limits and an evaluation of the Arrhenius acceleration of creep speed with temperature (1.28±0.13 °C -1). The duration of the second experiment was only 1 year but more free of systematic errors. The effective test period of this second experiment (normalized with the Arrhenius acceleration measured in the first experiment) extends in billions of years showing no sign of anomalous creep. The result of both experiments also produced a simple procedure capable of eliminating all practical effects of creep from the Advanced LIGO seismic isolation and suspensions. Measurements of creep under various stress levels, and of the thermal variations of Young's modulus (2.023 (±0.013)×10 -4 °C -1) are reported as well.

  19. "A New Class of Creep Resistant Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites"

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mohit Jain, Dr. Ganesh Skandan, Prof. Roger Cannon, Rutgers University

    2007-03-30

    Despite recent progress in the development of SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), their application in industrial gas turbines for distributed energy (DE) systems has been limited. The poor oxidation resistance of the non-oxide ceramics warrants the use of envrionmental barrier coatings (EBCs), which in turn lead to issues pertaining to life expectancy of the coatings. On the other hand, oxide/oxide CMCs are potential replacements, but their use has been limited until now due to the poor creep resistance at high temperatures, particularly above 1200 oC: the lack of a creep resistant matrix has been a major limiting factor. Using yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) as the matrix material system, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in oxide/oxide CMCs by introducing innovations in both the structure and composition of the matrix material, thereby leading to high temperature matrix creep properties not achieved until now. An array of YAG-based powders with a unique set of particle characteristics were produced in-house and sintered to full density and compressive creep data was obtained. Aided in part by the composition and the microstructure, the creep rates were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially. Even after accounting for porosity and a smaller matrix grain size in a practical CMC component, the YAG-based matrix material was found to creep slower than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially.

  20. Producing graphite with desired properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. M.; Imprescia, R. J.; Reiswig, R. D.; Smith, M. C.

    1971-01-01

    Isotropic or anisotropic graphite is synthesized with precise control of particle size, distribution, and shape. The isotropic graphites are nearly perfectly isotropic, with thermal expansion coefficients two or three times those of ordinary graphites. The anisotropic graphites approach the anisotropy of pyrolytic graphite.

  1. Creep of plasma sprayed zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 1000, 2000, and 3500 psi and temperatures of 1100 C, 1250 C, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, magnesia, and two different concentrations of yttria. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate. The creep rate for 20% Y2O3-80% ZrO2 was 1/3 to 1/2 that of 8% Y2O3-92% ZrO2. Both magnesia and calcia stabilized ZrO2 crept at a rate 5 to 10 times that of the 20% Y2O3 material. A near proportionality between creep rate and applied stress was observed. The rate controlling process appeared to be thermally activated, with an activation energy of approximately 100 cal/gm mole K. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  2. Graphite for nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Virgiliev, Yu.S.; Kalyagina, I.P.

    1993-12-31

    Relative dimensional changes and physical properties of structural graphites - {Gamma}p-280 (nuclear graphite) and {Gamma}p{Pi}-2 (modificated variety of nuclear graphite for the rings of elastic contact) irradiated at temperatures ranging from 320 to 1900K with a fluence of about 2.5.10{sup 22}nvt (E {ge} 0.18 MeV) are represented. In order to ensure a long-time serviceability of the VGM - reactor blocks the high-strength graphite of {Gamma}p-1 grade are developed. The properties and its irradiation changes of {Gamma}p-1 graphite are represented. A secondary swelling of the graphite develops similar to the swelling of metals, alloys and high-melting compounds.

  3. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  4. Creep behavior of tungsten/niobium and tungsten/niobium-1 percent zirconium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Titran, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using tungsten fiber reinforced niobium or niobium-1 percent zirconium matrix composites to meet the anticipated increased temperature and creep resistance requirements imposed by advanced space power systems. The results obtained on the short time tensile properties indicated that W/Nb composites showed significant improvements in high temperature strength and offer significant mass reductions for high temperature space power systems. The prime material requirement for space power systems applications is long time creep resistance. A study was conducted to determine the effect of high temperature exposure on the properties of these composites, with emphasis upon their creep behavior at elevated temperatures.

  5. Creep and Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth at Structural Discontinuities and Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. F. W. Brust; Dr. G. M. Wilkowski; Dr. P. Krishnaswamy; Mr. Keith Wichman

    2010-01-27

    methods often need to be addressed as plants age. Shutdown inspection intervals can only be designed using creep and creep-fatigue crack growth techniques. (5) The use of crack growth procedures can aid in examining the seriousness of creep damage in structural components. How cracks grow can be used to assess margins on components and lead to further safe operation. After examining the pros and cons of all these methods, the R5 code was chosen as the most up-to-date and validated high temperature creep and creep fatigue code currently used in the world at present. R5 is considered the leader because the code: (1) has well established and validated rules, (2) has a team of experts continually improving and updating it, (3) has software that can be used by designers, (4) extensive validation in many parts with available data from BE resources as well as input from Imperial college's database, and (5) was specifically developed for use in nuclear plants. R5 was specifically developed for use in gas cooled nuclear reactors which operate in the UK and much of the experience is based on materials and temperatures which are experienced in these reactors. If the next generation advanced reactors to be built in the US used these same materials within the same temperature ranges as these reactors, then R5 may be appropriate for consideration of direct implementation within ASME code NH or Section XI. However, until more verification and validation of these creep/fatigue crack growth rules for the specific materials and temperatures to be used in the GEN IV reactors is complete, ASME should consider delaying this implementation. With this in mind, it is this authors opinion that R5 methods are the best available for code use today. The focus of this work was to examine the literature for creep and creep-fatigue crack growth procedures that are well established in codes in other countries and choose a procedure to consider implementation into ASME NH. It is very important to

  6. Creep and Creep-Fatigue of Alloy 617 Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jill K.; Carroll, Laura J.; Wright, Richard N.

    2014-08-01

    Alloy 617 is the primary candidate material for the heat exchanger of a very high temperature gas cooled reactor intended to operate up to 950°C. While this alloy is currently qualified in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for non-nuclear construction, it is not currently allowed for use in nuclear designs. A draft Code Case to qualify Alloy 617 for nuclear pressure boundary applications was submitted in 1992, but was withdrawn prior to approval. Prior to withdrawal of the draft, comments were received indicating that there was insufficient knowledge of the creep and creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 welds. In this report the results of recent experiments and analysis of the creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 617 welds prepared using the gas tungsten arc process with Alloy 617 filler wire. Low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue properties of weldments are also discussed. The experiments cover a range of temperatures from 750 to 1000°C to support development of a new Code Case to qualify the material for elevated temperature nuclear design. Properties of the welded material are compared to results of extensive characterization of solution annealed plate base metal.

  7. Development of polyphenylquinoxaline graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggatt, J. T.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Shdo, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    The potential of polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ)/graphite composites to serve as structural material at 316 C (600 F)has been demonstrated using a block copolymer, BlCo(13), PPQ derivative. Initially, thirteen polyphenylquinoxalines were evaluated. From this work, four candidate polymers were selected for preliminary evaluation as matrices for HMS graphite fiber reinforced composites. The preliminary composite evaluation enabled selection of one of the four polymers for advanced composite preparation and testing. Using an experimentally established cure schedule for each of the four polymers, preliminary laminates of 50% resin volume content, prepared without postcure, were tested for flexure strength and modulus, interlaminar shear strength (short beam), and tensile strength and modulus at ambient temperature. A block copolymer (Bl Co 13) derived from one mole p-bis (phenylglyoxalyl) benzene, one fourth mole 3,3'-diaminobenzidine and three-fourths mole 3,3', 4,4'-tetraminobenzophenone was selected for extensive study. Tensile, flexural, and interlaminar shear values were obtained after aging and testing postcured BlCo(13) laminates at 316 C (600 F). The potential of PPQ/graphite laminates to serve as short term structural materials at temperatures up to 371 C (700 F) was demonstrated through weight loss experiments.

  8. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chih-Yuan

    Alumina-graphite composites, which combine high wear resistance and self-lubricity, are a potential and promising candidate for advanced tribological applications. The processing, mechanical properties and tribology of alumina-graphite composites are discussed. Full density is difficult to achieve by a pressureless sintering route. Porosity of the composites increases with graphite content which causes the strength, modulus of elasticity, and hardness of the composites to decrease. The increased porosity does cause the fracture toughness to slightly increases. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites was studied with a pin-on-disk tribometer with emphasis on the following aspects: the graphite content in both pin and disk, the graphite flake size and the orientation of the graphite flakes. Scan electronic microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction are utilized to examine and characterize the wear debris and the worn surface. Results confirmed that it is necessary to optimize the structure and the supply of lubricant to improve the tribological behavior and that the arrangements of sliding couples also affect the tribology of self-lubricated ceramic composites. Continuous measurements of the friction coefficients were collected at high frequency in an attempt to correlate the tribology of alumina-graphite composites to vibrations introduced by friction. While these measurements indicate that the time frequency behavior of tribology is an important area of study, conclusions regarding the frequency response of different sliding couples could not be definitively stated. Finally, a new concept connecting instantaneous wear coefficient and instantaneous contact stress is proposed for prediction of wear behavior of brittle materials.

  9. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    DOEpatents

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  10. Coating method for graphite

    DOEpatents

    Banker, John G.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided comprising coating the graphite surface with a suspension of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4% by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  11. Coating method for graphite

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  12. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

  13. Creep of ice: Further studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, H. C.; Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed studies have been done of ice creep as related to the icy satellites, Ganymede and Callisto. Included were: (1) the flow of high-pressure water ices II, III, and V, and (2) frictional sliding of ice I sub h. Work was also begun on the study of the effects of impurities on the flow of ice. Test results are summarized.

  14. Multiple-creep-test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haehner, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Simplified, compact apparatus uses fixtures that can test three samples at once for flexure, compression, or double-shear creep. Each fixture uses series of rods and plates to divide one load equally among three samples. Fixtures could be expanded to carry more samples by adding more rods and plates.

  15. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  16. Mechanism of spontaneous and triggered shallow creep events - Implications for shallow fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Kaneko, Y.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Slip on tectonic faults take place over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales as earthquakes, continuous aseismic creep, or transient creep events. Shallow creep events on continental strike-slip faults can occur spontaneously, or are coupled with earthquake afterslip, or are triggered by nearby earthquakes. Despite more than five decades of observations, the mechanism of shallow creep events and their implications for seismic hazard are still not fully understood. To understand the mechanism of creep events, we developed a physics-based numerical model to simulate shallow creep events on a strike-slip fault with rate-and-state frictional properties (Wei et al., 2013). We show that the widely used synoptic model (Scholz, 1998) cannot reproduce both rapid afterslip and frequent creep events as observed on the Superstition Hills fault in the Salton Trough after the 1987 Mw 6.6 earthquake. Rather, an unstable layer embedded in the shallow stable zone is required to match the geodetic observations of the creep behavior. Using the strike-slip fault model, we studied the triggering process of creep events, by either static or dynamic, or combined stress perturbations induced on the fault by nearby earthquakes. Preliminary results show that static stress perturbations in the effective normal stress on a system with spontaneous creep events can advance or delay creep events. The magnitude and timing of perturbations determines the clock change of creep events. The magnitude and interval of creep events changes permanently after static stress perturbation. Dynamic stress perturbations in effective normal stress can advance the timings of creep events when the perturbation temporally decreases the effective normal stress. A threshold exists for instantaneous triggering. The size of triggered slip increases as the dynamic perturbation increases in the direction of less normal stress. The system returns to pre-perturbation state after a long period of no slip. The length

  17. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2014-11-11

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range 650° to 732°C at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics aremore » common amongst the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non Nb bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.« less

  18. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2014-11-11

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range 650° to 732°C at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics are common amongst the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non Nb bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.

  19. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range of 923 K to 1005 K (650 °C to 732 °C) at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature-stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M-type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys, this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady-state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics are common among the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non-Nb-bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.

  20. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  1. Effects of radiation and creep on viscoelastic damping materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, John P.; Lewis, Tom M.; Murrell, Fred H.; Mangra, Danny

    1995-05-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), requires precise alignment of several large magnets. Submicron vibratory displacements of the magnets can degrade the performance of this important facility. Viscoelastic materials (VEM) have been shown to be effective in the control of the vibration of these magnets. Damping pads, placed under the magnet support structures in the APS storage ring, use thin layers of VEM. These soft VEM layers are subject to both high-energy radiation environment and continuous through-the-thickness compressive loads. Material experiments were conducted to answer concerns over the long term effects of the radiation environment and creep in the viscoelastic damping layers. The effects of exposure to radiation as high as 108 rad on the complex modulus were measured. Through-the-thickness creep displacements of VEM thin layers subjected to static loads of 50 psi were measured. Creep tests were conducted at elevated temperatures. Time-temperature equivalence principles were used to project creep displacements at room temperatures over several years. These damping material measurements should be of interest to vibration control engineers working with a variety of applications of fields ranging from aerospace to industrial machinery.

  2. Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems - (CASTS). [graphite fiber/polyimide matrix composites and polyimide adhesives for the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The CASTS Project initiated to develop graphite fiber/polyimide matrix (GR/PI) composite structures with 589K operational capability for aerospace vehicles is described. Near term tasks include screening composites and adhesives for 589K service, developing fabrication procedures and specifications, developing design allowables test methods and data, design and test of structural elements, and construction of a full scale aft body flap for the space shuttle orbiter vehicle for ground testing. Far term tasks include research efforts directed at new materials, manufacturing procedures and design/analysis methodology. Specific results discussed include: (1) identification of four GR/PI composites and three PI adhesives with 589K service potential for periods ranging from 125 to 500 hours; (2) development of an adhesive formulation suitable for bonding reusable surface insulation (RSI) titles to 589K (GR/PI) substructure; (3) the capability to fabricate and nondestructively inspect laminates, hat section shaped stiffeners, honeycomb sandwich panels, and chopped fiber moldings; and (4) test methods for measuring design allowables at 117K.

  3. NEW METHOD OF GRAPHITE PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Harper, W.T.

    1961-08-29

    BS>A method is described for producing graphite objects comprising mixing coal tar pitch, carbon black, and a material selected from the class comprising raw coke, calcined coke, and graphite flour. The mixture is placed in a graphite mold, pressurized to at least 1200 psi, and baked and graphitized by heating to about 2500 deg C while maintaining such pressure. (AEC)

  4. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source. (JDH)

  5. Superlubricity of graphite.

    PubMed

    Dienwiebel, Martin; Verhoeven, Gertjan S; Pradeep, Namboodiri; Frenken, Joost W M; Heimberg, Jennifer A; Zandbergen, Henny W

    2004-03-26

    Using a home-built frictional force microscope that is able to detect forces in three dimensions with a lateral force resolution down to 15 pN, we have studied the energy dissipation between a tungsten tip sliding over a graphite surface in dry contact. By measuring atomic-scale friction as a function of the rotational angle between two contacting bodies, we show that the origin of the ultralow friction of graphite lies in the incommensurability between rotated graphite layers, an effect proposed under the name of "superlubricity" [Phys. Rev. B 41, 11 837 (1990)

  6. Creep of Structural Nuclear Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Will Windes; R.W. Lloyd

    2005-09-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. One of the primary degradation mechanisms anticipated for these core components is high temperature thermal and irradiation enhanced creep. As a consequence, high temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for very high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone"-shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures are currently being established from these high temperature mechanical tests.

  7. Silicon on graphite cloth

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.; Thomas, C.J.; Ingram, A.E.; Bai, Y.B.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    A new polycrystalline silicon solar cell has been developed that utilizes commercially available graphite cloth as a substrate. This solar cell has achieved an energy conversion efficiency of 13.4% (AM1.5G). It is believed that this is a record efficiency for a silicon solar cell formed on a graphite substrate. The silicon-on-fabric structure is comprised of a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon grown directly on the graphite fabric substrate. The structure is fabricated by a low-cost ribbon process that avoids the expense and waste of wafering. The fabric substrate gives structural support to the thin device. Critical to the achievement of device quality silicon layers is control over impurities in the graphite fabric. The silicon-on-fabric technology has the potential to supply lightweight, low-cost solar cells to weight-sensitive markets at a fraction of the cost of conventionally thinned wafers.

  8. Intercalated graphite electrical conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    For years NASA has wanted to reduce the weight of spacecraft and aircraft. Experiments are conducted to find a lightweight synthetic metal to replace copper. The subject of this paper, intercalated graphite, is such a material. Intercalated graphite is made by heating petroleum or coal to remove the hydrogen and to form more covalent bonds, thus increasing the molecular weight. The coal or petroleum eventually turns to pitch, which can then be drawn into a fiber. With continued heating the pitch-based fiber releases hydrogen and forms a carbon fiber. The carbon fiber, if heated sufficiently, becomes more organized in parallel layers of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms in the form of graphite. A conductor of intercalated graphite is potentially useful for spacecraft or aircraft applications because of its low weight.

  9. Creep of Oxide Single Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    literature data on Gd 3Ga5O1 2 (8) indicate that garnets may be highly deformation resistant at temperatures very close to their melting points...Data for Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Single Crystals Temperature Stress Creep Rate (sec 1 ) for Given Stress Direction (0C) (MPa) [111] [110] [100] 1650...Gadolinium Gallium Garnet Single Crystals," J.Mat.Sci., 17, 878-884 (1982). 9. B.M. Wanklyn, Clarendon Laboratory, personal communicaticn. 10. S.B. Austerman

  10. Postseismic relaxation and transient creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Yu, S.-B.

    2005-01-01

    Postseismic deformation has been observed in the epicentral area following the 1992 Landers (M = 7.3), 1999 Chi-Chi (M = 7.6), 1999 Hector Mine (M = 7.1), 2002 Denali (M = 7.9), 2003 San Simeon (M = 6.5), and 2004 Parkfield (M = 6.0) earthquakes. The observations consist of repeated GPS measurements of the position of one monument relative to another (separation ???100 km). The early observations (t < 0.1 year) are well fit by the function a' + c'log(t), where t is the time after the earthquake and a' and c' are constants chosen to fit the data. Because a log(t) time dependence is characteristic of transient (primary) creep, the early postseismic response may be governed by transient creep as Benioff proposed in 1951. That inference is provisional as the stress conditions prevailing in postseismic relaxation are not identical to the constant stress condition in creep experiments. The observed logarithmic time dependence includes no characteristic time that might aid in identifying the micromechanical cause.

  11. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  12. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  13. Quantifying microstructural dynamics and electrochemical activity of graphite and silicon-graphite lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Patrick; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Eller, Jens; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Schmidt, Volker; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-09-27

    Despite numerous studies presenting advances in tomographic imaging and analysis of lithium ion batteries, graphite-based anodes have received little attention. Weak X-ray attenuation of graphite and, as a result, poor contrast between graphite and the other carbon-based components in an electrode pore space renders data analysis challenging. Here we demonstrate operando tomography of weakly attenuating electrodes during electrochemical (de)lithiation. We use propagation-based phase contrast tomography to facilitate the differentiation between weakly attenuating materials and apply digital volume correlation to capture the dynamics of the electrodes during operation. After validating that we can quantify the local electrochemical activity and microstructural changes throughout graphite electrodes, we apply our technique to graphite-silicon composite electrodes. We show that microstructural changes that occur during (de)lithiation of a pure graphite electrode are of the same order of magnitude as spatial inhomogeneities within it, while strain in composite electrodes is locally pronounced and introduces significant microstructural changes.

  14. Quantifying microstructural dynamics and electrochemical activity of graphite and silicon-graphite lithium ion battery anodes

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Patrick; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Eller, Jens; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Schmidt, Volker; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous studies presenting advances in tomographic imaging and analysis of lithium ion batteries, graphite-based anodes have received little attention. Weak X-ray attenuation of graphite and, as a result, poor contrast between graphite and the other carbon-based components in an electrode pore space renders data analysis challenging. Here we demonstrate operando tomography of weakly attenuating electrodes during electrochemical (de)lithiation. We use propagation-based phase contrast tomography to facilitate the differentiation between weakly attenuating materials and apply digital volume correlation to capture the dynamics of the electrodes during operation. After validating that we can quantify the local electrochemical activity and microstructural changes throughout graphite electrodes, we apply our technique to graphite-silicon composite electrodes. We show that microstructural changes that occur during (de)lithiation of a pure graphite electrode are of the same order of magnitude as spatial inhomogeneities within it, while strain in composite electrodes is locally pronounced and introduces significant microstructural changes. PMID:27671269

  15. Flexural creep behaviour of jute polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandekar, Harichandra; Chaudhari, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    Present study is about the flexural creep behaviour of jute fabric reinforced polypropylene (Jute-PP) composites. The PP sheet and alkali treated jute fabric is stacked alternately and hot pressed in compression molding machine to get Jute-PP composite laminate. The flexural creep study is carried out on dynamic mechanical analyzer. The creep behaviour of the composite is modeled using four-parameter Burgers model. Short-term accelerated creep testing is conducted which is later used to predict long term creep behaviour. The feasibility of the construction of a master curve using the time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle to predict long term creep behavior of unreinforced PP and Jute-PP composite is investigated.

  16. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  17. The effects of physical aging at elevated temperatures on the viscoelastic creep on IM7/K3B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Physical aging at elevated temperature of the advanced composite IM7/K3B was investigated through the use of creep compliance tests. Testing consisted of short term isothermal, creep/recovery with the creep segments performed at constant load. The matrix dominated transverse tensile and in-plane shear behavior were measured at temperatures ranging from 200 to 230 C. Through the use of time based shifting procedures, the aging shift factors, shift rates and momentary master curve parameters were found at each temperature. These material parameters were used as input to a predictive methodology, which was based upon effective time theory and linear viscoelasticity combined with classical lamination theory. Long term creep compliance test data was compared to predictions to verify the method. The model was then used to predict the long term creep behavior for several general laminates.

  18. Effect of prior creep at 1365 K on the room temperature tensile properties of several oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine whether oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys in wrought bar form are subject to creep degradation effects similar to those found in thin-gage sheet. The bar products evaluated included ODS-Ni, ODS-NiCr, and advanced ODS-NiCrAl types; the alloys included microstructures ranging from an essentially perfect single crystal to a structure consisting of very small elongated grains. Tensile test specimens were exposed to creep at various stress levels at 1365 K and then tensile tested at room temperature. Low residual tensile properties, change in fracture mode, appearance of dispersoid free bands, grain boundary cavitation, and/or internal oxidation are interpreted as creep degradation effects. The amount of degradation depends on creep strain, and degradation appears to be due to diffusional creep which produces dispersoid free bands around grain boundaries acting as vacancy sources.

  19. Using graphitic foam as the bonding material in metal fuel pins for sodium fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahan, Aydın; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2013-10-01

    The study evaluates the possible use of graphite foam as the bonding material between U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel and steel clad for sodium fast reactor applications using FEAST-METAL fuel performance code. Furthermore, the applicability of FEAST-METAL to the advanced fuel designs is demonstrated. Replacing the sodium bond with a chemically stable foam material would eliminate fuel clad metallurgical interactions, and allow for fuel swelling under low external stress. Hence, a significant improvement is expected for the steady state and transient performance. FEAST-METAL was used to assess the thermo-mechanical behavior of the new fuel form and a reference metallic fuel pin. Nearly unity conversion ratio, 75% smear density U-15Pu-6Zr metallic fuel pin with sodium bond, and T91 cladding was selected as a reference case. It was found that operating the reference case at high clad temperatures (600-660 °C) results in (1) excessive clad wastage formation/clad thinning due to lanthanide migration and formation of brittle phases at clad inner surface, and (2) excessive clad hoop strain at the upper axial section due mainly to the occurrence of thermal creep. The combination of these two factors may lead to cladding breach. The work concludes that replacing the sodium bond with 80% porous graphite foam and reducing the fuel smear density to 70%, it is likely that the fuel clad metallurgical interaction would be eliminated while the fuel swelling is allowed without excessive fuel clad mechanical interaction. The suggested design appears as an alternative for a high performance metallic fuel design for sodium fast reactors.

  20. Creep Deformation of B2 Alumindes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The creep resistance and elevated temperature deformation mechanisms in CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl are reviewed. The stress and temperature dependencies of the steady state creep rate, the primary creep behavior, the dislocation substructure, and the response during transient tests are used as the main indicators of the deformation processes. In single phase intermetallics, the influence of grain size, stoichiometry, and solid solution hardening have been examined. In addition, the effect of adding dispersoids, precipitates, and other types of reinforcements to improve creep strength are compared.

  1. Creep characterization of solder bumps using nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingjie; Liu, Xiao Hu; Fu, Boshen; Shaw, Thomas M.; Lu, Minhua; Wassick, Thomas A.; Bonilla, Griselda; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-10-01

    Current nanoindentation techniques for the measurement of creep properties are applicable to viscoplastic materials with negligible elastic deformations. A new technique for characterization of creep behavior is needed for situations where the elastic deformation plays a significant role. In this paper, the effect of elastic deformation on the determination of creep parameters using nanoindentation with a self-similar nanoindenter tip is evaluated using finite element analysis (FEA). It is found that the creep exponent measured from nanoindentation without taking into account of the contribution of elastic deformation tends to be higher than the actual value. An effective correction method is developed to consider the elastic deformation in the calculation of creep parameters. FEA shows that this method provides accurate creep exponent. The creep parameters, namely the creep exponent and activation energy, were measured for three types of reflowed solder bumps using the nanoindentation method. The measured parameters were verified using FEA. The results show that the new correction approach allows extraction of creep parameters with precision from nanoindentation data.

  2. Creep deformation of B2 aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1992-01-01

    The creep resistance and elevated temperature deformation mechanisms in CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl are reviewed. The stress and temperature dependencies of the steady state creep rate, the primary creep behavior, the dislocation substructure, and the response during transient tests are used as the main indicators of the deformation processes. In single phase intermetallics, the influence of grain size, stoichiometry, and solid solution hardening have been examined. In addition, the effect of adding dispersoids, precipitates, and other types of reinforcements to improve creep strength are compared.

  3. Electrochemical control of creep in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xing-Long; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2013-11-11

    We have investigated the mechanical stability of nanoporous gold (npg) in an electrochemical environment, using in situ dilatometry and compression experiments. It is demonstrated that the gold nano-ligaments creep under the action of surface stress which leads to spontaneous volume contractions in macroscopic npg samples. The creep of npg, under or without external forces, can be controlled electrochemically. The creep rate increases with increasing potential in double-layer potential region, and deceases to almost zero when the gold surface is adsorbed with oxygen. Surprisingly, we also noticed a correlation between creep and surface diffusivity, which links the deformation of nanocrystals to mobility of surface atoms.

  4. Analysis on Thermal Conductivity of Graphite/Al Composite by Experimental and Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, C.; Bai, H.; Tao, P. F.; Jiang, N.; Wang, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    Graphite/Al composites were fabricated by vacuum hot pressing technology in this study. The main factors affecting the thermal conductivity (TC) of graphite/Al composites were deeply investigated by experimental and modeling study. The results showed that the TC of graphite/Al composite can be improved via designing the preferred orientation of graphite flakes, selecting graphite flakes with large diameter, increasing the content of graphite flakes in graphite/Al composite and solving the poor wettability between Al and graphite. The modified model can well predict the heat transfer behavior of graphite/Al composite.

  5. Creep-fatigue interaction in aircraft gas turbine components by simulation and testing at scaled temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabour, Mohammad Hossein

    Advanced gas turbine engines, which use hot section airfoil cooling, present a wide range of design problems. The frequencies of applied loads and the natural frequencies of the blade also are important since they have significant effects on failure of the component due to fatigue phenomenon. Due to high temperature environment the thermal creep and fatigue are quite severe. One-dimensional creep model, using ANSYS has been formulated in order to predict the creep life of a gas turbine engine blade. Innovative mathematical models for the prediction of the operating life of aircraft components, specifically gas turbine blades, which are subjected to creep-fatigue at high temperatures, are proposed. The components are modeled by FEM, mathematically, and using similitude principles. Three models have been suggested and evaluated numerically and experimentally. Using FEM method for natural frequencies causes phenomena such as curve veering which is studied in more detail. The simulation studies on the life-limiting modes of failure, as well as estimating the expected lifetime of the blade, using the proposed models have been carried out. Although the scale model approach has been used for quite some time, the thermal scaling has been used in this study for the first time. The only thermal studies in literature using scaling for structures is by NASA in which materials of both the prototype and the model are the same, but in the present study materials also are different. The finite element method is employed to model the structure. Because of stress redistribution due to the creep process, it is necessary to include a full inelastic creep step in the finite element formulation. Otherwise over-conservative creep life predictions will be estimated if only the initial elastic stresses are considered. The experimental investigations are carried out in order to validate the models. The main contributions in the thesis are: (1) Using similitude theory for life prediction of

  6. Role of interfacial and matrix creep during thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, I.

    2000-03-14

    A uni-dimensional micro-mechanical model for thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites is developed. The model treats the fiber and matrix as thermo-elastic and thermo-elasto-plastic-creeping solids, respectively, and allows the operation of multiple matrix creep mechanisms at various stages of deformation through the use of unified creep laws. It also incorporates the effect of interfacial sliding by an interface-diffusion-controlled diffusional creep mechanism proposed earlier (Funn and Dutta, Acta mater., 1999, 47, 149). The results of thermal cycling simulations based on a graphite fiber reinforced pure aluminum-matrix composite were compared with experimental data on a P100 graphite-6061 Al composite. The model successfully captured all the important features of the observed heating/cooling rate dependence, strain hysteresis, residual permanent strain at the end of a cycle, as well as both intrusion and protrusion of the fiber-ends relative to the matrix at the completion of cycling. The analysis showed that the dominant deformation mechanism operative in the matrix changes continually during thermal cycling due to continuous stress and temperature revision. Based on these results, a framework for the construction of a transient deformation mechanism map for thermal excursions of continuous fiber composites is proposed.

  7. Physical aging effects on the compressive linear viscoelastic creep of IM7/K3B composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to establish the viscoelastic behavior of 1M7/K3B composite in compression at elevated temperature. Creep compliance, strain recovery and the effects of physical aging on the time dependent response was measured for uniaxial loading at several isothermal conditions below the glass transition temperature (T(g)). The IM7/K3B composite is a graphite reinforced thermoplastic polyimide with a T(g) of approximately 240 C. In a composite, the two matrix dominated compliance terms associated with time dependent behavior occur in the transverse and shear directions. Linear viscoelasticity was used to characterize the creep/recovery behavior and superposition techniques were used to establish the physical aging related material constants. Creep strain was converted to compliance and measured as a function of test time and aging time. Results included creep compliance master curves, physical aging shift factors and shift rates. The description of the unique experimental techniques required for compressive testing is also given.

  8. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  9. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  10. Creep-Fatigue Relationsihps in Electroactive Polymer Systems and Predicted Effects in an Actuator Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, Aleksandra M.; Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Henslee, Issac

    2009-01-01

    The paper concerns the time-dependent behavior of electroactive polymers (EAP) and their use in advanced intelligent structures for space exploration. Innovative actuator design for low weight and low power valves required in small plants planned for use on the moon for chemical analysis is discussed. It is shown that in-depth understanding of cyclic loading effects observed through accelerated creep rates due to creep-fatigue interaction in polymers is critical in terms of proper functioning of EAP based actuator devices. In the paper, an overview of experimental results concerning the creep properties and cyclic creep response of a thin film piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is presented. The development of a constitutive creep-fatigue interaction model to predict the durability and service life of electroactive polymers is discussed. A novel method is proposed to predict damage accumulation and fatigue life of polymers under oyclic loading conditions in the presence of creep. The study provides a basis for ongoing research initiatives at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in the pursuit of new technologies using EAP as active elements for lunar exploration systems.

  11. Non-contact Creep Resistance Measurement for Ultra-high temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Lee, Jonghuyn; Bradshaw, Richard C.; Rogers, Jan; Rathz, Thomas J.; Wall, James J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    Continuing pressures for higher performance and efficiency in propulsion are driving ever more demanding needs for high-temperature materials. Some immediate applications in spaceflight include combustion chambers for advanced chemical rockets and turbomachinery for jet engines and power conversion in nuclear-electric propulsion. In the case of rockets, the combination of high stresses and high temperatures make the characterization of creep properties very important. Creep is even more important in the turbomachinery, where a long service life is an additional constraint. Some very high-temperature materials are being developed, including platinum group metals, carbides, borides, and silicides. But the measurement of creep properties at very high temperatures is itself problematic, because the testing instrument must operate at such high temperatures. Conventional techniques are limited to about 1700 C. A new, containerless technique for measuring creep deformation has been developed. This technique is based on electrostatic levitation (ESL) of a spherical sample, which is heated to the measurement temperature and rotated at a rate such that the centrifugal acceleration causes creep deformation. Creep of samples has been demonstrated at up to 2300 C in the ESL facility at NASA MSFC, while ESL itself has been applied at over 3000 C, and has no theoretical maximum temperature. The preliminary results and future directions of this NASA-funded research collaboration will be presented.

  12. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  13. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  14. Superlubricity of Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienwiebel, Martin; Verhoeven, Gertjan S.; Pradeep, Namboodiri; Frenken, Joost W.; Heimberg, Jennifer A.; Zandbergen, Henny W.

    2004-03-01

    Using a home-built frictional force microscope that is able to detect forces in three dimensions with a lateral force resolution down to 15 pN, we have studied the energy dissipation between a tungsten tip sliding over a graphite surface in dry contact. By measuring atomic-scale friction as a function of the rotational angle between two contacting bodies, we show that the origin of the ultralow friction of graphite lies in the incommensurability between rotated graphite layers, an effect proposed under the name of “superlubricity” [

    M. Hirano and K. Shinjo, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO0163-1829 41, 11 837 (1990)10.1103/PhysRevB.41.11837
    ].

  15. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  16. Metallic Coatings for Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Aero Structures Dept -. Radomes Section B-2 DISTRIBUTION (cont.)K COPIES * U. S. Army Air Mobility R&D Laboratory 1II 1Fort Eustis, VA ATTN: SAVDL-EU...for graphite/epoxy laminated aircraft structures were developed to provide protection against moisture penetration, electro’)- magnetic interference...performance * aircraft. Utilization of advanced composite structures to their design limits neces- sitates the protection of these structures against

  17. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  18. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  19. Microstructure and creep properties of alumina.

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J. M. C.; Lopez, A. R.; Rodriguez, A. D.; Routbort, J. L.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Seville

    1995-01-01

    High temperature creep of two zirconia toughened alumina ceramics, fabricated by powder processing and sol-gel precursors processing, has been studied in order to determine plastic deformation mechanisms. Compressive creep tests were carried out between 1300 and 1450 C, under stresses from 10 to 150 MPa. For the sample fabricated from powders, a stress exponent of 1.4 and an activation energy of 580 kJ/mol were found below a critical stress of 40 MPa. For larger stresses, accelerated creep rates developed. In the specimens processed from precursors, values of 1.8 for the stress exponent and 540 kJ/mol for the activation energy, over the entire range of stresses have been determined. Creep parameters and microstructural evolution of the samples during the experiments have been correlated with models to establish the dominant creep mechanism.

  20. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for the fabrication of both polyphenylquinoxaline and polyimide composites by the in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on the graphite reinforcing fibers, rather than using previously prepared prepolymer varnishes. Void-free polyphenylquinoxaline composites were fabricated and evaluated for room and elevated flexure and shear properties. The technology of the polyimide system was advanced to the point where the material is ready for commercial exploitation. A reproducible processing cycle free of operator judgment factors was developed for fabrication of void-free composites exhibiting excellent mechanical properties and a long time isothermal life in the range of 288 C to 316 C. The effects of monomer reactant stoichiometry and process modification on resin flow were investigated. Demonstration of the utility and quality of this polyimide system was provided through the successful fabrication and evaluation of four complex high tip speed fan blades.

  1. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  2. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  3. Analysis of Graphite-Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    Strategically embedding graphite meshes in a compliant cementitious matrix produces a composite material with relatively high tension and compressive properties as compared to steel-reinforced structures fabricated from a standard concrete mix. Although these composite systems are somewhat similar, the methods used to analyze steel-reinforced composites often fail to characterize the behavior of their more advanced graphite-reinforced counterparts. This Technical Memorandum describes some of the analytical methods being developed to determine the deflections and stresses in graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is initially demonstrated that the standard transform section method fails to provide accurate results when the elastic moduli ratio exceeds 20. An alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach. When the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subjected to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed using the laminated composite plate theory with material properties established from tensile tests. Then, finite element modeling is used to verify the results. Considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  4. GRAPHITE BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1964-02-25

    A process for bonding or joining graphite members together in which a thin platinum foil is placed between the members, heated in an inert atmosphere to a temperature of 1800 deg C, and then cooled to room temperature is described. (AEC)

  5. Structural graphitic carbon foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, K.M.; Anderson, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Graphitic carbon foams are a unique material form with very high structural and thermal properties at a light weight. A process has been developed to produce microcellular, open-celled graphitic foams. The process includes heating a mesophase pitch preform above the pitch melting temperature in a pressurized reactor. At the appropriate time, the pressure is released, the gas nucleates bubbles, and these bubbles grow forming the pitch into the foam structure. The resultant foamed pitch is then stabilized in an oxygen environment. At this point a rigid structure exists with some mechanical integrity. The foam is then carbonized to 800 C followed by a graphitization to 2700 C. The shear action from the growing bubbles aligns the graphitic planes along the foam struts to provide the ideal structure for good mechanical properties. Some of these properties have been characterized for some of the foam materials. It is known that variations of the blowing temperature, blowing pressure and saturation time result in foams of variously sized with mostly open pores; however, the mechanism of bubble nucleation is not known. Therefore foams were blown with various gases to begin to determine the nucleation method. These gases are comprised of a variety of molecular weights as well as a range of various solubility levels. By examining the resultant structures of the foam, differences were noted to develop an explanation of the foaming mechanism.

  6. Coatings for Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Several approaches for applying high resistance coatings continuously to graphite yarn were investigated. Two of the most promising approaches involved (1) chemically vapor depositing (CVD) SiC coatings on the surface of the fiber followed by oxidation, and (2) drawing the graphite yarn through an organo-silicone solution followed by heat treatments. In both methods, coated fibers were obtained which exhibited increased electrical resistances over untreated fibers and which were not degraded. This work was conducted in a previous program. In this program, the continuous CVD SiC coating process used on HTS fiber was extended to the coating of HMS, Celion 6000, Celion 12000 and T-300 graphite fiber. Electrical resistances three order of magnitude greater than the uncoated fiber were measured with no significant degradation of the fiber strength. Graphite fibers coated with CVD Si3N4 and BN had resistances greater than 10(exp 6) ohm/cm. Lower pyrolysis temperatures were used in preparing the silica-like coatings also resulting in resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than the uncoated fiber. The epoxy matrix composites prepared using these coated fibers had low shear strengths indicating that the coatings were weak.

  7. Deformation by grain boundary sliding and slip creep versus diffusional creep

    SciTech Connect

    Ruano, O A; Sherby, O D; Wadsworth, J

    1998-11-04

    A review is presented of the debates between the present authors and other investigators regarding the possible role of diffusional creep in the plastic flow of polycrystalline metals at low stresses. These debates are recorded in eleven papers over the past seventeen years. ln these papers it has been shown that the creep rates of materials in the so-called "diffusional creep region" are almost always higher than those predicted by the diffusional creep theory. Additionally, the predictions of grain size effects and stress exponents from diffusional creep theory are often not found in the experimental data. Finally, denuded zones have been universally considered to be direct evidence for diffusional creep; but, those reported in the literature are shown to be found only under conditions where a high stress exponent is observed. Also, the locations of the denuded zones do not match those predicted. Alternative mechanisms are described in which diffusion-controlled dislocation creep and/or grain boundary sliding are the dominant deformation processes in low-stress creep. It is proposed that denuded zones are formed by stress-directed grain boundary migration with the precipitates dissolving in the moving grain boundaries. The above observations have led us to the conclusion that grain boundary sliding and slip creep are in fact the principal mechanisms for observations of plastic flow in the so-called "diffusional creep regions".

  8. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon

    2017-03-01

    Delocalized π electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, π electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The π electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negative Curie temperature, field irreversibility, and slow relaxation. The overall results indicate that magnetic moments in graphite oxide slowly interact and develop magnetic frustration.

  9. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon

    2017-01-01

    Delocalized π electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, π electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The π electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negative Curie temperature, field irreversibility, and slow relaxation. The overall results indicate that magnetic moments in graphite oxide slowly interact and develop magnetic frustration. PMID:28327606

  10. Flexible graphite as battery anode and current collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, M. S.; Krassowski, D.; Prakash, J.

    In making graphite-based electrodes and current collectors, there is significant simplification if a flexible graphite process is used. The lithium intercalation capacity of Grafoil ® flexible graphite sheet and its powder was evaluated using electrochemical charge-discharge cycling in half-cell configuration (coin cell with Li anode and graphite cathode). The sheet form was used with and without a copper current collector. Excellent electrical conductivity of the monolithic material with very low interface resistance helps as current collector and electrode. The comparatively low capacity of Grafoil ® sheet is thought to be due to diffusion limitation of the structure, especially in the light of the very high capacity of its powder form. The highly irreversible capacity of the powdered material may be due to unfunctionalized graphitic structures or impurities present in the powder. Impedance response for the first intercalation-deintercalation was different than responses taken after several cycles. The presence of a second impedance arc suggests structural modification is taking place in the graphite anode, possibly through formation of a porous structure as a result of graphite expansion. ®GRAFOIL is a registered trademark of Advanced Energy Technology Inc.

  11. Evaluation of hoop creep behaviors in long-term dry storage condition of pre-hydrided and high burn-up nuclear fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Ki; Bang, J.G.; Kim, D.H.; Yang, Y.S.

    2007-07-01

    Related to the degradation of the mechanical properties of Zr-based nuclear fuel cladding tubes under long term dry storage condition, the mechanical tests which can simulate the degradation of the mechanical properties properly are needed. Especially, the degradation of the mechanical properties by creep mechanism seems to be dominant under long term dry storage condition. Accordingly, in this paper, ring creep tests were performed in order to evaluate the creep behaviors of high burn-up fuel cladding under a hoop loading condition in a hot cell. The tests are performed with Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding whose burn-up is approximately {approx}60,000 MWd/tU in the temperature range from 350 deg. to 550 deg.. The tests are also performed with pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO up to 1,000 ppm. First of all, the hoop loading grip for the ring creep test was designed in order that a constant curvature of the specimen was maintained during the creep deformation, and the graphite lubricant was used to minimize the friction between the outer surface of the die insert and the inner surface of the ring specimen. The specimen for the ring creep test was designed to limit the deformation within the gauge section and to maximize the uniformity of the strain distribution. It was confirmed that the mechanical properties under a hoop loading condition can be correctly evaluated by using this test technique. In this paper, secondary creep rate with increasing hydrogen content are drawn, and then kinetic data such as pre-exponential factor and activation energy for creep process are also drawn. In addition, creep life are predicted by obtaining LMP (Larson-Miller parameter) correlation in the function of hydrogen content and applied stress to yield stress ratio. (authors)

  12. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is very similar to the GlidCop{trademark} alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to {approx}3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90{degrees}C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of {+-}0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1}. These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys.

  13. Prediction of creep of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Khristova, Yu.; Aniskevich, K.

    1995-11-01

    We studied the applicability of the phenomenological approach to the prediction of long-time creep of polymer concrete consisting of polyester binder with diabase filler and diabase aggregate. We discovered that the principles of temperature-time analogy, of moisture-time analogy, and of temperature-moisture-time analogy are applicable to the description of the diagrams of short-time creep and to the prediction of long-time creep of polymer concrete at different temperatures and constant moisture content of the material.

  14. Thermodynamic approach to creep and plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Loefstedt, R.

    1997-06-01

    A solid subjected to a small load distorts rapidly in the manner predicted by elasticity theory. On a much longer time scale, the solid will creep. This dissipative motion is an important consideration in the engineering design of, for example, aircraft engines, but the macroscopic equations of motion describing this deformation are based on empirical observations. The principles of thermodynamics specify the dissipative fluxes appropriate to the classical equations of elasticity, which include one, unique to solids, which describes creep. The thermodynamic theory is presented, and the insights into the underlying microscopic mechanisms of creep, gleaned from the macroscopic formalism, are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Creep deformation of TD-nickel chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of the mechanical behavioral characteristics of thoria-dispersed (TD) NiCr materials at elevated temperatures. The experimental procedure used is discussed along with the significance of the obtained results. Attention is given to basic creep behavior and creep thermal activation parameter measurements. It is found that the overall creep behavior of TD-NiCr can be explained on the basis of the relative contributions of two parallel-concurrent deformation mechanisms, including diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding and dislocation motion.

  16. Creep substructure formation in sodium chloride single crystals in the power law and exponential creep regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pharr, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Creep tests conducted on NaCl single crystals in the temperature range from 373 to 1023 K show that true steady state creep is obtained only above 873 K when the ratio of the applied stress to the shear modulus is less than or equal to 0.0001. Under other stress and temperature conditions, corresponding to both power law and exponential creep, the creep rate decreases monotonically with increasing strain. The transition from power law to exponential creep is shown to be associated with increases in the dislocation density, the cell boundary width, and the aspect ratio of the subgrains along the primary slip planes. The relation between dislocation structure and creep behavior is also assessed.

  17. Creep of Refractory Fibers and Modeling of Metal and Ceramic Matrix Composite Creep Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    Our concentration during this research was on the following subprograms. (1) Ultra high vacuum creep tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires, temperature range from 1100 K to 1500 K, creep time of 1 to 500 hours. (2) High temperature vacuum tensile tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires. (3) Air and vacuum tensile creep tests on polycrystalline and single crystal alumina fibers, such as alumina-mullite Nextel fiber, yttrium aluminum ganet (YAG) and Saphikon, temperature range from 1150 K to 1470 K, creep time of 2 to 200 hours. (4) Microstructural evaluation of crept fibers, TEM study on the crept metal wires, SEM study on the fracture surface of ceramic fibers. (5) Metal Matrix Composite creep models, based on the fiber creep properties and fiber-matrix interface zone formation.

  18. The Role of Eta Phase Formation on the Creep Strength and Ductility of INCONEL Alloy 740 t 1023 k (750 Degrees C)

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, John P; Pharr, George Mathews

    2012-01-01

    INCONEL alloy 740 is an age-hardenable nickel-based superalloy proposed for advanced ultrasupercritical steam boiler applications operating at high stress and long times above 973 K (700 C), where creep will be the dominate deformation mode. During high-temperature exposure, the alloy can form eta phase platelets that many have suggested may be detrimental to creep strength and ductility. In this study, creep-rupture tests were conducted on smooth and notched bars of INCONEL alloy 740 at 1023 K (750 C) for times up to 20,000 hours. Examination of the creep-rupture life, creep ductility, failure modes, and microstructure by quantitative electron microscopy shows that a small amount of eta phase does not diminish the creep performance. Applied stress appears to have a minor effect on the precipitation of the eta phase but not its growth rate. Based on the observation that the microstructure after 20,000 hours of creep exposure has reached equilibrium in comparison to thermodynamic calculations, it is concluded that 20,000 hour creep tests are adequate for prediction of long-term creep performance.

  19. Creep of plain weave polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Abhishek

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in various industrial sectors to reduce structural weight and improve performance. Woven (also known as textile) composites are one class of polymer matrix composites with increasing market share mostly due to their lightweight, their flexibility to form into desired shape, their mechanical properties and toughness. Due to the viscoelasticity of the polymer matrix, time-dependent degradation in modulus (creep) and strength (creep rupture) are two of the major mechanical properties required by engineers to design a structure reliably when using these materials. Unfortunately, creep and creep rupture of woven composites have received little attention by the research community and thus, there is a dire need to generate additional knowledge and prediction models, given the increasing market share of woven composites in load bearing structural applications. Currently, available creep models are limited in scope and have not been validated for any loading orientation and time period beyond the experimental time window. In this thesis, an analytical creep model, namely the Modified Equivalent Laminate Model (MELM), was developed to predict tensile creep of plain weave composites for any orientation of the load with respect to the orientation of the fill and warp fibers, using creep of unidirectional composites. The ability of the model to predict creep for any orientation of the load is a "first" in this area. The model was validated using an extensive experimental involving the tensile creep of plain weave composites under varying loading orientation and service conditions. Plain weave epoxy (F263)/ carbon fiber (T300) composite, currently used in aerospace applications, was procured as fabrics from Hexcel Corporation. Creep tests were conducted under two loading conditions: on-axis loading (0°) and off-axis loading (45°). Constant load creep, in the temperature range of 80-240°C and stress range of 1-70% UTS of the

  20. Development and fabrication of a graphite polyimide box beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, M. A.; Darms, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of graphite/polyimide structures was evaluated and key design and fabrication issues to be considered in future hardware programs are defined. The fabrication and testing at 500 F of a graphite/polyimide center wing box beam using OV-10A aircraft criteria was accomplished. The baseline design of this box was developed in a series of studies of other advanced composite materials: glass/epoxy, boron/epoxy, and boron/polyimide. The use of this basic design permits ready comparison of the performance of graphite/polyimide with these materials. Modifications to the baseline composite design were made only in those areas effected by the change of materials. Processing studies of graphite fiber polyimide resins systems resulted in the selection of a Modmor II/Gemon L material.

  1. On estimating the fracture probability of nuclear graphite components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2008-10-01

    The properties of nuclear grade graphites exhibit anisotropy and could vary considerably within a manufactured block. Graphite strength is affected by the direction of alignment of the constituent coke particles, which is dictated by the forming method, coke particle size, and the size, shape, and orientation distribution of pores in the structure. In this paper, a Weibull failure probability analysis for components is presented using the American Society of Testing Materials strength specification for nuclear grade graphites for core components in advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The risk of rupture (probability of fracture) and survival probability (reliability) of large graphite blocks are calculated for varying and discrete values of service tensile stresses. The limitations in these calculations are discussed from considerations of actual reactor environmental conditions that could potentially degrade the specification properties because of damage due to complex interactions between irradiation, temperature, stress, and variability in reactor operation.

  2. Tensile creep and creep-recovery behavior of a SiC-fiber-Si3N4-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, John W.; Park, Yong H.; Jones, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile creep and creep-recovery behavior of a hot-pressed unidirectional SiC-fiber/Si3N4-matrix composite was investigated at 1200 C in air, in order to determine how various sustained and cyclic creep loading histories would influence the creep rate, accumulated creep strain, and the amount of strain recovered upon specimen unloading. The data accumulated indicate that the fundamental damage mode for sustained tensile creep at stresses of 200 and 250 MPa was periodic fiber fracture and that the creep life and the failure mode at 250 MPa were strongly influenced by the rate at which the initial creep stress was applied. Cyclic loading significantly lowered the duration of primary creep and the overall creep-strain accumulation. The implications of the results for microstructural and component design are discussed.

  3. Computational Design of Creep-Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Peter

    2014-12-31

    A new class of ferritic superalloys containing B2-type zones inside parent L21-type precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), has been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by the addition of the Ti element into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). In the present research, systematic investigations, including advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations, and numerical simulations, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of HPSFAs. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy, scanningtransmission- electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography, which provide detailed microstructural information of HPSFAs. Systematic tension/compression creep tests revealed that HPSFAs exhibit the superior creep resistance, compared with the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels (i.e., the creep rates of HPSFAs are about 4 orders of magnitude slower than the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels.) First-principles calculations include interfacial free energies, anti-phase boundary (APB) free energies, elastic constants, and impurity diffusivities in Fe. Combined with kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations of interdiffusion coefficients, and the integration of computational thermodynamics and kinetics, these calculations provide great understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of HPSFAs. In addition to the systematic experimental approach and first-principles calculations, a series of numerical tools and algorithms, which assist in the optimization of creep properties of ferritic superalloys, are utilized and developed. These numerical simulation results are compared with the available experimental data and previous first

  4. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Windes, William; Smith, Rebecca; Carroll, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  5. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  6. Creep behavior of niobium alloy PWC-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Moore, T. J.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    The high vacuum creep and creep-rupture behavior of a Nb-1Zr-.1C alloy (PWC 11) was investigated at 1350 and 1400 K with an applied stress of 40 MPa. The material was tested in the following four conditions: annealed (1 hr 1755 K/2 hr 1475 K); annealed plus EB welded; annealed plus aged for 1000 hr at 1350 or 1400 K; and annealed, welded, and aged. It was found that the material in the annealed state was the most creep-resistant condition tested, and that aging the alloy for 1000 hr without an applied stress greatly reduced that strength; however, it was still approximately three times as creep resistant as Nb-1Zr. Additionally, the EB weld region was stronger than the base metal in each condition tested, and phase extraction of the dispersed precipitate revealed the presence of a 70%ZrC-30%NbC cubic monocarbide phase.

  7. Intercalated Graphite Fiber Conductor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Lightweight electrical conductors were developed from graphitic fibers inter- calated with highly electrophilic intercalants. Conductance increases of...intercalated with highly electrophilic molecules ("intercalants") to en- hance their electrical conductivity. Evaluation of the elec- trical resistance of two...corrosion resistant to fluorine containing chemicals. Since the moisture permeability of the TFE is much less than that of the FEP, attempts were made to

  8. Improved Graphite Fiber Adhesion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    determined from a variety of surface analysis techniques , the oxygen-containing functional groups on commercial AS-i graphite fiber are predominantly...heterogenity within the fiber itself or experimental errors within the technique . In the limited time devoted to this work we did not devise a procedure...samples. Drzal optically measured the diameter of each fiber tested. Figure 6 shows the linear regression analysis plot used to determine the polar and

  9. Microcracks in nuclear graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Keyun; Marrow, James; Marsden, Barry

    2008-10-01

    Microcracks with varied length and width are observed in nuclear grade graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by transmission electron microscopy. In situ observations show that these cracks tend to close up on heating the sample. The crystal dimensional change from in situ electron-irradiation also causes the closure of the cracks. Although some of the cracks may be identifiable as accommodation porosity (i.e. Mrozowski cracks), others appear to have already formed prior to carbonization and graphitization.

  10. Some stochastic aspects of intergranular creep cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Fariborz, S.J.; Farris, J.P.; Harlow, D.G.; Delph, T.J.

    1987-10-01

    We present some results obtained from a simplified stochastic model of intergranular creep cavitation. The probabilistic features of the model arise from the inclusion of random cavity placement on the grain boundary and time-discrete stochastic cavity nucleation. Among the predictions of the model are Weibull-distributed creep rupture failure times and a Weibull distribution of cavity radii. Both of these predictions have qualitative experimental support. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Spatial fluctuations in transient creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurson, Lasse; Rosti, Jari; Koivisto, Juha; Miksic, Amandine; Alava, Mikko J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the spatial fluctuations of transient creep deformation of materials as a function of time, both by digital image correlation (DIC) measurements of paper samples and by numerical simulations of a crystal plasticity or discrete dislocation dynamics model. This model has a jamming or yielding phase transition, around which power law or Andrade creep is found. During primary creep, the relative strength of the strain rate fluctuations increases with time in both cases—the spatially averaged creep rate obeys the Andrade law epsilont ~ t - 0.7, while the time dependence of the spatial fluctuations of the local creep rates is given by Δepsilont ~ t - 0.5. A similar scaling for the fluctuations is found in the logarithmic creep regime that is typically observed for lower applied stresses. We review briefly some classical theories of Andrade creep from the point of view of such spatial fluctuations. We consider these phenomenological, time-dependent creep laws in terms of a description based on a non-equilibrium phase transition separating evolving and frozen states of the system when the externally applied load is varied. Such an interpretation is discussed further by the data collapse of the local deformations in the spirit of absorbing state/depinning phase transitions, as well as deformation-deformation correlations and the width of the cumulative strain distributions. The results are also compared with the order parameter fluctuations observed close to the depinning transition of the 2d linear interface model or the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation.

  12. Micromechanics of brittle creep in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses well below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress (“brittle creep”). Here we provide a micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990), and the crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non linear, and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt rock samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as an inflexion between those two end-member phases. The minimum strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term strain rate as a function of depth in the upper crust due to the action of the applied stresses: in this way, sub-critical cracking reduces the failure stress in a manner equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. We also investigate the competition with pressure solution in porous rocks, and show that the transition from sub

  13. METHOD OF FABRICATING A GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kratz, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    S>A nuclear reactor formed of spaced bodies of uranium and graphite blocks is improved by diffusing helium through the graphite blocks in order to replace the air in the pores of the graphite with helium. The helium-impregnated graphite conducts heat better, and absorbs neutrons less, than the original air- impregnated graphite. (AEC)

  14. CMB-13 research on carbon and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary results of the research on carbon and graphite accomplished during this report period are presented. Included are: particle characteristics of Santa Maria fillers, compositions and density data for hot-molded Santa Maria graphites, properties of hot-molded Santa Maria graphites, and properties of hot-molded anisotropic graphites. Ablation-resistant graphites are also discussed.

  15. ICME Design of a Castable, Creep-Resistant, Single-Crystal Turbine Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiadong; Snyder, David; Kozmel, Thomas; Kern, Chris; Saal, James E.; Berglund, Ida; Sebastian, Jason; Olson, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    To improve the efficiency of advanced power systems, integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) tools are being developed at QuesTek Innovations LLC for the design of high-performance alloys for gas turbine. In this article, we detail progress on the design of a low-Re, castable, creep-resistant, single-crystal Ni-based superalloy (QTSX). CALPHAD-based indicators for castability (liquid buoyancy) and creep resistance (γ' coarsening rate constant) were simultaneously employed to predict an optimum alloy composition. Component-level QTSX trail castings have been fabricated, and characterization of the castings has demonstrated freckle-free solidification and creep resistance comparable to CMSX4 and ReneN5, which validates this accelerated ICME approach.

  16. Creep Resistance of Disk Alloy CH98 with Tungsten and Niobium Additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic transports will likely have higher pressure ratios which will require nickel-base superalloy disks with temperature capability up to 1400 F, an increase of about 200 F over current engines. Several advanced disk alloys are being developed to fill this need. One of these, CH98, is a promising candidate for gas turbine engines and is being studied in NASA's AST Program. Additions of the refractory elements tungsten and niobium have been shown to improve tensile and creep properties while maintaining good high temperature fatigue crack growth resistance. Further improvements in creep and crack growth resistance can be achieved with a coarse grain microstructure. The purpose of the present study is aimed at providing a detailed assessment of 0.2 percent creep rates for coarse grain CH98 with tungsten and niobium additions over a range of temperatures and stresses of interest to disk applications.

  17. Integrated Design Software Predicts the Creep Life of Monolithic Ceramic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Significant improvements in propulsion and power generation for the next century will require revolutionary advances in high-temperature materials and structural design. Advanced ceramics are candidate materials for these elevated-temperature applications. As design protocols emerge for these material systems, designers must be aware of several innate features, including the degrading ability of ceramics to carry sustained load. Usually, time-dependent failure in ceramics occurs because of two different, delayedfailure mechanisms: slow crack growth and creep rupture. Slow crack growth initiates at a preexisting flaw and continues until a critical crack length is reached, causing catastrophic failure. Creep rupture, on the other hand, occurs because of bulk damage in the material: void nucleation and coalescence that eventually leads to macrocracks which then propagate to failure. Successful application of advanced ceramics depends on proper characterization of material behavior and the use of an appropriate design methodology. The life of a ceramic component can be predicted with the NASA Lewis Research Center's Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) integrated design programs. CARES/CREEP determines the expected life of a component under creep conditions, and CARES/LIFE predicts the component life due to fast fracture and subcritical crack growth. The previously developed CARES/LIFE program has been used in numerous industrial and Government applications.

  18. Analysis of advanced vapor source for cadmium telluride solar cell manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetani, Tejas Harshadkumar

    A thin film CdS/CdTe solar cell manufacturing line has been developed in the Materials Engineering Laboratory at Colorado State University. The original design incorporated infrared lamps for heating the vapor source. This system has been redesigned to improve the energy efficiency of the system, allow co-sublimation and allow longer run time before the sources have to be replenished. The advanced vapor source incorporates conduction heating with heating elements embedded in graphite. The advanced vapor source was modeled by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). From these models, the required maximum operating temperature of the element was determined to be 720 C for the processing of CdS/CdTe solar cells. Nichrome and Kanthal A1 were primarily selected for this application at temperature of 720 °C in vacuum with oxygen partial pressure. Research on oxidation effects and life due to oxidation as well as creep deformation was done, and Nichrome was found more suitable for this application. A study of the life of the Nichrome heating elements in this application was conducted and the estimate of life is approximately 1900 years for repeated on-off application. This is many orders of magnitude higher than the life of infrared heat lamps. Ceramic cement based on aluminum oxide (Resbond 920) is used for bonding the elements to the graphite. Thermodynamic calculations showed that this cement is inert to the heating element. An earlier design of the advanced source encountered failure of the element. The failed element was studies by scanning electron microscopy and the failure was attributed to loss of adhesion between the graphite and the ceramic element. The design has been modified and the advanced vapor source is currently in operation.

  19. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    DOEpatents

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  20. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  1. Hayward fault: Large earthquakes versus surface creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.; Borchardt, Glenn; Borchardt, Glenn; Hirschfeld, Sue E.; Lienkaemper, James J.; McClellan, Patrick H.; Williams, Patrick L.; Wong, Ivan G.

    1992-01-01

    The Hayward fault, thought a likely source of large earthquakes in the next few decades, has generated two large historic earthquakes (about magnitude 7), one in 1836 and another in 1868. We know little about the 1836 event, but the 1868 event had a surface rupture extending 41 km along the southern Hayward fault. Right-lateral surface slip occurred in 1868, but was not well measured. Witness accounts suggest coseismic right slip and afterslip of under a meter. We measured the spatial variation of the historic creep rate along the Hayward fault, deriving rates mainly from surveys of offset cultural features, (curbs, fences, and buildings). Creep occurs along at least 69 km of the fault's 82-km length (13 km is underwater). Creep rate seems nearly constant over many decades with short-term variations. The creep rate mostly ranges from 3.5 to 6.5 mm/yr, varying systemically along strike. The fastest creep is along a 4-km section near the south end. Here creep has been about 9mm/yr since 1921, and possibly since the 1868 event as indicated by offset railroad track rebuilt in 1869. This 9mm/yr slip rate may approach the long-term or deep slip rate related to the strain buildup that produces large earthquakes, a hypothesis supported by geoloic studies (Lienkaemper and Borchardt, 1992). If so, the potential for slip in large earthquakes which originate below the surficial creeping zone, may now be 1/1m along the southern (1868) segment and ≥1.4m along the northern (1836?) segment. Substracting surface creep rates from a long-term slip rate of 9mm/yr gives present potential for surface slip in large earthquakes of up to 0.8m. Our earthquake potential model which accounts for historic creep rate, microseismicity distribution, and geodetic data, suggests that enough strain may now be available for large magnitude earthquakes (magnitude 6.8 in the northern (1836?) segment, 6.7 in the southern (1868) segment, and 7.0 for both). Thus despite surficial creep, the fault may be

  2. Creep events and creep noise in gravitational-wave interferometers: Basic formalism and stationary limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    In gravitational-wave interferometers, test masses are suspended on thin fibers which experience considerable tension stress. Sudden microscopic stress release in a suspension fiber, which I call a “creep event,” would excite motion of the test mass that would be coupled to the interferometer’s readout. The random test-mass motion due to a time sequence of creep events is referred to as “creep noise.” In this paper I present an elastodynamic calculation for the test-mass motion due to a creep event. I show that within a simple suspension model, the main coupling to the optical readout occurs via a combination of a “dc” horizontal displacement of the test mass and excitation of the violin and pendulum modes, and not, as was thought previously, via lengthening of the fiber. When the creep events occur sufficiently frequently and their statistics is time independent, the creep noise can be well approximated by a stationary Gaussian random process. I derive the functional form of the creep noise spectral density in this limit, with the restrictive assumption that the creep events are statistically independent from each other.

  3. Correlation of creep rate with microstructural changes during high temperature creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Hochella, W. A.; Lytton, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques of electron microscopy were used to examine the microstructural changes which occur during primary creep for two important types of engineering alloys: (1) alloys strengthened by solid-solution additions, and (2) dispersion-strengthened alloys. The metals chosen for study are unalloyed titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, and the cobalt-base alloy, Haynes 188. Results to date on NGR 47-004-108 show that development of prior dislocation substructure in Haynes 188 by 10% prestrain and annealing for one hour at 1800 F increases the time to reach 0.5% creep strain at 1600 F by more than an order of magnitude for creep stresses from 3 to 20 ksi. For creep at 1800 F, similar results were obtaind for stresses above 7 ksi, but the prior substructure decreases creep resistance below 7 ksi. This effect appears to be related to instability of grain structure at 1800 F in prestrained material.

  4. Effect of solute interactions in columbium /Nb/ on creep strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Metcalfe, A. G.

    1973-01-01

    The creep strength of 17 ternary columbium (Nb)-base alloys was determined using an abbreviated measuring technique, and the results were analyzed to identify the contributions of solute interactions to creep strength. Isostrength creep diagrams and an interaction strengthening parameter, ST, were used to present and analyze data. It was shown that the isostrength creep diagram can be used to estimate the creep strength of untested alloys and to identify compositions with the most economical use of alloy elements. Positive values of ST were found for most alloys, showing that interaction strengthening makes an important contribution to the creep strength of these ternary alloys.

  5. Steady State Creep of Zirconium at High and Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.S.; Hayes, T.A.

    2000-04-08

    Creep of zirconium and zirconium alloys has been labeled ''anomalous.'' Researchers often report that zirconium and its alloys never reach true steady state creep and have stress exponents that continuously change with stress and temperature. Many varied interpretations have been offered explaining the creep behavior of zirconium. Some have suggested that creep is diffusion controlled, while others maintain that creep is dislocation glide controlled. Cumulative zirconium creep data will be presented based on an extensive literature review. An interpretation of results will be presented and compared to previous interpretations.

  6. Creep behavior of uranium carbide-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, T. R.; Moak, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work gives the results of experiments on the influence of zirconium carbide and tungsten on the creep properties of uranium carbide. The creep behavior of high-density UC samples follows the classical time-dependence pattern of (1) an instantaneous deformation, (2) a primary creep region, and (3) a period of steady-state creep. Creep rates for unalloyed UC-1.01 and UC-1.05 are several orders of magnitude greater than those measured for carbide alloys containing a Zr-C and/or W dispersoid. The difference in creep strength between alloyed and unalloyed materials varies with temperature and applied stress.

  7. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  8. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  9. Graphitic packing removal tool

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  10. Granular controls of hillslope deformation and creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdowsi, B.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Ortiz, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment transport on hillslopes has been described as "creep", and has been modeled as a "diffusive" process by invoking random disturbance of soil in the presence of a gradient. In this framework, physical and biological agents are envisioned to cause dilation of the soil that is greatest at the surface and decays with depth. Thus, there is a kind of internal energy of the sediment that allows flow, even below the angle of repose. This transport has not yet been connected, however, to the more general phenomenon of creep in disordered, particulate systems. Work in such "soft matter" materials has shown that disordered solids are fragile, and may deform slowly by localized particle rearrangement under static loads much smaller than the yield stress at which fluid-like flow occurs. The transition from creep to granular flow has not been thoroughly examined. Here we use particle dynamics simulations to examine creep and granular flow dynamics and the transition between them, and to test the ability of a granular physics model to describe observations of hillslope soil creep. We employ a well-developed discrete element model, with frictional and over-damped interactions among grains to approximate the conditions of earth hillslopes. Transient and equilibrium particle dynamics are described for a range of inclination angles that transit the angle of repose. We verify that sub-threshold creep occurs, even in the absence of internal energy, and describe its dynamic signature. Moreover, simulations show that the transition from creeping to a sustained granular flow is continuous as the angle of repose is crossed. We then perturb the granular system with acoustic vibrations, to directly compare the model with previously-reported laboratory experiments of acoustically-driven hillslope transport. We test the ability of the model to reproduce the heuristic nonlinear hillslope flux law. Results reveal that the bulk movement of hillslope sediment over long timescales may be

  11. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  12. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  13. Sources of Variation in Creep Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Creep rupture is an important material characteristic for the design of rocket engines. It was observed during the characterization of GRCop-84 that the complete data set had nearly 4 orders of magnitude of scatter. This scatter likely confounded attempts to determine how creep performance was influenced by manufacturing. It was unclear if this variation was from the testing, the material, or both. Sources of variation were examined by conducting tests on identically processed specimens at the same specified stresses and temperatures. Significant differences existed between the five constant-load creep frames. The specimen temperature was higher than the desired temperature by as much as 43 C. It was also observed that the temperature gradient was up to 44 C. Improved specimen temperature control minimized temperature variations. The data from additional tests demonstrated that the results from all five frames were comparable. The variation decreased to 1/2 order of magnitude from 2 orders of magnitude for the baseline data set. Independent determination of creep rates in a reference load frame closely matched the creep rates determined after the modifications. Testing in helium tended to decrease the sample temperature gradient, but helium was not a significant improvement over vacuum.

  14. Some problems on the theory of creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabotnov, Y N

    1953-01-01

    The term creep of metals is applied to the phenomenon in which, at temperatures beyond a certain limit, the metal subjected to a load slowly undergoes deformation with time. For the case of steel, the creep phenomenon must be taken into account at temperatures above 400 degrees C. Very slow deformations for a prolonged period are cumulative and lead either to inadmissible changes in the dimensions of a structural part or to its failure. The theory of creep constitutes part of the mechanics of dense media and the mechanical formulation of the problem may be given as the following: a body is subjected to the action of a given system of forces, or initial displacements are prescribed on its surface. It is required to find the stress distribution in the body and the changes or its deformations with time. For the solution of the problem of creep as thus formulated, a mechanical theory of creep is required. Such theory must necessarily bear an external, overall character based, not on the investigation of microprocesses, but on the results of mechanical tests.

  15. Bonded and Bolted Graphite/Polyimide Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoumal, D. E.; Cushman, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Four types of high-temperature joints designed for control surfaces. Design, analysis, and testing performed to develop four types of graphite/polyimide bonded and bolted composite joints for lightly loaded control surfaces on advanced transportation systems that operate at temperatures up to 550 degrees F (288 degrees C).

  16. Pristine graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Dimiev, Ayrat; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Alemany, Lawrence B; Chaguine, Pavel; Tour, James M

    2012-02-08

    Graphite oxide (GO) is a lamellar substance with an ambiguous structure due to material complexity. Recently published GO-related studies employ only one out of several existing models to interpret the experimental data. Because the models are different, this leads to confusion in understanding the nature of the observed phenomena. Lessening the structural ambiguity would lead to further developments in functionalization and use of GO. Here, we show that the structure and properties of GO depend significantly on the quenching and purification procedures, rather than, as is commonly thought, on the type of graphite used or oxidation protocol. We introduce a new purification protocol that produces a product that we refer to as pristine GO (pGO) in contrast to the commonly known material that we will refer to as conventional GO (cGO). We explain the differences between pGO and cGO by transformations caused by reaction with water. We produce ultraviolet-visible spectroscopic, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, and scanning electron microscopic analytical evidence for the structure of pGO. This work provides a new explanation for the acidity of GO solutions and allows us to add critical details to existing GO models.

  17. Effect of Reacting Surface Density on the Overall Graphite Oxidation Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung Kim; Jong Lim; Richard Schultz; David Petti

    2009-05-01

    Graphite oxidation in an air-ingress accident is presently a very important issue for the reactor safety of the very high temperature gas cooled-reactor (VHTR), the concept of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) because of its potential problems such as mechanical degradation of the supporting graphite in the lower plenum of the VHTR might lead to core collapse if the countermeasure is taken carefully. The oxidation process of graphite has known to be affected by various factors, including temperature, pressure, oxygen concentration, types of graphite, graphite shape and size, flow distribution, etc. However, our recent study reveals that the internal pore characteristics play very important roles in the overall graphite oxidation rate. One of the main issues regarding graphite oxidation is the potential core collapse problem that may occur following the degradation of graphite mechanical strength. In analyzing this phenomenon, it is very important to understand the relationship between the degree of oxidization and strength degradation. In addition, the change of oxidation rate by graphite oxidation degree characterization by burn-off (ratio of the oxidized graphite density to the original density) should be quantified because graphite strength degradation is followed by graphite density decrease, which highly affects oxidation rates and patterns. Because the density change is proportional to the internal pore surface area, they should be quantified in advance. In order to understand the above issues, the following experiments were performed: (1)Experiment on the fracture of the oxidized graphite and validation of the previous correlations, (2) Experiment on the change of oxidation rate using graphite density and data collection, (3) Measure the BET surface area of the graphite. The experiments were performed using H451 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation) and IG-110 (Toyo Tanso Co., Ltd) graphite. The reason for the use of those graphite materials is because

  18. Homogenized Creep Behavior of CFRP Laminates at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Kawai, M.

    In this study, creep behavior of a CFRP laminate subjected to a constant stress is analyzed based on the time-dependent homogenization theory developed by the present authors. The laminate is a unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminate T800H/#3631 manufactured by Toray Industries, Inc. Two kinds of creep analyses are performed. First, 45° off-axis creep deformation of the laminate at high temperature (100°C) is analyzed with three kinds of creep stress levels, respectively. It is shown that the present theory accurately predicts macroscopic creep behavior of the unidirectional CFRP laminate observed in experiments. Then, high temperature creep deformations at a constant creep stress are simulated with seven kinds of off-axis angles, i.e., θ = 0°, 10°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°. It is shown that the laminate has marked in-plane anisotropy with respect to the creep behavior.

  19. Fluctuations and Scaling in Creep Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosti, Jari; Koivisto, Juha; Laurson, Lasse; Alava, Mikko J.

    2010-09-01

    The spatial fluctuations of deformation are studied in the creep in Andrade’s power law and the logarithmic phases, using paper samples. Measurements by the digital image correlation technique show that the relative strength of the strain rate fluctuations increases with time, in both creep regimes. In the Andrade creep phase characterized by a power-law decay of the strain rate γt˜t-θ, with θ≈0.7, the fluctuations obey Δγt˜t-γ, with γ≈0.5. The local deformation follows a data collapse appropriate for a phase transition. Similar behavior is found in a crystal plasticity model, with a jamming or yielding transition.

  20. Creep Effects in Pultruded FRP Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscato, G.; Casalegno, C.; Russo, S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of two creep tests on pultruded open-section GFRP beams aimed to evaluate the long-term deformations, the residual deflection after unloading, and the influence of creep strains on the flexuraltorsional buckling phenomenon. Two beams were subjected to a constant load for about one year. Then one of the beams was unloaded to evaluate its residual deflection. For the other beam, the load was increased up to failure, and the residual buckling strength was compared with that of a similar beam tested up to failure. The parameters of the Findley power law are evaluated, and the experimental results are compared with those of numerical analyses and with available formulations for prediction of the time-dependent properties of composite beams. Results of the investigation testify, in particular, to a noninsignificant time-dependent increment in deflections of the beams and to a significant reduction in their buckling strength due to creep deformations.

  1. Creep turns linear in narrow ferromagnetic nanostrips

    PubMed Central

    Leliaert, Jonathan; Van de Wiele, Ben; Vansteenkiste, Arne; Laurson, Lasse; Durin, Gianfranco; Dupré, Luc; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel

    2016-01-01

    The motion of domain walls in magnetic materials is a typical example of a creep process, usually characterised by a stretched exponential velocity-force relation. By performing large-scale micromagnetic simulations, and analyzing an extended 1D model which takes the effects of finite temperatures and material defects into account, we show that this creep scaling law breaks down in sufficiently narrow ferromagnetic strips. Our analysis of current-driven transverse domain wall motion in disordered Permalloy nanostrips reveals instead a creep regime with a linear dependence of the domain wall velocity on the applied field or current density. This originates from the essentially point-like nature of domain walls moving in narrow, line- like disordered nanostrips. An analogous linear relation is found also by analyzing existing experimental data on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetised media. PMID:26843125

  2. Creep turns linear in narrow ferromagnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leliaert, Jonathan; van de Wiele, Ben; Vansteenkiste, Arne; Laurson, Lasse; Durin, Gianfranco; Dupré, Luc; van Waeyenberge, Bartel

    2016-02-01

    The motion of domain walls in magnetic materials is a typical example of a creep process, usually characterised by a stretched exponential velocity-force relation. By performing large-scale micromagnetic simulations, and analyzing an extended 1D model which takes the effects of finite temperatures and material defects into account, we show that this creep scaling law breaks down in sufficiently narrow ferromagnetic strips. Our analysis of current-driven transverse domain wall motion in disordered Permalloy nanostrips reveals instead a creep regime with a linear dependence of the domain wall velocity on the applied field or current density. This originates from the essentially point-like nature of domain walls moving in narrow, line- like disordered nanostrips. An analogous linear relation is found also by analyzing existing experimental data on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetised media.

  3. Creep on a composite resin in water.

    PubMed

    Hirano, S; Hirasawa, T

    1989-06-01

    The compressive creep test of a composite resin (0-3.5 kg/mm2 stress levels) was conducted in water for 500 h. Linear regressions were obtained between the creep strains and the compressive stress levels at various hours. It is possible to predict the creep strain of the composite from the regression when it reaches water absorbed equilibrium after 500 h. The stress of the hygroscopic expansion was calculated from the linear regressions. The maximum stress due to the hygroscopic examination of the composite was 0.74 kg/mm2 at equilibrium of the water absorbed of the composite. The linear regressions at several compressive stress levels were obtained within 30-50 hr in the strain-log time diagrams.

  4. Creep turns linear in narrow ferromagnetic nanostrips.

    PubMed

    Leliaert, Jonathan; Van de Wiele, Ben; Vansteenkiste, Arne; Laurson, Lasse; Durin, Gianfranco; Dupré, Luc; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel

    2016-02-04

    The motion of domain walls in magnetic materials is a typical example of a creep process, usually characterised by a stretched exponential velocity-force relation. By performing large-scale micromagnetic simulations, and analyzing an extended 1D model which takes the effects of finite temperatures and material defects into account, we show that this creep scaling law breaks down in sufficiently narrow ferromagnetic strips. Our analysis of current-driven transverse domain wall motion in disordered Permalloy nanostrips reveals instead a creep regime with a linear dependence of the domain wall velocity on the applied field or current density. This originates from the essentially point-like nature of domain walls moving in narrow, line- like disordered nanostrips. An analogous linear relation is found also by analyzing existing experimental data on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetised media.

  5. Creep and residual mechanical properties of cast superalloys and oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile, stress-rupture, creep, and residual tensile properties after creep testing were determined for two typical cast superalloys and four advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. The superalloys examined included the nickel-base alloy B-1900 and the cobalt-base alloy MAR-M509. The nickel-base ODS MA-757 (Ni-16CR-4Al-0.6Y2O3 and the iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 (Fe-20Cr-5Al-0.8Y2O3) were extensively studied, while limited testing was conducted on the ODS nickel-base alloys STCA (Ni-16Cr-4.5Al-2Y2O3) with a without Ta and YD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-5Al-2Y2O3). Elevated temperature testing was conducted from 114 to 1477 K except for STCA and YD-NiCrAl alloys, which were only tested at 1366 K. The residual tensile properties of B-1900 and MAR-M509 are not reduced by prior creep testing (strains at least up to 1 percent), while the room temperature tensile properties of ODS nickel-base alloys can be reduced by small amounts of prior creep strain (less than 0.5 percent). The iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 does not appear to be susceptible to creep degradation at least up to strains of about 0.25 percent. However, MA-956 exhibits unusual creep behavior which apparently involves crack nucleation and growth.

  6. Viscoelastic Creep of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    viscoelastic creep tests were performed on a Nano Indenter XP (MTS Nano Instruments, Oak Ridge, TN) with a spherical indenter of tip radius of 150µm. The...viscoelastic behaviour due to their ability to dissipate mechanical energy [36]. It is expected that the nano -scale helical springs will inherit the same...Oliver W C and Fabes B D 1995 The relationship between indentation and uniaxial creep in amorphous selenium J. Mater. Res. 10 2024–32 [16] Lu Y C, Tandon G

  7. Algorithms for elasto-plastic-creep postbuckling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Tovichakchaikul, S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers the development of an improved constrained time stepping scheme which can efficiently and stably handle the pre-post-buckling behavior of general structure subject to high temperature environments. Due to the generality of the scheme, the combined influence of elastic-plastic behavior can be handled in addition to time dependent creep effects. This includes structural problems exhibiting indefinite tangent properties. To illustrate the capability of the procedure, several benchmark problems employing finite element analyses are presented. These demonstrate the numerical efficiency and stability of the scheme. Additionally, the potential influence of complex creep histories on the buckling characteristics is considered.

  8. Analysis of vibrational response in graphite oxide nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prias Barragan, Jhon Jairo; Gross, Katherine; Lajaunie, Luc; Arenal, Raul; Ariza Calderon, Hernando; Prieto, Pedro

    In this work, we present a new low-cost fabrication process to obtain graphite oxide nanoplatelets from bamboo pyroligneous acid (GO-BPA) by thermal decomposition method using a pyrolysis system for different carbonization temperatures from 673 to 973 K. The GO-BPA samples were characterized by using Raman, FTIR, XRD, SEM and TEM techniques, whose results suggest that increased carbonization temperature increases graphite conversion, boundary defects, desorption of some organic compounds and phonon response, respectively. We discuss potential applications of the GO-BPA samples involving phonon response that would benefit from a fully scaled technology, advanced electronic sensors and devices.

  9. METHOD OF OBTAINING UNIFORM COATINGS ON GRAPHITE

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, I.E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  10. Method of Obtaining Uniform Coatings on Graphite

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, I. E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  11. Mineral resource of the month: graphite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The article presents facts about graphite ideal for industrial applications. Among the characteristics of graphite are its metallic luster, softness, perfect basal cleavage and electrical conductivity. Batteries, brake linings and powdered metals are some of the products that make use of graphite. It attributes the potential applications for graphite in high-technology fields to innovations in thermal technology and acid-leaching techniques.

  12. Graphitized needle cokes and natural graphites for lithium intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Spellman, L.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Goldberger, W.M.; Kinoshita, K.

    1996-05-10

    This paper examined effects of heat treatment and milling (before or after heat treatment) on the (electrochemical) intercalating ability of needle petroleum coke; natural graphite particles are included for comparison. 1 tab, 4 figs, 7 refs.

  13. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  14. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part I; Isothermal Creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This two-part paper is the first published report on the long term, low temperature creep of hot-extruded near-stoichiometric NiTi. Constant load tensile creep tests were conducted on hot-extruded near-stoichiometric NiTi at 300, 373 and 473 K under initial applied stresses varying between 200 and 350 MPa as long as 15 months. These temperatures corresponded to the martensitic, two-phase and austenitic phase regions, respectively. Normal primary creep lasting several months was observed under all conditions indicating dislocation activity. Although steady-state creep was not observed under these conditions, the estimated creep rates varied between 10(exp -10) and 10(exp -9)/s. The creep behavior of the two phases showed significant differences. The martensitic phase exhibited a large strain on loading followed by a primary creep region accumulating a small amount of strain over a period of several months. The loading strain was attributed to the detwinning of the martensitic phase whereas the subsequent strain accumulation was attributed to dislocation glide-controlled creep. An "incubation period" was observed before the occurrence of detwinning. In contrast, the austenitic phase exhibited a relatively smaller loading strain followed by a primary creep region, where the creep strain continued to increase over several months. It is concluded that the creep of the austenitic phase occurs by a dislocation glide-controlled creep mechanism as well as by the nucleation and growth of deformation twins.

  15. Nonlinear creep and ductile creep rupture of perfectly elastoplastic rods under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Romanov, A. V.; Romanova, N. V.

    2008-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of predicting nonlinear creep strains and time to ductile rupture of prismatic rods under constant tension. The material of the rod is assumed isotropic, homogeneous, and perfectly plastic. The problem is solved using models that take into account the change in the geometry of the rod during creep, the finiteness of the creep strains, and the effect of the initial and actual elastic strains. The conditions whereby the characteristic dimension of the rod tends to infinity and the accumulated and real strains in the viscous flow are limited are used as a failure criterion. The calculated results are compared with experimental data for a number of steels and alloys to formulate the conditions for the ductile rupture and embrittlement of metallic materials under uniaxial creep

  16. Creep Testing of High-Temperature Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb Alloy Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    -8 Cr-4 Nb alloy. The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International is conducting independent testing to analyze the properties for their projected needs in advanced rocket engine applications. Metallamics, a company based in Traverse City, Michigan, is entering into a Space Act Agreement to evaluate and test Cu-Cr-Nb alloys as materials for welding electrodes that are used in robotic welding operations. Creep rate is one of the alloy properties that determines the degree to which a welding electrode will mushroom or expand at the tip. A material with a low creep rate will resist mushrooming and give the electrode a longer life, minimizing downtime. This application holds the potential for large-scale usage of the alloy in the automotive and other industries. Success here would dramatically decrease the cost of the alloy and increase availability for aerospace applications.

  17. Analysis of available creep and creep-rupture data for commercially heat-treated alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1980-03-01

    The Ni-Cr-Fe-Nb alloy 718 is a widely used material in elevated- temperature applications. Currently, it is approved by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code only as a bolting material for elevated-temperature nuclear service. This report presents analyses of available creep and creep-rupture data for commercially heat-treated alloy 718 toward the development of allowable stress levels for this material in general elevated-temperature nuclear service. Available data came from 14 heats of bar, plate, and forging material over the temperature range from 538 to 704{degrees}C. The longest rupture time encompassed by the data was almost 87,000 h. Generalized regression analyses were performed to yield an analytical expression for rupture life as a function of stress and temperature. Heat-to-heat variations were accounted for by lot-centering'' the data. Effects of different solution heat treatment temperatures (T{sub s}) were accounted for by normalizing the creep stresses to the data for T{sub s} = 954{degrees}C. Thus, the results are strictly applicable only for material with this solution treatment. Time and strain to tertiary creep were predicted as functions of rupture life. Creep strain-time data were represented by normalization to the time and strain to tertiary creep and development of master creep curves.'' The results allow estimation of time-dependent allowable stress per American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code Class N-47, and the creep strain-time relationships can be used to develop isochronous stress-strain curves. 29 refs., 44 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Irreversible thermodynamics of creep in crystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Y.; Warren, J. A.; Sekerka, R. F.; Boettinger, W. J.

    2013-11-01

    We develop an irreversible thermodynamics framework for the description of creep deformation in crystalline solids by mechanisms that involve vacancy diffusion and lattice site generation and annihilation. The material undergoing the creep deformation is treated as a nonhydrostatically stressed multicomponent solid medium with nonconserved lattice sites and inhomogeneities handled by employing gradient thermodynamics. Phase fields describe microstructure evolution, which gives rise to redistribution of vacancy sinks and sources in the material during the creep process. We derive a general expression for the entropy production rate and use it to identify of the relevant fluxes and driving forces and to formulate phenomenological relations among them taking into account symmetry properties of the material. As a simple application, we analyze a one-dimensional model of a bicrystal in which the grain boundary acts as a sink and source of vacancies. The kinetic equations of the model describe a creep deformation process accompanied by grain boundary migration and relative rigid translations of the grains. They also demonstrate the effect of grain boundary migration induced by a vacancy concentration gradient across the boundary.

  19. First principles model of carbonate compaction creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    Rocks under compressional stress conditions are subject to long-term creep deformation. From first principles we develop a simple micromechanical model of creep in rocks under compressional stress that combines microscopic fracturing and pressure solution. This model was then upscaled by a statistical mechanical approach to predict strain rate at core and reservoir scale. The model uses no fitting parameter and has few input parameters: effective stress, temperature, water saturation porosity, and material parameters. Material parameters are porosity, pore size distribution, Young's modulus, interfacial energy of wet calcite, the dissolution, and precipitation rates of calcite, and the diffusion rate of calcium carbonate, all of which are independently measurable without performing any type of deformation or creep test. Existing long-term creep experiments were used to test the model which successfully predicts the magnitude of the resulting strain rate under very different effective stress, temperature, and water saturation conditions. The model was used to predict the observed compaction of a producing chalk reservoir.

  20. A model of compaction creep in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2015-04-01

    Rocks in compressional stress conditions are subject to long-term creep deformations. We created a simple conceptual micomechanical model of creep in rocks combining microscopic fracturing and pressure solution. This was then scaled up to macroscopic scale by a statistical mechanical approach to predict strain rate at core scale. The model uses no fitting parameter and have a few input parameters: effective stress, porosity, pore size distribution, temperature and water saturation. Internal parameters are Young's modulus, interfacial energy of wet calcite and dissolution rates of calcite, all of which are measurable independently. Existing long-term creep experiments were used to verify the model which was able to predict the magnitude of the resulting strain in largely different effective stress, temperature and water saturation conditions. The model was also able to predict the compaction of a producing chalk reservoir with a good agreement. Further generalization of the model might function as a general theory of long-term creep of rocks in compressional settings.

  1. Estimation of long-term creep behavior of salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, R.C.

    1980-08-01

    A computer routine for both primary and secondary creep laws has been developed using a modified strain hardening law. The computations reveal that results from Heard's steady-state creep law and Lomenick and Bradshaw's primary creep law can differ from each other by a factor of thirty after about 6 hours of creep deformation, but the difference diminishes as time becomes large. The belief that these two creep laws may yield long-term results that are orders of magnitude apart is shown to be unfounded.

  2. Features controlling the early stages of creep deformation of Waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A.; Wilson, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    A model has been presented for describing primary and second stage creep. General equations were derived for the amount and time of primary creep. It was shown how the model can be used to extrapolate creep data. Applicability of the model was demonstrated for Waspaloy with gamma prime particle sizes from 75 - 1000 A creep tested in the temperature range 1000 - 1400 F (538 - 760 C). Equations were developed showing the dependence of creep parameters on dislocation mechanism, gamma prime volume fraction and size.

  3. Microstructural characterisation of nuclear grade graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. N.; Hall, G. N.; Joyce, M.; Hodgkins, A.; Wen, K.; Marrow, T. J.; Marsden, B. J.

    2008-10-01

    Field emission and transmission electron microscopy are used to characterise the microstructure and morphology of baked carbon block and graphitized grades (from the same carbon block stock) of nuclear graphite. Quantitative analysis using Raman and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the decrease of crystallinity with graphitization and sample purity. Both baked carbon and graphitized nuclear graphites show no sensitivity of the Raman band shift to strain, consistent with strain accommodation by the porous structure.

  4. Creep and Environmental Effects on High Temperature Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Carroll; C. Cabet; R. Madland; R. Wright

    2011-06-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 C. System start-ups and shut-downs as well as power transients will produce low cycle fatigue (LCF) loadings of components. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior in both air and impure helium, representative of the VHTR primary coolant. Strain controlled LCF tests including hold times at maximum tensile strain were conducted at total strain range of 0.3% in air at 950 C. Creep-fatigue testing was also performed in a simulated VHTR impure helium coolant for selected experimental conditions. The fatigue resistance decreased when a hold time was added at peak tensile stress, consistent with the observed change in fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular with introduction of a tensile hold. Increases in the tensile hold time, beyond 180 sec, was not detrimental to the creep-fatigue resistance. Grain boundary damage in the form of grain boundary cracking was present in the bulk of the creep-fatigue specimens. This bulk cracking was quantified and found to be similar for hold times of up to 1800 sec consistent with the saturation in failure lives and rapid stress relaxation observed during the creep portion of the creep-fatigue cycle.

  5. CALANDRIA TYPE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, R.M.; Mahlmeister, J.E.; Vaughn, N.E.; Sanders, W.J.; Williams, A.C.

    1964-02-11

    A sodium graphite power reactor in which the unclad graphite moderator and fuel elements are contained within a core tank is described. The core tank is submersed in sodium within the reactor vessel. Extending longitudinally through the core thnk are process tubes with fuel elements positioned therein. A bellows sealing means allows axial expansion and construction of the tubes. Within the core tank, a leakage plenum is located below the graphite, and above the graphite is a gas space. A vent line regulates the gas pressure in the space, and another line removes sodium from the plenum. The sodium coolant flows from the lower reactor vessel through the annular space between the fuel elements and process tubes and out into the reactor vessel space above the core tank. From there, the heated coolant is drawn off through an outlet line and sent to the heat exchange. (AEC)

  6. Intercalated hybrid graphite fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is directed to a highly conductive lightweight hybrid material and methods of producing the same. The hybrid composite is obtained by weaving strands of a high strength carbon or graphite fiber into a fabric-like structure, depositing a layer of carbon onto the structure, heat treating the structure to graphitize the carbon layer, and intercalating the graphitic carbon layer structure. A laminate composite material useful for protection against lightning strikes comprises at least one layer of the hybrid material over at least one layer of high strength carbon or graphite fibers. The composite material of the present invention is compatible with matrix compounds, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which is the same as underlying fiber layers, and is resistant to galvanic corrosion in addition to being highly conductive. These materials are useful in the aerospace industry, in particular as lightning strike protection for airplanes.

  7. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.

  8. Graphite for the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Fuller, E.L.; Romanoski, G.R.; Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite finds applications in both fission and fusion reactors. Fission reactors harness the energy liberated when heavy elements, such as uranium or plutonium, fragment or fission''. Reactors of this type have existed for nearly 50 years. The first nuclear fission reactor, Chicago Pile No. 1, was constructed of graphite under a football stand at Stagg Field, University of Chicago. Fusion energy devices will produce power by utilizing the energy produced when isotopes of the element hydrogen are fused together to form helium, the same reaction that powers our sun. The role of graphite is very different in these two reactor systems. Here we summarize the function of the graphite in fission and fusion reactors, detailing the reasons for their selection and discussing some of the challenges associated with their application in nuclear fission and fusion reactors. 10 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Nonlinear creep damage constitutive model for soft rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Z.; Xie, H. Q.; He, J. D.; Xiao, M. L.; Zhuo, L.

    2017-02-01

    In some existing nonlinear creep damage models, it may be less rigorous to directly introduce a damage variable into the creep equation when the damage variable of the viscous component is a function of time or strain. In this paper, we adopt the Kachanov creep damage rate and introduce a damage variable into a rheological differential constitutive equation to derive an analytical integral solution for the creep damage equation of the Bingham model. We also propose a new nonlinear viscous component which reflects nonlinear properties related to the axial stress of soft rock in the steady-state creep stage. Furthermore, we build an improved Nishihara model by using this new component in series with the correctional Nishihara damage model that describes the accelerating creep, and deduce the rheological constitutive relation of the improved model. Based on superposition principle, we obtain the damage creep equation for conditions of both uniaxial and triaxial compression stress, and study the method for determining the model parameters. Finally, this paper presents the laboratory test results performed on mica-quartz schist in parallel with, or vertical to the schistosity direction, and applies the improved Nishihara model to the parameter identification of mica-quartz schist. Using a comparative analysis with test data, results show that the improved model has a superior ability to reflect the creep properties of soft rock in the decelerating creep stage, the steady-state creep stage, and particularly within the accelerating creep stage, in comparison with the traditional Nishihara model.

  10. Creep deformation mechanism mapping in nickel base disk superalloys

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Timothy M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Deutchman, Hallee; ...

    2016-05-10

    We investigated the creep deformation mechanisms at intermediate temperature in ME3, a modern Ni-based disk superalloy, using diffraction contrast imaging. Both conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM were utilised. Distinctly different deformation mechanisms become operative during creep at temperatures between 677-815 °C and at stresses ranging from 274 to 724 MPa. Both polycrystalline and single-crystal creep tests were conducted. The single-crystal tests provide new insight into grain orientation effects on creep response and deformation mechanisms. Creep at lower temperatures (≤760 °C) resulted in the thermally activated shearing modes such as microtwinning, stacking fault ribbons and isolated superlattice extrinsicmore » stacking faults. In contrast, these faulting modes occurred much less frequently during creep at 815 °C under lower applied stresses. Instead, the principal deformation mode was dislocation climb bypass. In addition to the difference in creep behaviour and creep deformation mechanisms as a function of stress and temperature, it was also observed that microstructural evolution occurs during creep at 760 °C and above, where the secondary coarsened and the tertiary precipitates dissolved. Based on this work, a creep deformation mechanism map is proposed, emphasising the influence of stress and temperature on the underlying creep mechanisms.« less

  11. Tensile Creep of Polycrystalline Near-Stoichiometric NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.

    2002-01-01

    Long term tensile creep studies were conducted on binary NiAl in the temperature range 700-1200 K with the objectives of characterizing and understanding the creep mechanisms. Inverse and normal primary creep curves were observed depending on stress and temperature. It was concluded that the creep of NiAl is limited by dislocation mobility. The stress exponent for creep, n, increased from 5.5 at 1200 K to 13.9 at 700 K. The true activation energy for creep, Qc, was constant and equal to about 400 kJ per mole between 20 and 50 MPa but decreased to a constant value of 250 kJ per mole between 50 and 110 MPa. The activation energy was observed to be stress dependent above 110 MPa. The tensile creep results reported in this investigation were compared with compression creep data reported in the literature. A detailed discussion of the probable dislocation creep mechanisms governing compressive and tensile creep of NiAl is presented. It is concluded that the non-conservative motion of jogs on screw dislocations influenced the nature of the primary creep curves, where the climb of these jogs involves either the next nearest neighbor or the six-jump cycle vacancy diffusion mechanism. The probable nature of the atom vacancy exchange that occur within the core of an edge dislocation undergoing climb in NiAl are schematically examined.

  12. Creep deformation mechanism mapping in nickel base disk superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Timothy M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Deutchman, Hallee; Mills, Michael J.

    2016-05-10

    We investigated the creep deformation mechanisms at intermediate temperature in ME3, a modern Ni-based disk superalloy, using diffraction contrast imaging. Both conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM were utilised. Distinctly different deformation mechanisms become operative during creep at temperatures between 677-815 °C and at stresses ranging from 274 to 724 MPa. Both polycrystalline and single-crystal creep tests were conducted. The single-crystal tests provide new insight into grain orientation effects on creep response and deformation mechanisms. Creep at lower temperatures (≤760 °C) resulted in the thermally activated shearing modes such as microtwinning, stacking fault ribbons and isolated superlattice extrinsic stacking faults. In contrast, these faulting modes occurred much less frequently during creep at 815 °C under lower applied stresses. Instead, the principal deformation mode was dislocation climb bypass. In addition to the difference in creep behaviour and creep deformation mechanisms as a function of stress and temperature, it was also observed that microstructural evolution occurs during creep at 760 °C and above, where the secondary coarsened and the tertiary precipitates dissolved. Based on this work, a creep deformation mechanism map is proposed, emphasising the influence of stress and temperature on the underlying creep mechanisms.

  13. Soil creep as factor of landscape change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucke, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Many erosion models assume that soils are transported grain-by-grain, and thus calculate loss and deposition according to parameters such as bulk density and average grain size. However, there are indications that clay-rich soils, such as the widespread Red Mediterranean Soils or Terrae Rossae, behave differently. This is illustrated by a case study of historic landscape changes in Jordan, where evidence for soil creep as main process of soil movement was found in the context of ancient cemeteries. Due to a dominance of smectites, the Red Mediterranean Soils in this area shrink and form cracks during the dry period. Because of the cracks and underlying limestone karst, they can swallow strong rains without high erosion risk. However, when water-saturated, these soils expand and can start creeping. Buried geoarchaeological features like small water channels on formerly cleared rocks suggest that soils can move a few cm uplslope when wet, and buried graves illustrate that soil creep can create new level surfaces, sealing cavities but not completely filling them. Such processes seem associated with slumping and earth flows as instable rocks might collapse under the weight of a creeping soil. While it is very difficult to measure such processes, landscape archaeology offers at least an indirect approach that could be suited to estimate the scale and impact of soil creep. Analogies with modern rainfalls, including record levels of precipitation during the winter 1991/1992, indicate that similar levels of soil moisture have not been reached during times of modern instrumental rainfall monitoring. This suggests that very strong deluges must have occurred during historical periods, that could potentially cause tremendous damage to modern infrastructure if happening again.

  14. Creep studies for zircaloy life prediction in water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, K. Linga

    1999-10-01

    Zirconium alloys, commonly used as cladding tubes in water reactors, undergo complex biaxial creep deformation. The anisotropic nature of these metals makes it relatively complex to predict their dimensional changes in-reactor. These alloys exhibit transients in creep mechanisms as stress levels change. The underlying creep mechanisms and creep anisotropy depend on the alloy composition as well as the thermomechanical treatment. The anisotropic biaxial creep of cold-worked and recrystallized Zircaloy-4 in terms of Hill’s generalized stress formulation is described, and the temperature and stress dependencies of the steady-state creep rate are reviewed. Predictive models that incorporate anelastic strain are used for transient and transients in creep.

  15. An Evaluation of Four Current Models to Predict the Creep-Fatigue Interaction in Rene 95

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    r’eracti were evaluated for their ability to predict fatigue behrivior at 1200?F (650 9C) of thermomechanical !y processed Rene 93--an advanced nickel-base...strain. This axial strain was controlled during the test by a servo-hydraulic testing machine. The specimen was " heated by an induction coil. A...AFML-TR-79- 4075 L V U rm• AN EVALUATION OF FOUR CURRENT MODELS TO PREDICT THE CREEP- FATIGUE INTERACTION IN RENf 95 Henry L. Bernstein Systems

  16. Advanced Ceramic Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-11

    materials, toughened alumina, fiber -reinforced glass matrix composites, and multilayer-gradient materials for ballistic testing. Fabrication and...material systems: Multilayer advanced armor materials consisting of a hard ceramic faceplate bonded to a graphite fiber -reinforced glass matrix...toughened alumina, and fiber - applied studies of advanced reinforced ceramic matrix glass and glass -ceramic composites for ballistic testing. technologies

  17. Mechanical behavior of low porosity carbonate rock: from brittle creep to ductile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this experimental study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a low porosity (9%) white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite) at P-Q conditions beyond the elastic domain. It has been shown that in sandstones composed of quartz, cracks are developing under these conditions. However, in carbonates, calcite minerals can meanwhile also exhibit microplasticity. The samples were deformed in the triaxial cell of the Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris at effective confining pressures ranging from 35 MPa to 85 MPa and room temperature. Experiments were carried on dry and water saturated samples to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Time dependency was investigated by a creep steps methodology: at each step, differential stress was increased rapidly and kept constant for at least 24h. During these steps elastic wave velocities (P and S) and permeability were measured continuously. Our results show two different creep behaviors: (1) brittle creep is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile creep is observed at higher confining pressures. These two creep behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes. Indeed, in the brittle domain, the primary creep is associated with a decrease of elastic wave velocities and an increase of permeability, and no secondary creep is observed. In the ductile domain, the primary creep

  18. Tensile creep and creep rupture behavior of monolithic and SiC-whisker-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ohji, Tatsuki; Yamauchi, Yukihiko )

    1993-12-01

    The tensile creep and creep rupture behavior of silicon nitride was investigated at 1,200 to 1,350 C using hot-pressed materials with and without SiC whiskers. Stable steady-state creep was observed under low applied stresses at 1,200 C. Accelerated creep regimes, which were absent below 1,300 C, were identified above that temperature. The appearance of accelerated creep at the higher temperatures attributable to formation of microcracks throughout a specimen. The whisker-reinforced material exhibited better creep resistance than the monolith at 1,200 C. Considerably high values 3 to 5, were obtained for the creep exponent in the overall temperature range. The exponent tended to decrease with decreasing applied stress at 1,200 C. The primary creep mechanism was considered cavitation-enhanced creep. Specimen lifetimes followed the Monkman-Grant relationship except for fractures with large accelerated creep regimes. The creep rupture behavior is discussed in association with cavity formation and crack adolescence.

  19. Phenomenological approach to precise creep life prediction by means of quantitative evaluation of strain rate acceleration in secondary creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Takaya

    2010-07-01

    A method of creep life prediction by means of Strain-Acceleration-Parameter (SAP), α, is presented. The authors show that the shape of creep curve can be characterized by SAP that reflects magnitude of strain-rate change in secondary creep. The SAP-values, α are evaluated on magnesium-aluminium solution hardened alloys. Reconstruction of creep curves by combinations of SAP and minimum-creep rates are successfully performed, and the curves reasonably agree with experiments. The advantage of the proposed method is that the required parameters evaluated from individual creep curves are directly connected with the minimum creep rate. The predicted times-to-failure agree well with that obtained by experiments, and possibility of precise life time prediction by SAP is pronounced.

  20. Effects of temperature on internal friction of Graphit-iC graphite-like carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi-yong; Shi, Wen; Wan, Zi; Yuan, Jun-feng; Li, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    Graphit-iC graphite-like carbon coatings were deposited on SDC90 cold work die steel by using an unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology. Effects of the temperature on microstructure and internal friction of the carbon coatings were characterized by Raman spectroscopy (Raman) and a low-frequency mechanical analyzer (LMA-1) testing system. The results indicate that the internal friction of the two-side deposited carbon coatings is small (2.17×10-4), being higher than one of the substrate (1.63×10-4), and increases with temperature. However, there is an internal friction peak at 250°C accompanied with partial sp3 transferred to sp2 and increasing the intensity ratio ID/IG. There is gradual graphitization tendency of the carbon coatings as temperatures increase from 25°C to 350 °C. This would be progressive transformation from amorphous to crystalline.

  1. Creep rupture testing of alloy 617 and A508/533 base metals and weldments.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-01-17

    The NGNP, which is an advanced HTGR concept with emphasis on both electricity and hydrogen production, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 750-1000 C. Alloy 617 is a prime candidate for VHTR structural components such as reactor internals, piping, and heat exchangers in view of its resistance to oxidation and elevated temperature strength. However, lack of adequate data on the performance of the alloy in welded condition prompted to initiate a creep test program at Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, Testing has been initiated to evaluate the creep rupture properties of the pressure vessel steel A508/533 in air and in helium environments. The program, which began in December 2009, was certified for quality assurance NQA-1 requirements during January and February 2010. Specimens were designed and fabricated during March and the tests were initiated in April 2010. During the past year, several creep tests were conducted in air on Alloy 617 base metal and weldment specimens at temperatures of 750, 850, and 950 C. Idaho National Laboratory, using gas tungsten arc welding method with Alloy 617 weld wire, fabricated the weldment specimens. Eight tests were conducted on Alloy 617 base metal specimens and nine were on Alloy 617 weldments. The creep rupture times for the base alloy and weldment tests were up to {approx}3900 and {approx}4500 h, respectively. The results showed that the creep rupture lives of weld specimens are much longer than those for the base alloy, when tested under identical test conditions. The test results also showed that the creep strain at fracture is in the range of 7-18% for weldment samples and were much lower than those for the base alloy, under similar test conditions. In general, the weldment specimens showed more of a flat or constant creep rate region than the base metal specimens. The base alloy and the weldment exhibited tertiary creep

  2. Ferric chloride graphite intercalation compounds prepared from graphite fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    The reaction between graphite fluoride and ferric chloride was observed in the temperature range of 300 to 400 C. The graphite fluorides used for this reaction have an sp3 electronic structure and are electrical insulators. They can be made by fluorinating either carbon fibers or powder having various degrees of graphitization. Reaction is fast and spontaneous and can occur in the presence of air. The ferric chloride does not have to be predried. The products have an sp2 electronic structure and are electrical conductors. They contain first stage FeCl3 intercalated graphite. Some of the products contain FeCl2*2H2O, others contain FeF3 in concentrations that depend on the intercalation condition. The graphite intercalated compounds (GIC) deintercalated slowly in air at room temperature, but deintercalated quickly and completely at 370 C. Deintercalation is accompanied by the disappearing of iron halides and the formation of rust (hematite) distributed unevenly on the fiber surface. When heated to 400 C in pure N2 (99.99 vol %), this new GIC deintercalates without losing its molecular structure. However, when the compounds are heated to 800 C in quartz tube, they lost most of its halogen atoms and formed iron oxides (other than hematite), distributed evenly in or on the fiber. This iron-oxide-covered fiber may be useful in making carbon-fiber/ceramic-matrix composites with strong bonding at the fiber-ceramic interface.

  3. Ferrix Chloride-Graphite Intercalation Compounds Prepared From Graphite Flouride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1995-01-01

    The reaction between graphite fluoride and ferric chloride was observed in the temperature range of 300 to 400 C. The graphite fluorides used for this reaction have an sp(sup 3) electronic structure and are electrical insulators. They can be made by fluorinating either carbon fibers or powder having various degrees of graphitization. Reaction is fast and spontaneous and can occur in the presence of air. The ferric chloride does not have to be predried. The products have an sp(sup 2) electronic structure and are electrical conductors. They contain first-stage FeCl3 intercalated graphite. Some of the products contain FeCl2 (center dot) 2H2O, others contain FeF3, in concentrations that depend on the intercalation condition. The graphite intercalated compounds (GIC) deintercalated slowly in air at room temperature, but deintercalated quickly and completely at 370 C. Deintercalation is accompanied by the disappearance of iron halides and the formation of rust (hematite) distributed unevenly on the fiber surface. When heated to 400 C in pure N2 (99.99 vol%), this new GIC deintercalates without losing its molecular structure. However, when the compounds are exposed to 800 C N2, in a quartz tube, they lost most of their halogen atoms and formed iron oxides (other than hematite), distributed evenly in or on the fiber.

  4. Thermally activated dislocation creep model for primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M., Jr

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing awareness that awareness that environmentally assisted creep plays an important role in integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of NiCrFe alloys in the primary coolant water environment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The expected creep mechanism is the thermally activated glide of dislocations. This mode of deformation is favored by the relatively low temperature of PWR operation combined with the large residual stresses that are most often identified as responsible for the SCC failure of plant components. Stress corrosion crack growth rate (CGR) equations that properly reflect the influence of this mechanism of crack tip deformation are required for accurate component life predictions. A phenomenological IGSCC-CGR model, which is based on an apriori assumption that the IGSCC-CGR is controlled by a low temperature dislocation creep mechanism, is developed in this report. Obstacles to dislocation creep include solute atoms such as carbon, which increase the lattice friction force, and forest dislocations, which can be introduced by cold prestrain. Dislocation creep also may be environmentally assisted due to hydrogen absorption at the crack tip. The IGSCC-CGR model developed here is based on an assumption that crack growth occurs by repeated fracture events occurring within an advancing crack-tip creep-fracture zone. Thermal activation parameters for stress corrosion cracking are obtained by fitting the CGR model to IGSCC-CGR data obtained on NiCrFe alloys, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 600. These IGSCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to activation parameters obtained from creep and stress relaxation tests. Recently reported CGR data, which exhibit an activation energy that depends on yield stress and the applied stress intensity factor, are used to benchmark the model. Finally, the effects of matrix carbon concentration, grain boundary carbides and absorbed hydrogen concentration are discussed within context of the model.

  5. Characterization of 14C in Neutron-Irradiated Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrier, Daniel Patrick

    A long-term radiological concern regarding irradiated graphite waste is the presence of the radionuclide 14C. Recent studies suggest that a significant portion of 14C contamination present in reactor-irradiated graphite is concentrated on the surface and within near-surface layers. Methods for treating irradiated graphite waste (e.g. pyrolysis, oxidation) in order to remove 14C-bearing species from the bulk graphite are being investigated to lend guidance in optimizing long-term disposal strategies. Characterization studies were performed in order to determine the chemical nature of 14C on irradiated graphite surfaces. Samples of the nuclear-grade graphite NBG-25 were irradiated in a neutron flux of 10 14 n/cm2-s for 360 days at the Advanced Test Reactor (at the Idaho National Laboratory). Surface-sensitive analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS, SEM/EDS and Raman) were employed to determine the type, location and quantity of specific chemical species and bonds that were present on the surfaces of irradiated graphite samples. Several 14C precursor species were identified on the surfaces of irradiated NBG-25; the quantities of these species decrease at sub-surface depths, which, is consistent with the observation of high concentrations of 14C on the surfaces of graphite reactor components. The elevated presence of surface oxide complexes on irradiated NBG-25 surfaces was attributed directly to neutron irradiation. Pathways for the release of 14C were identified for irradiated NBG-25: carboxyls and lactones (14CO 2), and carbonyls, ethers and quinones (14CO). Increased amounts of C-O and C=O bonding were observed on irradiated NBG-25 surfaces (when compared to unirradiated samples) in the form of interlattice (e.g. ether) and dangling (e.g. carboxyl or quinone) bonds; the quantities of these bond types also decrease at sub-surface depths. The results of this study are consistent with thermal treatment studies that indicate that the primary candidates for the release of

  6. Axial creep-rupture time of boron-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Koichi; Hamada, Jun`ichi

    1995-11-01

    Axial creep tests of a 10vol% boron-aluminum hotpressed monolayer composite were carried out under several constant loads at 300 C in air. The composite behaved with slight primary creep, but did not show appreciable secondary creep. Several specimens encountered a momentary increase of strain during the creep test which separated the creep curve into two regions, because of the individual fiber breaks in the composite. And then, almost all the specimens suddenly fractured without tertiary creep. From the viewpoint of reliability engineering the statistical properties of the creep-rupture time were investigated. The average creep-rupture time decreased with an increase in the applied stress, and the relatively large coefficient of variation was estimated in every case, being around 1,000%. However, these scatters were estimated to be smaller than the scatter of creep-rupture time in the boron fiber itself. That means, the reliability of the fiber`s creep-rupture time is improved by compositing with matrix material.

  7. Influence of phosphorus on the creep ductility of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandström, Rolf; Wu, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Around 1990 it was discovered that pure copper could have extra low creep ductility in the temperature interval 180-250 °C. The material was intended for use in canisters for nuclear waste disposal. Although extra low creep ductility was not observed much below 180 °C and the temperature in the canister will never exceed 100 °C, it was feared that the creep ductility could reach low values at lower temperatures after long term exposure. If 50 ppm phosphorus was added to the copper the low creep ductility disappeared. A creep cavitation model is presented that can quantitatively describe the cavitation behaviour in uniaxial and multiaxial creep tests as well as the observed creep ductility for copper with and without phosphorus. A so-called double ledge model has been introduced that demonstrates why the nucleation rate of creep cavities is often proportional to the creep rate. The phosphorus agglomerates at the grain boundaries and limits their local deformation and thereby reduces the formation and growth of cavities. This explains why extra low creep ductility does not occur in phosphorus alloyed copper.

  8. Creep Damage Analysis of a Lattice Truss Panel Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenchun; Li, Shaohua; Luo, Yun; Xu, Shugen

    2017-01-01

    The creep failure for a lattice truss sandwich panel structure has been predicted by finite element method (FEM). The creep damage is calculated by three kinds of stresses: as-brazed residual stress, operating thermal stress and mechanical load. The creep damage at tensile and compressive loads have been calculated and compared. The creep rate calculated by FEM, Gibson-Ashby and Hodge-Dunand models have been compared. The results show that the creep failure is located at the fillet at both tensile and creep loads. The damage rate at the fillet at tensile load is 50 times as much as that at compressive load. The lattice truss panel structure has a better creep resistance to compressive load than tensile load, because the creep and stress triaxiality at the fillet has been decreased at compressive load. The maximum creep strain at the fillet and the equivalent creep strain of the panel structure increase with the increase of applied load. Compared with Gibson-Ashby model and Hodge-Dunand models, the modified Gibson-Ashby model has a good prediction result compared with FEM. However, a more accurate model considering the size effect of the structure still needs to be developed.

  9. Compression and Tensile Creep of Binary NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.

    2005-01-01

    Compression creep and long term tensile creep studies were conducted on cast and extruded binary NiAl in the temperature range 700-1200 K with the objectives of characterizing and understanding the creep mechanisms. Inverse and normal primary creep curves were observed in both compression and tension creep depending on stress and temperature although an asymmetrical response was observed under these two stress states. It was concluded that the primary creep of NiAl is limited by dislocation mobility. The stress exponents, n, for compression and tensile creep were similar varying between about 5 and 14. However, there were significant differences in the stress dependence of the activation energies for compression and tensile creep. The true activation energy for tensile creep, Q(sub c), was constant and equal to about 400 kJ/mol between 20 and 50 MPa but decreased to a constant value of 250 kJ/mol between 50 and 110 MPa. The activation energy was observed to be inversely stress dependent above 110 MPa. In contrast, Q(sub c) = 300 kJ/mol for compression creep was constant between 25 and 70 MPa and inversely dependent on the true stress above 70 MPa. A detailed discussion of the probable dislocation creep mechanisms governing compressive and tensile creep of NiAl is presented. It is concluded that the non-conservative motion of jogs on screw dislocations influenced the nature of the primary creep curves, where the climb of these jogs involves either the next nearest neighbor or the six-jump cycle vacancy diffusion mechanism. The probable natures of the atom-vacancy exchange that occur within the core of an edge dislocation undergoing climb in NiAl are schematically examined.

  10. Mineralogical and isotopic characterization of graphite deposits from the Anatectic Complex of Toledo, central Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Méndez, Iván; Boixereu, Ester; Villaseca, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Graphite is found dispersed in high-grade metapelitic rocks of the Anatectic Complex of Toledo (ACT) and was mined during the mid twentieth century in places where it has been concentrated (Guadamur and la Puebla de Montalbán mines). Some samples from these mines show variable but significant alteration intensity, reaching very low-T hydrothermal (supergene) conditions for some samples from the waste heap of the Guadamur site (<100 °C and 1 kbar). Micro-Raman and XRD data indicate that all the studied ACT graphite is of high crystallinity irrespective of the degree of hydrothermal alteration. Chemical differences were obtained for graphite δ13C composition. ACT granulitic graphite shows δ13CPDB values in the range of -20.5 to -27.8 ‰, indicating a biogenic origin. Interaction of graphite with hydrothermal fluids does not modify isotopic compositions even in the most transformed samples from mining sites. The different isotopic signatures of graphite from the mining sites reflect its contrasted primary carbon source. The high crystallinity of studied graphite makes this area of central Spain suitable for graphitic exploration and its potential exploitation, due to the low carbon content required for its viability and its strategic applications in advanced technologies, such as graphene synthesis.

  11. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of A-USC Alloy Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H.; DuPont, John N.; Siefert, John A.; Shingledecker, John P.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of the microstructural evolution of fusion welds in alloys slated for use in advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) boilers during creep has been performed. Creep-rupture specimens involving INCONEL® 740, NIMONIC® 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and Haynes® 282® (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) have been analyzed via light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermodynamic and kinetic modeling. Focus has been given to the microstructures that develop along the grain boundaries in these alloys during creep at temperatures relevant to the A-USC process cycle, and particular attention has been paid to any evidence of the formation of local γ'-denuded or γ'-free zones. This work has been performed in an effort to understand the microstructural changes that lead to a weld strength reduction factor (WSRF) in these alloys as compared to solution annealed and aged alloy 740 base metal. γ' precipitate-free zones have been identified in alloy 740 base metal, solution annealed alloy 740 weld metal, and alloy 263 weld metal after creep. Their development during long-term thermal exposure is correlated with the stabilization of phases that are rich in γ'-forming elements ( e.g., η and G) and is suppressed by precipitation of phases that do not contain the γ' formers ( e.g., M23C6 and μ). The location of failure and creep performance in terms of rupture life and WSRF for each welded joint is presented and discussed.

  12. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  13. Creep damage development in structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Page, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Creep rupture of structural ceramics occurs by either the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of grain-boundary cavities throughout the material or the growth of a dominant flaw. Recent experimental results obtained with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and stereo imaging strain analysis are reviewed and used to answer a number of critical questions pertaining to both damage mechanisms. The nucleation and growth processes of grain-boundary cavities are examined using the SANS results and pertinent results from other studies. The stochastic nature of cavitation is demonstrated and discussed. Creep-crack growth is described as either a direct mass transport process or a damage zone growth process. New stereo imaging strain results pertinent to the damage zone growth process are presented and used to elucidate the crack growth process and the growth threshold.

  14. Failure of bacterial streamers in creeping flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ishita; Ghosh, Ranajay; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada; Kumar, Aloke

    2016-11-01

    In the recent years, the dynamical response of filamentous bacterial aggregates called bacterial streamer in creeping flows has attracted attention. We report the observation of 'necking-type' instability leading to failure in bacterial (Pseudomonas fluorescens) streamers formed in creeping flows. Quantification of the failure process was made possible through the use of 200 nm red fluorescent polystyrene tracer particles embedded in the bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The nonlinear failure behavior shows distinct phases of deformation with mutually different characteristic times, which end with a distinct localized failure of the streamer. We also develop a simplified analytical model to describe the experimental observations of the failure phenomena. The theoretical power law relationship between critical stretch ratio and the fluid velocity scale matches closely experimental observations.

  15. Compressive Creep Performance and High Temperature Dimensional Stability of Conventional Silica Refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Karakus, M.; Kirkland, T.P.; Liu, K.C.; Moore, R.E.; Pint, B.A.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    1999-03-01

    Furnace designers and refractory engineers recognize that optimized furnace superstructure design and refractory selection are needed as glass production furnaces are continually striving toward greater output and efficiencies. Harsher operating conditions test refractories to the limit, while changing production technology (such as the conversion to oxy-fuel from traditional air-fuel firing) can alter the way the materials perform. Refractories for both oxy- and air-fuel fired furnace superstructures are subjected to high temperatures during service that may cause them to excessively creep or subside if the refractory material is not creep resistant, or if it is subjected to high stress, or both. Furnace designers can ensure that superstructure structural integrity is maintained if the creep behavior of the refractory material is well understood and well represented by appropriate engineering creep models. Several issues limit the abilities of furnace designers to (1) choose the optimum refractory for their applications, (2) optimize the engineering design, or (3) predict the service mechanical integrity of their furnace superstructures. Published engineering creep data are essentially non-existent for almost all commercially available refractories used for glass furnace superstructures. The limited data that do exist are supplied by the various refractory suppliers. Unfortunately, these suppliers generally have different ways of conducting their mechanical testing and they also interpret and report their data differently; this makes it hard for furnace designers to draw fair comparisons between competing grades of candidate refractories. Furthermore, the refractory supplier's data are often not available in a form that can be readily used for furnace design and for the prediction and design of long-term structural integrity of furnace superstructures. With the aim of providing such comparable data, the US DOE's Office of Industrial Technology and its Advanced

  16. Creep Cavitation in Lower Crustal Shear Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, L. M.; Fusseis, F.; Stunitz, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Shear zones channelize fluid flow in the Earth's crust. A number of mechanisms have been suggested to control fluid migration pathways in upper- and mid-crustal shear zones, amongst them creep cavitation, which is well-known from deforming metals and ceramics. However, little is known on deep crustal fluid migration and on how fluids are channelized and distributed in actively deforming lower crustal shear zones.This study investigates the deformation mechanisms, fluid-rock interaction, and development of porosity in a monzonite ultramylonite from Lofoten, northern Norway. The rock was deformed under lower crustal conditions (T=700-730° C, P=0.65-0.8 GPa). The ultramylonite consists of feldspathic layers and of domains of amphibole + quartz + calcite, which represent the products of hydration reactions of magmatic clinopyroxene. The average grain size in both domains is <25 μm. Microstructural observations and EBSD analysis are consistent with diffusion creep as the dominant deformation mechanism in both domains. In feldspathic layers, isolated quartz grains without a crystallographic preferred orientation occur along C'-type shear bands. All microstructures suggest that quartz precipitated in cavities. The orientation of such quartz bands overlaps with the preferred orientation of pores in the ultramylonites, as evidenced from synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Such C'-type shear bands are interpreted as high-strain cavitation bands resulting from diffusion creep deformation associated with grain boundary sliding. Mass-balance calculation indicates a 2% volume increase during the protolith-ultramylonite transformation. The volume increase is consistent with a synkinematic formation of cavities. Thus, this study presents clear evidence that high-strain cavitation bands may control deep crustal porosity and fluid flow. Nucleation of new phases in cavitation bands inhibits grain growth and enhances the activity of grain-size sensitive creep, thereby maintaining

  17. Leidenfrost Gas Ratchets Driven by Thermal Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würger, Alois

    2011-10-01

    We show that thermal creep is at the origin of the recently discovered Leidenfrost ratchet, where liquid droplets float on a vapor layer along a heated sawtooth surface and accelerate to velocities of up to 40cm/s. As the active element, the asymmetric temperature profile at each ratchet summit rectifies the vapor flow in the boundary layer. This mechanism works at low Reynolds number and provides a novel tool for controlling gas flow at nanostructured surfaces.

  18. Changes in rate of fault creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harsh, P.

    1979-01-01

    Aseismic slip or fault creep is occurring on many faults in California. Although the creep rates are generally less than 10 mm/yr in most regions, the maximum observed rate along the San Andreas fault between San Juan Bautista and Gold Hill in central California exceeds 30 mm/yr. Changes in slip rates along a 162 km segment of the San Andreas fault in this region have occurred at approximately the same time at up to nine alinement array sites. Rates of creep on the fault near the epicenters of moderate earthquakes (ML 4-6) vary for periods of several years, decreasing before the main shocks and increasing thereafter, in agreement with prior observations based on creepmeter results. The change of surface slip rate is most pronounced within the epicentral region defined by aftershocks, but records from sites at distances up to 100 km show similar variations. Additionally, some variations in rate, also apparently consistent among many sites, have a less obvious relation with seismic activity and have usually taken place over shorter periods. Not all sites exhibit a significant variation in rate at the time of a regional change, and the amplitudes of the change at nearby sites are not consistently related. The time intervals between measurements at the nine array sites during a given period have not always been short with respect to the intervals between surveys at one site; hence, uneven sampling intervals may bias the results slightly. Anomalies in creep rates thus far observed, therefore, have not been demonstrably consistent precursors to moderate earthquakes; and in the cases when an earthquake has followed a long period change of rate, the anomaly has not specified time, place, or magnitude with a high degree of certainty. The consistency of rate changes may represent a large scale phenomenon that occurs along much of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. ?? 1979.

  19. A creep mechanism for metal single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cuitino, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper we present a mechanism of creep for metal single crystals. This creep mechanism is consistent with the hardening mechanism in metals single crystals, i.e. forest hardening. Hardening in metals is mainly due to the resistance to the dislocation motion opposed by obstacles. In single crystals, obstacles are generated by dislocation segments crossing the glide plane (forest dislocations). When a dislocation is released from an obstacle, it moves until stopped at the following obstacle inducing plastic deformation. It has been proposed as a mechanisms of creep that obstacles can be overcome by dislocation climb. However, the kind of obstacles remains in planes parallel to the gliding plane. Thus, the dislocation segment after climb is still stopped at the same obstacle and unable to glide, unless, a second jog moving in the forest dislocation meets simultaneously with the jog in the gliding segment. In this case, the gliding segment can move by the height of the forest jog. The gliding area is proportional to this height and the distance between obstacles. We call this mechanism of glide by congruent climb. Creep rate depends on the jog density and jog velocity. For a well-annealed material the number of jogs is relatively low. As plastic deformation proceeds, new jogs are formed by mainly two mechanisms: dislocation intersection and double cross slip. For a crystal undergoing single slip, the cross-slip contribution dominates jog generation, since dislocation intersections are relatively rare due to the low forest dislocation density. The situation is reversed for multiple glide as a consequence of the rapid dislocation multiplication which takes place in the active slip systems, which results in a high rate of dislocation intersection. The number of cross slip events and dislocation intersections can be readily estimated by our dislocation model of plastic deformation. Jog velocity is determined based on vacancy diffusion along the dislocation core.

  20. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  1. Characterization of the Intrinsic Water Wettability of Graphite Using Contact Angle Measurements: Effect of Defects on Static and Dynamic Contact Angles.

    PubMed

    Kozbial, Andrew; Trouba, Charlie; Liu, Haitao; Li, Lei

    2017-01-31

    Elucidating the intrinsic water wettability of the graphitic surface has increasingly attracted research interests, triggered by the recent finding that the well-established hydrophobicity of graphitic surfaces actually results from airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Currently, static water contact angle (WCA) is often used to characterize the intrinsic water wettability of graphitic surfaces. In the current paper, we show that because of the existence of defects, static WCA does not necessarily characterize the intrinsic water wettability. Freshly exfoliated graphite of varying qualities, characterized using atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, was studied using static, advancing, and receding WCA measurements. The results showed that graphite of different qualities (i.e., defect density) always has a similar advancing WCA, but it could have very different static and receding WCAs. This finding indicates that defects play an important role in contact angle measurements, and the static contact angle does not always represent the intrinsic water wettability of pristine graphite. On the basis of the experimental results, a qualitative model is proposed to explain the effect of defects on static, advancing, and receding contact angles. The model suggests that the advancing WCA reflects the intrinsic water wettability of pristine (defect-free) graphite. Our results showed that the advancing WCA for pristine graphite is 68.6°, which indicates that graphitic carbon is intrinsically mildly hydrophilic.

  2. NGNP Graphite Testing and Qualification Specimen Selection Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2005-05-01

    The available grades of graphite for the NGNP are reviewed. A selection matrix is presented outlining the available grades for the NGNP graphite irradiation program based upon input from potential NGNP vendors, graphite manufactures, and graphite experts.

  3. Creep cavitation in 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.W.; Argon, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    Creep cavitation in 304 stainless steel at 0.5 T/sub m/ was investigated. Two specially developed techniques were used to study the nucleation and growth of grain-boundary cavities. It was found that cavities nucleated heterogeneously throughout the creep history and those observed were well in their growth stage. Comparison of these observations with the theory for cavity nucleation requires that a high interfacial stress be present. Experiments suggest that such stress concentrations are present in the early stages of boundary sliding, and in additional transients associated with intermittent sliding of boundaries throughout the creep life. It was found that microstructural variations such as those caused by twins which strongly affect initial particle densities on boundaries can alter cavitation behavior drastically. Our results also show that wedge cracks are the result of accelerated linking of growing cavities in the triple point region of stress concentration and are not a separate phenomenon. Furthermore, at higher strain rates growth of cavities can be accelerated by grain boundary sliding. Lastly, evidence is given to support the view that in engineering alloys which contain complex phas constitutents particularly along grain-boundaries, cavitation in long term service is likely to be caused by cavities nucleated in connection with a prior cold forming operation. 15 figures.

  4. Magnetic field annealing for improved creep resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Nicholson, Don M.; Rios, Orlando; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-12-22

    The method provides heat-resistant chromia- or alumina-forming Fe-, Fe(Ni), Ni(Fe), or Ni-based alloys having improved creep resistance. A precursor is provided containing preselected constituents of a chromia- or alumina-forming Fe-, Fe(Ni), Ni(Fe), or Ni-based alloy, at least one of the constituents for forming a nanoscale precipitate MaXb where M is Cr, Nb, Ti, V, Zr, or Hf, individually and in combination, and X is C, N, O, B, individually and in combination, a=1 to 23 and b=1 to 6. The precursor is annealed at a temperature of 1000-1500.degree. C. for 1-48 h in the presence of a magnetic field of at least 5 Tesla to enhance supersaturation of the M.sub.aX.sub.b constituents in the annealed precursor. This forms nanoscale M.sub.aX.sub.b precipitates for improved creep resistance when the alloy is used at service temperatures of 500-1000.degree. C. Alloys having improved creep resistance are also disclosed.

  5. The relationship between indentation and uniaxial creep in amorphous selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Poisl, W.H.; Oliver, W.C.; Fabes, B.D.

    1995-08-01

    Ultralow load indentation techniques can be used to obtain time-dependent mechanical properties, termed indentation creep, of materials. However, the comparison of indentation creep data to that obtained during conventional creep testing is difficult, mainly due to the determination of the strain rate experienced by the material during indentation. Using the power-law creep equation and the equation for Newtonian viscosity as a function of stress and strain rate, a relationship between indentation strain rate,{center_dot}{epsilon}{sub {ital l}}={ital @};Dh/{ital h}, and the effective strain rate occurring during the indentation creep process is obtained. Indentation creep measurements on amorphous selenium in the Newtonian viscous flow regime above the glass transition temperature were obtained. The data was then used to determine that the coefficient relating indentation strain rate to the effective strain rate is equal to 0.09, or{center_dot}{epsilon}=0.0{center_dot}{epsilon}{sub {ital l}}.

  6. Creep-characteristics of a tropical wood-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, L. H. L.; Teoh, S. H.; Boey, F. Y. C.

    Wood polymer composite (WPC) specimens were produced by impregnating a tropical wood with methyl methacrylate and subsequently polymerised by γ-irradiation. Beam specimens of varying weight percentages of polymer were then subjected to a three point bend creep test under a constant load condition, for 250, 300 and 350 N. A Norton-Bailey (power law) mathematical model was used to describe the creep behavior, with the creep components determined by a nonlinear regression analysis. Significant creep improvements were obtained from the composite specimens as compared to the untreated wood specimens. Results indicated that maximum creep resistance is obtained when the amount of polymer loading exceeded 30%. An interfacial interaction between the polymer and the wood cell wall was used to account for the behavior of the increase in the creep resistance.

  7. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  8. Pure climb creep mechanism drives flow in Earth's lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Boioli, Francesca; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick; Devincre, Benoit; Gouriet, Karine; Hirel, Pierre; Kraych, Antoine; Ritterbex, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    At high pressure prevailing in the lower mantle, lattice friction opposed to dislocation glide becomes very high, as reported in recent experimental and theoretical studies. We examine the consequences of this high resistance to plastic shear exhibited by ringwoodite and bridgmanite on creep mechanisms under mantle conditions. To evaluate the consequences of this effect, we model dislocation creep by dislocation dynamics. The calculation yields to an original dominant creep behavior for lower mantle silicates where strain is produced by dislocation climb, which is very different from what can be activated under high stresses under laboratory conditions. This mechanism, named pure climb creep, is grain-size-insensitive and produces no crystal preferred orientation. In comparison to the previous considered diffusion creep mechanism, it is also a more efficient strain-producing mechanism for grain sizes larger than ca. 0.1 mm. The specificities of pure climb creep well match the seismic anisotropy observed of Earth's lower mantle.

  9. Cyclic creep analysis from elastic finite-element solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hwang, S. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A uniaxial approach was developed for calculating cyclic creep and stress relaxation at the critical location of a structure subjected to cyclic thermomechanical loading. This approach was incorporated into a simplified analytical procedure for predicting the stress-strain history at a crack initiation site for life prediction purposes. An elastic finite-element solution for the problem was used as input for the simplified procedure. The creep analysis includes a self-adaptive time incrementing scheme. Cumulative creep is the sum of the initial creep, the recovery from the stress relaxation and the incremental creep. The simplified analysis was exercised for four cases involving a benchmark notched plate problem. Comparisons were made with elastic-plastic-creep solutions for these cases using the MARC nonlinear finite-element computer code.

  10. Creep-Fatigue Interactions in Advanced Eutectic Superalloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-20

    hitracion ocur n aed itac 14B at 825oC. LCF data of Nitac 14F and -AAG-170 at 8000C obey the~ Coffin - Manson relation. AG-170 displays superior L.CF...material can be effectively described by a single scatter band, and that the Coffin - Manson -- U, equation: N faA = Constant (1)f P is obeyed. Two min...80 at 871"C. Values of the Coffin - Manson constants 8 and C are tabulated for the two S. alloys in Table 3. The slope B, is markedly reduced by the hold

  11. Reliability and Creep/Fatigue Analysis of a CMC Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2007-01-01

    High temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are being explored as viable candidate materials for hot section gas turbine components. These advanced composites can potentially lead to reduced weight and enable higher operating temperatures requiring less cooling; thus leading to increased engine efficiencies. There is a need for convenient design tools that can accommodate various loading conditions and material data with their associated uncertainties to estimate the minimum predicted life as well as the failure probabilities of a structural component. This paper presents a review of the life prediction and probabilistic analyses performed for a CMC turbine stator vane. A computer code, NASALife, is used to predict the life of a 2-D woven silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) turbine stator vane due to a mission cycle which induces low cycle fatigue and creep. The output from this program includes damage from creep loading, damage due to cyclic loading and the combined damage due to the given loading cycle. Results indicate that the trends predicted by NASALife are as expected for the loading conditions used for this study. In addition, a combination of woven composite micromechanics, finite element structural analysis and Fast Probability Integration (FPI) techniques has been used to evaluate the maximum stress and its probabilistic distribution in a CMC turbine stator vane. Input variables causing scatter are identified and ranked based upon their sensitivity magnitude. Results indicate that reducing the scatter in proportional limit strength of the vane material has the greatest effect in improving the overall reliability of the CMC vane.

  12. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic): Fourth year progress review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Richard S.; Schoendorf, John F.

    1986-01-01

    As gas turbine technology continues to advance, the need for advanced life prediction methods for hot section components is becoming more and more evident. The complex local strain and temperature histories at critical locations must be accurately interpreted to account for the effects of various damage mechanisms (such as fatigue, creep, and oxidation) and their possible interactions. As part of the overall NASA HOST effort, this program is designed to investigate these fundamental damage processes, identify modeling strategies, and develop practical models which can be used to guide the early design and development of new engines and to increase the durability of existing engines.

  13. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  14. Radiation and temperature effects on the time-dependent response of T300/934 graphite/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, Robert N.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1988-01-01

    A time-dependent characterization study was performed on T300/934 graphite/epoxy in a simulated space environment. Creep tests on irradiated and nonirradiated graphite/epoxy and bulk resin specimens were carried out at temperatures of 72 and 250 F. Irradiated specimens were exposed to dosages of penetrating electron radiation equal to 30 years exposure at GEO-synchronous orbit. Radiation was shown to have little effect on the creep response of both the composite and bulk resin specimens at 72 F while radiation had a significant effect at 250 F. A healing process was shown to be present in the irradiated specimens where broken bonds in the epoxy due to radiation recombined over time to form cross-links in the 934 resin structure. An analytical micromechanical model was also developed to predict the viscoelastic response of fiber reinforced composite materials. The model was shown to correlate well with experimental results for linearly viscoelastic materials with relatively small creep strains.

  15. Heated mine room and pillar secondary creep response

    SciTech Connect

    Tillerson, J.R.; Dawson, P.R.

    1980-04-01

    Heated salt mine room and pillar simulations have been performed to provide information regarding parameters affecting room closure rates to designers of radioactive waste isolation facilities. A coupled secondary creep and heat transfer formulation with large strain capabilities was used to assess the effects of variations in creep law parameters, thermal properties, imposed boundary conditions, temporal integration, and meshing resolution on room closure rates. Results indicate that the greatest effect results from variations in parameters appearing in the creep constitutive equation.

  16. A microphysical model of Harper-Dorn creep

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.N.

    1996-03-01

    Using experimental data for Harper-Dorn creep in different materials, it is demonstrated that the flow process in this creep may be dislocation glide plus climb with the climb being rate-controlling under a constant dislocation density determined by the magnitude of the Peierls stress. A rate equation is presented which may be used to predict the occurrence of Harper-Dorn creep in any crystalline material.

  17. Creeping Faults and Seismicity: Lessons From The Hayward Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malservisi, R.; Furlong, K. P.; Gans, C.

    While faults remain mostly locked between large strain releasing events, they can dissipate some of the accumulating elastic strain through creep. One such fault that releases a significant fraction of accumulating strain by creep is the Hayward fault in the San Francisco Bay region of California. The seismic risk associated with creeping faults such as the Hayward fault will depend in part on the net rate of moment accu- mulation (slip deficit) on the fault. Using a visco-elastic finite-element model driven by far field plate motions, we have investigated how the specific geometry of locked and free portions of the fault, and the interactions between the fault zone and the sur- rounding lithosphere influence creep on the fault plane and thus the seismic risk. In contrast to previous studies of the effects of the geometry of locked patches on the surface creep rate that specified rates on those patches, we specify only "creepable" regions and allow the system to adjust the creep rate. With our approach, we can infer fault zone geometries and physical properties that can produce the observed surface creep on the Hayward fault letting the rheology, geometry, and mechanics of sys- tem determine patterns of creep on the fault plane. Our results show that the creep rate decreases smoothly moving toward the locked patches. This leads to "creepable" (low friction) areas that accumulate a high slip deficit as compared to other low fric- tion segments of the fault. A comparison of the creep pattern from our results with Hayward fault micro-seismicity indicates that events cluster in the "creepable" re- gions with a creeping-velocity gradient that leads to a significant strain accumulation rate in the elastic material surrounding the creeping fault. This correlation provides an additional tool to map deformation patterns and strain accumulation on the fault. Micro-seismicity, surface deformation, and geodynamic modeling combine to allow us to refine our estimation of net

  18. Viscous Creep in Dry Unconsolidated Gulf of Mexico Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Zoback, M. D.

    2002-12-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate creep characteristics of dry unconsolidated shale recovered from the pathfinder well, Gulf of Mexico (GOM). We subjected jacketed cylindrical specimens (25.4 mm diameter) to hydrostatic pressure that increased from 10 to 50 MPa in steps of 5 MPa. We kept the pressure constant in each step for at least 6 hours and measured axial and lateral strains (provided by LVDTs) and ultrasonic velocities (provided by seismic-wave transducers). The dry shale exhibited pronounced creep strain at all pressure levels, indicating that the dry frame of the shale possesses an intrinsic viscous property. Interestingly, the creep behavior of the shale is different above and below 30 MPa confining pressure. Above 30 MPa, the amount of creep strain in 6 hours is nearly constant with equal pressurization steps, indicating a linear viscous rheology. Below 30 MPa, the amount of creep increases linearly as pressure is raised in constant incremental steps, suggesting that the creep deformation accelerates as pressure increases within this pressure range. Thus, the general creep behavior of the GOM shale is characterized by a bilinear dependence on pressure magnitude. This creep characteristic is quite different from that observed in unconsolidated reservoir sands (Hagin and Zoback, 2002), which exhibited nearly constant amount of creep regardless of the pressure magnitude for equal increasing steps of pressure. The shale exhibits a lack of creep (and nearly negligible strain recovery) when unloaded, suggesting that the creep strain is irrecoverable and can be considered viscoplastic deformation. SEM observations show that the major mechanism of compaction of the dry shale appears to be packing of clay and a progressive collapse of pore (void) spaces. Creep compaction is considerably more significant than compaction that occurs instantaneously, indicating that the process of shale compaction is largely time-dependent.

  19. Systems and methods for forming defects on graphitic materials and curing radiation-damaged graphitic materials

    DOEpatents

    Ryu, Sunmin; Brus, Louis E.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Liu, Haitao

    2012-09-25

    Systems and methods are disclosed herein for forming defects on graphitic materials. The methods for forming defects include applying a radiation reactive material on a graphitic material, irradiating the applied radiation reactive material to produce a reactive species, and permitting the reactive species to react with the graphitic material to form defects. Additionally, disclosed are methods for removing defects on graphitic materials.

  20. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  1. Graphite filament wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Damico, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Filament wound NOL rings, 4-inch and 8-inch diameter closed-end vessels involving three epoxy resin systems and three graphite fibers were tested to develop property data and fabrication technology for filament wound graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst tests at room temperature. Manufacturing parameters were established for tooling, winding, and curing that resulted in the development of a pressure/vessel performance factor (pressure x volume/weight) or more than 900,000 in. for an oblate spheroid specimen.

  2. Pyrolytic graphite collector development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Pyrolytic graphite promises to have significant advantages as a material for multistage depressed collector electrodes. Among these advantages are lighter weight, improved mechanical stiffness under shock and vibration, reduced secondary electron back-streaming for higher efficiency, and reduced outgassing at higher operating temperatures. The essential properties of pyrolytic graphite and the necessary design criteria are discussed. This includes the study of suitable electrode geometries and methods of attachment to other metal and ceramic collector components consistent with typical electrical, thermal, and mechanical requirements.

  3. Synthetic Metals from Intercalated Graphite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-09

    Studies of the Structure of SbCl 5Graphite Inter- calation Compounds", L.E. McNeil, J. Steinbeck, L. Salamanca- Riba and G. Dresselhaus, Bull. APS 29...Graphite Intercalation Compounds", L.E. McNeil, J. Steinbeck, L. Salamanca- Riba and G. Dresselhaus, Phys. Rev. B31, 2451 (1985). 12. "Non-Ohmic Transport...Boston (1984), p. 149. 16. "High Resolution Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Diffraction Studies on SbCI5 - GIC", G. Roth, L. Salamanca- Riba , A.R. Kortan, G

  4. Annealing Effects on Creep and Rupture of Polycrystalline Alumina-Based Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, J. C.; Yun, H. M.; Morscher, G. N.; DiCarlo, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Continuous-length polycrystalline aluminum-oxide-based fibers are being considered as reinforcements for advanced high-temperature composite materials. For these fine-grained fibers, basic issues arise concerning grain growth and microstructural instability during composite fabrication and the resulting effects on the fiber's thermo-mechanical properties. To examine these issues, commercially available Nextel 610 (alumina) and Altex (alumina-silica) fibers were annealed at 1100 and 1300 C for up to 100 hr in air. Changes in fiber microstructure, fiber tensile creep, stress rupture, and bend stress relaxation (BSR) that occurred with annealing were then determined. BSR tests were also used to compare as-received and annealed fibers to other polycrystalline oxide fibers. Annealing was shown to have a significant effect, particularly on the Altex fiber, and caused it to have increased creep resistance.

  5. Creep of Nearly Lamellar TiAl Alloy Containing W

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Hsiung, L M; Nieh, T

    2004-04-08

    Effects of W on the creep resistance of two nearly fully lamellar TiAl alloys with 1.0 and 2.0 at.%W have been investigated. In the low stress regime (LS) a nearly quadratic (1.5creep behavior was observed. It is found that the addition of W can improve the creep resistance; however, the addition of excess W can result in the formation of {beta} phase, which produces an adverse effect on the creep strength.

  6. Contribution to irradiation creep arising from gas-driven bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, C.H.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    In a previous paper the relationship was defined between void swelling and irradiation creep arising from the interaction of the SIPA and SIG creep-driven deformation and swelling-driven deformation was highly interactive in nature, and that the two contributions could not be independently calculated and then considered as directly additive. This model could be used to explain the recent experimental observation that the creep-swelling coupling coefficient was not a constant as previously assumed, but declined continuously as the swelling rate increased. Such a model thereby explained the creep-disappearance and creep-damping anomalies observed in conditions where significant void swelling occurred before substantial creep deformation developed. At lower irradiation temperatures and high helium/hydrogen generation rates, such as found in light water cooled reactors and some fusion concepts, gas-filled cavities that have not yet exceeded the critical radius for bubble-void conversion should also exert an influence on irradiation creep. In this paper the original concept is adapted to include such conditions, and its predictions then compared with available data. It is shown that a measurable increase in the creep rate is expected compared to the rate found in low gas-generating environments. The creep rate is directly related to the gas generation rate and thereby to the neutron flux and spectrum.

  7. Micromechanical modeling of microstructural damage in creeping alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Argon, A.S.

    1984-11-15

    Fracture under service conditions at high temperatures in structures undergoing creep deformation is intergranular. Cavities on grain boundaries are produced on interfaces of hard particles during transient sliding of grain boundaries. The growth of grain boundary cavities by a combination of continuum creep and diffusional flow is often constrained by the creep deformation of the surrounding grain matrix. The constrained growth and linking of grain boundary cavities produces isolated cracked grain boundary facets which continue to grow by continuum creep and in the process accelerate overall creep flow. Cracked grain boundary facets are the principal form of creep damage, and their density per unit volume can be taken as the parameter characterizing creep damage. This damage parameter can be incorporated into three-dimensional constitutive relations of creep deformation, and these relations can be used in large strain finite element programs to solve complex engineering problems of creeping structures. All the microstructural mechanics that enter into the above description have been verified in a selection of key experiments on cavitation and crack growth.

  8. Preparation of creep data sheet: Material strength data sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Chiaki; Yagi, Koichi; Ikeda, Sadao; Ito, Hiroshi; Baba, Eiji; Shimizu, Masaru; Tanaka, Hideo; Yokokawa, Kenji; Nagai, Hideo; Kanamaru, Osamu

    1993-01-01

    Continuing from the first and the second term, creep rupture data sheet on metals for high temperatures was continued targeting for 100,000 hours. Creep strain data sheet for elastic analysis, conceived in the second term was carried out this term. Additionally, research was planned into the Cr group steel, which is increasingly in demand for high temperature equipment, and material sampling and testing commenced accordingly. In 1986, the creep data sheet (B Version) was published for the first time, including the creep rupture data exceeding final target of 100,000 hours. Since then, B versions were published on 12 different materials this term. There has been much research using the data from creep data sheets and test samples, including creep strain characteristics, stress relaxation characteristics, creep rupture characteristics and life estimate, with substantial results. In the creep test technology aiming for highly reliable data, deterioration factors of thermocouples were investigated. The results from creep data sheets and related research contributed to improvement in strength reliability of metals at high temperatures.

  9. Creep Behavior of Anisotropic Functionally Graded Rotating Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattan, Minto; Chamoli, Neeraj; Singh, Satya Bir; Gupta, Nishi

    2013-08-01

    The creep behavior of an anisotropic rotating disc of functionally gradient material (FGM) has been investigated in the present study using Hill's yield criteria and the creep behavior in this case is assumed to follow Sherby's constitutive model. The stress and strain rate distributions are calculated for disc having different types of anisotropy and the results obtained are compared graphically. It is concluded that the anisotropy of the material has a significant effect on the creep behavior of the FGM disc. It is also observed that the FGM disc shows better creep behavior than the non-FGM disc.

  10. Creep behaviour of Cu-30 percent Zn at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    The present, intermediate-temperature (573-823 K) range investigation of creep properties for single-phase Cu-30 percent Zn alpha-brass observed inverse, linear, and sigmoidal primary-creep transients above 573 K under stresses that yield minimum creep rates in the 10 to the -7th to 2 x 10 to the -4th range; normal primary creep occurred in all other conditions. In conjunction with a review of the pertinent literature, a detailed analysis of these data suggests that no clearly defined, classes M-to-A-to-M transition exists in this alloy notwithstanding the presence of both classes' characteristics under nominally similar stresses and temperatures.

  11. RECOVERY OF VALUABLE MATERIAL FROM GRAPHITE BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Fromm, L.W. Jr.

    1959-09-01

    An electrolytic process for recovering uranium from a graphite fuel element is described. The uraniumcontaining graphite body is disposed as the anode of a cell containing a nitric acid electrolyte and a 5 amp/cm/sup 2/ current passed to induce a progressive disintegration of the graphite body. The dissolved uranium is quickly and easily separated from the resulting graphite particles by simple mechanical means, such as centrifugation, filtration, and decontamination.

  12. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F. M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana; Makarova, Tatiana; Mombrú, Álvaro W.

    2012-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm-1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  13. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Albert J.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a brazing material for joining graphite structures that can be used at temperatures up to about 2800.degree. C. The brazing material formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600.degree. C. with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800.degree. C. so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. This brazing temperature for hafnium carbide is considerably less than the eutectic temperature of hafnium carbide of about 3150.degree. C. The brazing composition also incorporates the thermosetting resin so that during the brazing operation the graphite structures may be temporarily bonded together by thermosetting the resin so that machining of the structures to final dimensions may be completed prior to the completion of the brazing operation. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures joined thereby and also provides a joint of sufficient integrity so as to at least correspond with the strength and other properties of the graphite.

  14. High speed hydrogen/graphite interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Hamman, R.; Sharma, O. P.; Harrje, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of a research program on high speed hydrogen/graphite interaction are presented. Major areas discussed are: (1) theoretical predictions of hydrogen/graphite erosion rates; (2) high temperature, nonequilibrium hydrogen flow in a nozzle; and (3) molecular beam studies of hydrogen/graphite erosion.

  15. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  16. CMB-13 research on carbon and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    The research on graphite and carbon for this period is reported. Topics discussed include: effects of grinding on the Santa Marie graphites, properties and purities of coal-tar, resin-bonded graphite, carbonization of resin components, and glass-like carbon filler.

  17. Graphitization behaviour of chemically derived graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Long, Donghui; Li, Wei; Qiao, Wenming; Miyawaki, Jin; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao; Ling, Licheng

    2011-09-01

    Graphene sheets were prepared via chemical reduction of graphite oxides and then graphitized at 2800 °C. The structure changes from pristine graphite to graphitized graphene sheets were monitored using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the graphitized graphene sheets exhibited relatively low degree of graphitization and high level of structural defects. XPS spectra revealed that oxygen functionalities could be completely eliminated after graphitization. Morphology observations indicated that graphitization could induce the coalescence and connection of the crumpled graphene agglomerations into compressed grains. The connections included the joint of graphitic sheets along the c-axis with van der Waals force between graphitic sheets and the joint of sheets in the in-plane with covalent bond between carbon atoms. New structures such as the formation of loop at the tip of graphene sheets and the formation of 3D concentric graphene nanoparticles occurred in the graphitized graphene sheets, as a result of self-organization to achieve their lowest potential energy. Our findings should provide some experimental implications for understanding of graphitization behaviour and thermal stability of strictly 2D graphene monolayers.

  18. Collect Available Creep-Fatigue Data and Study Existing Creep-Fatigue Evaluation Procedures for Grade 91 and Hastelloy XR

    SciTech Connect

    Tai Asayama; Yukio Tachibana

    2007-09-30

    This report describes the results of investigation on Task 5 of DOE/ASME Materials Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 5 is to collect available creep-fatigue data and study existing creep-fatigue evaluation procedures for Grade 91 steel and Hastelloy XR. Part I of this report is devoted to Grade 91 steel. Existing creep-fatigue data were collected (Appendix A) and analyzed from the viewpoints of establishing a creep-fatigue procedure for VHTR design. A fair amount of creep-fatigue data has been obtained and creep-fatigue phenomena have been clarified to develop design standards mainly for fast breeder reactors. Following this, existing creep-fatigue procedures were studied and it was clarified that the creep-fatigue evaluation procedure of the ASME-NH has a lot of conservatisms and they were analyzed in detail from the viewpoints of the evaluation of creep damage of material. Based on the above studies, suggestions to improve the ASME-NH procedure along with necessary research and development items were presented. Part II of this report is devoted to Hastelloy XR. Existing creep-fatigue data used for development of the high temperature structural design guideline for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) were collected. Creep-fatigue evaluation procedure in the design guideline and its application to design of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was described. Finally, some necessary research and development items in relation to creep-fatigue evaluation for Gen IV and VHTR reactors were presented.

  19. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of a continuous strand, swirl mat reinforced polymer composite in automotive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1998-12-31

    Creep and creep-rupture behavior of an isocyanurate based polyurethane matrix with a continuous strand, swirl mat E-glass reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications. The material under stress was exposed to various automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on its creep and creep-rupture properties. Proposed design guide lines and stress reduction factors were developed for various automotive environments. These composites are considered candidate structural materials for light weight and fuel efficient automobiles of the future.

  20. Accelerated viscoelastic characterization of T300-5208 graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Brinson, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    A viscoelastic response scheme for the accelerated characterization of polymer-based composite laminates in applied to T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. The response of uni-directional specimens is modeled. The transient component of the viscoelastic creep compliance is assumed to follow a power law approximation. A recursive relationship is developed, based upon the Schapery single-integral equation, which allows approximation of a continuous time-varying uniaxial load using discrete steps in stress. The viscoelastic response of T300/5208 to transverse normal and shear stresses is determined unsing 90 deg and 10 deg off-axis tensile specimens. In each case the seven viscoelastic material parameters required in the analysis are determined experimentally using short-term creep and creep recovery tests. It is shown that an accurate measure of the power law exponent is crucial for accurate long-term prediction. A short term test cycle selection procedure is proposed, which should provide useful guidelines for the evaluation of other viscoelastic materials.

  1. Fabrication of Reticulated Graphitic Foam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    mesophase pitch (MP). Mesophase pitch is...goes through several heat treatments to stabilize the mesophase pitch , burn out the polyurethane, carbonize and finally graphitize the foam, all the while maintaining the same morphology as the initial polyurethane foam....struts gives some initial molecular orientation. The dipped foam is dried, leaving behind a the polyurethane foam coated with the pitch . The foam

  2. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  3. Igneous Graphite in Enstatite Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1997-01-01

    Igneous graphite. a rare constituent in terrestrial mafic and ultramafic rocks. occurs in three EH and one EL enstatite chondrite impact-melt breccias as 2-150 Ilm long euhedrallaths. some with pyramidal terminations. In contrast. graphite in most enstatite chondrites exsolved from metallic Fe-Ni as polygonal. rounded or irregular aggregates. Literature data for five EH chondrites on C combusting at high temperatures show that Abee contains the most homogeneous C isotopes (i.e. delta(sup 13)C = -8.1+/-2.1%); in addition. Abee's mean delta(sup l3)C value is the same as the average high-temperature C value for the set of five EH chondrites. This suggests that Abee scavenged C from a plurality of sources on its parent body and homogenized the C during a large-scale melting event. Whereas igneous graphite in terrestrial rocks typically forms at relatively high pressure and only moderately low oxygen fugacity (e.g., approx. 5 kbar. logfO2, approx. -10 at 1200 C ). igneous graphite in asteroidal meteorites formed at much lower pressures and oxygen fugacities.

  4. Modelling the graphite fracture mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquemoud, C.; Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2012-07-01

    In order to define a design criterion for graphite components, it is important to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the graphite fracture, to include them in a more effective modelling. In a first step, a large panel of experiments have been realised in order to build up an important database; results of tensile tests, 3 and 4 point bending tests on smooth and notched specimens have been analysed and have demonstrated an important geometry related effects on the behavior up to fracture. Then, first simulations with an elastic or an elastoplastic bilinear constitutive law have not made it possible to simulate the experimental fracture stress variations with the specimen geometry, the fracture mechanisms of the graphite being at the microstructural scale. That is the reason why a specific F.E. model of the graphite structure has been developed in which every graphite grain has been meshed independently, the crack initiation along the basal plane of the particles as well as the crack propagation and coalescence have been modelled too. This specific model has been used to test two different approaches for fracture initiation: a critical stress criterion and two criteria of fracture mechanic type. They are all based on crystallographic considerations as a global critical stress criterion gave unsatisfactory results. The criteria of fracture mechanic type being extremely unstable and unable to represent the graphite global behaviour up to the final collapse, the critical stress criterion has been preferred to predict the results of the large range of available experiments, on both smooth and notched specimens. In so doing, the experimental observations have been correctly simulated: the geometry related effects on the experimental fracture stress dispersion, the specimen volume effects on the macroscopic fracture stress and the crack propagation at a constant stress intensity factor. In addition, the parameters of the criterion have been related to

  5. Failure by Creep Cracking and Creep Fatigue Interaction in Nickel Base Superalloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    S * - . ’I 14 The result in (12) shows that Nf 1/A p when cumulative creep damage is the mechanism of failure (in low-cycle-fatigue, Coffin - Manson ...L. C. Coffin Jr. Am. S,,c. Test. have poor resistance to cavitation. Apparently, at Mater. Spec. Tech. Publ. 520, 112(1972). least in alloys of Cu and

  6. Correlation of creep rate with microstructural changes during high temperature creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Sommers, B. R.; Lytton, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted on Haynes 188 cobalt-base alloy and alpha titanium. The tests on Haynes 188 were conducted at 1600 F and 1800 F for stresses from 3 to 20 ksi, and the as-received, mill-annealed results were compared to specimens given 5%, 10%, and 15% room temperature prestrains and then annealed one hour at 1800 F. The tests on alpha titanium were performed at 7,250 and 10,000 psi at 500 C. One creep test was done at 527 C and 10,000 psi to provide information on kinetics. Results for annealed titanium were compared to specimens given 10% and 20% room temperature prestrains followed by 100 hours recovery at 550 C. Electron microscopy was used to relate dislocation and precipitate structure to the creep behavior of the two materials. The results on Haynes 188 alloy reveal that the time to reach 0.5% creep strain at 1600 F increases with increasing prestrain for exposure times less than 1,000 hours, the increase at 15% prestrain being more than a factor of ten.

  7. Variations in creep rate along the Hayward Fault, California, interpreted as changes in depth of creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Galehouse, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Variations ill surface creep rate along the Hayward fault are modeled as changes in locking depth using 3D boundary elements. Model creep is driven by screw dislocations at 12 km depth under the Hayward and other regional faults. Inferred depth to locking varies along strike from 4-12 km. (12 km implies no locking.) Our models require locked patches under the central Hayward fault, consistent with a M6.8 earthquake in 1868, but the geometry and extent of locking under the north and south ends depend critically on assumptions regarding continuity and creep behavior of the fault at its ends. For the northern onshore part of the fault, our models contain 1.4-1.7 times more stored moment than the model of Bu??rgmann et al. [2000]; 45-57% of this stored moment resides in creeping areas. It is important for seismic hazard estimation to know how much of this moment is released coseismically or as aseismic afterslip.

  8. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  9. Catalytic properties of lamellar compounds of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Yu. N.; Vol'pin, M. E.

    1981-05-01

    In heterogenous catalysis, the supports derived from graphite and carbon-graphite materials constitute a unique and exceptionally attractive group. The lamellar compounds of graphite with various kinds of electron acceptors and donors show catalytic activities on the following reactions: the oxidation of organic compounds with molecular oxygen, many sorts of polymerization, alcohol and formic acid dehydrogenation, hydrogenation and isomerization of olefins and acetylenes, ammonia synthesis from nitrogen and hydrogen, and also CO hydrogenation. Furthermore, the transition metal lamellar compounds of graphite are highly active catalysts in the process of the graphite-to-diamond conversion.

  10. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of research for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are presented. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a glass matrix.

  11. On the superconductivity of graphite interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquinazi, P.; Heikkilä, T. T.; Lysogorskiy, Y. V.; Tayurskii, D. A.; Volovik, G. E.

    2014-11-01

    We propose an explanation for the appearance of superconductivity at the interfaces of graphite with Bernal stacking order. A network of line defects with flat bands appears at the interfaces between two slightly twisted graphite structures. Due to the flat band the probability to find high temperature superconductivity at these quasi one-dimensional corridors is strongly enhanced. When the network of superconducting lines is dense it becomes effectively two-dimensional. The model provides an explanation for several reports on the observation of superconductivity up to room temperature in different oriented graphite samples, graphite powders as well as graphite-composite samples published in the past.

  12. Optimized Conditioning of Activated Reactor Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, G.; Doehring, L.; Pauli, H.; Beer, H.-F.

    2002-02-25

    The research reactor DIORIT at the Paul Scherrer Institute was decommissioned in 1993 and is now being dismantled. One of the materials to be conditioned is activated reactor graphite, approximately 45 tons. A cost effective conditioning method has been developed. The graphite is crushed to less than 6 mm and added to concrete and grout. This graphite concrete is used as matrix for embedding dismantling waste in containers. The waste containers that would have been needed for separate conditioning and disposal of activated reactor graphite are thus saved. Applying the new method, the cost can be reduced from about 55 SFr/kg to about 17 SFr/kg graphite.

  13. Design related aspects in advanced nuclear fission plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    Important issues to be considered for design of future reactors are: extrapolation of stress rupture data, creep-fatigue, negligible creep, damage monitoring. The paper highlights some new developments taking examples from a martensitic steel (mod 9% Cr), oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and nickel-base superalloys. Traditional approaches to extrapolation of (thermal) stress rupture data like Larson-Miller Parameter or Monkman-Grant rule seem to be valid concepts also for advanced reactors. However, a significant influence of cyclic softening on creep rates and stress rupture data can be expected as shown for grade 91. This is particularly true for creep-fatigue interactions. Based on cyclic stress-strain behaviour it is also possible to get very good life-time predictions under creep-fatigue with a strain range separation (inelastic fatigue and creep ranges) technique which could replace the currently used linear life fraction rule. Results from in-beam irradiation creep reveal no significant influence of dispersoid size. It can be assumed that irradiation creep is a matrix property. Finally it is shown that micro-sample testing of exposed material could be used as an advanced method for damage assessment in future nuclear power plants.

  14. Mechanical response of ceramics to creep loading

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, W.R.

    1983-08-01

    The mechanical response of small, semi-elliptical, identification-induced surface cracks in fine-grain alumina was studied. The deformation behavior of the crack tip region was monitored using crack opening and surface displacements. Results indicate values of the secondary creep exponent, n, between 1.5 and 2 with a temperature dependence consistent with secondary creep data from the same material. Crack growth was measured at 1300 and 1400/sup 0/C and a narrow power-law growth regime was revealed. Again the power-law exponent and activation energy were very close to creep values. Asymptotic behavior was exhibited near both K/sub Ic/ and K/sub th/, the crack growth threshold. The threshold occurred near 0.4 K/sub Ic/, independent of temperature. Crack tip damage in the form of grain boundary cavities growing by diffusion was responsible for crack extension. The damage also exerts a strong influence on the displacement field as predicted by recent theories. The crack growth threshold is preceded by a transition in the size and distribution of damage. At K/sub I/ near K/sub Ic/ the damage is restricted to a few facets directly ahead of the crack tip. Near K/sub th/ damage concentrates in side-lobes far ahead of the crack tip and at angles between 20/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/ from the plane of the crack. The transition between frontal and side-lobe damage is anticipated to be moderately dependent on grain size. 34 figures.

  15. Buckling Analysis in Creep Conditions: Review and Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Turbat, Andre; Drubay, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    In the case of structures operating at high temperature in normal or accidental conditions, the influence of creep has to be considered at the design stage because this phenomenon may reduce the lifetime significantly. This is true in particular for buckling analysis: in creep conditions, the buckling sometimes occurs after a long period under a compressive load which is lower than the critical load assessed when considering an instantaneous buckling. The main reason is that creep deformations induce an amplification of the initial geometrical imperfections and consequently a reduction of the buckling load. Some Design Codes incorporate special rules and/or methods to take creep buckling into account. Creep buckling analysis methods aim at evaluating critical loading for a given hold period with creep or alternatively critical creep time for a given loading. The Codes where creep buckling is considered also define margins with respect to critical loading: it shall be demonstrated that creep instability will not occur during the whole lifetime when multiplying the specified loading by a coefficient (design factor) depending on the situation level. For the design of NPP, specific creep buckling rules exist in the US, France and Russia. In the US, ASME, Section III, Subsection NH, which is dedicated to high temperature components design, provides limits which are applicable to general geometrical configurations and loading conditions that may cause buckling due to creep behaviour of the material. For load-controlled time-dependent creep buckling, the design factors to apply to the specified loadings are 1.5 for levels A, B or C service loadings and 1.25 for level D service loadings. A design factor is not required in the case of purely strain-controlled buckling. No specific method is provided to obtain critical loading or critical time for creep instability. In France, creep buckling rules included in RCC-MR, Chapter RB or RC 3200 are similar to those of ASME

  16. General observation of lithium intercalation into graphite in ethylene-carbonate-free superconcentrated electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuki; Usui, Kenji; Chiang, Ching Hua; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Furukawa, Keizo; Yamada, Atsuo

    2014-07-23

    Lithium-ion batteries have exclusively employed an ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolyte to ensure the reversibility of the graphite negative electrode reaction. Because of the limitation of electrolyte compositions, there has been no remarkable progress in commercial lithium-ion batteries despite active research on positive electrode materials. Herein, we present a salt-superconcentrating strategy as a simple and effective method of universalizing a graphite negative electrode reaction in various organic solvents. A dilute electrolyte (e.g., 1 mol dm(-3)) of sulfoxide, ether, and sulfone results in solvent cointercalation and/or severe electrolyte decomposition at a graphite electrode, whereas their superconcentrated electrolyte (e.g., >3 mol dm(-3)) allows for highly reversible lithium intercalation into graphite. We have found a unique coordination structure in the superconcentrated solution and an anion-based inorganic SEI film on the cycled graphite electrode, which would be the origin of the reversible graphite negative electrode reaction without EC. Our salt-superconcentrating strategy, expanding the graphite negative electrode reaction in various organic solvents other than EC, will contribute to the development of advanced lithium-ion batteries with high-voltage and fast-charging characters based on new EC-free functional electrolytes.

  17. Creep behavior of thin laminates of iron-cobalt alloys for use in switched reluctance motors and generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingers, Richard Todd

    The United States Air Force is in the process of developing magnetic bearings as well as an aircraft Integrated Power Unit and an Internal Starter/Generator for main propulsion engines. These developments are the driving force behind a new emphasis on high temperature, high strength magnetic materials for power applications. Analytical work, utilizing elasticity theory, in conjunction with design requirements, indicates a need for magnetic materials to have strengths in excess of 80 ksi up to about 1000sp°F. It is this combination of desired material characteristics that is the motivation for this effort to measure, model, and predict the creep behavior of such advanced magnetic materials. Hipercosp°ler Alloy 50HS, manufactured by Carpenter Technology Corporation, is one of the leading candidates for application and is studied in this effort by subjecting mechanical test specimens to a battery of tensile and creep tests. The tensile tests provide stress versus strain behaviors that clearly indicate: a yield point, a heterogeneous deformation described as Luders elongation, the Portevin-LeChatelier effect at elevated temperatures, and, most often, a section of homogeneous deformation that concluded with necking and fracture. Creep testing indicated two distinct types of behavior. The first was a traditional response with primary, secondary and tertiary stages, while the second type could be characterized by an abrupt increase in strain rate that acted as a transition from one steady state behavior to another. This second linear region was then followed by the tertiary stage. The relationship between the tensile response and the creep responses is discussed. Analyses of the mechanical behavior includes double linear regression of empirically modeled data, scanning electron microscopy for microstructural investigations, isochronous stress-strain relations, and constant strain rate testing to relate the tensile and creep test parameters. Also, elastic and creep

  18. The role of cobalt on the creep of Waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Chin, L.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Cobalt was systematically replaced with nickel in Waspaloy (which normally contains 13% Co) to determine the effects of cobalt on the creep behavior of this alloy. Effects of cobalt were found to be minimal on tensile strengths and microstructure. The creep resistance and the stress rupture resistance determined in the range from 704 to 760 C (1300 to 1400 C) were found to decrease as cobalt was removed from the standard alloy at all stresses and temperatures. Roughly a ten-fold drop in rupture life and a corresponding increase in minimum creep rate were found under all test conditions. Both the apparent creep activation energy and the matrix contribution to creep resistance were found to increase with cobalt. These creep effects are attributed to cobalt lowering the stacking fault energy of the alloy matrix. The creep resistance loss due to the removal of cobalt is shown to be restored by slightly increasing the gamma' volume fraction. Results are compared to a previous study on Udimet 700, a higher strength, higher gamma' volume fraction alloy with similar phase chemistry, in which cobalt did not affect creep resistance. An explanation for this difference in behavior based on interparticle spacing and cross-slip is presented.

  19. Cavitation contributes substantially to tensile creep in silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Luecke, W.E.; Wiederhorn, S.M.; Hockey, B.J.; Krause, R.F. Jr.; Long, G.G.

    1995-08-01

    During tensile creep of a hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitride, the volume fraction of cavities increases linearly with strain; these cavities produce nearly all of the measured strain. In contrast, compressive creep in the same stress and temperature range produces very little cavitation. A stress exponent that increases with stress ({dot {var_epsilon}} {proportional_to} {sigma}{sup n}, 2 < n < 7) characterizes the tensile creep response, while the compressive creep response exhibits a stress dependence of unity. Furthermore, under the same stress and temperature, the material creeps nearly 100 times faster in tension than in compression. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the cavities formed during tensile creep occur in pockets of residual crystalline silicate phase located at silicon nitride multigrain junctions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) from crept material quantifies the size distribution of cavities observed in TEM and demonstrates that cavity addition, rather than cavity growth, dominates the cavitation process. These observations are in accord with a model for creep based on the deformation of granular materials in which the microstructure must dilate for individual grains t slide past one another. During tensile creep the silicon nitride grains remain rigid; cavitation in the multigrain junctions allows the silicate to flow from cavities to surrounding silicate pockets, allowing the dilation of the microstructure and deformation of the material. Silicon nitride grain boundary sliding accommodates this expansion and leads to extension of the specimen. In compression, where cavitation is suppressed, deformation occurs by solution-reprecipitation of silicon nitride.

  20. Effect of unloading time on interrupted creep in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of unloading time on the interrupted creep behavior of polycrystalline copper specimens was investigated over the temperature range 298--773 K. Up to 553 K, cyclic creep acceleration could be explained in terms of deformation and hardening using a dislocation glide model with recovery during unloading being due to dislocation climb. At higher temperatures, recrystallization effects probably influence behavior.

  1. Computer program for predicting creep behavior of bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R.; Greenbaum, G.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, CRAB, uses finite-element method to calculate creep behavior and predict steady-state stresses in an arbitrary body of revolution subjected to a time-dependent axisymmetric load. Creep strains follow a time hardening law and a Prandtl-Reuss stress-strain relationship.

  2. Error correction for Moiré based creep measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yi; Harding, Kevin G.; Nieters, Edward J.; Tait, Robert W.; Hasz, Wayne C.; Piche, Nicole

    2014-05-01

    Due to the high temperatures and stresses present in the high-pressure section of a gas turbine, the airfoils experience creep or radial stretching. Nowadays manufacturers are putting in place condition-based maintenance programs in which the condition of individual components is assessed to determine their remaining lives. To accurately track this creep effect and predict the impact on part life, the ability to accurately assess creep has become an important engineering challenge. One approach for measuring creep is using moiré imaging. Using pad-print technology, a grating pattern can be directly printed on a turbine bucket, and it compares against a reference pattern built in the creep measurement system to create moiré interference pattern. The authors assembled a creep measurement prototype for this application. By measuring the frequency change of the moiré fringes, it is then possible to determine the local creep distribution. However, since the sensitivity requirement for the creep measurement is very stringent (0.1 micron), the measurement result can be easily offset due to optical system aberrations, tilts and magnification. In this paper, a mechanical specimen subjected to a tensile test to induce plastic deformation up to 4% in the gage was used to evaluate the system. The results show some offset compared to the readings from a strain gage and an extensometer. By using a new grating pattern with two subset patterns, it was possible to correct these offset errors.

  3. Out-of-pile creep behavior of uranium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, T. R.; Seltzer, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    Compression creep tests were investigated on various UC-based fuel materials having a variation in both density and composition. Specimens were prepared by casting and by hot pressing. Steady-state creep rates were measured under vacuum at 1400 to 1800 C in the stress range 500-4000 psi.

  4. Accelerated Creep Testing of High Strength Aramid Webbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Stnfield, Clarence E.; Valverde, Omar

    2012-01-01

    A series of preliminary accelerated creep tests were performed on four variants of 12K and 24K lbf rated Vectran webbing to help develop an accelerated creep test methodology and analysis capability for high strength aramid webbings. The variants included pristine, aged, folded and stitched samples. This class of webbings is used in the restraint layer of habitable, inflatable space structures, for which the lifetime properties are currently not well characterized. The Stepped Isothermal Method was used to accelerate the creep life of the webbings and a novel stereo photogrammetry system was used to measure the full-field strains. A custom MATLAB code is described, and used to reduce the strain data to produce master creep curves for the test samples. Initial results show good correlation between replicates; however, it is clear that a larger number of samples are needed to build confidence in the consistency of the results. It is noted that local fiber breaks affect the creep response in a similar manner to increasing the load, thus raising the creep rate and reducing the time to creep failure. The stitched webbings produced the highest variance between replicates, due to the combination of higher local stresses and thread-on-fiber damage. Large variability in the strength of the webbings is also shown to have an impact on the range of predicted creep life.

  5. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, A.J.; Dykes, N.L.

    1982-08-10

    A brazing material is described for joining graphite structures that can be used up to 2800/sup 0/C. The brazing material is formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600/sup 0/C with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800/sup 0/C so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures.

  6. Grain boundary engineering for intergranular fracture and creep resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, G.; Lehockey, E.M.; Lin, P.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of special grain boundary frequency on the bulk creep performance of 99.99% Ni at 84 MPa and 450{degrees}C (grain boundary sliding regime). Increasing the frequency of `special` grain boundaries (by thermomechanical processing) from 13% to 66% results in a 16-fold reduction in steady state creep rate and a 6-fold reduction in primary creep strain. Consistent with the previous intergranular fracture analysis, a moderate increase in special boundary frequency from 13% to 45% yields the greatest reduction in the creep strain parameters. Microstructural evaluation of the specimens following testing to 1.8% total strain showed that (1) cavitation had occurred exclusively at general grain boundaries (i.e., {Sigma}>29) and (2) no cavities were formed in the material containing 66% special grain boundaries. The results of this study provide considerable promise for a `grain boundary engineering` approach towards the mitigation of intergranular-creep and -fracture in practical engineering materials.

  7. Application Of Shakedown Analysis To Cyclic Creep Damage Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Shakedown analysis may be used to provide a conservative estimate of local rupture and hence cyclic creep damage for use in a creep-fatigue assessment. The shakedown analysis is based on an elastic-perfectly plastic material with a temperature-dependent pseudo yield stress defined to guarantee that a shakedown solution exists which does not exceed rupture stress and temperature for a defined life. The ratio of design life to the estimated maximum cyclic life is the shakedown creep damage. The methodology does not require stress classification and is also applicable to cycles over the full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Full cyclic creep and damage analysis is the alternative when shakedown analysis appears to be excessively conservative.

  8. Thermally activated creep and fluidization in flowing disordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabia, Samy; Detcheverry, François

    2016-11-01

    When submitted to a constant mechanical load, many materials display power law creep followed by fluidization. A fundamental understanding of these processes is still far from being achieved. Here, we characterize creep and fluidization on the basis of a mesoscopic viscoplastic model that includes thermally activated yielding events and a broad distribution of energy barriers, which may be lowered under the effect of a local deformation. We relate the creep exponent observed before fluidization to the width of barrier distribution and to the specific form of stress redistribution following yielding events. We show that Andrade creep is accompanied by local strain hardening driven by stress redistribution and find that the fluidization time depends exponentially on the applied stress. The simulation results are interpreted in the light of a mean-field analysis, and should help in rationalizing the creep phenomenology in disordered materials.

  9. Strong ground motions generated by earthquakes on creeping faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Ruth A.; Abrahamson, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    A tenet of earthquake science is that faults are locked in position until they abruptly slip during the sudden strain-relieving events that are earthquakes. Whereas it is expected that locked faults when they finally do slip will produce noticeable ground shaking, what is uncertain is how the ground shakes during earthquakes on creeping faults. Creeping faults are rare throughout much of the Earth's continental crust, but there is a group of them in the San Andreas fault system. Here we evaluate the strongest ground motions from the largest well-recorded earthquakes on creeping faults. We find that the peak ground motions generated by the creeping fault earthquakes are similar to the peak ground motions generated by earthquakes on locked faults. Our findings imply that buildings near creeping faults need to be designed to withstand the same level of shaking as those constructed near locked faults.

  10. On the creep constrained diffusive cavitation of grain boundary facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    CREEP rupture in a polycrystalline metal at a high temperature, by cavity growth on a number of grain boundary facets, is studied numerically. An axisymmetric model problem is analysed, in which a cavitating facet is represented as disk-shaped, and the model dimensions are taken to represent spacings between neighbouring cavitating facets. For the grains both power law creep and elastic deformations are taken into account, and the description of cavity growth is based on an approximate expression that incorporates the coupled influence of grain boundary diffusion and power law creep. The cases considered include creep-constrained cavity growth at low stresses, where the voids link up to form grain boundary cracks at relatively small overall strains, as well as the power law creep dominated behaviour at higher stress levels, where rupture occurs at large overall strains. The numerical results are compared with results based on various simplified analyses.

  11. Structural-phase state and creep of mixed nitride fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, I. I.; Tarasov, B. A.; Glagovsky, E. M.

    2016-04-01

    By the analysis of thermal creep data in conjunction with structural-phase state the most likely mechanisms of UN creep are considered. An equation relating the thermal and radiation creep of nitride fuel with such important parameters as plutonium content, porosity, grain size, the content of impurities of transition metals and oxygen, the carbon content has been suggested. At stationary operating parameters in reactor the creep of nitride fuel with technical purity is defined by the thermal component at mechanism of intergranular slip and by the radiation component, which plays a significant role at temperatures below 1100°C. Both types of creep in a first approximation have a linear dependence on the stress.

  12. Effect of misalignment on mechanical behavior of metals in creep. [computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the endochronic theory of viscoplasticity to creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation at the small strain and short time range produced the following results: (1) The governing constitutive equations for constant-strain-rate stress-strain behavior, creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation were derived by imposing appropriate constraints on the general constitutive equation of the endochronic theory. (2) A set of material constants was found which correlate strain-hardening, creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation. (3) The theory predicts with reasonable accuracy the creep and creep recovery behaviors at short time. (4) The initial strain history prior to the creep stage affects the subsequent creep significantly. (5) A critical stress was established for creep recovery. A computer program, written for the misalignment problem is reported.

  13. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of CLAM steel at 823 K and 873 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Boyu; Huang, Bo; Li, Chunjing; Liu, Shaojun; Xu, Gang; Zhao, Yanyun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is selected as the candidate structural material in Fusion Design Study (FDS) series fusion reactor conceptual designs. The creep property of CLAM steel has been studied in this paper. Creep tests have been carried out at 823 K and 873 K over a stress range of 150-230 MPa. The creep curves showed three creep regimes, primary creep, steady-state creep and tertiary creep. The relationship between minimum creep rate (ε˙min) and the applied stress (σ) could be described by Norton power law, and the stress exponent n was decreased with the increase of the creep temperature. The creep mechanism was analyzed with the fractographes of the rupture specimens which were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The coarsening of precipitates observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicated the microstructural degradation after creep test.

  14. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  15. TMI-2 lower head creep rupture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thinnes, G.L.

    1988-08-01

    The TMI-2 accident resulted in approximately 40% of the reactor's core melting and collecting on the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. The severity of the accident has raised questions about the margin of safety against rupture of the lower head in this accident since all evidence seems to indicate no major breach of the vessel occurred. Scoping heat transfer analyses of the relocated core debris and lower head have been made based upon assumed core melting scenarios and core material debris formations while in contact with the lower head. This report describes the structural finite element creep rupture analysis of the lower head using a temperature transient judged most likely to challenge the structural capacity of the vessel. This evaluation of vessel response to this transient has provided insight into the creep mechanisms of the vessel wall, a realistic mode of failure, and a means by which margin to failure can be evaluated once examination provides estimated maximum wall temperatures. Suggestions for more extensive research in this area are also provided. 6 refs., 15 figs.

  16. Testing Protocol for Module Encapsulant Creep (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.; Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.; Moseley, J. M.; Shah, Q.; Tamizhmani, G.; Sakurai, K.; Inoue, M.; Doi, T.; Masuda, A.

    2012-02-01

    Recently there has been an interest in the use of thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules to replace chemically crosslinked materials, e.g., ethylene-vinyl acetate. The related motivations include the desire to: reduce lamination time or temperature; use less moisture-permeable materials; or use materials with better corrosion characteristics. However, the use of any thermoplastic material in a high-temperature environment raises safety and performance concerns, as the standardized tests currently do not expose the modules to temperatures in excess of 85C, yet modules may experience temperatures above 100C in operation. Here we constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass mock modules using different encapsulation materials of which only two were designed to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with insulation on the back side in Arizona in the summer, and an identical set was exposed in environmental chambers. High precision creep measurements and performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials being in the melt state at some of the highest outdoor temperatures achievable, very little creep was seen because of their high viscosity, temperature heterogeneity across the modules, and in the case of the crystalline-silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet. These findings have very important implications for the development of IEC and UL qualification and safety standards, and in regards to the necessary level of cure during the processing of crosslinking encapsulants.

  17. Analysis of EST sequences suggests recent origin of allotetraploid colonial and creeping bentgrasses.

    PubMed

    Rotter, David; Bharti, Arvind K; Li, Huaijun Michael; Luo, Chongyuan; Bonos, Stacy A; Bughrara, Suleiman; Jung, Geunhwa; Messing, Joachim; Meyer, William A; Rudd, Stephen; Warnke, Scott E; Belanger, Faith C

    2007-08-01

    Advances in plant genomics have permitted the analysis of several members of the grass family, including the major domesticated species, and provided new insights into the evolution of the major crops on earth. Two members, colonial bentgrass (Agrostis capillaris L.) and creeping bentgrass (A. stolonifera L.) have only recently been domesticated and provide an interesting case of polyploidy and comparison to crops that have undergone human selection for thousands of years. As an initial step of characterizing these genomes, we have sampled roughly 10% of their gene content, thereby also serving as a starting point for the construction of their physical and genetic maps. Sampling mRNA from plants subjected to environmental stress showed a remarkable increase in transcription of transposable elements. Both colonial and creeping bentgrass are allotetraploids and are considered to have one genome in common, designated the A2 genome. Analysis of conserved genes present among the ESTs suggests the colonial and creeping bentgrass A2 genomes diverged from a common ancestor approximately 2.2 million years ago (MYA), thereby providing an enhanced evolutionary zoom in respect to the origin of maize, which formed 4.8 MYA, and tetraploid wheat, which formed only 0.5 MYA and is the progenitor of domesticated hexaploid wheat.

  18. A New Creep Constitutive Model for 7075 Aluminum Alloy Under Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Jiang, Yu-Qiang; Zhou, Hua-Min; Liu, Guan

    2014-12-01

    Exposure of aluminum alloy to an elastic loading, during "creep-aging forming" or other manufacturing processes at relatively high temperature, may lead to the lasting creep deformation. The creep behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy are investigated by uniaxial tensile creep experiments over wide ranges of temperature and external stress. The results show that the creep behaviors of the studied aluminum alloy strongly depend on the creep temperature, external stress, and creep time. With the increase of creep temperature and external stress, the creep strain increases quickly. In order to overcome the shortcomings of the Bailey-Norton law and θ projection method, a new constitutive model is proposed to describe the variations of creep strain with time for the studied aluminum alloy. In the proposed model, the dependences of creep strain on the creep temperature, external stress, and creep time are well taken into account. A good agreement between the predicted and measured creep strains shows that the established creep constitutive model can give an accurate description of the creep behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy. Meanwhile, the obtained stress exponent indicates that the creep process is controlled by the dislocation glide, which is verified by the microstructural observations.

  19. Numerical modeling of shallow fault creep triggered by nearby earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapha Mw 7.2 earthquake is the largest earthquake that strikes southern California in the last 18 years. It has triggered shallow fault creep on many faults in Salton Trough, Southern California, making it at least the 8th time in the last 42 years that a local or regional earthquake has done so. However, the triggering mechanism of fault creep and its implications to seismic hazard and fault mechanics is still poorly understood. For example, what determines the relative importance of static triggering and dynamic triggering of fault creep? What can we learn about the local frictional properties and normal stress from the triggering of fault creep? To understand the triggering mechanism and constrain fault frictional properties, we simulate the triggered fault creep on the Superstition Hills Fault (SHF), Salton Trough, Southern California. We use realistic static and dynamic shaking due to nearby earthquakes as stress perturbations to a 2D (in a 3D medium) planar fault model with rate-and-state frictional property variations both in depth and along strike. Unlike many previous studies, we focus on the simulation of triggered shallow fault creep instead of earthquakes. Our fault model can reproduce the triggering process, by static, dynamic , and combined stress perturbation. Preliminary results show that the magnitude of perturbation relative to the original stress level is an important parameter. In the static case, perturbation of 1% of normal stress trigger delayed fault creep whereas 10% of normal stress generate instantaneous creep. In the dynamic case, a change of two times in magnitude of perturbation can result in difference of triggered creep in several orders of magnitude. We explore combined triggering with different ratio of static and dynamic perturbation. The timing of triggering in a earthquake cycle is also important. With measurements on triggered creep on the SHF, we constrain local stress level and frictional parameters, which

  20. Evidence of graphitic AB stacking order of graphite oxides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae-Kyung; Lee, Yun Pyo; Lahaye, Rob J W E; Park, Min-Ho; An, Kay Hyeok; Kim, Ick Jun; Yang, Cheol-Woong; Park, Chong Yun; Ruoff, Rodney S; Lee, Young Hee

    2008-01-30

    Graphite oxide (GO) samples were prepared by a simplified Brodie method. Hydroxyl, epoxide, carboxyl, and some alkyl functional groups are present in the GO, as identified by solid-state 13C NMR, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Starting with pyrolytic graphite (interlayer separation 3.36 A), the average interlayer distance after 1 h of reaction, as determined by X-ray diffraction, increased to 5.62 A and then increased with further oxidation to 7.37 A after 24 h. A smaller signal in 13C CPMAS NMR compared to that in 13C NMR suggests that carboxyl and alkyl groups are at the edges of the flakes of graphite oxide. Other aspects of the chemical bonding were assessed from the NMR and XPS data and are discussed. AB stacking of the layers in the GO was inferred from an electron diffraction study. The elemental composition of GO prepared using this simplified Brodie method is further discussed.

  1. Testing and performance evaluation of T1000G/RS-14 graphite/polycyanate composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Starbuck, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a graphite fiber/polycyanate matrix composite material system, T1000G/RS-14, was evaluated by performing an extensive mechanical property test program. The test program included both static strength and long-term tests for creep, fatigue, and stress rupture. The system was evaluated at both ambient temperature and elevated temperatures. The specimens were machined from composite cylinders that had a unidirectional layup with all the fibers oriented in the hoop direction. The cylinders were fabricated using the wet-filament winding process. In general, the T1000G/RS-14 system demonstrated adequate static strengths for possible aerospace structural applications. The results from the static tests indicated that very high composite hoop tensile strengths can be achieved with this system at both ambient and elevated temperatures as high as 350{degree}F. However, in the long-term testing for compressive creep and tension-tension fatigue the results indicated a lower elevated temperature was required to minimize the risk of using this material system. Additional testing and analysis activities led to the selection of 275{degree}F as the desired temperature for future performance evaluation. Subsequent testing efforts for determining the resin and composite transverse compressive creep responses at 275{degrees}F indicated that excessive creep strain rates may still be a weakness of this system. In the long-term tests, sufficient data was generated from impregnated strand and composite ring stress-life testing, and composite ring tension-tension fatigue to determine failure probabilities for a given set of design requirements. The statistical analyses of the test data, in terms of determining failure probability curves, will be reported on in a separate report. However, it is expected that this material system will have a very low failure probability for stress rupture based on the collected stress-life data. Material responses that will require further

  2. Propagating episodic creep and the aseismic slip behavior of the Calaveras fault north of Hollister, California

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K.F.; Burford, R.O.; King, G.C.P.

    1981-05-10

    A detailed kinematic study of fault slip occurring from the surface to a depth of about 7 km on the Calaveras fault north of Hollister was conducted during the summer of 1977. The observations coincided with a period of propagating episodic fault creep activity sensed along the fault trace. Data used in the investigation consist of creepmeter records, near-field strainmeter observations, and high-resolution geodetic measurements, all collected contemporaneously over a period of 4 months. Detailed descriptions and analyses of the creepmeter and geodetic data have been presented elsewhere. The near-field strain measurements are here reported in detail, and their analysis draws upon the previous two data sets for support. The strainmeter observations are most sensitive to slip occurring in the upper 2 km; hence the emphasis of the paper is placed upon the role of propagating episode creep in the broad-scale behavior of the fault. The results suggest that propagating episodic fault creep as sensed along the fault trace is confined to the upper kilometer or so of the crust and represents the response of the surface layers to a longer-term form of episode aseismic slip occurring below. The mean form of the advancing rupture front within the upper kilometer is ostensibly the same as that indicated by records from the surface creepmeters. Evidence is presented, however, which suggests that propagating creep events may not always break the surface and may propagate at velocities much slower and at amplitudes significantly larger than those generally observed at the surface.

  3. Report on FY15 Alloy 617 SMT Creep-Fatigue Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Jetter, Robert I.; Baird, Seth T.; Pu, Chao; Sham, Sam

    2015-06-22

    For the temperature range of 990-950C, Alloy 617 is a candidate IHX structural material for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) because of its high temperature creep properties. Also, its superior strength over a broad temperature range also offers advantages for certain component applications. In order for the designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to propose a Code Case for use of Alloy 617 at elevated temperature in Section III of the ASME Code by September 2015. There has not been a new high temperature material approved for use in Section III for almost 20 years. The Alloy 617 Code Case effort would lead the way to establish a path for Code qualification of new high temperature materials of interest to other advanced SMRs. Creep-fatigue at elevated temperatures is the most damaging structural failure mode. In the past 40 years significant efforts have been devoted to the elevated temperature Code rule development in Section III, Subsection NH* of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, to ascertain conservative structural designs to prevent creep-fatigue failure. The current Subsection NH creep-fatigue procedure was established by the steps of (1) analytically obtaining a detailed stress-strain history, (2) comparing the stress and strain components to cyclic test results deconstructed into stress and strain quantities, and (3) recombining the results to obtain a damage function in the form of the so-called creep-fatigue damage-diagram. The deconstruction and recombination present difficulties in evaluation of test data and determination of cyclic damage in design. The uncertainties in these steps lead to the use of overly conservative design factors in the current creep-fatigue procedure. In addition, and of major significance to the

  4. 3He on preplated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Boronat, J.

    2016-10-01

    By using the diffusion Monte Carlo method, we obtained the full phase diagram of 3He on top of graphite preplated with a solid layer of 4He. All the 4He atoms of the substrate were explicitly considered and allowed to move during the simulation. We found that the ground state is a liquid of density 0.007 ±0.001 Å-2, in good agreement with available experimental data. This is significantly different from the case of 3He on clean graphite, in which both theory and experiment agree on the existence of a gas-liquid transition at low densities. Upon an increase in 3He density, we predict a first-order phase transition between a dense liquid and a registered 7/12 phase, the 4/7 phase being found metastable in our calculations. At larger second-layer densities, a final transition is produced to an incommensurate triangular phase.

  5. Graphite moderated (252)Cf source.

    PubMed

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Barros, Haydn; Greaves, Eduardo D; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    The Thorium molten-salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid-fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a (252)Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the (252)Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator.

  6. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Loyalka, Sudarshan; Ghosh, Tushar; Viswanath, Dabir; Walton, Kyle; Haffner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  7. Dispersive interactions in graphitic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, L. M.; Popescu, A.; Drosdoff, D.; Bondarev, I. V.

    2013-02-01

    The Casimir interaction between graphitic nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets, is investigated at the quantum mechanical limit (T = 0 K) using a quantum electrodynamical approach for absorbing and dispersive media. It is found that the nanotube/nanotube interaction in a double wall carbon nanotube configuration is profoundly affected by the collective low frequency excitations of individual nanotubes. It is shown that pronounced, low frequency peaks in the nanotube electron energy loss spectra are a main factor contributing to the strength of the intertube attraction. The graphene/graphene force is also investigated. It is obtained that the graphene optical transparency is the main reason for the reduced attraction as compared to the one for perfect metals. This study presents a unified approach for electromagnetic interactions in graphitic nanostructures, which is able to account for their unique electronic and response properties and geometry configurations.

  8. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  9. Diffusion creep in the mantle may create and maintain anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, John

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion creep is thought to play an important role in lower mantle deformation and hence must be understood in detail if Earth behaviour is to be explained. It is commonly claimed that diffusion creep gives rise to equant grain shapes and destroys any crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), so all physical properties would be isotropic. Some experiments on olivine support the first assertion but other minerals, and polyphase rocks, commonly show inequant grain shapes in nature and experiment even when diffusion creep is thought to be a major contribution to strain. Numerical models allow rigorous exploration of the effects of deformation under conditions not easily reached in experiments. A numerical model named 'DiffForm' (Wheeler & Ford 2007) gives insight into how grain shapes and microstructures evolve during diffusion creep. Modelling shows that whilst grains may initially rotate in apparently chaotic fashion during diffusion creep, such rotations slow down as grains become inequant. Consequently, an initial CPO (formed, for example, by dislocation creep at higher strain rates) will be decreased in intensity but not destroyed. Seismic anisotropy will decrease but not disappear (Wheeler 2009). Diffusion creep is also predicted to have intense mechanical anisotropy. In simple models diffusion creep is controlled entirely by diffusion and sliding along grain boundaries; there is no crystallographic influence. An aggregate of equant grains must then be mechanically isotropic, but a model microstructure with inequant grains has marked mechanical anisotropy (Wheeler 2010) - an effect related to the fact that grain boundary sliding is an intrinsic part of diffusion creep. That work was based on a very simple microstructure with a single inequant grain shape but I present here new results showing that for more complicated microstructures, mechanical anisotropy is intense even for quite modest grain elongations. There will be feedback between strain and

  10. Graphite/Thermoplastic-Pultrusion Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Frye, Mark W.; Johnson, Gary S.; Stanfield, Clarence E.

    1990-01-01

    Attachment to extruder produces thermoplastic-impregnated graphite tape. Consists of profile die, fiber/resin collimator, and crosshead die body. Die designed to be attached to commercially available extrusion machine capable of extruding high-performance thermoplastics. Simple attachment to commercial extruder enables developers of composites to begin experimenting with large numbers of proprietary resins, fibers, and hybrid composite structures. With device, almost any possible fiber/resin combination fabricated.

  11. Poco Graphite Mirror Metrology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently a lightweight mirror technology was tested at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optic Manufacturing Technology Center (MSFC, SOMTC). The mirror is a Poco Graphite CVD Si clad SiC substrate. It was tested for cryogenic (cryo) survivability to 20deg Kelvin in SOMTC's X-ray Calibration and Cryogenic Test Facility. The surface figure of the mirror was measured before and after cry0 cycling. The test technique and results are discussed.

  12. Identification of a possible superconducting transition above room temperature in natural graphite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Precker, Christian E.; Esquinazi, Pablo D.; Champi, Ana; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Zoraghi, Mahsa; Muiños-Landin, Santiago; Setzer, Annette; Böhlmann, Winfried; Spemann, Daniel; Meijer, Jan; Muenster, Tom; Baehre, Oliver; Kloess, Gert; Beth, Henning

    2016-11-01

    Measuring with high precision the electrical resistance of highly ordered natural graphite samples from a Brazil mine, we have identified a transition at ∼350 K with ∼40 K transition width. The step-like change in temperature of the resistance, its magnetic irreversibility and time dependence after a field change, consistent with trapped flux and flux creep, and the partial magnetic flux expulsion obtained by magnetization measurements, suggest the existence of granular superconductivity below 350 K. The zero-field virgin state can only be reached again after zero field cooling the sample from above the transition. Paradoxically, the extraordinarily high transition temperature we found for this and several other graphite samples is the reason why this transition remained undetected so far. The existence of well ordered rhombohedral graphite phase in all measured samples has been proved by x-rays diffraction measurements, suggesting its interfaces with the Bernal phase as a possible origin for the high-temperature superconductivity, as theoretical studies predicted. The localization of the granular superconductivity at these two dimensional interfaces prevents the observation of a zero resistance state or of a full Meissner state.

  13. Creep of water ices at planetary conditions: A compilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Many constitutive laws for the flow of ice have been published since the advent of the Voyager explorations of the outer solar system. Conflicting data have occasionally come from different laboratories, and refinement of experimental techniques has led to the publication of laws that supersede earlier ones. In addition, there are unpublished data from ongoing research that also amend the constitutive laws. Here we compile the most current laboratory-derived flow laws for water ice phases I, II, III, V, and VI, and ice I mixtures with hard particulates. The rheology of interest is mainly that of steady state, and the conditions reviewed are the pressures and temperatures applicable to the surfaces and interiors of icy moons of the outer solar system. Advances in grain-size-dependent creep in ices I and II as well as in phase transformations and metastability under differential stress are also included in this compilation. At laboratory strain rates the several ice polymorphs are rheologically distinct in terms of their stress, temperature, and pressure dependencies but, with the exception of ice III, have fairly similar strengths. Hard particulates strengthen ice I significantly only at high particulate volume fractions. Ice III has the potential for significantly affecting mantle dynamics because it is much weaker than the other polymorphs and its region of stability, which may extend metastably well into what is nominally the ice II field, is located near likely geotherms of large icy moons. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  15. Long-term monitoring of creep rate along the Hayward fault and evidence for a lasting creep response to 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, J.J.; Galehouse, J.S.; Simpson, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    We present results from over 30 yr of precise surveys of creep along the Hayward fault. Along most of the fault, spatial variability in long-term creep rates is well determined by these data and can help constrain 3D-models of the depth of the creeping zone. However, creep at the south end of the fault stopped completely for more than 6 years after the M7 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake (LPEQ), perhaps delayed by stress drop imposed by this event. With a decade of detailed data before LPEQ and a decade after it, we report that creep response to that event does indeed indicate the expected deficit in creep.

  16. Silicon Nitride Creep Under Various Specimen-Loading Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Holland, Frederic A.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive creep testing of a hot-pressed silicon nitride (NC 132) was performed at 1300 C in air using five different specimen-loading configurations: (1) pure tension, (2) pure compression, (3) four-point uniaxial flexure, (4) ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, and (5) ring-on-ring biaxial flexure. This paper reports experimental results as well as test techniques developed in this work. Nominal creep strain and its rate for a given nominal applied stress were greatest in tension, least in compression, and intermediate in uniaxial and biaxial flexure. Except for the case of compression loading, nominal creep strain generally decreased with time, resulting in a less-defined steady-state condition. Of the four creep formulations-power-law, hyperbolic sine, step, and redistribution--the conventional power-law formulation still provides the most convenient and reasonable estimation of the creep parameters of the NC 132 material. The data base to be obtained will be used to validate the NASA Glenn-developed design code CARES/Creep (ceramics analysis and reliability evaluation of structures and creep).

  17. Rate-Controlling Mechanisms in Five-Power-Law Creep

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. Kassner

    2004-04-20

    OAK-B135 Rate-Controlling Mechanisms in Five-Power-Law Creep. The initial grant emphasized the rate-controlling processes for five power-law creep. The effort has six aspects: (1) Theory of Taylor hardening from the Frank dislocation network in five power law substructures. (2) The dual dynamical and hardening nature of dislocations in five power law substructures. (3) Determination of the existence of long-range internal stress in five-power law creep dislocation substructures. (4) Dynamic recovery mechanisms associated with dislocation heterogeneities during five power law creep. (5) Versatility of five power law creep concept to other (hcp) crystal structures. (6) Writing of a book on ''Fundamental of Creep in Metals and Alloys'' by M.E. Kassner and Maria-Teresa Perez-Frado (postdoctoral scholar, funded by this project) Elsevier Press, 2004, in press. These areas are consistent with the original goals of this project as delineated in the original proposal to Basic Energy Sciences. The progress in each of these areas will be discussed separately and there will be an attempt to tie each aspect together so as to allow a summary regarding the conclusions with respect to the rate-controlling mechanisms of five power-law creep.

  18. Solder creep-fatigue interactions with flexible leaded parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.; Wen, L. C.; Mon, G. R.; Jetter, E.

    1992-01-01

    With flexible leaded parts, the solder-joint failure process involves a complex interplay of creep and fatigue mechanisms. To better understand the role of creep in typical multi-hour cyclic loading conditions, a specialized non-linear finite-element creep simulation computer program has been formulated. The numerical algorithm includes the complete part-lead-solder-PWB system, accounting for strain-rate dependence of creep on applied stress and temperature, and the role of the part-lead dimensions and flexibility that determine the total creep deflection (solder strain range) during stress relaxation. The computer program has been used to explore the effects of various solder creep-fatigue parameters such as lead height and stiffness, thermal-cycle test profile, and part/board differential thermal expansion properties. One of the most interesting findings is the strong presence of unidirectional creep-ratcheting that occurs during thermal cycling due to temperature dominated strain-rate effects. To corroborate the solder fatigue model predictions, a number of carefully controlled thermal-cycle tests have been conducted using special bimetallic test boards.

  19. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  20. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  1. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  2. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH METALLIC CARBIDES

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.A.

    1960-03-22

    A method for producing refractory coatings of metallic carbides on graphite was developed. In particular, the graphite piece to be coated is immersed in a molten solution of 4 to 5% by weight of zirconium, titanium, or niobium dissolved in tin. The solution is heated in an argon atmosphere to above 1400 deg C, whereby the refractory metal reacts with the surface of the graphite to form a layer of metalic carbide. The molten solution is cooled to 300 to 400 deg C, and the graphite piece is removed. Excess tin is wiped from the graphite, which is then heated in vacuum to above 2300 deg C. The tin vaporizes from the graphite surface, leaving the surface coated with a tenacious layer of refractory metallic carbide.

  3. Superlubricity of Fullerene Intercalated Graphite Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kouji; Tsuda, Daisuke; Itamura, Noriaki; Sasaki, Naruo

    2007-08-01

    A novel superlubric system of fullerene intercalated graphite composite is reported. First, it is clarified that fullerene intercalated graphite films exhibit an ultralow average friction force and an excellent friction coefficient μ <0.001 smaller than μ <0.002 for MoS2 and μ\\cong 0.001 for graphite. Next, it is demonstrated that superlubricity can be controlled by changing the intercalant species. The C60 intercalated graphite film shows much less maximum static friction force than the C70 intercalated graphite film. Finally, we propose one of the simple guidelines on designing a practical superlubric system-reduction in the contact area between the intercalated fullerene and the graphite sheet to the pointlike contact. Our newly developed superlubric system will contribute to solving energy and environmental problems.

  4. Creep-fatigue modelling in structural steels using empirical and constitutive creep methods implemented in a strip-yield model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Benjamin J.

    The phenomena of creep and fatigue have each been thoroughly studied. More recently, attempts have been made to predict the damage evolution in engineering materials due to combined creep and fatigue loading, but these formulations have been strictly empirical and have not been used successfully outside of a narrow set of conditions. This work proposes a new creep-fatigue crack growth model based on constitutive creep equations (adjusted to experimental data) and Paris law fatigue crack growth. Predictions from this model are compared to experimental data in two steels: modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and AISI 316L stainless steel. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a high-strength steel used in the construction of pressure vessels and piping for nuclear and conventional power plants, especially for high temperature applications. Creep-fatigue and pure creep experimental data from the literature are compared to model predictions, and they show good agreement. Material constants for the constitutive creep model are obtained for AISI 316L stainless steel, an alloy steel widely used for temperature and corrosion resistance for such components as exhaust manifolds, furnace parts, heat exchangers and jet engine parts. Model predictions are compared to pure creep experimental data, with satisfactory results. Assumptions and constraints inherent in the implementation of the present model are examined. They include: spatial discretization, similitude, plane stress constraint and linear elasticity. It is shown that the implementation of the present model had a non-trivial impact on the model solutions in 316L stainless steel, especially the spatial discretization. Based on these studies, the following conclusions are drawn: 1. The constitutive creep model consistently performs better than the Nikbin, Smith and Webster (NSW) model for predicting creep and creep-fatigue crack extension. 2. Given a database of uniaxial creep test data, a constitutive material model such as the one developed for

  5. Effect of Orientation on the Tensile and Creep Properties of Coarse-Grained INCONEL Alloy MA754

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier; Thomas M. Lillo

    2005-03-01

    Elevated temperature tensile and creep-rupture tests were performed on INCONEL MA754 in longitudinal and transverse orientations at temperatures from 700 to 1000°C. The transverse orientation was weaker and less ductile than the longitudinal orientation due to a higher grain boundary density perpendicular to the applied stress axis. This effect was especially pronounced in creep tests at 900 and 1000°C. Threshold creep behavior was observed for the longitudinal orientation, with stress exponents ranging from 29 to 40. Stress exponents in the long transverse orientation ranged from 24 at 800°C to 5 at 1000°C, indicating a temperature-varying deformation mechanism. Creep ductility in the transverse orientation was extremely low, less than 1 pct for higher temperature, lower stress conditions. Failure in all transverse specimens was controlled by grain boundary separation. Even in the relatively weak transverse direction, the strength of MA754 compares favorably with other alloys being considered for advanced power plant applications.

  6. Comparison of measured temperatures, thermal stresses and creep residues with predictions on a built-up titanium structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1987-01-01

    Temperature, thermal stresses, and residual creep stresses were studied by comparing laboratory values measured on a built-up titanium structure with values calculated from finite-element models. Several such models were used to examine the relationship between computational thermal stresses and thermal stresses measured on a built-up structure. Element suitability, element density, and computational temperature discrepancies were studied to determine their impact on measured and calculated thermal stress. The optimum number of elements is established from a balance between element density and suitable safety margins, such that the answer is acceptably safe yet is economical from a computational viewpoint. It is noted that situations exist where relatively small excursions of calculated temperatures from measured values result in far more than proportional increases in thermal stress values. Measured residual stresses due to creep significantly exceeded the values computed by the piecewise linear elastic strain analogy approach. The most important element in the computation is the correct definition of the creep law. Computational methodology advances in predicting residual stresses due to creep require significantly more viscoelastic material characterization.

  7. Overview of strategies for high-temperature creep and oxidation resistance of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Santella, Michael L; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the {approx}923 K to 1173 K (650 C to 900 C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale rather than the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni{sub 3}Al-L1{sub 2}, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  8. Overview of Strategies for High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation Resistance of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Santella, M. L.; Bei, H.; Maziasz, P. J.; Pint, B. A.

    2011-04-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the ~923 K to 1173 K (650 °C to 900 °C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al2O3 scale rather than the Cr2O3 scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe2(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni3Al-L12, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  9. An Approach for Impression Creep of Lead Free Microelectronic Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, Onofrio A.

    2002-06-01

    Currently, the microelectronics industry is transitioning from lead-containing to lead-free solders in response to legislation in the EU and Japan. Before an alternative alloy can be designated as a replacement for current Pb-Sn extensive testing must be accomplished. One major characteristic of the alloy that must be considered is creep. Traditionally, creep testing requires numerous samples and a long tin, which thwarts the generation of comprehensive creep databases for difficult to prepare samples such as microelectronic solder joints. However, a relatively new technique, impression creep enables us to rapidly generate creep data. This test uses a cylindrical punch with a flat end to make an impression on the surface of a specimen under constant load. The steady state velocity of the indenter is found to have the same stress and temperature dependence as the conventional unidirectional creep test using bulk specimens. This thesis examines impression creep tests of eutectic Sn-Ag. A testing program and apparatus was developed constructed based on a servo hydraulic test frame. The apparatus is capable of a load resolution of 0.01N with a stability of plus/minus 0.1N, and a displacement resolution of 0.05 microns with a stability of plus/minus 0.1 microns. Samples of eutectic Sn-Ag solder were reflowed to develop the microstructure used in microelectronic packaging. Creep tests were conducted at various stresses and temperatures and showed that coarse microstructures creep more rapidly than the microstructures in the tested regime.

  10. Interfacial Control of Creep Deformation in Ultrafine Lamellar TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M

    2002-11-26

    Solute effect on the creep resistance of two-phase lamellar TiAl with an ultrafine microstructure creep-deformed in a low-stress (LS) creep regime [where a linear creep behavior was observed] has been investigated. The resulted deformation substructure and in-situ TEM experiment revealed that interface sliding by the motion of pre-existing interfacial dislocations is the predominant deformation mechanism in LS creep regime. Solute segregation at lamellar interfaces and interfacial precipitation caused by the solute segregation result in a beneficial effect on the creep resistance of ultrafine lamellar TiAl in LS creep regime.

  11. Evidence of viscoplastic behavior of exfoliated graphite nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Hermida-Merino, Carolina; Pérez-Rodríguez, Martín; Piñeiro, Manuel M; Pastoriza-Gallego, María José

    2016-02-28

    The rheological behavior of ethylene glycol-based nanofluids containing exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets has been carried out using a cone-plate Physica MCR rheometer. Initial experiments based on flow curves were carried out, the flow curves were based on the controlled shear stress model, these tests show that the studied nanofluids present non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior with yield stress. Furthermore, linear viscoelastic experiments were conducted in order to determine the viscoelastic behavior: using strain sweep and frequency sweep tests the storage and loss modulus were determined. The fractal dimension (Df) was estimated from the suspension static yield-stress and volume fraction (ϕ) dependence, and was determined to be Df = 2.36, a value consistent with a process of aggregation of RLCA type (reaction limited cluster aggregation). This value is unusual if compared with other nanofluids, and can be regarded as a result of the bidimensionality of the suspended nanoplatelets. Finally, creep-recovery tests and mechanical models confirm the viscoplastic nature of our nanofluids, a feature never shown so far for this type of systems, increasing the solid-like character in the range of concentrations studied if compared with other nanofluids reported in the literature. This is a result of the combination of a remarkable internal structure and strong interactions, which evidence an unexpected behaviour sharing many solid-like features.

  12. Removal of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Smith, Tara E.

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. On of the isotopes of great concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates 14C is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented here is to develop a practical method by which 14C can be removed. In parallel with these efforts, the same irradiated graphite material is being characterized to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam®, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of 14C precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). During post-irradiation thermal treatment, graphite samples were heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without the addition of an oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon only were performed at 900 °C and 1400 °C to evaluate the selective removal of 14C. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 vol% oxygen at temperatures 700 °C and 1400 °C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of 14C. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient 14C removal.

  13. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  14. High temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1989-01-01

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt % 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150.degree.-1200.degree. C. and then cold deforming 5-15 %. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700.degree. C.

  15. Flux creep in a TEVATRON cable

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Tollestrup, A.V.

    1988-08-22

    We have measured the slow magnetization decay of a short sample (2.3 cm) of Tevatron cable in fields up to 0.3 T. The special susceptometer in development for these measurements is based on a commercial SQUID and is described in detail. The observed decay is logarithmic in time as expected from flux creep in the NbTi filaments. A strong correlation was found between the decay and the magnetization status of the sample. It is too early yet to present a quantitative correlation between what we observed and the decay observed in the sextupole component of Tevatron dipoles. The detailed understanding of this phenomenon may be instrumental in guiding the search for efficient superconducting synchrotron operational procedures. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Creep of two-phase microstructures for microelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Heidi Linch

    The mechanical properties of low-melting temperature alloys are highly influenced by their creep behavior. This study investigates the dominant mechanisms that control creep behavior of two-phase, low-melting temperature alloys as a function of microstructure. The alloy systems selected for study were In-Ag and Sn-Bi because their eutectic compositions represent distinctly different microstructures. The In-Ag eutectic contains a discontinuous phase while the Sn-Bi eutectic consists of two continuous phases. In addition, this work generates useful engineering data on Pb-free alloys with a joint specimen geometry that simulates microstructures found in microelectronic applications. The use of joint test specimens allows for observations regarding the practical attainability of superplastic microstructures in real solder joints by varying the cooling rate. Steady-state creep properties of In-Ag eutectic, Sn-Bi eutectic, Sn-xBi solid-solution and pure Bi joints have been measured using constant load tests at temperatures ranging from 0°C to 90°C. Constitutive equations are derived to describe the steady-state creep behavior for In-Ag eutectic solder joints and Sn-xBi solid-solution joints. The data are well represented by an equation of the form proposed by Dorn: a power-law equation applies to each independent creep mechanism. Rate-controlling creep mechanisms, as a function of applied shear stress, test temperature, and joint microstructure, are discussed. Literature data on the steady-state creep properties of Sn-Bi eutectic are reviewed and compared with the Sn-xBi solid-solution and pure Bi joint data measured in the current study. The role of constituent phases in controlling eutectic creep behavior is discussed for both alloy systems. In general, for continuous, two-phase microstructures, where each phase exhibits significantly different creep behavior, the harder or more creep resistant phase will dominate the creep behavior in a lamellar microstructure. If a

  17. Creep of Two-Phase Microstructures for Microelectronic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Heidi Linch

    1998-12-01

    The mechanical properties of low-melting temperature alloys are highly influenced by their creep behavior. This study investigates the dominant mechanisms that control creep behavior of two-phase, low-melting temperature alloys as a function of microstructure. The alloy systems selected for study were In-Ag and Sn-Bi because their eutectic compositions represent distinctly different microstructure.” The In-Ag eutectic contains a discontinuous phase while the Sn-Bi eutectic consists of two continuous phases. In addition, this work generates useful engineering data on Pb-free alloys with a joint specimen geometry that simulates microstructure found in microelectronic applications. The use of joint test specimens allows for observations regarding the practical attainability of superplastic microstructure in real solder joints by varying the cooling rate. Steady-state creep properties of In-Ag eutectic, Sn-Bi eutectic, Sn-xBi solid-solution and pure Bi joints have been measured using constant load tests at temperatures ranging from O°C to 90°C. Constitutive equations are derived to describe the steady-state creep behavior for In-Ageutectic solder joints and Sn-xBi solid-solution joints. The data are well represented by an equation of the form proposed by Dom: a power-law equation applies to each independent creep mechanism. Rate-controlling creep mechanisms, as a function of applied shear stress, test temperature, and joint microstructure, are discussed. Literature data on the steady-state creep properties of Sn-Bi eutectic are reviewed and compared with the Sn-xBi solid-solution and pure Bi joint data measured in the current study. The role of constituent phases in controlling eutectic creep behavior is discussed for both alloy systems. In general, for continuous, two-phase microstructure, where each phase exhibits significantly different creep behavior, the harder or more creep resistant phase will dominate the creep behavior in a lamellar microstructure. If a

  18. Predicting dislocation climb and creep from explicit atomistic details.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Mukul; Lau, Timothy T; Rodney, David; Yip, Sidney; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2010-08-27

    Here we report kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of dislocation climb in heavily deformed, body-centered cubic iron comprising a supersaturation of vacancies. This approach explicitly incorporates the effect of nonlinear vacancy-dislocation interaction on vacancy migration barriers as determined from atomistic calculations, and enables observations of diffusivity and climb over time scales and temperatures relevant to power-law creep. By capturing the underlying microscopic physics, the calculated stress exponents for steady-state creep rates agree quantitatively with the experimentally measured range, and qualitatively with the stress dependence of creep activation energies.

  19. Effect of Specimen Thickness on the Creep Response of a Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    size dependent creep response is termed the thickness debit effect. To investigate the mechanism of the thickness debit effect, isothermal, constant... creep rate even at low strain levels and a decreased time to rupture but with no systematic dependence of the creep ... 15. SUBJECT TERMS creep ...predict a size independent creep strain rate and creep rupture strain. This size dependent creep response is termed the thickness debit effect. To

  20. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH NIOBIUM CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Kane, J.S.; Carpenter, J.H.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1962-01-16

    A method is given for coating graphite with a hard, tenacious layer of niobium carbide up to 30 mils or more thick. The method makes use of the discovery that niobium metal, if degassed and heated rapidly below the carburization temperature in contact with graphite, spreads, wets, and penetrates the graphite without carburization. The method includes the obvious steps of physically contacting niobium powders or other physical forms of niobium with graphite, degassing the assembly below the niobium melting point, e.g., 1400 deg C, heating to about 2200 to 2400 deg C within about 15 minutes while outgassing at a high volume throughput, and thereafter carburizing the niobium. (AEC)

  1. Nickel coated graphite fiber conductive composites

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.E.; Hall, D.E.; Luxon, B.A.

    1986-07-01

    Nickel coated graphite (NCG) fiber, consisting of a thin continuous plating of high purity nickel over an aerospace-grade graphite core, offers performance added features by combining the lightweight and high structural reinforcement of graphite fiber with the thermal and electrical conductivity of nickel. These NCG filaments, which are composite constructions in their own right, can be processed and impregnated with thermosetting or thermoplastic resins in the same manner that graphite fiber tows are processed and impregnated to produce roving, tape or fabric prepreg. Therefore, NCG fibers can be readily integrated into structural laminate assemblies using established composites-manufacturing practices.

  2. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-03-21

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  3. Creep behavior of refractory concretes. First annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, T.D.

    1982-12-01

    Objectives are to evaluate the creep of alumina refractory concretes, determine differential transient creep strain of pristine specimens, develop a mathematical model for the creep behavior of refractory concretes, investigate the creep of commercial refractory concretes, and determine the effect of fiber reinforcements on the creep of concretes. After a summary of the first four years' progress, the technical progress during the fourth year is described in detail. 97 figures. (DLC)

  4. Thermophysical property and pore structure evolution in stressed and non-stressed neutron irradiated IG-110 nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Contescu, C. I.; Byun, T. S.; Porter, W.

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear graphite, IG-110, was irradiated with and without a compressive load of 5 MPa at ∼400 °C up to 9.3 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Following irradiation physical properties were studied to compare the effect of graphite irradiation on microstructure developed under compression and in stress-free conditions. Properties included: dimensional change, thermal conductivity, dynamic modulus, and CTE. The effect of stress on open internal porosity was determined through nitrogen adsorption. The IG-110 graphite experienced irradiation-induced creep that is differentiated from irradiation-induced swelling. Irradiation under stress resulted in somewhat greater thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion. While a significant increase in dynamic modulus occurs, no differentiation between materials irradiated with and without compressive stress was observed. Nitrogen adsorption analysis suggests a difference in pore evolution in the 0.3-40 nm range for graphite irradiated with and without stress, but this evolution is seen to be a small contributor to the overall dimensional change.

  5. Thermophysical property and pore structure evolution in stressed and non-stressed neutron irradiated IG-110 nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance; Contescu, Christian I.; Byun, Thak Sang; Porter, Wallace D.

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear graphite, IG-110, was irradiated with and without a compressive load of 5 MPa at ~400 *C up to 9.3E25 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Following irradiation physical properties were studied to compare the effect of graphite irradiation on microstructure developed under compression and in stress-free conditions. Properties included: dimensional change, thermal conductivity, dynamic modulus, and CTE. The effect of stress on open internal porosity was determined through nitrogen adsorption. The IG-110 graphite experienced irradiation-induced creep that is differentiated from irradiation-induced swelling. Irradiation under stress resulted in somewhat greater thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion. While a significant increase in dynamic modulus occurs, no differentiation between materials irradiated with and without compressive stress was observed. Nitrogen adsorption analysis suggests a difference in pore evolution in the 0.3e40 nm range for graphite irradiated with and without stress, but this evolution is seen to be a small contributor to the overall dimensional change.

  6. Thermophysical property and pore structure evolution in stressed and non-stressed neutron irradiated IG-110 nuclear graphite

    DOE PAGES

    Snead, Lance L.; Contescu, C. I.; Byun, T. S.; ...

    2016-04-23

    The nuclear graphite, IG-110, was irradiated with and without a compressive load of 5 MPa at ~400 C up to 9.3x1025 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV.) Following irradiation physical properties were studied to compare the effect of graphite irradiation on microstructure developed under compression and in stress-free condition. Properties included: dimensional change, thermal conductivity, dynamic modulus, and CTE. The effect of stress on open internal porosity was determined through nitrogen adsorption. The IG-110 graphite experienced irradiation-induced creep that is differentiated from irradiation-induced swelling. Irradiation under stress resulted in somewhat greater thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion. While a significant increase inmore » dynamic modulus occurs, no differentiation between materials irradiated with and without compressive stress was observed. Nitrogen adsorption analysis suggests a difference in pore evolution in the 0.3-40 nm range for graphite irradiated with and without stress, but this evolution is seen to be a small contributor to the overall dimensional change.« less

  7. Thermophysical property and pore structure evolution in stressed and non-stressed neutron irradiated IG-110 nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance L.; Contescu, C. I.; Byun, T. S.; Porter, W.

    2016-04-23

    The nuclear graphite, IG-110, was irradiated with and without a compressive load of 5 MPa at ~400 C up to 9.3x1025 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV.) Following irradiation physical properties were studied to compare the effect of graphite irradiation on microstructure developed under compression and in stress-free condition. Properties included: dimensional change, thermal conductivity, dynamic modulus, and CTE. The effect of stress on open internal porosity was determined through nitrogen adsorption. The IG-110 graphite experienced irradiation-induced creep that is differentiated from irradiation-induced swelling. Irradiation under stress resulted in somewhat greater thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion. While a significant increase in dynamic modulus occurs, no differentiation between materials irradiated with and without compressive stress was observed. Nitrogen adsorption analysis suggests a difference in pore evolution in the 0.3-40 nm range for graphite irradiated with and without stress, but this evolution is seen to be a small contributor to the overall dimensional change.

  8. Graphitized-carbon fiber/carbon char fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, John F.

    2007-08-28

    A method for recovery of intact graphitic fibers from fiber/polymer composites is described. The method comprises first pyrolyzing the graphite fiber/polymer composite mixture and then separating the graphite fibers by molten salt electrochemical oxidation.

  9. Analysis of pellet cladding interaction and creep of U 3SIi2 fuel for use in light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Kathryn E.

    Following the accident at the Fukushima plant, enhancing the accident tolerance of the light water reactor (LWR) fleet became a topic of serious discussion. Under the direction of congress, the DOE office of Nuclear Energy added accident tolerant fuel development as a primary component to the existing Advanced Fuels Program. The DOE defines accident tolerant fuels as fuels that "in comparison with the standard UO2- Zircaloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events." To be economically viable, proposed accident tolerant fuels and claddings should be backward compatible with LWR designs, provide significant operating cost improvements such as power uprates, increased fuel burnup, or increased cycle length. In terms of safety, an alternative fuel pellet must have resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, thermal conductivity equal to or larger than that of UO2, and a melting temperature that allows the material to remain solid under power reactor conditions. Among the candidates, U3Si2 has a number of advantageous thermophysical properties, including; high density, high thermal conductivity at room temperature, and a high melting temperature. These properties support its use as an accident tolerant fuel while its high uranium density is capable of supporting uprates to the LWR fleet. This research characterizes U3Si2 pellets and analyzes U3Si2 under light water reactor conditions using the fuel performance code BISON. While some thermophysical properties for U3Si2 have been found in the literature, the irradiation behavior is sparse and limited to experience with dispersion fuels. Accordingly, the creep behavior for U3Si2 has been unknown, making it

  10. The action of macrosounds on graphite ore and derived products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradeteanu, C.; Dragan, O.

    1974-01-01

    A suspension of graphite ore, floated graphite, and the gangue left over from flotation were subjected to the action of macrosounds under determinant conditions. The following was found: (1) The graphite ore undergoes an efficient settling action. (2) The floated graphite is strongly crushed down to the dimensions of colloidal graphite. (3) The gangue left over from flotation can be further processed to recuperate graphite from its nuclei.

  11. Creep-fatigue analysis by strain-range partitioning.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Halford, G. R.; Hirschberg, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    The framework of a new method is outlined for treating creep-fatigue behavior of metals. Inelastic strain-ranges are partitioned into the components of (1) completely reversed plasticity, (2) tensile plasticity reversed by compressive creep, or tensile creep reversed by compressive plasticity, and (3) completely reversed creep. Each of these components is shown to be related to cyclic life by a Manson-Coffin type power-law equation. A linear life fraction rule is used to combine the damaging effects of the individual components enabling the prediction of life. Test results are presented for a 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel as well as limited information for a Type 316 stainless steel.

  12. Creep behavior of 6 micrometer linear low density polyethylene film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. M.; Schur, W. W.

    1993-01-01

    Creep tests were performed to provide material characteristics for a 6.4-micron polyethylene film used to construct high altitude balloons. Results suggest simple power law relationships are adequate for stresses below about 4.83 MPa.

  13. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  14. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  15. Creeping attachment: autogenous graft vs dermal matrix allograft.

    PubMed

    Haeri, A; Parsell, D

    2000-09-01

    For many years, free autogenous grafts have been used as a method of gaining keratinized tissue around teeth with mucogingival problems. Creeping attachment using autogenous graft material has been actively studied. In addition, biocompatible, acellular connective-tissue material has recently been used as an alternative to free gingival grafts to increase the zone of keratinization. This report presents a patient with bilateral mucogingival defects in the canine and premolar areas. The patient received an autogenous graft on one side and a dermal matrix allograft on the contralateral side. Creeping attachments were measured and compared at 3 months and 12 months after surgery. After 12 months of healing, an average of 1.23 mm of creeping attachment was measured on the free gingival graft side and 0.96 mm of creeping attachment was measured with the dermal matrix allograft.

  16. Creep and Fatigue Interaction Characteristics of PWA1484

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    103 6.4 Summary... 103 Bibliography ....................................................................................................................105 List of...temperature parameters that are used in the analysis of creep in superalloys is the Larsen-Miller parameter ( LMP ). Before we discuss the LMP , we will

  17. Healing mechanism of nanocrack in nanocrystalline metals during creep process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraj, Md.; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been performed to demonstrate the fate of cracks present inside ultrafine-grained (grain size 7 nm) nanocrystalline Ni specimen during creep deformation process. It is observed that internal nanocracks are healed within a few pico-seconds of initial part of creep process even if the constant applied load on the specimen is tensile in nature and acting normal to crack surface in the outward direction. This kind of crack-healing phenomenon can be accounted by the facts such as stress-driven grain boundary migration, grain boundary diffusion and amorphization of specimen as per results obtained from this MD simulation. This MD study also reveals that the presence of nanocrack inside ultrafine-grained NC Ni in fact slightly improves creep properties and such enhancement of the creep properties is intensified as the size of internal crack increases.

  18. NASALIFE - Component Fatigue and Creep Life Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2014-01-01

    NASALIFE is a life prediction program for propulsion system components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and creep rupture conditions. Although the primary focus was for CMC components, the underlying methodologies are equally applicable to other material systems as well. The program references empirical data for low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep rupture, and static material properties as part of the life prediction process. Multiaxial stresses are accommodated by Von Mises based methods and a Walker model is used to address mean stress effects. Varying loads are reduced by the Rainflow counting method or a peak counting type method. Lastly, damage due to cyclic loading and creep is combined with Minor's Rule to determine damage due to cyclic loading, damage due to creep, and the total damage per mission and the number of potential missions the component can provide before failure.

  19. Synthetic Metals from Intercalated Graphite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-30

    34, L. Salamanca- Riba and M.S. Dres- selhaus, Carbon, (in press) (1986). 16. "High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy on KH.-GICs", L. Salaman...ca- Riba , N.C. Yeh, M.S. Dresselhaus, M. Endo and T. Enoki, J. of Mat. Res. (in press) (1986). 11 04 -.4* 17. "Electron Beam Induced Damage and...Structure of SbCl5 Graphite Intercalation Compounds", L. Salamanca- Riba , G. Roth, J.M. Gibson, A.R. Kortan, G. Dresselhaus and - R.J. Birgeneau, Phys. Rev

  20. Effect of graphite surface structure on initial irreversible reaction in graphite anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kimihito; Hamada, Takeshi; Sugiura, Tsutomu

    1999-03-01

    The initial irreversible reaction that occurs in graphite anodes during the first lithium intercalation in lithium rechargeable batteries was studied in view of graphite surface structure. Graphitized mesophase spheres and pitch-based carbon fibers, which show low irreversible capacity, were shown to have turbostatic surface regions and highly graphitized cores using Ar-ion laser Raman spectroscopy. Burning off these surface regions resulted in remarkable increases of initial irreversible capacity. Those results can be explained by a proposed model that a turbostatic structure of the graphite surface region resists drastic swelling of interlayer spaces arising from cointercalation of solvated ions and depresses the side reaction.

  1. Analysis of Wigner energy release process in graphite stack of shut-down uranium-graphite reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespala, E. V.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.

    2015-10-01

    Data, which finding during thermal differential analysis of sampled irradiated graphite are presented. Results of computational modeling of Winger energy release process from irradiated graphite staking are demonstrated. It's shown, that spontaneous combustion of graphite possible only in adiabatic case.

  2. Threshold Stress Creep Behavior of Alloy 617 at Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Benz; L.J. Carroll; J.K. Wright; R.N. Wright; T. Lillo

    2014-06-01

    Creep of Alloy 617, a solid solution Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, was studied in the temperature range of 1023 K to 1273 K (750 °C to 1000 °C). Typical power-law creep behavior with a stress exponent of approximately 5 is observed at temperatures from 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C). Creep at 1023 K (750 °C), however, exhibits threshold stress behavior coinciding with the temperature at which a low volume fraction of ordered coherent y' precipitates forms. The threshold stress is determined experimentally to be around 70 MPa at 1023 K (750 °C) and is verified to be near zero at 1173 K (900 °C)—temperatures directly correlating to the formation and dissolution of y' precipitates, respectively. The y' precipitates provide an obstacle to continued dislocation motion and result in the presence of a threshold stress. TEM analysis of specimens crept at 1023 K (750 °C) to various strains, and modeling of stresses necessary for y' precipitate dislocation bypass, suggests that the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates is the controlling factor for continued deformation at the end of primary creep and into the tertiary creep regime. As creep deformation proceeds at an applied stress of 121 MPa and the precipitates coarsen, the stress required for Orowan bowing is reached and this mechanism becomes active. At the minimum creep rate at an applied stress of 145 MPa, the finer precipitate size results in higher Orowan bowing stresses and the creep deformation is dominated by the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates.

  3. Does Mt Etna creep in a brittle manner?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2010-12-01

    Time-dependent brittle deformation is a fundamental and pervasive process operating in the Earth’s upper crust. Its characterization is a pre-requisite to understanding and unravelling the complexities of crustal evolution and dynamics. The preferential chemical interaction between pore fluids and strained atomic bonds at crack tips, a mechanism known as stress corrosion, allows rock to fail under a constant stress that is well below its short-term strength over an extended period of time; a process known as brittle creep. Here we present the first experimental measurements of brittle creep in a basic rock (basalt from Mt Etna volcano) under triaxial stress conditions. Results from conventional creep experiments demonstrate that creep strain rates are highly and non-linearly dependent on the level of applied stress; with a 20% increase in stress producing close to three orders of magnitude increase in creep strain rate. Results from stress-stepping creep experiments show that creep strain rates are also highly dependent on the effective confining pressure. Stress corrosion reactions are inhibited at higher effective confining pressures, and this is interpreted as being due to a reduction in crack aperture that restricts the transport of reactive species to crack tips. Overall, our results also suggest that a critical level of crack damage is required before the deformation starts to accelerate to failure, regardless of the level of applied stress and the time taken to reach this point. The experimental results are discussed in terms of microstructural observations and fits to a macroscopic creep law, and compared with the observed deformation history at Mt Etna volcano.

  4. Creep and fracture of dispersion-strengthened materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.

    1991-01-01

    The creep and fracture of dispersion strengthened materials is reviewed. A compilation of creep data on several alloys showed that the reported values of the stress exponent for creep varied between 3.5 and 100. The activation energy for creep exceeded that for lattice self diffusion in the matrix in the case of some materials and a threshold stress behavior was generally reported in these instances. The threshold stress is shown to be dependent on the interparticle spacing and it is significantly affected by the initial microstructure. The effect of particle size and the nature of the dispersoid on the threshold stress is not well understood at the present time. In general, most studies indicate that the microstructure after creep is similar to that before testing and very few dislocations are usually observed. It is shown that the stress acting on a dispersoid due to a rapidly moving dislocation can exceed the particle yield strength of the G sub p/1000, where G sub p is the shear modulus of the dispersoid. The case when the particle deforms is examined and it is suggested that the dislocation creep threshold stress of the alloy is equal to the yield strength of the dispersoid under these conditions. These results indicate that the possibility that the dispersoid creep threshold stress is determined by either the particle yield strength or the stress required to detach a dislocation from the dispersoid matrix interface. The conditions under which the threshold stress is influenced by one or the other mechanism are discussed and it is shown that the particle yield strength is important until the extent of dislocation core relaxation at the dispersoid matrix interface exceeds about 25 pct. depending on the nature of the particle matrix combination. Finally, the effect of grain boundaries and grain morphology on the creep and fracture behavior of dispersoid strengthened alloys is examined.

  5. What Polar Bears Can Teach Us about Mission Creep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-16

    Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 21-07-2014 to 12-06-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE What Polar Bears Can Teach Us about Mission Creep 5a...What Polar Bears Can Teach Us about Mission Creep by Thomas B. Ham Colonel, United States Army Not for Commercial Use without the...express written permission of the author This page is intentionally blank What Polar Bears Can Teach Us about

  6. Creep, Plasticity, and Fatigue of Single Crystal Superalloy. (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    control mode ( 1R ) using servo- hydraulic machines. The test specimen was heated using a low frequency (10 kHz) induction generator. Tests were...1989), Thermomechanical Fatigue , Oxidation, and Creep. Part II. Life Prediction, Metallurgical Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4223 CREEP, PLASTICITY, AND FATIGUE OF SINGLE CRYSTAL SUPERALLOY Alexander Staroselsky United Technologies

  7. The high temperature creep behavior of oxides and oxide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Linda E.; Tressler, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A thorough review of the literature was conducted on the high-temperature creep behavior of single and polycrystalline oxides which potentially could serve as fiber reinforcements in ceramics or metal matrix applications. Sapphire when oriented with the basal plane perpendicular to the fiber axis (c-axis oriented) is highly creep resistant at temperatures in excess of 1600 C and applied loads of 100 MPa and higher. Pyramidal slip is preferentially activated in sapphire under these conditions and steady-state creep rates in the range of 10(exp -7) to 10 (exp -8)/s were reported. Data on the creep resistance of polycrystalline beryllia suggest that C-axiz oriented single crystal beryllia may be a viable candidate as a fiber reinforcement material; however, the issure of fabricability and moisture sensitivity must be addressed for this material. Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) also appears to be a fiber candidate material having a high resistance to creep which is due to it's complex crystal structure and high Peierl resistance. The high creep resistance of garnet suggests that there may be other complex ternary oxides such as single crystal mullite which may also be candidate materials for fiber reinforcements. Finally, CVD and single crystal SiC, although not oxides, do possess a high resistance to creep in the temperature range between 1550 and 1850 C and under stresses of 110 to 220 MPa. From a review of the literature, it appears that for high creep resistant applications sapphire, silicon carbide, yttrium aluminum garnet, mullite, and beryllia are desirable candidate materials which require further investigation.

  8. Porosity Evolution in a Creeping Single Crystal (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    to tertiary creep which, as will be shown subsequently, is associated with necking of the ligament between adjacent voids. Under the creep loading...conditions here the increase in strain rate accompanying necking occurs less abruptly than for the nearly rate independent materials in [13]. Here, and...loading, and for values of the Lode parameter, is that for values of the stress triaxiality χ ≥ 0.75 the analyses were terminated due to necking down of

  9. Models of Anisotropic Creep in Integral Wing Panel Forming Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinikov, A. I.; Oleinikov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    For a sufficiently wide range of stresses the titanic and aluminummagnesium alloys, as a rule, strained differently in the process of creep under tension and compression along a fixed direction. There are suggested constitutive relations for the description of the steady-state creep of transversely isotropic materials with different tension and compression characteristics. Experimental justification is given to the proposed constitutive equations. Modeling of forming of wing panels of the aircraft are considered.

  10. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  11. High-precision Non-Contact Measurement of Creep of Ultra-High Temperature Materials for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    For high-temperature applications (greater than 2,000 C) such as solid rocket motors, hypersonic aircraft, nuclear electric/thermal propulsion for spacecraft, and more efficient jet engines, creep becomes one of the most important design factors to be considered. Conventional creep-testing methods, where the specimen and test apparatus are in contact with each other, are limited to temperatures approximately 1,700 C. Development of alloys for higher-temperature applications is limited by the availability of testing methods at temperatures above 2000 C. Development of alloys for applications requiring a long service life at temperatures as low as 1500 C, such as the next generation of jet turbine superalloys, is limited by the difficulty of accelerated testing at temperatures above 1700 C. For these reasons, a new, non-contact creep-measurement technique is needed for higher temperature applications. A new non-contact method for creep measurements of ultra-high-temperature metals and ceramics has been developed and validated. Using the electrostatic levitation (ESL) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, a spherical sample is rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation due to centrifugal acceleration. Very accurate measurement of the deformed shape through digital image analysis allows the stress exponent n to be determined very precisely from a single test, rather than from numerous conventional tests. Validation tests on single-crystal niobium spheres showed excellent agreement with conventional tests at 1985 C; however the non-contact method provides much greater precision while using only about 40 milligrams of material. This method is being applied to materials including metals and ceramics for non-eroding throats in solid rockets and next-generation superalloys for turbine engines. Recent advances in the method and the current state of these new measurements will be presented.

  12. Transient creep and semibrittle behavior of crystalline rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, N.L.; Kirby, S.H.

    1978-01-01

    We review transient creep and semibrittle behavior of crystalline solids. The results are expected to be pertinent to crystalline rocks undergoing deformation in the depth range 5 to 20 km, corresponding to depths of focus of many major earthquakes. Transient creep data for crystalline rocks at elevated temperatures are analyzed but are poorly understood because of lack of information on the deformation processes which, at low to moderate pressure, are likely to be semibrittle in nature. Activation energies for transient creep at high effective confining pressure are much higher than those found for atmospheric pressure tests in which thermally-activated microfracturing probably dominates the creep rate. Empirical transient creep equations are extrapolated at 200?? to 600??C, stresses from 0.1 to 1.0 kbar, to times ranging from 3.17??102 to 3.17??108 years. At the higher temperatures, appreciable transient creep strains may take place but the physical significance of the results is in question because the flow mechanisms have not been determined. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate careful research on this important topic. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  13. The activation energy for creep of columbium /niobium/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Gulden, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    The activation energy for creep of nominally pure columbium (niobium) was determined in the temperature range from 0.4 to 0.75 T sub M by measuring strain rate changes induced by temperature shifts at constant stress. A peak in the activation energy vs temperature curve was found with a maximum value of 160 kcal/mole. A pretest heat treatment of 3000 F for 30 min resulted in even higher values of activation energy (greater than 600 kcal/mole) in this temperature range. The activation energy for the heat-treated columbium (Nb) could not be determined near 0.5 T sub M because of unusual creep curves involving negligible steady-state creep rates and failure at less than 5% creep strain. It is suggested that the anomalous activation energy values and the unusual creep behavior in this temperature range are caused by dynamic strain aging involving substitutional atom impurities and that this type of strain aging may be in part responsible for the scatter in previously reported values of activation energy for creep of columbium (Nb) near 0.5 T sub M.

  14. Permeability Evolution of Granite Gneiss During Triaxial Creep Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, W. Y.; Wang, H. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, R. B.

    2016-09-01

    Permeability is an important factor for seepage analysis of rock material, and a key factor in ensuring the safety of underground works. In this study, the permeability evolution of granite gneiss during triaxial creep tests was investigated. In the context of an underground oil storage cavern in China, a series of hydro-mechanical coupling creep tests were conducted on rock cores of granite gneiss at three different pore pressures to reveal the effect of pore pressure on the permeability evolution and to investigate the correlation between the permeability and volumetric strain during the creep process. During the creep tests, the permeability decreases in the initial loading phase. At all deviatoric stress levels, the permeability remains stable in the steady creep stage and increases rapidly in the accelerated creep stage. Based on the test data, the initial permeability, steady permeability and peak permeability at various stress levels are defined. The effect of pore pressure on the permeability is captured by a linear model. In addition, the relationship between permeability and volumetric strain can be described as a process divided into three phases, with different functions in each phase.

  15. Creep properties of Pb-free solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H.G.; Morris Jr., J.W.; Hua, F.

    2002-04-01

    Describes the creep behavior of three Sn-rich solders that have become candidates for use in Pb-free solder joints: Sn-3.5Ag, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-0.7Cu. The three solders show the same general behavior when tested in thin joints between Cu and Ni/Au metallized pads at temperatures between 60 and 130 C. Their steady-state creep rates are separated into two regimes with different stress exponents(n). The low-stress exponents range from {approx}3-6, while the high-stress exponents are anomalously high (7-12). Strikingly, the high-stress exponent has a strong temperature dependence near room temperature, increasing significantly as the temperature drops from 95 to 60 C. The anomalous creep behavior of the solders appears to be due to the dominant Sn constituent. Joints of pure Sn have stress exponents, n, that change with stress and temperature almost exactly like those of the Sn-rich solder joints. Research on creep in bulk samples of pure Sn suggests that the anomalous temperature dependence of the stress exponent may show a change in the dominant mechanism of creep. Whatever its source, it has the consequence that conventional constitutive relations for steady-state creep must be used with caution in treating Sn-rich solder joints, and qualification tests that are intended to verify performance should be carefully designed.

  16. Developing Process of Positive Creeping Discharge along Aerial Insulated Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Toshiyuki; Hanaoka, Ryoichi; Takata, Shinzo

    In high voltage aerial distribution systems, the insulated wires are supported by the insulator with the binding wire at the electric light pole. When a lightning strike happened in the neighborhood of the aerial insulated wire in a power distribution system, the inductive lightning surges invade to the central line of the wire. Then, the creeping discharges develop along the wire surface from the binding wire tip in the same time as the flashover of the insulator at a supporting point of the wire. If the wire insulator has weak points such as the pin-holes, the disaster near the wire supporting point may occur with a melting of wire due to the punch-through breakdown. To prevent such accidents, it is important to clarify the mechanism of the creeping discharge along the insulated wire which caused by the lightning strike. The polarity of creeping discharges is decided by the polarity of inductive lightning surges, and the developing length and aspect of the discharge are greatly different by the discharge polarity. The developing of these creeping discharges is attributed to complicated behaviors of the positive and negative electric charges. In the present study, we examined in detail the developing process of positive creeping discharge along the wire surface by using a high speed image converter camera. This paper describes the developing mechanism of positive creeping discharge based on the experimental results.

  17. Creep Behavior and Mechanism for CMCs with Continuous Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chermant, Jean-Louis; Farizy, Gaëlle; Boitier, Guillaume; Darzens, Séverine; Vicens, Jean; Sangleboeuf, Jean-Christophe

    This paper gives an overview on the creep behavior and mechanism of some CMCs, with a SiC ceramic matrix, such as Cf-SiC, SiCf-SiC and SiCf-SiBC. Tensile creep tests were conducted under argon and air in order to have the influence of the environmental conditions on the macroscopical mechanical response. Nevertheless, multi-scale and multi-technique approaches were required to identify and quantify mechanism(s) which is (are) involved in the creep behavior. The initiation and propagation of damages which are occurring under high stress and temperature conditions were investigated at mesoscopic, microscopic and nanoscopic scales using SEM, TEM and HREM, in order to identify the mechanism(s) involved at each scale. Automatic image analysis was used in order to quantify the evolution of some damage morphological parameters. The macroscopical creep behavior has been investigated through a damage mechanics approach which seems to be the most promising route. A good correlation was found between the kinetics of the damage mechanisms and the creep behavior. For such ceramic matrix composites, the governing mechanism is a damage-creep one, with an additional delay effect due to formation of a glass when tests are performed under air.

  18. Micromechanics of Brittle Creep Under Triaxial Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time-dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail (i) at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and (ii) even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we provide a micromechanical model and experimental results describing time-dependent brittle creep of water-saturated granite under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of microcracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing-crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strain and strain rates are then computed from the change in energy potential due to microcrack growth. They are non-linear, and compare well with complementary experimental results obtained on granite samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decreasing crack growth rate , due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as merely an inflexion between the two end-member phases.

  19. Triggered dynamics in a model of different fault creep regimes

    PubMed Central

    Kostić, Srđan; Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Todorović, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The study is focused on the effect of transient external force induced by a passing seismic wave on fault motion in different creep regimes. Displacement along the fault is represented by the movement of a spring-block model, whereby the uniform and oscillatory motion correspond to the fault dynamics in post-seismic and inter-seismic creep regime, respectively. The effect of the external force is introduced as a change of block acceleration in the form of a sine wave scaled by an exponential pulse. Model dynamics is examined for variable parameters of the induced acceleration changes in reference to periodic oscillations of the unperturbed system above the supercritical Hopf bifurcation curve. The analysis indicates the occurrence of weak irregular oscillations if external force acts in the post-seismic creep regime. When fault motion is exposed to external force in the inter-seismic creep regime, one finds the transition to quasiperiodic- or chaos-like motion, which we attribute to the precursory creep regime and seismic motion, respectively. If the triggered acceleration changes are of longer duration, a reverse transition from inter-seismic to post-seismic creep regime is detected on a larger time scale. PMID:24954397

  20. Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

    2013-10-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900°C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

  1. Mineral Resource of the Month: Graphite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Donald W.

    2008-01-01

    Graphite, a grayish black opaque mineral with a metallic luster, is one of four forms of pure crystalline carbon (the others are carbon nanotubes, diamonds and fullerenes). It is one of the softest minerals and it exhibits perfect basal (one-plane) cleavage. Graphite is the most electrically and thermally conductive of the nonmetals, and it is chemically inert.

  2. Tire containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A tire, tire lining or inner tube, containing a polymer composite, made of at least one rubber and/or at least one elastomer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g.

  3. Irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels and their dependence on cold work level

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. ); Eiholzer, C.R. ); Toloczko, M.B. ); Kumar, A.S. )

    1991-11-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% from the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550{degrees}c. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in-reactor creep rupture response and initial strength.

  4. Influence of cold work level on the irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. ); Eiholzer, C.R. ); Toloczko, M.B. ); Kumar, A.S. )

    1992-06-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% form the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550{degrees}C. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in- reactor creep rapture response and initial strength.

  5. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  6. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted cumulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  7. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  8. SIMPLIFIED SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, R.W.

    1963-03-01

    This patent relates to a nuclear power reactor comprising a reactor vessel, shielding means positioned at the top of said vessel, means sealing said reactor vessel to said shielding means, said vessel containing a quantity of sodium, a core tank, unclad graphite moderator disposed in said tank, means including a plurality of process tubes traversing said tank for isolating said graphite from said sodium, fuel elements positioned in said process tubes, said core tank being supported in spaced relation to the walls and bottom of said reactor vessel and below the level of said sodium, neutron shielding means positioned adjacent said core tank between said core tank and the walls of said vessel, said neutron shielding means defining an annuiar volume adjacent the inside wall of said reactor vessel, inlet plenum means below said core tank for providing a passage between said annular volume and said process tubes, heat exchanger means removably supported from the first-named shielding means and positioned in said annular volume, and means for circulating said sodium over said neutron shielding means down through said heat exchanger, across said inlet plenum and upward through said process tubes, said last-named means including electromagnetic pumps located outside said vessel and supported on said vessel wall between said heat exchanger means and said inlet plenum means. (AEC)

  9. Status of Graphite Oxidation Work

    SciTech Connect

    Rebecca Smith

    2010-05-01

    Data were developed to compare the extent of structural damage associated with high temperature exposure to an air leak. Two materials, NBG-18 graphite and unpurified PCEA graphite have been tested as of this report. The scope was limited to isothermal oxidation at a single temperature, 750°C. Ambient post-oxidation compression strength testing was performed for three levels of burn off (1%, 5%, and 10% mass loss) for two leak scenarios: 100% air and 10% air in helium. Temperature, gas flow, and dynamic mass loss oxidation conditions were monitored and recorded for each sample. The oxidation period was controlled with flow of inert gas during the thermal ramp and upon cool down with a constant 10 liter per minute flow maintained throughout furnace operation. Compressive strengths of parallel un-oxidized samples were tested to assess the relative mass loss effects. In addition to baseline samples matching the un-oxidized dimensions of the oxidized samples, two sets of mechanically reduced samples were prepared. One set was trimmed to achieve the desired mass loss by removing an effectively uniform depth from the geometric surface of the sample. The other set was cored to produce a full penetration axial hole down the center of each sample.

  10. Development of polyphenylquinoxaline graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggatt, J. T.; Hill, S. G.; Shdo, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    This exploratory program was divided into four basic tasks. The initial phase was devoted toward investigating processing variables associated with previously developed PPO resins. These polymers were derived from p-bis(phenyl glyoxalyl)benzene reacted with 3,3'-diamino benzidine and/or 3,3',4,4'-tetramino benzophenone. Four new phenyl quinoxaline polymers were synthesized and characterized in Tasks 2 and 3. These consisted of a hydroxyl group containing PPQ synthesized from 3,3'-diamino benzidine (DAB), m-bis(phenyl glyoxal)benzene and m-bis(p'-hydroxy phenyl glyoxalyl) benzene; a cyano group containing PPQ from the reaction of DAB and p-bis(p'-cyano phenoxy phenyl glyoxalyl)benzene; an end-capped block copolymer; and a polymer from the reaction of 3,3',4,4'-tetraamino benzo phenone and m-bis(phenyl glyoxalyl)benzene. The latter two polymers were chosen for composite studies in the latter two tasks of the program. Mechanical properties of the graphite reinforced PPQ composites were determined over the temperature range of +21 C to 316 C. Flexural strengths of the HMS graphite fiber composites were in excess of 8.97 X 10 to the 8th power N/sq m (130,000 psi) at +21 C (70 F) with over 50% strength retention at +316 C.

  11. Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

    2012-04-01

    This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

  12. Fiber release characteristics of graphite hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henshaw, J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers different material concepts that can be fabricated of hybridized composites which demonstrate improved graphite fiber retention capability in a severe fire without significant reduction to the composite properties. More than 30 panels were fabricated for mechanical and fire tests, the details and results of which are presented. Methods of composite hybridization investigated included the addition of oxidation resistant fillers to the resin, mechanically interlocking the graphite fibers by the use of woven fabrics, and the addition of glass fibers and glass additives designed to melt and fuse the graphite fibers together. It is concluded that a woven fabric with a serving of glass around each graphite tow is by far the superior of those evaluated: not only is there a coalescing effect in each graphite layer, but there is also a definite adhesion of each layer to its neighbor.

  13. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    A composite that can be used at temperatures up to 875 K with mechanical properties equal or superior to graphite fiber reinforced epoxy composites is presented. The composite system consist of graphite fiber, uniaxially or biaxially, reinforced borosilicate glass. The mechanical and thermal properties of such a graphite fiber reinforced glass composite are described, and the system is shown to offer promise as a high performance structural material. Specific properties that were measured were: a modified borosilicate glass uniaxially reinforced by Hercules HMS graphite fiber has a three-point flexural strength of 1030 MPa, a four-point flexural strength of 964 MPa, an elastic modulus of 199 GPa and a failure strain of 0.0052. The preparation and properties of similar composites with Hercules HTS, Celanese DG-102, Thornel 300 and Thornel Pitch graphite fibers are also described.

  14. Structure of different grades of nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, B. E.; Westwood, A. V. K.; Scott, A. J.; Brydson, R.; Jones, A. N.

    2012-07-01

    Owing to its low neutron absorption cross-section, large scattering cross section and thermal and chemical stability, graphite is a key component of operational nuclear reactors where it is used as a moderator, reflector and as major structural component for 90% of current UK nuclear plants. It is also of interest for use in developing the future high temperature gas-cooled reactors. The properties of the nuclear graphite are influenced by its structural characteristics, which change as a function of neutron irradiation, temperature and oxidation. The principal structural changes during neutron irradiation that affect the integrity and dimensions of nuclear graphite components, thereby affecting service lifetime, are that the a-axis contracts and the c-axis expands in the crystallites. Characterization of virgin graphite structure and of the damage evolution after irradiation of nuclear graphite has an important role to play in the understanding and development of materials used in current and future nuclear reactors, respectively.

  15. Microstructural characterization of next generation nuclear graphites.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Chinnathambi; Kane, Joshua; Butt, Darryl P; Windes, William E; Ubic, Rick

    2012-04-01

    This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

  16. Model experiments of superlubricity of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienwiebel, Martin; Pradeep, Namboodiri; Verhoeven, Gertjan S.; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Frenken, Joost W. M.

    2005-02-01

    Graphite is known to be a good solid lubricant. The low-friction behavior is traditionally ascribed to the low resistance to shear. We have recently observed that the ultra-low friction found in friction force microscopy experiments on graphite is due to a effect called superlubricity [M. Dienwiebel, G. S. Verhoeven, N. Pradeep, J.W.M. Frenken, J.A. Heimberg, H.W. Zandbergen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (2004) 126101]. Here, we provide additional experimental evidence that superlubricity has been taken place between a small graphite flake attached to the scanning tip and the graphite surface. Finally, we speculate about the significance of this for the lubricating properties of graphite.

  17. Creep deformation of grain boundary in a highly crystalline SiC fibre.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Tamaki; Yoshida, Yutaka; Yano, Yasuhide; Takahashi, Heishichiro

    2003-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) matrix composites reinforced by SiC fibres (SiC/SiC composites) are currently being considered as alternative materials in high Ni alloys for high-temperature applications, such as aerospace components, gas-turbine energy-conversion systems and nuclear fusion reactors, because of their high specific strength and fracture toughness at elevated temperatures compared with monolithic SiC ceramics. It is important to evaluate the creep properties of SiC fibres under tensile loading in order to determine their usefulness as structural components. However, it would be hard to evaluate creep properties by monoaxial tensile properties when we have little knowledge on the microstructure of crept specimens, especially at the grain boundary. Recently, a simple fibre bend stress relaxation (BSR) test was introduced by Morscher and DiCarlo to address this problem. Interpretation of the fracture mechanism at the grain boundary is also essential to allow improvement of the mechanical properties. In this paper, effects of stress applied by BSR test on microstructural evolution in advanced SiC fibres, such as Tyranno-SA including small amounts of Al, are described and discussed along with the results of microstructure analysis on an atomic scale by using advanced microscopy.

  18. Numerical simulations of creep in ductile-phase toughened intermetallic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Strum, M.J.

    1994-04-07

    Analytical and finite element method (FEM) simulations of creep in idealized ductile-phase toughened intermetallic composites are described. For these strong-matrix materials, the two types of analyses predict similar time-independent composite creep rates if each phase individually exhibits only steady-state creep. The composite creep rate becomes increasingly higher than that of the monolithic intermetallic as the stress exponent of the intermetallic and the volume fraction and creep rate of the ductile phase increase. FEM analysis shows that the shape of the ductile phase does not affect the creep rate but may affect the internal stress and strain distributions, and thus damage accumulation rates. If primary creep occurs in one or both of the individual phases, the composite also exhibits primary creep. In this case, there can be significant deviations in the creep curves computed by the analytical and FEM models. The model predictions are compared with data for the Nb5Si3/Nb system.

  19. Creep behavior of tantalum alloy T-222 at 1365 to 1700 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    High vacuum creep tests on the tantalum T-222 alloy at 0.42 to 0.52 T sub m show that the major portion of the creep curves, up to at least 1 percent strain, can be best described by an increasing creep rate, with strain varying linearly with time. Correlation and extrapolation of the creep curves on the basis of increasing creep rates results in more accurate engineering design data than would use of approximated linear rates. Based on increasing creep rates, the stress for 1 percent strain in 10,000 hours for T-222 is about four times greater than for the Ta-10W alloy. Increasing the grain size results in increased creep strength. Thermal aging prior to testing caused precipitation of the hexagonal close packed (Hf,Ta) sub 2 C, which initially increased creep strength. However, this dimetal carbide was converted during creep testing to face-centered cubic (Hf,Ta)C.

  20. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission